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Sample records for magnetic co-sputtering al-cu-fe

  1. Multiple diffraction in an icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C. Z.; Weber, Th.; Deloudi, S.; Steurer, W.

    2011-07-01

    In order to reveal its influence on quasicrystal structure analysis, multiple diffraction (MD) effects in an icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal have been investigated in-house on an Oxford Diffraction four-circle diffractometer equipped with an Onyx™ CCD area detector and MoKα radiation. For that purpose, an automated approach for Renninger scans (ψ-scans) has been developed. Two weak reflections were chosen as the main reflections (called P) in the present measurements. As is well known for periodic crystals, it is also observed for this quasicrystal that the intensity of the main reflection may significantly increase if the simultaneous (H) and the coupling (P-H) reflections are both strong, while there is no obvious MD effect if one of them is weak. The occurrence of MD events during ψ-scans has been studied based on an ideal structure model and the kinematical MD theory. The reliability of the approach is revealed by the good agreement between simulation and experiment. It shows that the multiple diffraction effect is quite significant.

  2. Structural stability of the icosahedral AlCuFe quasicrystal under high-pressure and high-temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Kyono, A.; Nakamoto, Y.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    We report high-pressure and high-temperature in-situ X-ray diffraction study of icosahedral (i)-AlCuFe quasicrystal "icosahedrite" which is the first known naturally occurring quasicrystal mineral discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite. The i-AlCuFe quasicrystal was synthesized in laboratory from a powder mixture with an atomic ratio of Al : Cu : Fe = 65 : 20 : 15. The high-temperature and high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments were performed using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell system installed at BL10XU, SPring-8, Japan. The i-AlCuFe showed a characteristic X-ray diffraction pattern of quasicrystal. With only compression, the diffraction patterns of the i-AlCuFe were continued until 75 GPa. At a pressure of 87 GPa two small new peaks occurred and then kept up to the maximum pressure of 104 GPa in the study. The results indicate that the pressure-induced structural phase transition of the i-AlCuFe occurs above 87 GPa, and the structure of the i-AlCuFe remains unchanged at least up to 75 GPa. Under simultaneously high pressure and high temperature, on the other hand, the i-AlCuFe was readily transformed to crystalline phase. It can be characterized by an irreversible transformation process. The structure of the i-AlCuFe is therefore more affected by thermal metamorphism than by pressure metamorphism. The present high-pressure and high-temperature experiments clearly revealed the thermal and pressure stability of the i-AlCuFe quasicrystal which may help to explain the formation of the naturally occurring quasicrystal in the solar system.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, S.

    1995-11-09

    Our lab has been working with plasma spraying of both high pressure gas atomized (HPGA) and cast and crushed quasicrystal powders. A major component of this research includes comparative studies of PAS coatings formed with starting powders prepared by both techniques. In addition, a thorough investigation of the effects of starting powder particle size on coating microstructure is included. During the course of the overall research, an interest developed in forming Al-Cu-Fe materials with finer grain sizes. Therefore, a brief study was performed to characterize the effect of adding boron to Al-Cu-Fe materials prepared by different techniques. In addition to characterizing the microstructural features of the above materials, oxidation and wear behavior was also examined.

  4. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Surface Structures of Icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe Quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tanhong Cai

    2002-12-31

    Three papers are included in this dissertation. The first paper: ''Structural aspects of the fivefold quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe surface from STM and dynamical LEED studies'', is in press with ''Surface Science''. The second paper: ''An STM study of the atomic structure of the icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surface'' is submitted to ''Physical Review B, Rapid Communication''. The third paper: ''Pseudomorphic starfish: arrangement of extrinsic metal atoms on a quasicrystalline substrate'' is submitted to ''Nature''. Following the third paper are general conclusions and appendices that document the published paper ''Structural aspects of the three-fold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn'' (appearing in volume 461, issue 1-3 of ''Surface Science'' on page L521-L527, 2000), the design as well as the specifications of the aluminum evaporator used in the aluminum deposition study in this dissertation, an extended discussion of the aluminum deposition on the quasicrystalline surface, and the STM database.

  5. Interatomic force interaction in an i-AlCuFe quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Parshin, P. P.; Zemlyanov, M. G. Brand, R. A.

    2007-11-15

    Partial spectra of thermal vibrations of Al, Cu, and Fe atoms in an icosahedral quasicrystal have been obtained by the isotopic-contrast method in inelastic neutron scattering. Joint analysis of these results and the published data on the atomic and electronic structures of the icosahedral i-AlCuFe quasicrystal has been performed. A physical model of the quasicrystal structure is proposed that is in agreement with the existing experimental data and qualitatively describes the peculiarities of interatomic interaction.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Bulk Al-Cu-Fe Based Quasicrystals and Composites by Spray Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N. K.; Uhlenwinkel, V.; Srivastava, V. C.

    2015-06-01

    The bulk quasicrystalline (QC) materials and their composites have attracted considerable interest due to their promising mechanical properties. In the present investigation, spray forming has been used to synthesize bulk single-phase icosahedral quasicrystals and composites in Al62.5Cu25Fe12.5 system as well as in quaternary system containing 10% Sn. The elemental materials were induction melted under nitrogen cover and a billet of 250 mm in diameter and 350 mm in height was spray formed. The phase constitution of the spray-formed materials showed a bulk single-phase icosahedral quasicrystal as a major phase along with other crystalline phases. A large number of annealing twins were observed in the microstructure in ternary AlCuFe alloys. It is interesting to note that due to addition of Sn, the volume fraction of β-Al(CuFe) phase was found to increase and annealing twins were almost absent. The hardness of the single-phase AlCuFe alloy and Sn-containing composites was found to be 8.6 and 6.0 GPa, respectively, at a load of 300 g. In general, the hardness decreases with heat treatment at high temperatures. However, in case of Sn-containing alloy, hardness increases with low-temperature heat treatment. Long and hair-like cracks (Palmqvist type) are observed to form from the corner of the indentations of the ternary alloys, whereas in Sn-containing composites, the cracks are not sharp and long suggesting the enhancement of fracture toughness in the composites. Attempts have been made to understand the effect of Sn on the evolution of icosahedral phase, other crystalline phases and their composite effects on the mechanical properties.

  7. Icosahedral AlCuFe quasicrystal at high pressure and temperature and its implications for the stability of icosahedrite.

    PubMed

    Stagno, Vincenzo; Bindi, Luca; Shibazaki, Yuki; Tange, Yoshinori; Higo, Yuji; Mao, H-K; Steinhardt, Paul J; Fei, Yingwei

    2014-01-01

    The first natural-occurring quasicrystal, icosahedrite, was recently discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a new CV3 carbonaceous chondrite. Its finding raised fundamental questions regarding the effects of pressure and temperature on the kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the quasicrystal structure relative to possible isochemical crystalline or amorphous phases. Although several studies showed the stability at ambient temperature of synthetic icosahedral AlCuFe up to ~35 GPa, the simultaneous effect of temperature and pressure relevant for the formation of icosahedrite has been never investigated so far. Here we present in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on synthetic icosahedral AlCuFe using multianvil device to explore possible temperature-induced phase transformations at pressures of 5 GPa and temperature up to 1773 K. Results show the structural stability of i-AlCuFe phase with a negligible effect of pressure on the volumetric thermal expansion properties. In addition, the structural analysis of the recovered sample excludes the transformation of AlCuFe quasicrystalline phase to possible approximant phases, which is in contrast with previous predictions at ambient pressure. Results from this study extend our knowledge on the stability of icosahedral AlCuFe at higher temperature and pressure than previously examined, and provide a new constraint on the stability of icosahedrite. PMID:25070248

  8. Structural aspects of the fivefold quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe surface from STM and dynamical LEED Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, T.; Shi, F.; Shen, Z.; Gierer, M.; Goldman, A.I.; Kramer, M.J.; Jenks, C.J.; Lograsso, T.A.; Delaney, D.W.; Thiel, P.A.; Van, M.A.

    2001-04-15

    We investigate the atomic structure of the fivefold surface of an icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe alloy, using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging and a special dynamical low energy-electron diffraction (LEED) method. STM indicates that the step heights adopt (primarily) two values in the ratio of tau, but the spatial distribution of these two values does not follow a Fibonacci sequence, thus breaking the ideal bulk-like quasicrystalline layer stacking order perpendicular to the surface. The appearance of screw dislocations in the STM images is another indication of imperfect quasicrystallinity. On the other hand, the LEED analysis, which was successfully applied to Al-Pd-Mn in a previous study, is equally successful for Al-Cu-Fe. Similar structural features are found for both materials, in particular for interlayer relaxations and surface terminations. Although there is no structural periodicity, there are clear atomic planes in the bulk of the quasicrystal, some of which can be grouped in recurring patterns. The surface tends to form between these grouped layers in both alloys. For Al-Cu-Fe, the step heights measured by STM are consistent with the thicknesses of the grouped layers favored in LEED. These results suggest that the fivefold Al-Cu-Fe surface exhibits a quasicrystalline layering structure, but with stacking defects.

  9. Annealing effect on the magnetic induced austenite transformation in polycrystalline freestanding Ni-Co-Mn-In films produced by co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Crouïgneau, G.; Porcar, L.; Pairis, S.; Mossang, E.; Eyraud, E.; Bourgault, D.; Courtois, P.

    2015-01-21

    Ni-Co-Mn-In freestanding films, with a magneto-structural transformation at room temperature were successfully produced by co-sputtering and post-annealing methods leading to film composition mastering. For a post-annealing temperature of 700 °C, the phase transformation occurs slightly above room temperature, with a twisted martensitic microstructure phase observed at 300 K by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy. Magnetization measurements on a polycrystalline film showed a phase transformation from a weakly magnetic martensite to a magnetic austenite phase. Moreover, an inverse magnetocaloric effect with an entropy variation of 4 J/kg K under 5 T was also measured. A simple magneto-actuation experiment based on the magnetic induced austenite transformation was also successfully completed. The possibility to insert such films in microsystems is clearly demonstrated in this work.

  10. Annealing effect on the magnetic induced austenite transformation in polycrystalline freestanding Ni-Co-Mn-In films produced by co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouïgneau, G.; Porcar, L.; Courtois, P.; Pairis, S.; Mossang, E.; Eyraud, E.; Bourgault, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ni-Co-Mn-In freestanding films, with a magneto-structural transformation at room temperature were successfully produced by co-sputtering and post-annealing methods leading to film composition mastering. For a post-annealing temperature of 700 °C, the phase transformation occurs slightly above room temperature, with a twisted martensitic microstructure phase observed at 300 K by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy. Magnetization measurements on a polycrystalline film showed a phase transformation from a weakly magnetic martensite to a magnetic austenite phase. Moreover, an inverse magnetocaloric effect with an entropy variation of 4 J/kg K under 5 T was also measured. A simple magneto-actuation experiment based on the magnetic induced austenite transformation was also successfully completed. The possibility to insert such films in microsystems is clearly demonstrated in this work.

  11. Surface Characteristics of Quasicrystal Thin Films of AlCuFe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symko, Orest G.; Abdel-Rahman, Ehab; Emmi, Matthew; Zudova, Snezhana

    2000-03-01

    We have investigated the surface energy and surface structure of thin films of i-AlCuFe. Such films are important for applications and in particular for coatings. The films investigated ranged in thickness from 10 nm to 300 nm; they were deposited on various substrates such as sapphire, silicon, stainless steel, and others. The surface energy was determined by contact angle measurements using the drop method. Results show contact angles comparable to Teflon. Studies were extended to the surface structure using an Atomic Force Microscope at ambient conditions. Images show extremely smooth surfaces which at certain locations provide evidence for the icosahedral symmetries of the quasicrystal. Such images were enhanced by auto-correlation techniques thus revealing more clearly the symmetries at the surface of the films. Other techniques such as x-ray diffraction, TEM, XPS and ToF-SIMS were used to determine the quality of the quasicrystal films and the nature of the surface. This characterization is essential for biomedical applications of our QC coatings.

  12. Structural and dynamical magnetic response of co-sputtered Co2FeAl heusler alloy thin films grown at different substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anjali; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2014-04-01

    The interdependence between the dynamical magnetic response and the microstructural properties such as crystallinity, lateral crystallite size, structural ordering of the co-sputtered polycrystalline Co2FeAl thin films on Si (100) are studied by varying the growth temperature from room temperature (RT) to 600 °C. Frequency (7-11 GHz) dependent in-plane ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) studies were carried out by using co-planar waveguide to estimate Gilbert damping constant (α) and effective saturation magnetization (4πMeff). The improvement in crystallinity, larger crystallite and particle sizes of the films are critical in obtaining films with lower α and higher 4πMeff. Increase in the lattice constant with substrate temperature indicates the improvement in the structural ordering at higher temperatures. Minimum value of α is found to be 0.005 ± 0.0003 for the film deposited at 500 °C, which is comparable to the values reported for epitaxial Co2FeAl films. The value of 4πMeff is found to increase from 1.32 to 1.51 T with the increase in deposition temperature from RT to 500 °C. The study also shows that the root mean square (rms) roughness linearly affects the FMR in-homogenous line broadening and the anisotropy field.

  13. Modification of the phase composition and structure of the quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe alloy prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepeshev, A. A.; Bayukov, O. A.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Fedorov, L. Yu.

    2015-02-01

    The structural-phase state of quasicrystalline coatings of the Al-Cu-Fe alloy produced under different thermal conditions of plasma spraying (different contact temperatures T k of the substrate) has been investigated. It has been shown that sprayed coatings are heterophase with the dominant content of the icosahedral ψ and cubic β phases, the formation and fractional ratio of which depend on spraying conditions. The distribution of probabilities P(QS) of quadrupole splitting in experimental γ-resonance spectra has been analyzed. The dependence of hyperfine interaction parameters (QS, A) on spraying conditions of the coating has been established. Five nonequivalent positions of resonant iron atoms, the appearance and filling of which are determined by spraying conditions, have been revealed.

  14. Influence of leaching on surface composition, microstructure, and valence band of single grain icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, M.; Yadav, T. P.; Fournée, V.; Ledieu, J.; McGrath, R.; Sharma, H. R.

    2015-03-01

    The use of quasicrystals as precursors to catalysts for the steam reforming of methanol is potentially one of the most important applications of these new materials. To develop application as a technology requires a detailed understanding of the microscopic behavior of the catalyst. Here, we report the effect of leaching treatments on the surface microstructure, chemical composition, and valence band of the icosahedral (i-) Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal in an attempt to prepare a model catalyst. The high symmetry fivefold surface of a single grain i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal was leached with NaOH solution for varying times, and the resulting surface was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The leaching treatments preferentially remove Al producing a capping layer consisting of Fe and Cu oxides. The subsurface layer contains elemental Fe and Cu in addition to the oxides. The quasicrystalline bulk structure beneath remains unchanged. The subsurface gradually becomes Fe3O4 rich with increasing leaching time. The surface after leaching exhibits micron sized dodecahedral cavities due to preferential leaching along the fivefold axis. Nanoparticles of the transition metals and their oxides are precipitated on the surface after leaching. The size of the nanoparticles is estimated by high resolution transmission microscopy to be 5-20 nm, which is in agreement with the AFM results. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) confirms the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. SAED further reveals the formation of an interface between the high atomic density lattice planes of nanoparticles and the quasicrystal. These results provide an important insight into the preparation of model catalysts of nanoparticles for steam reforming of methanol.

  15. Influence of leaching on surface composition, microstructure, and valence band of single grain icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, M.; McGrath, R.; Sharma, H. R.; Yadav, T. P.; Fournée, V.; Ledieu, J.

    2015-03-07

    The use of quasicrystals as precursors to catalysts for the steam reforming of methanol is potentially one of the most important applications of these new materials. To develop application as a technology requires a detailed understanding of the microscopic behavior of the catalyst. Here, we report the effect of leaching treatments on the surface microstructure, chemical composition, and valence band of the icosahedral (i-) Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal in an attempt to prepare a model catalyst. The high symmetry fivefold surface of a single grain i-Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal was leached with NaOH solution for varying times, and the resulting surface was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The leaching treatments preferentially remove Al producing a capping layer consisting of Fe and Cu oxides. The subsurface layer contains elemental Fe and Cu in addition to the oxides. The quasicrystalline bulk structure beneath remains unchanged. The subsurface gradually becomes Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} rich with increasing leaching time. The surface after leaching exhibits micron sized dodecahedral cavities due to preferential leaching along the fivefold axis. Nanoparticles of the transition metals and their oxides are precipitated on the surface after leaching. The size of the nanoparticles is estimated by high resolution transmission microscopy to be 5-20 nm, which is in agreement with the AFM results. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) confirms the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. SAED further reveals the formation of an interface between the high atomic density lattice planes of nanoparticles and the quasicrystal. These results provide an important insight into the preparation of model catalysts of nanoparticles for steam reforming of methanol.

  16. The Microstructure-Processing-Property Relationships in an Al Matrix Composite System Reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe Alloy Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fei Tang

    2004-12-19

    Metal matrix composites (MMC), especially Al matrix composites, received a lot of attention during many years of research because of their promise for the development of automotive and aerospace materials with improved properties and performance, such as lighter weight and better structural properties, improved thermal conductivity and wear resistance. In order to make the MMC materials more viable in various applications, current research efforts on the MMCs should continue to focus on two important aspects, including improving the properties of MMCs and finding more economical techniques to produce MMCs. Solid state vacuum sintering was studied in tap densified Al powder and in hot quasi-isostatically forged samples composed of commercial inert gas atomized or high purity Al powder, generated by a gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) technique. The GARS process results in spherical Al powder with a far thinner surface oxide. The overall results indicated the enhanced ability of GARS-processed Al and Al alloy powders for solid state sintering, which may lead to simplification of current Al powder consolidation processing methods. Elemental Al-based composites reinforced with spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders were produced by quasi-isostatic forging and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) consolidation methods. Microstructures and tensile properties of AYAl-Cu-Fe composites were characterized. It was proved that spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders can serve as an effective reinforcement particulate for elemental Al-based composites, because of their high hardness and a preferred type of matrix/reinforcement interfacial bonding, with reduced strain concentration around the particles. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the composites were increased over the corresponding Al matrix values, far beyond typical observations. This remarkable strengthening was achieved without precipitation hardening and without severe strain hardening during consolidation because of

  17. Large E-field tunability of magnetic anisotropy and ferromagnetic resonance frequency of co-sputtered Fe50Co50-B film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shandong; Xue, Qian; Du, Honglei; Xu, Jie; Li, Qiang; Shi, Zhipeng; Gao, Xiaoyang; Liu, Ming; Nan, Tianxiang; Hu, Zhongqiang; Sun, Nian X.; Shao, Weiquan

    2015-05-01

    Fe27.45Co30.19B42.36 (referred to as FeCoB) films with 100 nm in thickness were co-sputtered on (011)-cut lead zinc niobate-lead titanate (PZN-PT) single crystal substrate under RF powers of 80 W for Fe50Co50 target and 120 W for B target, respectively. The anisotropy field HK of the FeCoB/PZN-PT multiferroic composite is increased by more than 10 times, from 56 to 663 Oe under the E-field from 0 to 7 kV/cm due to the strong magnetoelectric coupling, corresponding to a large tunability of HK of 86.7 Oe cm/kV. At the same time, the self-bias ferromagnetic resonance frequency fFMR is dramatically shifted upwards by an electric field from 2.57 to 9.02 GHz with an increment of 6.45 GHz, corresponding to E-field tunablity of fFMR 921.4 MHz.cm/kV. These features demonstrate that FeCoB/PZN-PT multiferroic laminates prepared under an integrated circuits process are promising in fabrication of E-field tunable monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) devices and their components.

  18. Laser cladding of quasi-crystal-forming Al-Cu-Fe-Bi on an Al-Si alloy substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Krishanu; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Galun, Rolf; Mordike, Barry L.

    2005-07-01

    We report here the results of an investigation aimed at producing coatings containing phases closely related to the quasi-crystalline phase with dispersions of soft Bi particles using an Al-Cu-Fe-Bi elemental powder mixture on Al-10.5 at. pct Si substrates. A two-step process of cladding followed by remelting is used to fine-tune the alloying, phase distribution, and microstructure. A powder mix of Al64Cu22.3Fe11.7Bi2 has been used to form the clads. The basic reason for choosing Bi lies in the fact that it is immiscible with each of the constituent elements. Therefore, it is expected that Bi will solidify in the form of dispersoids during the rapid solidification. A detailed microstructural analysis has been carried out by using the backscattered imaging mode in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The microstructural features are described in terms of layers of different phases. Contrary to our expectation, the quasi-crystalline phase could not form on the Al-Si substrate. The bottom of the clad and remelted layers shows the regrowth of aluminum. The formation of phases such as blocky hexagonal Al-Fe-Si and a ternary eutectic (Al + CuAl2 + Si) have been found in this layer. The middle layer shows the formation of long plate-shaped Al13Fe4 along with hexagonal Al-Fe-Si phase growing at the periphery of the former. The formation of metastable Al-Al6Fe eutectic has also been found in this layer. The top layer, in the case of the as-clad track, shows the presence of plate-shaped Al13Fe4 along with a 1/1 cubic rational approximant of a quasi-crystal. The top layer of the remelted track shows the presence of a significant amount of a 1/1 cubic rational approximant. In addition, the as-clad and remelted microstructures show a fine-scale dispersion of Bi particles of different sizes formed during monotectic solidification. The remelting is found to have a strong effect on the size and distribution of Bi particles. The dry

  19. Undercooling and solidification behavior of melts of the quasicrystal-forming alloys Al-Cu-Fe and Al-Cu-Co

    SciTech Connect

    Holland-Moritz, D.; Schroers, J.; Herlach, D.M.; Grushko, B.; Urban, K.

    1998-03-02

    Al-Cu-Fe, Al-Fe and Al-Cu-Co melts of different compositions were undercooled by containerless processing in an electromagnetic levitation facility. The phase selection during solidification from the undercooled melt was determined by direct measurements of the temperature changes during recalescence. Complimentarily, the phase selection and microstructure development was studied by scanning- and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) on the as-solidified samples with the undercooling and the alloy composition as experimental parameters. For comparison, rapidly quenched samples of the same alloys were produced by splat-cooling and investigated by TEM and XRD. The undercooling results were analyzed within the framework of classical nucleation theory. The activation threshold for the nucleation was found to be small for the icosahedral quasicrystalline phase in Al-Cu-Fe, medium for the decagonal D-phase in Al-Cu-Co and crystalline phases with polytetrahedral symmetry elements (Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4} and Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}), but large for the cubic phase of Al{sub 50}(CuCo){sub 50} with non-polytetrahedral crystalline symmetry. These results are explained assuming of an icosahedral short-range order that prevails in the undercooled melt and gives rise to an interfacial energy decreasing with increasing degree of polytetrahedral order in the solid nucleus.

  20. Magnetron co-sputtering system for coating ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.; Halsey, W.G.; Jameson, G.T.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1981-09-09

    Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets requires deposition of various types of coatings on microspheres. The mechanical strength, and surface finish of the coatings are of concern in ICF experiments. The tensile strength of coatings can be controlled through grain refinement, selective doping and alloy formation. We have constructed a magnetron co-sputtering system to produce variable density profile coatings with high tensile strength on microspheres.

  1. Structural analysis of ferromagnetic Ni-Mn-Sn thin films fabricated by co-sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guvenc, Sema; Yumak, Mehmet; Nedelcos, A. Quintana; Llamazares, J. L. Sanchez; Garcia, Carlos Garcia

    2015-03-01

    Ferromagnetic Ni-Mn-X (Sn, In) alloys are predicted as potential candidates for energy efficient Magnetocaloric Effect (MCE) technologies. The MCE is the basis of magnetic refrigeration and it leads to a groundbreaking progress on conventional refrigeration methods. In our research, Ni-Mn-Sn thin films were fabricated by co-sputter deposition method. The Mn losses due to the high Mn vapor pressure produce a deviation from the desired Ni50Mn37Sn13 composition, which are partially compensated by increasing power of the Mn target gun. A systematic study of thin film co-sputter fabrication was divided into three stages; i) a Ni-Mn-Sn target was evaporated at different temperatures in order to study the grain size temperature dependence, ii) the nominal chemical composition (Ni50Mn37Sn13) was reached by controlling the power value applied to the Mn target, iii) the dependence of the phase transformation temperature with the grain size of the thin film alloys was studied. Grain size can be controlled by modifying the substrate temperature (Ts) .

  2. Magnetron co-sputtering system for coating ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.; Halsey, W.G.; Jameson, G.T.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1981-12-09

    Fabrication of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets requires deposition of various types of coatings on microspheres. The mechanical strength, and surface finish of the coatings are of concern in ICF experiments. The tensile strength of coatings can be controlled through grain refinement, selective doping and alloy formation. We have constructed a magnetron co-sputtering system to produce variable density profile coatings with high tensile strength on microspheres. The preliminary data on the properties of a Au-Cu binary alloy system by SEM and STEM analysis is presented.

  3. Ion beam analysis and co-sputtering simulation (CO-SS) of bi-metal films produced by magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, J.; Andrade, E.; Muhl, S.; Canto, C.; de Lucio, O.; Chávez, E.; Rocha, M. F.; Garcés-Medina, E.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetron sputtering is widely used to deposit thin films on different types of substrates. An important application of this method is to make multicomponent thin films using co-sputtering, where two or more elements are included in the target. The thickness and elemental composition of the films depend on the experimental parameters used, the system geometry and the spatial distribution of the elements in the target. If the target is made of two spatially separate pieces of the materials, then the composition of the deposit depends on a combination of the relative areas, the sputtering yield and the angular distribution of the emission of the sputtered flux of each material. In this work, a co-sputtering simulation program, known as CO-SS, was developed to simulate the thickness and composition of metal films produced by DC magnetron sputtering (Al) and co-sputtering (Al + Ti). The CO-SS code models the angular distribution of particles ejected by sputtering from the target, where this is assumed to vary as cosn β , where n is a free parameter and β is the angle of ejection relative to the normal to the surface of the target, and the sputtering yield of each material. The program also takes into account other geometry factors such as the distance between the target and the substrate, and the size of the substrate. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) using 4He was employed to measure the thickness and the composition of the films deposited on glass cover slides in order to assess the CO-SS program. The film thickness was also measured by profilometry. The CO-SS code was found to accurately model the experimental results for both the Al and Ti/Al films. The CO-SS code is freely available for use from http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/CoSputteringSimulationCOSS/.

  4. Concentric nano rings observed on Al-Cu-Fe microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfei; Wang, Limin; Hampikian, Helen; Bair, Matthew; Baker, Andrew; Hua, Mingjian; Wang, Qiongshu; Li, Dingqiang

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that when particle size is reduced, surface effect becomes important. As a result, micro/nanoparticles tend to have well defined geometric shapes to reduce total surface energy, as opposed to the irregular shapes observed in most bulk materials. The surface of such micro/nanostructures are smooth. Any deviation from a smooth surface implies an increased surface energy which is not energetically favorable. Here, we report an observation of spherical particles in an alloy of Al65Cu20Fe15 nominal composition prepared by arc melting. Such spherical particles stand out from those reported so far due to the decoration of concentric nanorings on the surface. Three models for the formation of these concentric ring patterns are suggested. The most prominent ones assume that the rings are frozen features of liquid motion which could open the door to investigate the kinetics of liquid motion on the micro/nanometer scale.

  5. Co-sputtering NbTiN thin films on PSG/Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Jingjiao; Zhang, Lu; You, Lixing; Su, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Single-crystalline silicon is one of a few promising substrate materials on which to grow NbTiN ultrathin films for applications in superconducting single photon detection devices. In this work, a buffer layer of phosphorus silicate glass (PSG) ∼250 nm is formed rapidly on the silicon substrate under a relatively low temperature to ease the mismatching between NbTiN and substrate, and simultaneously act as an antireflection layer at the working wavelength. (111)-oriented NbTiN films were deposited on both SiO2/Si and PSG/Si substrates by using a dc reactive magnetron co-sputtering system of independent Nb and Ti targets. The superconducting critical temperature T c of the 5 nm-NbTiN/PSG/Si sample reaches ∼8.8 K due to effectively relieving the mismatch between NbTiN and Si by PSG buffer layer.

  6. The electronic structure of co-sputtered zinc indium tin oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, Paz; Antony, Aldrin; Bertomeu, Joan; Gutmann, Sebastian; Schlaf, Rudy

    2011-10-01

    Zinc indium tin oxide (ZITO) transparent conductive oxide layers were deposited via radio frequency (RF) magnetron co-sputtering at room temperature. A series of samples with gradually varying zinc content was investigated. The samples were characterized with x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS, UPS) to determine the electronic structure of the surface. Valence and conduction bands maxima (VBM, CBM), and work function were determined. The experiments indicate that increasing Zn content results in films with a higher defect rate at the surface leading to the formation of a degenerately doped surface layer if the Zn content surpasses {approx}50%. Furthermore, the experiments demonstrate that ZITO is susceptible to ultraviolet light induced work function reduction, similar to what was earlier observed on ITO and TiO{sub 2} films.

  7. Evolution of the microstructure and oxidation resistance in co-sputtered Zr-Y-N coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhengtao; Qi, Zhengbing; Zhang, Dongfang; Wang, Zhoucheng

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the influence of Y addition to the microstructure and oxidation resistance of ZrN coating. Zr-Y-N coatings with a 0-5.8 at.% Y addition were fabricated by reactive co-sputtering in an Ar-N2 atmosphere. The results indicate that solid solution-type Zr-Y-N coatings show a columnar structure with a strong (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The grain size decreases from 76 to 21 nm with an increase in the amount of Y from 0 to 5.8 at.%. The oxidation results demonstrate that the most beneficial addition of Y to improve the oxidation resistance of ZrN coating is 1.0 at.%. An excessive addition of Y produces detrimental effects. Cracking in the oxide scale and oxygen inward diffusion through the scale have been identified as the primary reasons for the loss of oxidation resistance.

  8. Combinatorial study of WInZnO films deposited by rf magnetron co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Byeong-Yun; Park, Jae-Cheol; Lee, Young-Jun; Cha, Sang-Jun; Kim, Joo-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Young; Kim, Tae-Won; Heo, Gi-Seok

    2011-09-15

    The compositional dependence of co-sputtered tungsten indium zinc oxide (WInZnO) film properties was first investigated by means of a combinatorial technique. Indium zinc oxide (IZO) and WO{sub 3} targets were used with different target power. W composition ratio [W/(In+Zn+W)] was varied between 3 and 30 at% and film thickness was reduced as the sample position moved toward WO{sub 3} target. Furthermore, the optical bandgap energy increased gradually, which might be affected by the reduction in film thickness. All the WInZnO films showed an amorphous phase regardless of the W/(In+Zn+W) ratio. As the W/(In+Zn+W) ratio in WInZnO films increased, the carrier concentration was restricted, causing the increase in electrical resistivity. W cations worked as oxygen binders in determining the electronic properties, resulting in suppressing the formation of oxygen vacancies. Consequentially, W metal cations were effectively incorporated into the WInZnO films as a suppressor against the oxygen vacancies and the carrier generation by employing the combinatorial technique. - Graphical abstract: The film thickness and the sheet resistance (R{sub s}) with respect to the sample position of WInZnO films, which is compositionally graded by rf power for each target, are exhibited. Highlights: > The compositional dependence of co-sputtered WInZnO film properties is first investigated. > W cations work as oxygen binders in determining the electronic properties. > All the WInZnO films show an amorphous phase regardless of the W/(In+Zn+W) ratio. > W metal cations are effectively incorporated into the WInZnO films by the combinatorial technique.

  9. Co-sputter deposited nickel-copper bimetallic nanoalloy embedded carbon films for electrocatalytic biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Shunsuke; Kato, Dai; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Niwa, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    We report the fabrication of a nickel (Ni)-copper (Cu) bimetallic nanoalloy (~3 nm) embedded carbon film electrode with the unbalanced magnetron (UBM) co-sputtering technique, which requires only a one-step process at room temperature. Most of each nanoalloy body was firmly embedded in a chemically stable carbon matrix with an atomically flat surface (Ra: 0.21 nm), suppressing the aggregation and/or detachment of the nanoalloy from the electrode surface. The nanoalloy size and composition can be controlled simply by individually controlling the target powers of carbon, Ni and Cu, which also makes it possible to localize the nanoalloys near the electrode surface. This electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity for d-mannitol, which should be detected with a low detection limit in urine samples for the diagnosis of severe intestinal diseases. With a Ni/Cu ratio of around 64/36, the electrocatalytic current per metal area was 3.4 times larger than that of an alloy film electrode with a similar composition (~70/30). This improved electrocatalytic activity realized higher stability (n = 60, relative standard deviation (RSD): 4.6%) than the alloy film (RSD: 32.2%) as demonstrated by continuous measurements of d-mannitol.We report the fabrication of a nickel (Ni)-copper (Cu) bimetallic nanoalloy (~3 nm) embedded carbon film electrode with the unbalanced magnetron (UBM) co-sputtering technique, which requires only a one-step process at room temperature. Most of each nanoalloy body was firmly embedded in a chemically stable carbon matrix with an atomically flat surface (Ra: 0.21 nm), suppressing the aggregation and/or detachment of the nanoalloy from the electrode surface. The nanoalloy size and composition can be controlled simply by individually controlling the target powers of carbon, Ni and Cu, which also makes it possible to localize the nanoalloys near the electrode surface. This electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity for d

  10. Work Function Modification of Tungsten-Doped Indium Oxides Deposited by the Co-Sputtering Method.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gyujin; Jeon, Jia; Lee, Kyoung Su; Kim, Eun Kyu

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the work function modification of tungsten-doped indium oxides (IWOs) through the co-sputtering of indium oxide (In2O3) and indium tungsten oxide (In2O3 80 wt% + WO3 20 wt%) via a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system. By controlling the elemental deposition of IWOs, the resultant work functions varied from 4.37 eV to 4.1 eV. The IWO thin films showed excellent properties for application as transparent conducting oxide materials in the region of 0 to 2.43 at.% of tungsten versus the total metal content. The carrier concentration of n-type IWO thin films varied from 8.39 x 10(19) cm(-3) to 8.58 x 10(21) cm(-3), while the resistivity varied from 3.15 x 10(-4) Ωcm to 2.26 x 10(-3) Ωcm. The largest measured optical band gap was 3.82 eV determined at 2.43 at.% of tungsten atoms relative to the total amount of metal atoms, while the smallest optical band gap was 3.6 eV at 4.78 at.% of tungsten. IWO films containing more than 2.43 at.% of tungsten atoms relative to the total number of metal atoms revealed an average transmittance of over 80% within the visible light region. PMID:27483882

  11. Growth of CZTS by co-sputtering and sulfurization for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhunthan, N.; Singh, Om Pal; Singh, V. N.

    2013-12-01

    Earth abundant copper-zinc-tin-sulfide (CZTS) is an important class of material for the development of low cost and sustainable thin film solar cells. Fabrications of CZTS thin film is carried out by magnetron co-sputtering the metallic and sulfide targets and post deposition sulfurization. We sputter Cu using DC power and ZnS and SnS using RF power. In order to study its structure properties and to establish the best growth conditions, Raman spectroscopy and Glazing incident XRD analysis were carried out. These studies indicated that the grown CZTS film have a kesterite with good crystallinity and strong preferential orientation along (112) plane. SEM analysis revealed a homogeneous, compact surface morphology and large grains throughout the thickness of the film. The grown CZTS film demonstrated an optical absorption coefficient higher than ~ 6x104cm-1 and optical band gap of 1.45 eV. The sheet resistance, carrier concentration, mobility and activation energy of the CZTS film are 2.52 kΩ, 1.86 x 1018 cm-3, 1.92 cm2V-1s-1, and 37.8 meV, respectively. These optical and electrical properties are suitable for thin film solar cell fabrication.

  12. Co-sputter deposited nickel-copper bimetallic nanoalloy embedded carbon films for electrocatalytic biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Shunsuke; Kato, Dai; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Niwa, Osamu

    2016-07-14

    We report the fabrication of a nickel (Ni)-copper (Cu) bimetallic nanoalloy (∼3 nm) embedded carbon film electrode with the unbalanced magnetron (UBM) co-sputtering technique, which requires only a one-step process at room temperature. Most of each nanoalloy body was firmly embedded in a chemically stable carbon matrix with an atomically flat surface (Ra: 0.21 nm), suppressing the aggregation and/or detachment of the nanoalloy from the electrode surface. The nanoalloy size and composition can be controlled simply by individually controlling the target powers of carbon, Ni and Cu, which also makes it possible to localize the nanoalloys near the electrode surface. This electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity for d-mannitol, which should be detected with a low detection limit in urine samples for the diagnosis of severe intestinal diseases. With a Ni/Cu ratio of around 64/36, the electrocatalytic current per metal area was 3.4 times larger than that of an alloy film electrode with a similar composition (∼70/30). This improved electrocatalytic activity realized higher stability (n = 60, relative standard deviation (RSD): 4.6%) than the alloy film (RSD: 32.2%) as demonstrated by continuous measurements of d-mannitol. PMID:27333270

  13. Characterization of Ta-Si-N coatings prepared using direct current magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-I.; Lin, Kun-Yi; Wang, Hsiu-Hui; Cheng, Yu-Ru

    2014-06-01

    Ta-Si-N coatings were prepared using reactive direct current magnetron co-sputtering on silicon substrates. When the sputtering powers and N2 flow ratio were varied, Ta-Si-N coatings exhibited various chemical compositions and crystalline characteristics. The high-Si-content Ta-Si-N coatings exhibited an amorphous phase in the as-deposited states, whereas the low-Si-content coatings exhibited a face-centered cubic phase or an amorphous phase depending on the N content. This study evaluated the application of amorphous Ta-Si-N coatings, such as the protective coatings on glass molding dies, in high-temperature and oxygen-containing atmospheres for longed operation durations. To explore the oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of the Ta-Si-N coatings, annealing treatments were conducted in a 1%O2-99%Ar atmosphere at 600 °C for 4-100 h. The material characteristics and oxidation behavior of the annealed Ta-Si-N coatings were examined using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and a nanoindentation tester. The Si oxidized preferentially in the Ta-Si-N coatings. The in-diffusion of oxygen during 600 °C annealing was restricted by the formation of an amorphous oxide scale consisting of Si and O.

  14. P-type doping of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films with boron by reactive radio-frequency co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Suzuki, M.; Sakamoto, N.; Meguro, T.

    2001-12-01

    B has been successfully doped into the hydrogenated amorphous Si films without using explosive and/or toxic gases SiH 4 or B 2H 6 by reactive radio-frequency co-sputtering. The target used for co-sputtering was a composite target composed of a B-doped Si wafer and B chips attached on the Si wafer with silver powder bond. The maximum area fraction of B chips used was 0.11. Argon and hydrogen pressures were 5×10 -3 and 5×10 -4 Torr, respectively. Substrates were kept at 200°C or 250°C during sputtering. The maximum B concentration in the film obtained was 2×10 19 cm -3 from secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurement. Films with resistivity of 10 4-10 5 Ω cm were obtained, which was low for the above acceptor concentration, compared with other group III impurities doping, indicating the high doping efficiency of B. A heterostructure, which was prepared by co-sputtering these B-doped films on an n-type crystalline Si, shows a good rectification characteristic. A small photovoltaic effect is also observed.

  15. Deposition of novel nanocomposite films by a newly developed differential pumping co-sputtering system

    SciTech Connect

    Nose, Masateru; Kurimoto, Takeshi; Saiki, Atsushi; Matsuda, Kenji; Terayama, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-15

    A differential pumping co-sputtering system was developed to facilitate a controlled, but flexible fabrication of multifunctional nanocomposite films with compositions not limited by thermodynamic restrictions. This system features a multichamber design with a differential pumping system. Dividing atmospheres with this set up greatly reduced the cross-contamination between chambers, and each material could be co-deposited by rapid rotation of the substrate. The clearance between the substrate holder and the chamber was set at 1-2 mm, and the conductance of the clearance was examined roughly using conductance equations for typical types of orifices. It was found that the potential difference (PD) value of the clearance between the two chambers was less than 0.01; the gas flow between the two chambers through the clearance thus appears to be a practical molecular flow. The PD value, where P is a pressure (Pa) and D is a diameter of an orifice or a pipe (m), is a gas flow indicator or parameter obtained from an equation of Knudsen number. The changes in the oxygen partial pressure and glow discharge plasma in the left chamber were investigated using a process gas monitor (PGM) and optical emission spectroscope (OES) by introducing different gases to each chamber. The PGM results revealed that the cross-contamination of oxygen from the other chamber was suppressed to 10 {+-} 3% of the original. In addition, the OES measurement for glow discharge plasma did not detect substantial oxygen contamination from the other chamber. Using the newly developed system, an AlN/SiO{sub x} nanocomposite film consisting of B4-type AlN and amorphous SiO{sub x} was obtained successfully.

  16. Thermal Stability of Co-Sputtered Ru Ti Alloy Electrodes for Dynamic Random Access Memory Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horng, Ray-Hua; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Wu, Luh-Huei; Lee, Ming-Kwei; Chan, Shih-Hsiung; Leu, Ching-Chich; Huang, Tiao-Yuan; Sze, Simon

    1998-10-01

    Ru Ti alloy films were studied for use as a bottom electrode of ferroelectric/paraelectric thin film capacitors. These thin films with different Ru/Ti compositions were first prepared by co-sputtering. The Ru/Ti ratio in the alloy was found to strongly affect the resistivity, structure formation and thermal stability. The resistivity of the as-deposited films decreases and closes to that of pure Ru metal films as the amount of Ru atoms increasing. From X-ray diffraction measurement, it was found that the RuTi phase has formed for the as-deposited sample. There also exist Ru and Ti phases for Ru-enriched and Ti-enriched samples, respectively. As-deposited alloy films were also annealed by rapid thermal processing (RTP, 600 750°C, 1 min) in oxygen ambient to simulate the processing of ferroelectric/paraelectric thin film capacitors. It was found that the composition of the thin film has a large effect on the thermal stability. The resistivity of alloy thin films is thermally stable as the Ru composition varies from 0.68 to 0.81. It may be due to the RuTiO2 formation at the surface and play an important role in preventing further oxidation of the Ru-enriched layer. This oxide also presents conductive behavior. On the other hand, the interface between Ru-enriched alloys and Si substrate was still sharp for the RTP-treated sample at 600°C for 1 min. The alloy film with high Ru composition shows excellent thermal stability and barriers against interdiffusion of Si and oxygen. These results suggest that the Ru-enriched alloy films are suitable for the bottom electrode application in ferroelectric/paraelectric thin film capacitors.

  17. Near-infrared photoactive Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} thin films by co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Banavoth, Murali; Dias, Sandra; Krupanidhi, S. B.

    2013-08-15

    The thin films of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) were grown by co-sputtering further the structural, optical and electrical properties were analyzed and confirmed the CZTS phase formation. The photo response of CZTS in near IR photodectection has been demonstrated. The detector response was measured employing both the IR lamp and IR laser illuminations. The calculated growth and decay constants were 130 m sec and 700 m sec followed by the slower components upon lamp illumination. The external quantum efficiency of 15%, responsivity of 13 AW{sup −1} makes CZTS a suitable candidate for the IR photodectection.

  18. Thermoelectric properties of Bi2Te3-In2Se3 composite thin films prepared by co-sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Chon; Choi, Won Chel; Kim, Hyun Jae; Lyeo, Ho-Ki; Kim, Jin-Sang; Park, Chan

    2012-04-01

    Bi2Te3-In2Se3 films were prepared by co-sputtering followed by annealing, and their structural and thermoelectric properties were investigated. The immiscible nature of the two alloys results in precipitation of the second phase, thus leading to structures with self-assembled dots that are a few nanometers in scale. HAADF-STEM and HRTEM were used to confirm that In2Se3 nanodots that were a few nanometers in size did indeed form in the Bi2Te3 thin film. It was found that the incorporation of these nanodots can reduce the thermal conductivity of the thin film. PMID:22849184

  19. Effects of Ta Addition Through Co-Sputtering on the Electrical Characteristics of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Nae; Son, Dae-Ho; Sung, Shi-Joon; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Dae-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of adding (Ta) ions to InSnO thin films by co-sputtering on the performance of InSnO thin film transistors (TFTs). TaInSnO TFTs exhibited significantly lower off currents and higher on/off current ratios. Ta ions, owing to their strong affinity to oxygen suppress the formation of free electron carriers in thin films; and hence, play an important role in enhancing the electrical characteristics of the TFTs. The optimized TaInSnO TFTs showed high on/off ratios and low subthreshold swings. PMID:26328366

  20. Fabrication and evaluation of green-light emitting Ta2O5:Er, Ce co-sputtered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, K.; Osawa, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yokota, Y.; Hanaizumi, O.

    Erbium and cerium co-doped tantalum-oxide (Ta2O5:Er, Ce) thin films were fabricated using radio-frequency co-sputtering of Ta2O5, Er2O3, and CeO2 for the first time. Enhanced green-light emission due to Er3+ that seems to be sensitized by Ce3+ was observed from the film annealed at 900 °C for 20 min. From XRD measurements of the films, the β-Ta2O5 (orthorhombic), δ-Ta2O5 (hexagonal), and (2 0 1) Ta2O5 phases seem to be very important for obtaining green PL from them. Such Ta2O5:Er, Ce co-sputtered films can be used as high-refractive-index materials of autocloned photonic crystals that can be applied to novel green-light-emitting devices, and they will also be used as multi-functional coating films that can work both as anti-reflection and down-conversion films for realizing high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  1. Crystallization behaviour of co-sputtered Cu₂ZnSnS₄ precursor prepared by sequential sulfurization processes.

    PubMed

    Han, Junhee; Shin, Seung Wook; Gang, Myeong Gil; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2013-03-01

    Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS) thin films were prepared by the sequential sulfurization of a co-sputtered precursor with a multitarget (Cu, ZnS, and SnS(2)) sputtering system. In order to investigate the crystallization behaviour of the thin films, the precursors were sulfurized in a tube furnace at different temperatures for different time durations. The Raman spectra of the sulfurized thin films showed that their crystallinity gradually improved with an increase in the sulfurization temperature and duration. However, transmission electron microscopy revealed an unexpected result-the precursor thin films were not completely transformed to the CZTS phase and showed the presence of uncrystallized material when sulfurized at 250-400 °C for 60 min and at 500 °C for 30 min. Thus, the crystallization of the co-sputtered precursor thin films showed a strong dependence on the sulfurization temperature and duration. The crystallization mechanism of the precursor thin films was understood on the basis of these results and has been described in this paper. The understanding of this mechanism may improve the standard preparation method for high-quality CZTS absorber layers. PMID:23396187

  2. Effect of growth temperature on the electronic transport and anomalous Hall effect response in co-sputtered Co2FeSi thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anjali; Chaudhary, Sujeet

    2015-11-01

    Co-sputtered Co2FeSi thin films are studied by varying the growth temperature (Ts) as a control parameter in terms of the appreciable change in the disorder. The effect of Ts on structural, magnetic, electrical, and magneto-transport properties was investigated. As Ts is increased from room temperature to 400 °C, an improvement in the crystallinity and atomic ordering are observed. These are found to be correlated with the associated reduction in residual resistivity ( ρ x x 0 ) from 410 to 88 μΩ cm, an increment in residual resistivity ratio (r) from 0.8 to 1.23, and an increase in saturation magnetization from 1074 to 1196 emu/cc. The spin wave stiffness constant in these films is found to increase with Ts, with a reasonably high value of 358 meVÅ2 at the optimum value of Ts of 400 °C. Further, the obtained high carrier concentration and mobility values (at 10 K) of ˜30 e-s/f.u. and ˜0.11 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the films deposited at Ts = 400 °C shows the presence of compensated Fermi surface. The transport properties are investigated qualitatively from the scaling of anomalous Hall resistivity ρx y s (T) with the longitudinal resistivity ρ x x ( T ) data, employing the extrinsic (skew- and side-jump scatterings) and intrinsic scattering contributions. The variation in the intrinsic scattering contributions observed via the variation in linear dependence of ρx y s on ρx x 2 with the change in Ts is found to be associated with the improvement in the crystallinity of these films.

  3. SiC formation for a solar cell passivation layer using an RF magnetron co-sputtering system.

    PubMed

    Joung, Yeun-Ho; Kang, Hyun Il; Kim, Jung Hyun; Lee, Hae-Seok; Lee, Jaehyung; Choi, Won Seok

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method of amorphous silicon carbide film formation for a solar cell passivation layer. The film was deposited on p-type silicon (100) and glass substrates by an RF magnetron co-sputtering system using a Si target and a C target at a room-temperature condition. Several different SiC [Si1-xCx] film compositions were achieved by controlling the Si target power with a fixed C target power at 150 W. Then, structural, optical, and electrical properties of the Si1-xCx films were studied. The structural properties were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The optical properties were achieved by UV-visible spectroscopy and ellipsometry. The performance of Si1-xCx passivation was explored by carrier lifetime measurement. PMID:22221730

  4. Transparent conductive Nb-doped TiO2 films deposited by RF magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Guangmiao; Wang, Shenwei; Zhang, Xinwu; Huang, Miaoling; Zhang, Yanwei; Duan, Wubiao; Yi, Lixin

    2015-12-01

    In this work, Nb-doped TiO2 films were deposited on glass substrates utilizing RF magnetron co-sputtering with a TiO2 target and a Nb target. In order to study the effect of Nb concentration, four groups of films with different Nb concentration were prepared and annealed in N2 at 500 °C. Crystal structure, surface morphology, electrical and optical property of the films were characterized. The lowest resistivity was measured to be 1.2 × 10-3 Ω cm at the Nb concentration of 7.0 at.%. Meanwhile, Hall mobility and carrier density were 2.0 cm2/Vs and 2.6 × 1021 cm-3, respectively.

  5. [Study on the Properties of the Pc-Si Films Prepared by Magnetron Co-Sputtering at Low Temperature].

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang-fei; Yang, Wen; Zhang, Li-yuan; Li, Xue-ming; Chen, Xiao-bo; Yang, Pei-zhi

    2016-03-01

    The polycrystalline silicon thin films play an important role in the field of electronics. In the paper, α-SiAl composite membranes on glass substrates was prepared by magnetron co-sputtering. The contents of Al radicals encapsulated-in the α-Si film can be adjusted by changing the Al to Si sputtering power ratios. The as-prepared α-Si films were converted into polycrystalline films by using a rapid thermal annealing (RTP) at low temperature of 350 degrees C for 10 minutes in N2 atmosphere. An X-ray diffractometer, and Raman scattering and UV-Visible-NIR Spectrometers were used to characterize the properties of the Pc-Si films. The influences of Al content on the properties of the Pc-Si films were studied. The results showed that the polycrystalline silicon films were obtained from α-SiAl composite films which were prepared by magnetron co-sputtering at a low temperature following by a rapid thermal annealing. The grain size and the degree of crystallization of the Pc-Si films increased with the increase of Al content, while the optical band gap was reduced. The nc-Si films were prepared when the Al to Si sputtering power ratio was 0.1. And a higher Crystallization rate (≥ 85%) of polycrystalline silicon films were obtained when the ratio was 0.3. The band gaps of the polycrystalline silicon films can be controlled by changing the aluminum content in the films. PMID:27400496

  6. Heavily-doped ZnO:Al thin films prepared by using magnetron Co-sputtering: Optical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-A.; Jun, Young-Kil; Kim, Nam-Hoon; Lee, Woo-Sun

    2016-07-01

    Photovoltaic applications require transparent conducting-oxide (TCO) thin films with high optical transmittance in the visible spectral region (380 - 780 nm), low resistivity, and high thermal/chemical stability. The ZnO thin film is one of the most common alternatives to the conventional indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film TCO. Highly transparent and conductive ZnO thin films can be prepared by doping with group III elements. Heavily-doped ZnO:Al (AZO) thin films were prepared by using the RF magnetron co-sputtering method with ZnO and Al targets to obtain better characteristics at a low cost. The RF sputtering power to each target was varied to control the doping concentration in fixed-thickness AZO thin films. The crystal structures of the AZO thin films were analyzed by using X-ray diffraction. The morphological microstructure was observed by using scanning electron microscopy. The optical transmittance and the band gap energy of the AZO thin films were examined with an UV-visible spectrophotometer in the range of 300 - 1800 nm. The resistivity and the carrier concentration were examined by using a Hall-effect measurement system. An excellent optical transmittance > 80% with an appropriate band gap energy (3.26 - 3.27 eV) and an improved resistivity (~10 -1 Ω·cm) with high carrier concentration (1017 - 1019 cm -3) were demonstrated in 350-nm-thick AZO thin films for thin-film photovoltaic applications.

  7. Structure adhesion and corrosion resistance study of tungsten bisulfide doped with titanium deposited by DC magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Roche, J.; González, J. M.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Sequeda, F.; Alleh, V.; Scharf, T. W.

    2014-11-01

    Titanium-doped tungsten bisulfide thin films (WS2-Ti) were grown using a DC magnetron co-sputtering technique on AISI 304 stainless steel and silicon substrates. The films were produced by varying the Ti cathode power from 0 to 25 W. Using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the concentration of Ti in the WS2 was determined, and a maximum of 10% was obtained for the sample grown at 25 W. Moreover, the S/W ratio was calculated and determined to increase as a function of the Ti cathode power. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results, at high titanium concentrations (greater than 6%), nanocomposite formation was observed, with nanocrystals of Ti embedded in an amorphous matrix of WS2. Using the scratch test, the coatings' adhesion was analyzed, and it was observed that as the Ti percentage was increased, the critical load (Lc) also increased. Furthermore, the failure type changed from plastic to elastic. Finally, the corrosion resistance was evaluated using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique, and it was observed that at high Ti concentrations, the corrosion resistance was improved, as Ti facilitates coating densification and generates a protective layer.

  8. Optical and electrical properties of nonstoichiometric a-Ge1-xCx films prepared by magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. Q.; Jiang, C. Z.; Han, J. C.; Yu, H. L.; Wang, J. Z.; Jia, Z. C.; Chen, R. R.

    2012-02-01

    Amorphous non-hydrogenated germanium carbide (a-Ge1-xCx) films have been prepared by magnetron co-sputtering method in a discharge of Ar. The dependence of structural and chemical bonding properties on the Ge/C ratio (R) has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The relationship between the chemical bonding and the optical and electrical properties of the a-Ge1-xCx films has also been explored. It has been shown that the refractive index of the films increases from 2.9 to 4.4 and the optical gap decreases from 1.55 to 1.05 eV as R increases from 1.22 to 5.67. Moreover, the conductivity σ increases clearly and the activation energy Ea decreases with the increasing R owing to the reduction of sp3 Csbnd Ge bonds. The a-Ge1-xCx films exhibit refractive index and optical gap values changing with x in a wide range, which may make a-Ge1-xCx films good candidates in the fields of protection coatings for IR windows and electronic devices.

  9. Effect of Ta addition of co-sputtered amorphous tantalum indium zinc oxide thin film transistors with bias stability.

    PubMed

    Son, Dae-Ho; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Park, Si-Nae; Sung, Shi-Joon; Kang, Jin-Kyu

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we have fabricated thin film transistors (TFTs) using amorphous tantalum indium zinc oxide (a-TaInZnO) channels by the co-sputtering process. The effects of incorporating tantalum on the InZnO material were investigated using Hall-effect measurement results, and electrical characteristics. We also found that the carrier densities of thin films and the transistor on-off currents were greatly influenced by the composition of tantalum addition. Ta ions have strong affinity to oxygen and so suppress the formation of free electron carriers inthin films; they play an important role in enhancing the electrical characteristic due to their high oxygen bonding ability. The electrical characteristics of the optimized TFTs shows a field effect mobility of 3.67 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), a threshold voltage of 1.28 V, an on/off ratio of 1.1 x 10(8), and a subthreshold swing of 480 mV/dec. Under gate bias stress conditions, the TaInZnO TFTs showed lower shift in threshold voltage shifts. PMID:25958492

  10. Optical design and co-sputtering preparation of high performance Mo-SiO2 cermet solar selective absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqing; Gao, Fangyuan; Zhao, Shuxi; Zhou, Fuyun; Nshimiyimana, Jean Pierre; Diao, Xungang

    2013-09-01

    In order to optimize and prepare high performance Mo-SiO2 cermet solar selective absorbing coating, a series of Mo-SiO2 cermet films with different metal volume fraction were deposited on optical glass using mid-frequency (MF) and radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering. The reflectance (R) and transmittance (T) in the wavelength range of 250-2500 nm have been simulated using SCOUT software with different dielectric function models. The optical constants, film thickness, metal volume fraction and other parameters have been deduced from the modeling. The fitted optical constants were then used to simulate and optimize the Mo-SiO2 solar selective coating and samples were prepared based on the optimized parameters. The Maxwell Garnett (MG) and Bruggeman (BR) effective-medium theory have been added in the dielectric function models to describe low metal volume fraction cermet layer (LMVF) and high metal volume fraction cermet layer (HMVF), separately. The optical spectra (R and T) of all single films were in a good agreement with the fitted spectra by dielectric function models. The experimental measured reflectance of the solar selective coating was also in rather good agreement with the optimized result. The solar absorptance of theoretically optimized selective coating was 0.945, while the absorptance of the experimental coating was 0.95. The thermal emittance of 0.15 (at 400 °C) was obtained.

  11. [Spectral Characteristics of Si Quantum Dots Embedded in SiN(x) Thin Films Prepared by Magnetron Co-Sputtering].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-bo; Yang, Wen; Duan, Liang-fei; Zhang, Li-yuan; Yang, Pei-zhi; Song, Zhao-ning

    2015-07-01

    The silicon-rich SiN(x) films were fabricated on Si(100) substrate and quartz substrate at different substrate temperatures varying from room temperature to 400 degrees C by bipolar pulse ane RF magnetron co-sputtering deposition technique. After deposition, the films were annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere by rapid photothermal annealing at 1050 degrees C for 3 minutes. This thermal step allows the formation of the silicon quantum dots. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to analyze the bonding configurations, microstructures and luminescence properties of the films. The experimental results showed that: silicon-rich Si-N bonds were found in Fourier transform infrared spectra, suggesting that the silicon-rich SiN, films were successfully prepared; when the substrate temperature was not lower than 200 degrees C, the Raman spectra of the films showed the transverse optical mode of Si-Si vibration, while the significant diffraction peaks of Si(111) and Si(311) were shown in grazing incidence X-ray diffraction spectra, confirming the formation of silicon quantum dots; our work indicated that there was an optimal substrate temperature (300 degrees C), which could significantly increase the amount and the crystalline volume fraction of silicon quantum dots; three visible photoluminescence bands can be obtained for both 30 degrees C sample and 400 degrees C sample, and in combination with Raman results, the emission peaks were reasonably explained by using the quantum confinement effect and radiative recombination defect state of Si nanocrystals; the average size of the silicon quantum dots is 3.5 and 3.4 nm for the 300 degrees C sample and 400 degrees C sample, respectively. These results are useful for optimizing the fabrication parameters of silicon quantum dots embedded in SiN. thin films and have valuable implications for silicon based photoelectric device

  12. Texture and microstructure in co-sputtered Mg-M-O (M = Mg, Al, Cr, Ti, Zr, and Y) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraiva, M.; Depla, D.

    2012-05-01

    Mg-M-O solid solution films (M = Mg, Al, Cr, Ti, Zr, and Y) with various M contents are grown employing reactive co-sputtering by varying the target-to-substrate distance. It is shown that all films are biaxially aligned. When the two cathodes are equipped with the same target material (Mg), the in-plane alignment is determined by the cathode closest to the substrate, i.e., by the largest material flux. In the case of nearly equal material fluxes from the two cathodes, double in-plane orientation is observed. This is also the case for the Mg-Al-O and Mg-Cr-O films, while the Mg-Ti-O, Mg-Zr-O and Mg-Y-O films exhibit single in-plane orientation. Pole figures indicate that the grains in Mg-M-O (M different than Mg) are titled; in the Mg-Al-O, Mg-Cr-O, and Mg-Ti-O films, the grains tilt towards the Al, Cr, and Ti metal flux, respectively, while the grain tilt of the Mg-Zr-O and Mg-Y-O films is found to be towards the Mg metal flux. Furthermore, SEM cross-sectional images of the Mg-M-O films reveal columnar microstructure with columns tilted to the same direction as the grains. A mechanism which is based on the cation radius change upon the incorporation of an M atom in the MgO lattice is proposed to explain the tilting.

  13. Structure of multilayered Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} nanocomposite coatings fabricated by differential pumping co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nose, Masateru; Onishi, Ichiro; Shiojiri, Makoto

    2013-11-11

    A Cr(Al)N/38 vol. % SiO{sub x} hard coating was prepared on a (001) Si substrate at 250 °C in a differential pumping co-sputtering system, which has two chambers for radio frequency (RF) sputtering and a substrate holder rotating on the chambers. The composite coating was grown by alternate sputter-depositions from CrAl and SiO{sub 2} targets with flows of N{sub 2}+Ar and Ar at RF powers of 200 and 75 W, respectively, on transition layers grown on the substrate. Analytical electron microscopy reveled that the Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} coating had a multilayered structure of Cr(Al)N crystal layers ∼1.6 nm thick and two-dimensionally dispersed amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}) particles with sizes of ∼1 nm or less. The a-SiO{sub x} particles were enclosed with the Cr(Al)N layers. The coating had a low indentation hardness of ∼25 GPa at room temperature, due to a high oxide fraction of 38 vol. % and a low substrate rotational speed of 1 rpm. Faster rotation and lower oxide fraction would make a-SiO{sub x} particles smaller, resulting in the formation of Cr(Al)N crystal including the very fine a-SiO{sub x} particles with small number density. They would work as obstacles for the lattice deformation of the Cr(Al)N crystals. We have fabricated a superhard coating of Cr(Al)N/17 vol. % SiO{sub x} with a hardness of 46 GPa prepared at 12 rpm.

  14. Optical and electrical properties of Ti(Cr)O2:N thin films deposited by magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollbek, K.; Szkudlarek, A.; Marzec, M. M.; Lyson-Sypien, B.; Cecot, M.; Bernasik, A.; Radecka, M.; Zakrzewska, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with TiO2-based thin films, doped with Cr and N, obtained by magnetron co-sputtering from titanium dioxide ceramic and chromium targets in Ar + N2 atmosphere. Co-doped samples of Ti(Cr)O2:N are investigated from the point of view of morphological, crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties. Characterization techniques such as: X-ray diffraction, XRD, scanning electron microscopy, SEM, atomic force microscopy, AFM, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, EDX, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, optical spectrophotometry as well as impedance spectroscopy are applied. XRD reveals TiO2 and TiO2:N thin films are well crystallized as opposed to those of TiO2:Cr and Ti(Cr)O2:N. XPS spectra confirm that co-doping has been successfully performed with the biggest contribution from the lower binding energy component of N 1s peak at 396 eV. SEM analysis indicates uniform and dense morphology without columnar growth. Comparison between the band gaps indicates a significant shift of the absorption edge towards visible range from 3.69 eV in the case of non-stoichiometric Ti(Cr)O2-x:N to 2.78 eV in the case of stoichiometric Ti(Cr)O2:N which should be attributed to the incorporation of both dopants at substitutional positions in TiO2 lattice. Electrical conductivity of stoichiometric Ti(Cr)O2:N increases in comparison to co-doped nonstoichiometric TiO2-x thin film and reaches almost the same value as that of TiO2 stoichiometric film.

  15. Structure of multilayered Cr(Al)N/SiOx nanocomposite coatings fabricated by differential pumping co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nose, Masateru; Onishi, Ichiro; Shiojiri, Makoto

    2013-11-01

    A Cr(Al)N/38 vol. % SiOx hard coating was prepared on a (001) Si substrate at 250 °C in a differential pumping co-sputtering system, which has two chambers for radio frequency (RF) sputtering and a substrate holder rotating on the chambers. The composite coating was grown by alternate sputter-depositions from CrAl and SiO2 targets with flows of N2+Ar and Ar at RF powers of 200 and 75 W, respectively, on transition layers grown on the substrate. Analytical electron microscopy reveled that the Cr(Al)N/SiOx coating had a multilayered structure of Cr(Al)N crystal layers ˜1.6 nm thick and two-dimensionally dispersed amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiOx) particles with sizes of ˜1 nm or less. The a-SiOx particles were enclosed with the Cr(Al)N layers. The coating had a low indentation hardness of ˜25 GPa at room temperature, due to a high oxide fraction of 38 vol. % and a low substrate rotational speed of 1 rpm. Faster rotation and lower oxide fraction would make a-SiOx particles smaller, resulting in the formation of Cr(Al)N crystal including the very fine a-SiOx particles with small number density. They would work as obstacles for the lattice deformation of the Cr(Al)N crystals. We have fabricated a superhard coating of Cr(Al)N/17 vol. % SiOx with a hardness of 46 GPa prepared at 12 rpm.

  16. Optical and structural properties of co-sputtered Cu-Si-O and Cu-Ge-O thin films (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lirong; Murphy, Neil R.; Jones, John G.; Grant, John T.

    2015-08-01

    The co-sputtered Cu-Si-O and Cu-Ge-O thin films were prepared using reactive DC, pulse DC and modulated pulse power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) on two separate Cu and Si or Cu and Ge targets simultaneously. The powers on each target and Oxygen/Argon flow ratio f(O2) were varied to have different stoichiometies determined by XPS. The film thickness, refractive index n and extinction coefficient k were extracted from in situ ellipsometry and the reactive plasma discharge was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy in real time during film growth. The grazing incident x-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the films deposited at low f(O2) have the nanocrystalline structure of cuprous Cu2O with diffraction peaks of (111) and (200). The films deposited at high f(O2) (>= 1) have cupric oxide CuO phase. The optical constant n and k, film density and band gap of the co-sputtered film were investigated and determined by in situ ellipsometry, X-ray reflectivity and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. Their structural, chemical and optical properties are able to be tuned by incorporating Cu2O, CuO and the mixtures of them into Silicon oxide or Germanium oxide matrix with varying target powers and oxygen/Argon ratio for applications in optical coatings and optical filters.

  17. Observations on Si-based micro-clusters embedded in TaN thin film deposited by co-sputtering with oxygen contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Mi; Jung, Min-Sang; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Jung, Min-Cherl

    2015-08-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with the synchrotron radiation we investigated Si-based micro-clusters embedded in TaSiN thin films having oxygen contamination. TaSiN thin films were deposited by co-sputtering on fixed or rotated substrates and with various power conditions of TaN and Si targets. Three types of embedded micro-clusters with the chemical states of pure Si, SiOx-capped Si, and SiO2-capped Si were observed and analyzed using SEM and Si 2p and Ta 4f core-level spectra were derived. Their different resistivities are presumably due to the different chemical states and densities of Si-based micro-clusters.

  18. Synthesis of bamboo-leaf-shaped ZnO nanostructures by oxidation of Zn/SiO 2 composite films deposited with radio frequency magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liwei; Li, Yuguo; Xue, Chengshan; Zhuang, Huizhao; He, Jianting; Tian, Dengheng

    2006-02-01

    Bamboo-leaf-shaped ZnO nanostructures were synthesized by oxidation of metal Zn/SiO 2 matrix composite thin films deposited on Si(1 1 1) substrates with radio frequency magnetron co-sputtering. The synthesized bamboo-leaf-shaped ZnO are single crystalline in nature with widths ranging from 30 to 60 nm and lengths of up to 5-10 μm, room temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the nanostructures shows a strong and sharp UV emission band at 372 nm and a weak and broad green emission band at about 520 nm which indicates relatively excellent crystallization and optical quality of the ZnO nanostructures synthesized by this novel method.

  19. Effect of hafnium doping on density of states in dual-target magnetron co-sputtering HfZnSnO thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan-Xin; Li, Jun Fu, Yi-Zhou; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Lin

    2015-11-23

    This study investigates the effect of hafnium doping on the density of states (DOSs) in HfZnSnO thin film transistors fabricated by dual-target magnetron co-sputtering system. The DOSs is extracted by temperature-dependent field-effect measurements, and they decrease from 1.1 × 10{sup 17} to 4.6 × 10{sup 16 }eV/cm{sup 3} with increasing the hafnium concentrations. The behavior of DOSs for the increasing hafnium concentration HfZnSnO thin film transistors can be confirmed by both the reduction of ΔV{sub T} under bias stress and the trapping charges calculated by capacitance voltage measurements. It suggests that the reduction in DOSs due to the hafnium doping is closely related with the bias stability and thermal stability.

  20. Observations on Si-based micro-clusters embedded in TaN thin film deposited by co-sputtering with oxygen contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Mi; Jung, Min-Sang; Choi, Duck-Kyun E-mail: mcjung@oist.jp; Jung, Min-Cherl E-mail: mcjung@oist.jp

    2015-08-15

    Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with the synchrotron radiation we investigated Si-based micro-clusters embedded in TaSiN thin films having oxygen contamination. TaSiN thin films were deposited by co-sputtering on fixed or rotated substrates and with various power conditions of TaN and Si targets. Three types of embedded micro-clusters with the chemical states of pure Si, SiO{sub x}-capped Si, and SiO{sub 2}-capped Si were observed and analyzed using SEM and Si 2p and Ta 4f core-level spectra were derived. Their different resistivities are presumably due to the different chemical states and densities of Si-based micro-clusters.

  1. Structural and optical properties of Zn-doped SnO2 films prepared by DC and RF magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo; Ren, Xiao-Guang; Gu, Guang-Rui; Lan, Lei-Lei; Wu, Bao-Jia

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the Zn-doped SnO2 (SnO2:Zn) thin films, with different Zn-doping concentration, were successfully prepared on Si (100) and glass substrates by direct current (DC) and radio frequency (RF) magnetron co-sputtering. The effects of dopant concentration, determined by the sputtering power applied on Zn target, on the structural, photoluminescent and optical performances of Zn-doped SnO2 films were investigated by X-ray diffraction(XRD), scanning electron microscope(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX),high-resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM) and Ultraviolet-Visible-Near IR spectroscopy. The results show all these films exhibited excellent crystalline quality with tetragonal rutile structure. Two photoluminescence (PL) peaks related to Zn-doping were detected at about 351 nm (3.53 eV) and 369 nm (3.36 eV). Moreover, the average transmittance and the band gap energy of the films continuously decreased from 85% to 75% and from 3.52 eV to 3.34 eV, respectively, with the increase of the doping level. The excellent properties of Zn-doped SnO2 films make them capable for wider applications.

  2. The n-type conduction of indium-doped Cu{sub 2}O thin films fabricated by direct current magnetron co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Xing-Min; Su, Xiao-Qiang; Ye, Fan Wang, Huan; Tian, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Fan, Ping; Luo, Jing-Ting; Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Liang, Guang-Xing; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-08-24

    Indium-doped Cu{sub 2}O thin films were fabricated on K9 glass substrates by direct current magnetron co-sputtering in an atmosphere of Ar and O{sub 2}. Metallic copper and indium disks were used as the targets. X-ray diffraction showed that the diffraction peaks could only be indexed to simple cubic Cu{sub 2}O, with no other phases detected. Indium atoms exist as In{sup 3+} in Cu{sub 2}O. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy showed that the transmittance of the samples was relatively high and that indium doping increased the optical band gaps. The Hall effect measurement showed that the samples were n-type semiconductors at room temperature. The Seebeck effect test showed that the films were n-type semiconductors near or over room temperature (<400 K), changing to p-type at relatively high temperatures. The conduction by the samples in the temperature range of the n-type was due to thermal band conduction and the donor energy level was estimated to be 620.2–713.8 meV below the conduction band. The theoretical calculation showed that indium doping can raise the Fermi energy level of Cu{sub 2}O and, therefore, lead to n-type conduction.

  3. Stress controlled pulsed direct current co-sputtered Al{sub 1−x}Sc{sub x}N as piezoelectric phase for micromechanical sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtner, Simon; Reimer, Tim; Chemnitz, Steffen; Wagner, Bernhard; Lofink, Fabian

    2015-11-01

    Scandium alloyed aluminum nitride (Al{sub 1−x}Sc{sub x}N) thin films were fabricated by reactive pulsed direct current co-sputtering of separate scandium and aluminum targets with x ≤ 0.37. A significant improvement of the clamped transversal piezoelectric response to strain e{sub 31,f} from −1.28 C/m{sup 2} to −3.01 C/m{sup 2} was recorded, while dielectric constant and loss angle remain low. Further, the built-in stress level of Al{sub 1−x}Sc{sub x}N was found to be tuneable by varying pressure, Ar/N{sub 2} ratio, and Sc content. The thus resulting enhancement of the expectable signal to noise ratio by a factor of 2.1 and the ability to control built-in stress make the integration of Al{sub 1−x}Sc{sub x}N as the piezoelectric phase of micro-electro-mechanical system sensor applications highly attractive.

  4. Co-Sputtered and Rapid-Thermal-Annealed CIAS Thin Films Using CuSe2/ln/Al Triple Targets of Varying Ln/Al Compositions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Hoon; Jun, Young-Kil; Lee, Woo-Sun

    2016-02-01

    The 20.9% conversion efficiency of I-III-VI chalcopyrite-based solar cells, the highest in the world, makes them promising candidates for high-efficiency thin film solar cells. However, Ga is one of the most expensive rare materials with the critical degradation in device efficiency. Cu(ln(1-X)Al(X))Se2 (CIAS) is considered an alternative to Cu(ln(1-X)Ga(X))Se2 because of its good structural suitability and the low cost of Al. CIAS thin films were formed using triple targets of CuSe2/ln/Al in a co-sputtering system to control the composition ratio, x = [Al]/([ln]+[Al), by varying each RF power for In/Al with rapid thermal annealing. The chalcopyrite peaks shifted toward higher 2theta as x increased. The CIAS thin films had 74.24-86.81% absorption with band gap, Eg, of 2.28-2.50 eV in the 400-1600 nm range. A low resistivity of 1.1 x 10(-2) omega(-cm) was obtained in the CIAS thin films with x of 0.74. PMID:27433625

  5. Effect of Sn Doping on the Properties of Nano-Structured ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Co-Sputtering Technique.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Rahman, K S; Haque, F; Khan, N A; Akhtaruzzaman, M; Alam, M M; Ruslan, H; Sopian, K; Amin, N

    2015-11-01

    In this study, tin doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Sn) nano-structured thin films were successfully deposited by co-sputtering of ZnO and Sn on top of glass substrate. The effect of Sn doping on the microstructure, phase, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the films were extensively investigated by means of XRD, EDX, SEM, AFM, Hall Effect measurement, and UV-Vis spectrometry. The results showed that the undoped ZnO film exhibited preferred orientation along the c-axis of the hexagonal wurtzite structure. With increase of Sn doping, the peak position of the (002) plane was shifted to the higher 20 values, and ultimately changed to amorphous structure. The absorption edge was shifted to blue region which confirmed the excitonic quantum confinement effect in the films. Consequently, improved surface morphology with optical bandgap, reduced average particle size, reduced resistivity, enhanced Hall mobility and carrier concentration were observed in the doped films after vacuum annealing. Among all of the as-deposited and annealed ZnO:Sn films investigated in this study, annealed film doped with 8 at.% of Sn concentration exhibited the best properties with a bandgap of 3.84 eV, RMS roughness of 2.51 nm, resistivity of 2.36 ohm-cm, and Hall mobility of 83 cm2 V(-1) s(-1). PMID:26726665

  6. Microstructural characteristics of tin oxide-based thin films on (0001) Al2O3 substrates: effects of substrate temperature and RF power during co-sputtering.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sooyeon; Lee, Ju Ho; Kim, Young Yi; Yun, Myeong Goo; Lee, Kwan-Hun; Lee, Jeong Yong; Cho, Hyung Koun

    2014-12-01

    While tin oxides such as SnO and SnO2 are widely used in various applications, surprisingly, only a limited number of reports have been presented on the microstructural characteristics of tin oxide thin films grown under various growth conditions. In this paper, the effects of the substrate temperature and content of foreign Zn ion on the microstructural characteristics of tin oxide thin films grown by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering were investigated. The increase in substrate temperature induced change in the stoichiometry of the thin films from SnO(1+x) to SnO(2-x). Additionally, the phase contrast in the transmission electron microscopy image revealed that SnO(1+x) and SnO(2-x) phases were alternating in thin films and the width of each phase became narrower at high substrate temperature. The ternary zinc tin oxide thin films were deposited using the co-sputtering method. As the ZnO target power increased, the crystallinity of the thin films became poly-crystalline, and then showed improved crystallinity again with two types of phases. PMID:25970980

  7. The n-type conduction of indium-doped Cu2O thin films fabricated by direct current magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xing-Min; Su, Xiao-Qiang; Ye, Fan; Wang, Huan; Tian, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Fan, Ping; Luo, Jing-Ting; Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Liang, Guang-Xing; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-08-01

    Indium-doped Cu2O thin films were fabricated on K9 glass substrates by direct current magnetron co-sputtering in an atmosphere of Ar and O2. Metallic copper and indium disks were used as the targets. X-ray diffraction showed that the diffraction peaks could only be indexed to simple cubic Cu2O, with no other phases detected. Indium atoms exist as In3+ in Cu2O. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy showed that the transmittance of the samples was relatively high and that indium doping increased the optical band gaps. The Hall effect measurement showed that the samples were n-type semiconductors at room temperature. The Seebeck effect test showed that the films were n-type semiconductors near or over room temperature (<400 K), changing to p-type at relatively high temperatures. The conduction by the samples in the temperature range of the n-type was due to thermal band conduction and the donor energy level was estimated to be 620.2-713.8 meV below the conduction band. The theoretical calculation showed that indium doping can raise the Fermi energy level of Cu2O and, therefore, lead to n-type conduction.

  8. Mechanical, tribological, and electrochemical behavior of Cr 1- xAl xN coatings deposited by r.f. reactive magnetron co-sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchéz, J. E.; Sanchéz, O. M.; Ipaz, L.; Aperador, W.; Caicedo, J. C.; Amaya, C.; Landaverde, M. A. Hernández; Beltran, F. Espinoza; Muñoz-Saldaña, J.; Zambrano, G.

    2010-02-01

    Chromium aluminum nitride (Cr 1- xAl xN) coatings were deposited onto AISI H13 steel and silicon substrates by r.f. reactive magnetron co-sputtering in (Ar/N 2) gas mixture from chromium and aluminum targets. Properties of deposited Cr 1- xAl xN coatings such as compositional, structural, morphological, electrochemical, mechanical and tribological, were investigated as functions of aluminum content. X-ray diffraction patterns of Cr 1- xAl xN coatings with different atomic concentrations of aluminum (0.51 < x < 0.69) showed the presence and evolution of (1 1 1), (2 0 0), and (1 0 2) crystallographic orientations associated to the Cr 1- xAl xN cubic and w-AlN phases, respectively. The rate of corrosion of the steel coated with Cr 1- xAl xN varied with the applied power; however, always being clearly lower when compared to the uncoated substrate. The behavior of the protective effect of the Cr 1- xAl xN coatings is based on the substitution of Cr for Al, when the power applied to the aluminum target increases. The mechanical properties were also sensitive to the power applied, leading to a maximum in hardness and a reduced elastic modulus of 30 and 303 GPa at 350 W and a monotonic decrease to 11 and 212 GPa at 450 W, respectively. Finally, the friction coefficient measured by pin-on disk revealed values between 0.45 and 0.70 in humid atmosphere.

  9. Secondary growth mechanism of SiGe islands deposited on a mixed-phase microcrystalline Si by ion beam co-sputtering.

    PubMed

    Ke, S Y; Yang, J; Qiu, F; Wang, Z Q; Wang, C; Yang, Y

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the SiGe island co-sputtering deposition on a microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si) buffer layer and the secondary island growth based on this pre-SiGe island layer. The growth phenomenon of SiGe islands on crystalline silicon (c-Si) is also investigated for comparison. The pre-SiGe layer grown on μc-Si exhibits a mixed-phase structure, including SiGe islands and amorphous SiGe (a-SiGe) alloy, while the layer deposited on c-Si shows a single-phase island structure. The preferential growth and Ostwald ripening growth are shown to be the secondary growth mechanism of SiGe islands on μc-Si and c-Si, respectively. This difference may result from the effect of amorphous phase Si (AP-Si) in μc-Si on the island growth. In addition, the Si-Ge intermixing behavior of the secondary-grown islands on μc-Si is interpreted by constructing the model of lateral atomic migration, while this behavior on c-Si is ascribed to traditional uphill atomic diffusion. It is found that the aspect ratios of the preferential-grown super islands are higher than those of the Ostwald-ripening ones. The lower lateral growth rate of super islands due to the lower surface energy of AP-Si on the μc-Si buffer layer for the non-wetting of Ge at 700 °C and the stronger Si-Ge intermixing effect at 730 °C may be responsible for this aspect ratio difference. PMID:26457572

  10. Secondary growth mechanism of SiGe islands deposited on a mixed-phase microcrystalline Si by ion beam co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, S. Y.; Yang, J.; Qiu, F.; Wang, Z. Q.; Wang, C.; Yang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the SiGe island co-sputtering deposition on a microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si) buffer layer and the secondary island growth based on this pre-SiGe island layer. The growth phenomenon of SiGe islands on crystalline silicon (c-Si) is also investigated for comparison. The pre-SiGe layer grown on μc-Si exhibits a mixed-phase structure, including SiGe islands and amorphous SiGe (a-SiGe) alloy, while the layer deposited on c-Si shows a single-phase island structure. The preferential growth and Ostwald ripening growth are shown to be the secondary growth mechanism of SiGe islands on μc-Si and c-Si, respectively. This difference may result from the effect of amorphous phase Si (AP-Si) in μc-Si on the island growth. In addition, the Si-Ge intermixing behavior of the secondary-grown islands on μc-Si is interpreted by constructing the model of lateral atomic migration, while this behavior on c-Si is ascribed to traditional uphill atomic diffusion. It is found that the aspect ratios of the preferential-grown super islands are higher than those of the Ostwald-ripening ones. The lower lateral growth rate of super islands due to the lower surface energy of AP-Si on the μc-Si buffer layer for the non-wetting of Ge at 700 °C and the stronger Si-Ge intermixing effect at 730 °C may be responsible for this aspect ratio difference.

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometry determination of the optical constants of titanium-doped WO{sub 3} films made by co-sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Rubio, E. J.; Gutierrez, A.; Ramana, C. V.

    2014-04-07

    Titanium (Ti) doped tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films were grown by co-sputter deposition of W and Ti metal targets. The sputtering powers to the W and Ti were kept constant at 100 W and 50 W, respectively, while varying the growth temperature (T{sub s}) in the range of 25–400 °C. The structural quality of Ti-doped WO{sub 3} films is dependent on T{sub s}. Ti-doped WO{sub 3} films grown at T{sub s} < 400 °C were amorphous. A temperature of 400 °C is critical to promote the structural order and formation of monoclinic, nanocrystalline films. The optical constants and their dispersion profiles determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry indicate that there is no significant inter-diffusion at the film-substrate interface for W-Ti oxide film growth of ∼40 nm. The index refraction (n) at λ = 550 nm varies in the range of 2.15–2.40 with a gradual increase in T{sub s}. Lorentz-Lorenz analysis (n{sub (λ)} = 550 nm) of the data indicates the gradual improvement in the packing density coupled with structural transformation accounts for the observed optical quality of the Ti-doped WO{sub 3} films as a function of T{sub s}. A correlation between the growth conditions and optical constants is discussed.

  12. TiO2 thin films with rutile phase prepared by DC magnetron co-sputtering at room temperature: Effect of Cu incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Yujie; Ba, Xin; Huang, Lin; Yu, Ying

    2015-08-01

    The thin films for pure TiO2 and that incorporated with Cu ion were deposited by DC magnetron co-sputtering with Ar gas. The crystal texture, surface morphology, energy gap and optical properties of the prepared films have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), UV-vis spectrophotometer, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that as-deposited TiO2 film mainly possesses anatase structure at room temperature with pure Ar gas, but the introduction of Cu can alter the phase structure of crystallite TiO2. XRD patterns and Raman spectra indicate that the Cu incorporation with high concentration (ACu/ATi + ACu ≈ 20%) favors the formation of rutile phase. Moreover, the Cu incorporation into TiO2 lattice induces band gap narrowing. Band structures and density of states have been analyzed based on density functional theory (DFT) and periodic models in order to investigate the influence of the Cu incorporation on the electronic structure of TiO2. Both experimental data and electronic structure calculations evidence the fact that the change in film structure from the anatase to the rutile phase can be ascribed to the possible incorporation of Cu1+ in the sites previously occupied by Ti4+, and the presence of Cu results in important effect on the electronic states, which is mainly related to the 3d Cu orbitals in the gap and in the vicinity of the valence band edges for TiO2.

  13. Morphology and structure evolution of Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} films deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering with electron cyclotron resonance plasma assistance

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Man Ellmer, Klaus

    2014-02-28

    Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} (CIGS) films were deposited on Mo coated soda lime glass substrates using an electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced one-step reactive magnetron co-sputtering process (ECR-RMS). The crystalline quality and the morphology of the Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescence. We also compared these CIGS films with films previously prepared without ECR assistance and find that the crystallinity of the CIGS films is correlated with the roughness evolution during deposition. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the surface topography and to derive one-dimensional power spectral densities (1DPSD). All 1DPSD spectra of CIGS films exhibit no characteristic peak which is typical for the scaling of a self-affine surface. The growth exponent β, characterizing the roughness R{sub q} evolution during the film growth as R{sub q} ∼ d{sup β}, changes with film thickness. The root-mean-square roughness at low temperatures increases only slightly with a growth exponent β = 0.013 in the initial growth stage, while R{sub q} increases with a much higher exponent β = 0.584 when the film thickness is larger than about 270 nm. Additionally, we found that the H{sub 2}S content of the sputtering atmosphere and the Cu- to-(In + Ga) ratio has a strong influence of the morphology of the CIGS films in this one-step ECR-RMS process.

  14. Characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films prepared by the sulfurization of co-sputtered metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abusnina, Mohamed; Matin, Mohammad; Moutinho, Helio; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we report on the synthesis and characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films prepared by annealing of co-sputtered metal precursors in sulfur atmosphere. Radio-frequency magnetron sputtering was applied to deposit the metal layers from single metal targets on Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrates. The chemical composition of the precursors was controlled by varying the sputtering working power, resulting in films with various compositions. X-ray fluorescence was used to determine the elemental concentration of these metal films. The metal precursors were then converted into CZTS in a tube furnace using different sulfurization conditions to investigate the effect of the annealing process on the properties of the final CZTS films. Film structural characterization and phase identification results were supported by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Surface and cross-sectional film morphology was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the sulfurized films, significant Sn loss was noticed. However, the loss of Sn was successfully controlled by depositing precursors with an excess of Sn. After optimizing the composition of the metal precursor, XRD and Raman scattering results revealed single-phase CZTS films without clear signs of secondary phases. SEM showed improved morphology in the form of dense structures and smooth surfaces for the films sulfurized at 600°C. Our first solar cell, based on a CZTS film originating from a precursor sulfurized at 550°C for 60 min, showed an open-circuit voltage of 471 mV, a short-circuit current density of 9.92 mA/cm-2, a fill factor of 36.9%, and an efficiency of 1.72%.

  15. Effect of Cr incorporation on the structural and optoelectronic properties of TiO 2:Cr deposited by means of a magnetron co-sputtering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjaji, A.; Gaidi, M.; Bessais, B.; Khakani, M. A. El

    2011-10-01

    In this work, we report on the effect of Cr incorporation on the microstructural and optical properties of TiO 2:Cr thin films deposited by the RF-magnetron sputtering method. The structural, morphological, chemical bonding and optoelectronic properties of the sputter-deposited TiO 2:Cr films were systematically investigated, as a function the incorporated Cr content, by means of various techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) absorption, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and ellipsometry. The Cr incorporation into the TiO 2 films was controlled by adjusting the RF power ( PCr) on the Cr target during the co-sputtering process of TiO 2 and Cr. We were thus able to demonstrate that by varying PCr from 8 W to 150 W, the Cr content of the TiO 2:Cr films can be fairly controlled from ˜2 at.% to ˜18 at.% and their associated bandgap engineered from 3.3 eV to 1.5 eV. The room-temperature deposited TiO 2:Cr are mainly amorphous with the presence of some TiO 2 nanocrystallites, and their density increases as their Cr content is increased. The Cr inclusions were found to coexist under both metallic and oxidized forms in the films. By subjecting the TiO 2:Cr films to post-annealing treatment (at 550 °C), their crystalline structure was found to be sensitive to their Cr content. Indeed, an anatase-to-rutile phase transformation has been pointed out to occur at a Cr content of ˜7 at.%. Likewise, the Cr-content dependence of the bandgap of annealed TiO 2:Cr films undergoes a transition around the 7 at.% of Cr. Our results demonstrate the ability to control the Cr-content of TiO 2:Cr films, which leads to tune their optoelectronic properties, such as bandgap or optical absorption edge.

  16. Global mapping of Al, Cu, Fe, and Zn in-use stocks and in-ground resources

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Jason N.

    2009-01-01

    Human activity has become a significant geomorphic force in modern times, resulting in unprecedented movements of material around Earth. An essential constituent of this material movement, the major industrial metals aluminium, copper, iron, and zinc in the human-built environment are mapped globally at 1-km nominal resolution for the year 2000 and compared with the locations of present-day in-ground resources. While the maps of in-ground resources generated essentially combine available databases, the mapping methodology of in-use stocks relies on the linear regression between gross domestic product and both in-use stock estimates and the Nighttime Lights of the World dataset. As the first global maps of in-use metal stocks, they reveal that a full 25% of the world's Fe, Al, Cu, and Zn in-use deposits are concentrated in three bands: (i) the Eastern seaboard from Washington, D.C. to Boston in the United States, (ii) England, Benelux into Germany and Northern Italy, and (iii) South Korea and Japan. This pattern is consistent across all metals investigated. In contrast, the global maps of primary metal resources reveal these deposits are more evenly distributed between the developed and developing worlds, with the distribution pattern differing depending on the metal. This analysis highlights the magnitude at which in-ground metal resources have been translocated to in-use stocks, largely from highly concentrated but globally dispersed in-ground deposits to more diffuse in-use stocks located primarily in developed urban regions. PMID:19858486

  17. Unusual photoelectric behaviors of Mo-doped TiO2 multilayer thin films prepared by RF magnetron co-sputtering: effect of barrier tunneling on internal charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, B. X.; Luo, S. Y.; Mao, X. G.; Shen, J.; Zhou, Q. F.

    2013-01-01

    Mo-doped TiO2 multilayer thin films were prepared by RF magnetron co-sputtering. Microstructures, crystallite parameters and the absorption band were investigated with atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Internal carrier transport characteristics and the photoelectric property of different layer-assemble modes were examined on an electrochemical workstation under visible light. The result indicates that the double-layer structure with an undoped surface layer demonstrated a red-shifted absorption edge and a much stronger photocurrent compared to the uniformly doped sample, signifying that the electric field implanted at the interface between particles in different layers accelerated internal charge transfer effectively. However, a heavily doped layer implanted at the bottom of the three-layer film merely brought about negative effects on the photoelectric property, mainly because of the Schottky junction existing above the substrate. Nevertheless, this obstacle was successfully eliminated by raising the Mo concentration to 1020 cm-3, where the thickness of the depletion layer fell into the order of angstroms and the tunneling coefficient manifested a dramatic increase. Under this circumstance, the Schottky junction disappeared and the strongest photocurrent was observed in the three-layer film.

  18. Electrical properties of Mg x Zn1- x O thin films deposited by using RF magnetron co-sputtering with ZnO and Mg0.3Zn0.7O targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Li Li; Yang, Yi Da; Kim, Hong Seung; Jang, Nak Won; Yun, Young

    2016-03-01

    We successfully deposited hexagonal wurtzite Mg x Zn1- x O (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.18) films on Si substrates by using RF magnetron co-sputtering with ZnO and Mg0.3Zn0.7O targets. The Mg content was varied by controlling the RF power of the Mg0.3Zn0.7O target while the RF power of the ZnO target was fixed at 100 W. The electrical properties of the Mg x Zn1- x O films were investigated by using a transmission line model (TLM) with Ti/Au electrode and Hall effect measurements. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate that some Zn atoms can be replaced by Mg atoms in the Mg x Zn1- x O films. As the Mg content was increased from 0 at.% to 18 at.%, the resistivity of Mg x Zn1- x O films increased and the carrier concentration decreased from 1.17 × 1019 cm-3 to 1.17 × 1017 cm-3, which indicates a decrease in the number of oxygen vacancies. Meanwhile, the Hall mobility increased to 15.3 cm2/Vs. The electrical properties of Mg x Zn1- x O films were tuned by using the Mg content.

  19. Epitaxial growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N alloy films on sapphire and silicon by reactive co-sputtering of GaAs and indium

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Shyam Major, S. S.; Srinivasa, R. S.

    2015-06-24

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N alloy films (0.2co-sputtering of GaAs and indium with 100% nitrogen at a substrate temperature of 600 °C. X-ray diffraction studies show the formation of completely c-axis oriented, single phase alloy films over the studied range of composition. The crystallite size along the growth direction and surface morphology of alloy films, particularly those with higher indium fraction exhibit substantial improvement on Si (100) substrate, compared to the c-cut sapphire substrate. The electrical resistivity decreases monotonously with increase in indium fraction and the alloy films on Si (100) show substantially higher mobility, compared to those on sapphire. These features are attributed to superior crystallinity of alloy films on Si (100), which possibly arise from the formation of interfacial hexagonal α-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, owing to the interaction of nitrogen plasma with Si surface.

  20. Variations of surface roughness for deposition of Co-sputtered-ZnO(002) by Auger electron spectroscopy and surface magneto-optic Faraday effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.-C.; Su, C.-W.; Chang, S.-C.; Lee, Y.-H.

    2011-02-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy and the surface magneto-optical Faraday effect were used to monitor the deposition of Co ultrathin films on an initially rough ZnO(002) crystal surface. The magnetic properties of the epitaxial films were compared with those associated with that the structure properties in a 3D island growth mode. The magneto-optic signals are very sensitive to the thickness of the Co film structure, even if it is rough. The ZnO(002) substrate surface formed by routine ion sputtering may exhibit short-range ordering in the initial sample preparation. The roughness of a sputtered substrate surface can be determined from the sensitive magneto-optical signals, especially when ultrathin films are deposited in the initial stage of growth.

  1. Effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of co-sputtered Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M.; Jin, C.; Bai, H. L.

    2014-11-07

    Motivated by the theoretical calculations that Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si can simultaneously exhibit a high spin polarization with a high Curie temperature to be applied in spintronic devices, and in order to further study the effect of Mn contents on the physical properties of Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si, we have investigated the effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si (0≤x≤1) films systematically. The Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si films were epitaxially grown on MgO(001) plane with 45° rotation. The magnetization for various x shows enhanced irreversibility, implying the antiferromagnetic ordering induced by the substitution of Mn. A metal-semiconductor crossover was observed due to the enhanced disorders of interactions and the local lowering of symmetry induced by the substitution of Mn. The single-domain state in the Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si films leads to twofold symmetric curves of the anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall resistivity.

  2. Preparation of CuSbS2 Thin Films by Co-Sputtering and Solar Cell Devices with Band Gap-Adjustable n-Type InGaN as a Substitute of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Dong-Hau; Tuan, Thi Tran Anh

    2016-01-01

    CuSbS2 films were fabricated by co-sputtering with the (Cu + Sb2S3) target at powers of 50 W, 55 W, and 60 W and a Cu target at 2 W under the deposition temperature of 300°C for 2 h, followed by annealing at 350-450°C for 1 h under a Sb2S3 compensation disc to avoid the sulfur deficiency. The (Cu + Sb2S3) cermet target with the composition of Cu:Sb2S3 = 2:1 was formed by hot pressing. The effects of processing conditions on the growth behavior, microstructural characteristics, and electrical properties of CuSbS2 films were investigated. X-ray diffractometry showed that the films prepared by the (Cu + Sb2S3) target at 50 W and 55 W were single phases. The peaks located at 28.4°, 28.7°, and 29.9° were contributed from the (111), (410), and (301) diffraction peaks, respectively. The film prepared with the (Cu + Sb2S3) target at 60 W was Cu rich and had a high electrical conductivity of 180 S cm-1. The 55 W-deposited film was Cu stoichiometric and had low electrical conductivity of 0.05 S cm-1. The 50 W-deposited film with electrical conductivity of 0.24 S cm-1 was good for use as a solar cell device. The solar cell devices made of the p-CuSbS2/ n-ZnO system had an efficiency of 0.16%, while it was 0.76% for the p-CuSbS2/ n-In0.3Ga0.7N system with the InGaN made by reactive sputtering at 200°C instead of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition above 750°C. This replacement with InGaN for a solar cell device has led to a 4.75-fold increase in efficiency.

  3. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  4. Itinerant and localized magnetic moments in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 2}CoGa thin films identified with x-ray magnetic linear dichroism: experiment and ab initio theory

    SciTech Connect

    Meinert, M.; Schmalhorst, J; Klewe, C.; Reiss, G.; Arenholz, E.; Bohnert, T.; Nielsch, K.

    2011-08-08

    Epitaxial thin films of the half-metallic X{sub a}-compound Mn{sub 2}CoGa (Hg{sub 2}CuTi prototype) were prepared by dc magnetron co-sputtering with different heat treatments on MgO (001) substrates. High-quality #12;lms with a bulk magnetization of 1.95(5) {mu}{sub #22;}B per unit cell were obtained. The average Mn magnetic moment and the Co moment are parallel, in agreement with theory. The x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra agree with calculations based on density functional theory and reveal the antiparallel alignment of the two inequivalent Mn moments. X-ray magnetic linear dichroism allows to distinguish between itinerant and localized Mn moments. It is shown that one of the two Mn moments has localized character, whereas the other Mn moment and the Co moment are itinerant.

  5. Comparison of ferromagnetism in n- and p-type magnetic semiconductor thin films of ZnCoO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lee, J. C.; Min, J. F.; Su, C. W.

    2011-07-01

    Both n- and p-type diluted magnetic semiconductor ZnCoO are made by magnetron co-sputtering with, respectively, dopants of Al and dual dopants of Al and N. The two sputtering targets are compound ZnCoO with 5% weight of Co and pure metal Al. Sputtering gases for n- and p-type films are pure Ar and N 2, respectively. These films are magnetic at room temperature and possess free electron- and hole-concentration of 5.34×10 20 and 5.27×10 13 cm -3. Only the n-type film exhibits anomalous Hall-effect signals. Magnetic properties of these two types of films are compared and discussed based on measurements of microstructure and magneto-transport properties.

  6. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  7. Experimental and first-principles study on the magnetic and transport properties of Ti-doped Fe3O4 epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C.; Mi, W. B.; Li, P.; Bai, H. L.

    2011-10-01

    Structure, magnetic, and transport properties of the epitaxial Fe3-xTixO4 films with x ≤ 0.09 fabricated by reactive co-sputtering were investigated systematically. The lattice constant expands from 0.8360 to 0.8376 nm with x increases from 0 to 0.09. The room-temperature saturation magnetization increases by 31.7%, and the negative magnetoresistance (at 100 K) increases from 3.7% to 6.9% as x increases from 0 to 0.09. The results indicate that Ti atoms might exist at the tetrahedral sites in the spinel structure. Theoretical calculations based on the density-functional theory suggest that the doped Ti on the tetrahedral sites indeed enhances the lattice constant and magnetic moment. Meanwhile, the calculated results also imply that the Ti-doped Fe3O4 has a high spin polarization near 100%.

  8. Electronic excitation of condensed CO: Sputtering and chemical change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrisey, D. B.; Brown, W. L.; Boring, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    We have bombarded condensed CO "ice" films with keV and MeV ions at low temperatures to investigate the physical sputtering mechanisms and chemical modifications of the ice. The sputtering yield measured for keV and MeV H + and He + ions indicates that the yield has a quadratic dependence on the electronic stopping power of the ions. Energy spectra of CO molecules sputtered by bombardment with 53 keV He + and 34 keV Ar + ions are very similar and show a collision-cascade-like behavior. We explore the origin of this quadratic dependence in terms of several models proposed for sputtering by electronic excitation and conclude that the quadratic dependence is intrinsic to the electronic relaxation process for CO. RBS measurements of the residue produced from sputtering various thicknesses of the initial CO film (˜ (3-25) × 10 17 CO/cm 2) indicate the production of the residue is approximately proportional to the initial thickness, accounts for ˜ 2% of the initial mass, and has a stoichiometric composition of approximately C 3O. The production and composition of the residue is discussed in terms of existing mechanisms for the radiolysis of gas phase CO.

  9. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vernieres, Jerome Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Bobo, Jean-François; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO{sub 3} phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  10. Magnetization enhancement due to incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content in (Co84Zr16)Nx nano-composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jitendra; Shukla, Rishabh; Bagri, Anita; Dhaka, Rajendra S.; Akhtar, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    We report the magnetic, electronic, and structural properties of nano-composite (Co84Zr16)Nx or CZN films prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition method. As-deposited CZN films have shown enhancement in magnetization (Ms) with incorporation of nitrogen content, which is related to the evolution of nano-composite phase. X-ray diffraction study has confirmed poly-crystalline growth of CZN films with fcc(331) and fcc(422) phases. High-resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Co nano-clusters, which are embedded in the nano-composite matrix. Photoemission measurements show the change in the intensity near the Fermi level most likely due to defects and shift in the core-levels binding energy with nitrogen concentration. Raman spectroscopy data show an increase in the intensity of the Raman lines with nitrogen concentration upto 20%. However, the intensity is significantly lower for 30% sample. This indicates that less nitrogen or defect states are being substituted into the lattice above 20% and is consistent with the observed magnetic behavior. Our studies indicate that defects induced due to the incorporation of non-magnetic nitrogen content play a key role to enhance the magnetization.

  11. Stoichiometry dependent phase transition in Mn-Co-Ga-based thin films: From cubic in-plane, soft magnetized to tetragonal perpendicular, hard magnetized

    SciTech Connect

    Ouardi, Siham; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Stinshoff, Rolf; Felser, Claudia; Kubota, Takahide; Mizukami, Shigemi; Miyazaki, Terunobu; Ikenaga, Eiji

    2012-12-10

    Epitaxial thin films of Mn{sub 3-x}Co{sub x}Ga were grown on MgO by magnetron co-sputtering with different Co content. Dependent on the Co content tetragonal or cubic structures are obtained. The composition dependence of saturation magnetization M{sub S} and uniaxial magnetic anisotropy K{sub u} in the epitaxial films were investigated. A high magnetic anisotropy K{sub u} of 1.2 MJ m{sup -3} was achieved for the Mn{sub 2.6}Co{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 1.1} film with low magnetic moment of 0.84 {mu}{sub B}. The valence band spectra of the films were investigated mainly by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The evidence of sharp states in the cubic case, which are smeared out in the tetragonal case, proof the existence of a van Hove singularity that causes a band Jahn-Teller effect accompanied by a tetragonal distortion. These differences are in well agreement to the ab-initio calculations of the electronic structure.

  12. Interactions controlled evolution of complex magnetoresistance in as-deposited Ag100-xCox nanogranular films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K.

    2015-11-01

    Evolution of a complex magnetoresistance and dc-magnetization behavior of as-deposited co-sputtered Ag100-xCox films with the variation of cobalt concentration 'x' from 25.2 to 45.1 at% is presented. At 20 K, a transition from normal to complex magnetoresistance behavior, in conjunction with magnetic force microscopy evidence of the existence of a magnetic microstructure resulting in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is observed for x=32.6 cobalt concentration film. The dc-magnetization studies provide additional support to the presence of PMA in film that gets reduced with the increase of cobalt concentration. The complex magnetoresistance (MR) behavior also decreases with the increase of 'x'. The room temperature MR, coercivity behavior and remanence to saturation magnetization ratio indicate the presence of direct ferromagnetic interactions due to the presence of ferromagnetic particles for x≥32.6 films. The observed complex MR behavior and presence of PMA are interpreted in terms of manifestation of the transition of interparticle magnetic interaction nature from dipolar to direct ferromagnetic.

  13. Composition Mapping of Co-Pt-Ti-O Perpendicular Magnetic Recording Media by Simultaneous EDS and EELS Spectrum Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Risner, Juliet D.; Sinclair, Prof. Robert

    2007-01-01

    For nearly a decade core-loss elemental mapping by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) with {approx}1 nm resolution has contributed greatly to the understanding of Co(Cr)-based thin-film longitudinal magnetic recording media for computer hard disks. Intergranular layers of non-ferromagnetic Cr-enriched material a few nanometers thick are critical for optimum performance since they decouple the magnetic exchange between grains allowing the magnetization within individual grains to be switched independently, as required for high-density recording of data. Modern perpendicular thin-film recording media, which allow higher recording densities than traditional longitudinal media, have a similar columnar grain structure with nonferromagnetic material separating and decoupling the grains. The present work involves plan-view TEM characterization of back-thinned Co-Pt media (Co/Pt{approx}4) with 6 levels of co-sputtered TiO{sub 2} from 0 to 43 vol%. The layer structure of the media was: polished Al substrate/6 nm seed layers/50 nm soft magnetic underlayer/14 nm Ru underlayer/12 nm Co-Pt-TiO{sub 2}/1 nm C overcoat.

  14. Magnetic and microstructural properties of sputter-deposited amorphous cobalt-samarium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yukiko

    The correlation between, the magnetic and the structural properties of co-sputtered Co1-xSmx thin films at ambient temperature is investigated. The large in-plane magnetic anisotropy and coercivity in amorphous Co1-xSmx thin films are due to structural anisotropy induced by the internal stress developed during the non-equilibrium film growth. The cusp shaped underlayer micro-roughness is found to control the coercivity by providing domain wall pinning sites at the underlayer/Co1-xSmx interface. The importance of controlling the microstructural properties of magnetic thin films has been recognized in order to obtain ultra-high density recording. In particular, small, magnetically-decoupled grain structures are required to reduce the medium noise. The grain size must be continuously reduced to achieve higher storage densities. Of prime concern is the fact that as the size of magnetic switching unit becomes too close to the superparamagnetic limit, the magnetic orientation in the medium easily randomizes even at ambient temperature. In order to push the magnetic switching unit size beyond the superparamagnetic, particle size of conventional Co-based alloys, new material system with high uniaxial anisotropy energy and high saturation magnetization are required for future ultra-high longitudinal recording density media. The intermetallic compounds Co5Sm and Co17Sm2 are known to exhibit magnetic anisotropies exceeding 20--100 times that observed in CoCrX-type conventional alloys. However, the formation of intermetallic phases requires high temperatures near 1300 K for processing which is not compatible with the fabrication of magnetic thin films for information storage. Therefore, a central part of this work was to ascertain whether similar properties to the intermetallic phases could be achieved in sputtered CoSm thin films. Co1-xSmx thin films were grown onto AlMg, Glass disk, and (100) Si substrates by co-sputtering from elemental targets at ambient temperature. This

  15. Characterization of Fe-doped In-Sb-Te (Fe: 10 at.%) material with individual electrical-phase-change and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Mi; Dung, Dang Duc; Cho, Sunglae; Jung, Min Sang; Choi, Duck Kyun; Ahn, Docheon; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Jae-Young; Jung, Min-Cherl

    2011-06-01

    We propose a new electrical-phase-change magnetic material, namely Fe-doped In-Sb-Te (FIST), for possible non-volatile multi-bit memory applications. FIST was formed by typical co-sputter method with Fe 10 at.% doping in In3Sb1Te2. FIST offers the electrical-phase-change and magnetic properties by way of the change of In 4d chemical bonding density and embedded Fe nanoclusters with the size of 4˜5 nm, respectively. It maintained the amorphous phase on the electrical-phase-change. Chemical state of In was only changed to increase the density of In-In chemical bonding during the electrical-phase-change without Fe nanoclusters contribution. Also, the magnetic property by Fe nanoclusters was not changed by the electrical-phase-change. On this basis, we propose the FIST material with the individual electrical-phase-change and magnetic properties for the multi-bit nonvolatile memory materials.

  16. Phase ordering and its effect on magnetic and structural properties of FeRh ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Q. J.; Qiu, J. J.; Luo, P.; Ying, J. F.; Han, G. C.; Laughlin, D. E.; Zhu, J.-G.; Kanbe, T.; Shige, T.

    2014-07-01

    Applications using FeRh for controllable exchange coupling of two magnetic layers with in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropies require ultrathin (˜10 nm) films with pure antiferromagnetic (AF) FeRh α″ phase at room temperature (RT). However, it is also well known that the antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic (AF-FM) transition of FeRh is sensitive to composition and deteriorates at low thicknesses. Hence, in this work, we study the composition-dependent phase ordering of co-sputtered FeRh thin films at ultrathin thicknesses of ˜10 nm. As the ultrathin films get richer in Rh, the appearance of α″ phase is typically characterized magnetically by a sudden drop in RT moment, and structurally by a slight decrease in degree of B2 chemical ordering with a sharp decrease in c-axis lattice constant. These observations are consistent with the FeRh phase diagram where FeRh abruptly enters the AF α″ phase once it becomes slightly disordered. Dependences of magnetic transition parameters on composition were also described. Moreover, higher sputtering powers possibly allow the formation of purer α″ phase with less γ-face centered cubic phase impurities. Consequently, a composition optimized 10 nm film shows a relatively low residual moment (13.5 emu/cc), thus suggesting good AF phase formation. In addition, correlation of the magnetic transition parameters with the crystal structural parameters reveal that the maximum rate of AF-FM transition (Rmax,h) and the corresponding total change in magnetization (ΔMh) interestingly shows linear dependence on the c-axis lattice constant, but would depart from this linearity under certain conditions, i.e., when grain sizes were large, crystallinity was improved and Fe content was high.

  17. NMR and NQR study of the thermodynamically stable quasicrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shastri, A.

    1995-02-10

    {sup 27}Al and {sup 61,65}Cu NMR measurements are reported for powder samples of stable AlCuFe and AlCuRu icosahedral quasicrystals and their crystalline approximants, and for a AlPdMn single grain quasicrystal. Furthermore, {sup 27}Al NQR spectra at 4.2 K have been observed in the AlCuFe and AlCuRu samples. From the quadrupole perturbed NMR spectra at different magnetic fields, and from the zero field NQR spectra, a wide distribution of local electric field gradient (EFG) tensor components and principal axis system orientations was found at the Al site. A model EFG calculation based on a 1/1 AlCuFe approximant was successful in explaining the observed NQR spectra. It is concluded that the average local gradient is largely determined by the p-electron wave function at the Al site, while the width of the distribution is due to the lattice contribution to the EFG. Comparison of {sup 63}Cu NMR with {sup 27}Al NMR shows that the EFG distribution at the two sites is similar, but that the electronic contribution to the EFG is considerably smaller at the Cu site, in agreement with a more s-type wave function of the conduction electrons.

  18. Effect of B content on structure and magnetic properties of FeCoB-Al2O3 nanogranular films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu; Zhang, Xudong; Li, Jiangong; Tian, Qiang; Kou, Xinli

    2011-07-01

    The effect of B content on the structure, soft magnetic properties, and high frequency characteristics of as-deposited FeCoB-Al2O3 nanogranular films fabricated by radio frequency magnetron co-sputtering was studied in this work. The introduction of B into the FeCo-Al2O3 films leads to a refinement of granular microstructure. The FeCoB-Al2O3 nanogranular films consist of the FeCoB nanoparticles uniformly embedded in the amorphous Al2O3 matrix. An addition of a small amount of B into the FeCo-Al2O3 films can markedly decrease the coercivity of the films. The excellent magnetic softness with a low coercivity of about 0.08 kA/m was achieved in the FeCoB-Al2O3 films. The Henkel plots confirm the existence of intergranular exchange coupling in the FeCoB-Al2O3 films. The FeCoB-Al2O3 films with low B content exhibit a high permeability over 200 at low frequency and a high-resonance frequency of 3.2 GHz, implying a high cut-off frequency for high frequency applications.

  19. Aligned and exchange-coupled L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt-based magnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; George, T. A.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2012-04-01

    Films of aligned L1{sub 0}-structure (Fe,Co)Pt with fcc Fe(Co,Pt) are synthesized by co-sputtering Fe, Co, and Pt on an (001) MgO substrate with in situ heating at 830 deg. C. The nanostructures and magnetic properties of the films are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The compositions of the samples (Fe,Co){sub x}Pt{sub 1-x} are designed to maintain an atomic Fe: Co ratio of 65: 35 while increasing the Fe,Co content in each successive sample. In samples with low Fe and Co concentration, the XRD patterns exhibit three strong peaks, namely L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt (001), L1{sub 0} (Fe,Co)Pt (002), and MgO (002). A fourth peak is observed in samples with high Fe and Co concentration and identified as fcc (002). The XRD patterns confirm the formation of L1{sub 0}-ordered (Fe,Co)Pt and its epitaxial growth on MgO. TEM shows that the (Fe,Co)Pt films form isolated magnetic grains of about 100 nm in diameter. Hysteresis-loop measurements show that the increase of the Fe,Co concentration from 57.3 to 68.3 at % enhances the saturation magnetization M{sub s} from 1245 emu/cm{sup 3} to 1416 emu/cm{sup 3}, and the coercivity decreases from 32 kOe to 8.9 kOe. The nominal maximum energy product per grain is 64 MGOe.

  20. Magnetic Properties of FeNi-Based Thin Film Materials with Different Additives.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cai; Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Wang, Qing Xiao; Liu, Yang; Gianchandani, Yogesh; Kosel, Jurgen

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a study of FeNi-based thin film materials deposited with Mo, Al and B using a co-sputtering process. The existence of soft magnetic properties in combination with strong magneto-mechanical coupling makes these materials attractive for sensor applications. Our findings show that FeNi deposited with Mo or Al yields magnetically soft materials and that depositing with B further increases the softness. The out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of FeNi thin films is reduced by depositing with Al and completely removed by depositing with B. The effect of depositing with Mo is dependent on the Mo concentration. The coercivity of FeNiMo and FeNiAl is reduced to less than a half of that of FeNi, and a value as low as 40 A/m is obtained for FeNiB. The surfaces of the obtained FeNiMo, FeNiAl and FeNiB thin films reveal very different morphologies. The surface of FeNiMo shows nano-cracks, while the FeNiAl films show large clusters and fewer nano-cracks. When FeNi is deposited with B, a very smooth morphology is obtained. The crystal structure of FeNiMo strongly depends on the depositant concentration and changes into an amorphous structure at a higher Mo level. FeNiAl thin films remain polycrystalline, even at a very high concentration of Al, and FeNiB films are amorphous, even at a very low concentration of B. PMID:25587418

  1. Direct laser interference patterning of magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktag, Aliekber

    Recently, patterned magnetic thin films have attracted much attention for a variety of applications such as high density magnetic recording, magnetoresistive sensing, and magnetic random access memories. In the case of magnetic recording, one scheme calls for the films to be patterned into single domain "dots", where every dot represents a thermally stable bit. In this thesis, we extended a technique called direct laser interference patterning (DLIP), originally developed by Polushkin and co-workers, to pattern and locally modify the materials properties of magnetic thin films. In this technique, a high-intensity Nd:YAG pulse laser beam was split into two, three, or four beams, which are then recombined to interfere on a sample surface. The interference intensity maxima can modify the local materials properties of the film through local "annealing" or, more drastically, by ablation. We carried out some preliminary investigations of the DLIP process in several films including co-sputtered Co-C, amorphous Dy/Co:SiO2 multilayers, and Co/SiO2 multilayers in order to refine our techniques. We successfully produced regular arrays of lines, dots, or antidots formed by ablation of the thin film. The preliminary studies also showed that, in the regime of more modest pulse energies, it is possible to modify the magnetic properties of the films without noticeably changing the film topography. We then prepared perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Co/Pt multilayers with a SiO x passivation layer and applied DLIP at fairly modest intensities to pattern the film. We then studied the structural and magnetic changes that occurred in some detail. X-ray diffraction scans showed the Co/Pt:SiO x multilayer films to be nanocrystalline before and after patterning. Atomic force microscopy images showed no evidence for topographic changes of the Co/Pt:SiOx during patterning. In contrast, magnetic force microscopy showed regular periodic dot arrays, indicating that the local magnetic

  2. Specialty magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-07-01

    A number of basic conceptual designs are explained for magnet systems that use permanent magnet materials. Included are iron free multipoles and hybrid magnets. Also appended is a discussion of the manufacturing process and magnetic properties of some permanent magnet materials. (LEW)

  3. Neodymium Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wida, Sam

    1992-01-01

    Uses extremely strong neodymium magnets to demonstrate several principles of physics including electromagnetic induction, Lenz's Law, domain theory, demagnetization, the Curie point, and magnetic flux lines. (MDH)

  4. Mechanical property improvement by texture control of magnetron co-sputtered Zr-Ti films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weipeng; Zhan, Peng; Xie, Zheng; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2014-01-01

    The present work studies the effect of substrate temperature and film composition on the structural and mechanical properties evolution of magnetron sputtered Zr-Ti films. As-deposited films show a monotonically strengthening (0002) crystallographic texture ranging from ambient temperature to 523 K, while then reveal a (0002) texture to randomly orientated structure transition at higher temperature. High Resolution TEM observations reveal a competitive and reconstruction growth mechanism which is in good agreement with the well-known Structure Zone Model. Nano-indentation measurements revealed that texture strengthening contribute to the improvement of mechanical properties. These results suggest that by establishing a semi-quantitative phase diagram based on the Structure Zone Model, structure and structure-related properties modification can be easily realized and precisely controlled by modifying the TS/Tm region during deposition.

  5. Co-sputtered metal and polymer nanocomposite films and their electrical responses for gas sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rujisamphan, Nopporn; Murray, Roy E.; Deng, Fei; Supasai, Thidarat

    2016-04-01

    Titanium and polytetrafluoroethylene (Ti-PTFE) nanocomposite thin films were successfully fabricated on glass substrates using a combination of dc and rf magnetron sputtering. When the Ti-PTFE composites were prepared at below the percolation threshold i.e. 27% metal volume filling (F), Ti clusters with the average sizes of 7 ± 2 nm were found. As the Ti content was increased above the percolation threshold (F = 62%), the connecting regions of Ti were formed within the polymer matrix and the electrical property changed rapidly from insulator-like to metal-like properties. The Ti-PTFE composites prepared near the percolation threshold showed the electrical response to different volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The sensitivity significantly depended upon the VOCs concentrations. These composites devices showed the presence of distinct chemical bonds of Csbnd C, Csbnd CF, Csbnd F and CF2 and TiF in TiO2 on the surface as investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) while the surface morphology, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) presented the root mean square (RMS) surface roughness of 13.3 nm. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the device revealed Ti clusters dispersed in PTFE matrix with particle sizes varied between 10 nm and 30 nm.

  6. Highly accurate coating composition control during co-sputtering, based on controlling plasma chromaticity

    SciTech Connect

    Anguita, J.V.; Thwaites, M.; Holton, B.; Hockley, P.; Holton, B.; Rand, S.

    2005-03-01

    Highly accurate control of sputtering processes is of paramount importance to industry. Plasma diagnostic equipment based on spectroscopic methods such as optical emission spectroscopy (OES) have been commercially available for many years and have the ability to deliver a high level of accuracy. Despite this, their complexity, demand for operator time, and disregard for the vast majority of the optical emission spectrum have rendered them as unpopular, and they are rarely used in manufacturing lines. This article introduces the measurement of the chromaticity of the plasma as a new method of analysis, as an alternative to OES. This method is simple, while maintaining a high level of sensitivity. Chromaticity monitors a wide range of the optical emission spectrum, obtaining a large amount of process information. It also averages and simplifies the data, making them easier to analyze.

  7. Co-sputtering yttrium into hafnium oxide thin films to produce ferroelectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, T.; Schroeder, U.; Mueller, S.; Krause, A.; Martin, D.; Singh, A.; Mueller, J.; Geidel, M.; Mikolajick, T.

    2012-08-20

    Thin film capacitors were fabricated by sputtering TiN-Y doped HfO{sub 2}-TiN stacks on silicon substrates. Yttrium was incorporated into the HfO{sub 2} layers by simultaneously sputtering from Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} sources. Electric polarization and relative permittivity measurements yield distinct ferroelectric properties as a result of low yttrium dopant concentrations in the range of 0.9-1.9 mol. %. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements show the formation of an orthorhombic phase in this range. Compared to atomic layer deposition films, the highest remanent polarization and the highest relative permittivity were obtained at significantly lower doping concentrations in these sputtered films.

  8. Magnetic Levitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hull, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the principles of magnetic levitation presented in the physics classroom and applied to transportation systems. Topics discussed include three classroom demonstrations to illustrate magnetic levitation, the concept of eddy currents, lift and drag forces on a moving magnet, magnetic levitation vehicles, levitation with permanent magnets…

  9. Magnetic Spinner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays…

  10. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1981-01-01

    A synoptic view of early and recent data on the planetary magnetism of Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn is presented. The data on Mercury from Mariner 10 are synthesized with various other sources, while data for Venus obtained from 120 orbits of Pioneer Venus give the upper limit of the magnetic dipole. Explorer 35 Lunar Orbiter data provided the first evidence of lunar magnetization, but it was the Apollo subsatellite data that measured accurately the magnetic dipole of the moon. A complete magnetic survey of Mars is still needed, and only some preliminary data are given on the magnetic dipole of the planet. Figures on the magnetic dipoles of Jupiter and Saturn are also suggested. It is concluded that if the magnetic field data are to be used to infer the interior properties of the planets, good measures of the multiple harmonics in the field are needed, which may be obtained only through low altitude polar orbits.

  11. Magnetizing of permanent magnets using HTS bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Muraya, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Nobutaka; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao; Terasawa, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned just above the magnetic pole which contains the HTS bulk magnet generating a magnetic field of 3.27 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. We examined the magnetic field distributions when the magnetic poles were scanned twice to activate the magnet plate inversely with various overlap distances between the tracks of the bulk magnet. The magnetic field of the "rewritten" magnet reached the values of the magnetically saturated region of the material, showing steep gradients at the border of each magnetic pole. As a replacement for conventional pulse field magnetizing methods, this technique is proposed to expand the degree of freedom in the design of electromagnetic devices, and is proposed as a novel practical method for magnetizing rare-earth magnets, which have excellent magnetic performance and require intense fields of more than 3 T to be activated.

  12. Magnetic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K

    2010-06-23

    Characteristic results of magnetism in small particles, thin films and tunnel junctions are presented. As a consequence of the reduced atomic coordination in small clusters and thin films the electronic states and density of states are modified. Thus, magnetic moments and magnetization are affected. Generally, in clusters and thin films magnetic anisotropy plays a special role. In tunnel junctions the interplay of magnetism, spin currents and superconductivity are of particular interest. In ring-like mesoscopic systems Aharonov-Bohm-induced currents are studied. Results are given for single transition metal clusters, cluster ensembles, thin films, mesoscopic structures and tunnel systems. PMID:21393778

  13. Magnetic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Baldwin, M.J.

    1983-12-31

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Planetary Magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  15. Magnetic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Silke; Appel, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanocomposites are multi-component materials, typically containing nanosized magnetic materials to trigger the response to an external stimulus (i.e., an external static or alternating magnetic field). Up to now, the search for novel nanocomposites has lead to the combination of a plethora of different materials (e.g., gels, liquid crystals, renewable polymers, silica, carbon or metal organic frameworks) with various types of magnetic particles, offering exciting perspectives not only for fundamental investigations but also for application in various fields, including medical therapy and diagnosis, separations, actuation, or catalysis. In this review, we have selected a few of the most recent examples to highlight general concepts and advances in the preparation of magnetic nanocomposites and recent advances in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:26938504

  16. Magnetic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford-Long, A. K.

    Spin-transport effects, such as giant magnetoresistance, rely on the fact that there is a difference in scattering between the spin-up and spin-down electrons in a ferromagnetic material. The degree to which each electron channel is scattered depends on the magnetisation direction within the material, and thus on the local magnetic domain structure. It is therefore of importance when analysing spin-transport devices to understand their magnetic domain structure, both as a bulk property and locally. The aim of this chapter is to review a number of the techniques currently used to image magnetic domain structure in materials. Although a considerable amount of information about the magnetic properties and behaviour of a piece of material, for example a thin ferromagnetic film, can be obtained from bulk magnetometry measurements, it is often extremely useful to image the magnetic domain structure of the film and thus gain information about its magnetic properties at a local level. The various magnetic imaging techniques yet to be described can be extended, by the application of in-situ magnetic fields which allow not only the magnetic domains but also the magnetisation reversal process to be followed in real-time.

  17. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  18. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  19. Planetary magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io.

  20. Tunnel magnetoresistance effect in magnetic tunnel junctions using Fermi-level-tuned epitaxial Fe2Cr1-xCoxSi Heusler alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Pu; Han, Gu-Chang; Lu, Hui; Qiu, Jinjun; Yap, Qi-Jia; Teo, Kie-Leong

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports a systematic investigation on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe2Cr1-xCoxSi Heusler alloys with various compositions of x by co-sputtering Fe2CrSi and Fe2CoSi targets and their applications in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Fe2Cr1-xCoxSi films of high crystalline quality have been epitaxially grown on MgO substrate using Cr as a buffer layer. The L21 phase can be obtained at x = 0.3 and 0.5, while B2 phase for the rest compositions. A tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 19.3% at room temperature is achieved for MTJs using Fe2Cr0.3Co0.7Si as the bottom electrode with 350 °C post-annealing. This suggests that the Fermi level in Fe2Cr1-xCoxSi has been successfully tuned close to the center of band gap of minority spin with x = 0.7 and therefore better thermal stability and higher spin polarization are achieved in Fe2Cr0.3Co0.7Si. The post-annealing effect for MTJs is also studied in details. The removal of the oxidized Fe2Cr0.3Co0.7Si at the interface with MgO barrier is found to be the key to improve the TMR ratio. When the thickness of the inserted Mg layer increases from 0.3 to 0.4 nm, the TMR ratio is greatly enhanced from 19.3% to 28%.

  1. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  2. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  3. Magnet Healing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2000-03-01

    Many people are convinced that static magnets—applied to their skin—will heal ills, and many businesses sell such magnets. The biophysics of such healing was reviewed [1] together with the general biophysics of static fields. Birds and insects do use the earth’s magnetic field for navigation. While insect and frog egg development can clearly be influenced by high fields (7 T and 17 T respectively), there is no experimental evidence that small magnetic fields (of less than 0.5 T) might heal, and much evidence that they cannot heal. A puzzle to the physics community is: How to show laypersons that simple magnets (very probably) do not heal, however attractive that idea might be. [1] L. Finegold, The Physics of "Alternative Medicine": Magnet Therapy, The Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine 3:26-33 (1999).

  4. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  5. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  6. Magnetic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinson, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic disk recording was invented in 1953 and has undergone intensive development ever since. As a result of this 38 years of development, the cost per byte and the areal density has halved and doubled, respectively every 2 to 2 1/2 years. Today, the cost per byte is lower than 10(exp -6) dollars per byte and area densities exceed 100 x 10(exp 6) bits per square inch. The recent achievements in magnetic disk recording will first be surveyed briefly. Then the principal areas of current technical development will be outlined. Finally, some comments will be made about the future of magnetic disk recording.

  7. Lunar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.; Srnka, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of lunar paleomagnetic and electromagnetic sounding results which appear inconsistent with the hypothesis that an ancient core dynamo was the dominant source of the observed crustal magnetism are discussed. Evidence is summarized involving a correlation between observed magnetic anomalies and ejecta blankets from impact events which indicates the possible importance of local mechanisms involving meteoroid impact processes in generating strong magnetic fields at the lunar surface. A reply is given to the latter argument which also presents recent evidence of a lunar iron core.

  8. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Preskill, J

    1984-01-01

    This article offers a review of the physics of the magnetic monopole, which, although as yet unseen, offers sound theoretical reasons to believe that it must exist. Several theories are presented and equations are given. The idea that magnetic monopoles, stable particles carrying magnetic charges, ought to exist has, according to the authors, proved to be very durable. One theory presented demonstrates the consistency of magnetic monopoles with quantum electrodynamics. Another theory demonstrates the necessity of monopoles in grand unified gauge theories. The authors believe it is reasonable to expect the monopole to be an extremely heavy stable elementary particle. The stability of the classical monopole solution given is ensured by a topological principle explained.

  9. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references.

  10. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  11. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  12. CRYOGENIC MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Taylor, C.E.

    1963-05-21

    A cryogenic magnet coil is described for generating magnetic fields of the order of 100,000 gauss with a minimum expenditure of energy lost in resistive heating of the coil inductors and energy lost irreversibly in running the coil refrigeration plant. The cryogenic coil comprises a coil conductor for generating a magnetic field upon energization with electrical current, and refrigeration means disposed in heat conductive relation to the coil conductor for cooling to a low temperature. A substantial reduction in the power requirements for generating these magnetic fields is attained by scaling the field generating coil to large size and particular dimensions for a particular conductor, and operating the coil at a particular optimum temperature commensurate with minimum overall power requirements. (AEC)

  13. Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Video Gallery

    This science visualization shows a magnetospheric substorm, during which, magnetic reconnection causes energy to be rapidly released along the field lines in the magnetotail, that part of the magne...

  14. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  15. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  16. Magnetic direction.

    PubMed

    Duchene, Pam; Muhm, John B

    2005-01-01

    In April 2005, the American Nurses Association (ANA) awarded St. Joseph Hospital, Nashua, NH, its highest honor for excellence in nursing: "Magnet Recognition." The Magnet Recognition Program was developed by the ANA's American Nurses Credentialing Center in the early 1980s to recognize health care organizations that provide the best in nursing care and uphold the tradition of excellence in professional nursing practice. St. Joseph began pursuing Magnet status more than three years ago, starting with a number of enhancements to nursing practices. The hospital worked hard to improve nurse-to-patient staffing and included many of its nurses on the nursing quality council, division advisory, and cultural diversity committees. Magnet program appraisers visited the hospital this January to conduct an intensive, on-site three-day examination. They interviewed patients, staff nurses, physicians, hospital employees, administrators, board members, and nursing leadership to evaluate St. Joseph's nursing care, services, and delivery of care to patients and their families. Soon after, Magnet status was bestowed. PMID:16350902

  17. MAGNETIC GRID

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1960-08-01

    An electronic grid is designed employing magnetic forces for controlling the passage of charged particles. The grid is particularly applicable to use in gas-filled tubes such as ignitrons. thyratrons, etc., since the magnetic grid action is impartial to the polarity of the charged particles and, accordingly. the sheath effects encountered with electrostatic grids are not present. The grid comprises a conductor having sections spaced apart and extending in substantially opposite directions in the same plane, the ends of the conductor being adapted for connection to a current source.

  18. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  19. Tunnel magnetoresistance effect in magnetic tunnel junctions using Fermi-level-tuned epitaxial Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Si Heusler alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu-Pu; Han, Gu-Chang; Qiu, Jinjun; Yap, Qi-Jia; Lu, Hui; Teo, Kie-Leong

    2014-05-07

    This paper reports a systematic investigation on the structural and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Si Heusler alloys with various compositions of x by co-sputtering Fe{sub 2}CrSi and Fe{sub 2}CoSi targets and their applications in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Si films of high crystalline quality have been epitaxially grown on MgO substrate using Cr as a buffer layer. The L2{sub 1} phase can be obtained at x = 0.3 and 0.5, while B2 phase for the rest compositions. A tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 19.3% at room temperature is achieved for MTJs using Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.7}Si as the bottom electrode with 350 °C post-annealing. This suggests that the Fermi level in Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Si has been successfully tuned close to the center of band gap of minority spin with x = 0.7 and therefore better thermal stability and higher spin polarization are achieved in Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.7}Si. The post-annealing effect for MTJs is also studied in details. The removal of the oxidized Fe{sub 2}Cr{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.7}Si at the interface with MgO barrier is found to be the key to improve the TMR ratio. When the thickness of the inserted Mg layer increases from 0.3 to 0.4 nm, the TMR ratio is greatly enhanced from 19.3% to 28%.

  20. Magnetic tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Harriss

    1992-01-01

    The move to visualization and image processing in data systems is increasing the demand for larger and faster mass storage systems. The technology of choice is magnetic tape. This paper briefly reviews the technology past, present, and projected. A case is made for standards and the value of the standards to users.

  1. "Swinging" Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Languis, Marlin

    1975-01-01

    Presents detailed teaching plans for activities with "rubberized" magnets as well as background information and alternative teaching-learning approaches. This activity may be used to develop student skills in inferring and in observing evidence of interaction. Includes instructions for equipment construction. (BR)

  2. Magnetic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ferrofluidics Corporation's recent innovation is a spindle for rotating computer discs that supports the disc's rotating shaft on a film of magnetic fluid instead of conventional ball bearings. According to its developers, the spindle offers greatly increased rotational stability, meaning substantially reduced vibration and mechanical noise, and non- repeatable runout. This allows disc drives to store two to 10 times more information.

  3. Permanent magnet array for the magnetic refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. J.; Kenkel, J. M.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Jiles, D. C.

    2002-05-01

    Recent research into the development of magnetic refrigeration (MR) operating at room temperature has shown that it can provide a reliable, energy-efficient cooling system. To enhance the cooling power of the magnetic refrigerator, it is required to use a magnetic refrigerant material with large magnetocaloric effect (MCE) at the appropriate temperature. Most advanced magnetic refrigerant materials show largest MCE at high applied magnetic fields generated by a superconducting magnet. For application of MCE to air conditioners or household refrigerators, it is essential to develop a permanent magnet array to form a compact, strong, and energy-efficient magnetic field generator. Generating a magnetic field well above the remanence of a permanent magnet material is hard to achieve through conventional designs. A permanent magnet array based on a hollow cylindrical flux source is found to provide an appropriate geometry and magnetic field strength for MR applications.

  4. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  5. Magnetic bearing. [for supplying magnetic fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A magnetic bearing is described which includes a pair of coaxial, toroidal, and permanent magnets having axially directed poles. Like poles of the permanent magnets are adjacent to each other, whereby the permanent magnets have a tendency to be urged apart along the common axis. An electromagnet is wound coaxially with the permanent magnets in such a manner that the poles are axially directed. Between the poles of each permanent magnet there is a low magnetic reluctance circuit including two series air gaps. Between the poles of the electromagnet a low reluctance path including only one air gap of each of the low magnetic reluctance circuits is provided. The low reluctance path for the electromagnet includes a ring axially translatable relative to the permanent magnets. The ring forms opposite faces of the air gaps in the magnetic circuits for each permanent magnet.

  6. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Kamide, Y.

    1996-01-01

    This talk provides a brief summary of the first conference devoted entirely to magnetic storms. Topics cover the relevant phenomena at the Sun/corona, propogation of these structures through interplanetary space, the response of the magnetosphere to interaction with these interplanetary structures, the formation of the storm time ring current (in particular the oxygen content of the ring-current), and storm ionospheric effects and ground based effects.

  7. Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  8. Magnetic cumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskij, A. I.

    1990-08-01

    The second half of 40-th -finish of 60-th of the XX-th Century were prolific y ears of scientific activity of A.D. Sakharov (1921-1990), when his unique creati ve aptitudes and inventivity has found a wide manifestation. Besides of his decis ive contribution to creation of Soviet thermonuclear weapons, in the area of his interests entered various problems of tehrmonuclaer energetics. In 1950 I.E. Tam m and A.D. Sakharov formulated the principles of magnetic thermoisolation of High temperature Plasmas, which put a beginning to controlled thermonuclear synthesis in the U.S.S.R. In 1951 A.D. Sakharov developed the theory of magnetic stationa ry thermonuclear reactor, which are closed to modern Tokamaks. Approximately in 1960-1961 He examined the possibility of thermonuclear synthesis on the basis of L aser compression of a spherical target. The idea of magnetic cumulation was forwrded by A.D. Sakharov as one of the ways of the obtaining of a controlled impulse thermonuclear reaction.

  9. Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators.

    PubMed

    Götz, K J G; Blien, S; Stiller, P L; Vavra, O; Mayer, T; Huber, T; Meier, T N G; Kronseder, M; Strunk, Ch; Hüttel, A K

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum rhenium alloy thin films can exhibit superconductivity up to critical temperatures of T(c)=15K. At the same time, the films are highly stable in the high-temperature methane/hydrogen atmosphere typically required to grow single wall carbon nanotubes. We characterize molybdenum rhenium alloy films deposited via simultaneous sputtering from two sources, with respect to their composition as function of sputter parameters and their electronic dc as well as GHz properties at low temperature. Specific emphasis is placed on the effect of the carbon nanotube growth conditions on the film. Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators are defined lithographically; we demonstrate that the resonators remain functional when undergoing nanotube growth conditions, and characterize their properties as function of temperature. This paves the way for ultra-clean nanotube devices grown in situ onto superconducting coplanar waveguide circuit elements. PMID:26901846

  10. Formation and microstructural analysis of co-sputtered thin films consisting of cobalt nanograins embedded in carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Delaunay, J.; Hayashi, T.; Tomita, M.; Hirono, S.

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt{endash}carbon thin films were deposited with a carbon concentration ranging from 27 to 57 at.{percent} at different substrate temperatures. The morphology and phases of as-deposited films were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The effect of annealing on the microstructure is reported. Under particular conditions of substrate temperature, carbon concentration, and subsequent annealing, a granular morphology consisting of nanocrystalline cobalt grains embedded in graphitelike carbon was obtained. The cobalt grains were uniform in size. The particle size could be controlled in the range from 4 to 7 nm by varying the carbon concentration. The cobalt phase was found to depend on the carbon concentration and substrate temperature. The hexagonal close-packed cobalt phase was observed only via the formation of the metastable carbide {delta}{sup {prime}}-Co{sub 2}C and its subsequent decomposition upon annealing. Otherwise the cobalt phase has a heavily faulted close-packed structure or a random stacking structure. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Co-sputtered MoRe thin films for carbon nanotube growth-compatible superconducting coplanar resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, K. J. G.; Blien, S.; Stiller, P. L.; Vavra, O.; Mayer, T.; Huber, T.; Meier, T. N. G.; Kronseder, M.; Strunk, Ch; Hüttel, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum rhenium alloy thin films can exhibit superconductivity up to critical temperatures of {T}{{c}}=15 {{K}}. At the same time, the films are highly stable in the high-temperature methane/hydrogen atmosphere typically required to grow single wall carbon nanotubes. We characterize molybdenum rhenium alloy films deposited via simultaneous sputtering from two sources, with respect to their composition as function of sputter parameters and their electronic dc as well as GHz properties at low temperature. Specific emphasis is placed on the effect of the carbon nanotube growth conditions on the film. Superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators are defined lithographically; we demonstrate that the resonators remain functional when undergoing nanotube growth conditions, and characterize their properties as function of temperature. This paves the way for ultra-clean nanotube devices grown in situ onto superconducting coplanar waveguide circuit elements.

  12. Endotaxially stabilized B2-FeSi nanodots in Si (100) via ion beam co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, Cathal Singh, Vidyadhar; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Kioseoglou, Joseph; Lal, Chhagan; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-04-21

    We report on the formation of embedded B2-FeSi nanodots in [100]-oriented Si substrates, and investigate the crystallographic mechanism underlying the stabilization of this uncommon, bulk-unstable, phase. The nanodots were approximately 10 nm in size, and were formed by iron thin film deposition and subsequent annealing. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, energy loss spectroscopy mapping, and quantitative image simulation and analysis were utilized to identify the phase, strain, and orientational relationship of the nanodots to the host silicon lattice. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to analyze the surface composition and local bonding. Elasticity calculations yielded a nanodot residual strain value of −18%. Geometrical phase analysis graphically pinpointed the positions of misfit dislocations, and clearly showed the presence of pinned (11{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}){sub Si}//(100){sub FeSi}, and unpinned (2{sup ¯}42){sub Si}//(010){sub FeSi}, interfaces. This partial endotaxy in the host silicon lattice was the mechanism that stabilized the B2-FeSi phase.

  13. Large and robust resistive switching in co-sputtered Pt-(NiO-Al2O3)-Pt devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, A.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2016-02-01

    We have systematically investigated the resistive switching and electroresistance behavior in Pt-[NiO-Al2O3]-Pt (PNAP) capacitor-like structures. The PNAP devices show a large ON-OFF ratio (˜107), which is strongly dependent on the rate of the voltage sweep. Interestingly, the devices exhibit a robust electroresistance behavior in the high resistance OFF state and show an intriguing change of sign of rectification with increasing end voltage. Our direct measurement of the surface temperature of the sample during resistive switching indicates that RESET process is assisted by Joule heating effects. The results are explained on the basis of plausible interplay between Schottky barrier modification due to the trapped charge carriers at the metal-oxide interface and percolation effects of conducting nanofilaments.

  14. BiVO4 photoanodes for water splitting with high injection efficiency, deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Haibo; Freudenberg, Norman; Nie, Man; van de Krol, Roel; Ellmer, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Photoactive bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) thin films were deposited by reactive co-magnetron sputtering from metallic Bi and V targets. The effects of the V-to-Bi ratio, molybdenum doping and post-annealing on the crystallographic and photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties of the BiVO4 films were investigated. Phase-pure monoclinic BiVO4 films, which are more photoactive than the tetragonal BiVO4 phase, were obtained under slightly vanadium-rich conditions. After annealing of the Mo-doped BiVO4 films, the photocurrent increased 2.6 times compared to undoped films. After optimization of the BiVO4 film thickness, the photocurrent densities (without a catalyst or a blocking layer or a hole scavenger) exceeded 1.2 mA/cm2 at a potential of 1.23 VRHE under solar AM1.5 irradiation. The surprisingly high injection efficiency of holes into the electrolyte is attributed to the highly porous film morphology. This co-magnetron sputtering preparation route for photoactive BiVO4 films opens new possibilities for the fabrication of large-scale devices for water splitting.

  15. Loess magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Friedrich; Evans, Michael E.

    Loess is a wind-blown Quaternary silt deposit that blankets vast tracts of land and in places reaches thicknesses in excess of 300 m. Over the last decade it has emerged that certain loess sections have recorded the polarity history of the geomagnetic field and now provide essentially continuous magnetostratigraphic archives covering the last 2-3 m.y. Indeed, it is the chronology provided by the magnetic polarity signature itself that was largely responsible for establishing the timing of the initiation of loess accumulation, particularly in the celebrated Chinese loess plateau, where a starting date close to the Gauss-Matuyama chron boundary (2.6 Ma) is now firmly established. This coincides with a widely documented global climatic shift and accelerated uplift of the Tibetan planteau. Many loess sections contain fossil soils (paleosols) that bear witness to warmer and wetter climatic conditions corresponding to interglacial periods in contrast to the cold, arid environments in which pristine loess accumulated and which correspond to glacial intervals. The resulting sequences of alternating loess and paleosols also manifest themselves magnetically, in this case in terms of susceptibility changes, entirely distinct from the remanence characteristics, which encode the geomagnetic polarity. The susceptibility time series obtained from localities in Alaska and China correlate remarkably well with the oceanic oxygen isotope signal and yield spectral power estimates in agreement with those predicted by the astronomical (Milankovitch) theory of ice ages. Comparisons of susceptibility patterns with corresponding profiles of 10Be concentration in loess allows major changes in rainfall to be estimated. In China, for example data spanning the last 130 kyr (corresponding to oxygen isotope stages 1-5) indicate that paleoprecipitation was almost halved (from ≃540 to ≃310 mm yr-1) as the warm interglacial during which paleosol S1 formed gave way to the following glacial

  16. Ferroelectricity in spiral magnets.

    PubMed

    Mostovoy, Maxim

    2006-02-17

    It was recently observed that the ferroelectrics showing the strongest sensitivity to an applied magnetic field are spiral magnets. We present a phenomenological theory of inhomogeneous ferroelectric magnets, which describes their thermodynamics and magnetic field behavior, e.g., dielectric susceptibility anomalies at magnetic transitions and sudden flops of electric polarization in an applied magnetic field. We show that electric polarization can also be induced at domain walls and that magnetic vortices carry electric charge. PMID:16606047

  17. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  18. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  19. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  20. Thin Magnetically Soft Wires for Magnetic Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhukova, Valentina; Ipatov, Mihail; Zhukov, Arcady

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in technology involving magnetic materials require development of novel advanced magnetic materials with improved magnetic and magneto-transport properties and with reduced dimensionality. Therefore magnetic materials with outstanding magnetic characteristics and reduced dimensionality have recently gained much attention. Among these magnetic materials a family of thin wires with reduced geometrical dimensions (of order of 1–30 μm in diameter) have gained importance within the last few years. These thin wires combine excellent soft magnetic properties (with coercivities up to 4 A/m) with attractive magneto-transport properties (Giant Magneto-impedance effect, GMI, Giant Magneto-resistance effect, GMR) and an unusual re-magnetization process in positive magnetostriction compositions exhibiting quite fast domain wall propagation. In this paper we overview the magnetic and magneto-transport properties of these microwires that make them suitable for microsensor applications. PMID:22291562

  1. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  2. Magnet innovations for linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1986-06-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results will be presented about past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs.

  3. Permanent magnet assembly

    DOEpatents

    Chell, Jeremy; Zimm, Carl B.

    2006-12-12

    A permanent magnet assembly is disclosed that is adapted to provide a magnetic field across an arc-shaped gap. Such a permanent magnet assembly can be used, for example, to provide a time-varying magnetic field to an annular region for use in a magnetic refrigerator.

  4. The magnetization process: Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsamel, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The magnetization process, hysteresis (the difference in the path of magnetization for an increasing and decreasing magnetic field), hysteresis loops, and hard magnetic materials are discussed. The fabrication of classroom projects for demonstrating hysteresis and the hysteresis of common magnetic materials is described in detail.

  5. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  6. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  7. Samarium/Cobalt Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, D.; Kumar, K.; Frost, R.; Chang, C.

    1985-01-01

    Intrinsic magnetic coercivities of samarium cobalt magnets made to approach theoretical limit of 350 kA/m by carefully eliminating oxygen from finished magnet by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). HIP process viable alternative to currently used sintering process.

  8. Magnetism of Carbonados

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Taylor, P. T.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Origin of Carbonado is not clear. Magnetism of Carbonado comes from the surface, indicating contemporary formation of both the surface and magnetic carriers. The interior of carbonado is relatively free of magnetic phases.

  9. Nanosecond magnetization reversal in nanocrystalline magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, I. Z.; Gandhi, A. A.; Khaddem-Mousavi, M. V.; Lynch, T. F.; Rahman, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of dynamic magnetization reversal process in electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni and Ni80Fe20 films by employing nanosecond magnetic pulse technique. The surface morphology has been investigated using SEM, EDAX, XRD and AFM analyses and static magnetic properties of the films are characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Two different techniques are designed and employed to study the nanosecond magnetization reversal process in nanocrystalline thin films: Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) and nanosecond pulsed field magnetometer. Results of dynamical behavior as a function of several variables such as magnitude of applied bias magnetic field, amplitude and width of the pulsed magnetic field are analyzed in detail using both techniques. A computer simulation package called Object Oriented Micro-Magnetic Framework (OOMMF) has been used to simulate the magnetic domain patterns of the samples.

  10. Laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Behrsing, G.U.; Halbach, K.; Marks, J.S.; Morrison, M.E.; Nelson, D.H.

    1989-03-01

    Twenty-three laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnets have been constructed, tested, and installed in the SuperHILAC heavy ion linear accelerator at LBL, marking the first accelerator use of this new type of quadrupole. The magnets consist of conventional tape-wound quadrupole electromagnets, using iron pole-pieces, with permanent magnet material (samarium cobalt) inserted between the poles to reduce the effects of saturation. The iron is preloaded with magnetic flux generated by the permanent magnet material, resulting in an asymmetrical saturation curve. Since the polarity of the individual quadrupole magnets in a drift tube linac is never reversed, we can take advantage of this asymmetrical saturation to provide about 20% greater focusing strength than is available with conventional quadrupoles, while replacing the vanadium permendur poletips with iron poletips. Comparisons between these magnets and conventional tape-wound quadrupoles will be presented. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  11. The Third Flight Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGhee, R. Wayne

    1998-01-01

    A self-shielded superconducting magnet was designed for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator Program. This is the third magnet built from this design. The magnets utilize Cryomagnetics' patented ultra-low current technology. The magnetic system is capable of reaching a central field of two tesla at slightly under two amperes and has a total inductance of 1068 henries. This final report details the requirements of the magnet, the specifications of the resulting magnet, the test procedures and test result data for the third magnet (Serial # C-654-M), and recommended precautions for use of the magnet.

  12. MAGNETIC DENSITOMETER

    DOEpatents

    McCann, J.A.; Jones, R.H.

    1961-08-15

    A magnetic densitometer for locating defects and metallic inclusions in materials is described. The apparatus consists of two primary coils connected in series opposition and adapted te be placed in inductive relation to the material under test, a source of constant frequency alternating current coupled across the primary coil combination, a pick-up coil disposed in symmetrical inductive relationship with said primary coils, a phase-shifter coupled to the output of the energizing source. The output of the phase-shifter is coupled in series with the pick-up coil. An amplifier is provided selective to the third harmonic of the energizing source frequency. The series combination of the pick-up coil and the phase-shifter output are connected across the input of the amplifier, and an amplitude comparitor is coupled to the output of the amplifier and the energizing source for comparing the instantaneous amplitude of the amplifier output and the instantaneous output of the energizing source and producing an output proportional to the difference in amplitude. A recorder is coupled to the output of the amplitude comparison means to give an indication of the amplitude difference, thereby providing a permanent presentation of the character of the changes in characteristics exhibited by the material under test. (AEC)

  13. Laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Behrsing, G.U.; Halbach, K.; Marks, J.S.; Morrison, M.E.; Nelson, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    A laced permanent magnet quadrupole drift tube magnet has been constructed for a proof-of-principle test. The magnet is a conventional tape-wound quadrupole electromagnet, using iron pole- pieces, with the addition of permanent magnet material (neodymium iron) between the poles to reduce the effects of saturation. The iron is preloaded with magnetic flux generated by the permanent magnet material, resulting in an asymmetrical saturation curve. Since the polarity of the quadrupole magnets in a drift tube linac is not reversed we can take advantage of this asymmetrical saturation to provide greater focusing strength. The magnet configuration has been optimized and the vanadium permendur poles needed in a conventional quadrupole have been replaced with iron poles. The use of permanent magnet material has allowed us to increase the focusing strength of the magnet by about 20% over that of a conventional tape-wound quadrupole. Comparisons will be made between this magnet and the conventional tape-wound quadrupole. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  15. A Magnetic Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arndt, Ebe

    2006-01-01

    Two recent articles in this journal described how an air core solenoid connected to an ac power source may restore the magnetization of a bar magnet with an alternating magnetic field (see Figs. 1 and 2). Although we are quite accustomed to using a constant magnetic field in an air core solenoid to remagnetize a ferromagnet, it is puzzling that we…

  16. Superconducting magnets 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Superconducting Magnets; SSC Magnet Industrialization; Collider Quadrupole Development; A Record-Setting Magnet; D20: The Push Beyond 10T; Nonaccelerator Applications; APC Materials Development; High-T{sub c} at Low Temperature; Cable and Cabling-Machine Development; and Analytical Magnet Design.

  17. Magnetic Membrane System

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael W.; ; Lucas, Matthew S.

    2004-12-30

    The present invention provides a membrane with magnetic particles. In one embodiment the membrane is created by mixing particles in a non-magnetic base. The membrane may act as an actuator, a sensor, a pump, a valve, or other device. A magnet is operatively connected to the membrane. The magnet acts on and changes the shape of the membrane.

  18. Magnetic multilayer structure

    DOEpatents

    Herget, Philipp; O'Sullivan, Eugene J.; Romankiw, Lubomyr T.; Wang, Naigang; Webb, Bucknell C.

    2016-07-05

    A mechanism is provided for an integrated laminated magnetic device. A substrate and a multilayer stack structure form the device. The multilayer stack structure includes alternating magnetic layers and diode structures formed on the substrate. Each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by a diode structure.

  19. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  20. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  1. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  2. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D. M.; Chen, S. S.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  3. Heteropolar Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misovec, Kathleen; Johnson, Bruce; Downer, James; Eisenhaure, David; Hockney, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Compact permanent-magnet/electromagnet actuator has six degrees of freedom. Heteropolar magnetic actuator conceived for use as actively controlled vibration-isolating suspension device. Exerts forces along, and torques about, all three principal coordinate axes to resist all three components of translational vibration and all three components of rotational vibration. Inner cylinder suspended magnetically within outer cylinder. Electro-magnet coils interact with fields of permanent magnets to provide active control of suspending force and torque.

  4. Magnetically operated check valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G. (Inventor); Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetically operated check valve is disclosed. The valve is comprised of a valve body and a movable poppet disposed therein. A magnet attracts the poppet to hold the valve shut until the force of fluid flow through the valve overcomes the magnetic attraction and moves the poppet to an unseated, open position. The poppet and magnet are configured and disposed to trap a magnetically attracted particulate and prevent it from flowing to a valve seating region.

  5. High efficiency magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Anand, Davinder K.; Kirk, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities concerning high efficiency permanent magnet plus electromagnet (PM/EM) pancake magnetic bearings at the University of Maryland are reported. A description of the construction and working of the magnetic bearing is provided. Next, parameters needed to describe the bearing are explained. Then, methods developed for the design and testing of magnetic bearings are summarized. Finally, a new magnetic bearing which allows active torque control in the off axes directions is discussed.

  6. Magnetic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemko, Polina; Orio, Marina

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of optical and X-ray observations of two quiescent novae, V2491 Cyg and V4743 Sgr. Our observations suggest the intriguing possibility of localization of hydrogen burning in magnetic novae, in which accretion is streamed to the polar caps. V2491 Cyg was observed with Suzaku more than 2 years after the outburst and V4743 Sgr was observed with XMM Newton 2 and 3.5 years after maximum. In the framework of a monitoring program of novae previously observed as super soft X-ray sources we also obtained optical spectra of V4743 Sgr with the SALT telescope 11.5 years after the eruption and of V2491 Cyg with the 6m Big Azimutal Telescope 4 and 7 years post-outburst. In order to confirm the possible white dwarf spin period of V2491 Cyg measured in the Suzaku observations we obtained photometric data using the 90cm WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak and the 1.2 m telescope in Crimea. We found that V4743 Sgr is an intermediate polar (IP) and V2491 Cyg is a strong IP candidate. Both novae show modulation of their X-ray light curves and have X-ray spectra typical of IPs. The Suzaku and XMM Newton exposures revealed that the spectra of both novae have a very soft blackbody-like component with a temperature close to that of the hydrogen burning white dwarfs in their SSS phases, but with flux by at least two orders of magnitude lower, implying a possible shrinking of emitting regions in the thin atmosphere that is heated by nuclear burning underneath it. In quiescent IPs, independently of the burning, an ultrasoft X-ray flux component originates at times in the polar regions irradiated by the accretion column, but the soft component of V4743 Sgr disappeared in 2006, indicating that the origin may be different from accretion. We suggest it may have been due to an atmospheric temperature gradient on the white dwarf surface, or to continuing localized thermonuclear burning at the bottom of the envelope, before complete turn-off. The optical spectra of V2491 Cyg and V

  7. Nanocomposite Magnets: Transformational Nanostructured Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GE is using nanomaterials technology to develop advanced magnets that contain fewer rare earth materials than their predecessors. Nanomaterials technology involves manipulating matter at the atomic or molecular scale, which can represent a stumbling block for magnets because it is difficult to create a finely grained magnet at that scale. GE is developing bulk magnets with finely tuned structures using iron-based mixtures that contain 80% less rare earth materials than traditional magnets, which will reduce their overall cost. These magnets will enable further commercialization of HEVs, EVs, and wind turbine generators while enhancing U.S. competitiveness in industries that heavily utilize these alternatives to rare earth minerals.

  8. Magnetically Damped Furnace Bitter Magnet Coil 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    A magnet has been built by the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory for NASA on a cost reimbursement contract. The magnet is intended to demonstrate the technology and feasibility of building a magnet for space based crystal growth. A Bitter magnet (named after Francis Bitter, its inventor) was built consisting of four split coils electrically in series and hydraulically in parallel. The coils are housed in a steel vessel to reduce the fringe field and provide some on-axis field enhancement. The steel was nickel plated and Teflon coated to minimize interaction with the water cooling system. The magnet provides 0.14 T in a 184 mm bore with 3 kW of power.

  9. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  10. Magnetic switch coupling to synchronize magnetic modulators

    DOEpatents

    Reed, K.W.; Kiekel, P.

    1999-04-27

    Apparatus for synchronizing the output pulses from a pair of magnetic switches is disclosed. An electrically conductive loop is provided between the pair of switches with the loop having windings about the core of each of the magnetic switches. The magnetic coupling created by the loop removes voltage and timing variations between the outputs of the two magnetic switches caused by any of a variety of factors. The only remaining variation is a very small fixed timing offset caused by the geometry and length of the loop itself. 13 figs.

  11. Magnetic switch coupling to synchronize magnetic modulators

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Kim W.; Kiekel, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus for synchronizing the output pulses from a pair of magnetic switches. An electrically conductive loop is provided between the pair of switches with the loop having windlings about the core of each of the magnetic switches. The magnetic coupling created by the loop removes voltage and timing variations between the outputs of the two magnetic switches caused by any of a variety of factors. The only remaining variation is a very small fixed timing offset caused by the geometry and length of the loop itself.

  12. Magnequench magnets status overview

    SciTech Connect

    Panchanathan, V.

    1995-08-01

    The advent of neodymium-iron-boron material having excellent magnetic properties and potential economic advantages has initiated a new era in permanent magnet technology. One method of making these magnets is by the rapid solidification process. It is typically carried out by melt spinning, which produces a highly stable, magnetically hard microstructure powder, directly from the melt. This can be used for bonded magnet applications. Alternatively, this powder can be hot pressed to produce fully dense isotropic magnets with energy products up to 15 MGOe. Anisotropic magnets with energy products ranging up to 50 MGOe can be produced by thermomechanical orientation or hot deformation process. Current processing and properties of Magnequench (General Motors) materials are reviewed, as well as the applications and advances of these materials. The advances include high-temperature bonded magnet and high-energy product anisotropic bonded and fully dense magnets.

  13. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mueller, Fred M.; Bronisz, Lawrence; Grube, Holger; Nelson, David C.; Mace, Jonathan L.

    2006-11-14

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. Magnetically levitated superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, B.R.; Lynds, L. Jr.

    1993-10-26

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet mounted on a shaft that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor supported on a stator in proximity to the magnet. The superconductor is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet and supports a load on the shaft. The interaction between the superconductor and magnet also produces surface screening currents that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature. The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet is supported on the stator and the superconductor is mounted on the shaft. The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field. 6 figures.

  15. Vehicle with magnetic engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wortham, C.

    1993-06-15

    A vehicle is described comprising a vehicle frame fitted with axles and wheels rotatably carried by the axles; an engine block mounted on the frame; a plurality of magnetic cylinders provided in the engine block and a plurality of magnetic pistons disposed in the magnetic cylinders, respectively, in reciprocating relationship, the magnetic cylinders having a first magnetic polarity in one end and a second magnetic polarity in the opposite end for alternately attracting and repelling the magnetic pistons, respectively; a crankshaft journalled for rotation in the engine block; power transmission means connecting the crankshaft to at least one of the axles in driving relationship; and connecting rods connecting the crankshaft to the magnetic pistons, respectively, whereby reciprocation of the magnetic pistons in the magnetic cylinders effects rotation of the crankshaft; a cylinder head provided on the engine block and piston electromagnetic means provided in the cylinder head above the magnetic cylinders and the magnetic pistons, respectively for alternately attracting and repelling the magnetic pistons; at least one battery carried by the frame; and polarity timing means electrically connected to the battery and the piston electromagnetic means, for alternating the polarity of the piston electromagnet means, whereby electric current is supplied to the piston electromagnetic means in current-reversing relationship to alternately attract and repel the magnetic pistons in reciprocating relationship responsive to operation of the polarity timing means.

  16. Magnetism of cigarette ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, Neli; Jordanova, Diana; Henry, Bernard; Le Goff, Maxime; Dimov, Dimo; Tsacheva, Tsenka

    2006-06-01

    Mineral composition of cigarette ashes is well studied in the literature, but no reports are available about the magnetic fraction. Our study presents an investigation of the basic magnetic characteristics of ashes from several commercially available cigarette brands and a wood ash. Magnetic susceptibility, which is a concentration-dependent parameter in case of uniform mineralogy, shows that cigarette ashes contain relatively high amount of magnetic iron minerals, similar to that in wood ash from our study and other literature data. Magnetization data suggest that cigarette ashes contain some 0.1 wt% or lower quantity of magnetite, depending on the brand. Analyses of magnetic mineralogy imply that the main magnetic minerals in ashes from higher quality cigarette brands are magnetite and iron carbide cementite, while in ashes from lower quality brands without additives magnetic minerals are pure and substituted with foreign ions magnetite. Magnetic grain-size analysis shows that cigarette ashes contain significant amount of very fine, nano-meter sized magnetic particles, as well as coarser (up to several microns), magnetically stable grains. Thus, the magnetic study of cigarette ashes proved that these plant ashes possess non-negligible magnetic properties. The results could serve for better elucidation of mineralogy of cigarette ashes as a whole, as well as for future investigation on the presence of magnetic ultra fine particles in cigarette smoke, which may be inhaled in lungs during smoking.

  17. Large gap magnetic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelsalam, Moustafa K.; Eyssa, Y. M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a large gap magnetic suspension system is discussed. Some of the topics covered include: the system configuration, permanent magnet material, levitation magnet system, superconducting magnets, resistive magnets, superconducting levitation coils, resistive levitation coils, levitation magnet system, and the nitrogen cooled magnet system.

  18. Tamper resistant magnetic stripes

    DOEpatents

    Naylor, Richard Brian; Sharp, Donald J.

    1999-01-01

    This invention relates to a magnetic stripe comprising a medium in which magnetized particles are suspended and in which the encoded information is recorded by actual physical rotation or alignment of the previously magnetized particles within the flux reversals of the stripe which are 180.degree. opposed in their magnetic polarity. The magnetized particles are suspended in a medium which is solid, or physically rigid, at ambient temperatures but which at moderately elevated temperatures, such as 40.degree. C., is thinable to a viscosity permissive of rotation of the particles therein under applications of moderate external magnetic field strengths within acceptable time limits.

  19. Magnetic microhelix coil structures.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elliot J; Makarov, Denys; Sanchez, Samuel; Fomin, Vladimir M; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2011-08-26

    Together with the well-known ferro- and antiferromagnetic ordering, nature has created a variety of complex helical magnetic configurations. Here, we design and investigate three-dimensional microhelix coil structures that are radial-, corkscrew-, and hollow-bar-magnetized. The magnetization configurations of the differently magnetized coils are experimentally revealed by probing their specific dynamic response to an external magnetic field. Helix coils offer an opportunity to realize microscale geometries of the magnetic toroidal moment, observed so far only in bulk multiferroic materials. PMID:21929266

  20. Magnetic Microhelix Coil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elliot J.; Makarov, Denys; Sanchez, Samuel; Fomin, Vladimir M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2011-08-01

    Together with the well-known ferro- and antiferromagnetic ordering, nature has created a variety of complex helical magnetic configurations. Here, we design and investigate three-dimensional microhelix coil structures that are radial-, corkscrew-, and hollow-bar-magnetized. The magnetization configurations of the differently magnetized coils are experimentally revealed by probing their specific dynamic response to an external magnetic field. Helix coils offer an opportunity to realize microscale geometries of the magnetic toroidal moment, observed so far only in bulk multiferroic materials.

  1. Multilayered Magnetic Gelatin Membrane Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sangram K; Goranov, Vitaly; Dash, Mamoni; Russo, Alessandro; Shelyakova, Tatiana; Graziosi, Patrizio; Lungaro, Lisa; Riminucci, Alberto; Uhlarz, Marc; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Rivas, Jose; Herrmannsdörfer, Thomas; Rajadas, Jayakumar; De Smedt, Stefaan; Braeckmans, Kevin; Kaplan, David L; Dediu, V Alek

    2015-10-21

    A versatile approach for the design and fabrication of multilayer magnetic scaffolds with tunable magnetic gradients is described. Multilayer magnetic gelatin membrane scaffolds with intrinsic magnetic gradients were designed to encapsulate magnetized bioagents under an externally applied magnetic field for use in magnetic-field-assisted tissue engineering. The temperature of the individual membranes increased up to 43.7 °C under an applied oscillating magnetic field for 70 s by magnetic hyperthermia, enabling the possibility of inducing a thermal gradient inside the final 3D multilayer magnetic scaffolds. On the basis of finite element method simulations, magnetic gelatin membranes with different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were assembled into 3D multilayered scaffolds. A magnetic-gradient-controlled distribution of magnetically labeled stem cells was demonstrated in vitro. This magnetic biomaterial-magnetic cell strategy can be expanded to a number of different magnetic biomaterials for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26451743

  2. Magnetic Separation Dynamics of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, M.; Huijin Zhang,; You Qiang,

    2013-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are appealing candidates for analytical separation of heavy metal ions from waste water and separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. This work studies the separation dynamics and investigates the appropriate magnetic-field gradients. A dynamic study of colloidal MNPs was performed for steady-state flow. Measurements were conducted to record the separation time of particles as a function of magnetic field gradient. The drag and magnetic forces play a significant role on the separation time. A drop in saturation magnetization and variation of particle size occurs after surface functionalization of the MNPs; these are the primary factors that affect the separation time and velocity of the MNPs. The experimental results are correlated to a theoretical one-dimensional model.

  3. Single molecule magnets from magnetic building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, W.; Paretzki, A.; Cervetti, C.; Hohloch, S.; Rauschenbach, S.; Kern, K.; Dressel, M.; Bogani, L.; M&üLler, P.

    2013-03-01

    We provide a basic set of magnetic building blocks that can be rationally assembled, similar to magnetic LEGO bricks, in order to create a huge variety of magnetic behavior. Using rare-earth centers and multipyridine ligands, fine-tuning of intra and intermolecular exchange interaction is demonstrated. We have investigated a series of molecules with monomeric, dimeric and trimeric lanthanide centers using SQUID susceptometry and Hall bar magnetometry. A home-made micro-Hall-probe magnetometer was used to measure magnetic hysteresis loops at mK temperatures and fields up to 17 T. All compounds show hysteresis below blocking temperatures of 3 to 4 K. The correlation of the assembly of the building blocks with the magnetic properties will be discussed.

  4. Magnetic induction hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, V. N.

    2007-09-01

    A review of physical principles and experimental data on magnetic hyperthermia are presented. The main principles of magnetic hyperthermia are considered. Results of its application in the therapy of oncology diseases are presented.

  5. Magnets for Pain Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... devices. Otherwise, magnets are generally considered safe when applied to the skin. Tell all your health care ... device. Otherwise, magnets are generally considered safe when applied to the skin. Reports of side effects or ...

  6. Experiments on Magnetic Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, C. S.; Ertel, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of a simple apparatus to measure the magnetization density and magnetic susceptibility of ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and the diamagnetic solids and liquids. (Author/GA)

  7. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  8. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  9. Magnetic therapy in physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Gail S.

    2000-03-01

    A critical thinking activity focused on students' understanding of magnets is described. The activity includes a short written paper about the validity of advertisements for alternative medical therapy devices based on magnets. It includes also self assessment through peer interaction.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  11. The magnetic genome project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic materials underpin a vast and diverse range of modern technologies, going from data storage to energy production and use. However, the choice of magnets for mainstream applications is limited to a few dozens and the development of a new high-performance magnetic compound is a long and often unpredictable process. Here we describe a systematic pathway to the discovery of novel magnetic materials for multiple applications, which demonstrates an unprecedented throughput and speed up in the discovery process. We have constructed a massive electronic structures library for Heusler alloys containing 236,856 materials. We have then extracted those magnetic compounds with specific electronic properties, such as half-metallicity and large magnetization density, and finally established whether these can be fabricated at thermodynamical equilibrium. Based on our analysis we have identified 249 stable new intermetallic Heuslers, including 21 new magnets. Our work paves the way for large scale design of novel magnetic materials at unprecedented speed.

  12. Spin and orbital magnetization loops obtained using magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Koizumi, A.

    2013-02-25

    We present an application of magnetic Compton scattering (MCS) to decompose a total magnetization loop into spin and orbital magnetization contributions. A spin magnetization loop of SmAl{sub 2} was measured by recording the intensity of magnetic Compton scattering as a function of applied magnetic field. Comparing the spin magnetization loop with the total magnetization one measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer, the orbital magnetization loop was obtained. The data display an anti-coupled behavior between the spin and orbital magnetizations and confirm that the orbital part dominates the magnetization.

  13. Superposition of DC magnetic fields by cascading multiple magnets in magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-09-01

    A novel method that can effectively collect the DC magnetic field produced by multiple separated magnets is proposed. With the proposed idea of a magnetic loop, the DC magnetic field produced by these separated magnets can be effectively superimposed together. The separated magnets can be cascaded in series or in parallel. A novel nested magnetic loop is also proposed to achieve a higher DC magnetic field in the common air region without increasing the DC magnetic field in each magnetic loop. The magnetic loop can be made by a magnetic hose, which is designed by transformation optics and can be realized by the combination of super-conductors and ferromagnetic materials.

  14. Physician Perceptions of Magnet Nurses and Magnet Designation.

    PubMed

    Vila, Linda L

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study uses focus group methodology to examine physician perceptions of Magnet nurses and Magnet designation. No studies have explored physicians' insights, which are becoming increasingly important to implementing and sustaining a Magnet culture. Qualitative content analysis demonstrated that physicians highly regard Magnet nurses and benefit from Magnet status. Key themes emerged related to Magnet nurse characteristics, relationships with physicians, nursing leadership, shared governance, and Magnet as a marketing tool. "Magnet marginalization" emerged as a new concept. PMID:27144678

  15. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  16. Irreversible magnetic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an irreversible magnetic switch containing a ferromagnetic amorphous metal having a predetermined crystallization temperature in its inductor magnetic path. With the incorporation of such material, the magnetic properties after cooling from a high temperature excursion above its crystallization temperature are only a fraction of the original value. The difference is used to provide a safety feature in the magnetic switch.

  17. Testing the Capture Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image of a model capture magnet was taken after an experiment in a Mars simulation chamber at the University of Aarhus, Denmark. It has some dust on it, but not as much as that on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's capture magnet. The capture and filter magnets on both Mars Exploration Rovers were delivered by the magnetic properties team at the Center for Planetary Science, Copenhagen, Denmark.

  18. Passive Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic bearing for limited rotation devices requires no feedback control system to sense and correct shaft position. Passive Magnetic Torsion Bearing requires no power supply and has no rubbing parts. Torsion wire restrains against axial instability. Magnetic flux geometry chosen to assure lateral stability with radial restoring force that maintains alignment.

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, E. R.

    2009-06-01

    Author's preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Basic theory; 3. Experimental methods; 4. Measurement of nuclear properties and general physical applications; 5. Nuclear magnetic resonance in liquids and gases; 6. Nuclear magnetic resonance in non-metallic solids; 7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in metals; 8. Quadrupole effects; Appendices 1-6; Glossary of symbols; Bibliography and author index; Subject index.

  20. A Memory for Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachworth, Martin D.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a teacher-made instructional material that can be used to help students understand and retain the concepts of magnet and magnetic field. Doughnut-shaped magnets levitate above each other when placed over a post with like poles facing each other. Instructions are provided to make the device. (MDH)

  1. Iron dominated magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  2. A Magnetic Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Ebe

    2006-11-01

    Two recent articles1,2 in this journal described how an air core solenoid connected to an ac power source may restore the magnetization of a bar magnet with an alternating magnetic field (see Figs. 1 and 2). Although we are quite accustomed to using a constant magnetic field in an air core solenoid to remagnetize a ferromagnet, it is puzzling that we can also use an alternating magnetic field to realign the magnetic domains of a ferromagnet. To make the puzzle even more intriguing, the very same setup may be used to degauss a TV screen; that is, the alternating magnetic field of an air core solenoid can also "scramble" the magnetic domains of a ferromagnet! Although the latter phenomenon intuitively makes more sense, we are still left with a confusing paradox: How can an alternating magnetic field align the magnetic domains in one ferromagnet and scramble the magnetic domains in another? Paradoxes like these are ideal for student investigations because they create a natural interest. In fact, since the two articles mentioned above were unable to explain the magnetic paradox, my students and I were intrigued enough to investigate the phenomenon and then try to understand it theoretically. This paper describes how we used the paradoxical phenomenon for a student investigation into nonlinear systems. In order to be successful, students should be familiar with calculus, preferably at the level of an advanced-placement class.

  3. Common Magnets, Unexpected Polarities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss a "misconception" in magnetism so simple and pervasive as to be typically unnoticed. That magnets have poles might be considered one of the more straightforward notions in introductory physics. However, the magnets common to students' experiences are likely different from those presented in educational…

  4. Magnetism in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, J. M.; Rowe, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    An overview is presented of magnetism in meteorites. A glossary of magnetism terminology followed by discussion of the various techniques used for magnetism studies in meteorites are included. The generalized results from use of these techniques by workers in the field are described. A brief critical analysis is offered.

  5. Magnetic Refrigeration Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardoff, D. D.; Johnson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is being developed to determine whether it may be used as an alternative to the Joule-Thomson circuit of a closed cycle refrigerator for providing 4 K refrigeration. An engineering model 4-15 K magnetic refrigerator has been designed and is being fabricated. This article describes the overall design of the magnetic refrigerator.

  6. A Magnet Spring Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, T. H.; Mead, L.

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses an elementary spring model representing the motion of a magnet suspended from the ceiling at one end of a vertical spring which is held directly above a second magnet fixed on the floor. There are two cases depending upon the north-south pole orientation of the two magnets. The attraction or repelling force induced by the…

  7. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  9. Magnetic nanohole superlattices

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Feng

    2013-05-14

    A magnetic material is disclosed including a two-dimensional array of carbon atoms and a two-dimensional array of nanoholes patterned in the two-dimensional array of carbon atoms. The magnetic material has long-range magnetic ordering at a temperature below a critical temperature Tc.

  10. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  11. Magnetic hyperthermia with hard-magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashevsky, Bronislav E.; Kashevsky, Sergey B.; Korenkov, Victor S.; Istomin, Yuri P.; Terpinskaya, Tatyana I.; Ulashchik, Vladimir S.

    2015-04-01

    Recent clinical trials of magnetic hyperthermia have proved, and even hardened, the Ankinson-Brezovich restriction as upon magnetic field conditions applicable to any site of human body. Subject to this restriction, which is harshly violated in numerous laboratory and small animal studies, magnetic hyperthermia can relay on rather moderate heat source, so that optimization of the whole hyperthermia system remains, after all, the basic problem predetermining its clinical perspectives. We present short account of our complex (theoretical, laboratory and small animal) studies to demonstrate that such perspectives should be related with the hyperthermia system based on hard-magnetic (Stoner-Wohlfarth type) nanoparticles and strong low-frequency fields rather than with superparamagnetic (Brownian or Neél) nanoparticles and weak high-frequency fields. This conclusion is backed by an analytical evaluation of the maximum absorption rates possible under the field restriction in the ideal hard-magnetic (Stoner-Wohlarth) and the ideal superparamagnetic (single relaxation time) systems, by theoretical and experimental studies of the dynamic magnetic hysteresis in suspensions of movable hard-magnetic particles, by producing nanoparticles with adjusted coercivity and suspensions of such particles capable of effective energy absorption and intratumoral penetration, and finally, by successful treatment of a mice model tumor under field conditions acceptable for whole human body.

  12. Magnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwell, William D. (Inventor); Wu, Mitchell B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic attachment mechanism adapted for interfacing with the manipulator arm (11) of a remote manipulator system and comprising a pair of permanent magnets (31,32) of rare earth material which are arranged in a stator-rotor relationship. The rotor magnet (32), is journalled for rotation about its longitudinal axis between pole plates (35,36) of the stator magnet (31), each of which includes an adhering surface (35a,36a). In a first rotary position corresponding to the ON condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet (32) is closely adjacent a stator magnet pole plate of like polarity whereby the respective magnet fields are additive for producing a strong magnetic field emanating from the adhering surfaces (35a,36a) for attracting a ferrous magnetic plate 20, or the like, affixed to the payload (20 or 50). When the rotor magnet (32) is rotated to a second position corresponding to the OFF condition, each of the poles of the rotor magnet (31) is disposed closely adjacent a pole plate of unlike polarity whereby the magnetic fields of the magnets are in cancelling relationship at the adhering surfaces (35a,36a) which permits the release of a payload. An actuator (51 or 70) for selectively rotating the rotor magnet (32) between the ON and OFF positions is provided for interfacing and connecting the magnetic attachment mechanism with a manipulator arm. For effecting an optimal rigidized attachment the payload is provided with guides (91,92) cooperable with guides (96,16,17) on the housing of the mechanism for directing adhering surfaces (35a,36a) of the polar plates to the ferrous plate (20).

  13. Magnetic field synthesis for microwave magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1982-04-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group of the M.I.T. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science undertook a two-year research program directed at developing synthesis procedures that allow magnetostatic and/or magnetoelastic modes to be specially tailored for microwave signal processing applications that include magnetically tunable filters and limiters as well as delay lines that are either linearly dispersive or nondispersive over prescribed bandwidths. Special emphasis was given to devices employing thin films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) that are blessed with spatially nonuniform dc magnetic fields.

  14. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  15. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  16. Rare earth permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    Permanent magnets were discovered centuries ago from what was known as {open_quotes}lodestone{close_quotes}, a rock containing large quantities of the iron-bearing mineral magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The compass was the first technological use for permanent magnetic materials; it was used extensively for navigational purposes by the fifteenth century. During the twentieth century, as new applications for permanent magnets were developed, interest and research in permanent magnetic materials soared. Four major types of permanent magnets have been developed since the turn of the century.

  17. Magnetic damping for maglev

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters to control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study is presented to measure the magnetic damping using a direct method. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters on magnetic damping such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all magnetic damping coefficients, some of which can not be measured by an indirect method.

  18. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  19. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  20. Magnetizing technique for permanent magnets by intense static fields generated by HTS bulk magnets: Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N. Kawasaki; Oka, T.; Fukui, S.; Ogawa, J.; Sato, T.; Terasawa, T.; Itoh, Y.

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned in the strong magnetic field space just above the magnetic pole containing a HTS bulk magnet which generates the magnetic field 3.4 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. The finite element method was carried out for the static field magnetization of a permanent magnet using a HTS bulk magnet. Previously, our research group experimentally demonstrated the possibility of full magnetization of rare earth permanent magnets with high-performance magnetic properties with use of the static field of HTS bulk magnets. In the present study, however, we succeeded for the first time in visualizing the behavior of the magnetizing field of the bulk magnet during the magnetization process and the shape of the magnetic field inside the body being magnetized. By applying this kind of numerical analysis to the magnetization for planned motor rotors which incorporate rare-earth permanent magnets, we hope to study the fully magnetized regions for the new magnetizing method using bulk magnets and to give motor designing a high degree of freedom.

  1. Magnetism: Principles and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craik, Derek J.

    2003-09-01

    If you are studying physics, chemistry, materials science, electrical engineering, information technology or medicine, then you'll know that understanding magnetism is fundamental to success in your studies and here is the key to unlocking the mysteries of magnetism....... You can: obtain a simple overview of magnetism, including the roles of B and H, resonances and special techniques take full advantage of modern magnets with a wealth of expressions for fields and forces develop realistic general design programmes using isoparametric finite elements study the subtleties of the general theory of magnetic moments and their dynamics follow the development of outstanding materials appreciate how magnetism encompasses topics as diverse as rock magnetism, chemical reaction rates, biological compasses, medical therapies, superconductivity and levitation understand the basis and remarkable achievements of magnetic resonance imaging In his new book, Magnetism, Derek Craik throws light on the principles and applications of this fascinating subject. From formulae for calculating fields to quantum theory, the secrets of magnetism are exposed, ensuring that whether you are a chemist or engineer, physicist, medic or materials scientist Magnetism is the book for our course.

  2. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  3. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  4. Superconducting multipole corrector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    A novel concept of superconducting multipole corrector magnet is discussed. This magnet assembled from 12 identical racetrack type coils and can generate any combination of dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnetic fields. The coil groups are powered from separate power supplies. In the case of normal dipole, quadrupole and sextupole fields the total field is symmetrical relatively the magnet median plane and there are only five powered separately coil groups. This type multipole corrector magnet was proposed for BTeV, Fermilab project and has following advantages: universal configuration, simple manufacturing and high mechanical stability. The results of magnetic design including the field quality and magnetic forces in comparison with known shell type superconducting correctors are presented.

  5. Graded permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, R.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of semihard magnetic phases and interfaces on the performance of nanostructured two-phase permanent magnets is investigated by model calculations. In addition to the trivial coercivity increase due to the replacement of soft regions by semihard regions, there is a coercivity enhancement even if the volume-averaged anisotropy is kept constant during the introduction of the semihard phase. A variational approach is used to derive analytical results for representative anisotropy profiles. The improvement is operative on length scales slightly larger than that of the soft phase in hard-soft composites, but the main challenge is to find semihard light or heavy transition metal phases with a high magnetization. There are several Fe- and Co-based phases, but most are thin-film systems and difficult to use in bulk magnets. Very hard nanostructured magnets may also be created from soft phases with negative but large anisotropy constants (hard-magnetic soft-soft magnets).

  6. Magnetic heat pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic element is used to control the temperature and applied magnetic field of the element to cause the state of the element as represented on a temperature-magnetic entropy diagram to repeatedly traverse a loop. The loop may have a first portion of concurrent substantially isothermal or constant temperature and increasing applied magnetic field, a second portion of lowering temperature and constant applied magnetic field, a third portion of isothermal and decreasing applied magnetic field, and a fourth portion of increasing temperature and constant applied magnetic field. Other loops may be four-sided, with two isotherms and two adiabats. Preferably, a regenerator is used to enhance desired cooling or heating effects, with varied magnetic fields, or varying temperatures including three-sided figures traversed by the representative point.

  7. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  8. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  9. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  10. Unveiling magnetic Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Paula; Concha, Andres; Aguayo, David

    Hysteresis manifests as the lack of retraceability of the magnetization curve in magnetic systems. It has been associated with rotation of magnetization and changes of magnetic domains. However, up to date there has been no realization that allows to separate these coupled mechanisms. We introduce a minimal magnetic system where hysteresis is realized in a simple and minimal fashion. The basic units are a few U(1) ferromagnetic altitudinal rotors placed along a one dimensional chain. They exhibit a dissipative dynamics, interacting via magnetic coupling among them and via Zeeman interaction with the external magnetic field. The system displays a hysteretic behavior starting with N=2 rotors which remains qualitatively invariant as more magnets are added to the chain. We explain this irreversibility by using a model that includes Coulombic interactions between magnetic charges located at the ends of the magnets, zeeman coupling and viscous dissipation. We show that interactions between the unit components is the key element responsible for hysteresis and find that the ability to perceive hysteresis, depends on how the time frequencies of damping and interactions inherent to the system compare with the time frequency set by the external field ramping rate.