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Sample records for magnetic cycles influence

  1. Rapid cycling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Gambardella, U.; Greco, M.; Volpini, G.

    2006-04-01

    The paper deals with the general problematic related to the development of fast cycled superconducting magnets for application in particle accelerator machines. Starting from the requirements of SIS300 synchrotron under design at GSI and an envisaged future Super-SPS injector at CERN, it is shown which developments are mandatory in the superconducting wire technology and in the magnet design field.

  2. Solar magnetic cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Karen L.

    1993-01-01

    Using NSO/KP magnetograms, the pattern and rate of the emergence of magnetic flux and the development of the large-scale patterns of unipolar fields are considered in terms of the solar magnetic cycle. Magnetic flux emerges in active regions at an average rate of 2 x 10(exp 21) Mx/day, approximately 10 times the estimated rate in ephemeral regions. Observations are presented that demonstrate that the large-scale unipolar fields originate in active regions and activity nests. For cycle 21, the net contribution of ephemeral regions to the axial dipole moment of the Sun is positive, and is of opposite sign to that of active regions. Its amplitude is smaller by a factor of 6, assuming an average lifetime of ephemeral regions of 8 hours. Active regions larger than 4500 Mm(sup 2) are the primary contributor to the cycle variation of Sun's axial dipole moment.

  3. Influence of microstructural changes on magnetic refrigeration performance for La(Fe0.94Co0.06)11.8Si1.2 alloys during magnetic field cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. M.; He, J.; Yang, L.; Xia, Z. J.; Zhao, D. L.; You, C. Y.; Ren, W. J.

    2015-05-01

    NaZn13-type La(Fe0.94Co0.06)11.8Si1.2 alloys were manufactured to investigate the influence of their microstructural change on magnetic refrigeration performance during magnetic field cycling. The magnetic refrigeration performance measurements indicate that both the large magnetic entropy change value (ΔS = 14.1 J kg-1 K-1) and maximum adiabatic temperature change (ΔT = 2.2 K) are favorable for the alloys to be superior candidate of magnetic refrigerants. However, the alloys exhibit nearly 10% decrease of ΔS and ΔT when they performed cycling ten-thousand times. More than thousand times of cycles induce local stress and grain cleavages presented by the accumulation of irreversible microstructure changes such as micro-cracks and sub-boundaries. According to the domain observation for the alloys with different field cycles, these microstructure characteristics accompany with the reconfiguration of the local magnetic domains and increase of domain wall energy, which are considered to be the reason of the decrease of ΔS.

  4. MAGNETIC WREATHS AND CYCLES IN CONVECTIVE DYNAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Toomre, Juri; Brown, Benjamin P.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2013-01-10

    Solar-type stars exhibit a rich variety of magnetic activity. Seeking to explore the convective origins of this activity, we have carried out a series of global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the anelastic spherical harmonic code. Here we report on the dynamo mechanisms achieved as the effects of artificial diffusion are systematically decreased. The simulations are carried out at a nominal rotation rate of three times the solar value (3 {Omega}{sub Sun }), but similar dynamics may also apply to the Sun. Our previous simulations demonstrated that convective dynamos can build persistent toroidal flux structures (magnetic wreaths) in the midst of a turbulent convection zone and that high rotation rates promote the cyclic reversal of these wreaths. Here we demonstrate that magnetic cycles can also be achieved by reducing the diffusion, thus increasing the Reynolds and magnetic Reynolds numbers. In these more turbulent models, diffusive processes no longer play a significant role in the key dynamical balances that establish and maintain the differential rotation and magnetic wreaths. Magnetic reversals are attributed to an imbalance in the poloidal magnetic induction by convective motions that is stabilized at higher diffusion levels. Additionally, the enhanced levels of turbulence lead to greater intermittency in the toroidal magnetic wreaths, promoting the generation of buoyant magnetic loops that rise from the deep interior to the upper regions of our simulated domain. The implications of such turbulence-induced magnetic buoyancy for solar and stellar flux emergence are also discussed.

  5. Magnetic cycles at different ages of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, K.; Kővári, Zs.; Petrovay, K.; Soon, W.; Baliunas, S.; Kolláth, Z.; Vida, K.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We study the different patterns of interannual magnetic variability in stars on or near the lower main sequence, approximately solar-type (G-K dwarf) stars in time series of 36 yr from the Mount Wilson Observatory Ca ii H&K survey. Our main aim is to search for correlations between cycles, activity measures, and ages. Methods: Time-frequency analysis has been used to discern and reveal patterns and morphology of stellar activity cycles, including multiple and changing cycles, in the datasets. Both the results from short-term Fourier transform and its refinement using the Choi-Williams distribution, with better frequency resolution, are presented in this study. Rotational periods of the stars were derived using multifrequency Fourier analysis. Results: We found at least one activity cycle on 28 of the 29 stars we studied. Twelve stars, with longer rotational periods (39.7 ± 6.0 days), have simple smooth cycles, and the remaining stars, with much faster rotation (18.1 ± 12.2 days) on average, show complex and sometimes vigorously changing multiple cycles. The cycles are longer and quite uniform in the first group (9.7 ± 1.9 yr), while they are generally shorter and vary more strongly in the second group (7.6 ± 4.9). The clear age division between stars with smooth and complex cycles follows the known separation between the older and younger stars at around 2 to 3 Gyr of age.

  6. Quadrupole magnet for a rapid cycling synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, H.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    Rapid Cycling Synchrotrons (RCS) feature interleaved warm and cold dipole magnets; the field of the warm magnets is used to modulate the average bending field depending on the particle energy. It has been shown that RCS can be an attractive option for fast acceleration of particles, for example, muons, which decay quickly. In previous studies it was demonstrated that in principle warm dipole magnets can be designed which can provide the required ramp rates, which are equivalent to frequencies of about 1 kHz. To reduce the losses it is beneficial to employ two separate materials for the yoke; it was also shown that by employing an optimized excitation coil geometry the eddy current losses are acceptable. In this paper we show that the same principles can be applied to quadrupole magnets targeting 30 T/m with a repetition rate of 1kHz and good field quality.

  7. Magnetic Stirling cycles - A new application for magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    There is the prospect of a fundamental new application for magnetic materials as the working substance in thermodynamic cycles. Recuperative cycles which use a rare-earth ferromagnetic material near its Curie point in the field of a superconducting magnet appear feasible for applications from below 20 K to above room temperature. The elements of the cycle, advanced in an earlier paper, are summarized. The basic advantages include high entropy density in the magnetic material, completely reversible processes, convenient control of the entropy by the applied field, the feature that heat transfer is possible during all processes, and the ability of the ideal cycle to attain Carnot efficiency. The mean field theory is used to predict the entropy of a ferromagnet in an applied field and also the isothermal entropy change and isentropic temperature change caused by applying a field. Results are presented for J = 7/2 and g = 2. The results for isentropic temperature change are compared with experimental data on Gd. Coarse mixtures of ferromagnetic materials with different Curie points are proposed to modify the path of the cycle in the T-S diagram in order to improve the efficiency or to increase the specific power.

  8. Solar cycle variation of network magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. X.; Jin, C. L.

    With the unique database from Michelson Doppler Imager aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in an interval embodying solar cycle 23, the cyclic behavior of solar small-scale magnetic elements is studied. More than 13 million solar network magnetic elements are selected, and the following results are discussed. (1) With increasing flux per element, the number variation of the network elements shows a three-fold scenario: no-correlation, anti-correlation, and correlation with sunspots, respectively. The anti-correlated elements cover flux range of (2.9 - 32.0)× 10^{18} Mx, and occupy 77.2% of total network elements. (2) The latitude distribution of the correlated elements follows the sunspot butterfly diagram in the solar cycle but has wider latitude distribution than sunspots. Furthermore, the anti-correlated elements also show much broad latitude distribution, but a moderate migration toward equator during the solar maximum which was clearly out of phase with sunspots. These results shed new light in understanding anti-correlated variations of small-scale solar activity, e.g., X-ray coronal bright points, and the origin of the Sun's small-scale magnetism.

  9. Magnetic stirling cycles: A new application for magnetic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    The elements of the cycle are summarized. The basic advantages include high entropy density in the magnetic material, completely reversible processes, convenient control of the entropy by the applied field, the feature that heat transfer is possible during all processes, and the ability of the ideal cycle to attain Carnot efficiency. The mean field theory is used to predict the entropy of a ferromagnet in an applied field and also the isothermal entropy change and isentropic temperature change caused by applying a field. The results for isentropic temperature change are compared with experimental data on Gd. Coarse mixtures of ferromagnetic materials with different Curie points are proposed to modify the path of the cycle in the T-S diagram in order to improve the efficiency or to increase the specific power.

  10. Influence of moderate cycling on scrotal temperature.

    PubMed

    Jung, A; Strauss, P; Lindner, H J; Schuppe, H C

    2008-08-01

    Testicular temperature highly correlates with scrotal temperature. It has been postulated that cycling is associated with increased scrotal temperatures with time and consecutively with impaired semen quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of moderate cycling on scrotal temperature during highly standardized conditions in an experimental lab. A total of 25 volunteers without a history of infertility and normal andrological examination were included for scrotal temperature evaluation. Scrotal temperatures were measured every minute with a portable data recorder connected with two thermistor temperature sensors, which were attached on either side of the scrotum. A further thermistor sensor was attached on the central surface of the bicycle saddle. Ambient temperature in the study room was adjusted to 22 degrees C throughout the whole experiment. All volunteers started the experiment at the same daytime. Clothing of the volunteers consisted of standardized cotton wool trousers and shirts fitting to body size. After acclimatization to the study room in a sitting posture, each volunteer cycled on an exercise cycle for 60 min with a power of 25 Watt representing a speed of 25.45 km/h respectively. The saddle surface temperature reached in the median 35.59 degrees C after 60 min cycling. Median values of scrotal temperatures increased from 35.75 degrees C at the beginning to 35.82 degrees C after 60 min for the left side and from 35.50 to 35.59 degrees C for the right side. No correlation between cycling duration and scrotal temperatures could be found using multivariate anova for repeated measurements. However, scrotal temperatures during cycling were significantly lower (p < 0.001) compared with the last 10 min in sitting posture before starting cycling with a difference of 1.31 degrees C for the left and 1.46 degrees C for the right side. The present study suggests that moderate cycling under standardized conditions with a power of 25 Watt is not

  11. Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Uchida, Mona; Tomioka, Michiko; Matsuki, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition. PMID:27580019

  12. Desktop fast-field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometer.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Duarte Mesquita; Marques, Gil Domingos; Cascais, José Manuel; Sebastião, Pedro José

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a new type of Fast Field Cycling (FFC) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxometer with low power consumption (200W) and cycle to cycle field stability better than 10(-4) is described. The new high-permeability magnet was designed to allow for good magnetic field homogeneity and allows for the sample rotation around an axis perpendicular to magnetic field, operating with magnetic fields between 0 and 0.21T. The power supply of the new relaxometer was specially developed in order to have steady state accurate currents and allow for magnetic field switching times less than 3ms. Additional control circuits were developed and included to compensate the Earth magnetic field component parallel to the field axis and to compensate for parasitic currents. The main aspects of the developed circuits together with some calibrating experimental results using the liquid crystal compounds 5CB and 8CB are presented and discussed. PMID:20688489

  13. Attosecond-magnetic-field-pulse generation by intense few-cycle circularly polarized UV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-07-01

    Intense attosecond-magnetic-field pulses are predicted to be produced by intense few-cycle attosecond circularly polarized UV pulses. Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for H2+ are used to study the electronic dynamical process. Spinning attosecond circular electron wave packets are created on subnanometer molecular dimensions, thus generating attosecond magnetic fields of several tens of Teslas (105 G). Simulations show that the induced magnetic field is critically dependent on the pulse wavelength λ and pulse duration nτ (n is number of cycles) as predicted by a classical model. For ultrashort few-cycle circularly polarized attosecond pulses, molecular orientation influences the generation of the induced magnetic fields as a result of preferential ionization perpendicular to the molecular axis. The nonspherical asymmetry of molecules allows for efficient attosecond-magnetic-field-pulse generation.

  14. The connection between stellar activity cycles and magnetic field topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Boro Saikia, S.; Bouvier, J.; Fares, R.; Folsom, C. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Moutou, C.; do Nascimento, J. D.; Petit, P.; Waite, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Zeeman Doppler imaging has successfully mapped the large-scale magnetic fields of stars over a large range of spectral types, rotation periods and ages. When observed over multiple epochs, some stars show polarity reversals in their global magnetic fields. On the Sun, polarity reversals are a feature of its activity cycle. In this paper, we examine the magnetic properties of stars with existing chromospherically determined cycle periods. Previous authors have suggested that cycle periods lie on multiple branches, either in the cycle period-Rossby number plane or the cycle period-rotation period plane. We find some evidence that stars along the active branch show significant average toroidal fields that exhibit large temporal variations while stars exclusively on the inactive branch remain dominantly poloidal throughout their entire cycle. This lends credence to the idea that different shear layers are in operation along each branch. There is also evidence that the short magnetic polarity switches observed on some stars are characteristic of the inactive branch while the longer chromospherically determined periods are characteristic of the active branch. This may explain the discrepancy between the magnetic and chromospheric cycle periods found on some stars. These results represent a first attempt at linking global magnetic field properties obtained form ZDI and activity cycles.

  15. The Otto thermodynamic cycle using the magnetic molecule Ni2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Wolfgang; Dong, Chuanding; Lefkidis, Georgios

    2012-02-01

    In order to design realistic molecular heat engines, the study of quantum thermodynamics is essential since classical thermodynamics does not apply in this extreme miniaturization limit [1,2]. Realizing a thermodynamic cycle on an existing magnetic molecule embodies a novel and unique approach to understand and exploit the thermodynamic properties of spin at the molecular level.Here we propose an Otto cycle in the Ni2 dimer based on a fully ab-initio calculation of the electronic states and the perturbative inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. A laser pulse, described by the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation, is used to heat the Ni2 dimer. The pulse not only excites the electrons to higher, many-body electronic states, but also influences the spin of the system due to spin-orbit coupling. Using a low-temperature thermal bath the system is cooled back to the ground state. The adiabatic work exchange between the Ni2 and the environment is described by the quasi-static expansion or compression of the bond length of the dimer. The calculated efficiency of the cycle is up to 34%.[1] T. D. Kieu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 140403 (2004)[2] H. T. Quan, Phys. Rev. E 79 041129 (2009)[3] T. Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. A 75 062102 (2007)

  16. Influence of Solar Cycles on Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, M.

    2011-12-01

    This research inspects possible influence of solar cycles on earthquakes through of statistical analyses. We also discussed the mechanism that would drive the occurrence of increasing of earthquakes during solar maxima. The study was based on worldwide earthquakes events during approximately four hundred years (1600-2010). The increase of earthquakes events followed the Maxima of Solar cycle, and also depends on the tectonic plate location. From 1600 until 1645 events increased during the Maxima in some of the tectonic plates as Pacific, Arabian and South America. The earthquakes analyzed during two grand solar minima, the Maunder (1645-1720) and the Dalton (1790-1820) showed a decrease in the number of earthquakes and the solar activity. It was observed during these minima a significant number of events at specific geological features. After the last minima (Dalton) the earthquakes pattern increased with solar maxima. The calculations showed that events increasing during solar maxima most in the Pacific, South America or Arabian until 1900. Since there were few records during these three centuries we needed additional analysis on modern data. We took the last four solar cycles events (1950-2010) and made similar calculations. The results agreed with the former calculations. It might be that the mechanism for the Sun-Earth connection relies on the solar wind speed. In both records (1600-1900) and (1950-2010) the results showed a significant increase in earthquakes events in some of the tectonic plates linked to solar maxima. The Solar wind energy striking the Earth's magnetosphere affects the entire environment because the pressure on the region increases and the magnetosphere shrinks sometimes four Earth's radii. This sudden compression causes earthquakes in specific plates. During the times of solar minima the pressure from the solar wind on the earth decreases, then the magnetosphere expands and earthquakes happen in a different pattern according to the

  17. Intense magnetic fields at 1 AU: Solar cycle 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; King, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Of the intense magnetic fields (greater than 13 gamma) observed at 1 AU during solar cycle 20 (1973-1975), 92% were associated with shocks, stream interfaces, or cold magnetic enhancements (CMEs). Most (52%) of the magnetic field intensity enhancements occurred at stream interfaces; 27% occurred behind shocks without interfaces; and 11% occurred in CMEs. The most intense fields (25 gamma to 37 gamma) followed shocks. Magnetic field intensities at interfaces did not exceed 25 gamma, suggesting a mechanism such as a magnetoacoustic wave limits the intensity ahead of streams. Intense magnetic fields persist longest behind shocks.

  18. Lanthanide Al-Ni base Ericsson cycle magnetic refrigerants

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-10-31

    A magnetic refrigerant for a magnetic refrigerator using the Ericsson thermodynamic cycle comprises DyAlNi and (Gd{sub 0.54}Er{sub 0.46})AlNi alloys having a relatively constant {Delta}Tmc over a wide temperature range. 16 figs.

  19. Lanthanide Al-Ni base Ericsson cycle magnetic refrigerants

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-10-31

    A magnetic refrigerant for a magnetic refrigerator using the Ericsson thermodynamic cycle comprises DyAlNi and (Gd.sub.0.54 Er.sub.0.46)AlNi alloys having a relatively constant .DELTA.Tmc over a wide temperature range.

  20. Solar Cycle: Magnetized March to Equator

    NASA Video Gallery

    Bands of magnetized solar material – with alternating south and north polarity – march toward the sun's equator. Comparing the evolution of the bands with the sunspot number in each hemisphere over...

  1. Solar cycle variations in the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    ISEE 3 interplanetary magnetic field measurements have been used to extend the NSSDC hourly averaged IMF composite data set through mid-1982. Most of sunspot cycle 20 (start:1964) and the first half of cycle 21 (start:1976) are now covered. The average magnitude of the field was relatively constant over cycle 20 with approx. 5-10% decreases in 1969 and 1971, when the Sun's polar regions changed polarity, and a 20% decrease in 1975-6 around solar minimum. Since the start of the new cycle, the total field strength has risen with the mean for the first third of 1982 being about 40% greater than the cycle 20 average. As during the previous cycle, an approx. 10% drop in IMF magnitude accompanied the 1980 reversal of the solar magnetic field. While the interplanetary magnetic field is clearly stronger during the present solar cycle, another 5-7 years of observations will be needed to determine if cycle 21 exhibits the same modest variations as the last cycle. Accordingly, it appears at this time that intercycle changes in IMF magnitude may be much larger than the intracycle variations.

  2. Magnetic cycles in global magnetohydrodynamical simulations of solar convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I will review some recent advances in our understanding of the solar magnetic cycle through global magnetohydrodynamical simulations of thermally-driven convection in a thick, stratified spherical shell of electrically conducting fluid. I will focus on three related issues: (1) the nature of the turbulent dynamo mechanism; (2) the nature of the mechanism(s) controlling the cycle amplitude; and (3) epochs of strongly suppressed cycle amplitudes, and the existence of possible precursor to such events to be found in the patterns of magnetically-driven torsional oscillations and meridional flow variations arising in the simulations.

  3. Magnetic Cycles and Buoyant Magnetic Structures in a Rapidly Rotating Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Brown, B. P.; Brun, S.; Miesch, M. S.; Toomre, J.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of sun-like stars rotating faster than our current sun show that they exhibit solar-like magnetic cycles and features, such as star spots. Using global 3-D simulations to study the coupling of large-scale convection, rotation, and magnetism in a younger sun, we have probed the effects of more rapid rotation on stellar dynamos and the nature of magnetic cycles. Our anelastic spherical harmonics (ASH) code allows study of the convective envelope, occupying the outer 30% by radius of a sun-like star. Major MHD simulations carried out at three times the current solar rotation rate reveal magnetic dynamo action that can produce wreaths of strong toroidal magnetic field at low latitudes, often with opposite polarity in the two hemispheres. The presence of the wreaths is quite surprising, for they arise as quite persistent global structures amidst the vigorous and turbulent convection. We have recently explored behavior in systems with considerably lower diffusivities, achieved with a dynamic Smagorinsky treatment of unresolved turbulence. The lower levels of diffusion create magnetic wreaths that undergo prominent variations in field strength, even exhibiting global magnetic cycles that involve polarity reversals. Additionally, during the cycle maximum, when magnetic energies and mean magnetic fields peak, the wreaths possess buoyant magnetic structures that rise coherently through much of the convective envelope via a combination of advection by convective upflows and magnetic buoyancy. We explore aspects of these rising magnetic structures and the evolving global dynamo action which produces them.

  4. Experimental simulation of a magnetic refrigeration cycle in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilmieva, E. T.; Kamantsev, A. P.; Koledov, V. V.; Mashirov, A. V.; Shavrov, V. G.; Cwik, J.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    The complete magnetic refrigeration cycle has been simulated on a sample of gadolinium in magnetic fields of a Bitter coil magnet up to 12 T. The total change of temperature of the sample during the cycle is a consequence of magnetic refrigeration, and the dependence of the magnetization of the sample on the magnetic field exhibits a hysteretic behavior. This makes it possible to determine the work done by the magnetic field on the sample during the magnetic refrigeration cycle and to calculate the coefficient of performance of the process. In a magnetic field of 2 T near the Curie temperature of gadolinium, the coefficient of performance of the magnetic refrigeration is found to be 92. With an increase in the magnetic field, the coefficient of performance of the process decreases sharply down to 15 in a magnetic field of 12 T. The reasons, for which the coefficient of performance of the magnetic refrigeration is significantly below the fundamental limitations imposed by the reversed Carnot theorem, have been discussed.

  5. Lithium-Ion Battery Cycling for Magnetism Control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingyun; Luo, Xi; Wang, Luning; Zhang, Lifang; Khalid, Bilal; Gong, Jianghong; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-13

    Magnetization and electric-field coupling is fundamentally interesting and important. Specifically, current- or voltage-driven magnetization switching at room temperature is highly desirable from scientific and technological viewpoints. Herein, we demonstrate that magnetization can be controlled via the discharge-charge cycling of a lithium-ion battery (LIB) with rationally designed electrode nanomaterials. Reversible manipulation of magnetism over 3 orders of magnitude was achieved by controlling the lithiation/delithiation of a nanoscale α-Fe2O3-based electrode. The process was completed rapidly under room-temperature conditions. Our results indicate that in addition to energy storage LIBs, which have been under continuous development for several decades, provide exciting opportunities for the multireversible magnetization of magnetic fields. PMID:26654117

  6. Sun's Polar Magnetic Field Reversals in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishkalo, M. I.; Leiko, U. M.

    It is known that polar magnetic field of the Sun changes its sign at the maximum of solar cycle. These changes were called as polar field reversals. We investigated dynamics of high-latitude solar magnetic fields separately in northern and southern hemispheres. Solar polar field strength measurements from the Wilcox Solar Observatory and low-resolution synoptic magnetic maps from the SOLIS project and from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory were used. We analyzed total magnetic flux at near-polar zones, starting from 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and 85 degrees of latitude, and found time points when the total magnetic flux changed its sign. It was concluded that total magnetic flux changed its sign at first at lower latitudes and finally near the poles. Single polar magnetic field reversal was found in the southern hemisphere. The northern hemisphere was characterized by three-fold magnetic field reversal. Polar magnetic field reversals finished in northern and southern hemispheres by CR 2150 and CR 2162, respectively.

  7. On the Influence of the Solar Bi-Cycle on Comic Ray Modulatio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifter, N. Part Xxvii: A. Defect Of The Solar Dynamo. B.; Scissors, K.; Sprucener, H.

    In this presentation we propose a new paradigm that explains the different lengths of individual solar Hale cycles. It proves beneficial to distinguish between a so-called inHale and ex-Hale cycle, which together form the solar bi-cycle. We carefully analyzed the influence of so-called complex mode excitations (CMEs) on comic ray modulation, in particular on the drifts of the comic isotope O+3 , which we found to induce characteristic anisotropies. This comic isotope anisotropy (CIA) is caused by the wellknown north-south asymmetry (NSA) and can be observed as a rare Forbush increase (FBI). The latter is linked to the solar magnetic field which appears to have a chaotic behaviour (for details see part I-XXVI). Especially during an ex-Hale cycle magnetic flux is pseudo-pneumatically escaping through a coronal hole. Consequently, the solar dynamo can no longer operate efficiently, i.e. is defect.

  8. Towards better constrained models of the solar magnetic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres

    2010-12-01

    The best tools we have for understanding the origin of solar magnetic variability are kinematic dynamo models. During the last decade, this type of models has seen a continuous evolution and has become increasingly successful at reproducing solar cycle characteristics. The basic ingredients of these models are: the solar differential rotation -- which acts as the main source of energy for the system by shearing the magnetic field; the meridional circulation -- which plays a crucial role in magnetic field transport; the turbulent diffusivity -- which attempts to capture the effect of convective turbulence on the large scale magnetic field; and the poloidal field source -- which closes the cycle by regenerating the poloidal magnetic field. However, most of these ingredients remain poorly constrained which allows one to obtain solar-like solutions by "tuning" the input parameters, leading to controversy regarding which parameter set is more appropriate. In this thesis we revisit each of those ingredients in an attempt to constrain them better by using observational data and theoretical considerations, reducing the amount of free parameters in the model. For the meridional flow and differential rotation we use helioseismic data to constrain free parameters and find that the differential rotation is well determined, but the available data can only constrain the latitudinal dependence of the meridional flow. For the turbulent magnetic diffusivity we show that combining mixing-length theory estimates with magnetic quenching allows us to obtain viable magnetic cycles and that the commonly used diffusivity profiles can be understood as a spatiotemporal average of this process. For the poloidal source we introduce a more realistic way of modeling active region emergence and decay and find that this resolves existing discrepancies between kinematic dynamo models and surface flux transport simulations. We also study the physical mechanisms behind the unusually long minimum of

  9. Magnetic Flux Conservation in the Heliosheath Including Solar Cycle Variations of Magnetic Field Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, A. T.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Tóth, G.

    2015-04-01

    In the heliosheath (HS), Voyager 2 has observed a flow with constant radial velocity and magnetic flux conservation. Voyager 1, however, has observed a decrease in the flow’s radial velocity and an order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux. We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variation of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic flux within the HS using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN and interplanetary scintillations data and implemented solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27 day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database. With the inclusion of the solar cycle time-dependent magnetic field intensity, the model matches the observed intensity of the magnetic field in the HS along both Voyager 1 and 2. This is a significant improvement from the same model without magnetic field solar cycle variations, which was over a factor of two larger. The model accurately predicts the radial velocity observed by Voyager 2; however, the model predicts a flow speed ˜100 km s-1 larger than that derived from LECP measurements at Voyager 1. In the model, magnetic flux is conserved along both Voyager trajectories, contrary to observations. This implies that the solar cycle variations in solar wind magnetic field observed at 1 AU does not cause the order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux observed in the Voyager 1 data.

  10. DYNAMO ACTION AND MAGNETIC CYCLES IN F-TYPE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Augustson, Kyle C.; Toomre, Juri; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2013-11-10

    Magnetic activity and differential rotation are commonly observed features on main-sequence F-type stars. We seek to make contact with such observations and to provide a self-consistent picture of how differential rotation and magnetic fields arise in the interiors of these stars. The three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic code is employed to simulate global-scale convection and dynamo processes in a 1.2 M{sub ☉} F-type star at two rotation rates. The simulations are carried out in spherical shells that encompass most of the convection zone and a portion of the stably stratified radiative zone below it, allowing us to explore the effects a stable zone has upon the morphology of the global-scale magnetic fields. We find that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs in the star rotating more rapidly at 20 Ω{sub ☉}, with the polarity of the mean field reversing on a timescale of about 1600 days. Between reversals, the magnetic energy rises and falls with a fairly regular period, with three magnetic energy cycles required to complete a reversal. The magnetic energy cycles and polarity reversals arise due to a linking of the polar-slip instability in the stable region and dynamo action present in the convection zone. For the more slowly rotating case (10 Ω{sub ☉}), persistent wreaths of magnetism are established and maintained by dynamo action. Compared to their hydrodynamic progenitors, the dynamo states here involve a marked reduction in the exhibited latitudinal differential rotation, which also vary during the course of a cycle.

  11. Solar cycle according to mean magnetic field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obridko, V. N.; Sokoloff, D. D.; Kuzanyan, K. M.; Shelting, B. D.; Zakharov, V. G.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the shape of the solar cycle, we have performed a wavelet analysis of the large-scale magnetic field data for 1960-2000 for several latitudinal belts and have isolated the following quasi-periodic components: ~22, 7 and 2 yr. The main 22-yr oscillation dominates all latitudinal belts except the latitudes of +/-30° from the equator. The butterfly diagram for the nominal 22-yr oscillation shows a standing dipole wave in the low-latitude domain (|θ|<= 30°) and another wave in the sub-polar domain (|θ|>= 35°), which migrates slowly polewards. The phase shift between these waves is about π. The nominal 7-yr oscillation yields a butterfly diagram with two domains. In the low-latitude domain (|θ|<= 35°), the dipole wave propagates equatorwards and in the sub-polar region, polewards. The nominal 2-yr oscillation is much more chaotic than the other two modes; however the waves propagate polewards whenever they can be isolated. We conclude that the shape of the solar cycle inferred from the large-scale magnetic field data differs significantly from that inferred from sunspot data. Obviously, the dynamo models for a solar cycle must be generalized to include large-scale magnetic field data. We believe that sunspot data give adequate information concerning the magnetic field configuration deep inside the convection zone (say, in overshoot later), while the large-scale magnetic field is strongly affected by meridional circulation in its upper layer. This interpretation suggests that the poloidal magnetic field is affected by the polewards meridional circulation, whose velocity is comparable with that of the dynamo wave in the overshoot layer. The 7- and 2-yr oscillations could be explained as a contribution of two sub-critical dynamo modes with the corresponding frequencies.

  12. The influence of magnetic aftereffects on the magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashukov, A.; Mashukova, A.

    2012-04-01

    There were investigated the time dependences of the magnetic anisotropy characteristics of artificial depositions received in the geomagnetic field. The content of magnetite in the nonmagnetic matrix of kaolin did not exceed 1%. The Co content in the grains of magnetite Fe3 O4 was 0.0018%. The viscous magnetization was created in the depositions with grain sizes of Fe3O4 in micrometers (0 ÷ 8), (9 ÷ 16), (17 ÷ 32), (33 ÷ 64), (65 ÷ 100), (101 ÷ 150). The X-ray method of direct pole figures indicates that the intensity of the ordering of the ferromagnetic grains in the depositions depends strongly on the grain size in the above-mentioned ranges, getting reduced from 1.9 to 1.1. Compared with the characteristics received immediately after drying the samples and after holding them for two years in the earth's magnetic field in the direction of In, one could observe increase in all the characteristics of the magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude Hd of the magnetic field having the periodicity change of Hd 2π to π increases. This indicates the stabilization of the new domain structure. The increase in the uniaxial anisotropy constant (K) is associated with the emergence of the large induced anisotropy due to the diffusion of Co ions. It was found out that the constant K decreases markedly with increasing particle size in the range from 8 mm to 40 microns. Based on the results of the X-ray analysis by using the method direct pole figures, it may be explained by the creation of the axial texture in the depositions with grains having the size less than 40 microns. The intensity of more than 40 microns decreases insignificantly - from 1.3 to 1.1. After creating the viscous magnetization in two years, the constant K has increased by 1.5 - 2 times. The influence of the magnetic after-effects on K in strong magnetic fields denotes the diffusion nature of the viscous magnetization. The losses of the rotational magnetic hysteresis (W) also rise in the presence of the

  13. Plasma heating via adiabatic magnetic compression-expansion cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, K.; Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of collisionless plasmas in closed adiabatic magnetic cycle comprising of a quasi static compression followed by a non quasi static constrained expansion against a constant external pressure is proposed. Thermodynamic constraints are derived to show that the plasma always gains heat in cycles having at least one non quasi static process. The turbulent relaxation of the plasma to the equilibrium state at the end of the non quasi static expansion is discussed and verified via 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations. Applications of this scheme to heating plasmas in open configurations (mirror machines) and closed configurations (tokamak, reverse field pinche) are discussed.

  14. The Heliospheric Magnetic Field Over the Hale Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwardron, N. A.; Owens, M.; Crooker, N. U.

    2008-01-01

    The concept that open magnetic flux of the Sun (rooted with one and only one footpoint at the Sun) is a conserved quantity is taking root in the heliospheric community. Observations show that the Sun's open magnetic flux returns to the baseline from one solar minimum to the next. The temporary enhancement in the 1AU heliospheric magnetic flux near solar maximum can be accounted for by the temporary creation of closed magnetic flux (with two footpoints at the Sun) during the ejection of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which are more frequent near solar maximum. As a part of the International Heliophysical Year activities, this paper reviews two recently discussed consequences of open flux conservation: the reversal of open magnetic flux over the solar cycle driven by Coronal Mass Ejections and the impacts of open flux conservation on the global structure of the heliospheric magnetic field. These studies demonstrate the inherent linkages between coronal mass ejections, footpoint motions back at the Sun, and the global structure and evolution of the heliospheric magnetic field.

  15. Magnetic Cycles and Buoyant Loops in Convective Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Solar-type stars display a rich spectrum of magnetic activity. Seeking to explore convective dynamo action in solar-like stars with the anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code, we have carried out a series of global 3-D MHD simulations. Here we report on the dynamo mechanisms realized in a series of numerical models of a sun-like star which explore the effects of decreasing diffusion. While these models nominally rotate at three times the current solar rate (3Ω), the results may be more widely applicable as both these simulations and the solar convection zone achieve similar levels of rotationally constrained convection. Previous simulations at 3Ω have shown that convective dynamos can build persistent wreath-like structures of strong toroidal magnetic field in the convection zone (Brown et al. 2010). Here we find that magnetic reversals and cycles can be realized at 3Ω by decreasing the explicit diffusion and thereby making the resolved flows more turbulent. In these more turbulent models, diffusive processes no longer play a primary role in the key dynamical balances which maintain differential rotation and generate the global-scale wreaths. With reduced resistive diffusion of magnetic fields, the axisymmetric poloidal fields can no longer achieve a steady state and this triggers reversals in global magnetic polarity. Additionally, the enhanced levels of turbulence lead to greater intermittency in the toroidal magnetic wreaths, which can create buoyant magnetic loops that rise from the deep interior to the upper regions of our simulated domain. Turbulence-enabled magnetic buoyancy in our most turbulent simulation yields large numbers of buoyant loops, enabling us to examine the distribution of the characteristics of buoyant magnetic loops, such as twist, tilt angle, and relation to axisymmetric fields. These models provide a pathway towards linking convective dynamo models and the emergence of magnetic flux in the Sun and sun-like stars.

  16. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  17. Magnetic Cloud Polarity and Geomagnetic Activities over Three Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luhmann, J.

    2006-12-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) that show fluxrope magnetic structures are named magnetic clouds (MCs). Majority of the MCs exhibit bipolar signature in their north-south component (Bz) in IMF measurements. The Bz component of a bipolar cloud is either NS (north first then turning south as the MC traverses the spacecraft) or SN. Studies show that the occurrence of these two types of MCs has some solar cycle dependence. However it appears to be a complex relationship as the switch between the two types of MCs is not concurrent with either the solar polar reversal or the time of the sunspot minimum when the new cycle sunspots start to appear. In this paper, we use ACE solar wind and IMF observations to obtain the most updated MC signatures and their temporal variation. In combination with our previously published results, we analyze MC polarity variations over the three solar cycles of 21, 22 and 23. Interpretations in terms of their solar sources will be attempted. On the other hand, the geomagnetic activities over the same solar cycles will be studied using geomagnetic indices. The geoeffectiveness of the MC will be evaluated in the aid of Dst indices.

  18. Solar-Cycle Evolution of Subsurface Flows and Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Local helioseismology and magnetic field measurements from the HMI instrument on SDO provide unique high-resolution data that allow us to investigate detailed dynamics of the upper convection zone and its relation to the magnetic field evolution during the first five years of the current solar cycle. This study is focused on the understanding the role of the near-surface shear layer (NSSL) in the dynamo process, generation, emergence and transport of the solar magnetic flux. The helioseismology data represent 3D flow maps in the depth range of 0-20 Mm, obtained uninterruptedly every 8 hours for almost the whole solar disk with the spatial sampling of two arcsec. We calculate the flow characteristics (such as divergence, vorticity and kinetic helicity) on different spatio-temporal scales from supergranulation to global-scale zonal and meridional flows. We investigate the multi-scale organization of the subsurface flows, including the inflows into active regions, the hemispheric `flip-flop’ asymmetry of variations of the meridional flows, the structure and dynamics of torsional oscillations, and compare the flow behavior with the evolution of the observed magnetic activity of the current cycle.

  19. Magnetic field influence on paramecium motility

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.F.; Rosen, A.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The influence of a moderately intense static magnetic field on movement patterns of free swimming Paramecium was studied. When exposed to fields of 0.126 T, these ciliated protozoa exhibited significant reduction in velocity as well as a disorganization of movement pattern. It is suggested that these findings may be explained on the basis of alteration in function of ion specific channels within the cell membrane.

  20. Properties of Magnetic Tongues over a Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Mariano; Démoulin, Pascal; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Mandrini, Cristina H.

    2016-08-01

    The photospheric spatial distribution of the main magnetic polarities of bipolar active regions (ARs) present during their emergence deformations are known as magnetic tongues. They are attributed to the presence of twist in the toroidal magnetic-flux tubes that form the ARs. The aim of this article is to study the twist of newly emerged ARs from the evolution of magnetic tongues observed in photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms. We apply the procedure described by Poisson et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 727, 2015a) to ARs observed over the full Solar Cycle 23 and the beginning of Cycle 24. Our results show that the hemispherical rule obtained using the tongues as a proxy of the twist has a weak sign dominance (53 % in the southern hemisphere and 58 % in the northern hemisphere). By defining the variation of the tongue angle, we characterize the strength of the magnetic tongues during different phases of the AR emergence. We find that there is a tendency of the tongues to be stronger during the beginning of the emergence and to become weaker as the AR reaches its maximum magnetic flux. We compare this evolution with the emergence of a toroidal flux-rope model with non-uniform twist. The variety of evolution of the tongues in the analyzed ARs can only be reproduced when using a broad range of twist profiles, in particular having a large variety of twist gradients in the direction vertical to the photosphere. Although the analytical model used is a special case, selected to minimize the complexity of the problem, the results obtained set new observational constraints to theoretical models of flux-rope emergence that form bipolar ARs.

  1. Properties of Magnetic Tongues over a Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Mariano; Démoulin, Pascal; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Mandrini, Cristina H.

    2016-07-01

    The photospheric spatial distribution of the main magnetic polarities of bipolar active regions (ARs) present during their emergence deformations are known as magnetic tongues. They are attributed to the presence of twist in the toroidal magnetic-flux tubes that form the ARs. The aim of this article is to study the twist of newly emerged ARs from the evolution of magnetic tongues observed in photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms. We apply the procedure described by Poisson et al. (Solar Phys. 290, 727, 2015a) to ARs observed over the full Solar Cycle 23 and the beginning of Cycle 24. Our results show that the hemispherical rule obtained using the tongues as a proxy of the twist has a weak sign dominance (53 % in the southern hemisphere and 58 % in the northern hemisphere). By defining the variation of the tongue angle, we characterize the strength of the magnetic tongues during different phases of the AR emergence. We find that there is a tendency of the tongues to be stronger during the beginning of the emergence and to become weaker as the AR reaches its maximum magnetic flux. We compare this evolution with the emergence of a toroidal flux-rope model with non-uniform twist. The variety of evolution of the tongues in the analyzed ARs can only be reproduced when using a broad range of twist profiles, in particular having a large variety of twist gradients in the direction vertical to the photosphere. Although the analytical model used is a special case, selected to minimize the complexity of the problem, the results obtained set new observational constraints to theoretical models of flux-rope emergence that form bipolar ARs.

  2. Estrous cycle phase and gonadal hormones influence conditioned fear extinction

    PubMed Central

    Milad, Mohammed R; Igoe, Sarah A; Lebron-Milad, Kelimer; Novales, Juan E

    2009-01-01

    Gonadal hormones modulate fear acquisition, but less is known about the influence of gonadal hormones on fear extinction. We assessed sex differences and the influence of gonadal hormone fluctuations and exogenous manipulations of estrogen and progesterone on acquisition, extinction learning and extinction recall in a 3-day auditory fear conditioning and extinction protocol. Experiments were conducted on males and naturally cycling female rats. Regarding female rats, significant differences in fear extinction were observed between subgroups of females, depending on their phase of the estrous cycle. Extinction that took place during the proestrus (high estrogen/progesterone) phase was more fully consolidated, as evidenced by low freezing during a recall test. This suggests that estrogen and/or progesterone facilitate extinction. In support of this, injection of both estrogen and progesterone prior to extinction learning in female rats during the metestrus phase of the cycle (low estrogen/progesterone) facilitated extinction consolidation, and blockade of estrogen and progesterone receptors during the proestrus phase impaired extinction consolidation. When comparing male to female rats without consideration of the estrous cycle phase, no significant sex differences were observed. When accounting for cycle phase in females, sex differences were observed only during extinction recall. Female rats that underwent extinction during the metestrus phase showed significantly higher freezing during the recall test relative to males. Collectively, these data suggest that gonadal hormones influence extinction behavior possibly by influencing the function of brain regions involved in the consolidation of fear extinction. Moreover, the elevated fear observed in female relative to male rats during extinction recall suggests that gonadal hormones may in part play a role in the higher prevalence of anxiety disorders in women. PMID:19761818

  3. Optimization of the performance characteristics in an irreversible regeneration magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Wu, GuoXing

    2012-02-01

    A model of the irreversible regenerative Brayton refrigeration cycle working with paramagnetic materials is established, in which the regeneration problem in two constant-magnetic field processes and the irreversibility in two adiabatic processes are considered synthetically. Expressions for the COP, cooling rate, power input, the minimum ratio of the two magnetic fields, etc., are derived. It is found that the influence of the irreversibility and the regeneration on the main performance parameters of the magnetic Brayton refrigerator is remarkable. It is important that we have obtained several optimal criteria, which may provide some theoretical basis for the optimal design and operation of the Brayton refrigerator. The results obtained in the paper can provide some new theoretical information for the optimal design and performance improvement of real Brayton refrigerators.

  4. Quadrupole mass filter operation under the influence of magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Syed, S U A H; Maher, S; Taylor, S

    2013-12-01

    This work demonstrates resolution enhancement of a quadrupole mass filter (QMF) under the influence of a static magnetic field. Generally, QMF resolution can be improved by increasing the number of rf cycles an ion experiences when passing through the mass filter. In order to improve the resolution, the dimensions of the QMF or the operating parameters need to be changed. However, geometric modifications to improve performance increase the manufacturing cost and usually the size of the instrument. By applying a magnetic field, a low-cost, small footprint instrument with reduced power requirements can be realized. Significant improvement in QMF resolution was observed experimentally for certain magnetic field conditions, and these have been explained in terms of our theoretical model developed at the University of Liverpool. This model is capable of accurate simulation of spectra allowing the user to specify different values of mass spectrometer dimensions and applied input signals. The model predicts enhanced instrument resolution R>26,000 for a CO2 and N2 mixture with a 200-mm long mass filter operating in stability zone 3 via application of an axial magnetic field. PMID:24338888

  5. Developing a Solar Magnetic Catalog Spanning Four Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werginz, Zachary; Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeLuca, Michael D.; Vargas Acosta, Juan Pablo; Vargas Dominguez, Santiago; Zhang, Jie; Longcope, Dana; Martens, Petrus C.

    2016-05-01

    Bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) are the cornerstone of solar cycle propagation, the building blocks that give structure to the solar atmosphere, and the origin of the majority of space weather events. However, in spite of their importance, there is no homogeneous BMR catalog spanning the era of systematic solar magnetic field measurements. Here we present the results of an ongoing project to address this deficiency applying the Bipolar Active Region Detection (BARD) code to magnetograms from the 512 Channel of the Kitt Peak Vaccum Telescope, SOHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI.The BARD code automatically identifies BMRs and tracks them as they are rotated by differential rotation. The output of the automatic detection is supervised by a human observer to correct possible mistakes made by the automatic algorithm (like incorrect pairings and tracking mislabels). Extra passes are made to integrate fragmented regions as well as to balance the flux between BMR polarities. At the moment, our BMR database includes 6,885 unique objects (detected and tracked) belonging to four separate solar cycles (21-24).

  6. Magnetic Influences on the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Lauren N.

    2016-01-01

    The Sun is our closest star, and even with the ability to resolve fine structure, there are several large mysteries that remain unsolved. One of these unanswered questions is how the supersonic outflow from the Sun, the solar wind, is generated and accelerated. In this dissertation, I have investigated the role of Alfvén waves in heating the corona and accelerating the wind. I focus on modeling of flux tubes that are open to the heliosphere, i.e. bundles of magnetic field that stretch beyond a few solar radii into the heliosphere. In these flux tubes, Alfvén waves are launched by the shaking of the footpoints from the convective motions of granulation on the solar photosphere. I present results of modeling efforts in one dimension that investigate how this process changes for a variety of different magnetic field structures over a solar cycle and three-dimensional modeling of time-dependent processes that unlock a connection between pico- and nanoflare-scale events and the turbulent heating generated by counter-propagating Alfvén waves. In addition to computational modeling, I also present efforts to find magnetic thresholds in observations of small-scale network jets seen with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). These jets were first discovered by IRIS due to their short lifetimes (10s of seconds) and small size (widths of 100s of kilometers). The findings for this project suggest that the modeled Alfvén-wave-driven turbulence is consistent with these network jets.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Joo Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-09

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π/2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-01

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π / 2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  9. Cycle Length Dependence of Stellar Magnetic Activity and Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hwajin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Oh, Suyeon; Kim, Bogyeong; Kim, Hoonkyu; Yi, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Solar cycle (SC) 23 was extraordinarily long with remarkably low magnetic activity. We have investigated whether this is a common behavior of solar-type stars. From the Ca ii H and K line intensities of 111 stars observed at Mount Wilson Observatory from 1966 to 1991, we have retrieved data of all 23 G-type stars and recalculated their cycle lengths using the damped least-squares method for the chromospheric activity index S as a function of time. A regression analysis was performed to find relations between the derived cycle length, Pavg, and the index for excess chromospheric emission, RHK\\prime . As a noteworthy result, we found a segregation between young and old solar-type stars in the cycle length-activity correlation. We incorporated the relation for the solar-type stars into the previously known rule for stellar chromospheric activity and brightness to estimate the variation of solar brightness from SC 22 to SC 23 as (0.12 ± 0.06)%, much higher than the actual variation of total solar irradiance (TSI) ≤0.02%. We have then examined solar spectral irradiance (SSI) to find a good phase correlation with a sunspot number in the wavelength range of 170-260 nm, which is close to the spectral range effective in heating the Earth’s atmosphere. Therefore, it appears that SSI rather than TSI is a good indicator of the chromospheric activity, and its cycle length dependent variation would be more relevant to the possible role of the Sun in the cyclic variation of the Earth’s atmosphere.

  10. Magnetic cycle of LQ Hydrae: observational indications and dynamo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.; Jardine, M.; Donati, J.-F.

    2000-11-01

    We present a model for the differential rotation and dynamo activity of the young rapidly rotating K0 dwarf LQ Hya (Prot=1.6d). As might be expected from observations of the similar rapid rotator AB Dor, the predicted differential rotation is small (~=0.8per cent) but extremely efficient in generating magnetic fields. The dynamo, which is of a distributed type, produces a globally axisymmetric field with radial and azimuthal components that are of the same magnitude and display a phase-lag in their evolution of about π/2. This is consistent with the long-term Zeeman-Doppler imaging study by Donati. The latitudinal distribution of flux is, however, a little different from that observed and the cycle period of 3.2yr is somewhat shorter than suggested by the observations.

  11. Menstrual cycle influences on voice and speech in adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Meurer, Elisea M; Garcez, Vera; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Capp, Edison

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize voice intensity and stability of fundamental frequency, formants and diadochokinesis, vocal modulations, rhythms, and speed of speech in adolescents during follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Twenty-three adolescent females who were nonusers of oral contraceptives participated in a cross-sectional study of menstrual cycle influences on voicing and speaking tasks. Acoustic analyses were performed during both phases of the menstrual cycle using the Kay Elemetrics Computer Speech Lab Software Package. Data were analyzed using Student's paired sample t test. Phono-articulatory parameters were similar in both phases of the menstrual cycle (fundamental frequency: 192.6+/-23.9 Hz; minimum formant 891.7+/-110.3 Hz; and maximum formant: 2471.5+/-203.6 Hz). In diadochokinesis, they had a speed of 5.6+/-0.6 seg/s and vocal intensity was 61.5+/-2.6 dB. The mean values for the variations in voice modulations were as follows: anger (21.7+/-8.7 Hz)cycle, the speed of speech was 5.2+/-0.6 seg/s in meaningful sentences and 1.9+/-0.2 seg/s in meaningless sentences. In conclusion, the adolescents showed similar voice fundamental frequency and intensity, formants, speed of speech, and suprasegmental speech parameters. The results shown in this study may be used as standard of acoustic phono-articulatory for adolescents. PMID:17981011

  12. Influence of Menstrual Cycle Phase on Neural and Craving Responses to Appetitive Smoking Cues in Naturally Cycling Females

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Kanchana; Wetherill, Reagan R.; Johnson, Barbara; Kelly, Shannon; Langguth, Jamison; Mumma, Joel; Childress, Anna Rose

    2015-01-01

    Introdu ction: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used extensively in an attempt to understand brain vulnerabilities that mediate maladaptive responses to drug cues. Using perfusion fMRI, we have consistently shown reward-related activation (medial orbitofrontal cortex/ventral striatum) to smoking cues (SCs). Because preclinical and clinical studies generally show that progesterone may reduce reward and craving, we hypothesized that females in the follicular phase of the cycle (FPs; when progesterone levels are low) would have greater reward-related neural responses to SCs compared with females in the luteal phase (LPs). Methods: Sated cigarette-dependent premenopausal naturally cycling females underwent pseudo-continuous arterial spin-labeled perfusion fMRI during exposure to 10-min audio visual clips of appetitive SCs and non-SCs. Brain responses to SCs relative to non-SCs were examined among females grouped according to menstrual cycle (MC) phase at the time of scanning (22 FPs, 15 LPs). Craving scores were acquired pre- and post-SC exposure. Results: FPs showed increased neural responses to SCs compared with non-SCs in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (p ≤ .05corrected), whereas LPs did not. FPs reported SC-elicited craving (p ≤ .005), whereas LPs did not. Within FPs, SC-induced craving correlated with increased neural responses in the anterior insula (r = 0.73, p < .0001). Conclusions: FPs may be more vulnerable to relapse during appetitive SC exposure than LPs. Because the influence of MC phase on drug cue neural activity has not been examined, these results contribute to our knowledge of the neurobiological underpinnings of responses to drug cues, and they highlight the importance of monitoring menstrual cycle phase in all areas of addiction research. PMID:25762748

  13. Factors Influencing Phosphorous Cycling in Biogeochemical 'Hot Spots'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saia, S. M.; Walter, M. T.; Buda, A. R.; Carrick, H. J.; Regan, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic alteration of the phosphorus (P) cycle has led to subsequent soil and water quality issues. For example, P build up in soils due to historic fertilizer application may become biologically available and exacerbate eutrophication and anoxia in nearby water bodies. In the humid Northeastern United States, storm runoff transports P and also stimulates biogeochemical processes, these locations are termed biogeochemical 'hot spots'. Many studies have looked at nitrogen and carbon cycling in biogeochemical hot spots but few have focused on P. We hypothesize the periodic wetting and drying of biogeochemical hot spots promotes a combination of abiotic and biotic processes that influence the mobility of P. To test this hypothesis, we took monthly soil samples (5 cm deep) from May to October in forest, pasture, and cropped land near Ithaca, NY. In-situ measurements taken with each sample included volumetric soil moisture and soil temperature. We also analyzed samples for 'runoff generated' phosphate, nitrate, and sulfate (from 0.01 M CaCl2 extraction), Fe(II), percent organic matter, pH, as well as oxalate extractable and total P, Al, and Fe. We used linear mixed effects models to test how runoff generated phosphate concentrations vary with soil moisture and whether other environmental factors strengthen/weaken this relationship. The knowledge gained from this study will improve our understanding of P cycling in biogeochemical hot spots and can be used to improve the effectiveness of agricultural management practices in the Northeastern United States.

  14. Influence of sulfur compounds on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Using the climate model developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM), numerical experiments have been conducted in line with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), but scaling the anthropogenic emissions of sulfur compounds into the troposphere by ±25%. Two types of impacts of sulfur compounds on climate and the global carbon cycle are considered: climate impact (CI, associated with the influence of tropospheric sulfates on climate and, as a consequence, on the carbon cycle characteristics) and ecological impact (EI, associated with the influence of SO2 on the rate of photosynthesis of terrestrial plants). The climate impact was found to be generally more important than the ecological one. However, in a number of regions, the EI is comparable to CI, including in the southeast parts of North America and, especially, of Asia. The contribution of EI to the change in global characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems in the 20th century is likewise considerable. The CI is generally more sensitive to the uncertainty in anthropogenic emissions of sulfur compounds into the troposphere than the EI.

  15. The menstrual cycle influences the gastric emptying of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Kaibara, Naoko; Kobori, Ayase; Sekime, Ayako; Miyasaka, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that ingestion of 60 mL of red wine or vodka prior to the ingestion of a pancake significantly inhibited the gastric emptying of the pancake in male subjects, but not in female subjects, and that the retention times of wine and vodka were significantly longer than those of the congener of red wine and mineral water in male subjects, whereas in female subjects the retention times of these four drinks did not differ significantly from one another. We hypothesized that the menstrual cycle may influence the gastric emptying of alcohol beverages. Here, we determined and compared the retention times of vodka and water in the stomach during the luteal phase and the follicular phase. Ten female healthy volunteers were studied. They recorded their basal body temperatures every day, and participated in the following experiments: each volunteer drank mineral water or vodka containing 14% alcohol (60 mL) during the low-temperature (follicular) phase as well as during the high-temperature (luteal) phase. The retention time of vodka was significantly longer than that of mineral water during the follicular phase, but no significant differences between the retention times of the two drinks were observed during the luteal phase. In conclusion, the menstrual cycle influences the gastric emptying rate of alcohol. PMID:26700595

  16. Solar Magnetic Activity Cycles, Coronal Potential Field Models and Eruption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2013-05-01

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun vector spectro-magnetograph, the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from Stanford University's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Polar field changes are found to be well correlated with active fields over most of the period studied, except between 2003 and 2006 when the active fields did not produce significant polar field changes. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The tilt of the solar dipole is therefore almost entirely due to active-region fields. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking, Solar Eruptive Event Detection System, and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003 and 2012 than for those between 1997 and 2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  17. Solar magnetic activity cycles, coronal potential field models and eruption rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon

    2013-07-01

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the NSO's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) vector spectro-magnetograph (VSM), the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from the U. Stanford's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus), Solar Eruptive Event Detection System (SEEDS), and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003-2012 than for those between 1997-2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  18. Exotic Earthworm Influence on Nitrogen Cycling in FACE Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Top, S. M.; Filley, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    Exotic earthworm invasion in northern North American forests has the potential to significantly alter nitrogen and carbon cycling in forest soils, through litter layer losses, loss of organic horizon, and changes in fine root density. Earthworm influence on nitrogen cycling is currently being investigated in the free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) sites at Rhinelander, WI. Because of the 13C depleted CO2 used in the FACE experiment and a 15N addition to the soil, this system affords an ideal opportunity to determine the impact of earthworm activity on soil organic matter dynamics by tracking the relative abundance and stable isotope compositions of biopolymers (amino acids, etc.) isolated in earthworms fecal pellets and soils. The 15N and 13C isotope composition of earthworm fecal matter from epigeic (litter and organic matter horizon dwelling) and endogeic (predominantly mineral soil dwelling) species highlighted their distinct role in litter, surface soil, and deeper soil movement through the soil. Specifically, endogeic fecal matter exhibited a lower uptake of FACE-derived C and a more enriched 15N signal. Nitrogen content of soil between the control and elevated CO2 treatments is not significantly different; however, elevated CO2 treatments exhibited relative depletion in both the soil and root 15N with respect to controls. The loss of 15N in the roots and the top 5 cm of the soil under elevated CO2, suggests that there is greater cycling power with increased below ground productivity and earthworm activity under elevated CO2, as higher abundances of earthworms exist in the elevated CO2 treatments. Amino acid extractions from the soil and fecal matter are ongoing and will help clarify the details regarding molecular nitrogen cycling.

  19. Source of the Magnetic Susceptibility Variations in Southern Ocean Sediments Over the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, B.; Thompson, R.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in the sources, mineralogy and rates of iron supply to the Southern Ocean may have global impact and significance, by influencing plankton growth rates and nutrient take-up in this, the largest of the high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) regions of the world ocean. Iron 'fertilization' in the Southern Ocean may increase rates of carbon export production and thus the ocean uptake flux of atmospheric CO2, and also diminish the northward flow of residual nutrients to the extra-polar ocean, especially the HNLC regions of the Pacific. Changes in Southern Ocean export production may contribute to global climate change over glacial-interglacial timescales. The key sources of iron for the Southern Ocean are reported to be windblown dust and sedimentary supply; their relative significance an issue of much long-standing debate. Links between aeolian dust fluxes to the Southern Ocean and to the Antarctic ice cores have been proposed for the Scotia Sea region of the Southern Ocean, downwind from the South American land mass. Regional downcore variations in the magnetic susceptibility of sediments from the Scotia Sea show remarkable similarity to variations in dust concentration and flux in East Antarctic ice cores (with glacial stages characterised by increases in ice dust and sediment magnetic susceptibility). Indeed, the strength of the ice dust/sediment magnetism correlations (r ~ 0.7) provides a pragmatic basis for use of the sedimentary magnetic susceptibility records as a chronostratigraphic proxy, a boon in the carbonate-free deep-sea sediments of the Southern Ocean. However, the source and causal basis of the sediment magnetism/ice dust co-variations remain controversial; aeolian dust, bacterial magnetite and wind-driven current transport of marine sediment have all been invoked as possible key sources. Here, we use magnetic and isotopic methods to resolve this debate, and identify and quantify the sources of magnetic material to the Scotia Sea for the last

  20. Influence of Plants on Chlorine Cycling in Terrestrial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelius, Malin; Thiry, Yves; Marang, Laura; Ranger, Jacques; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Svensson, Teresia; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Chlorine (Cl), one of the 20 most abundant elements on Earth, is crucial for life as a regulator of cellular ionic strength and an essential co-factor in photosynthesis. Chlorinated organic compounds (Clorg) molecules are surprisingly abundant in soils, in fact many studies during the last decades show that Clorg typically account for more than 60% of the total soil Cl pool in boreal and temperate forest soils and frequently exceed chloride (Cl-) levels. The natural and primarily biotic formation of this Clorg pool has been confirmed experimentally but the detailed content of the Clorg pool and the reasons for its high abundance remains puzzling and there is a lack of Cl budgets for different ecosystems. Recently, the radioisotope 36Cl has caused concerns because of presence in radioactive waste, a long half-life (301 000 years), potential high mobility, and limited knowledge about Cl residence times, speciation and uptake by organisms in terrestrial environments. The chlorination of organic molecules may influence the pool of available Cl- to organisms and thereby the Cl cycling dynamics. This will prolong residence times of total Cl in the soil-vegetation system, which affects exposure times in radioactive 36Cl isotope risk assessments. We tested to what extent the dominating tree species influences the overall terrestrial Cl cycling and the balance between Cl- and Clorg. Total Cl and Clorg were measured in different tree compartments and soil horizons in the Breuil experimental forest, Bourgogne, established in 1976 and located at Breuil-Chenue in Eastern France. The results from this field experiment show how the dominating tree species affected Cl cycling and accumulation over a time period of 30 years. Cl uptake by trees as well as content of both total Cl and Clorg in soil humus was much higher in experimental plots with coniferous forests compared to deciduous forests. The amounts of Clorg found in plant tissue indicate significant Clorg production inside

  1. Out-of-Plane Torque Influence on Magnetization Switching and Susceptibility in Magnetic Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chun-Yang; Wang, Zheng-Chuan

    2010-07-01

    Based on both the spin diffusion equation and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, we demonstrate the influence of out-of-plane spin torque on magnetization switching and susceptibility in a magnetic multilayer system. The variation of spin accumulation and local magnetization with respect to time are studied in the magnetization reversal induced by spin torque. We also research the susceptibility subject to a microwave magnetic field, which is compared with the results obtained without out-of-plane torque.

  2. Menstrual cycle influence on cognitive function and emotion processing—from a reproductive perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Gingnell, Malin

    2014-01-01

    The menstrual cycle has attracted research interest ever since the 1930s. For many researchers the menstrual cycle is an excellent model of ovarian steroid influence on emotion, behavior, and cognition. Over the past years methodological improvements in menstrual cycle studies have been noted, and this review summarizes the findings of methodologically sound menstrual cycle studies in healthy women. Whereas the predominant hypotheses of the cognitive field state that sexually dimorphic cognitive skills that favor men are improved during menstrual cycle phases with low estrogen and that cognitive skills that favor women are improved during cycle phases with increased estrogen and/or progesterone, this review has not found sufficient evidence to support any of these hypotheses. Mental rotation has gained specific interest in this aspect, but a meta-analysis yielded a standardized mean difference in error rate of 1.61 (95% CI −0.35 to 3.57), suggesting, at present, no favor of an early follicular phase improvement in mental rotation performance. Besides the sexually dimorphic cognitive skills, studies exploring menstrual cycle effects on tasks that probe prefrontal cortex function, for instance verbal or spatial working memory, have also been reviewed. While studies thus far are few, results at hand suggest improved performance at times of high estradiol levels. Menstrual cycle studies on emotional processing, on the other hand, tap into the emotional disorders of the luteal phase, and may be of relevance for women with premenstrual disorders. Although evidence at present is limited, it is suggested that emotion recognition, consolidation of emotional memories, and fear extinction is modulated by the menstrual cycle in women. With the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, several studies report changes in brain reactivity across the menstrual cycle, most notably increased amygdala reactivity in the luteal phase. Thus, to the extent that behavioral changes

  3. The influence of the forest canopy on nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Cindy E

    2002-11-01

    Rates of key soil processes involved in recycling of nutrients in forests are governed by temperature and moisture conditions and by the chemical and physical nature of the litter. The forest canopy influences all of these factors and thus has a large influence on nutrient cycling. The increased availability of nutrients in soil in clearcuts illustrates how the canopy retains nutrients (especially N) on site, both by storing nutrients in foliage and through the steady input of available C in litter. The idea that faster decomposition is responsible for the flush of nitrate in clearcuts has not been supported by experimental evidence. Soil N availability increases in canopy gaps as small as 0.1 ha, so natural disturbances or partial harvesting practices that increase the complexity of the canopy by creating gaps will similarly increase the spatial variability in soil N cycling and availability within the forest. Canopy characteristics affect the amount and composition of leaf litter produced, which largely determines the amount of nutrients to be recycled and the resulting nutrient availability. Although effects of tree species on soil nutrient availability were thought to be brought about largely through differences in the decomposition rate of their foliar litter, recent studies indicate that the effect of tree species can be better predicted from the mass and nutrient content of litter produced, hence total nutrient return, than from litter decay rate. The greater canopy complexity in mixed species forests creates similar heterogeneity in nutritional characteristics of the forest floor. Site differences in slope position, parent material and soil texture lead to variation in species composition and productivity of forests, and thus in the nature and amount of litter produced. Through this positive feedback, the canopy accentuates inherent differences in site fertility. PMID:12414379

  4. Oscillating dynamo in the presence of a fossil magnetic field - The solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E. H.; Boyer, D.

    1982-01-01

    Hydromagnetic dynamo generation of oscillating magnetic fields in the presence of an external, ambient magnetic field introduces a marked polarity asymmetry between the two halves of the magnetic cycle. The principle of oscillating dynamo interaction with external fields is developed, and a tentative application to the sun is described. In the sun a dipole moment associated with the stable fluid beneath the convection zone would produce an asymmetrical solar cycle.

  5. Characterization of biological types of cattle (Cycle VII): influence of postpartum interval and estrous cycle length on fertility.

    PubMed

    Cushman, R A; Allan, M F; Thallman, R M; Cundiff, L V

    2007-09-01

    Genetic improvement in reproductive efficiency through selection is difficult because many reproductive traits are binomial and have low heritabilities. Before genetic markers can be generated for fertility in cows, greater characterization of reproductive phenotypes is needed to understand the components of the trait. The current study tested the hypotheses that: 1) breeds vary in postpartum interval to estrus (PPIE) and estrous cycle length, 2) a longer estrous cycle immediately before breeding increased pregnancy rates, and 3) a greater number of cycles before breeding increased conception rates. The postpartum interval to estrus, estrous cycle length, and number of cycles before breeding were examined in F1 cows (n = 519) obtained from mating Hereford, Angus, and MARC III cows to Hereford, Angus, Simmental, Limousin, Charolais, Gelbvieh, and Red Angus sires. Cows were classified as having 0, 1, 2, or 3 observed estrous cycles before breeding. All traits analyzed were adjusted to constant BCS. Sire breed of the cow influenced length of the PPIE and number of cycles before the start of breeding (P <0.001). Simmental-sired cows had the shortest PPIE and greatest number of cycles before breeding, whereas Limousin-sired cows had the longest PPIE and least number of cycles before breeding. Cows with a greater number of cycles before breeding did not have greater conception rates than cows that had not exhibited standing estrus before breeding (P = 0.87). In cows that cycled before breeding, the length of the estrous cycle immediately before breeding was influenced by dam breed and BCS (P <0.01). Cows out of Hereford dams had shorter estrous cycles than cows out of MARC III or Angus dams, and estrous cycle length increased as BCS increased. Conception rate decreased as length of the estrous cycle immediately before breeding increased (P = 0.05, -2.2% per d of cycle length). Therefore, previously anestrous cows were just as likely to conceive as cows that had cycled

  6. Influence of soil moisture-carbon cycle interactions on the terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L.; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    Water availability is a crucial limiting factor for terrestrial ecosystems, but relatively few studies have quantitatively assessed the influence of soil moisture variability on the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here, we investigate the role of soil moisture variability and state in the contemporary terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe. For this we use a Regional Earth System Model (RESM) based on the COSMO-CLM Regional Climate Model, coupled to the Community Land Model version 4.0 (CLM4.0) and its carbon-nitrogen module. The simulation setup consists of a control simulation over the period 1979-2010 in which soil moisture is interactive and three sensitivity simulations in which soil moisture is prescribed to a mean, a very dry or a very wet seasonal cycle without inter-annual variability. The cumulative net biome productivity varies markedly between the different experiments ranging from a strong sink of up to 6PgC in the wet experiment to a source of up to 1.2PgC in the dry experiment. Changes in the land carbon uptake are driven by a combination of two factors: the direct impact of soil moisture on plant's carbon uptake (essentially in southern Europe) and an indirect effect through changes in temperature affecting ecosystem respiration (mainly in central and northern Europe). We find that removing temporal variations in soil moisture dampens interannual variations in terrestrial carbon fluxes (Gross Primary Productivity, respiration, Net Biome Productivity) by more than 50% over most of Europe. Moreover, the analysis reveals that on annual scale about two-thirds of central Europe and about 70% of southern Europe display statistically significant effect of drying and/or wetting on the terrestrial carbon budget and its components. Our findings confirm the crucial role of soil moisture in determining the magnitude and the inter-annual variability in land CO2 uptake which is a key contributor to the year-to-year variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  7. The influence of stray magnetic fields on ion beam neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y.-C.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation is described of a comparison between the ion beam neutralization characteristics of a local neutralizer (within approximately 5 cm of the beam edge) and those associated with a distant one (approximately 1 meter away from the thruster). The influence of magnetic fields in the vicinity of the neutralizer cathode orifice which are either parallel or normal to the neutralizer axis is assessed. The plasma property profiles which reflect the influence of the magnetic fields are measured. The results suggest that magnetic fields at the region of a neutralizer cathode orifice influence its ability to couple to the ion beam. They reveal that there is a potential jump from the neutralizer cathode orifice to the plasma which exists close to the orifice. This potential drop is found to increase as the axial component of magnetic flux density increases. A magnetic field perpendicular to the neutralizer axis induces a potential rise a few centimeters downstream from the neutralizer cathode.

  8. ISOTHERMAL PHASE TRANSFORMATION CYCLING IN STEEL BY APPLICATION OF A HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Kisner, Roger A; Wilgen, John B

    2007-01-01

    A phase transformation reversal via the application and removal of a large magnetic field was investigated. Because a large magnetic field can alter the phase equilibrium between paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, volume fractions for each phase constituent can be modified at constant temperature by changing the magnetic field strength. In this research elevated temperature isothermal hold experiments were performed for 5160 steel. During the isothermal hold, the magnetic field was cycled between 0 and 30 Tesla. As companion experiments, temperature cycling and isothermal holds were performed without magnetic fields. The resulting microstructures were examined using optical and SEM metallography. These microstructures indicate that a portion of the microstructure experiences isothermal transformation cycling between austenite and ferrite due to the application and removal of the 30T (Tesla) magnetic field.

  9. Environmental magnetic fields: Influences on early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, I.L.; Hardman, W.E.; Winters, W.D.; Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    A 10-mG, 50 to 60-Hz magnetic field is in the intensity and frequency range that people worldwide are often exposed to in homes and in the workplace. Studies about the effects of 50- to 100-Hz electromagnetic fields on various species of animal embryos (fish, chick, fly, sea urchin, rat, and mouse) indicate that early stages of embryonic development are responsive to fluctuating magnetic fields. Chick, sea urchin, and mouse embryos are responsive to magnetic field intensities of 10-100 mG. Results from studies on sea urchin embryos indicate that exposure to conditions of rotating 60-Hz magnetic fields, e.g., similar to those in our environment, interferes with cell proliferation at the morula stage in a manner dependent on field intensity. The cleavage stages, prior to the 64-cell stage, were not delayed by this rotating 60-Hz magnetic field suggesting that the ionic surges, DNA replication, and translational events essential for early cleavage stages were not significantly altered. Studies of histone synthesis in early sea urchin embryos indicated that the rotating 60-Hz magnetic field decreased zygotic expression of early histone genes at the morula stage and suggests that this decrease in early histone production was limiting to cell proliferation. Whether these comparative observations from animal development studies will be paralleled by results from studies of human embryogenesis, as suggested by some epidemiology studies, has yet to be established. 38 refs.

  10. Magnetic stability under magnetic cycling of MgO-based magnetic tunneling junctions with an exchange-biased synthetic antiferromagnetic pinned layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qiang; Reid, Cameron; Xiao, Gang; Chan, Hon Ming

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic stability and endurance of MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with an exchange-biased synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) pinned layer. When a uniaxially cycling switching field is applied along the easy axis of the free magnetic layer, the magnetoresistance varies only by 1.7% logarithmically with the number of cycles, while no such change appears in the case of a rotating field. This observation is consistent with the effect of the formation and motion of domain walls in the free layer, which create significant stray fields within the pinned hard layer. Unlike in previous studies, the decay we observed only occurs during the first few starting cycles (<20), at which point there is no further variance in all performance parameters up to 107 cycles. Exchange-biased SAF structure is ideally suited for solid-state magnetic sensors and magnetic memory devices.

  11. Mushroom host influence on Lycoriella mali (Diptera: Sciaridae) life cycle.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, L; Keil, C B

    2005-04-01

    Lycoriella mali Fitch (Diptera: Sciaridae) infests mushroom crops early in the crop cycle. Recent observations in mushroom houses indicated a difference in emergence time and size of adult L. mali developing on various strains of commercial mushrooms. Samples of adult flies from isolated mushroom houses growing Portabella mushrooms were significantly heavier then those from oyster mushroom houses, whereas flies from shiitake mushroom houses were lightest in weight. Flies collected from isolated Portabella mushroom houses were reared on four strains and species of Agaricus and Pleurotus mushrooms. After the adults emerged, females were weighed, mated, and allowed to oviposit. The number of eggs laid increased as the weight of the female increased. Flies collected from isolated Portabella mushroom houses were reared on eight strains and species of mushrooms. Flies were reared for four generations on each host mushroom mycelium then switched to different host mushrooms. Overall, the hybrid strain of Agaricus bisporus (Lange) Imbach (Agaricales: Agaricomycetideae) was the most favorable host for L. mali, whereas the wild strain of A. bisporus was the least favorable host. Mushroom hosts influence developmental time, survivorship, weight, and reproduction of L. mali. PMID:15889722

  12. Prediction of solar activity from solar background magnetic field variations in cycles 21-23

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Simon J.; Zharkov, Sergei I.; Zharkova, Valentina V. E-mail: s.zharkov@hull.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive spectral analysis of both the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) in cycles 21-23 and the sunspot magnetic field in cycle 23 reported in our recent paper showed the presence of two principal components (PCs) of SBMF having opposite polarity, e.g., originating in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Over a duration of one solar cycle, both waves are found to travel with an increasing phase shift toward the northern hemisphere in odd cycles 21 and 23 and to the southern hemisphere in even cycle 22. These waves were linked to solar dynamo waves assumed to form in different layers of the solar interior. In this paper, for the first time, the PCs of SBMF in cycles 21-23 are analyzed with the symbolic regression technique using Hamiltonian principles, allowing us to uncover the underlying mathematical laws governing these complex waves in the SBMF presented by PCs and to extrapolate these PCs to cycles 24-26. The PCs predicted for cycle 24 very closely fit (with an accuracy better than 98%) the PCs derived from the SBMF observations in this cycle. This approach also predicts a strong reduction of the SBMF in cycles 25 and 26 and, thus, a reduction of the resulting solar activity. This decrease is accompanied by an increasing phase shift between the two predicted PCs (magnetic waves) in cycle 25 leading to their full separation into the opposite hemispheres in cycle 26. The variations of the modulus summary of the two PCs in SBMF reveals a remarkable resemblance to the average number of sunspots in cycles 21-24 and to predictions of reduced sunspot numbers compared to cycle 24: 80% in cycle 25 and 40% in cycle 26.

  13. Influence of menstrual cycle, parity and oral contraceptive use on steroid hormone receptors in normal breast.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, S.; Robertson, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.; King, R. J.; McPherson, K.

    1992-01-01

    Steroid receptor was assessed immunohistochemically in 158 samples of normal breast for variation through the menstrual cycle. Patterns and intensity of reaction were used in a semi-quantitative scoring system to examine the influence of cycle phase, cycle type, parity and age. The changes in oestrogen receptor for natural cycle and oral contraceptive (OC) cycles indicated down-regulation by progestins. Progesterone receptor did not vary significantly in natural cycles, but increased steadily through OC cycles. This study provides strong evidence that both oestrogen and progesterone influence breast epithelium, but dissimilarities from the endometrium are apparent. The interval since pregnancy had a significant negative effect on frequency and score of oestrogen receptor and score of progesterone receptor. Multivariate analysis established the phase of cycle and OC use as independent significant influences on oestrogen receptor. The interval since pregnancy was an independent significant factor for both oestrogen and progesterone receptor presence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1562470

  14. Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) sngle-stage kicker magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Suddeth, D.E.; Volk, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    A new single stage kicker magnet system is designed and is being fabricated for the RCS accelerator of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS-I) at the Argonne National Laboratory. This system will replace the two stage kicker in present use. The magnet aperture is 10 cm wide by 5 cm high and the magnetic length is 0.89 m. The magnetic field intensity is 0.1021 T for a 25 milliradian kick to the 500 MeV proton beam. A field rise time (10 to 90%) of 80 ns and a flattop of 100 ns is needed. The magnetic field fall time is not critical so a lumped parameter magnet with a 7.2 ohm load will be used. The electric current required through the single turn magnet is 4863 A. A new energy storage and switching system is designed and is being fabricated for energizing the magnets. The techniques and hardware used will be described along with some of the experience gained in the use of the two stage system which will help to improve the new design.

  15. Magnetic Influences on the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, Lauren

    2016-05-01

    The steady, supersonic outflow from the Sun we call the solar wind was first posited in the 1950s and initial theories rightly linked the acceleration of the wind to the existence of the million-degree solar corona. Still today, the wind acceleration mechanisms and the coronal heating processes remain unsolved challenges in solar physics. In this work, I seek to answer a portion of the mystery by focusing on a particular acceleration process: Alfven waves launched by the motion of magnetic field footpoints in the photosphere. The entire corona is threaded with magnetic loops and flux tubes that open up into the heliosphere. I have sought a better understanding of the role these magnetic fields play in determining solar wind properties in open flux tubes. After an introduction of relevant material, I discuss my parameter study of magnetic field profiles and the statistical understanding we can draw from the resulting steady-state wind. In the chapter following, I describe how I extended this work to consider time dependence in the turbulent heating by Alfven waves in three dimensional simulations. The bursty nature of this heating led to a natural next step that expands my work to include not only the theoretical, but also a project to analyze observations of small network jets in the chromosphere and transition region, and the underlying photospheric magnetic field that forms thresholds in jet production. In summary, this work takes a broad look at the extent to which Alfven-wave-driven turbulent heating can explain measured solar wind properties and other observed phenomena.

  16. Influence of driving cycles on unit emissions from passenger cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joumard, R.; André, M.; Vidon, R.; Tassel, P.; Pruvost, C.

    Small samples of petrol engine or diesel cars, equipped with or without catalysts, were tested over 36 driving cycles divided into four categories - standard cycles and three sets of cycles more representative of real-world driving conditions. The tests addressed standard gaseous pollutants and fuel consumption and also less frequently measured pollutant such as CH 4. In the first part of this paper we examine cold emissions in order to assess the duration of the cold start impact and the representativity of the cold ECE15 cycle. Then unit emissions are compared over the four driving cycle families. As compared to representative cycles, the standardised cycles underestimate hot emissions by almost 50% for petrol engine cars and 30% for diesel vehicles. Conversely, the results obtained for the three representative cycle families are in relatively close agreement with each other - within approximately 10%. However, the cinematic properties of the three families differ. Finally, we demonstrate that weighting all emission data equally, not taking into account the weight of each cycle in overall traffic, introduces significant biases, particularly when plotting emission vs. average speed curves.

  17. Linear astrophysical dynamos in rotating spheres Differential rotation, anisotropic turbulent magnetic diffusivity, and solar-stellar cycle magnetic parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, H.; Wang, Z.; Wu, F.

    1984-05-01

    Differential rotation dependence of the selection mechanism for magnetic parity of solar and stellar cycles is studied by assuming various differential rotation profiles in the dynamo equation. The parity selection depends on propagation direction of oscillating magnetic fields in the form of dynamo waves which propagate along isorotation surfaces. When there is any radial gradient in the differential rotation, dynamo waves propagate either equatorward or poleward. In the former case, field systems of the two hemispheres approach each other and collide at the equator. Then, odd parity is selected. In the latter case, field systems of the two hemispheres recede from each other and do not collide at the equator, and even parity is selected. Thus the equatorial migration of wings of the butterfly diagram of the solar cycle and its odd parity are intrinsically related. In the case of purely latitudinal differential rotation, dynamo waves propagate purely radially and growth rates of odd and even modes are nearly the same even when dynamo strength is weak when the parity selection mechanism should work most efficiently. In this case, anisotropy of turbulent diffusivity is a decisive factor to separate odd and even modes. Unlike in the case of radial-gradient-dominated differential rotation in which any difference between diffusivities for poloidal and toroidal fields enhances the parity selection without changing the parity, the parity selection in the case of latitudinal-gradient-dominated differential rotation depends on the difference of diffusivities for poloidal and toroidal fields. When diffusivity for poloidal fields is larger than that for toroidal fields, odd parity is selected; and when diffusivity for toroidal fields is larger, even parity is selected. This suggests that diffusivity for poloidal fields is larger than that for toroidal fields in the solar convection zone where magnetic parity is odd and where radial gradient influence on the parity selection

  18. Influence of magnetic shear on impurity transport

    SciTech Connect

    Nordman, H.; Fueloep, T.; Candy, J.; Strand, P.; Weiland, J.

    2007-05-15

    The magnetic shear dependence of impurity transport in tokamaks is studied using a quasilinear fluid model for ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron (TE) mode driven turbulence in the collisionless limit and the results are compared with nonlinear gyrokinetic results using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys 186, 545 (2003)]. It is shown that the impurity transport is sensitive to the magnetic shear, in particular for weak, negative, and large positive shear where a strong reduction of the effective impurity diffusivity is obtained. The fluid and gyrokinetic results are in qualitative agreement, with the gyrokinetic diffusivities typically a factor 2 larger than the fluid diffusivities. The steady state impurity profiles in source-free plasmas are found to be considerably less peaked than the electron density profiles for moderate shear. Comparisons between anomalous and neoclassical transport predictions are performed for ITER-like profiles [R. Aymar, P. Barabaschi, and Y. Shimomura, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 519 (2002)].

  19. Does the Earth's Magnetic Field Influence Climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluteau, F.; Courtillot, V.; Gallet, Y.; Le Mouel, J.; Genevey, A.

    2006-12-01

    Much of the observed increase in global surface temperature over the past 150 years occurred prior to the 1940's and after the 1980's. The main agents which are invoked are solar variability, changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas content or sulfur, due to natural or anthropogenic action, or internal variability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Magnetism has seldom been invoked, and evidence for connections between climate and magnetic field variations have received little attention. We review evidence for such connections, starting with suggested correlations, on three time scales: recent secular variation (10-100 years), historical and archeomagnetic change (100-5000 years) and excursions and reversals (1000-1 million years). We attempt to suggest which mechanisms could account for observed correlations. Evidence for correlations in field intensity changes, excursions and reversals, which invoke Milankovic forcing in the core, either directly or through changes in ice distribution and moments of inertia of the Earth, is still tenuous. Correlation between decadal changes in amplitude of geomagnetic variations of external origin, solar irradiance and global temperature is stronger. The correlation applies until the 1980's, suggesting that solar irradiance is the prime forcing function of climate until then, when the correlation breaks and anomalous warming may emerge from the signal. Indeed, only solar flux of energy and particles can jointly explain parallel variations in temperature and external magnetic field. The most intriguing feature may be recently proposed archeomagnetic jerks (see abstract by Gallet et al). These seem to correlate with significant climatic events. A proposed mechanism involves tilt of the dipole to low latitudes, resulting in enhanced cosmic-ray induced nucleation of clouds. Intense data acquisition over a broad range of durations is required to further probe these indications that the Earth's and Sun's magnetic fields may have

  20. Magnetic Flux Density in the Heliosphere through Several Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdős, G.; Balogh, A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, BR , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of BR to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average lang|BR |rang is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  1. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Erdős, G.; Balogh, A.

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  2. 22 year cycle in the imbalance of the photospheric magnetic fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernova, Elena; Baranov, Dmitrii; Tyasto, Marta

    The manifestation of the 22 year solar magnetic cycle in the imbalance of positive and negative photospheric magnetic fluxes is studied. For the analysis we use synoptic maps of the photospheric magnetic field of Kitt Peak Observatory (1976 - 2003) and John Wilcox Observatory in Stanford (1976 - 2012). We consider strong magnetic fields for the heliolatitudes in the interval from +40° to -40°. It is shown that the sign of the imbalance between positive and negative fluxes remains constant during 11 years from one inversion of the Sun’s global magnetic field to the next one and always coincides with the sign of the polar field in the Northern hemisphere. Thus, the imbalance between the magnetic fluxes of different polarities changes according to the 22 year cycle. The sign of the imbalance is determined both by the phase of the solar cycle (before or after the inversion) and by the parity of the solar cycle. The imbalance of positive and negative magnetic fluxes can be observed not only for the strong fields in the sunspot zone. The mean magnetic field of the Sun (Sun as a star), which is determined by the net flux of the background fields, changes according to the same pattern as the imbalance of the strong fields. The regular changes of the imbalance of the photospheric magnetic fields are reflected also in the parameters of heliosphere. We show the connection of the imbalance with the quadrupole component of the photospheric magnetic field and with the imbalance of the interplanetary magnetic field (the difference between the numbers of the days with positive and negative polarities of the interplanetary magnetic field near Earth).

  3. SOLAR CYCLE PROPAGATION, MEMORY, AND PREDICTION: INSIGHTS FROM A CENTURY OF MAGNETIC PROXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeLuca, Edward E.; Dasi-Espuig, Maria; Balmaceda, Laura A. E-mail: edeluca@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: lbalmaceda@icate-conicet.gob.ar

    2013-04-20

    The solar cycle and its associated magnetic activity are the main drivers behind changes in the interplanetary environment and Earth's upper atmosphere (commonly referred to as space weather). These changes have a direct impact on the lifetime of space-based assets and can create hazards to astronauts in space. In recent years there has been an effort to develop accurate solar cycle predictions (with aims at predicting the long-term evolution of space weather), leading to nearly a hundred widely spread predictions for the amplitude of solar cycle 24. A major contributor to the disagreement is the lack of direct long-term databases covering different components of the solar magnetic field (toroidal versus poloidal). Here, we use sunspot area and polar faculae measurements spanning a full century (as our toroidal and poloidal field proxies) to study solar cycle propagation, memory, and prediction. Our results substantiate predictions based on the polar magnetic fields, whereas we find sunspot area to be uncorrelated with cycle amplitude unless multiplied by area-weighted average tilt. This suggests that the joint assimilation of tilt and sunspot area is a better choice (with aims to cycle prediction) than sunspot area alone, and adds to the evidence in favor of active region emergence and decay as the main mechanism of poloidal field generation (i.e., the Babcock-Leighton mechanism). Finally, by looking at the correlation between our poloidal and toroidal proxies across multiple cycles, we find solar cycle memory to be limited to only one cycle.

  4. Solar Cycle Propagation, Memory, and Prediction: Insights from a Century of Magnetic Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Dasi-Espuig, María; Balmaceda, Laura A.; DeLuca, Edward E.

    2013-04-01

    The solar cycle and its associated magnetic activity are the main drivers behind changes in the interplanetary environment and Earth's upper atmosphere (commonly referred to as space weather). These changes have a direct impact on the lifetime of space-based assets and can create hazards to astronauts in space. In recent years there has been an effort to develop accurate solar cycle predictions (with aims at predicting the long-term evolution of space weather), leading to nearly a hundred widely spread predictions for the amplitude of solar cycle 24. A major contributor to the disagreement is the lack of direct long-term databases covering different components of the solar magnetic field (toroidal versus poloidal). Here, we use sunspot area and polar faculae measurements spanning a full century (as our toroidal and poloidal field proxies) to study solar cycle propagation, memory, and prediction. Our results substantiate predictions based on the polar magnetic fields, whereas we find sunspot area to be uncorrelated with cycle amplitude unless multiplied by area-weighted average tilt. This suggests that the joint assimilation of tilt and sunspot area is a better choice (with aims to cycle prediction) than sunspot area alone, and adds to the evidence in favor of active region emergence and decay as the main mechanism of poloidal field generation (i.e., the Babcock-Leighton mechanism). Finally, by looking at the correlation between our poloidal and toroidal proxies across multiple cycles, we find solar cycle memory to be limited to only one cycle.

  5. Influence of High Harmonics of Magnetic Fields on Trapped Magnetic Fluxes in HTS Bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, K.; Miyagi, D.; Tsukamoto, O.

    Various kinds of HTS bulk motors are proposed and have been developed. Generally, those motors are driven by semiconductor inverters and currents fed to the armature windings contain high harmonics. Therefore, the bulks are exposed to high harmonics magnetic fields and AC losses are produced in the bulks. The AC losses deteriorate the efficiency of the motors and cause temperature rise of the bulks which decrease the trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulks. Usually, electro-magnetic shielding devices are inserted between the bulks and armature windings. However, the shielding devices degrade compactness of the motors. Therefore, it is important to have knowledge of the influence of the high harmonics magnetic fields on the AC losses and trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulk for optimum design of the shielding devices. In this work, the authors experimentally study the influence of high harmonics magnetic fields.

  6. Design Considerations of Fast-cycling Synchrotrons Based on Superconducting Transmission Line Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Huang, Y.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Fast-cycling synchrotrons are key instruments for accelerator based nuclear and high-energy physics programs. We explore a possibility to construct fast-cycling synchrotrons by using super-ferric, {approx}2 Tesla B-field dipole magnets powered with a superconducting transmission line. We outline both the low temperature (LTS) and the high temperature (HTS) superconductor design options and consider dynamic power losses for an accelerator with operation cycle of 0.5 Hz. We also briefly outline possible power supply system for such accelerator, and discuss the quench protection system for the magnet string powered by a transmission line conductor.

  7. Prefrontal GABA concentration changes in women-Influence of menstrual cycle phase, hormonal contraceptive use, and correlation with premenstrual symptoms.

    PubMed

    De Bondt, Timo; De Belder, Frank; Vanhevel, Floris; Jacquemyn, Yves; Parizel, Paul M

    2015-02-01

    Prefrontal regions are involved in processing emotional stimuli and are a topic of interest in clinical and neurological research. Although sex steroids are potent neuromodulators, the influence of menstrual cycle phase and hormonal contraceptive use is rarely taken into account in neuroimaging studies. Our purpose was to evaluate changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in women, as measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), with phases of the menstrual cycle and use of hormonal contraceptives, and to assess correlations with premenstrual symptoms.Three MRI sessions per cycle were obtained in the natural cycle group, and two sessions in the hormonal contraceptives group. In addition to an anatomical scan, single voxel MRS in the prefrontal area was performed. After quality control, 10 women with natural cycle and 21 women taking hormonal contraceptives were included for analysis. Peripheral blood samples were obtained to determine endogenous hormone concentrations. Subjects were asked to complete a daily rating of severity of problems questionnaire, to quantify premenstrual symptoms. In the natural cycle group, we found a significant increase in prefrontal GABA concentration at the time of ovulation. Conversely, in the hormonal contraceptives group, no differences were found between the pill phase and pill-free phase. GABA concentrations did not significantly correlate with endogenous hormone levels, nor with premenstrual symptoms. Our results indicate that spectroscopically measured GABA concentrations are higher during ovulation in women with a natural menstrual cycle. We suggest that neuroimaging studies should take into account this variability. PMID:25481417

  8. CHANGE IN FIELD HARMONICS AFTER QUENCH AND THERMAL CYCLES IN SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; JAIN,A.; MURATORE,J.; WANDERER,P.; WILLEN,E.; WYSS,C.

    1997-05-12

    A change in field harmonics after quench and thermal cycles has been observed in superconducting magnets for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This paper presents the results of a systematic investigation of this effect in a number of RHIC dipole and quadrupole magnets. These changes in field harmonics may limit the ultimate field quality and its reproducibility in superconducting magnets. A change in pre-stress has also been observed after quench and thermal cycles. A possible link between these two changes is explored.

  9. The influence of cycle time on shoulder fatigue responses for a fixed total overhead workload.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Clark R; Meszaros, Kimberly A; Cudlip, Alan C; Chopp-Hurley, Jaclyn N; Langenderfer, Joseph E

    2015-08-20

    The relationship between overhead work and musculoskeletal health depends on multiple task and individual factors. Knowledge gaps persist, despite examination of many of these factors individually and in combination. This investigation targeted task variation, as parameterized by cycle time within a fixed overall workload. Participants performed an intermittent overhead pressing task with four different cycle time conditions while overall workload and duty cycle was held constant. Several manifestations of fatigue were monitored during task performance. Endurance time was influenced by cycle time with shorter cycle times having endurance times up to 25% higher than longer cycle times. Surface electromyography (sEMG) results were mixed, with two muscles demonstrating amplitude increases (middle deltoid and upper trapezius) that varied with cycle time. sEMG frequency was not influenced by cycle time for any muscle monitored, despite decreases for several cycle times. Trends existed for the influence of cycle time on time-varying reported discomfort (p=0.056) and static strength (p=0.055); large effect sizes were present (ηp(2)=0.31 and 0.27, respectively). The equivocal association of fatigue indicators and cycle time is analogous to the influence of other factors implicated in overhead work musculoskeletal risk, and probabilistic modeling offers a compelling avenue for integration of the known variation in the many factors that combine to inform this risk. PMID:26117074

  10. Deciphering solar magnetic activity. I. On the relationship between the sunspot cycle and the evolution of small magnetic features

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Wang, Xin; Markel, Robert S.; Thompson, Michael J.; Leamon, Robert J.; Malanushenko, Anna V.; Davey, Alisdair R.; Howe, Rachel; Krista, Larisza D.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Gurman, Joseph B.; Pesnell, William D.

    2014-09-01

    Sunspots are a canonical marker of the Sun's internal magnetic field which flips polarity every ∼22 yr. The principal variation of sunspots, an ∼11 yr variation, modulates the amount of the magnetic field that pierces the solar surface and drives significant variations in our star's radiative, particulate, and eruptive output over that period. This paper presents observations from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory indicating that the 11 yr sunspot variation is intrinsically tied to the spatio-temporal overlap of the activity bands belonging to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle. Using a systematic analysis of ubiquitous coronal brightpoints and the magnetic scale on which they appear to form, we show that the landmarks of sunspot cycle 23 can be explained by considering the evolution and interaction of the overlapping activity bands of the longer-scale variability.

  11. Influence of cycling current and power profiles on the cycle life of lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazov, G.; Pavlov, D.

    Batteries are assembled with positive plates of the novel strap grid tubular (SGTP) design described in a previous paper [1]. These batteries are subjected to four tests: (i) Peukert dependence determinations; (ii) classical galvanostatic cycling (5 h charge and 1 h discharge); (iii) EV-SFUDS, and (iv) EV-ECE-15 cycling tests. It has been established that the Peukert dependence curve of SGTP batteries is very close in profile to that for SLI batteries. This guarantees SGTP's batteries high power performance. These batteries endure over 950 cycles on galvanostatic cycling. When cycled according to the SFUDS power profile under a current load of 320 A/kg positive active mass during the 15th SFUDS step, SGTP batteries exhibit a cycle life of 350-450 cycles. If the current density during the 15th step is 190 A/kg PAM, the batteries endure over 600 charge/discharge cycles. The life of positive SGT plates is limited by power loss, but not by capacity. Similar results have also been obtained from ECE-15 cycle-life tests. On cycling SGTP batteries with a current load of 210 A/kg PAM during the 23rd ECE-15 step (the step during which maximum power output is demanded from the battery), they endure between 550 and 650 charge/discharge cycles. A summary of the test results obtained for two batches of experimental batteries indicates that there is a direct dependence between the SGTP battery cycle life and the maximum current density on discharge. Increasing the discharge current density decreases the battery life. It has also been established that the capacity on SFUDS (ECE-15) discharge declines gradually on cycling in favour of the residual galvanostatic capacity at 5 h rate of discharge (100% depth-of-discharge) which increases. This implies that two types of structures are formed in the positive plates on cycling: the first type ensuring high power output and the second type yielding low power but long cycle life. The higher the power delivered by the positive plate, the

  12. White-light corona and solar polar magnetic field strength over solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rušin, V.; Saniga, M.; Komžík, R.

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the large-scale structure of the solar corona, in particular its helmet streamers, as observed during total solar eclipses around maxima of solar cycles and make its comparison with solar polar magnetic field strength as observed by the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) since 1976. Even though the magnetic field strength at the solar poles around cycle minima decreased minimally twice in the last forty years, distributions of helmet streamers around the Sun in different cycles around cycle maxima remain nearly the same. This indicates that large-scale magnetic structures governing the shape and evolution of helmet streamers must be of a different nature than those related with solar polar fields.

  13. Lack of Influence of the Menstrual Cycle on Blood Lactate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Linda S.

    1986-01-01

    Nine healthy women were tested before, during, and after exercise during the follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycles to determine the effect of menstruation on blood lactate levels. Findings are discussed. (Author/MT)

  14. HIGH-LATITUDE SOLAR TORSIONAL OSCILLATIONS DURING PHASES OF CHANGING MAGNETIC CYCLE AMPLITUDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.

    2012-05-01

    Torsional oscillations are variations of the solar differential rotation that are strongly linked to the magnetic cycle of the Sun. Helioseismic inversions have revealed significant differences in the high-latitude branch of torsional oscillations between cycle 23 and cycle 24. Here we employ a non-kinematic flux-transport dynamo model that has been used previously to study torsional oscillations and simulate the response of the high-latitude branch to a change in the amplitude of the magnetic cycle. It is found that a reduction of the cycle amplitude leads to an increase in the amplitude of differential rotation that is mostly visible as a drop in the high-latitude rotation rate. Depending on the amplitude of this adjustment the high-latitude torsional oscillation signal can become temporarily hidden due to the unknown changing mean rotation rate that is required to properly define the torsional oscillation signal.

  15. Does the earth's magnetic field influence climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, V.; Fluteau, F.; Gallet, Y.; Le Mouel, J.

    2007-05-01

    The main agents which are invoked are solar variability, changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas content, or internal variability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Evidences for connections between climate and magnetic field variations have received less attention and will be reviewed. On the 10-100yr timescale, that of recent secular variation, there appears to be a rather good correlation between decadal changes in amplitude of geomagnetic variations of external origin, solar irradiance and global temperature. The correlation applies until the 1980's, suggesting that solar irradiance may be a key forcing function of climate until then, when the correlation breaks and (anomalous?) warming may emerge from the signal (this is the subject of separate, ongoing work). Indeed, only solar flux of energy and particles can jointly explain such parallel variations in temperature and external magnetic field. On the 100-5000yr timescale, that of historical and archeomagnetic change, intriguing features are the recently proposed archeomagnetic jerks, i.e. fairly abrupt (~100 yr long) geomagnetic field variations found at irregular intervals over the past few millennia, using the archeological record from Europe to the Middle East. These seem to correlate with significant climatic events in the eastern North Atlantic region. A proposed mechanism involves variations in the geometry of the geomagnetic field (f.i. tilt of the dipole to lower latitudes), resulting in enhanced cosmic-ray induced nucleation of clouds. On the 103-106 yr timescale, that of excursions and reversals, evidence for correlations in field intensity changes, excursions and reversals, which invoke Milankovic forcing in the core, either directly or through changes in ice distribution and moments of inertia of the Earth, is proposed but is still rather tenuous. In conclusion, no forcing factor, be it changes in CO2 concentration in the atmosphere or changes in cosmic ray flux modulated by solar activity and

  16. Influence of magnetic reluctances of magnetic elements on servo valve torque motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changhai; Jiang, Hongzhou

    2016-01-01

    The current research of electro-hydraulic servo valves mainly focuses on the vibration, pressure oscillating and source of noise. Unfortunately, literatures relating to the study of the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements are rarely available. This paper aims to analyze the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements on torque motor. Considering these magnetic reluctances ignored in previous literatures, a new mathematical model of servo valve torque motor is developed and proposed based on the fundamental laws of electromagnetism. By using this new mathematical model and the previous models, electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness are evaluated for a given set of torque motor parameters. A computer simulation by using AMESim software is also performed for the same set of torque motor parameters to verify the proposed model. The theoretical results of electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness evaluated by the proposed model render closer agreement with the simulation results than those evaluated by the previous models. In addition, an experimental measurement of the magnetic flux densities in the air-gaps is carried out by using SFL218 servo valve torque motor. Compared with the theoretical results of the magnetic flux densities in the air-gaps evaluated by the previous models, the theoretical results evaluated by the proposed model also show better agreement with the experimental data. The proposed model shows the influence of the magnetic reluctances of the magnetic elements on the servo valve torque motor, and offers modified and analytical expressions to electromagnetic torque constant and magnetic spring stiffness. These modified and analytical expressions could provide guidance more accurately for a linear control design approach and sensitivity analysis on electro-hydraulic servo valves than the previous expressions.

  17. The Life Cycle of Active Region Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Thompson, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a contemporary view of how solar active region magnetic fields are understood to be generated, transported and dispersed. Empirical trends of active region properties that guide model development are discussed. Physical principles considered important for active region evolution are introduced and advances in modeling are reviewed.

  18. Can beating between different dynamo modes explain multiple magnetic cycles in solar - type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoniello, R.; Karoff, C.; Metcalfe, T. S.

    2015-09-01

    Stellar magnetic activity can be characterized by a chaotic, multiple or single cycle behavior. Sometimes cyclic activity can be interrupted by a flat behavior. The mechanism that produce such a diverse behavior in stellar atmosphere is a matter of debate. We decided to address this issue by investigating the properties of a sample of 40 stars with high quality cycles, selected from the original data provided by the Mount Wilson Observatory. This sample contains stars with single and secondary cycles, whose secondary periods are longer or shorter than the primary cycle.

  19. Dependence of Stellar Magnetic Activity Cycles on Rotational Period in a Nonlinear Solar-type Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the turbulent generation of large-scale magnetic fields using nonlinear dynamo models for solar-type stars in the range of rotational periods from 14 to 30 days. Our models take into account nonlinear effects of dynamical quenching of magnetic helicity, and escape of magnetic field from the dynamo region due to magnetic buoyancy. The results show that the observed correlation between the period of rotation and the duration of activity cycles can be explained in the framework of a distributed dynamo model with a dynamical magnetic feedback acting on the turbulent generation from either magnetic buoyancy or magnetic helicity. We discuss implications of our findings for the understanding of dynamo processes operating in solar-like stars.

  20. Thermonuclear inverse magnetic pumping power cycle for stellarator reactor

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Darwin D.; Kulsrud, Russell M.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma column in a stellarator is compressed and expanded alternatively in minor radius. First a plasma in thermal balance is compressed adiabatically. The volume of the compressed plasma is maintained until the plasma reaches a new thermal equilibrium. The plasma is then expanded to its original volume. As a result of the way a stellarator works, the plasma pressure during compression is less than the corresponding pressure during expansion. Therefore, negative work is done on the plasma over a complete cycle. This work manifests itself as a back-voltage in the toroidal field coils. Direct electrical energy is obtained from this voltage. Alternatively, after the compression step, the plasma can be expanded at constant pressure. The cycle can be made self-sustaining by operating a system of two stellarator reactors in tandem. Part of the energy derived from the expansion phase of a first stellarator reactor is used to compress the plasma in a second stellarator reactor.

  1. Solar Cycle Propagation, Memory, and Prediction: Insights from a Century of Magnetic Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Dasi-Espuig, M.; Balmaceda, L. A.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2013-07-01

    In the simplest of forms, modern dynamo theory describes the solar cycle as a process that takes the solar magnetic field (back and forth) from a configuration that is predominantly poloidal (contained inside the meridional plane), to one predominantly toroidal (wrapped around the axis of rotation). However, there is still uncertainty and controversy in the detailed understanding of this process. A major contributor to this uncertainty is the lack of direct long-term databases covering different components of the solar magnetic field (an issue mainly affecting the poloidal component of the solar magnetic field). In this talk we will review the different observations that can be used as proxies for the solar magnetic field (in absence of direct magnetic observations). I will present a recently standardized database that can be used as a proxy for the evolution of the polar magnetic field. And to conclude, I will show the insights that can be gained (by taking advantage of this database) in the context of the transition between the toroidal and poloidal phases of the cycle, solar cycle memory as determined by the different mechanisms of flux transport, and the practical goal of solar cycle prediction.

  2. A Comparison Between Global Proxies of the Sun's Magnetic Activity Cycle: Inferences from Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomhall, A.-M.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    The last solar minimum was, by recent standards, unusually deep and long. We are now close to the maximum of the subsequent solar cycle, which is relatively weak. In this article we make comparisons between different global (unresolved) measures of the Sun's magnetic activity to investigate how they are responding to this weak-activity epoch. We focus on helioseismic data, which are sensitive to conditions, including the characteristics of the magnetic field, in the solar interior. Also considered are measures of the magnetic field in the photosphere (sunspot number and sunspot area), the chromosphere and corona (10.7 cm radio flux and 530.3 nm green coronal index), and two measures of the Sun's magnetic activity closer to Earth (the interplanetary magnetic field and the galactic cosmic-ray intensity). Scaled versions of the activity proxies diverge from the helioseismic data around 2000, indicating a change in relationship between the proxies. The degree of divergence varies from proxy to proxy, with sunspot area and 10.7 cm flux showing only small deviations, while sunspot number, coronal index, and the two interplanetary proxies show much larger departures. In Cycle 24 the deviations in the solar proxies and the helioseismic data decrease, raising the possibility that the deviations observed in Cycle 23 are just symptomatic of a 22-year Hale cycle. However, the deviations in the helioseismic data and the interplanetary proxies increase in Cycle 24. Interestingly, the divergence in the solar proxies and the helioseismic data are not reflected in the shorter-term variations (often referred to as quasi-biennial oscillations) observed on top of the dominant 11-year solar cycle. However, despite being highly correlated in Cycle 22, the short-term variations in the interplanetary proxies show very little correlation with the helioseismic data during Cycles 23 and 24.

  3. Solar grand and super-grand cycles derived with PCA from the solar background magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Shepherd, Simon; Zharkov, Sergei; Popova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    We present principal components analysis (PCA) of temporal magnetic field variations over the solar cycles 21-24. These PCs reveal two main magnetic waves with close frequencies (covering 40% of data variance) travelling from the opposite hemispheres with an increasing phase shift. Extrapolation of these PCs through their summary curve backward for 2000 years reveals a number of ~350-year grand cycles and about 2000 super-grand cycles superimposed on 22 year-cycles with the features showing a remarkable resemblance to sunspot activity reported in the past. The summary curve calculated forward for the next millennium predicts further three grand cycles with the closest grand minimum occurring in the forthcoming cycles 25-27 when the two magnetic field waves have a phase shift of 11 years. We explore a role of other independent components derived with PCA and their expected effects on the resulting summary curve, or solar activity curve. We suggest that these grand and super-grand cycles can be produced by two dynamo waves generated in different layers with close frequencies whose interaction leads to beating effects that is discussed in the work by Popova et al (2016) presented here. This approach opens a new era in investigation and prediction of solar activity on long-term timescales.

  4. INFLUENCE OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC DUTY CYCLE ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of duty cycle, the fraction of time the heating and cooling (HVAC) system was operating, were made in homes during the spring season of the RTP Particulate Matter Panel Study and the Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study. A temperature sensor/logger placed on an outlet...

  5. Magnetic Helicity of the Global Field in Solar Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-07-01

    For the first time we reconstruct the magnetic helicity density of the global axisymmetric field of the Sun using the method proposed by Brandenburg et al. and Pipin et al. To determine the components of the vector potential, we apply a gauge which is typically employed in mean-field dynamo models. This allows for a direct comparison of the reconstructed helicity with the predictions from the mean-field dynamo models. We apply this method to two different data sets: the synoptic maps of the line-of-sight magnetic field from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and vector magnetic field measurements from the Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) on the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) system. Based on the analysis of the MDI/SOHO data, we find that in solar cycle 23 the global magnetic field had positive (negative) magnetic helicity in the northern (southern) hemisphere. This hemispheric sign asymmetry is opposite to the helicity of the solar active regions, but it is in agreement with the predictions of mean-field dynamo models. The data also suggest that the hemispheric helicity rule may have reversed its sign during the early and late phases of cycle 23. Furthermore, the data indicate an imbalance in magnetic helicity between the northern and southern hemispheres. This imbalance seems to correlate with the total level of activity in each hemisphere in cycle 23. The magnetic helicity for the rising phase of cycle 24 is derived from SOLIS/VSM data, and qualitatively its latitudinal pattern is similar to the pattern derived from SOHO/MDI data for cycle 23.

  6. Variation in the statistical properties of IMF direction fluctuations during the 22-year solar magnetic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, D. V.

    2014-12-01

    The variation in the IMF direction distribution during the 22-year solar magnetic cycle has been studied. Data obtained in near-Earth orbits and measurements in the heliospheric regions located far from the Earth, performed with the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft devices, have been analyzed. It has been found that the correlation between the azimuth and magnetic field fluctuations is statistically significant in the low-latitude heliospheric region at heliocentric distances of 0.3-5.4 AU, and the sign of this correlation reverses at a change in the polar solar magnetic field orientation. In the polar zones of the heliosphere outside the latitudinal extension of the heliospheric current sheet, the angle correlation coefficient rapidly decreases with increasing heliographic latitude. The angle correlation sign reversal during the 22-year cycle is accompanied by a change of the asymmetry sign of the magnetic field inclination distribution.

  7. Influence of the submersed plant, Potamogeton perfoliatus, on nitrogen cycling in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caffrey, J.M.; Kemp, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Using 15N isotope techniques P. perfoliatus is shown to have a significant influence on sediment N cycling by direct uptake of NH4+ and NO3- and by indirect mechanisms leading to enhanced nitrification and denitrification. -from Authors

  8. ON POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSAL AND SURFACE FLUX TRANSPORT DURING SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-10

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  9. Are subsurface flows evidence of hidden magnetic flux during cycle minimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, Rudolf; Howe, Rachel; Hill, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Subsurface flows vary during the course of a solar cycle showing bands of faster- and slower-than-average rotation and bands of converging meridional flow. These flow patterns migrate with latitude; they first appear during the declining phase of a solar cycle and are present during cycle minimum. They appear several years before the magnetic pattern of a new cycle is apparent in synoptic maps and the values of magnetic flux at these locations are comparable to other quiet-Sun locations without such flow patterns. Do the precursory flow patterns thus indicate the presence of magnetic flux that is too small-scale or short-lived to be noticed in synoptic maps? How much flux would be required to generate these flow patterns?We quantify the relationship between subsurface flow patterns and magnetic activity during Cycles 23 and 24 and address these questions. We have analyzed GONG and SDO/HMI Dopplergrams using a dense-pack ring-diagram analysis and determined flows in the near-surface layers of the solar convection zone to a depth of about 16 Mm.

  10. The influence of nonlinear magnetic pull on hydropower generator rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Rolf. K.; Aidanpää, Jan-Olov

    2006-11-01

    In large electrical machines the electromagnetic forces can in some situations have a strong influence on the rotor dynamics. One such case is when the rotor is eccentrically displaced in the generator bore. A strong unbalanced magnetic pull will then appear in the direction of the smallest air-gap. In this paper, the influence of nonlinear magnetic pull is studied for a hydropower generator where the generator spider hub does not coincide with the centre of the generator rim. The generator model consists of a four-degree-of-freedom rigid body, which is connected to an elastic shaft supported by isotropic bearings. The influence of magnetic pull is calculated for the case when the generator spider hub deviates from the centre of the generator rim. A nonlinear model of the magnetic pull is introduced to the model by radial forces and transverse moments. In the numerical analysis input parameters typical for a 70 MW hydropower generator are used. Results are presented in stability and response diagrams. The results show that this type of rotor configuration can in some cases become unstable. Therefore, it is important to consider the distance between the centreline of generator spider hub and the centreline of generator rim.

  11. Principal Component Analysis of Solar Background and Sunspot Magnetic Field in cycles 21-24 and its implications for the solar activity prediction in cycles 25-27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Popova, Helen; Zharkov, Sergei; Shepherd, Simon

    Principle component analysis (PCA) of the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) measured from Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) and sunspot magnetic field (SMF) measured by SOHO/MDI magnetograms reveals the two principal components (PCs) of waves travelling in time. In addition, the independent components analysis helps to uncover 8 pairs of SBMF waves in latitudes: two large symmetric magnetic waves , which are the same for all cycles 21-23, and three pairs of asymmetric magnetic waves, which are unique for each cycle. In each pair the waves travel slightly off phase with different phase shift for each cycle and have a different number of equator crossings (Zharkova et al, 2012). These SBMF variations are assumed to be those of poloidal magnetic field traveling slightly off-phase from pole to pole which are caused by a joint action of dipole and quadruple magnetic sources in the Sun. The simulations with the two layer Parker's dynamo model with meridional circulation revealed that the dominant pair of PCs can be produced by a magnetic dipole accounting for the two main dynamo waves operating between the two magnetic poles. The further three pairs of the waves are unique to each cycle and associated with the multiple magnetic sources in the solar interior: with a quadruple symmetry in both layers for cycle 21, with quadruple magnetic sources in the upper layer and dipole sources in the inner layer for cycle 22 and with the quadruple magnetic sources in the inner layer and the dipole sources in the upper layer for cycle 23 (Popova et al, 2013). The PCs derived for all three cycles from SMBF were used as a training set for the magnetic wave prediction for the cycles 24-27 by using Hamiltonian approach (Shepherd and Zharkova, 2014) and verifying by the SBMF observations in the current cycle 24. The prediction results indicate that the solar activity is defined mainly by the solar background magnetic fields while the sunspots and their magnetic fields seem to be

  12. CORRELATION BETWEEN THE 22-YEAR SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE AND THE 22-YEAR QUASICYCLE IN THE EARTH'S ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Weizheng; Zhao Jinping; Huang Fei; Deng Shenggui

    2012-07-15

    According to the variation pattern of the solar magnetic field polarity and its relation to the relative sunspot number, we established the time series of the sunspot magnetic field polarity index and analyzed the strength and polarity cycle characteristics of the solar magnetic field. The analysis showed the existence of a cycle with about a 22-year periodicity in the strength and polarity of the solar magnetic field, which proved the Hale proposition that the 11-year sunspot cycle is one-half of the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. By analyzing the atmospheric temperature field, we found that the troposphere and the stratosphere in the middle latitude of both the northern and southern hemispheres exhibited a common 22-year quasicycle in the atmospheric temperature, which is believed to be attributable to the 22-year solar magnetic cycle.

  13. Multi-function ring magnet power supply for rapid-cycling synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Praeg, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Ring magnet power supply (RMPS) circuits that produce a wide range of magnet current waveshapes for rapid-cycling synchrotrons (RCS) are described. The shapes range from long flat-tops separated by a biased dual frequency cosine wave to those having a flat-bottom (injection), followed by a lower frequency cosine half wave (acceleration), a flat-top (extraction), and a higher frequency cosine half wave (magnet reset). Applications of these circuits for proposed synchrotrons are outlined. Solid-state switching circuits and the results of proof-of-concept tests are shown. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Leonora, E.; Aiello, S.; Leotta, G.

    2011-07-01

    The influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers proposed for a future deep sea neutrino telescope was studied under the EU-funded KM3NeT design study. The aims were to evaluate variations in PMT performance in the Earth's magnetic field and to decide whether the use of magnetic shielding is necessary. Measurements were performed on three Hamamatsu PMTs: two 8-inch R5912 types, one of these with super-bi-alkali photocathode, and a 10-inch R7081 type with a standard bi-alkali photocathode. The various characteristics of the PMTs were measured while varying the PMT orientations with respect to the Earth's magnetic field, both with and without a mu-metal cage as magnetic shield. In the 8-inch PMTs the impact of the magnetic field was found to be smaller than that on the 10-inch PMT. The increased quantum efficiency in the 8 super-bi-alkali PMT almost compensated its smaller detection surface compared to the 10' PMT. No significant effects were measured upon transit time and the fraction of spurious pulses. (authors)

  15. Influence of neutron irradiation on conduction cooling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Ogitsu, T.; Makida, Y.; Nakamoto, T.; Okamura, T.; Sasaki, K.; Sugano, M.

    2015-12-01

    The conduction-cooled superconducting magnets are now widely used in various applications due to their minimum usage of helium. In the accelerator science, they also play an increasingly important role in particle detector solenoids because they can minimize the materials needed for the magnet such that they can be more transparent against irradiated particles. For the same reason they are currently used in high radiation environments because they can reduce the heat load from the irradiation. However, the hadronic reactions, such as neutron or proton irradiation, can create degradation on the thermal conductivity of pure aluminum which is used as a cooling path. It leads to a poor cooling condition of the magnets. In Japan, there are two conduction-cooled superconducting magnets for muon production; one is already constructed and under operation, the other is now under construction. This paper briefly reports the influence of the irradiation on those magnets and discusses the possibilities of HTS based conduction-cooled magnets under high irradiation environments.

  16. The biogeochemical cycling of elemental mercury: Anthropogenic influences

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.P.; Morel, F.M.M. ); Fitzgerald, W.F. )

    1994-08-01

    A review of the available information on global Hg cycling shows that the atmosphere and surface ocean are in rapid equilibrium; the evasion of Hg[sup 0] from the oceans is balanced by the total oceanic deposition of Hg(II) from the atmosphere. The mechanisms whereby reactive Hg species are reduced to volatile Hg[sup 0] in the oceans are poorly known, but reduction appears to be chiefly biological. The rapid equilibrium of the surface oceans and the atmosphere, coupled with the small Hg sedimentation in the oceans makes deposition on land the dominant sink for atmospheric Hg. About half of the anthropogenic emissions appear to enter the global atmospheric cycle while the other half is deposited locally, presumably due to the presence of reactive Hg in flue gases. The authors estimate that over the last century anthropogenic emissions have tripled the concentrations of Hg in the atmosphere and in the surface ocean. Thus, two-thirds of the present Hg fluxes (such as deposition on land and on the ocean) are directly or indirectly of anthropogenic origin. Elimination of the anthropogenic load in the ocean and atmosphere would take fifteen to twenty years after termination of all anthropogenic emissions.

  17. Polarity Reversal Time of the Magnetic Dipole Component of the Sun in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamada, Kazuyuki

    2013-04-01

    The Sun's general magnetic field has shown polarity reversal three times during the last three solar cycles. We attempt to estimate the upcoming polarity reversal time of the solar magnetic dipole by using the coronal field model and synoptic data of the photospheric magnetic field. The scalar magnetic potential of the coronal magnetic field is expanded into a spherical harmonic series. The long-term variations of the dipole component (g01) calculated from the data of National Solar Observatory/Kitt Peak and Wilcox Solar Observatory are compared with each other. It is found that the two g01 values show a similar tendency and an approximately linear increase between the Carrington rotation periods CR 2070 and CR 2118. The next polarity reversal is estimated by linear extrapolation to be between CR 2132.2 (December 2012) and CR2134.8 (March 2013).

  18. DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC BIPOLES ON THE SUN OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Tlatov, Andrey G.; Vasil'eva, Valerya V.; Pevtsov, Alexei A. E-mail: apevtsov@nso.ed

    2010-07-01

    We employ synoptic full disk longitudinal magnetograms to study latitudinal distribution and orientation (tilt) of magnetic bipoles in the course of sunspot activity during cycles 21, 22, and 23. The data set includes daily observations from the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak (1975-2002) and Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (MDI/SOHO, 1996-2009). Bipole pairs were selected on the basis of proximity and flux balance of two neighboring flux elements of opposite polarity. Using the area of the bipoles, we have separated them into small quiet-Sun bipoles (QSBs), ephemeral regions (ERs), and active regions (ARs). We find that in their orientation, ERs and ARs follow Hale-Nicholson polarity rule. As expected, AR tilts follow Joy's law. ERs, however, show significantly larger tilts of opposite sign for a given hemisphere. QSBs are randomly oriented. Unlike ARs, ERs also show a preference in their orientation depending on the polarity of the large-scale magnetic field. These orientation properties may indicate that some ERs may form at or near the photosphere via the random encounter of opposite polarity elements, while others may originate in the convection zone at about the same location as ARs. The combined latitudinal distribution of ERs and ARs exhibits a clear presence of Spoerer's butterfly diagram (equatorward drift in the course of a solar cycle). ERs extend the ARs' 'wing' of the butterfly diagram to higher latitudes. This high latitude extension of ERs suggests an extended solar cycle with the first magnetic elements of the next cycle developing shortly after the maximum of the previous cycle. The polarity orientation and tilt of ERs may suggest the presence of poloidal fields of two configurations (new cycle and old cycle) in the convection zone at the declining phase of the sunspot cycle.

  19. Influence Deforestation on Hydrological Cycle at Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, J. C.; Beltrao, J.; Gandu, A. W.

    2007-05-01

    The last three decades, the Amazon Basin has been affected for the occupation with consequence large deforestation. The principal area deforested is located from Maranhao state to Rondonia state. This area is common called "Arc Deforestation", and representing the transition between two important Brazilian ecosystems, Amazon Forest and Savanna Region. Theses ecosystems have precious biodiversity, and it has population about 10.331.000. The objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of arc deforestation on the hydrological cycle at Amazon basin, using BRAMS (Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) including a model of dynamic vegetation, called GEMTM (General Energy and Mass Transport Model). In this study, numerical simulations were performed with a high spatial resolution regional model that allows capture some mesoscale aspects associated to the land used, topography, coastlines and large rivers. In order to predict the impact of the arc deforestation over the hydrological cycle, it was run two model simulations, conducted over a one-year period. In the first simulation, designated "control", it was used the scenarios derived from Soares Filho (2002), for the year 2002, in governance situation. In the second simulation called "deforestation", it was used the scenarios for the 2050, derived from results of Soares-Filho with governance, too. The higher-resolution regional modeling revealed important features of the deforestation process, displaying some associated mesoscale effects that are not typically represented in similar Global Circulation Model simulations. Near coastal zones and along large rivers, deforestation resulted in reduced precipitation. However, it was predicted increased precipitation over mountainous areas, especially on mountain slopes facing river valleys. Then, these higher-resolution simulations showed that, in general, orography, coastline profile and large river distribution play important roles in

  20. How the cell cycle impacts chromatin architecture and influences cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiqin; Kanakousaki, Kiriaki; Buttitta, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Since the earliest observations of cells undergoing mitosis, it has been clear that there is an intimate relationship between the cell cycle and nuclear chromatin architecture. The nuclear envelope and chromatin undergo robust assembly and disassembly during the cell cycle, and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone biogenesis and chromatin modification is controlled in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Chromatin binding proteins and chromatin modifications in turn influence the expression of critical cell cycle regulators, the accessibility of origins for DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell fate. In this review we aim to provide an integrated discussion of how the cell cycle machinery impacts nuclear architecture and vice-versa. We highlight recent advances in understanding cell cycle-dependent histone biogenesis and histone modification deposition, how cell cycle regulators control histone modifier activities, the contribution of chromatin modifications to origin firing for DNA replication, and newly identified roles for nucleoporins in regulating cell cycle gene expression, gene expression memory and differentiation. We close with a discussion of how cell cycle status may impact chromatin to influence cell fate decisions, under normal contexts of differentiation as well as in instances of cell fate reprogramming. PMID:25691891

  1. Magnetic Interactions Influence the Properties of Helium Defects in Iron.

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskaia, Tatiana; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations of He defect properties in iron have shown an unexpected influence of magnetism arising from the defect's electronic structure. In contrast with previous work that neglected such effects, the results indicate that the tetrahedral position is energetically more favorable for the He interstitial than the octahedral site. This may have significant implications for He clustering and bubble nucleation, which will impact material performance in future fusion reactors. These results provide the basis for development of improved atomistic models.

  2. Study and Development of an Air Conditioning System Operating on a Magnetic Heat Pump Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the design of a laboratory scale demonstration prototype of an air conditioning system operating on a magnetic heat pump cycle. Design parameters were selected through studies performed by a Kennedy Space Center (KSC) System Simulation Computer Model. The heat pump consists of a rotor turning through four magnetic fields that are created by permanent magnets. Gadolinium was selected as the working material for this demonstration prototype. The rotor was designed to be constructed of flat parallel disks of gadolinium with very little space in between. The rotor rotates in an aluminum housing. The laboratory scale demonstration prototype is designed to provide a theoretical Carnot Cycle efficiency of 62 percent and a Coefficient of Performance of 16.55.

  3. Properties and geoeffectiveness of magnetic clouds during solar cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Mäkelä, P.

    2015-11-01

    We report on a study that compares the properties of magnetic clouds (MCs) during the first 73 months of solar cycles 23 and 24 in order to understand the weak geomagnetic activity in cycle 24. We find that the number of MCs did not decline in cycle 24, although the average sunspot number is known to have declined by ~40%. Despite the large number of MCs, their geoeffectiveness in cycle 24 was very low. The average Dst index in the sheath and cloud portions in cycle 24 was -33 nT and -23 nT, compared to -66 nT and -55 nT, respectively, in cycle 23. One of the key outcomes of this investigation is that the reduction in the strength of geomagnetic storms as measured by the Dst index is a direct consequence of the reduction in the factor VBz (the product of the MC speed and the out-of-the-ecliptic component of the MC magnetic field). The reduction in MC-to-ambient total pressure in cycle 24 is compensated for by the reduction in the mean MC speed, resulting in the constancy of the dimensionless expansion rate at 1 AU. However, the MC size in cycle 24 was significantly smaller, which can be traced to the anomalous expansion of coronal mass ejections near the Sun reported by Gopalswamy et al. (2014a). One of the consequences of the anomalous expansion seems to be the larger heliocentric distance where the pressure balance between the CME flux ropes and the ambient medium occurs in cycle 24.

  4. Sharing leadership influence: a life-cycle model.

    PubMed

    Hunt, E H; Sleeth, R G

    1977-07-01

    We have described the effective leader in terms of several concepts: (1) leadership style as a means of sharing the influence of leadership with a ready group; (2) the readiness of a group to successfully exert influence on the practice; (3) the matching of leadership styles with group readiness; and (4) the impact of the environment on the readiness of a group. We have described how all of these elements combine to determine a leader's effectiveness. All elements interact and present the leader with a situation for which he must adopt an appropriate leadership style (Table 1). Several elements combine to change the readiness of a group through four phases - unready, ready, mature, and professional. The leader then matches leadership styles I through IV to these levels of readiness. We believe a dentist will be effective as a leader in proportion to his success in matching an appropriate leadership style to the readiness of his group to perform in its particular environment. PMID:267599

  5. Evolution of sunspot activity and inversion of the Sun's polar magnetic field in the current cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordvinov, A. V.; Grigoryev, V. M.; Erofeev, D. V.

    2015-06-01

    A spatiotemporal analysis of the Sun's magnetic field was carried out to study the polar-field inversion in the current cycle in relation to sunspot activity. The causal relationship between these phenomena was demonstrated in a time-latitude aspect. After decay of long-lived activity complexes their magnetic fields were redistributed into the surrounding photosphere and formed unipolar magnetic regions which were transported to high latitudes. Zones of intense sunspot activity during 2011/2012 produced unipolar magnetic regions of the following polarities, whose poleward drift led to the inversion of the Sun's polar fields at the North and South Poles. At the North Pole the polar field reversal was completed by May 2013. It was demonstrated that mixed magnetic polarities near the North Pole resulted from violations of Joy's law at lower latitudes. Later sunspot activity in the southern hemisphere has led to a delay in magnetic polarity reversal at the South Pole. Thus, the north-south asymmetry of sunspot activity resulted in asynchronous polar field reversal in the current cycle.

  6. Rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X. J.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    The rotation of solar magnetic fields for the current solar cycle 24 is investigated through a cross-correlation analysis of the Carrington synoptic maps of solar photospheric magnetic fields during Carrington rotation numbers 2076-2146 (2008 October to 2014 January). The sidereal rotation rates of positive and negative magnetic fields at some latitudes are shown, and it can be found that the positive (negative) fields generally rotate faster than the negative (positive) fields in the southern (northern) hemisphere at low latitudes. The mean rotation profiles of total, positive, and negative magnetic fields between ±60° latitudes in the time interval are also obtained. It should be noted that both of the mean rotation profiles of the positive and negative magnetic fields, as well as the mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field, exhibit a quasi-rigid rotation at latitudes above about 55°. The mean rotation rates of the positive (negative) polarity reach their maximum values at about 9°(6)° latitude in the southern (northern) hemisphere. The mean rotation profile of the total magnetic field displays an obvious north-south asymmetry, where the rotation seems to be more differential in the northern hemisphere. The latitude variation in the rotation rate differences between positive and negative magnetic fields is further studied, and it is found that magnetic fields with the same polarity as the leading sunspots at a given hemisphere rotate faster than those with the opposite polarity, except for the zones around 52° latitude of the southern hemisphere and around 35° latitude of the northern hemisphere. The implication of these results is discussed. It is clear that the obtained results can provide some observational constraints on the theoretical research of the mechanisms of differential rotation and solar cycle.

  7. Influence of magnetic electrodes thicknesses on the transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Dieny, Bernard

    2014-08-04

    The influence of the bottom and top magnetic electrodes thicknesses on both perpendicular anisotropy and transport properties is studied in (Co/Pt)/Ta/CoFeB/MgO/FeCoB/Ta magnetic tunnel junctions. By carefully investigating the relative magnetic moment of the two electrodes as a function of their thicknesses, we identify and quantify the presence of magnetically dead layers, likely localized at the interfaces with Ta, that is, 0.33 nm for the bottom electrode and 0.60 nm for the top one. Critical thicknesses (spin-reorientation transitions) are determined as 1.60 and 1.65 nm for bottom and top electrodes, respectively. The tunnel magnetoresistance ratio reaches its maximum value, as soon as both effective (corrected from dead layer) electrode thicknesses exceed 0.6 nm.

  8. Influence of magnetic electrodes thicknesses on the transport properties of magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchet, Léa; Rodmacq, Bernard; Auffret, Stéphane; Sousa, Ricardo C.; Dieny, Bernard

    2014-08-01

    The influence of the bottom and top magnetic electrodes thicknesses on both perpendicular anisotropy and transport properties is studied in (Co/Pt)/Ta/CoFeB/MgO/FeCoB/Ta magnetic tunnel junctions. By carefully investigating the relative magnetic moment of the two electrodes as a function of their thicknesses, we identify and quantify the presence of magnetically dead layers, likely localized at the interfaces with Ta, that is, 0.33 nm for the bottom electrode and 0.60 nm for the top one. Critical thicknesses (spin-reorientation transitions) are determined as 1.60 and 1.65 nm for bottom and top electrodes, respectively. The tunnel magnetoresistance ratio reaches its maximum value, as soon as both effective (corrected from dead layer) electrode thicknesses exceed 0.6 nm.

  9. Colaba-Alibag magnetic observatory and Nanabhoy Moos: the influence of one over the other

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawali, P. B.; Doiphode, M. G.; Nimje, R. N.

    2015-09-01

    The first permanent magnetic observatories in colonial India were established by the East India Company and under the Göttingen Magnetic Union. One of the world's longest running observatories was set up at Colaba (Bombay) in 1841, which was shifted to Alibag in 1904 to avoid electric traction effects on magnetic recordings. The observatory is located at the northwestern tip of Maharashtra, India, on the Arabian Sea. The magnetic data at Colaba were collected through eye-observation instruments from 1841 to 1872 and by photographic (magnetograph) instruments from 1872 to 1905, which reveal seasonal and other periodic effects on geomagnetic elements. Seasonal influence can be deciphered on the H minimum, but not on the maximum; the disturbances in March and April were opposite to those in December and January. D was maximum in 1880 (57' E) and minimum in 1904 (10' E). The data from 1882 to 1905 revealed that H annual inequality was influenced by 5.5-year periodicity, D by 13.5 days from 1888 to 1905, and I and Z by 11-year periodicity from 1894 to 1905 and 1873 to 1905, respectively. Secular variation of Z was parallel to that of I. Z exhibited an increasing trend from 1868 (12 874 nT) to 1905 (15 083 nT). The plan and location of Colaba-Alibag as well as the instruments used are discussed. The initial Colaba magnetic data containing "magnetic disturbances" was harnessed to identify the "disturbing point" on Earth. Nanabhoy Moos, the first Indian director, presciently hinted at a solar origin for magnetic disturbances, revealed the dependence of magnetic elements on the sunspot cycle, unraveled disturbance daily variation, and tried to understand the association, if any, between geomagnetic, seismological and meteorological phenomena. The two giant volumes published in 1910 attest to Moos' seminal work and his inventiveness in organizing and analyzing long series data. He also had a major role in moving Colaba magnetic observatory to Alibag. Thus, the observatory

  10. Air core notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Kruber, S; Farrher, G D; Anoardo, E

    2015-10-01

    In this manuscript we present details on the optimization, construction and performance of a wide-bore (71 mm) α-helical-cut notch-coil magnet with variable geometry for fast-field-cycling NMR. In addition to the usual requirements for this kind of magnets (high field-to-power ratio, good magnetic field homogeneity, low inductance and resistance values) a tunable homogeneity and a more uniform heat dissipation along the magnet body are considered. The presented magnet consists of only one machined metallic cylinder combined with two external movable pieces. The optimal configuration is calculated through an evaluation of the magnetic flux density within the entire volume of interest. The magnet has a field-to-current constant of 0.728 mT/A, allowing to switch from zero to 0.125 T in less than 3 ms without energy storage assistance. For a cylindrical sample volume of 35 cm(3) the effective magnet homogeneity is lower than 130 ppm. PMID:26367321

  11. Thermodynamic property evaluation and magnetic refrigeration cycle analysis for gadolinium gallium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.W.

    1994-12-01

    Based on relevant material property data and previous model formulations, a magnetothermodynamic property map for gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was adapted for refrigeration cycle analysis in the temperature range 4-40 K and the magnetic field range 0-6 T. Employing methods similar to those previously developed for other materials and temperature ranges, assessments of limitations and relative performance were made for Carnot, ideal regenerative, and pseudo-constant field regenerative cycles. It was found that although Carnot cycle limitations on available temperature lift for gadolinium gallium garnet are not as severe as the limitations for materials previously examined, considerable improvement in cooling capacity and temperature lift combinations can be achieved by using regenerative cycles if serious loss mechanisms are avoided.

  12. Does menstrual cycle phase influence the gender specificity of heterosexual women's genital and subjective sexual arousal?

    PubMed

    Bossio, Jennifer A; Suschinsky, Kelly D; Puts, David A; Chivers, Meredith L

    2014-07-01

    Unlike men, heterosexual women's genital arousal is gender nonspecific, such that heterosexual women show relatively similar genital arousal to sexual stimuli depicting men and women but typically report greater subjective arousal to male stimuli. Based on the ovulatory-shift hypothesis-that women show a mid-cycle shift in preferences towards more masculine features during peak fertility-we predicted that heterosexual women's genital and subjective arousal would be gender specific (more arousal towards male stimuli) during peak fertility. Twenty-two naturally-cycling heterosexual women were assessed during the follicular and luteal phases of their menstrual cycle to examine the role of menstrual cycle phase in gender specificity of genital and subjective sexual arousal. Menstrual cycle phase was confirmed with salivary hormone assays; phase at the time of first testing was counterbalanced. Women's genital and subjective sexual arousal patterns were gender nonspecific, irrespective of cycle phase. Cycle phase at first testing session did not influence genital or subjective arousal in the second testing session. Similar to previous research, women's genital and subjective sexual arousal varied with cues of sexual activity, but neither genital nor subjective sexual arousal varied by gender cues, with the exception of masturbation stimuli, where women showed higher genital arousal to the stimuli depicting male compared to female actors. These data suggest that menstrual cycle phase does not influence the gender specificity of heterosexual women's genital and subjective sexual arousal. PMID:24379080

  13. Polarity Reversal of the Solar Photospheric Magnetic Field During Activity Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-06-01

    The large-scale solar magnetic field reverses its polarity during the maximum phase of each activity cycle. As observed on the photosphere, active region (AR) magnetic flux migrates poleward in narrow, sheared streams resulted from large-scale flows and diffusion. A small net flux of the trailing sunspot polarity eventually aggregates at high latitudes, manifesting the poloidal field of the next cycle. We characterize this process for the ongoing cycle 24 based on four years' line-of-sight magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The axial dipole component reversed sign in early 2012, but the poleward flux migration was grossly out of phase in the two hemispheres. As a proxy, the northern polar field (taken as mean above 70 degrees latitude) switched from negative to positive in late 2012, whereas the southern remained positive as of March 2014. Three factors that are in line with the surface flux transport model may have contributed. First, AR emergence started and peaked earlier in the north. Second, several ARs with small or inverse tilt angles (w.r.t. the Joy's law) emerged in the south in late 2010. Third, meridional flow speed inferred from helioseismology varied greatly prior to 2013; slower streams (compared to a three-year mean at the same latitude) appeared earlier in the north. We correlate HMI with the long-running Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) dataset, and compare the current cycle with the previous three.

  14. Solar Sources and Geospace Consequences of Interplanetary Magnetic Clouds Observed During Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Michalek, G.; Lepping, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a statistical investigation of 99 magnetic clouds (MCs) observed during 1995-2005. The MC-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are faster and wider on the average and originate within +/-30deg from the solar disk center. The solar sources of MCs also followed the butterfly diagram. The correlation between the magnetic field strength and speed of MCs was found to be valid over a much wider range of speeds. The number of south-north (SN) MCs was dominant and decreased with solar cycle, while the number of north-south (NS) MCs increased confirming the odd-cycle behavior. Two-thirds of MCs were geoeffective; the Dst index was highly correlated with speed and magnetic field in MCs as well as their product. Many (55%) fully northward (FN) MCs were geoeffective solely due to their sheaths. The non-geoeffective MCs were slower (average speed approx. 382 km/s), had a weaker southward magnetic field (average approx. -5.2nT), and occurred mostly during the rise phase of the solar activity cycle.

  15. Mesoscale Influences of Wind Farms Throughout a Diurnal Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, A. C.; Lundquist, J. K.; Olson, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Few observations are available to give insight into the interaction between large wind farms and the boundary layer. As wind farm deployment increases, questions are arising on the potential impact on meteorology within and downwind of large wind farms. While large-eddy simulation can provide insight into the detailed interaction between individual turbines and the boundary layer, to date it has been too computationally expensive to simulate wind farms with large numbers of turbines and the resulting wake far downstream. Mesoscale numerical weather prediction models provide the opportunity to investigate the flow in and around large wind farms as a whole, and the resulting impact on meteorology. To this end, we have implemented a wind farm parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which represents wind turbines by imposing a momentum sink on the mean flow; converting kinetic energy into electricity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The parameterization improves upon previous models, basing the atmospheric drag of turbines on the thrust coefficient of a modern commercial turbine. In addition, the source of TKE varies with wind speed, reflecting the amount of energy extracted from the atmosphere by the turbines that does not produce electrical energy. We simulate a wind farm covering 10x10 km over land, consisting of 100 turbines each of nominal power output of 5 MW. Results will be presented showing how the wake structure varies dramatically over a diurnal cycle characteristic of a region in the Great Plains of the US, where wind farm deployment is planned. At night, a low-level jet forms within the rotor area, which is completely eliminated by energy extraction within the wind farm. The deep stable layer and lack of higher momentum air aloft at this time maximises the wind deficit and the length of the wake. The presentation will discuss the maximum reduction of wind speed within and downwind from the farm, and the wake e

  16. Influence of Magnetic Fields on Magneto-Aerotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Mathieu; McCarthy, Aongus; Fix, Dmitri; Edwards, Matthew R.; Repp, Felix; Vach, Peter; Dunlop, John W. C.; Sitti, Metin; Buller, Gerald S.; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The response of cells to changes in their physico-chemical micro-environment is essential to their survival. For example, bacterial magnetotaxis uses the Earth's magnetic field together with chemical sensing to help microorganisms move towards favoured habitats. The studies of such complex responses are lacking a method that permits the simultaneous mapping of the chemical environment and the response of the organisms, and the ability to generate a controlled physiological magnetic field. We have thus developed a multi-modal microscopy platform that fulfils these requirements. Using simultaneous fluorescence and high-speed imaging in conjunction with diffusion and aerotactic models, we characterized the magneto- aerotaxis of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. We assessed the influence of the magnetic field (orientation; strength) on the formation and the dynamic of a micro-aerotactic band (size, dynamic, position). As previously described by models of magnetotaxis, the application of a magnetic field pointing towards the anoxic zone of an oxygen gradient results in an enhanced aerotaxis even down to Earth's magnetic field strength. We found that neither a ten-fold increase of the field strength nor a tilt of 45° resulted in a significant change of the aerotactic efficiency. However, when the field strength is zeroed or when the field angle is tilted to 90°, the magneto-aerotaxis efficiency is drastically reduced. The classical model of magneto-aerotaxis assumes a response proportional to the cosine of the angle difference between the directions of the oxygen gradient and that of the magnetic field. Our experimental evidence however shows that this behaviour is more complex than assumed in this model, thus opening up new avenues for research. PMID:24983865

  17. Influence of magnetic fields on magneto-aerotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Mathieu; McCarthy, Aongus; Fix, Dmitri; Edwards, Matthew R; Repp, Felix; Vach, Peter; Dunlop, John W C; Sitti, Metin; Buller, Gerald S; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2014-01-01

    The response of cells to changes in their physico-chemical micro-environment is essential to their survival. For example, bacterial magnetotaxis uses the Earth's magnetic field together with chemical sensing to help microorganisms move towards favoured habitats. The studies of such complex responses are lacking a method that permits the simultaneous mapping of the chemical environment and the response of the organisms, and the ability to generate a controlled physiological magnetic field. We have thus developed a multi-modal microscopy platform that fulfils these requirements. Using simultaneous fluorescence and high-speed imaging in conjunction with diffusion and aerotactic models, we characterized the magneto-aerotaxis of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. We assessed the influence of the magnetic field (orientation; strength) on the formation and the dynamic of a micro-aerotactic band (size, dynamic, position). As previously described by models of magnetotaxis, the application of a magnetic field pointing towards the anoxic zone of an oxygen gradient results in an enhanced aerotaxis even down to Earth's magnetic field strength. We found that neither a ten-fold increase of the field strength nor a tilt of 45° resulted in a significant change of the aerotactic efficiency. However, when the field strength is zeroed or when the field angle is tilted to 90°, the magneto-aerotaxis efficiency is drastically reduced. The classical model of magneto-aerotaxis assumes a response proportional to the cosine of the angle difference between the directions of the oxygen gradient and that of the magnetic field. Our experimental evidence however shows that this behaviour is more complex than assumed in this model, thus opening up new avenues for research. PMID:24983865

  18. Variable spatial magnetic field influences peripheral nerves regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Suszyński, Krzysztof; Marcol, Wiesław; Szajkowski, Sebastian; Pietrucha-Dutczak, Marita; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Aleksander; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Generator of spatial magnetic field is one of most recent achievements among the magnetostimulators. This apparatus allows to obtain the rotating magnetic field. This new method may be more effective than other widely used techniques of magnetostimulation and magnetotherapy. We investigated the influence of alternating, spatial magnetic field on the regeneration of the crushed rat sciatic nerves. Functional and morphological evaluations were used. After crush injury of the right sciatic nerve, Wistar C rats (n = 80) were randomly divided into four groups (control and three experimental). The experimental groups (A, B, C) were exposed (20 min/day, 5 d/week, 4 weeks) to alternating spatial magnetic field of three different intensities. Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and tensometric assessments were performed every week after nerve crush. Forty-eight hours before the sacrificing of animals, DiI (1,1'-di-octadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyloindocarbocyanine perchlorate) was applied 5 mm distally to the crush site. Collected nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were subjected to histological and immunohistochemical staining. The survival rate of DRG neurons was estimated. Regrowth and myelination of the nerves was examined. The results of SFI and tensometric assessment showed improvement in all experimental groups as compared to control, with best outcome observed in group C, exposed to the strongest magnetic field. In addition, DRG survival rate and nerve regeneration intensity were significantly higher in the C group. Above results indicate that strong spatial alternating magnetic field exerts positive effect on peripheral nerve regeneration and its application could be taken under consideration in the therapy of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:23781984

  19. Sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding influence emotional memory for gist and detail.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Shawn E; Ahmed, Imran; Cahill, Larry

    2013-11-01

    Sex influences on emotional memory have received increasing interest over the past decade. However, only a subset of this previous work explored the influence of sex on memory for central information (gist) and peripheral detail in emotional versus neutral contexts. Here we examined the influence of sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding on memory for either an emotional or neutral story, specifically with respect to the retention of gist and peripheral detail. Healthy naturally cycling women and men viewed a brief, narrated, three-phase story containing neutral or emotionally arousing elements. One week later, participants received a surprise free recall test for story elements. The results indicate that naturally cycling women in the luteal (high hormone) phase of the menstrual cycle at encoding show enhanced memory for peripheral details, but not gist, when in the emotional compared with neutral stories (p<.05). In contrast, naturally cycling women in the follicular (low hormone) phase of the menstrual cycle at encoding did not show enhanced memory for gist or peripheral details in the emotional compared with neutral stories. Men show enhanced memory for gist, but not peripheral details, in the emotional versus neutral stories (p<.05). In addition, these sex influences on memory cannot be attributed to differences in attention or arousal; luteal women, follicular women, and men performed similarly on measures of attention (fixation time percentage) and arousal (pupil diameter changes) during the most arousing phase of the emotional story. These findings suggest that sex and menstrual cycle phase at encoding influence long term memory for different types of emotional information. PMID:23891713

  20. Polar Network Index as a Magnetic Proxy for the Solar Cycle Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyal, Muthu; Banerjee, Dipankar; Karak, Bidya Binay; Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Ravindra, B.; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Singh, Jagdev

    2014-09-01

    The Sun has a polar magnetic field which oscillates with the 11 yr sunspot cycle. This polar magnetic field is an important component of the dynamo process which operates in the solar convection zone and produces the sunspot cycle. We have direct systematic measurements of the Sun's polar magnetic field only from about the mid-1970s. There are, however, indirect proxies which give us information about this field at earlier times. The Ca-K spectroheliograms taken at the Kodaikanal Solar Observatory during 1904-2007 have now been digitized with 4k × 4k CCD and have higher resolution (~0.86 arcsec) than the other available historical data sets. From these Ca-K spectroheliograms, we have developed a completely new proxy (polar network index, hereafter PNI) for the Sun's polar magnetic field. We calculate PNI from the digitized images using an automated algorithm and calibrate our measured PNI against the polar field as measured by the Wilcox Solar Observatory for the period 1976-1990. This calibration allows us to estimate the polar fields for the earlier period up to 1904. The dynamo calculations performed with this proxy as input data reproduce reasonably well the Sun's magnetic behavior for the past century.

  1. POLAR NETWORK INDEX AS A MAGNETIC PROXY FOR THE SOLAR CYCLE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Priyal, Muthu; Banerjee, Dipankar; Ravindra, B.; Singh, Jagdev; Karak, Bidya Binay; Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai E-mail: dipu@iiap.res.in

    2014-09-20

    The Sun has a polar magnetic field which oscillates with the 11 yr sunspot cycle. This polar magnetic field is an important component of the dynamo process which operates in the solar convection zone and produces the sunspot cycle. We have direct systematic measurements of the Sun's polar magnetic field only from about the mid-1970s. There are, however, indirect proxies which give us information about this field at earlier times. The Ca-K spectroheliograms taken at the Kodaikanal Solar Observatory during 1904-2007 have now been digitized with 4k × 4k CCD and have higher resolution (∼0.86 arcsec) than the other available historical data sets. From these Ca-K spectroheliograms, we have developed a completely new proxy (polar network index, hereafter PNI) for the Sun's polar magnetic field. We calculate PNI from the digitized images using an automated algorithm and calibrate our measured PNI against the polar field as measured by the Wilcox Solar Observatory for the period 1976-1990. This calibration allows us to estimate the polar fields for the earlier period up to 1904. The dynamo calculations performed with this proxy as input data reproduce reasonably well the Sun's magnetic behavior for the past century.

  2. The spiral interplanetary magnetic field: A polarity and sunspot cycle variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Spacecraft observations near the earth of the yearly average direction of the interplanetary magnetic field during the sunspot maximum year 1968 showed a deviation from the spiral field. The angle between the average field direction when the field polarity was away from the sun and the average direction for toward polarity was 168 deg, rather than 180 deg. This effect appears to have a sunspot cycle variation.

  3. The spiral interplanetary magnetic field - A polarity and sunspot cycle variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Spacecraft observations near the earth of the average direction of the interplanetary magnetic field during the sunspot maximum year 1968 showed a deviation from the spiral field of Parker's classical description. The included angle between the average field direction when the field polarity was away from the sun and the average direction when the field polarity was toward the sun was 168 deg, rather than 180 deg as predicted by Parker. This effect appears to have a sunspot cycle variation.

  4. Magnetic interactions influence the properties of helium defects in iron.

    PubMed

    Seletskaia, Tatiana; Osetsky, Yuri; Stoller, R E; Stocks, G M

    2005-02-01

    Density functional theory calculations of He defect properties in iron have shown an unexpected influence of magnetism arising from the defect's electronic structure. In contrast with previous work that neglected such effects, the results indicate that the tetrahedral position is energetically more favorable for the He interstitial than the octahedral site. This may have significant implications for He clustering and bubble nucleation, which will impact material performance in future fusion reactors. These results provide the basis for development of improved atomistic models. PMID:15783579

  5. Influence of magnetization variations in the free layer on a non-volatile magnetic flip flop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windbacher, Thomas; Makarov, Alexander; Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2015-06-01

    Recently, we proposed an alternative non-volatile magnetic flip flop which allows high integration density. This work extends the up to now gained results to the devices' functionality under statistically distributed magnetization variations of its free layer. Assuming position uncorrelated random fluctuations in the free layer, that the variations are fixed with respect to time, and that small deviations from its mean are more likely than big ones, a Gaussian distribution was chosen to model the random fluctuations. The random variations were added to the simulations as a position dependent Zeeman term and their influence was varied by changing the variance of the distribution scaled in percent of the free layers saturation magnetization. The results with and without thermal excitation show that the flip flop is capable of operating under high free layer field variations.

  6. Direct observations of the full Dungey convection cycle in the polar ionosphere for southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.-H.; Lockwood, M.; Foster, J. C.; Zhang, S.-R.; Zhang, B.-C.; McCrea, I. W.; Moen, J.; Lester, M.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Tracking the formation and full evolution of polar cap ionization patches in the polar ionosphere, we directly observe the full Dungey convection cycle for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. This enables us to study how the Dungey cycle influences the patches' evolution. The patches were initially segmented from the dayside storm enhanced density plume at the equatorward edge of the cusp, by the expansion and contraction of the polar cap boundary due to pulsed dayside magnetopause reconnection, as indicated by in situ Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations. Convection led to the patches entering the polar cap and being transported antisunward, while being continuously monitored by the globally distributed arrays of GPS receivers and Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radars. Changes in convection over time resulted in the patches following a range of trajectories, each of which differed somewhat from the classical twin-cell convection streamlines. Pulsed nightside reconnection, occurring as part of the magnetospheric substorm cycle, modulated the exit of the patches from the polar cap, as confirmed by coordinated observations of the magnetometer at Tromsø and European Incoherent Scatter Tromsø UHF radar. After exiting the polar cap, the patches broke up into a number of plasma blobs and returned sunward in the auroral return flow of the dawn and/or dusk convection cell. The full circulation time was about 3 h.

  7. Solar Magnetic Flux as a Function of Disk Position over the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T.

    2005-05-01

    A novel analysis of a SOHO/MDI full-disk magnetogram time series from March 1996 to November 2004 is presented. Each of the 26,052 magnetograms in the series are segmented into sectors of constant μ = cos θ, each sector having a width of Δμ = 0.05. Within each sector, a histogram of signed magnetic flux density, corrected for the line-of-sight angle θ, is compiled. For each magnetogram we thus obtain a distribution of signed magnetic flux density as a function of μ. Summing the signed flux in each μ bin gives the total signed flux as a function of μ. Plotting these totals for each μ-sector as a function of time over the course of Solar Cycle 22 reveals that cycle minimum and maximum are differentiated only by the magnitude of the flux distributions. In other words, in contrast to analogous plots of flux versus heliocentric latitude, there is no discernible pattern, or "Butterfly Diagram", of flux seen on the solar disk from Earth. The finding is relevant to investigations of total solar irradiance (TSI) since it is known that the primary cause of the ~ 0.1% TSI variation over the solar cycle is the distribution of non-sunspot magnetic flux at smaller μ-values (so-called "faculae").

  8. Theoretical studies to elucidate the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions occurring in the magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaci, M.; Cacciola, M.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the study of magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively developed not only for their fundamental theoretical interest, but also for their many technological applications, especially biomedical applications, ranging from contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging to the deterioration of cancer cells via hyperthermia treatment. The theoretical and experimental research has shown until now that the magnetic dipolar interactions between nanoparticles can have a significant influence on the magnetic behaviour of the system. But, this influence is not well understood. It is clear that the magnetic dipolar interaction intensity is correlated with the nanoparticle concentration, volume fraction and magnetic moment orientations. In this paper, we try to understand the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions on the behaviour of magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications. For the model, we considered spherical nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy and lognormal distribution of the sizes. The model involves a simulation stage of the spatial distribution and orientation of the nanoparticles and their easy axes of magnetic anisotropy, and an evaluation stage of the Néel relaxation time. To assess the Néel relaxation time, we are going to discretise and adapt, to the local magnetic field, the Coffey analytical solution for the equation Fokker-Planck describing the dynamics of magnetic moments of nanoparticles in oblique external magnetic field. There are three fundamental aspects of interest in our studies on the magnetic nanoparticles: their spatial & orientational distributions, concentrations and sizes.

  9. A Preisach-Based Nonequilibrium Methodology for Simulating Performance of Hysteretic Magnetic Refrigeration Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy D.; Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Chen, Jing-Han; Karaman, Ibrahim; Ross, Joseph H.; Shamberger, Patrick J.

    2015-09-01

    In giant magnetocaloric effect (GMCE) materials a large entropy change couples to a magnetostructural first-order phase transition, potentially providing a basis for magnetic refrigeration cycles. However, hysteresis loss greatly reduces the availability of refrigeration work in such cycles. Here, we present a methodology combining a Preisach model for rate-independent hysteresis with a thermodynamic analysis of nonequilibrium phase transformations which, for GMCE materials exhibiting hysteresis, allows an evaluation of refrigeration work and efficiency terms for an arbitrary cycle. Using simplified but physically meaningful descriptors for the magnetic and thermal properties of a Ni45Co5Mn36.6In13.4 at.% single-crystal alloy, we relate these work/efficiency terms to fundamental material properties, demonstrating the method's use as a materials design tool. Following a simple two-parameter model for the alloy's hysteresis properties, we compute and interpret the effect of each parameter on the cyclic refrigeration work and efficiency terms. We show that hysteresis loss is a critical concern in cycles based on GMCE systems, since the resultant lost work can reduce the refrigeration work to zero; however, we also find that the lost work may be mitigated by modifying other aspects of the transition, such as the width over which the one-way transformation occurs.

  10. Magnetic stability in exchange-spring and exchange bias systems after multiple switching cycles.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J. S.; Inomata, A.; You, C.-Y.; Pearson, J. E.; Bader, S. D.

    2001-06-01

    We have studied the magnetic stability in exchange bias and exchange spring systems prepared via epitaxial sputter deposition. The two interfacial exchange coupled systems, Fe/Cr(211) double superlattices consisting of a ferromagnetic and an antiferromagnetic Fe/Cr superlattice that are exchange coupled through a Cr spacer, and Sin-Co/Fe exchange-spring bilayer structures with ferromagnetically coupled hard Sin-Co layer and soft Fe layer, were epitaxially grown on suitably prepared Cr buffer layers to give rise to different microstructure and magnetic anisotropy. The magnetic stability was investigated using the magneto-optic Kerr effect during repeated reversal of the soft layer magnetization by field cycling up to 10{sup 7} times. For uniaxial Fe/Cr exchange biased double superlattices and exchange spring bilayers with uniaxial Sin-Co, small but rapid initial decay in the exchange bias field HE and in the remanent magnetization is observed. However, the exchange spring bilayers with biaxial and random in-plane anisotropy in the Sin-Co layer shows gradual decay in H{sub E} and without large reduction of the magnetization. The different decay behaviors are attributed to the different microstructure and spin configuration of the pinning layers.

  11. MAGNETIC CYCLES IN A CONVECTIVE DYNAMO SIMULATION OF A YOUNG SOLAR-TYPE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Miesch, Mark S.; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2011-04-10

    Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and many are magnetically active. Some appear to undergo magnetic cycles similar to the 22 yr solar activity cycle. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore dynamo action achieved in the convective envelope of a solar-type star rotating at five times the current solar rotation rate. We find that dynamo action builds substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields in the midst of the convection zone. Striking magnetic wreaths span the convection zone and coexist with the turbulent convection. A surprising feature of this wreath-building dynamo is its rich time dependence. The dynamo exhibits cyclic activity and undergoes quasi-periodic polarity reversals where both the global-scale poloidal and toroidal fields change in sense on a roughly 1500 day timescale. These magnetic activity patterns emerge spontaneously from the turbulent flow and are more organized temporally and spatially than those realized in our previous simulations of the solar dynamo. We assess in detail the competing processes of magnetic field creation and destruction within our simulations that contribute to the global-scale reversals. We find that the mean toroidal fields are built primarily through an {Omega}-effect, while the mean poloidal fields are built by turbulent correlations which are not well represented by a simple {alpha}-effect. During a reversal the magnetic wreaths propagate toward the polar regions, and this appears to arise from a poleward propagating dynamo wave. As the magnetic fields wax and wane in strength and flip in polarity, the primary response in the convective flows involves the axisymmetric differential rotation which varies on similar timescales. Bands of relatively fast and slow fluid propagate toward the poles on timescales of roughly 500 days and are associated with the magnetic structures that propagate

  12. Flow downstream of the heliospheric terminal shock: Magnetic field line topology and solar cycle imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerney, Steven; Suess, S. T.; Schmahl, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The topology of the magnetic field in the heliosheath is illustrated using plots of the field lines. It is shown that the Archimedean spiral inside the terminal shock is rotated back in the heliosheath into nested spirals that are advected in the direction of the interstellar wind. The 22-year solar magnetic cycle is imprinted onto these field lines in the form of unipolar magnetic envelopes surrounded by volumes of strongly mixed polarity. Each envelope is defined by the changing tilt of the heliospheric current sheet, which is in turn defined by the boundary of unipolar high-latitude regions on the Sun that shrink to the pole at solar maximum and expand to the equator at solar minimum. The detailed shape of the envelopes is regulated by the solar wind velocity structure in the heliosheath.

  13. Jet Pump for Liquid Helium Circulation Through the Fast Cycling Magnets of Nuclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, Nikolay; Emelianov, Nikita; Mitrofanova, Julia; Nikiforov, Dmitry

    Nuclotron is the first fast cycling superconducting synchrotron intended for the acceleration of high-energy nuclei and heavy ions. Its cryogenic system includes two helium refrigerators with a total capacity of 4000 W at 4.5 K. The 251.5 m long accelerator ring consists of 144 superconducting dipole and quadruple magnets. The magnets connected in parallel are refrigerated by a two-phase flow of boiling helium. In order to increase liquid helium flow directed to the superconducting magnets, jet pumps are used. We explain theoretical and experimental results that allow one to determinate main technical specifications and optimal geometric dimensions of the jet pumps. The experience of using this device and corresponding flow diagrams are described.

  14. Magnetization, anomalous Barkhausen effect, and core loss of Supermendur under high temperature cycling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, J. M.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1971-01-01

    The magnetization and core loss of Supermendur were measured up to 900 C under conditions of slow temperature cycling in vacuum. As a consequence of this heating, the coercivity at 25 C increased from 21 A/m to about 110 A/m. This increase is less than previously reported. A prominent anomalous Barkhausen effect, pinched-in hysteresis loops, and a magnetic viscosity field in excess of 20 A/m were observed in the range of 600 to 700 C. At 850 C, Supermendur had a coercivity of 23 A/m, a saturation induction exceeding 1.5 T, a core loss of 26 W/kg at 400 Hz, and a maximum induction of 1.5 T. Supermendur may be useful for high temperature soft magnetic material applications where some history dependence of properties and instability of minor loops at lower temperatures is acceptable.

  15. Influence of coupling of sorption and photosynthetic processes on trace element cycles in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical and biological processes have important roles in the transport and cycling of trace elements in natural waters, but their complex interactions are often not well understood. Trace-element concentrations may, for example, be controlled by adsorption-desorption reactions at mineral surfaces, with the equilibrium strongly influenced by pH. Variations in pH due to photosynthetic activity should result in concentration fluctuations as the adsorption-desorption equilibrium shifts with pH. To investigate these interactions, we have studied the effect of diurnal cycling of pH on dissolved arsenate in a perennial stream contaminated with arsenic. As expected, a diurnal cycle in arsenate concentration was observed, but surprisingly, the arsenate cycle lags several hours behind the pH cycle. Laboratory experiments show that the lag results from a slow approach to sorption equilibrium. Our observations demonstrate that the coupling of photosynthesis and sorption processes may have an important influence on the cycling of many trace elements and emphasize the importance of understanding sorption kinetics in modelling these processes.

  16. Solar Wind and Magnetic Storms in 24-th Cycle of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val'chuk, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    Slow growth of 24-th solar cycle allows adding of this cycle to the type of low cycles. Geomagnetic activity is not expensive too - strong geomagnetic storms were absent in the beginning of growth branch of this cycle. Very prolonged minimum was lasting about 4 years. We may remember that century minimum of solar activity was proposed after XX century high strong cycles. It may be - we look this situation now in 2012. Our work is connected with sporadic phenomena in 24-th cycle. These more or less intensive variations of solar activity are not predicted, they are caused by flowing up of new magnetic fields of spots, the excitement of flares, intensive plasma flows, coronal mass ejections (CME) and filament eruptions. Now two last versions (CME and filaments) are primary. Geomagnetic activity on a descending phase of solar cycle depends on quality of coronal holes providing the recurrent geomagnetic storms. Sporadic phenomena, which generated geomagnetic storms in Earth magnetosphere if flare flows reached the Earth magnetosphere and transferred it the energy are more interesting for us - they are the valuable characteristics of 24-th cycle. The disturbed period of several geomagnetic storms was generated by solar active region N11429. It is one sample only, this case is difficult and indicative. Replacing each other scenarios describe geomagnetic variations at the beginning of March 2012. Detailed consideration of this interval revealed its communication with sporadic events on the Sun. The structural configuration of plasma in flare flows was defined by means fractal dimension calculations of solar plasma parameters: velocity Vx and density N in flare streams.

  17. Influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in API5L steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ortiz, P.; Pérez-Benítez, J. A.; Espina-Hernández, J. H.; Caleyo, F.; Mehboob, N.; Grössinger, R.; Hallen, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    This work studies the influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of the energy of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal in three different API5L pipeline steels. The results show that the shape of the angular dependence of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise energy changes with the increase of the amplitude of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon is a consequence of the presence of unlike magnetization processes at different magnitudes of the applied magnetic field. The outcomes reveal the importance of controlling the value of the maximum applied field as parameter for the improvement of the MBN angular dependence measurements.

  18. Influence of driving cycles on exhaust emissions and fuel consumption of gasoline passenger car in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Nutramon, Tamsanya; Supachart, Chungpaibulpatana

    2009-01-01

    The influence of different driving cycles on their exhaust emissions and fuel consumption rate of gasoline passenger car was investigated in Bangkok based on the actual measurements obtained from a test vehicle driving on a standard chassis dynamometer. A newly established Bangkok driving cycle (BDC) and the European driving cycle (EDC) which is presently adopted as the legislative cycle for testing automobiles registered in Thailand were used. The newly developed BDC is constructed using the driving characteristic data obtained from the real on-road driving tests along selected traffic routes. A method for selecting appropriate road routes for real driving tests is also introduced. Variations of keyed driving parameters of BDC with different driving cycles were discussed. The results showed that the HC and CO emission factors of BDC are almost two and four times greater than those of EDC, respectively. Although the difference in the NOx emission factor is small, the value from BDC is still greater than that of EDC by 10%. Under BDC, the test vehicle consumes fuel about 25% more than it does under EDC. All these differences are mainly attributed to the greater proportion of idle periods and higher fluctuations of vehicle speed in the BDC cycle. This result indicated that the exhausted emissions and fuel consumption of vehicles obtained from tests under the legislative modal-type driving cycle (EDC) are significantly different from those actually produced under real traffic conditions especially during peak periods. PMID:20108661

  19. The influence of the hydrologic cycle on the extent of sea ice with climatic implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Ken; Gosink, Joan

    1991-01-01

    The role was analyzed of the hydrologic cycle on the distribution of sea ice, and its influence on forcings and fluxes between the marine environment and the atmosphere. River discharge plays a significant role in degrading the sea ice before any melting occurs elsewhere along the coast. The influence is considered of river discharge on the albedo, thermal balance, and distribution of sea ice. Quantitative atmospheric-hydrologic models are being developed to describe these processes in the coastal zone. Input for the models will come from satellite images, hydrologic data, and field observations. The resulting analysis provides a basis for the study of the significance of the hydrologic cycle throughout the Arctic Basin and its influence on the regional climate as a result of possible climatic scenarios. The area offshore from the Mackenzie River delta was selected as the study area.

  20. Buffer influence on magnetic dead layer, critical current, and thermal stability in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Żywczak, Antoni; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Zietek, Sławomir; Kanak, Jarosław; Banasik, Monika; Powroźnik, Wiesław; Skowroński, Witold; Checiński, Jakub; Wrona, Jerzy; Głowiński, Hubert; Dubowik, Janusz; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed study of Ta/Ru-based buffers and their influence on features crucial from the point of view of applications of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions (MTJs) such as critical switching current and thermal stability. We study buffer/FeCoB/MgO/Ta/Ru and buffer/MgO/FeCoB/Ta/Ru layers, investigating the crystallographic texture, the roughness of the buffers, the magnetic domain pattern, the magnetic dead layer thickness, and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy fields for each sample. Additionally, we examine the effect of the current induced magnetization switching for complete nanopillar MTJs with lateral dimensions of 270 × 180 nm. Buffer Ta 5/Ru 10/Ta 3 (thicknesses in nm), which has the thickest dead layer, exhibits a much larger thermal stability factor (63 compared to 32.5) while featuring a slightly lower critical current density value (1.25 MA/cm2 compared to 1.5 MA/cm2) than the buffer with the thinnest dead layer Ta 5/Ru 20/Ta 5. We can account for these results by considering the difference in damping which compensates for the difference in the switching barrier heights.

  1. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (<900 ka) from hole 1063D that show magnetic properties vary in concert with glacial cycles. Magnetite appears to be the main magnetic carrier in the carbonate-dominated interglacial horizons, yet exhibits contrasting grain size distributions depending on the redox state of the horizons. Higher contributions of single domain magnetite exist above the present day sulfate reduction zone (ca. 44 mcd) with relatively higher multidomain magnetite components below that likely arise from the partial dissolution of SD magnetite in the deeper, anoxic horizons. Glacial horizons on the other hand, characterized by enhanced terrigenous deposition, show no evidence for diagenetic dissolution but do indicate the presence of authigenic greigite close to glacial maxima (acquisition of gyro-remanence, strong magnetostatic interactions and SD properties). Glacial horizons contain hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  2. Influence of nuclear spin on chemical reactions: Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects (A Review)

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    1983-01-01

    The course of chemical reactions involving radical pairs may depend on occurrence and orientation of nuclear spins in the pairs. The influence of nuclear spins is maximized when the radical pairs are confined to a space that serves as a cage that allows a certain degree of independent diffusional and rotational motion of the partners of the pair but that also encourages reencounters of the partners within a period which allows the nuclear spins to operate on the odd electron spins of the pair. Under the proper conditions, the nuclear spins can induce intersystem crossing between triplet and singlet states of radical pairs. It is shown that this dependence of intersystem crossing on nuclear spin leads to a magnetic isotope effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of separating isotopes on the basis of nuclear spins rather than nuclear masses and also leads to a magnetic field effect on the chemistry of radical pairs which provides a means of influencing the course of polymerization by the application of weak magnetic fields. PMID:16593273

  3. Influence on cell death of high frequency motion of magnetic nanoparticles during magnetic hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, N.; Clerc, P.; Fourmy, D.; Gigoux, V.; Carrey, J.

    2016-07-01

    Studies with transplanted tumors in animals and clinical trials have provided the proof-of-concept of magnetic hyperthermia (MH) therapy of cancers using iron oxide nanoparticles. Interestingly, in several studies, the application of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) to tumor cells having internalized and accumulated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into their lysosomes can induce cell death without detectable temperature increase. To explain these results, among other hypotheses, it was proposed that cell death could be due to the high-frequency translational motion of MNPs under the influence of the AMF gradient generated involuntarily by most inductors. Such mechanical actions of MNPs might cause cellular damages and participate in the induction of cell death under MH conditions. To test this hypothesis, we developed a setup maximizing this effect. It is composed of an anti-Helmholtz coil and two permanent magnets, which produce an AMF gradient and a superimposed static MF. We have measured the MNP heating power and treated tumor cells by a standard AMF and by an AMF gradient, on which was added or not a static magnetic field. We showed that the presence of a static magnetic field prevents MNP heating and cell death in standard MH conditions. The heating power of MNPs in an AMF gradient is weak, position-dependent, and related to the presence of a non-zero AMF. Under an AMF gradient and a static field, no MNP heating and cell death were measured. Consequently, the hypothesis that translational motions could be involved in cell death during MH experiments is ruled out by our experiments.

  4. Controlling Influence of Magnetic Field on Solar Wind Outflow: An Investigation using Current Sheet Source Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poduval, B.

    2016-08-01

    This Letter presents the results of an investigation into the controlling influence of large-scale magnetic field of the Sun in determining the solar wind outflow using two magnetostatic coronal models: current sheet source surface (CSSS) and potential field source surface. For this, we made use of the Wang and Sheeley inverse correlation between magnetic flux expansion rate (FTE) and observed solar wind speed (SWS) at 1 au. During the period of study, extended over solar cycle 23 and beginning of solar cycle 24, we found that the coefficients of the fitted quadratic equation representing the FTE–SWS inverse relation exhibited significant temporal variation, implying the changing pattern of the influence of FTE on SWS over time. A particularly noteworthy feature is an anomaly in the behavior of the fitted coefficients during the extended minimum, 2008–2010 (CRs 2073–2092), which is considered due to the particularly complex nature of the solar magnetic field during this period. However, this variation was significant only for the CSSS model, though not a systematic dependence on the phase of the solar cycle. Further, we noticed that the CSSS model demonstrated better solar wind prediction during the period of study, which we attribute to the treatment of volume and sheet currents throughout the corona and the more accurate tracing of footpoint locations resulting from the geometry of the model.

  5. Influence of road incline and body position on power-cadence relationship in endurance cycling.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Umberto; Denoth, Jachen

    2012-07-01

    In race cycling, the external power-cadence relationship at the performance level, that is sustainable for the given race distance, plays a key role. The two variables of interest from this relationship are the maximal external power output (P (max)) and the corresponding optimal cadence (C (opt)). Experimental studies and field observations of cyclists have revealed that when cycling uphill is compared to cycling on level ground, the freely chosen cadence is lower and a more upright body position seems to be advantageous. To date, no study has addressed whether P (max) or C (opt) is influenced by road incline or body position. Thus, the main aim of this study was to examine the effect of road incline (0 vs. 7%) and racing position (upright posture vs. dropped posture) on P (max) and C (opt). Eighteen experienced cyclists participated in this study. Experiment I tested the hypothesis that road incline influenced P (max) and C (opt) at the second ventilatory threshold ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Experiment II tested the hypothesis that the racing position influenced [Formula: see text], but not [Formula: see text]. The results of experiment I showed that [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] were significantly lower when cycling uphill compared to cycling on level ground (P < 0.01). Experiment II revealed that [Formula: see text] was significantly greater for the upright posture than for the dropped posture (P < 0.01) and that the racing position did not affect [Formula: see text]. The main conclusions of this study were that when cycling uphill, it is reasonable to choose (1) a lower cadence and (2) a more upright body position. PMID:22045414

  6. Influences of surface coating, UV irradiation and magnetic field on the algae removal using magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shijian; Agbakpe, Michael; Wu, Zhiyi; Kuang, Liyuan; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-20

    Magnetophoretic separation is a promising and sustainable technology for rapid algal separation or removal from water. This work demonstrated the application of magnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with a cationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), toward the separation of Scenedesmus dimorphus from the medium broth. The influences of surface coating, UV irradiation, and magnetic field on the magnetophoretic separation were systematically examined. After PEI coating, zeta potential of MNPs shifted from −7.9 ± 2.0 to +39.0 ± 3.1 mV at a pH of 7.0, which improved MNPs-algae interaction and helped reduce the dose demand of MNPs (e.g., from 0.2 to 0.1 g·g(–1) while the harvesting efficiency (HE) of over 80% remained unchanged). The extended Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory predicted a strong attractive force between PEI-coated MNPs and algae, which supported the improved algal harvesting. Moreover, the HE was greater under the UV365 irradiation than that under the UV254, and increased with the irradiation intensity. Continuous application of the external magnetic field at high strength remarkably improved the algal harvesting. Finally, the reuse of MNPs for multiple cycles of algal harvesting was studied, which aimed at increasing the sustainability and lowering the cost. PMID:25486124

  7. Tuning of magnetic parameters in cobalt-polystyrene nanocomposites by reduction cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Swapna S.; Sunny, Vijutha; Anantharaman, M.R.

    2011-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores. A porous polymer network (polystyrene) was chosen as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The concentration of cobalt can be tuned in this technique by repeating the cycling process. Highlights: {yields} Elementary cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized inside polystyrene by a novel process. {yields} The self protection is achieved by the auto-shelling with the metal oxide. {yields} The magnetisation and coercivity could be tuned by repeating the cycles. {yields} Tuning of magnetic properties (both coercivity and magnetisation) could be achieved by the repetition of reduction cycles. {yields} Synthesized nanocomposite can act as a catalyst for carbon nanotube synthesis. -- Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles were prepared by a reduction process inside polymer pores using CoSO{sub 4}.7H{sub 2}O and NaBH{sub 4}. A porous polymer network (sulphonated polystyrene) was chosen, as the template for the synthesis of elementary cobalt as high surface area cobalt nanoparticles are prone to oxidation. The preliminary studies reveal that the cobalt is first formed with an oxide protective layer outside and upon repeating the reduction cycles, inner pores of the polymers are opened which enhanced the yield of metallic cobalt. These high surface area cobalt nanoparticles embedded in a polymer are ideal for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as cobalt can act as a catalyst for the nanotube synthesis. The

  8. Langmuir-magnetic probe measurements of ELMs and dithering cycles in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, N.; Naulin, V.; Xu, G. S.; Rasmussen, J. J.; Wang, H. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, L.; Liang, Y.; Nielsen, A. H.; Madsen, J.; Guo, H. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-09-01

    Measurements of the dynamical behavior associated with edge localized modes (ELMs) have been carried out in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) by direct probing near the separatrix and far scrape-off layer (SOL) using electrostatic as well as magnetic probes. Type-III ELMs and dithering cycles have been investigated near the threshold power for the transition from the low confinement mode (L-mode) to the high confinement mode (H-mode). A precursor is observed prior to type-III ELM events with chirping frequency (130-70 kHz). It is located inside the separatrix and does not lead to considerable particle transport into the SOL. Distinct from type-III ELMs, no precursor modes precede the dithering cycles. It is evident from our measurements that the absence of precursor activity is a good indicator to distinguish the dithering cycles from type-III ELMs. A number of distinct current filaments are identified slightly inside the separatrix, both during type-III ELM events and dithering cycles. The characteristic current topology in these filaments is still ambiguous in our investigations. Furthermore, small ELMs are observed in type-I ELMy-like H-mode discharge regimes on EAST, in which solitary monopolar current filaments are observed to propagate in the SOL.

  9. Magnetic Cycles in Global Large-eddy Simulations of Solar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghizaru, Mihai; Charbonneau, Paul; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2010-06-01

    We report on a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the solar convection zone, which succeeds in generating a large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component, antisymmetric about the equatorial plane and undergoing regular polarity reversals on decadal timescales. We focus on a specific simulation run covering 255 years, during which 8 polarity reversals are observed, with a mean period of 30 years. Time-latitude slices of the zonally averaged toroidal magnetic component at the base of the convecting envelope show a well-organized toroidal flux system building up in each solar hemisphere, peaking at mid-latitudes and migrating toward the equator in the course of each cycle, in remarkable agreement with inferences based on the sunspot butterfly diagram. The simulation also produces a large-scale dipole moment, varying in phase with the internal toroidal component, suggesting that the simulation may be operating as what is known in mean-field theory as an αΩ dynamo.

  10. MAGNETIC CYCLES IN GLOBAL LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizaru, Mihai; Charbonneau, Paul; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2010-06-01

    We report on a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the solar convection zone, which succeeds in generating a large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component, antisymmetric about the equatorial plane and undergoing regular polarity reversals on decadal timescales. We focus on a specific simulation run covering 255 years, during which 8 polarity reversals are observed, with a mean period of 30 years. Time-latitude slices of the zonally averaged toroidal magnetic component at the base of the convecting envelope show a well-organized toroidal flux system building up in each solar hemisphere, peaking at mid-latitudes and migrating toward the equator in the course of each cycle, in remarkable agreement with inferences based on the sunspot butterfly diagram. The simulation also produces a large-scale dipole moment, varying in phase with the internal toroidal component, suggesting that the simulation may be operating as what is known in mean-field theory as an {alpha}{Omega} dynamo.

  11. Quasiperiodicity in cataclysmic variable stars caused by solar-type magnetic cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brian

    1988-01-01

    Cyclical variations of orbital periods, quiescent magnitudes and outburst intervals in the activity of cataclysmic variable binary stars are inter-related and are ascribed to variations in radii of the secondaries, caused by solar-type (sunspot) magnetic cycles. In the nova remnant DQ Herculis the observed variations in orbital period and quiescent magnitude are consistent with this mechanism. But accretion onto the white dwarf, from an accretion disk acquired from its companion, cannot explain the observed variation of the 71-second oscillations.

  12. Influence of spherical assembly of copper ferrite nanoparticles on magnetic properties: orientation of magnetic easy axis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biplab K; Bhattacharjee, Kaustav; Dey, Abhishek; Ghosh, Chandan K; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K

    2014-06-01

    The magnetic properties of copper ferrite (CuFe2O4) nanoparticles prepared via sol-gel auto combustion and facile solvothermal method are studied focusing on the effect of nanoparticle arrangement. Randomly oriented CuFe2O4 nanoparticles (NP) are obtained from the sol-gel auto combustion method, while the solvothermal method allows us to prepare iso-oriented uniform spherical ensembles of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles (NS). X-ray diffractometry (XRD), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) are used to investigate the composition, microstructure and magnetic properties of as-prepared ferrite nanoparticles. The field-dependent magnetization measurement for the NS sample at low temperature exhibits a step-like rectangular hysteresis loop (M(R)/M(S) ~ 1), suggesting cubic anisotropy in the system, whereas for the NP sample, typical features of uniaxial anisotropy (M(R)/M(S) ~ 0.5) are observed. The coercive field (HC) for the NS sample shows anomalous temperature dependence, which is correlated with the variation of effective anisotropy (K(E)) of the system. A high-temperature enhancement of H(C) and K(E) for the NS sample coincides with a strong spin-orbit coupling in the sample as evidenced by significant modification of Cu/Fe-O bond distances. The spherical arrangement of nanocrystals at mesoscopic scale provokes a high degree of alignment of the magnetic easy axis along the applied field leading to a step-like rectangular hysteresis loop. A detailed study on the temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of the system is carried out, emphasizing the influence of the formation of spherical iso-oriented assemblies. PMID:24714977

  13. Influence of Age, Reproductive Cycling Status, and Menstruation on the Vaginal Microbiome in Baboons (Papio anubis)

    PubMed Central

    UCHIHASHI, M.; BERGIN, I. L.; BASSIS, C. M.; HASHWAY, S. A.; CHAI, D.; BELL, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The vaginal microbiome is believed to influence host health by providing protection from pathogens and influencing reproductive outcomes such as fertility and gestational length. In humans, age-associated declines in diversity of the vaginal microbiome occur in puberty and persist into adulthood. Additionally, menstruation has been associated with decreased microbial community stability. Adult female baboons, like other non-human primates (NHPs), have a different and highly diverse vaginal microbiome compared to that of humans, which is most commonly dominated by Lactobacillus spp. We evaluated the influence of age, reproductive cycling status (cycling vs. non-cycling) and menstruation on the vaginal microbiome of 38 wild-caught, captive female olive baboons (Papio anubis) by culture-independent sequencing of the V3–V5 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. All baboons had highly diverse vaginal microbial communities. Adult baboons had significantly lower microbial diversity in comparison to subadult baboons, which was attributable to decreased relative abundance of minor taxa. No significant differences were detected based on cycling state or menstruation. Predictive metagenomic analysis showed uniformity in relative abundance of metabolic pathways regardless of age, cycle stage, or menstruation, indicating conservation of microbial community functions. This study suggests that selection of an optimal vaginal microbial community occurs at puberty. Since decreased diversity occurs in both baboons and humans at puberty, this may reflect a general strategy for selection of adult vaginal microbial communities. Comparative evaluation of vaginal microbial community development and composition may elucidate mechanisms of community formation and function that are conserved across host species or across microbial community types. These findings have implications for host health, evolutionary biology, and microbe-host ecosystems. PMID:25676781

  14. Social influences on the estrous cycle of the captive sun bear (Helarctos Malayanus).

    PubMed

    Frederick, Cheryl; Hunt, Kathleen; Kyes, Randall; Collins, Darin; Durrant, Barbara; Ha, James; Wasser, Samuel K

    2013-01-01

    We examined the potential influences of existing social housing arrangements on captive sun bear female reproductive cycling. Three social conditions were studied: 1.2, 1.1, and 0.2. Fecal hormone metabolites of total estrogens, progestins and glucocorticoids were compared between the three social conditions and were analyzed along with vaginal cytology data in individuals that experienced a change in social condition. Behavioral data were collected on females in each of the social conditions and summarized into agonistic, affiliative and sexual categories. Results indicated that sun bears are spontaneous ovulators, but that the presence of a male does influence hormone metabolite concentrations and cytological profiles. Male presence was also associated with a greater proportion of females cycling. In most female pairs, only one female cycled, typically the younger, subordinate female. The presence of a second female appeared to have a suppressive influence on both cycling and mating behavior. Agonistic behavior and associated stress may be a mechanism for lowering progesterone. In contrast, high estrogen levels were associated with low levels of agonistic interactions; thus, reproductive cycle monitoring could facilitate social introductions with either sex. Females in 1.2 social groupings had significantly higher GC metabolite concentrations and agonistic behavior, suggesting that 1.2 social groupings may not be advisable for captive breeding programs. Data from the North American historical captive population indicate that at most 32% of all sun bear pairs and only 18.5% of females have successfully reproduced. Implications of these social and reproductive patterns for captive management are discussed. PMID:24018964

  15. The influence of external cooling system on the performance of supercritical steam turbine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosman, Wojciech

    2010-09-01

    The problem presented in this paper refers to the concepts applied to the design of supercritical steam turbines. The issue under the investigation is the presence of a cooling system. Cooling systems aim to protect the main components of the turbines against overheating. However the cooling flows mix with the main flow and modify the expansion line in the steam path. This affects the expansion process in the turbine and changes the performance when compared to the uncooled turbine. The analysis described here investigates the range of the influence of the cooling system on the turbine cycle. This influence is measured mainly through the change of the power generation efficiency. The paper explains the approach towards the assessment of the cooling effects and presents results of the modeling for three supercritical steam cycles.

  16. Rieger-type Periodicity during Solar Cycles 14–24: Estimation of Dynamo Magnetic Field Strength in the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgenashvili, Eka; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Kukhianidze, Vasil; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis; Ramishvili, Giorgi; Shergelashvili, Bidzina; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-07-01

    Solar activity undergoes a variation over timescales of several months known as Rieger-type periodicity, which usually occurs near maxima of sunspot cycles. An early analysis showed that the periodicity appears only in some cycles and is absent in other cycles. But the appearance/absence during different cycles has not been explained. We performed a wavelet analysis of sunspot data from the Greenwich Royal Observatory and the Royal Observatory of Belgium during cycles 14–24. We found that the Rieger-type periods occur in all cycles, but they are cycle dependent: shorter periods occur during stronger cycles. Our analysis revealed a periodicity of 185–195 days during the weak cycles 14–15 and 24 and a periodicity of 155–165 days during the stronger cycles 16–23. We derived the dispersion relation of the spherical harmonics of the magnetic Rossby waves in the presence of differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field in the dynamo layer near the base of the convection zone. This showed that the harmonics of fast Rossby waves with m = 1 and n = 4, where m (n) indicates the toroidal (poloidal) wavenumbers, perfectly fit with the observed periodicity. The variation of the toroidal field strength from weaker to stronger cycles may lead to the different periods found in those cycles, which explains the observed enigmatic feature of the Rieger-type periodicity. Finally, we used the observed periodicity to estimate the dynamo field strength during cycles 14–24. Our estimations suggest a field strength of ∼40 kG for the stronger cycles and ∼20 kG for the weaker cycles.

  17. The influence of gouge and pressure cycling on permeability of macro-fracture in basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangzeng; Mitchell, Tom; Meredith, Philip; Wu, Zhiping

    2016-04-01

    Fractures are ubiquitous and allow crystalline rocks to store and transport fluids. But they are commonly filled with gouge-like materials and normally suffer from polyphasic evolution and multi-cycles of loading and unloading. Therefore, it's essential to investigate the influence of gouge and pressure cycling on transport properties (permeability here) of fracture. Here, we did several steady-state flow permeability measurements on a sample with 38mm diameter and length of Seljadur basalt, an intrusive basalt from SW Iceland with no visible cracks and exceptionally low initial permeability. First, using the Brazil disk technique, a macro-fracture was introduced in the sample, and baseline measurements on above unfilled macro-fractured sample under step-wise effective pressures from 5 up to 60 MPa and pressure cycling were done. Second, similar measurements were conducted on the same macro-fractured sample filled with 0.6mm thick artificial fault gouge (milled basalt) layer with the upper limit grain size of 63, 108, 125, 250, 500μm, respectively, to explore the influence of gouge grain size. Third, to investigate the influence of gouge thickness, measurements on the same sample with various thickness of gouge layers of 63 and 250μm were implemented, respectively. Forth, pressure cycling tests were done on 0.6mm thick 63, 125 and 250μm, respectively, to study the influence of pressure cycling. And at last, to understand compaction mechanism of the gouge, after tests, the thickness and grain size changes before and after tests were also measured. Results showed the adding of fine-grained (63μm here) gouge in fracture decreased its permeability significantly and barely changed with the increasing effective pressure and pressure cycles, while that filled with coarse-grained gouges (108-500μm, respectively) had very similar permeability, and gouge layers decreased its permeability under lower effective pressure, while increased its permeability instead by

  18. Research of the acoustic influence on residual magnetization of rocks containing magnetite from the various geological structures of the Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirova, Anzhela

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the study is influence of acoustic waves on the magnetization of rocks of Kola Peninsula under different experimental parameters. The results and further research in this field are of interest in the development of problems of nonlinear geophysics, as well as address some issues in materials science. To study the acoustic influence on the residual magnetization of rocks we used the samples of magnetite-calcite rocks with a high content of magnetite from the Kovdor massif, and weakly magnetic rocks: (a) ultramafic rock of the Kola composite terrane; (b) gabbro-norite from layered intrusions of Pana; c) metagabbro-norite of the Belomorsky mobile belt. The samples previously demagnetized by the time-variable magnetic field, subjected to three cycles of ultrasonic influence with increasing time of influence and further measurement of the residual magnetization. The dependence of the residual magnetization of the magnetite-calcite rock from the time of testing is determined. As a result of multiple influences on the samples of gabbro-norit, ultramafic rock and metagabbro-norit was obtained a weak change of the vector of the residual magnetization. Thus the study of the residual magnetization of the samples with different content of ferromagnetic mineral found a significant difference in the nature of the magnetic response of rocks. So the high magnetic magnetite-calcite rock from the Kovdor massif detects a significant increase of the magnetization from the first seconds of the ultrasound influence. The magnetic response of other rocks to external influence is weaker. The dependence of the residual magnetization of these rocks from the time of influence either not observed or observed on the last cycle of the experiment in terms of a significant increase of time of the acoustic influence. Magnetic properties of rocks associated with the ferromagnetic minerals. These minerals are usually dispersed in the form of small grains in total dia - and paramagnetic

  19. Duty Cycling Influences Current Generation in Multi-Anode Environmental Microbial Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gardel, EJ; Nielsen, ME; Grisdela, PT; Girguis, PR

    2012-05-01

    Improving microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance continues to be the subject of research, yet the role of operating conditions, specifically duty cycling, on MFC performance has been modestly addressed. We present a series of studies in which we use a 15-anode environmental MFC to explore how duty cycling (variations in the time an anode is connected) influences cumulative charge, current, and microbial composition. The data reveal particular switching intervals that result in the greatest time-normalized current. When disconnection times are sufficiently short, there is a striking decrease in current due to an increase in the overall electrode reaction resistance. This was observed over a number of whole cell potentials. Based on these results, we posit that replenishment of depleted electron donors within the biofilm and surrounding diffusion layer is necessary for maximum charge transfer, and that proton flux may be not limiting in the highly buffered aqueous phases that are common among environmental MFCs. Surprisingly, microbial diversity analyses found no discernible difference in gross community composition among duty cycling treatments, suggesting that duty cycling itself has little or no effect. Such duty cycling experiments are valuable in determining which factors govern performance of bioelectrochemical systems and might also be used to optimize field-deployed systems.

  20. Influence of creep damage on the low cycle thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of two tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Doble, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests have been performed on the tantalum base alloys T-111 and ASTAR 811C with synchronized, independently programmed temperature and strain cycling. The thermal-mechanical cycles applied fell into three basic categories: these were isothermal cycling, in-phase thermal cycling, and out-of-phase thermal cycling. In-phase cycling was defined as tensile deformation associated with high temperature and compressive deformation with low temperature, while out-of-phase thermal cycling was defined as the reverse case. The in-phase thermal cycling had a pronounced detrimental influence on the fatigue life of both alloys, with the life reduction being greater in the solid solution strengthened T-111 alloy than in the carbide strengthened ASTAR 811C alloy. The out-of-phase tests also showed pronounced effects on the fatigue life of both alloys, although not as dramatic.

  1. Hale cycle effects in cosmic ray east-west anisotropy and interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    We have reanalyzed diurnal anisotropy data obtained with the shielded ion chamber (IC) at Cheltenham/Fredericksburg and the neutron monitor (NM) at Swarthmore/Newark. IC data are for the 1936-1977 period and NM data are for the 1965-1988 period. We have corrected IC data for the diurnal temperature effect. Application of this correction results in a better agreement between IC and other data sets, thereby making it possible to study the long-term changes in the diurnal anisotropy using IC data. The behavior of the annual mean east-west anisotropy is studied for 53 years of observations. The period encompasses more than two solar magnetic (Hale) cycles. Its amplitude undergoes the expected 11 and 22 year variations, with the largest changes occurring near solar activity minima. Moreover, the data indicate the presence of the subsidiary maxima for the entire 53-year period, following the solar polar field reversals, during the declining phases of activity cycles when high-speed solar wind streams are present in the heliosphere. The data suggest that the amplitude of the subsidiary maximum is large when the solar polar magnetic field points toward the sun in the Northern Hemisphere, and radial anisotropy is absent.

  2. Influence of abrasive waterjet cutting on the magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoppa, A.; Louis, H.; Pude, F.; von Rad, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The laminations for magnetic cores used in electric motors, generators, ballasts are manufactured by punching, mechanical cutting or cutting by laser of coils of electrical steels. The magnetic material close to the cutting edge is essentially influenced by these processes. Compared with these methods the deterioration of the magnetic properties after the waterjet cutting of electrical steels is very low.

  3. Influence of magnetization on field quality in cosine-theta and block design dipole magnets wound with coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogabe, Yusuke; Sakashita, Masaki; Nakamura, Taketsune; Ogitsu, Toru; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2016-04-01

    We carried out electromagnetic field analyses on the cross sections of two dipole magnets wound with coated conductors. One was a cosine-theta magnet, and the other was a block design magnet. The electric field-current density characteristics of the coated conductors were formulated using a percolation depinning model based on the measured voltage-current characteristics. We calculated the temporal evolutions of the current-density distributions in all the turns of each magnet and used these evolutions to calculate the multipole components of the magnetic field. We compared the two magnets, which differed in coated-conductor orientations, regarding the influence of coated-conductor magnetization on the field qualities.

  4. The Latitude Distribution of Small-scale Magnetic Elements in Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X.

    2012-01-01

    With the unique data set from full-disk observations provided by Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in the interval embodying solar cycle 23, we have found that the cyclic variations of numbers and total flux of these small-scale magnetic elements covering fluxes of (2.9-32.0) × 1018 Mx and (4.27-38.01) × 1019 Mx show anticorrelation and correlation with sunspots, respectively. In this study, the time-latitude distributions of these anticorrelated and correlated elements are analyzed. The following results are disclosed: (1) for the correlated elements, the cyclic variations of the total flux in low-latitude and middle-latitude regions show a longer duration of cyclic maximum phase than that of an active region (AR) in the corresponding latitude region; the total flux of these elements shows the accordant south-north asymmetry with that of AR; the time-latitude distribution of their number displays a similar butterfly diagram but with a latitude distribution that is twice as wide as that of sunspots. (2) For the anticorrelated elements, the time-latitude distribution of number shows a solar cycle variation different from the sunspot butterfly diagram; in each latitude, the distribution of anticorrelated elements always shows the anticorrelated variation with that of sunspots; during solar cycle 23, the average speed of the peak latitudinal migration for anticorrelated elements reaches 7.5 deg year-1, almost three times that for sunspots. These results seem to imply that the correlated elements are the debris of decayed sunspots, and the anticorrelated elements have a different source but are affected or modulated by sunspot magnetic field.

  5. THE LATITUDE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC ELEMENTS IN SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X. E-mail: wangjx@nao.cas.cn

    2012-01-20

    With the unique data set from full-disk observations provided by Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in the interval embodying solar cycle 23, we have found that the cyclic variations of numbers and total flux of these small-scale magnetic elements covering fluxes of (2.9-32.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} Mx and (4.27-38.01) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx show anticorrelation and correlation with sunspots, respectively. In this study, the time-latitude distributions of these anticorrelated and correlated elements are analyzed. The following results are disclosed: (1) for the correlated elements, the cyclic variations of the total flux in low-latitude and middle-latitude regions show a longer duration of cyclic maximum phase than that of an active region (AR) in the corresponding latitude region; the total flux of these elements shows the accordant south-north asymmetry with that of AR; the time-latitude distribution of their number displays a similar butterfly diagram but with a latitude distribution that is twice as wide as that of sunspots. (2) For the anticorrelated elements, the time-latitude distribution of number shows a solar cycle variation different from the sunspot butterfly diagram; in each latitude, the distribution of anticorrelated elements always shows the anticorrelated variation with that of sunspots; during solar cycle 23, the average speed of the peak latitudinal migration for anticorrelated elements reaches 7.5 deg year{sup -1}, almost three times that for sunspots. These results seem to imply that the correlated elements are the debris of decayed sunspots, and the anticorrelated elements have a different source but are affected or modulated by sunspot magnetic field.

  6. The Influence of Free Space Environment in the Mission Life Cycle: Material Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David; Burns, Howard; De Groh, Kim

    Abstract The natural space environment has a great influence on the ability of space systems to perform according to mission design specification. Understanding the natural space environment and its influence on space system performance is critical to the concept formulation, design, development, and operation of space systems. Compatibility with the natural space environment is a primary factor in determining the functional lifetime of the space system. Space systems being designed and developed today are growing in complexity. In many instances, the increased complexity also increases its sensitivity to space environmental effects. Sensitivities to the natural space environment can be tempered through appropriate design measures, material selection, ground processing, mitigation strategies, and/or the acceptance of known risks. The design engineer must understand the effects of the natural space environment on the space system and its components. This paper will discuss the influence of the natural space environment in the mission life cycle with a specific focus on the role of material selection.

  7. The Influence of Free Space Environment in the Mission Life Cycle: Material Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; de Groh, Kim K.

    2014-01-01

    The natural space environment has a great influence on the ability of space systems to perform according to mission design specification. Understanding the natural space environment and its influence on space system performance is critical to the concept formulation, design, development, and operation of space systems. Compatibility with the natural space environment is a primary factor in determining the functional lifetime of the space system. Space systems being designed and developed today are growing in complexity. In many instances, the increased complexity also increases its sensitivity to space environmental effects. Sensitivities to the natural space environment can be tempered through appropriate design measures, material selection, ground processing, mitigation strategies, and/or the acceptance of known risks. The design engineer must understand the effects of the natural space environment on the space system and its components. This paper will discuss the influence of the natural space environment in the mission life cycle with a specific focus on the role of material selection.

  8. Abnormal fb Es enhancements in equatorial Es layers during magnetic storms of solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, L. C. A.; Denardini, C. M.; Batista, I. S.

    2013-09-01

    We have analyzed the behavior of blanketing frequency of the Es layer (fb Es) occurring at an equatorial station covering the days before, during and subsequent to 24 intense and very intense magnetic storms (Dst≤-100 nT) that occurred during the solar cycle 23. The fb Es was measured by digital ionosonde over São Luís, Brazil (2.33° S, 44.2° W, dip: -4.5°). Our analysis shows that there are significant changes in the fb Es, mainly during the recovery phase of magnetic storms, characterized by occurrence of peaks that exceed the ambient background values. Also, these peaks are associated to other types of sporadic E layer than the Esq (a non-blanketing layer detected due the plasma irregularities in the equatorial electrojet), which in turn means competing mechanisms. The results are discussed in terms of the statistics of the abnormal enhancement taking into account the phase of the magnetic storm.

  9. Rapid and Efficient Protein Digestion using Trypsin Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles under Pressure Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byoungsoo; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Kim, Byoung Chan; Na, Hyon Bin; Park, Yong Il; Weitz, Karl K.; Warner, Marvin G.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Sang-Won; Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Jungbae

    2011-01-01

    Trypsin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (EC-TR/NPs), prepared via a simple crosslinking of the enzyme to magnetic nanoparticles, were highly stable and could be easily captured using a magnet after the digestion was complete. EC-TR/NPs showed a negligible loss of trypsin activity after multiple uses and continuous shaking, while a control sample of covalently-attached trypsin on NPs resulted in a rapid inactivation under the same conditions due to the denaturation and autolysis of trypsin. Digestions were carried out on a single model protein, a five protein mixture, and a whole mouse brain proteome, and also compared for digestion at atmospheric pressure and 37 ºC for 12 h, and in combination with pressure cycling technology (PCT) at room temperature for 1 min. In all cases, the EC-TR/NPs performed equally as well or better than free trypsin in terms of the number of peptide/protein identifications and reproducibility across technical replicates. However, the concomitant use of EC-TR/NPs and PCT resulted in very fast (~1 min) and more reproducible digestions.

  10. Influence of magnetic clouds on cosmic ray intensity variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadav, R. S.; Yadav, N. R.; BADRUDDIN; Agrawal, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron monitor data has been analyzed to study the nature of galactic cosmic ray transient modulation associated with three types of interplanetary magnetic clouds - clouds associated with shocks, stream interfaces and cold magnetic enhancements.

  11. Evidences of the static magnetic field influence on cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Wendell Wagner Campos; Costa, Romero Marcos Pedrosa Brandão; Fernandes, Thiago de Salazar E; Porto, Ana Lúcia Figueiredo

    2016-05-01

    Efforts to elucidate the doubtful character of the static magnetic field (SMF) influence on living cells have been made, although the topic still faces controversies because confusing reports in the scientific literature. This study intended to collect the most relevant issues separated by different topics (relating the SMF to its action on cellular systems) and analyze how the many field intensities, cell types and exposure time would affect the cell or intracellular structures. The analysis was based in the search in online databases aiming to give a general view of how the data can show conformity. It is proposed that scientists have been searching for linearity in what is actually a well characterized nonlinear system and two outputs are considered: the high sensitivity of parameters in which specific cell responses are generated and also the complexity and particularity of each cellular system. It is possible to trigger effects from a SMF, however in a stochastic way and depending on the cell system. PMID:26975790

  12. Dual-tip magnetic force microscopy with suppressed influence on magnetically soft samples.

    PubMed

    Precner, Marián; Fedor, Ján; Šoltýs, Ján; Cambel, Vladimír

    2015-02-01

    Standard magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is considered as a powerful tool used for magnetic field imaging at nanoscale. The method consists of two passes realized by the magnetic tip. Within the first one, the topography pass, the magnetic tip directly touches the magnetic sample. Such contact perturbs the magnetization of the sample explored. To avoid the sample touching the magnetic tip, we present a new approach to magnetic field scanning by segregating the topological and magnetic scans with two different tips located on a cut cantilever. The approach minimizes the disturbance of sample magnetization, which could be a major problem in conventional MFM images of soft magnetic samples. By cutting the cantilever in half using the focused ion beam technique, we create one sensor with two different tips--one tip is magnetized, and the other one is left non-magnetized. The non-magnetized tip is used for topography and the magnetized one for the magnetic field imaging. The method developed we call dual-tip magnetic force microscopy (DT-MFM). We describe in detail the dual-tip fabrication process. In the experiments, we show that the DT-MFM method reduces significantly the perturbations of the magnetic tip as compared to the standard MFM method. The present technique can be used to investigate microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic samples and is relevant in a wide range of applications, e.g., data storage and biomedicine. PMID:25586704

  13. Dependence of magnetic cycle parameters on period of rotation in non-linear solar-type dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipin, V. V.

    2015-08-01

    Parameters of magnetic activity on the solar-type stars depend on the properties of the dynamo processes operating in stellar convection zones. We apply non-linear mean-field axisymmetric α2Ω dynamo models to calculate of the magnetic cycle parameters, such as the dynamo cycle period, the total magnetic flux and the Poynting magnetic energy flux on the surface of solar analogues with the rotation periods from 15 to 30 d. The models take into account the principal non-linear mechanisms of the large-scale dynamo, such as the magnetic helicity conservation, magnetic buoyancy and effects of magnetic forces on the angular momentum balance inside the convection zones. Also, we consider two types of the dynamo models. The distributed (D-type) models employ the standard α-effect distributed on the whole convection zone. The `boundary' (B-type) models employ the non-local α-effect, which is confined to the boundaries of the convection zone. Both the D- and B-type models show that the dynamo-generated magnetic flux increases with the increase of the stellar rotation rate. It is found that for the considered range of the rotational periods the magnetic helicity conservation is the most significant effect for the non-linear quenching of the dynamo. This quenching is more efficient in the B-type than in the D-type dynamo models. The D-type dynamo reproduces the observed dependence of the cycle period on the rotation rate for the Sun analogues. For the solar analogue rotating with a period of 15 d, we find non-linear dynamo regimes with multiply cycles.

  14. Features of influence of dc magnetic field pulses on a nuclear spin echo in magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamniashvili, G. I.; Gegechkori, T. O.; Akhalkatsi, A. M.; Gavasheli, C. A.

    2012-06-01

    Signal intensities of a two-pulse nuclear spin echo as a function of parameters of dc magnetic field pulses are measured in the series of materials: Li0.5Fe2.5-xZnxO4 (x < 0.25) (enriched in 57Fe isotope to 96.8%), NiMnSb, Co2MnSi, La1-хСахMnO3 (x = 0.2; 0.25) and polycrystalline Co. Two types of dependences of these signals on a supplying time of such pulses with respect to the times of the exciting RF pulses are found. The mechanisms of influence of a domain structure and a dynamic frequency shift on the observed features of the investigated signals are discussed.

  15. THE ACOUSTIC CUTOFF FREQUENCY OF THE SUN AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A.; Palle, P. L.; Garcia, R. A.

    2011-12-20

    The acoustic cutoff frequency-the highest frequency for acoustic solar eigenmodes-is an important parameter of the solar atmosphere as it determines the upper boundary of the p-mode resonant cavities. At frequencies beyond this value, acoustic disturbances are no longer trapped but are traveling waves. Interference among them gives rise to higher-frequency peaks-the pseudomodes-in the solar acoustic spectrum. The pseudomodes are shifted slightly in frequency with respect to p-modes, making possible the use of pseudomodes to determine the acoustic cutoff frequency. Using data from the GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, we calculate the acoustic cutoff frequency using the coherence function between both the velocity and intensity sets of data. By using data gathered by these instruments during the entire lifetime of the mission (1996 until the present), a variation in the acoustic cutoff frequency with the solar magnetic activity cycle is found.

  16. Influence of the female sexual cycle on BALB/c mouse calling behaviour during mating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, Mathieu; Gourbal, Benjamin E. F.; Gabrion, Claude; Petit, Gilles

    Real-time recording technology was used in this study to analyse calling activity during heterosexual encounters in BALB/c mice. The spectrographic analyses revealed distinct types of calls that could be linked to a precise pre-ejaculatory behavioural sequence. In addition, the oestrous cycle of the female was observed to influence the vocalization emission pattern. The recording technology used in this study provides numerous improvements in the characterization description of mice calling behaviour during mating and is expected to be useful in studies of vocal communication in many rodent species.

  17. TWO NOVEL PARAMETERS TO EVALUATE THE GLOBAL COMPLEXITY OF THE SUN'S MAGNETIC FIELD AND TRACK THE SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Gibson, S. E.

    2013-08-20

    Since the unusually prolonged and weak solar minimum between solar cycles 23 and 24 (2008-2010), the sunspot number is smaller and the overall morphology of the Sun's magnetic field is more complicated (i.e., less of a dipole component and more of a tilted current sheet) compared with the same minimum and ascending phases of the previous cycle. Nearly 13 yr after the last solar maximum ({approx}2000), the monthly sunspot number is currently only at half the highest value of the past cycle's maximum, whereas the polar magnetic field of the Sun is reversing (north pole first). These circumstances make it timely to consider alternatives to the sunspot number for tracking the Sun's magnetic cycle and measuring its complexity. In this study, we introduce two novel parameters, the standard deviation (SD) of the latitude of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) and the integrated slope (SL) of the HCS, to evaluate the complexity of the Sun's magnetic field and track the solar cycle. SD and SL are obtained from the magnetic synoptic maps calculated by a potential field source surface model. We find that SD and SL are sensitive to the complexity of the HCS: (1) they have low values when the HCS is flat at solar minimum, and high values when the HCS is highly tilted at solar maximum; (2) they respond to the topology of the HCS differently, as a higher SD value indicates that a larger part of the HCS extends to higher latitude, while a higher SL value implies that the HCS is wavier; (3) they are good indicators of magnetically anomalous cycles. Based on the comparison between SD and SL with the normalized sunspot number in the most recent four solar cycles, we find that in 2011 the solar magnetic field had attained a similar complexity as compared to the previous maxima. In addition, in the ascending phase of cycle 24, SD and SL in the northern hemisphere were on the average much greater than in the southern hemisphere, indicating a more tilted and wavier HCS in the north than

  18. Influence of Segmentation of Ring-Shaped NdFeB Magnets with Parallel Magnetization on Cylindrical Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Goltz, Evandro Claiton; Filho, Aly Ferreira Flores

    2014-01-01

    This work analyses the effects of segmentation followed by parallel magnetization of ring-shaped NdFeB permanent magnets used in slotless cylindrical linear actuators. The main purpose of the work is to evaluate the effects of that segmentation on the performance of the actuator and to present a general overview of the influence of parallel magnetization by varying the number of segments and comparing the results with ideal radially magnetized rings. The analysis is first performed by modelling mathematically the radial and circumferential components of magnetization for both radial and parallel magnetizations, followed by an analysis carried out by means of the 3D finite element method. Results obtained from the models are validated by measuring radial and tangential components of magnetic flux distribution in the air gap on a prototype which employs magnet rings with eight segments each with parallel magnetization. The axial force produced by the actuator was also measured and compared with the results obtained from numerical models. Although this analysis focused on a specific topology of cylindrical actuator, the observed effects on the topology could be extended to others in which surface-mounted permanent magnets are employed, including rotating electrical machines. PMID:25051032

  19. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Applied with a Rapid Cycle Has More Profound Influence on Hippocampal Electrophysiology Than a Standard Cycle.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lars E; Wadman, Wytse J; Marinazzo, Daniele; van Mierlo, Pieter; Delbeke, Jean; Daelemans, Sofie; Sprengers, Mathieu; Thyrion, Lisa; Van Lysebettens, Wouter; Carrette, Evelien; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl; Raedt, Robrecht

    2016-07-01

    Although vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is widely used, therapeutic mechanisms and optimal stimulation parameters remain elusive. In the present study, we investigated the effect of VNS on hippocampal field activity and compared the efficiency of different VNS paradigms. Hippocampal electroencephalography (EEG) and perforant path dentate field-evoked potentials were acquired before and during VNS in freely moving rats, using 2 VNS duty cycles: a rapid cycle (7 s on, 18 s off) and standard cycle (30 s on, 300 s off) and various output currents. VNS modulated the evoked potentials, reduced total power of the hippocampal EEG, and slowed the theta rhythm. In the hippocampal EEG, theta (4-8 Hz) and high gamma (75-150 Hz) activity displayed strong phase amplitude coupling that was reduced by VNS. Rapid-cycle VNS had a greater effect than standard-cycle VNS on all outcome measures. Using rapid cycle VNS, a maximal effect on EEG parameters was found at 300 μA, beyond which effects saturated. The findings suggest that rapid-cycle VNS produces a more robust outcome than standard cycle VNS and support already existing preclinical evidence that relatively low output currents are sufficient to produce changes in brain physiology and thus likely also therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27102987

  20. Simulations of the sun's polar magnetic fields during sunspot cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devore, C. Richard; Sheeley, Neil R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Regarding new bipolar magnetic regions as sources of flux, the evolution of the radial component of the solar photospheric magnetic field is simulated during 1976-1984, and the corresponding evolution of the line-of-sight polar fields as seen from earth is derived. The observed timing and strength of the polar-field reversal during cycle 21 can be accounted for by supergranular diffusion alone, for a diffusion coefficient of 800 sq km/sec. For an assumed 300 sq km/sec rate of diffusion, on the other hand, a poleward meridional flow with a moderately broad profile and a peak speed of 10 m/s reached at about 5 deg latitude is required to obtain agreement between the simulated and observed fields. Such a flow accelerates the transport of following-polarity flux to the polar caps, but also inhibits the diffusion of leading-polarity flux across the equator. For flows faster than about 10 m/s, the latter effect dominates, and the simulated polar fields reverse increasingly later and more weakly than the observed fields.

  1. Magnetic properties of uncultivated magnetotactic bacteria and their contribution to a stratified estuary iron cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. P.; Berounsky, V. M.; Chan, M. K.; Blackford, M. G.; Cady, C.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Kraal, P.; Lima, E. A.; Kopp, R. E.; Lumpkin, G. R.; Weiss, B. P.; Hesse, P.; Vella, N. G. F.

    2014-09-01

    Of the two nanocrystal (magnetosome) compositions biosynthesized by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), the magnetic properties of magnetite magnetosomes have been extensively studied using widely available cultures, while those of greigite magnetosomes remain poorly known. Here we have collected uncultivated magnetite- and greigite-producing MTB to determine their magnetic coercivity distribution and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra and to assess the MTB-associated iron flux. We find that compared with magnetite-producing MTB cultures, FMR spectra of uncultivated MTB are characterized by a wider empirical parameter range, thus complicating the use of FMR for fossilized magnetosome (magnetofossil) detection. Furthermore, in stark contrast to putative Neogene greigite magnetofossil records, the coercivity distributions for greigite-producing MTB are fundamentally left-skewed with a lower median. Lastly, a comparison between the MTB-associated iron flux in the investigated estuary and the pyritic-Fe flux in the Black Sea suggests MTB play an important, but heretofore overlooked role in euxinic marine system iron cycle.

  2. Magnetic properties of uncultivated magnetotactic bacteria and their contribution to a stratified estuary iron cycle.

    PubMed

    Chen, A P; Berounsky, V M; Chan, M K; Blackford, M G; Cady, C; Moskowitz, B M; Kraal, P; Lima, E A; Kopp, R E; Lumpkin, G R; Weiss, B P; Hesse, P; Vella, N G F

    2014-01-01

    Of the two nanocrystal (magnetosome) compositions biosynthesized by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), the magnetic properties of magnetite magnetosomes have been extensively studied using widely available cultures, while those of greigite magnetosomes remain poorly known. Here we have collected uncultivated magnetite- and greigite-producing MTB to determine their magnetic coercivity distribution and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra and to assess the MTB-associated iron flux. We find that compared with magnetite-producing MTB cultures, FMR spectra of uncultivated MTB are characterized by a wider empirical parameter range, thus complicating the use of FMR for fossilized magnetosome (magnetofossil) detection. Furthermore, in stark contrast to putative Neogene greigite magnetofossil records, the coercivity distributions for greigite-producing MTB are fundamentally left-skewed with a lower median. Lastly, a comparison between the MTB-associated iron flux in the investigated estuary and the pyritic-Fe flux in the Black Sea suggests MTB play an important, but heretofore overlooked role in euxinic marine system iron cycle. PMID:25175931

  3. Changes in Voluntary Activation Assessed by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation during Prolonged Cycling Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, Stephane; Temesi, John; Wuyam, Bernard; Levy, Patrick; Verges, Samuel; Millet, Guillaume Y.

    2014-01-01

    Maximal central motor drive is known to decrease during prolonged exercise although it remains to be determined whether a supraspinal deficit exists, and if so, when it appears. The purpose of this study was to evaluate corticospinal excitability and muscle voluntary activation before, during and after a 4-h cycling exercise. Ten healthy subjects performed three 80-min bouts on an ergocycle at 45% of their maximal aerobic power. Before exercise and immediately after each bout, neuromuscular function was evaluated in the quadriceps femoris muscles under isometric conditions. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to assess voluntary activation at the cortical level (VATMS), corticospinal excitability via motor-evoked potential (MEP) and intracortical inhibition by cortical silent period (CSP). Electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve was used to measure voluntary activation at the peripheral level (VAFNES) and muscle contractile properties. Maximal voluntary force was significantly reduced after the first bout (13±9%, P<0.01) and was further decreased (25±11%, P<0.001) at the end of exercise. CSP remained unchanged throughout the protocol. Rectus femoris and vastus lateralis but not vastus medialis MEP normalized to maximal M-wave amplitude significantly increased during cycling. Finally, significant decreases in both VATMS and VAFNES (∼8%, P<0.05 and ∼14%, P<0.001 post-exercise, respectively) were observed. In conclusion, reductions in VAFNES after a prolonged cycling exercise are partly explained by a deficit at the cortical level accompanied by increased corticospinal excitability and unchanged intracortical inhibition. When comparing the present results with the literature, this study highlights that changes at the cortical and/or motoneuronal levels depend not only on the type of exercise (single-joint vs. whole-body) but also on exercise intensity and/or duration. PMID:24586559

  4. Long periods (1 -10 mHz) geomagnetic pulsations variation with solar cycle in South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon Silva, Willian; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Guimarães Dutra, Severino Luiz; Babulal Trivedi, Nalin; Claudir da Silva, Andirlei; Souza Savian, Fernando; Ronan Coelho Stekel, Tardelli; de Siqueira, Josemar; Espindola Antunes, Cassio

    The occurrence and intensity of the geomagnetic pulsations Pc-5 (2-7 mHz) and its relationship with the solar cycle in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly -SAMA is presented. The study of geomagnetic pulsations is important to help the understanding of the physical processes that occurs in the magnetosphere region and help to predict geomagnetic storms. The fluxgate mag-netometers H, D and Z, three axis geomagnetic field data from the Southern Space Observatory -SSO/CRS/INPE -MCT, São Martinho da Serra (29.42° S, 53.87° W, 480m a.s.l.), RS, Brasil, a were analyzed and correlated with the solar wind parameters (speed, density and temperature) from the ACE and SOHO satellites. A digital filtering to enhance the 2-7 mHz geomagnetic pulsations was used. Five quiet days and five perturbed days in the solar minimum and in the solar maximum were selected for this analysis. The days were chosen based on the IAGA definition and on the Bartels Musical Diagrams (Kp index) for 2001 (solar maximum) and 2008 (solar minimum). The biggest Pc-5 amplitude averages differences between the H-component is 78,35 nT for the perturbed days and 1,60nT for the quiet days during the solar maximum. For perturbed days the average amplitude during the solar minimum is 8,32 nT, confirming a direct solar cycle influence in the geomagnetic pulsations intensity for long periods.

  5. Influence of suction cycles on the soil fabric of compacted swelling soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowamooz, Hossein; Masrouri, Farimah

    2010-12-01

    The soil fabric plays an important role in complex hydromechanical behaviour of the expansive soils. This article addresses the influence of the wetting and drying paths on the soil fabric of compacted bentonite and silt mixtures at two different initial dry densities corresponding to loose and dense states. To obtain the hydric response of the soil, two suction imposition techniques were used: osmotic technique for the suction range less than 8.5 MPa and the vapour equilibrium or the salt solution technique for the suction range between 8.5 and 287.9 MPa. Additionally, the soil fabric analysis was performed using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and nitrogen gas adsorption (BET) techniques. The dense samples produced cumulative swelling strains during the suction cycles, while shrinkage was observed for the loose samples. The suction cycles induced an equilibrium state indicative of the elastic behaviour of the samples. The soil fabric analysis showed that regardless of the soil's initial state (loose or dense), the samples obtained the same soil fabric at the equilibrium state. The experimental results illustrated also the existence of an elastic void ratio ( e0el) where the compacted soils at this state present an elastic hydric behaviour during the successive suction cycles.

  6. Temperature and Cyanobacterial Bloom Biomass Influence Phosphorous Cycling in Eutrophic Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; Ye, Tian-Ran; Krumholz, Lee R.; Jiang, He-Long

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms frequently occur in freshwater lakes, subsequently, substantial amounts of decaying cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) settles onto the lake sediments where anaerobic mineralization reactions prevail. Coupled Fe/S cycling processes can influence the mobilization of phosphorus (P) in sediments, with high releases often resulting in eutrophication. To better understand eutrophication in Lake Taihu (PRC), we investigated the effects of CBB and temperature on phosphorus cycling in lake sediments. Results indicated that added CBB not only enhanced sedimentary iron reduction, but also resulted in a change from net sulfur oxidation to sulfate reduction, which jointly resulted in a spike of soluble Fe(II) and the formation of FeS/FeS2. Phosphate release was also enhanced with CBB amendment along with increases in reduced sulfur. Further release of phosphate was associated with increases in incubation temperature. In addition, CBB amendment resulted in a shift in P from the Fe-adsorbed P and the relatively unreactive Residual-P pools to the more reactive Al-adsorbed P, Ca-bound P and organic-P pools. Phosphorus cycling rates increased on addition of CBB and were higher at elevated temperatures, resulting in increased phosphorus release from sediments. These findings suggest that settling of CBB into sediments will likely increase the extent of eutrophication in aquatic environments and these processes will be magnified at higher temperatures. PMID:24682039

  7. Influence of Dynamic Hydraulic Conditions on Nitrogen Cycling in Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassen, Niklas; von Netzer, Frederick; Ryabenko, Evgenia; Lüders, Tillmann; Stumpp, Christine

    2015-04-01

    In order to improve management strategies of agricultural nitrogen input, it is of major importance to further understand which factors influence turnover processes within the nitrogen cycle. Many studies have focused on the fate of nitrate in hydrological systems, but up to date only little is known about the influence of dynamic hydraulic conditions on the fate of nitrate at the soil-groundwater interface. We conducted column experiments with natural sediment and compared a system with a fluctuating water table to systems with different water content and static conditions under the constant input of ammonia into the system. We used hydrochemical methods in order to trace nitrogen species, 15N isotope methods to get information about dominating turnover processes and microbial community analysis in order to connect hydrochemical and microbial information. We found that added ammonia was removed more effectively under dynamic hydraulic conditions than under static conditions. Furthermore, denitrification is the dominant process under saturated, static conditions, while nitrification is more important under unsaturated, static conditions. We conclude that a fluctuating water table creates hot spots where both nitrification and denitrification processes can occur spatially close to each other and therefore remove nitrogen more effectively from the system. Furthermore, the fluctuating water table enhances the exchange of solutes and triggers hot moments of solute turnover. Therefore we conclude that a fluctuating water table can amplify hot spots and trigger hot moments of nitrogen cycling.

  8. Influence of preliminary tension on the low-cycle fatigue of 40Kh13 steel in gaseous hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Romaniv, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    Information is lacking on the influence of hydrogen entering from an electrolyte or an external gaseous medium on the low-cycle fatigue of steels after preliminary tension. Since preliminary plastic deformation by tension increases the elastic limit and hardness of the steel while reducing its toughness, this must be reflected in the processes of crack origin and propagation in low-cycle loading in hydrogen. The purpose of this work was to study the influence of the degree of preliminary tension on the low-cycle failure resistance of 40Kh13 martensitic class steel in an atmosphere of gaseous hydrogen.

  9. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Miedzik, Jan; Daniłko, Dariusz; Barral, Serge

    2015-04-15

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  10. Influence of oblique magnetic field on electron cross-field transport in a Hall effect thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miedzik, Jan; Barral, Serge; Daniłko, Dariusz

    2015-04-01

    The effects of the inclination of the magnetic field with respect to the channel walls in a Hall effect thruster are numerically studied with the use of a one-dimensional quasi-neutral Particle-In-Cell model with guiding center approximation of electron motion along magnetic lines. Parametric studies suggest that the incidence angle strongly influences electron transport across the magnetic field. In ion-focusing magnetic topologies, electrons collide predominantly on the side of the magnetic flux tube closer to the anode, thus increasing the electron cross-field drift. The opposite effect is observed in ion-defocussing topology.

  11. The influence of redox dynamics on nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide emissions from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubol, S.; Bellin, A.; Silver, W.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the role of the nitrogen cycle in soil systems is of importance in many environmental applications (for example, minimizing greenhouse emissions). Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide N2O releasing an estimated 9.5 Tg N2O -N year-1 (65% of global emissions according to IPCC, 2001a). Further research is still needed to comprehend key drivers of N2O emissions from soils and its influencing factors. Amongst these factors, water content can be considered a crucial one since it modifies the ratio of N2O - N2 emissions and influences the rate of oxygen supply thus determining whether aerobic processes such as nitrification or anaerobic processes (i.e., denitrification) becomes dominant within the soil. Also, water content is linked to dissolved oxygen and to redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Investigating the interplay between these physical and chemical factors is needed to comprehend the nitrogen cycle at the catchment scale. The importance of soil moisture in the nitrogen cycle has already been investigated, however only few works are focusing on water content dynamics. To our knowledge, there are no studies that investigate N-emission under realistic rain conditions as well as linking soil moisture dynamics to nitrate ammonification (also known as DNRA) along the soil profile. The purpose of this study is thus to analyze if there are existing conditions in which an equivalent soil moisture value can be used in predictive models operating at the daily scale. Solving this problem is interesting as a failsafe feature in capabilities of the more complex system, as well as an improvement in understanding better the soil processes themselves. In the current work, we design an experimental soil column which allows one to relate water dynamics to gas emissions in a closed-controlled environment.

  12. Influence of lunar cycles on growth of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera [L.] Dunal)

    PubMed Central

    Tavhare, Swagata D.; Nishteswar, K.; Shukla, Vinay J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ayurvedic classics have advocated to collect the medicinal plants according to part used and seasons in order to get desired pharmacological action and therapeutic benefits. The logic behind this principle is being validated by recent researches. Aim: To analyze the influence of lunar cycles on growth of Ashwagandha in Shishira and Greeshma Ritu (winter and summer season). Materials and Methods: Fourteen small crops of Ashwagandha of average size 10 cm were collected on October 7, 2013, from institute campus and then replantation was done at Charaka Herbal Garden, Gujarat Ayurved University, Jamnagar in an area of 60 cm × 60 cm (l × b). No fertilizers or pesticides were used. The plants were watered daily and plants were uprooted as per lunar cycles for analysis. Eight samples were collected and observed during Shishira and Greeshma season on Pournima (full moon) and Amavasya (new moon) days. The measurements were taken thrice and average values were taken into consideration for study purpose. The variations in morphological characteristics such as length, breadth, weight, and number of roots and twigs were studied through statistical procedure of principle component analysis, which makes interpretation of all possible related variables. Results: Root weight (RW), pith diameter (PD) and internodal distance (ID) were found to be increased on full moon days as compared to new moon days. The maximum RW was observed during Greeshma Aashadha Pournima. Conclusion: The study has shown a definite influence of lunar cycles on the growth of the plant parts assessed by RW, PD, and ID that have found to be increased on full moon days as compared to new moon days. PMID:27313411

  13. Muskie Lunacy: does the lunar cycle influence angler catch of muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?

    PubMed

    Vinson, Mark R; Angradi, Ted R

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ≈5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge. PMID:24871329

  14. Muskie Lunacy: Does the Lunar Cycle Influence Angler Catch of Muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)?

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Mark R.; Angradi, Ted R.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed angling catch records for 341,959 muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) from North America to test for a cyclic lunar influence on the catch. Using periodic regression, we showed that the number caught was strongly related to the 29-day lunar cycle, and the effect was consistent across most fisheries. More muskellunge were caught around the full and new moon than at other times. At night, more muskellunge were caught around the full moon than the new moon. The predicted maximum relative effect was ≈5% overall. Anglers fishing exclusively on the peak lunar day would, on average, catch 5% more muskellunge than anglers fishing on random days. On some lakes and at night, the maximum relative effect was higher. We obtained angler effort data for Wisconsin, Mille Lacs (MN), and Lake Vermilion (MN). For Lake Vermilion there was a significant effect of the lunar cycle on angler effort. We could therefore not conclude that the lunar effect on catch was due to an effect on fish behavior alone. Several factors affected the amount of variation explained by the lunar cycle. The lunar effect was stronger for larger muskellunge (>102 cm) than for smaller fish, stronger in midsummer than in June or October, and stronger for fish caught at high latitudes (>48°N) than for fish caught further south. There was no difference in the lunar effect between expert and novice muskellunge anglers. We argue that this variation is evidence that the effect of the lunar cycle on catch is mediated by biological factors and is not due solely to angler effort and reflects lunar synchronization in feeding. This effect has been attributed to variation among moon phases in lunar illumination, but our results do not support that hypothesis for angler-caught muskellunge. PMID:24871329

  15. Diode magnetic-field influence on radiographic spot size

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A. Jr.

    2012-09-04

    Flash radiography of hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories. The Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos was developed for flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) produce the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each experiment ('hydrotest'). The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. For time resolution of the hydrotest dynamics, the 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by slicing them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{micro}s flattop. Both axes now routinely produce radiographic source spot sizes having full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) less than 1 mm. To further improve on the radiographic resolution, one must consider the major factors influencing the spot size: (1) Beam convergence at the final focus; (2) Beam emittance; (3) Beam canonical angular momentum; (4) Beam-motion blur; and (5) Beam-target interactions. Beam emittance growth and motion in the accelerators have been addressed by careful tuning. Defocusing by beam-target interactions has been minimized through tuning of the final focus solenoid for optimum convergence and other means. Finally, the beam canonical angular momentum is minimized by using a 'shielded source' of electrons. An ideal shielded source creates the beam in a region where the axial magnetic field is zero, thus the canonical momentum zero, since the beam is born with no mechanical angular momentum. It then follows from Busch's conservation theorem that the canonical angular momentum is minimized at the target, at least in principal. In the DARHT accelerators, the axial magnetic field at the cathode is minmized by using a 'bucking coil' solenoid with reverse polarity to cancel out whatever solenoidal beam transport field exists there. This is imperfect in practice, because of

  16. Influence of mold surface temperature on polymer part warpage in rapid heat cycle molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, G. R.; Pacher, G. A.; Pichler, A.; Friesenbichler, W.; Gruber, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic mold surface temperature control was examined for its influence on the warpage. A test mold, featuring two different rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM) technologies was used to manufacture complex plate-shaped parts having different ribs, varying thin-wall regions, and both, circular and rectangular cut-outs. The mold's nozzle side is equipped with the areal heating and cooling technology BFMOLD®, where the heating/cooling channels are replaced by a ball-filled slot near the cavity surface flooded through with hot and cold water sequentially. Two local electrical ceramic heating elements are installed into the mold's ejection side. Based on a 23 full-factorial design of experiments (DoE) plan, varying nozzle temperature (Tnozzle), rapid heat cycle molding temperature (TRHCM) and holding pressure (pn), specimens of POM were manufactured systematically. Five specimens were examined per DoE run. The resulting warpage was measured at 6 surface line scans per part using the non-contact confocal topography system FRT MicroProf®. Two warpage parameters were calculated, the curvature of a 2nd order approximation a, and the vertical deflection at the profile center d. Both, the influence strength and the acting direction of the process parameters and their interactions on a and d were calculated by statistical analysis. Linear mathematical process models were determined for a and d to predict the warpage as a function of the process parameter settings. Finally, an optimum process setting was predicted, based on the process models and Microsoft Excel GRG solver. Clear and significant influences of TRHCM, pn, Tnozzle, and the interaction of TRHCM and pn were determined. While TRHCM was dominant close to the gate, pn became more effective as the flow length increased.

  17. Influence of seasonal cycles in Martian atmosphere on entry, descent and landing sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčeta, Dušan; Šegan, Stevo; Rašuo, Boško

    2014-05-01

    The phenomena like high eccentricity of Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion, separately or together can significantly alter not only the level of some Martian atmospheric parameters but also the characteristics of its diurnal and seasonal cycle. Considering that entry, descent and landing (EDL) sequence is mainly driven by the density profile of the atmosphere and aerodynamic characteristic of the entry vehicle. We have performed the analysis of the influence of the seasonal cycles of the atmospheric parameters on EDL profiles by using Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM). Since the height of the deployment of the parachute and the time passed from the deployment to propulsion firing (descent time) are of crucial importance for safe landing and the achievable landing site elevation we paid special attention to the influence of the areocentric longitude of the Sun (Ls) on these variables. We have found that these variables have periodic variability with respect to Ls and can be very well approximated with a sine wave function whose mean value depends only on the landing site elevation while the amplitudes and phases depend only on the landing site latitude. The amplitudes exhibit behavior which is symmetric with respect to the latitude but the symmetry is shifted from the equator to the northern mid-tropics. We have also noticed that the strong temperature inversions which are usual for middle and higher northern latitudes while Mars is around its orbital perihelion significantly alter the descent time without influencing the height of the parachute deployment. At last, we applied our model to determine the dependence of the accessible landing region on Ls and found that this region reaches maximum when Mars is around the orbital perihelion and can vary 50° in latitude throughout the Martian year.

  18. Influence of magnetic fields on structural martensitic transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, J C; Cooley, J C; Smith, J L; Fisher, R A; Modic, K A; Yang, X- D; Riseborough, P S; Opeil, C P; Finlayson, T R; Goddard, P A; Silhanek, A V

    2009-01-01

    We show evidence that a structural martensitic transition is related to significant changes in the electronic structure, as revealed in thermodynamic measurements made in high-magnetic fields. The magnetic field dependence is considered unusual as many influential investigations of martensitic transitions have emphasized that the structural transitions are primarily lattice dynamical and are driven by the entropy due to the phonons. We provide a theoretical framework which can be used to describe the effect of magnetic field on the lattice dynamics in which the field dependence originates from the dielectric constant.

  19. Influence of Nanocrystalline Ferrite Particles on Properties of Magnetic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Robert; Habisreuther, Tobias; Hiergeist, Robert; Steinmetz, Hanna; Zeisberger, Matthias; Gawalek, Wolfgang

    Nanocrystalline mainly superparamagnetic ferrite particles ≈ 10 nm are used for the preparation of magnetic fluids. Barium hexaferrite BaFe12-2xTixCoxO19 powders with mean particle sizes < 30 nm show the transition to single domain Stoner-Wohlfarth behaviour. Hysteresis parameters, losses and the initial susceptibility versus temperature were obtained by VSM. Ba-ferrite ferrofluids have been prepared using Isopar M or dodecane as carrier liquid. Small Angle Neutron Scattering curves lead to a bimodal size distribution consisting of single magnetic particles and aggregated magnetic particles. Particle size investigations were done by TEM.

  20. Influence of external magnetic field on dynamics of open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2007-03-15

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the non-Markovian dynamics of an open two-dimensional quantum system is investigated. The fluctuations of collective coordinate and momentum and transport coefficients are studied for a charged harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a neutral bosonic heat bath. It is shown that the dissipation of collective energy slows down with increasing strength of the external magnetic field. The role of magnetic field in the diffusion processes is illustrated by several examples.

  1. The Fraction of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections That Are Magnetic Clouds: Evidence for a Solar Cycle Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    "Magnetic clouds" (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized by enhanced magnetic fields with an organized rotation in direction, and low plasma beta. Though intensely studied, MCs only constitute a fraction of all the ICMEs that are detected in the solar wind. A comprehensive survey of ICMEs in the near- Earth solar wind during the ascending, maximum and early declining phases of solar cycle 23 in 1996 - 2003 shows that the MC fraction varies with the phase of the solar cycle, from approximately 100% (though with low statistics) at solar minimum to approximately 15% at solar maximum. A similar trend is evident in near-Earth observations during solar cycles 20 - 21, while Helios 1/2 spacecraft observations at 0.3 - 1.0 AU show a weaker trend and larger MC fraction.

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON INHIBITION OF MCF-7 CELL GROWTH BY TAMOXIFEN.
    Harland and Liburdy (1) reported that 1.2-uT, 60-Hz magnetic fields could significantly block the inhibitory action of pharmacological levels of tamoxifen (10-7 M) on the growth of MCF-7 human br...

  3. Influence of the cutting process on the magnetic properties of non-oriented electrical steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoppa, A.; Schneider, J.; Roth, J.-O.

    2000-06-01

    The laminations for the cores used in electrical applications like motors, generators, ballasts are manufactured by punching, mechanical cutting or cutting by laser of coils of non-oriented fully processed electrical steels. The magnetic material close to the cutting edge is essentially influenced by these processes. Depending on the parameter, the magnetic properties can vary substantially.

  4. The influence of ecosystem nitrogen status on carbon cycling in forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollinger, S. V.; Smith, M.; Richardson, A.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Martin, M.; Jenkins, J.

    2006-12-01

    The carbon and nitrogen cycles in terrestrial ecosystems are tightly coupled through a shared set of biological processes. The N status of plant canopies exerts a direct influence on carbon assimilation through its well-known effect on net photosynthesis. In soils, both the accumulation of N and the decay of organic matter are often related to the initial C/N ratio of litterfall. Similarly, respiration rates in both roots and foliage have been shown to be positively correlated with tissue N concentrations. These linkages suggest that the N status of ecosystems may provide a useful indicator of their overall C metabolism. Further, evidence from both CO2 and N enrichment experiments indicates that alteration of one cycle can have important implications for the other. This is significant in that global cycles of both C and N have been greatly perturbed by humans. Despite the well-known influence of nitrogen availability on fluxes of carbon, few studies have explicitly examined the role of nitrogen as it pertains to spatial and temporal variation in carbon cycling. This is due, in part, to limited crossover between different scientific communities, but also stems from some very real methodological limitations that make regional-scale assessment of N status difficult. Here, we report on an NACP investigation that examines the degree to which rates of carbon assimilation and growth in forests can be related to both local and regional variation in ecosystem N status. Field measurements from a series of forested research sites within the AmeriFlux network have been combined with hyperspectral remote sensing data from the AVIRIS and Hyperion instruments. Results from a cross-site synthesis indicate a positive relationship between canopy N and the maximum rate of carbon assimilation, as measured by flux towers. Because existing methods of canopy N detection are restricted to small landscapes, a parallel investigation involves developing generalizeable canopy N detection

  5. Influence of different salt marsh plants on hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms abundance throughout a phenological cycle.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Almeida, C Marisa R; Mucha, Ana Paula; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2013-01-01

    The influence of Juncus maritimus, Phragmites australis, and Triglochin striata on hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms (HD) in Lima River estuary (NW Portugal) was investigated through a year-long plant life cycle. Sediments un-colonized and colonized (rhizosediments) by those salt marsh plants were sampled for HD, total cell counts (TCC), and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) assessment. Generally, TCC seemed to be markedly thriving by the presence of roots, but without significant (p > 0.05) differences among rhizosediments. Nevertheless, plants seemed to have a distinct influence on HD abundance, particularly during the flowering season, with higher HD abundance in the rhizosediments of the fibrous roots plants (J. maritimus < P. australis < T. striata). Our data suggest that different plants have distinct influence on the dynamics of HD populations within its own rhizosphere, particularly during the flowering season, suggesting a period of higher rhizoremediation activity. Additionally, during the vegetative period, plants with fibrous and dense root system tend to retain hydrocarbons around their belowground tissues more efficiently than plants with adventitious root system. Overall results indicate that fibrous root plants have a higher potential to promote hydrocarbons degradation, and that seasonality should be taken into account when designing long-term rhizoremediation strategies in estuarine areas. PMID:23819270

  6. Detection of Polonium-210 on Spirit Dust Magnets and Implications for the Global Martian Dust Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, R.; Meslin, P.; Sabroux, J.; Madsen, M. B.; Pineau, J.; Richon, P.

    2013-12-01

    The radioactivity of airborne aerosols, which originates from the attachment of radionuclides produced by radon disintegration, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) or anthropogenic activities, especially fallouts from nuclear weapons testing, can be used to measure the residence time of these aerosols in the atmosphere and their deposition rate. It is also used to characterize soils erosion rates (Matissof et al., 2002) or to investigate the origin of desert rock varnish (Hodge et al., 2005), to name only a few terrestrial applications. A translation of these nuclear methods to the Martian atmosphere, which is characterized by a very active dust cycle, is tempting, and has the potential to offer a unique insight into the present-day recycling of the Martian surface. This approach is made possible by two facts: 1) the presence of radon in the Martian atmosphere, which produces long-lived radioactive decay products, in particular polonium-210, and whose abundance can be indirectly inferred by gamma ray spectrometry from orbit using Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) (Meslin et al., 2012); 2) the presence at the surface of Mars of two Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometers (APXS), onboard Opportunity and Spirit Mars Exploration Rovers, whose energy range (in the alpha mode) very fortuitously happens to include the energy of alpha particles emitted by the decay of polonium-210. The long half-life of this radionuclide is such that it is almost entirely attached to the particles that have been in suspension in the atmosphere, especially those characterized by a large specific surface area or by a long atmospheric residence time. It can therefore be used as a tracer of the dust cycle. An analysis of the alpha spectra acquired on the dust Capture and Filter magnets of the Spirit rover confirms results obtained by Meslin et al. (2006) that the Martian dust is radioactive w/r to polonium-210, thereby extending Opportunity's result to a global scale. This result enables us to

  7. Influence of 60-Hz magnetic fields on sea urchin development

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, S.; Zimmerman, A.M.; Winters, W.D.; Cameron, I.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Continuous exposure of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryos at 18 degrees C to a cyclic 60-Hz magnetic field at 0.1 mT rms beginning 4 min after insemination caused a significant developmental delay during the subsequent 23 hours. No delay in development was recorded for periods up to 18 hours after fertilization. At 18 h, most embryos were in the mesenchyme blastula stage. At 23 h, most control embryos were in mid-gastrula whereas most magnetic-field-exposed embryos were in the early gastrula stage. Thus an estimated 1-h delay occurred between these developmental stages. The results are discussed in terms of possible magnetic-field modification of transcription as well as interference with cell migration during gastrulation. The present study extends and supports the growing body of information about potential effects of exposures to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on developing organisms.

  8. The Role of Time-varying Meridional Flow Pattern During Past 20 Years In Influencing Upcoming Solar Cycle Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, M.; de Toma, G.; Gilman, P. A.; Corbard, T.; Rhodes, E. J.; Haber, D. A.; Bogart, R. S.; Rose, P. J.

    2004-05-01

    Given the success of a recently built flux-transport dynamo-based scheme (ApJ, 2004, 601, 1136) in reproducing observed polar field features in cycle 23 including a) why polar reversal as well as polar field build-up after reversal were unusually slow, and b) why S-pole reversed a year after N-pole did, we apply this scheme to predict some features of solar cycle 24. It has been demonstrated (ApJ, 2000, 543, 1027) that the duration of the Sun's memory of its own magnetic field is governed primarily by the meridional flow speed in flux-transport dynamos, and is no less than two solar cycles. Therefore, observations of the Sun's magnetic field patterns over at least the past two cycles, and dynamical changes in the Sun's large-scale mass-flow in which the solar magnetic fields are partially frozen, should play important roles in determining certain features in the upcoming solar cycle. We first demonstrate theoretically how a N-S asymmetry in meridional flow pattern can produce asymmetry in sunspot maxima in N & S hemispheres, hence causing double peaks, as observed in cycles 22 and 23. We also show how deceleration in meridional flow, during the rising phase of cycle 23 produced a slower rise in this cycle compared to cycles 21 and 22. We then discuss the team-effort for extracting observed changes in meridional flow over the past 20 years, using helioseismic archive of MWO. By incorporating this long-term dynamical variation in flow-pattern in our prediction model, if we can tune the model to successfully reproduce various "anomalies" in solar cycle 23, we can comment further that cycle 23 is going to be a longer cycle if meridional flow does not accelerate during its declining phase, hence causing onset of cycle 24 around 2007. This work is supported by NASA grants W-10107 and W-10175. National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by National Science Foundation.

  9. Characterizing and modeling magnetic flux transport in the sun's photosphere and determining its impact on the sunspot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Lisa A.

    The characterization and modeling of magnetic flux transport within the surface layers of the Sun are vital to explaining the sunspot cycle. The Sun's polar fields at solar cycle minimum are the seeds of the next solar cycle: weak polar fields produce weak cycles. Magnetic flux transport is key to the buildup of the polar fields and the subsequent magnetic reversals that are essential to modulating the sunspot cycle. The primary goals of this dissertation are threefold: 1. Make precise measurements of the Sun's axisymmetric flows (i.e., differential rotation and meridional flow). 2. Create a realistic surface flux transport model that reproduces the magnetic field evolution at the surface by incorporating the observed flows. 3. Investigate the role of flux transport in modulating the polar fields, and thereby the solar activity cycle. This work has been done in collaboration with Dr. David H. Hathaway of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. In Chapter 1, I provide an introduction to the Sun as a star. I begin with a discussion on stellar structure and evolution. I then discuss the techniques and instruments that have been used to study the Sun. I conclude Chapter 1 with a section on magnetic activity cycles on the Sun and in other stars. Magnetic flux on the Sun is transported by supergranular flows and the axisymmetric flows of differential rotation (DR) and meridional flow (MF). In Chapter 2, I introduce these flows. I then show a derivation of the Surface Flux Transport equation starting from Maxwell's equations and Ohm's Law. I conclude this chapter with an introduction to prior Surface Flux Transport models. In Chapter 3, I discuss a cross-correlation technique that we have used on magnetograms (maps of the magnetic field strengths over the surface of the Sun) to characterize the DR and MF and their variations from 1996 to present. Results show that while variability in DR is negligible, the MF varies in two fundamental ways: over the course of a solar cycle and

  10. The influence of quarantine on reproductive cycling in wild-caught Baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Liechty, Emma R; Wang, Diane Y; Chen, Emily; Chai, Daniel; Bell, Jason D; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2015-12-01

    Stress impacts nonhuman primate menstrual cycle length but the impact of quarantine is unknown. A retrospective analysis was performed on cycle data from 31 wild-caught baboons during and following quarantine. Cycling initiated in 94 days (19-181) and length normalized within 4-6 cycles. Quarantine significantly impacts menstrual cycle length. PMID:26308947

  11. Influence of the magnetic properties and repetitions on the energy product in layered thin film hard soft magnetic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagardo, David; Beik Mohammadi, Jamileh; Tuggle, Andrew; Mewes, Claudia; Mewes, Tim; Suzuki, Takao; MINT Center Team

    2015-03-01

    Exchange spring composites (hard-soft magnetic composites) are interesting for many applications such as rare-earth free permanent magnets and information storage. One key aspect is the figure of merit, the energy product, also called (BH)max. The system of study is a magnetic nano composite where each bilayer consists of a soft and hard magnetic material of total height of 22 nm. Using micromagnetic simulations we have investigated the influence of different ratios of the volume of the hard and soft layers on the energy product and the number of bilayer repetitions. Our findings indicate that the maximum energy product depends strongly on the volume ratio as well as on the number of repetitions. In addition we have studied the influence of different anisotropy contributions of the hard and soft magnetic layer on the energy product. Finally we have studied the influence of the interlayer exchange coupling on the energy product, which show that strong interlayer exchange coupling is necessary to reach a high energy product.

  12. The solar wind structure and heliospheric magnetic field in the solar Cycle 23-24 minimum and in the increasing phase of Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Zhao, L.; Fisk, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    The solar wind structure and the heliospheric magnetic field were substantially different in the latest solar minimum between solar Cycle 23 and 24 from the previous minimum. Compared with the previous minimum, in the latest solar minimum, the heliospheric magnetic field strength was substantially reduced; the streamer-associated-low-temperature solar wind (streamer-stalk wind) was distributed in a narrower region relative to the heliospheric current sheet (HCS); the slow-proton-speed solar wind was scattered in a wider latitudinal region; and there are more large and steady coronal holes at low latitude. We offer an explanation for the decreased magnetic-field strength and the narrowed streamer-stalk wind based on an analysis of the Ulysses and ACE in-situ observations. Solar-wind composition data are used to demonstrate that there are two distinct structures of solar wind: solar wind likely to originate from the stalk of the streamer belt (the highly elongated loops that underlie the HCS), and solar wind from outside this region. The region outside the streamer-stalk region is noticeably larger in the Cycle 23-24 minimum; however, the increased area can account for the reduction in the heliospheric magnetic-field strength in that minimum. Thus, the total magnetic flux contained in this region is the same in the two minima. To have a further understanding of the solar wind structure and its solar source, we ballistically map the ACE in-situ observation back along a radial trajectory from 1 AU to the solar source surface (r = 2.5Rsun) using the observed proton speeds. Then we track the field line from the source surface to the solar surface using a potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) extrapolation model. So the ACE observations, including the heliospheric magnetic field, the solar wind compositional and dynamic properties at 1AU, can be connected to their coronal sources on the solar surface. Synoptic maps showing this connection will be provided, and based on

  13. Influence Of Nanoparticles Diameter On Structural Properties Of Magnetic Fluid In Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kúdelčík, Jozef; Bury, Peter; Hardoň, Štefan; Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-07-01

    The properties of magnetic fluids depend on the nanoparticle diameter, their concentration and the carrier liquid. The structural changes in magnetic fluids with different nanoparticle diameter based on transformer oils TECHNOL and MOGUL under the effect of a magnetic field and temperature were studied by acoustic spectroscopy. At a linear and jump changes of the magnetic field at various temperatures a continuous change was observed of acoustic attenuation caused by aggregation of the magnetic nanoparticles to structures. From the anisotropy of acoustic attenuation and using the Taketomi theory the basic parameters of the structures are calculated and the impact of nanoparticle diameters on the size of structures is confirmed.

  14. Influence of magnetic non-uniformity existing in a rigid rotor supported by a superconducting magnetic bearing on its whirling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Soichiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Sugiura, Toshihiko

    2014-05-01

    Superconducting magnetic bearings (SMBs) have a significant feature over conventional bearings in terms of supporting a shaft without physical contact while attaining its stability without control. In their large-scale rotary applications, magnetization distribution of a rotor in the circumferential direction can be non-uniform and it would be better to know influence of such circumferential magnetic non-uniformity existing in a rotor on its dynamics, especially on its behaviors in the vicinity of the critical speed. In this study, further developing our previous research, we improved our analytical model so that we can adjust several different degrees of magnetic non-uniformity by arranging multiple magnetization vectors and investigated its influence. First, we simulated dynamical behavior of the system by numerical calculations and their results show that, with increasing the degree of magnetic non-uniformity, the whirling amplitude of the system, together with the difference of the amplitudes in the orthogonal directions in the whirling plane, get larger. Further, the rotational frequency at which the whirling amplitude takes its peak gets lower, which is caused by nonlinearity of the electromagnetic force. We carried out experiments and verified our numerical predicions.

  15. Influence of lateral displacement on the levitation performance of a magnetized bulk high-Tc superconductor magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Wang, J. S.; Ma, G. T.; Zheng, J.; Tuo, X. G.; Li, L. L.; Ye, C. Q.; Liao, X. L.; Wang, S. Y.

    2012-03-01

    Compared with the permanent magnet, the magnetized bulk high-Tc superconductor magnet (MBSCM) can trap higher magnetic field due to its strong flux pinning ability, so it is a good candidate to improve the levitation performance of high-Tc superconductive (HTS) maglev system. The trapped magnetic flux of a MBSCM is sustained by the inductive superconducting current produced by the magnetizing process and is susceptible to the current intensity as well as configuration. In the HTS maglev system, the lateral displacement is an important process to change the superconducting current within a MBSCM and then affects its levitation performance, which is essential for the traffic ability in curve-way, the loading capacity of lateral impact and so on. The research about influence of lateral displacement on the levitation performance of MBSCM is necessary when MBSCM is applied on the HTS maglev vehicle. The experimental investigations about the influence of lateral displacement on the levitation performance of a MBSCM with different trapped fluxes and applied fields are processed in this article. The analyses and conclusions of this article are useful for the practical application of MBSCM in HTS maglev system.

  16. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particle extracts: influence of driving cycle and environmental temperature.

    PubMed

    Clark, C R; Dutcher, J S; Brooks, A L; McClellan, R O; Marshall, W F; Naman, T M

    1982-01-01

    General Motors and Volkswagen diesel passenger cars (1980 and 1981 model year) were operated on a climate controlled chassis dynomometer and the particulate portion of the exhaust was collected on high volume filters. Dichloromethane extracts of the exhaust particles (soot) collected while the cars were operated under simulated highway, urban and congested urban driving cycles were assayed for mutagenicity in Salmonella strains TA-98 and TA-100. Driving pattern did not significantly influence the mutagenic potency of the exhaust particle extracts or estimates of the amount of mutagenicity emitted from the exhaust despite large differences in particle emission rates and extractable fraction of the particles. Mutagenicity of extracts of exhaust particles collected while the vehicles were operated at test chamber temperatures of 25, 50, 75 and 100 degrees F were also very similar. The results suggest that driving pattern and environmental temperature do not significantly alter the emission of genotoxic combustion products from the exhaust. PMID:6193022

  17. Influence of strong static magnetic field on human cancer HT 1080 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodins, Juris; Korhovs, Vadims; Freivalds, Talivaldis; Buikis, Indulis; Ivanova, Tatjana

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate strong uniform magnetic field influence on the human cancer cells HT 1080. The cells were treated with magnetic field of intensity 1,16 Tesla and with anticancer agent - cis-platinum 0.025 mg/ml or vincristinum 2-3 ng/ml. The intact and the treated cell samples were incubated in a medium with acridine orange (AO). The magnetic field after 15 minutes of influence significantly increased cytoplasmic red fluorescence. Increased AO accumulation in lysosomes suggested to cancer cell metabolic activity stimulation.

  18. Influence of the estrous cycle on the behavior of rats in the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Amauri; dos Santos, Ubirajara D; Felisbino, Fabrício E; de Afonseca, Taciana L; Antunes, Gabriela; Morato, Silvio

    2004-09-30

    The elevated T-maze is an animal anxiety model which can discriminate between anxiety-like and fear-like behaviors. The estrous cycle is an important variable of the response in animal anxiety tests and is known to affect other models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the estrous cycle on behavior displayed in the elevated T-maze test. Seventeen male and 60 female rats were submitted to one session in this test, with the females being screened for the estrous cycle and divided into groups according to the various phases. The elevated T-maze had three arms of equal dimensions ( 50 cm x 10 cm), one enclosed by 40-cm high walls and perpendicular to the others, the apparatus being elevated 50 cm above the floor. Each rat was placed in the end of the enclosed arm and the latency for it to leave this arm was recorded. These measurements were repeated three times separated by 30-s intervals (passive avoidance). After trial 3, each rat was placed at the distal end of the right open arm and the latency to exit this arm was recorded. Whenever latencies were greater than 300 s the trial was finished. The results demonstrated females in diestrus exhibited anxiety-like behaviors while females in metaestrus behaved in a similar way as the males. There were no differences between groups in fear-like behaviors. The results also indicate the elevated T-maze to be a sensitive test to measure anxiety. PMID:15240054

  19. The influence of woody encroachment on the nitrogen cycle: fixation, storage and gas loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs potentially alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates increase with tree age and are influenced by abiotic conditions. A model of soil N accrual around individual trees, accounting for atmospheric inputs and gas losses, generates lifetimes N fixation estimates of up to 9 kg for a 100-year-old tree and current rates of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. However, these N inputs and increased soil cycling rates do not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions for both land cover types average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Additional lab experiments suggested that N2 losses are low and that field oxygen conditions are not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of net N accrual under ongoing encroachment.

  20. Lunar cycles at mating do not influence sex ratio at birth in horses.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, J J; Cuervo-Arango, J; Santa Juliana, L

    2015-02-01

    It is scientifically demonstrated that lunar cycles have important effects on several biological events. Controversy exists about the lunar influence on human and animal parturition. In addition, in the horse industry, especially in Polo Horse breeders of Argentina and around the world there is a higher demand for female offspring than for males. The objective of this study was to determine whether there is a significant association between the lunar phase at the time of mating and the sex ratio at birth in horses. The Argentinean Stud Book provided information related to all matings registered for Thoroughbred and Arab horses between 2003 and 2011. Statistical associations were tested between dates of matings at different lunar phases or days and sex ratio at birth. A total of 65.535 gestations were studied. Overall, sex ratio at birth resulted in 33.396 fillies (50.96%) and 32.139 colts (49.04%). The percentages of males and females at birth were not statistically different amongst the different lunar phases or days. We can strongly conclude that managing the breeding dates in relation to lunar cycles in order to manipulate the sex ratio of the offspring is not a viable option in horses. PMID:25153135

  1. Influence of temperature on the life-cycle of Globodera spp.

    PubMed

    Blok, V; Kaczmarek, A; Palomares-Rius, J E

    2011-01-01

    The potato cyst nematodes (PCN) G. rostochiensis (Woll.) and G. pallida (Stone) are the most economically important pests of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) in the UK and are widespread in ware potato growing regions in Europe. The new EU directive 2007/33/EC which came into effect July 1, 2010 aims to control their spread and limit further increases in populations. We are investigating the role of temperature in the life cycle of PCN to assess how this effects population multiplication in relation to managing PCN. Hatching and nematode development are stages in the life cycle that are affected by temperature and thus are important life stages that can be examined to determine the impact of temperature on the length of time required for one generation to be completed and the potential for final populations to increase on different potato genetic backgrounds. In some conditions a partial or complete second generation has also been observed within the growing season. Females have been observed on the surface of tubers and "pecking" skin damage can occur which may be a result of a second generation. We are investigating the influence of temperature on the potential for a second generation or the induction of diapause. PMID:22696942

  2. Selection of organic process and source indicator substances for the anthropogenically influenced water cycle.

    PubMed

    Jekel, Martin; Dott, Wolfgang; Bergmann, Axel; Dünnbier, Uwe; Gnirß, Regina; Haist-Gulde, Brigitte; Hamscher, Gerd; Letzel, Marion; Licha, Tobias; Lyko, Sven; Miehe, Ulf; Sacher, Frank; Scheurer, Marco; Schmidt, Carsten K; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Ruhl, Aki Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    An increasing number of organic micropollutants (OMP) is detected in anthropogenically influenced water cycles. Source control and effective natural and technical barriers are essential to maintain a high quality of drinking water resources under these circumstances. Based on the literature and our own research this study proposes a limited number of OMP that can serve as indicator substances for the major sources of OMP, such as wastewater treatment plants, agriculture and surface runoff. Furthermore functional indicators are proposed that allow assessment of the proper function of natural and technical barriers in the aquatic environment, namely conventional municipal wastewater treatment, advanced treatment (ozonation, activated carbon), bank filtration and soil aquifer treatment as well as self-purification in surface water. These indicator substances include the artificial sweetener acesulfame, the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen, the anticonvulsant carbamazepine, the corrosion inhibitor benzotriazole and the herbicide mecoprop among others. The chemical indicator substances are intended to support comparisons between watersheds and technical and natural processes independent of specific water cycles and to reduce efforts and costs of chemical analyses without losing essential information. PMID:25563167

  3. The factors influencing car use in a cycle-friendly city: the case of Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Carse, Andrew; Goodman, Anna; Mackett, Roger L; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2013-04-01

    Encouraging people out of their cars and into other modes of transport, which has major advantages for health, the environment and urban development, has proved difficult. Greater understanding of the influences that lead people to use the car, particularly for shorter journeys, may help to achieve this. This paper examines the predictors of car use compared with the bicycle to explore how it may be possible to persuade more people to use the bicycle instead of the car. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the socio-demographic, transport and health-related correlates of mode choice for work, shopping and leisure trips in Cambridge, a city with high levels of cycling by UK standards. The key findings are that commuting distance and free workplace parking were strongly associated with use of the car for work trips, and car availability and lower levels of education were associated with car use for leisure, shopping and short-distanced commuting trips. The case of Cambridge shows that more policies could be adopted, particularly a reduction in free car parking, to increase cycling and reduce the use of the car, especially over short distances. PMID:24954981

  4. High-power UV-LED degradation: Continuous and cycled working condition influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arques-Orobon, F. J.; Nuñez, N.; Vazquez, M.; Segura-Antunez, C.; González-Posadas, V.

    2015-09-01

    High-power (HP) UV-LEDs can replace UV lamps for real-time fluoro-sensing applications by allowing portable and autonomous systems. However, HP UV-LEDs are not a mature technology, and there are still open issues regarding their performance evolution over time. This paper presents a reliability study of 3 W UV-LEDs, with special focus on LED degradation for two working conditions: continuous and cycled (30 s ON and 30 s OFF). Accelerated life tests are developed to evaluate the influence of temperature and electrical working conditions in high-power LEDs degradation, being the predominant failure mechanism the degradation of the package. An analysis that includes dynamic thermal and optical HP UV-LED measurements has been performed. Static thermal and stress simulation analysis with the finite element method (FEM) identifies the causes of package degradation. Accelerated life test results prove that HP UV-LEDs working in cycled condition have a better performance than those working in continuous condition.

  5. Factors influencing the life cycle burdens of the recovery of energy from residual municipal waste.

    PubMed

    Burnley, Stephen; Coleman, Terry; Peirce, Adam

    2015-05-01

    A life cycle assessment was carried out to assess a selection of the factors influencing the environmental impacts and benefits of incinerating the fraction of municipal waste remaining after source-separation for reuse, recycling, composting or anaerobic digestion. The factors investigated were the extent of any metal and aggregate recovery from the bottom ash, the thermal efficiency of the process, and the conventional fuel for electricity generation displaced by the power generated. The results demonstrate that incineration has significant advantages over landfill with lower impacts from climate change, resource depletion, acidification, eutrophication human toxicity and aquatic ecotoxicity. To maximise the benefits of energy recovery, metals, particularly aluminium, should be reclaimed from the residual bottom ash and the energy recovery stage of the process should be as efficient as possible. The overall environmental benefits/burdens of energy from waste also strongly depend on the source of the power displaced by the energy from waste, with coal giving the greatest benefits and combined cycle turbines fuelled by natural gas the lowest of those considered. Regardless of the conventional power displaced incineration presents a lower environmental burden than landfill. PMID:25758908

  6. The QBO as Potential Amplifier and Conduit to Lower Altitudes of Solar Cycle Influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, John G.; Chan, Kwing L.; Porter, Hayden S.

    2005-01-01

    The solar cycle (SC) effect in the lower atmosphere has been linked observationally to the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO), which is generated primarily by small-scale gravity waves. Salby and Callaghan analyzed the QBO observations covering more than 40 years and found that it contains a relatively large SC signature at 20 km. Following up on a 2D study with our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), we discuss here a 3D study in which we simulated the QBO under the influence of the SC. For a SC period of 10 years, the amplitude of the relative variations of radiative forcing is taken to vary from 0.2% at the surface to 2% at 50 km to 20% at 100 km and above. This model produces in the lower stratosphere a relatively large modulation of the QBO, which appears to be related to the SC and is in qualitative agreement with the observations. Further studies are needed, (1) to determine whether the effect is real and the results are robust and (2) to explore the mechanism(s) that may amplify the SC effect. Quasi-decadal oscillations, generated internally by the QBO interacting with the seasonal cycles, may interfere with or aid the SC effect.

  7. Influence of subsolvus thermomechanical processing on the low-cycle fatigue properties of haynes 230 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchio, Kenneth S.; Fitzpatrick, Michael D.; Klarstrom, Dwaine

    1995-03-01

    Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests have been conducted in air at elevated temperature to determine the influence of subsolvus thermomechanical processing on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of HAYNES 230 alloy. A series of tests at various strain ranges was conducted on material experimentally processed at 1121 °C, which is below the M23C6 carbide solvus temperature, and on material fully solution annealed at 1232 °C. A comparative strain-life analysis was performed on the LCF results, and the cyclic hardening/softening characteristics were examined. At 760 °C and 871 °C, the fatigue life of the experimental 230/1121 material was improved relative to the standard 230/1232 material up to a factor of 3. The fatigue life advantage of the experimental material was related primarily to a lower plastic (inelastic) strain amplitude response for a given imposed total strain range. It appears the increase in monotonic flow stress exhibited by the finer grain size experimental material has been translated into an increase in cyclic flow stress at the 760 °C and 871 °C test temperatures. Both materials exhibited entirely transgranular fatigue crack initiation and propagation modes at these temperatures. The LCF performance of the experimental material in tests performed at 982 °C was improved relative to the standard material up to a factor as high as 2. The life advantage of the 230/1121 material occurred despite having a larger plastic strain amplitude than the standard 230/1232 material for a given total strain range. Though not fully understood at present, it is suspected that this behavior is related to the deleterious influence of grain boundaries in the fatigue crack initiations of the standard processed material relative to the experimental material, and ultimately to differences in carbide morphology as a result of thermomechanical processing.

  8. [Modeling the Influencing Factors of Karstification and Karst Carbon Cycle in Laboratory].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui-yi; Lü, Xian-fu; Duan, Yi-fan

    2015-08-01

    To analyze the influencing factors of karstification and karst carbon cycle, a simulation experiment was carried out and 6 soil columns were designed. The results showed that the content of H2O4, hydrodynamic condition and thickness of the soil had important influence on karstification and karst carbon cycle. For the soil columns which were covered by the same thickness of soil, the concentrations of Ca2+ + Mg2+ and SO4(2-) followed the order of B20-2 > B20-1 > B20-3, B50-2 > B50-1 > B50-3. This meant that input of H2SO4 enhanced the karstification and increasing infiltration water had significant dilution effect on the chemical properties. For the soil columns with different thickness of soil but with the same slag pile and hydrodynamic conditions, the concentrations of Ca2+ + Mg2+ and SO4(2-) followed the order of B50-1 > B20-1, B50-2 > B20-2, B50-3 > B20-3. It was demonstrated that more carbonate rock was dissolved under the thick soil columns. In addition, the net consumption of CO2 mainly depended on the content of H2SO4 in this experiment due to slight contribution of H2CO3 to carbonate rock dissolution. More content of H2SO4 brought about less net consumption of C02, but B50-2 was an exception. Organic matter and other nutrients might be input into deep soil with the slag pile, and they promoted the production of soil C)2. Therefore, more CO2 was consumed due to the increased contribution of H2CO to karstification. PMID:26592011

  9. Gender and estrous cycle influences on behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adult rats neonatally administered ketamine.

    PubMed

    Célia Moreira Borella, Vládia; Seeman, Mary V; Carneiro Cordeiro, Rafaela; Vieira dos Santos, Júnia; Romário Matos de Souza, Marcos; Nunes de Sousa Fernandes, Ethel; Santos Monte, Aline; Maria Mendes Vasconcelos, Silvânia; Quinn, John P; de Lucena, David F; Carvalho, André F; Macêdo, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade in rodents triggers schizophrenia (SCZ)-like alterations during adult life. SCZ is influenced by gender in age of onset, premorbid functioning, and course. Estrogen, the hormone potentially driving the gender differences in SCZ, is known to present neuroprotective effects such as regulate oxidative pathways and the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, the aim of this study was to verify if differences in gender and/or estrous cycle phase during adulthood would influence the development of behavioral and neurochemical alterations in animals neonatally administered ketamine. The results showed that ketamine-treated male (KT-male) and female-in-diestrus (KTF-diestrus, the low estrogen phase) presented significant deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and spatial working memory, two behavioral SCZ endophenotypes. On the contrary, female ketamine-treated rats during proestrus (KTF-proestrus, the high estradiol phase) had no behavioral alterations. This correlated with an oxidative imbalance in the hippocampus (HC) of both male and KTF-diestrus female rats, that is, decreased levels of GSH and increased levels of lipid peroxidation and nitrite. Similarly, BDNF was decreased in the KTF-diestrus rats while no alterations were observed in KTF-proestrus and male animals. The changes in the HC were in contrast to those in the prefrontal cortex in which only increased levels of nitrite in all groups studied were observed. Thus, there is a gender difference in the adult rat HC in response to ketamine neonatal administration, which is based on the estrous cycle. This is discussed in relation to neuropsychiatric conditions and in particular SCZ. PMID:26215537

  10. THREE-DIMENSIONAL FEATURES OF THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE DUE TO COUPLING BETWEEN THE INTERSTELLAR AND INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS. IV. SOLAR CYCLE MODEL BASED ON ULYSSES OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Suess, S. T.; Borovikov, S. N.; Ebert, R. W.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-07-20

    The solar cycle has a profound influence on the solar wind (SW) interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) on more than one timescales. Also, there are substantial differences in individual solar cycle lengths and SW behavior within them. The presence of a slow SW belt, with a variable latitudinal extent changing within each solar cycle from rather small angles to 90 Degree-Sign , separated from the fast wind that originates at coronal holes substantially affects plasma in the inner heliosheath (IHS)-the SW region between the termination shock (TS) and the heliopause (HP). The solar cycle may be the reason why the complicated flow structure is observed in the IHS by Voyager 1. In this paper, we show that a substantial decrease in the SW ram pressure observed by Ulysses between the TS crossings by Voyager 1 and 2 contributes significantly to the difference in the heliocentric distances at which these crossings occurred. The Ulysses spacecraft is the source of valuable information about the three-dimensional and time-dependent properties of the SW. Its unique fast latitudinal scans of the SW regions make it possible to create a solar cycle model based on the spacecraft in situ measurements. On the basis of our analysis of the Ulysses data over the entire life of the mission, we generated time-dependent boundary conditions at 10 AU from the Sun and applied our MHD-neutral model to perform a numerical simulation of the SW-LISM interaction. We analyzed the global variations in the interaction pattern, the excursions of the TS and the HP, and the details of the plasma and magnetic field distributions in the IHS. Numerical results are compared with Voyager data as functions of time in the spacecraft frame. We discuss solar cycle effects which may be reasons for the recent decrease in the TS particles (ions accelerated to anomalous cosmic-ray energies) flux observed by Voyager 1.