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Sample records for magnetic domain imaging

  1. Imaging Domains In Magnetic Garnets By Use Of TSMFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Rice, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Tunneling-stabilized magnetic-force microscopy (TSMFM) demonstrated to yield images of magnetic domains in low-coercivity magnetic garnets with perpendicular anisotropy. Ability to generate images of domain walls and minute vertical Bloch lines aids study of vertical-Bloch-line magnetic memory devices that contain garnets. TSMFM provides desired resolution because its resolution not limited by diffraction.

  2. Imaging of magnetic domains by transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Eimüller, T.; Schütz, G.; Guttmann, P.; Schmahl, G.; Pruegl, K.; Bayreuther, G.

    1998-03-01

    The combination of the high-resolution transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) based on the zone plate technique with the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) providing a huge magnetic contrast is a new technique to image magnetic domain structures. It is inherently element specific and contains information on the local spin and orbital moments of the absorbing species that can be obtained by applying magneto-optical sum rules. A lateral spatial resolution depending on the quality of the zone plates down to 30 nm can be achieved. We report on first results at the Fe 0022-3727/31/6/012/img9 edges of Fe both in amorphous and in multilayered Gd-Fe systems. With a TXM set-up at BESSY I adapted to record magnetic images in varying magnetic fields the evolution of magnetic domains within a complete hysteresis loop and magnetic aftereffects have been studied.

  3. Layer Resolved Imaging of Magnetic Domain Motion in Epitaxial Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Sioan; Choi, Yongseong; Love, David; Mansell, Rhodri; Barnes, Crispin; Keavney, David; Rosenberg, Richard

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy (XELM) to image the elemental and layer resolved magnetic domain structure of an epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure in the presence of large magnetic fields. The observed magnetic domains exhibit several unique behaviors that depend on the Cr thickness (tCr) modulated interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) strength. For Cr thickness tCr??1.5?nm, strongly coupled parallel Co-Fe reversal and weakly coupled layer independent reversal are observed, respectively. The transition between these two reversal mechanisms for 0.34?domain wall motion and stationary zig zag domain walls. We observe domain walls nucleated at switching field minima are guided by IEC spatial gradients and collapse at switching field maxima.

  4. Dual-domain denoising in three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Zhou, Jiliu; Wu, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Denoising is a crucial preprocessing procedure for three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI). Existing denoising methods are predominantly implemented in a single domain, ignoring information in other domains. However, denoising methods are becoming increasingly complex, making analysis and implementation challenging. The present study aimed to develop a dual-domain image denoising (DDID) algorithm for 3D MRI that encapsulates information from the spatial and transform domains. In the present study, the DDID method was used to distinguish signal from noise in the spatial and frequency domains, after which robust accurate noise estimation was introduced for iterative filtering, which is simple and beneficial for computation. In addition, the proposed method was compared quantitatively and qualitatively with existing methods for synthetic and in vivo MRI datasets. The results of the present study suggested that the novel DDID algorithm performed well and provided competitive results, as compared with existing MRI denoising filters. PMID:27446257

  5. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huettner, Andrew M.; Mickevicius, Nikolai J.; Ersoz, Ali; Koch, Kevin M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Nencka, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF) pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517262

  6. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huettner, Andrew M; Mickevicius, Nikolai J; Ersoz, Ali; Koch, Kevin M; Muftuler, L Tugan; Nencka, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF) pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517262

  7. X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-06-20

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

  8. Imaging and Tailoring the Chirality of Domain Walls in Magnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K

    2015-10-14

    Electric-current-induced magnetization switching is a keystone concept in the development of spintronics devices. In the last few years this field has experienced a significant boost with the discovery of ultrafast domain wall motions and very low threshold currents in structures designed to stabilize chiral spin textures. Imaging domain-wall spin textures in situ, while fabricating magnetic multilayer structures, is a powerful way to investigate the forces stabilizing this type of chirality, and informs strategies to engineer structures with controlled spin textures. Here, recent results applying spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy to image chiral domain walls in magnetic multilayer films are summarized. Providing a way to measure the strength of the asymmetric exchange interaction that causes the chirality, this approach can be used to tailor the texture and handedness of magnetic domain walls by interface engineering. These results advance understanding of the underlying physics and offer new insights toward the design of spintronic devices. PMID:26032892

  9. Centimeter-order view for magnetic domain imaging with local magnetization direction by longitudinal Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Sakae; Akahane, Koichi; Saito, Shin

    2016-05-01

    An observation system of centimeter-order of view of magnetic domain with local magnetization direction was developed by designing a telecentric optical system of finite design through the extension of microscope technology. The field of view realized in the developed system was 1.40 × 1.05 cm as suppressing defocus and distortion. Detection of the local magnetization direction has become possible by longitudinal Kerr observation from the orthogonal two directions. This system can be applied to the domain observation of rough surface samples and time resolved analysis for soft magnetic materials such as amorphous foil strips and soft magnetic thin films.

  10. Image characterization by fractal descriptors in variational mode decomposition domain: Application to brain magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2016-08-01

    The main purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of fractal descriptors estimated in multi-resolution domains to characterize biomedical digital image texture. In this regard, three multi-resolution techniques are considered: the well-known discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and; the newly introduced; variational mode decomposition mode (VMD). The original image is decomposed by the DWT, EMD, and VMD into different scales. Then, Fourier spectrum based fractal descriptors is estimated at specific scales and directions to characterize the image. The support vector machine (SVM) was used to perform supervised classification. The empirical study was applied to the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected with Alzheimer disease (AD). Our results demonstrate that fractal descriptors estimated in VMD domain outperform those estimated in DWT and EMD domains; and also those directly estimated from the original image.

  11. X-ray holographic imaging of magnetic order in meander domain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzani, Carlo; Popescu, Horia; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Tortarolo, Marina; Jaouen, Nicolas; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    We performed x-ray holography experiments using synchrotron radiation. By analyzing the scattering of coherent circularly polarized x-rays tuned at the Co-2p resonance, we imaged perpendicular magnetic domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. We compare results obtained for continuous and laterally confined films.

  12. Magneto-optical imaging of magnetic domain pattern produced by intense femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Jaivarhan; Mohan, Shyam; Banerjee, S. S.; Kahaly, S.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2009-03-01

    An important and intriguing area of research is laser plasma generated giant magnetic field pulses. Interaction of ultrashort high intensity laser pulses with matter involves several mechanisms for generating ultrastrong magnetic fields. By irradiating a magnetic recordable tape constituting of γ-Fe2O3 particles with an intense p-polarized femtosecond laser pulses (˜ 10^16 W cm-2, 100fs), we have found complex magnetic field patterns stored in the tape. We image the local magnetic field distribution around the irradiated region [1] using the high sensitivity magneto-optical imaging technique. We understand the complex magnetic domains patterns recoded on the tape in terms of interesting instabilities [1] generated in the plasma produced during the irradiation of the tape with intense laser pulses. [0pt] [1] Jaivardhan Sinha, Shyam Mohan, S. S Banerjee, S. Kahaly, G. Ravindra Kumar, Phys. Rev. E 77, 046118(2008). *satyajit@iitk.ac.in

  13. Four-channel magnetic resonance imaging receiver using frequency domain multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wang; Qin, Xu; Jiejing, Ren; Gengying, Li

    2007-01-01

    An alternative technique that uses frequency domain multiplexing to acquire phased array magnetic resonance images is discussed in detail. The proposed method has advantages over traditional independent receiver chains in that it utilizes an analog-to-digital converter and a single-chip multicarrier receiver with high performance to reduce the size and cost of the phased array receiver system. A practical four-channel digital receiver using frequency domain multiplexing was implemented and verified on a home-built 0.3T magnetic resonance imaging system. The experimental results confirmed that the cross talk between each channel was below -60dB, the phase fluctuations were about 1°, and there was no obvious signal-to-noise ratio degradation. It is demonstrated that the frequency domain multiplexing is a valuable and economical technique, particularly for array coil systems where the multichannel receiver is indispensable and dynamic range is not a critical problem.

  14. Magnetic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford-Long, A. K.

    Spin-transport effects, such as giant magnetoresistance, rely on the fact that there is a difference in scattering between the spin-up and spin-down electrons in a ferromagnetic material. The degree to which each electron channel is scattered depends on the magnetisation direction within the material, and thus on the local magnetic domain structure. It is therefore of importance when analysing spin-transport devices to understand their magnetic domain structure, both as a bulk property and locally. The aim of this chapter is to review a number of the techniques currently used to image magnetic domain structure in materials. Although a considerable amount of information about the magnetic properties and behaviour of a piece of material, for example a thin ferromagnetic film, can be obtained from bulk magnetometry measurements, it is often extremely useful to image the magnetic domain structure of the film and thus gain information about its magnetic properties at a local level. The various magnetic imaging techniques yet to be described can be extended, by the application of in-situ magnetic fields which allow not only the magnetic domains but also the magnetisation reversal process to be followed in real-time.

  15. Analytical modelling and x-ray imaging of oscillations of a single magnetic domain wall

    SciTech Connect

    Bocklage, Lars; Kruger, Benjamin; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2009-07-10

    Domain-wall oscillation in a pinnig potential is described analytically in a one dimensional model for the feld-driven case. For a proper description the pinning potential has to be extended by nonharmonic contributions. Oscillations of a domain wall are observed on its genuine time scale by magnetic X-ray microscopy. It is shown that the nonharmonic terms are present in real samples with a strong restoring potential. In the framework of our model we gain deep insight into the domain-wall motion by looking at different phase spaces. The corrections of the harmonic potential can change the motion of the domain wall significantly. The damping parameter of permalloy is determined via the direct imaging technique.

  16. Nucleation, imaging, and motion of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, S., Col; Jamet, S.; StaÅo, M.; Trapp, B.; Le Denmat, S.; Cagnon, L.; Toussaint, J. C.; Fruchart, O.

    2016-08-01

    We report several procedures for the robust nucleation of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical permalloy nanowires. Specific features of the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) contrast of such wires are discussed, to avoid the misinterpretation of the magnetization states. The domain walls moved under quasistatic magnetic fields in the range 0.1-10 mT, as evidenced by MFM at remanence at different stages of their motion.

  17. Direct Imaging of Thermally Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Fan, Yabin; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Minsheng; Chang, Li-Te; Lang, Murong; Wong, Kin L.; Lewis, Mark; Lin, Yen-Ting; Tang, Jianshi; Cherepov, Sergiy; Zhou, Xuezhi; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Schwartz, Robert N.; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-04-01

    Thermally induced domain wall motion in a magnetic insulator was observed using spatiotemporally resolved polar magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. The following results were found: (i) the domain wall moves towards hot regime; (ii) a threshold temperature gradient (5K/mm), i.e., a minimal temperature gradient required to induce domain wall motion; (iii) a finite domain wall velocity outside of the region with a temperature gradient, slowly decreasing as a function of distance, which is interpreted to result from the penetration of a magnonic current into the constant temperature region; and (iv) a linear dependence of the average domain wall velocity on temperature gradient, beyond a threshold thermal bias. Our observations can be qualitatively explained using a magnonic spin transfer torque mechanism, which suggests the utility of magnonic spin transfer torque for controlling magnetization dynamics.

  18. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  19. Imaging the Fine Structure of a Magnetic Domain Wall in a Ni Nanocylinder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental imaging of the internal DW structure in 55 and 85 nm diameter Ni nanocylinders, using electron holography combined with micromagnetic calculations. We demonstrate the magnetic transition from a hybrid magnetic state with both vortex and transverse DW in 85 nm diameter Ni nanocylinders to a pure transverse wall in thinner nanowires. This is particularly important as DWs in nanocylinders are model systems to go beyond the classical Walker limit. PMID:23586647

  20. Compression and denoising in magnetic resonance imaging via SVD on the Fourier domain using computer algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Felipe

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) data reconstruction can be computationally a challenging task. The signal-to-noise ratio might also present complications, especially with high-resolution images. In this sense, data compression can be useful not only for reducing the complexity and memory requirements, but also to reduce noise, even to allow eliminate spurious components.This article proposes the use of a system based on singular value decomposition of low order for noise reconstruction and reduction in MR imaging system. The proposed method is evaluated using in vivo MRI data. Rebuilt images with less than 20 of the original data and with similar quality in terms of visual inspection are presented. Also a quantitative evaluation of the method is presented.

  1. Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Vakoc, Benjamin; Yun, Seok Hyun

    In this chapter, we discuss a frequency-domain approach, optical frequency-domain imaging (OFDI), which is based on optical frequency-domain reflectometry and uses a wavelength-swept laser and standard single-element photodetectors. The chapter begins with an overview of the fundamental aspects of the technology, including the detected signal, sensitivity, depth range, and resolution, and then goes on to discuss specific component technologies including the light source, interferometer and acquisition electronics, and image processing. The final section of the chapter provides a brief glimpse at some of the biomedical applications that most directly take advantage of the improved speed and sensitivity of OFDI.

  2. Trajectory dependent particle response for anisotropic mono domain particles in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeser, M.; Bente, K.; Neumann, A.; Buzug, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    In magnetic particle imaging, scanners use different spatial sampling techniques to cover the field of view (FOV). As spatial encoding is realized by a selective low field region (a field-free-point, or field-free-line), this region has to be moved through the FOV on specific sampling trajectories. To achieve these trajectories complex time dependent magnetic fields are necessary. Due to the superposition of the selection field and the homogeneous time dependent fields, particles at different spatial positions experience different field sequences. As a result, the dynamic behaviour of those particles can be strongly spatially dependent. So far, simulation studies that determined the trajectory quality have used the Langevin function to model the particle response. This however, neglects the dynamic relaxation of the particles, which is highly affected by magnetic anisotropy. More sophisticated models based on stochastic differential equations that include these effects were only used for one dimensional excitation. In this work, a model based on stochastic differential equations is applied to two-dimensional trajectory field sequences, and the effects of these field sequences on the particle response are investigated. The results show that the signal of anisotropic particles is not based on particle parameters such as size and shape alone, but is also determined by the field sequence that a particle ensemble experiences at its spatial position. It is concluded, that the particle parameters can be optimized in terms of the used trajectory.

  3. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  4. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, T; Motoyui, Y; Morozumi, K; Rödel, T C; Fortuna, F; Santander-Syro, A F; Shin, S

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  5. Magnetic field dependence of magnetic domains in Co doped Mn2Sb using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vikram; Saha, Pampi; Kushwaha, Pallavi; Thamizhavel, A.; Rawat, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic domains in the ferrimagnetic state of Co doped Mn2Sb single crystal has been visualized using Magnetic Force Microscopy. It shows fractal like domain structure. With the application of magnetic field, single domain state is achieved around 2000 Oe. The MFM images collected during field increasing and decreasing cycles show different morphology for same field value.

  6. Magnetic surface domain imaging of uncapped epitaxial FeRh(001) thin films across the temperature-induced metamagnetic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianzhong; Matthes, Frank; Bürgler, Daniel E.; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    The surface magnetic domain structure of uncapped epitaxial FeRh/MgO(001) thin films was imaged by in-situ scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA) at various temperatures between 122 and 450 K. This temperature range covers the temperature-driven antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition in the body of the films that was observed in-situ by means of the more depth-sensitive magneto-optical Kerr effect. The SEMPA images confirm that the interfacial ferromagnetism coexisting with the antiferromagnetic phase inside the film is an intrinsic property of the FeRh(001) surface. Furthermore, the SEMPA data display a reduction of the in-plane magnetization occuring well above the phase transition temperature which, thus, is not related to the volume expansion at the phase transition. This observation is interpreted as a spin reorientation of the surface magnetization for which we propose a possible mechanism based on temperature-dependent tetragonal distortion due to different thermal expansion coefficients of MgO and FeRh.

  7. Time-domain imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolliver, C. L.

    1989-01-01

    The quest for the highest resolution microwave imaging and principle of time-domain imaging has been the primary motivation for recent developments in time-domain techniques. With the present technology, fast time varying signals can now be measured and recorded both in magnitude and in-phase. It has also enhanced our ability to extract relevant details concerning the scattering object. In the past, the interface of object geometry or shape for scattered signals has received substantial attention in radar technology. Various scattering theories were proposed to develop analytical solutions to this problem. Furthermore, the random inversion, frequency swept holography, and the synthetic radar imaging, have two things in common: (1) the physical optic far-field approximation, and (2) the utilization of channels as an extra physical dimension, were also advanced. Despite the inherent vectorial nature of electromagnetic waves, these scalar treatments have brought forth some promising results in practice with notable examples in subsurface and structure sounding. The development of time-domain techniques are studied through the theoretical aspects as well as experimental verification. The use of time-domain imaging for space robotic vision applications has been suggested.

  8. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  9. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  10. Magnetically mediated thermoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaohua; Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, alternating magnetic field is explored for inducing thermoacoustic effect on dielectric objects. Termed as magnetically mediated thermo-acoustic (MMTA) effect that provides a contrast in conductivity, this approach employs magnetic resonance for delivering energy to a desired location by applying a large transient current at radio frequency below 50MHz to a compact magnetically resonant coil. The alternating magnetic field induces large electric field inside conductive objects, which then undergoes joule heating and emanates acoustic signal thermo-elastically. The magnetic mediation approach with low radio frequency can potentially provide deeper penetration than microwave radiation due to the non-magnetic nature of human body and therefore extend thermoacoustic imaging to deep laid organs. Both incoherent time domain method that applies a pulsed radio frequency current and coherent frequency domain approach that employs a linear chirp signal to modulate the envelop of the current are discussed. Owing to the coherent processing nature, the latter approach is capable of achieving much better signal to noise ratio and therefore potential for portable imaging system. Phantom experiments are carried out to demonstrate the signal generation together with some preliminary imaging results. Ex-vivo tissue studies are also investigated.

  11. Magnetic bubble domain memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ypma, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Some attractive features of Bubble Domain Memory and its relation to existing technologies are discussed. Two promising applications are block access mass memory and tape recorder replacement. The required chip capabilities for these uses are listed, and the specifications for a block access mass memory designed to fit between core and HPT disk are presented. A feasibility model for a tape recorder replacement is introduced.

  12. MISTRAL: a transmission soft X-ray microscopy beamline for cryo nano-tomography of biological samples and magnetic domains imaging.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Nicolás, Josep; Valcárcel, Ricardo; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Rosanes, Marc; Avila, Jose; Tkachuk, Andrei; Irwin, Jeff; Ferrer, Salvador; Pereiro, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The performance of MISTRAL is reported, the soft X-ray transmission microscopy beamline at the ALBA light source (Barcelona, Spain) which is primarily dedicated to cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) for three-dimensional visualization of whole unstained cells at spatial resolutions down to 30 nm (half pitch). Short acquisition times allowing for high-throughput and correlative microscopy studies have promoted cryo-SXT as an emerging cellular imaging tool for structural cell biologists bridging the gap between optical and electron microscopy. In addition, the beamline offers the possibility of imaging magnetic domains in thin magnetic films that are illustrated here with an example. PMID:26134819

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  14. Frequency Domain Sampling Using Biomedical Imaging Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Gun Ha; Chung, Minji; Kyung, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In magnetic resonance image analysis using physical and computational method, the process of transformation from frequency domain to image domain requires significant amount time because Inverse Fourier Transformation (IFT) takes every frequency points to determine the final output image. This paper shows the mechanisms and physics of image formation using the selectivity of proper k-space by removing different amounts of high or low frequencies to create the most optimal magnetic resonance image of a human tibial bone. Originally, square unit step function, N/2-N/10:N/2 + N/10 = 1, was used during the Fourier Transformations. And Gaussian filter, y = exp(-t2/40n) , where t = h-L/2, h = [0,M], L =2*7*N/40, the size of frequency matrix (M, N) = (365,557) was tested. Also circle equations as a filter, r = sqrt((x-M/2)2 + (y-N/2)2) , were tested in creating the images of the human tibial bone to find an efficient filter. The best efficiency occurred when the exponent n in the proposed Gaussian filter equation is in between 3 and 8, and therefore, a new algorithm is needed to find the exact number since the number is not only an integer.

  15. Time series analysis in the time domain and resampling methods for studies of functional magnetic resonance brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Locascio, J J; Jennings, P J; Moore, C I; Corkin, S

    1997-01-01

    Although functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods yield rich temporal and spatial data for even a single subject, universally accepted data analysis techniques have not been developed that use all the potential information from fMRI of the brain. Specifically, temporal correlations and confounds are a problem in assessing change within pixels. Spatial correlations across pixels are a problem in determining regions of activation and in correcting for multiple significance tests. We propose methods that address these issues in the analysis of task-related changes in mean signal intensity for individual subjects. Our approach to temporally based problems within pixels is to employ a model based on autoregressive-moving average (ARMA or "Box-Jenkins") time series methods, which we call CARMA (Contrasts and ARMA). To adjust for performing multiple significance tests across pixels, taking into account between-pixel correlations, we propose adjustment of P values with "resampling methods." Our objective is to produce two- or three-dimensional brain maps that provide, at each pixel in the map, an estimated P value with absolute meaning. That is, each P value approximates the probability of having obtained by chance the observed signal effect at that pixel, given that the null hypothesis is true. Simulated and real data examples are provided. PMID:20408214

  16. Domain wall manipulation with a magnetic tip.

    PubMed

    Stapelfeldt, T; Wieser, R; Vedmedenko, E Y; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-07-01

    A theoretical concept of local manipulation of magnetic domain walls is introduced. In the proposed procedure, a domain wall is driven by a spin-polarized current induced by a magnetic tip, as used in a scanning tunneling microscope, placed above a magnetic nanostripe and then moved along its long axis with a current flowing through the vacuum barrier. The angular momentum from the spin-polarized current exerts a torque on the magnetic moments underneath the tip and leads to a displacement of the domain wall. Particularly, the manipulation of a ferromagnetic 180° transverse domain wall has been studied by means of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Different relative orientations of the tip and the sample magnetization have been considered. PMID:21797636

  17. Magnetic domains in nanostructured media studied with M-TXM.

    PubMed

    Fischer, P; Eimüller, T; Schütz, G; Bayreuther, G; Tsunashima, S; Takagi, N; Denbeaux, G; Attwood, D

    2001-03-01

    Combining X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) with a transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) allows to image element-specifically magnetic domain structures with 25nm lateral resolution. Both in-plane and out-of-plane systems can be studied in applied magnetic fields. Thus field-dependent parameters, as individual nucleation fields in magnetic nanostructures can be deduced and related to morphology. Images of thermomagnetically written bits in magneto-optical TbFeCo media proof the reliability of the writing process and the importance of an exact thermal design of the systems. Domains observed at corresponding Co L edges proof the chemical sensitivity of M-TXM and its potential to image few monolayer systems. PMID:11512768

  18. Domain adaptation for microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Becker, Carlos; Christoudias, C Mario; Fua, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    Electron and light microscopy imaging can now deliver high-quality image stacks of neural structures. However, the amount of human annotation effort required to analyze them remains a major bottleneck. While machine learning algorithms can be used to help automate this process, they require training data, which is time-consuming to obtain manually, especially in image stacks. Furthermore, due to changing experimental conditions, successive stacks often exhibit differences that are severe enough to make it difficult to use a classifier trained for a specific one on another. This means that this tedious annotation process has to be repeated for each new stack. In this paper, we present a domain adaptation algorithm that addresses this issue by effectively leveraging labeled examples across different acquisitions and significantly reducing the annotation requirements. Our approach can handle complex, nonlinear image feature transformations and scales to large microscopy datasets that often involve high-dimensional feature spaces and large 3D data volumes. We evaluate our approach on four challenging electron and light microscopy applications that exhibit very different image modalities and where annotation is very costly. Across all applications we achieve a significant improvement over the state-of-the-art machine learning methods and demonstrate our ability to greatly reduce human annotation effort. PMID:25474809

  19. Photographic observation of magnetic domain structure with three-dimensional local magnetization direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Sakae; Akahane, Koichi; Saito, Shin

    2016-07-01

    The direction of magnetization of a magnetic material is possibly oriented three-dimensionally because of the presence of magnetic anisotropy field, self-demagnetizing field, and stray field. Therefore, the three-dimensional detection of the direction of magnetization is required. The method of magnetic domain observation by photographic imaging utilizing the Kerr effect is widely used. If the perpendicular magnetization components exist, there is a problem that obliquely incident light has superimposed longitudinal Kerr and polar Kerr effects. To perform the three-dimensional detection of magnetization direction, it is necessary to eliminate the influence of the polar Kerr effect from the Kerr effect of obliquely incident light. We report the photographic observation of the magnetic domain structure and the detection of the three-dimensional local magnetization direction using the Kerr effect, applying only an in-plane saturation magnetic field.

  20. Magnetic Domain Confinement by Anisotropy Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. P.; Lew, W. S.; Bland, J. A.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C. A.; Natali, M.; Chen, Y.

    2002-02-01

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a ``natural'' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic wall-the ``anisotropy constrained'' magnetic wall.

  1. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Allwood, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300 nm wide, 24 nm thick Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} nanowire. Both transverse and vortex type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences, or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  2. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P. J.; Allwood, D. A.

    2008-04-01

    Magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300nm wide, 24nm thick Ni81Fe19 nanowire. Both transverse- and vortex-type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  3. Magnetic domain wall motion by spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie; Chanthbouala, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Anane, A.; Cros, V.; Nguyen van Dau, F.; Fert, Albert

    2011-04-01

    The discovery that a spin polarized current can exert a large torque on a ferromagnet through a transfusion of spin angular momentum, offers a new way to control a magnetization by simple current injection, without the help of an applied external field. Spin transfer can be used to induce magnetization reversals and oscillations, or to control the position of a magnetic domain wall. In this review, we focus on this last mechanism, which is today the subject of an extensive research, both because the microscopic details for its origin are still debated, but also because promising applications are at stake for non-volatile magnetic memories.

  4. [Magnetic particle imaging (MPI)].

    PubMed

    Haegele, J; Sattel, T; Erbe, M; Luedtke-Buzug, K; Taupitz, M; Borgert, J; Buzug, T M; Barkhausen, J; Vogt, F M

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) displays the spatial distribution and concentration of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs). It is a quantitative, tomographic imaging method with high temporal and spatial resolution and allows work with high sensitivity yet without ionizing radiation. Thus, it may be a very promising tool for medical imaging. In this review, we describe the physical and technical basics and various concepts for clinical scanners. Furthermore, clinical applications such as cardiovascular imaging, interventional procedures, imaging and therapy of malignancies as well as molecular imaging are presented. PMID:22198836

  5. Domain wall transformations and hopping in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) nanostructures imaged with high resolution x-ray magnetic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Finizio, S; Foerster, M; Krüger, B; Vaz, C A F; Miyawaki, T; Mawass, M A; Peña, L; Méchin, L; Hühn, S; Moshnyaga, V; Büttner, F; Bisig, A; Le Guyader, L; El Moussaoui, S; Valencia, S; Kronast, F; Eisebitt, S; Kläui, M

    2014-11-12

    We investigate the effect of electric current pulse injection on domain walls in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) (LSMO) half-ring nanostructures by high resolution x-ray magnetic microscopy at room temperature. Due to the easily accessible Curie temperature of LSMO, we can employ reasonable current densities to induce the Joule heating necessary to observe effects such as hopping of the domain walls between different pinning sites and nucleation/annihilation events. Such effects are the dominant features close to the Curie temperature, while spin torque is found to play a small role close to room temperature. We are also able to observe thermally activated domain wall transformations and we find that, for the analyzed geometries, the vortex domain wall configuration is energetically favored, in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. PMID:25336527

  6. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Mitsunobu Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  9. Domain wall dynamics of periodic magnetic domain patterns in Co2MnGe-Heusler microstripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K.; Westerholt, K.; Zabel, H.

    2016-03-01

    Highly symmetric periodic domain patterns were obtained in Co2MnGe-Heusler microstripes as a result of the competition between growth-induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy and shape anisotropy. Zero field magnetic configurations and magnetic field-induced domain wall (DW) motion were studied by magnetic force microscopy-image technique for two different cases: dominant uniaxial- and dominant cubic in-plane anisotropy. We implemented a magneto-optical Kerr effect susceptometer to investigate the DW dynamics of periodic domain structures by measuring the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the Kerr signal as a function of magnetic field frequency and amplitude. The DW dynamics for fields applied transversally to the long stripe axis was found to be dominated by viscous slide motion. We used the inherent symmetry/periodicity properties of the magnetic domain structure to fit the experimental results with a theoretical model allowing to extract the DW mobility for the case of transverse DWs (μ TDW = 1.1 m s-1 Oe-1) as well as for vortex-like DWs (μ VDW = 8.7 m s-1 Oe-1). Internal spin structure transformations may cause a reduction of DW mobility in TDWs as observed by OMMFF simulations.

  10. Constricted nanowire with stabilized magnetic domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbiaa, R.; Al Bahri, M.

    2016-08-01

    Domain wall (DW)-based magnetic memory offers the possibility for increasing the storage capacity. However, stability of DW remains the major drawback of this scheme. In this letter, we propose a stepped nanowire for pinning DW in a desirable position. From micromagnetic simulation, the proposed design applied to in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows that by adjusting the nanowire step size and its width it is possible to stabilize DW for a desirable current density range. In contrast, only a movement of DW could be seen for conventional nanowire. An extension to a multi-stepped nanowire could be used for multi-bit per cell magnetic memory.

  11. Simplified technique demonstrates magnetic domain switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Light from a conventional photographic light source is polarized and projected through thin samples of gadolinium iron garnet and then observed with a conventional polarizing microscope. A distinctive change in color from red to yellow is observed as the magnetic domains are switched.

  12. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  13. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  14. X-ray study of aligned magnetic stripe domains in perpendicular multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, O.; Denbeaux, G.P.; Kortright, J.B.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2003-03-03

    We have investigated the stripe domain structure and the magnetic reversal of perpendicular Co/Pt based multilayers at room temperature using magnetometry, magnetic imaging and magnetic x-ray scattering. In-plane field cycling aligns the stripe domains along the field direction. In magnetic x-ray scattering the parallel stripe domains act as a magnetic grating resulting in observed Bragg reflections up to 5th order. We model the scattering profile to extract and quantify the domain as well as domain wall widths. Applying fields up to {approx}1.2 kOe perpendicular to the film reversibly changes the relative width of up versus down domains while maintaining the overall stripe periodicity. Fields above 1.2 kOe introduce irreversible changes into the domain structure by contracting and finally annihilating individual stripe domains. We compare the current results with modeling and previous measurements of films with perpendicular anisotropy.

  15. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Danby, G.

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager includes a generator for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager also includes a sensor for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object. 25 figs.

  16. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James; Reich, Morris; Danby, Gordon

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager 10 includes a generator 18 for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager 10 also includes a sensor 20 for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object.

  17. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. F.; Wu, J.; Niu, D. X.; Chen, L.; Morton, S. A.; Scholl, A.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Zhang, W.; Will, I.; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, R.; van der Laan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 1011 A.m−2) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of “Barkhausen jumps”. A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime. PMID:24170087

  18. Dynamic domain wall chirality rectification by rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisig, Andre; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Stärk, Martin; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Gliga, Sebastian; Weigand, Markus; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    We report on the observation of magnetic vortex domain wall chirality reversal in ferromagnetic rings that is controlled by the sense of rotation of a magnetic field. We use time-resolved X-ray microscopy to dynamically image the chirality-switching process and perform micromagnetic simulations to deduce the switching details from time-resolved snapshots. We find experimentally that the switching occurs within less than 4 ns and is observed in all samples with ring widths ranging from 0.5 μm to 2 μm, ring diameters between 2 μm and 5 μm, and a thickness of 30 nm, where a vortex domain wall is present in the magnetic onion state of the ring. From the magnetic contrast in the time-resolved images, we can identify effects of thermal activation, which plays a role for the switching process. Moreover, we find that the process is highly reproducible so that the domain wall chirality can be set with high fidelity.

  19. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes.

  20. Periodic magnetic domains in single-crystalline cobalt filament arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Wang, Fan; Jia, Fei; Li, Jingning; Liu, Kai; Huang, Sunxiang; Luan, Zhongzhi; Wu, Di; Chen, Yanbin; Zhu, Jianmin; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic structures with controlled domain wall pattern may be applied as potential building blocks for three-dimensional magnetic memory and logic devices. Using a unique electrochemical self-assembly method, we achieve regular single-crystalline cobalt filament arrays with specific geometric profile and crystallographic orientation, and the magnetic domain configuration can be conveniently tailored. We report the transition of periodic antiparallel magnetic domains to compressed vortex magnetic domains depending on the ratio of height to width of the wires. A "phase diagram" is obtained to describe the dependence of the type of magnetic domain and the geometrical profiles of the wires. Magnetoresistance of the filaments demonstrates that the contribution of a series of 180∘ domain walls is over 0.15 % of the zero-field resistance ρ (H =0 ) . These self-assembled magnetic nanofilaments, with controlled periodic domain patterns, offer an interesting platform to explore domain-wall-based memory and logic devices.

  1. Birdsong dialect patterns explained using magnetic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, James; Kenney, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The songs and calls of many bird species, like human speech, form distinct regional dialects. We suggest that the process of dialect formation is analogous to the physical process of magnetic domain formation. We take the coastal breeding grounds of the Puget Sound white crowned sparrow as an example. Previous field studies suggest that birds of this species learn multiple songs early in life, and when establishing a territory for the first time, retain one of these dialects in order to match the majority of their neighbors. We introduce a simple lattice model of the process, showing that this matching behavior can produce single dialect domains provided the death rate of adult birds is sufficiently low. We relate death rate to thermodynamic temperature in magnetic materials, and calculate the critical death rate by analogy with the Ising model. Using parameters consistent with the known behavior of these birds we show that coastal dialect domain shapes may be explained by viewing them as low-temperature "stripe states."

  2. Birdsong dialect patterns explained using magnetic domains.

    PubMed

    Burridge, James; Kenney, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The songs and calls of many bird species, like human speech, form distinct regional dialects. We suggest that the process of dialect formation is analogous to the physical process of magnetic domain formation. We take the coastal breeding grounds of the Puget Sound white crowned sparrow as an example. Previous field studies suggest that birds of this species learn multiple songs early in life, and when establishing a territory for the first time, retain one of these dialects in order to match the majority of their neighbors. We introduce a simple lattice model of the process, showing that this matching behavior can produce single dialect domains provided the death rate of adult birds is sufficiently low. We relate death rate to thermodynamic temperature in magnetic materials, and calculate the critical death rate by analogy with the Ising model. Using parameters consistent with the known behavior of these birds we show that coastal dialect domain shapes may be explained by viewing them as low-temperature "stripe states." PMID:27415293

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    PubMed

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  4. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C K; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ). PMID:26689141

  5. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C. K.; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ).

  6. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yurii P; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-05-24

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. PMID:27138460

  7. Accessible magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, L; Arakawa, M; Hale, J; Rothschild, P; Carlson, J; Hake, K; Kramer, D; Lu, W; Van Heteren, J

    1989-10-01

    The cost of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is driven by magnetic field strength. Misperceptions as to the impact of field strength on performance have led to systems that are more expensive than they need to be. Careful analysis of all the factors that affect diagnostic quality lead to the conclusion that field strength per se is not a strong determinant of system performance. Freed from the constraints imposed by high-field operation, it is possible to exploit a varied set of opportunities afforded by low-field operation. In addition to lower costs and easier siting, we can take advantage of shortened T1 times, higher contrast, reduced sensitivity to motion, and reduced radiofrequency power deposition. These conceptual advantages can be made to coalesce onto practical imaging systems. We describe a low-cost MRI system that utilizes a permanent magnet of open design. Careful optimization of receiving antennas and acquisition sequences permit performance levels consistent with those needed for an effective diagnostic unit. Ancillary advantages include easy access to the patient, reduced claustrophobia, quiet and comfortable operation, and absence of a missile effect. The system can be sited in 350 sq ft and consumes a modest amount of electricity. MRI equipment of this kind can widen the population base than can access this powerful and beneficial diagnostic modality. PMID:2640910

  8. Polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging system for endobronchial imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; de Lange, Joop; Daniels, Johannes M A; Grünberg, Katrien; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-01

    A polarization sensitive endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) system with a motorized distal scanning catheter is demonstrated. It employs a passive polarization delay unit to multiplex two orthogonal probing polarization states in depth, and a polarization diverse detection unit to detect interference signal in two orthogonal polarization channels. Per depth location four electro-magnetic field components are measured that can be represented in a complex 2x2 field matrix. A Jones matrix of the sample is derived and the sample birefringence is extracted by eigenvalue decomposition. The condition of balanced detection and the polarization mode dispersion are quantified. A complex field averaging method based on the alignment of randomly pointing field phasors is developed to reduce speckle noise. The variation of the polarization states incident on the tissue due to the circular scanning and catheter sheath birefringence is investigated. With this system we demonstrated imaging of ex vivo chicken muscle, in vivo pig lung and ex vivo human lung specimens. PMID:25836196

  9. Correlation Between Domain Behavior and Magnetic Properties of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Scott Leib

    2003-05-31

    Correlation between length scales in the field of magnetism has long been a topic of intensive study. The long-term desire is simple: to determine one theory that completely describes the magnetic behavior of matter from an individual atomic particle all the way up to large masses of material. One key piece to this puzzle is connecting the behavior of a material's domains on the nanometer scale with the magnetic properties of an entire large sample or device on the centimeter scale. In the first case study involving the FeSiAl thin films, contrast and spacing of domain patterns are clearly related to microstructure and stress. Case study 2 most clearly demonstrates localized, incoherent domain wall motion switching with field applied along an easy axis for a square hysteresis loop. In case study 3, axis-specific images of the complex Gd-Si-Ge material clearly show the influence of uniaxial anisotropy. Case study 4, the only study with the sole intent of creating domain structures for imaging, also demonstrated in fairly simple terms the effects of increasing stress on domain patterns. In case study 5, it was proven that the width of magnetoresistance loops could be quantitatively predicted using only MFM. When all of the case studies are considered together, a dominating factor seems to be that of anisotropy, both magneticrostaylline and stress induced. Any quantitative bulk measurements heavily reliant on K coefficients, such as the saturation fields for the FeSiAl films, H{sub c} in cases 1, 3, and 5, and the uniaxial character of the Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}), transferred to and from the domain scale quite well. In-situ measurements of domain rotation and switching, could also be strongly correlated with bulk magnetic properties, including coercivity, M{sub s}, and hysteresis loop shape. In most cases, the qualitative nature of the domain structures, when properly considered, matched quite well to what might have been expected from theory and calculation

  10. Magnetization process and domain structure in the near-surface region of conventional amorphous wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, Horia; Lostun, Mihaela; Óvári, Tibor-Adrian

    2011-04-01

    Results on the study of the surface magnetization process and domain structure by magneto-optical Kerr effect in conventional rapidly quenched amorphous magnetic wires are reported. Domain imaging confirms the presence of a bamboo-type structure in the near-surface region of these materials. Surface Kerr loops show that the overall magnetization in the near-surface region has a large axial component, besides the circular one. A bistable magnetic behavior on the axial direction has been emphasized. A circularly applied field leads to the disappearance of axial magnetic bistability. Kerr loops are changed by the presence of 180° interdomain walls in the near-surface region.

  11. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties.

  12. Third type of domain wall in soft magnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Fruchart, O.; Pizzini, S.; Vogel, J.; Toussaint, J.-C.; Rougemaille, N.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic domain walls (DWs) in nanostructures are low-dimensional objects that separate regions with uniform magnetisation. Since they can have different shapes and widths, DWs are an exciting playground for fundamental research, and became in the past years the subject of intense works, mainly focused on controlling, manipulating, and moving their internal magnetic configuration. In nanostrips with in-plane magnetisation, two DWs have been identified: in thin and narrow strips, transverse walls are energetically favored, while in thicker and wider strips vortex walls have lower energy. The associated phase diagram is now well established and often used to predict the low-energy magnetic configuration in a given magnetic nanostructure. However, besides the transverse and vortex walls, we find numerically that another type of wall exists in permalloy nanostrips. This third type of DW is characterised by a three-dimensional, flux closure micromagnetic structure with an unusual length and three internal degrees of freedom. Magnetic imaging on lithographically-patterned permalloy nanostrips confirms these predictions and shows that these DWs can be moved with an external magnetic field of about 1 mT. An extended phase diagram describing the regions of stability of all known types of DWs in permalloy nanostrips is provided.

  13. Nucleation of reversed domain and pinning effect on domain wall motion in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Shen, B. G.; Niu, E.; Sun, J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The magnetization behaviors show a strong pinning effect on domain wall motion in optimally melt-spun Pr8Fe87B5 ribbons at room temperature. According to analysis, the coercivity is determined by the nucleation field of reversed domain, and the pinning effect, which results from the weak exchange coupling at interface, makes domain nucleation processes independent and leads to non-uniform magnetization reversals. At a temperature of 60 K, owing to the weak exchange coupling between soft-hard grains, magnetization reversal undergoes processes of spring domain nucleation in soft grains and irreversible domain nucleation in hard grains, and the pinning effect remains strong among hard grains.

  14. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls.

    PubMed

    Dugaev, V K; Berakdar, J; Barnaś, J

    2006-02-01

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g., upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomenon is shown to be utilizable to manipulate the spin density in the domain vicinity. The domain wall parameters are readily controllable, and the predicted effect is hence exploitable in spintronic devices. PMID:16486888

  15. Image domain propeller fast spin echo☆

    PubMed Central

    Skare, Stefan; Holdsworth, Samantha J.; Lilja, Anders; Bammer, Roland

    2013-01-01

    A new pulse sequence for high-resolution T2-weighted (T2-w) imaging is proposed –image domain propeller fast spin echo (iProp-FSE). Similar to the T2-w PROPELLER sequence, iProp-FSE acquires data in a segmented fashion, as blades that are acquired in multiple TRs. However, the iProp-FSE blades are formed in the image domain instead of in the k-space domain. Each iProp-FSE blade resembles a single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequence with a very narrow phase-encoding field of view (FOV), after which N rotated blade replicas yield the final full circular FOV. Our method of combining the image domain blade data to a full FOV image is detailed, and optimal choices of phase-encoding FOVs and receiver bandwidths were evaluated on phantom and volunteers. The results suggest that a phase FOV of 15–20%, a receiver bandwidth of ±32–63 kHz and a subsequent readout time of about 300 ms provide a good tradeoff between signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency and T2 blurring. Comparisons between iProp-FSE, Cartesian FSE and PROPELLER were made on single-slice axial brain data, showing similar T2-w tissue contrast and SNR with great anatomical conspicuity at similar scan times –without colored noise or streaks from motion. A new slice interleaving order is also proposed to improve the multislice capabilities of iProp-FSE. PMID:23200683

  16. Engineered magnetic domain textures in exchange bias bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Alexander; Hankemeier, Sebastian; Holzinger, Dennis; Müglich, Nicolas David; Staeck, Philipp; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter; Ehresmann, Arno

    2016-07-01

    A magnetic domain texture has been deterministically engineered in a topographically flat exchange-biased (EB) thin film system. The texture consists of long-range periodically arranged unit cells of four individual domains, characterized by individual anisotropies, individual geometry, and with non-collinear remanent magnetizations. The texture has been engineered by a sequence of light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning of the EB layer system. The magnetic texture's in-plane spatial magnetization distribution and the corresponding domain walls have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). The influence of magnetic stray fields emerging from neighboring domain walls and the influence of the different anisotropies of the adjacent domains on the Néel type domain wall core's magnetization rotation sense and widths were investigated. It is shown that the usual energy degeneracy of clockwise and counterclockwise rotating magnetization through the walls is revoked, suppressing Bloch lines along the domain wall. Estimates of the domain wall widths for different domain configurations based on material parameters determined by vibrating sample magnetometry were quantitatively compared to the SEMPA data.

  17. Observation of thermomagnetically recorded domains with high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunashima, S.; Takagi, Nayuki; Yamaguchi, Atushi; Kume, Minoru; Fischer, P.; Kumazawa, M.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic domains were thermomagnetically recorded on TbFeCo films using laser pulsed magnetic field modulation (LP-MFM) and light intensity modulation (LIM). The domains were observed with high resolution magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) before and after the heat treatment in order to clarify the recording characteristics and the thermal stability of recorded domains. From the results of M-TXM images, it was found that isolated single marks whose lengths are much smaller than 100 nm can be recorded by LP-MFM but their mark lengths become often longer than designed. It was further confirmed that the heat treatment at 120 degree C for 50 hours does not influence significantly the crescent-shaped magnetic domains of 100 nm in width recorded using LP-MFM method and circular domains of 150 nm in diameter recorded using LIM method.

  18. Magnetic configuration of submicron-sized magnetic patterns in domain wall motion memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Norikazu; Numata, Hideaki; Fukami, Shunsuke; Nagahara, Kiyokazu; Suzuki, Tetsuhiro; Ishiwata, Nobuyuki; Fukumoto, Keiki; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Ono, Teruo

    2010-05-01

    We observed magnetic configuration and its change by external magnetic fields in submicron-sized U- and H-shaped NiFe patterns with an x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscope. The microscope images showed the formation of a single domain wall (DW) with transverse structure at one corner of the U- and H-shaped patterns by applying the magnetic field from the oblique direction. By applying the magnetic field from the direction parallel to a horizontal bar in the patterns, the magnetic configuration in the U-shaped pattern was changed and four patterns were formed: (1) the DW moved from one trap site to another, (2) the DW moved beyond the trap site and formed a single domain, (3) the DW moved and stopped between the trap sites, and (4) the DW remained at the initial position. Only pattern (1) showed reversible DW motion, although pattern (2) was predominantly formed. In contrast, the magnetization configurations showed pattern (1), and reversible DW motion was observed for more than 80% of the H-shaped patterns. Micromagnetic simulation revealed that the DW in the U-shaped pattern was not sufficiently fixed at the corner and easily moved and vanished at the edge of the patterns because the magnetization in the two parallel bars rotated with a magnetic field. The DW was trapped with sufficient strength at the corner, and DW motion occurred only between the trap sites for the H-shaped patterns. The DW motion process was observed with an in situ magnetic field using the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscope and the process could be optimized by controlling the pattern shape.

  19. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  20. Frequency domain analysis of knock images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yunliang; He, Xin; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-12-01

    High speed imaging-based knock analysis has mainly focused on time domain information, e.g. the spark triggered flame speed, the time when end gas auto-ignition occurs and the end gas flame speed after auto-ignition. This study presents a frequency domain analysis on the knock images recorded using a high speed camera with direct photography in a rapid compression machine (RCM). To clearly visualize the pressure wave oscillation in the combustion chamber, the images were high-pass-filtered to extract the luminosity oscillation. The luminosity spectrum was then obtained by applying fast Fourier transform (FFT) to three basic colour components (red, green and blue) of the high-pass-filtered images. Compared to the pressure spectrum, the luminosity spectra better identify the resonant modes of pressure wave oscillation. More importantly, the resonant mode shapes can be clearly visualized by reconstructing the images based on the amplitudes of luminosity spectra at the corresponding resonant frequencies, which agree well with the analytical solutions for mode shapes of gas vibration in a cylindrical cavity.

  1. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Devolder, Thibaut; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  2. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    SciTech Connect

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2015-11-02

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  3. AC driven magnetic domain quantification with 5 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenghua; Li, Xiang; Dong, Dapeng; Liu, Dongping; Saito, H; Ishio, S

    2014-01-01

    As the magnetic storage density increases in commercial products, e.g. the hard disc drives, a full understanding of dynamic magnetism in nanometer resolution underpins the development of next-generation products. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Moreover, the dynamic magnetism cannot be characterized because MFM is only sensitive to the static magnetic fields. Here, we develop a side-band magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to locally observe the alternating magnetic fields in nanometer length scales at an operating distance of 1 nm. Variations in alternating magnetic fields and their relating time-variable magnetic domain reversals have been demonstrated by the side-band MFM. The magnetic domain wall motions, relating to the periodical rotation of sample magnetization, are quantified via micromagnetics. Based on the side-band MFM, the magnetic moment can be determined locally in a volume as small as 5 nanometers. The present technique can be applied to investigate the microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic materials, and allows a wide range of future applications, for example, in data storage and biomedicine. PMID:25011670

  4. Non-volatile polarization switch of magnetic domain wall velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N.; Bernand-Mantel, A.; Schott, Marine; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.

    2015-12-21

    Controlled propagation speed of individual magnetic domains in metal channels at the room temperature is obtained via the non-volatile field effect associated with the switchable polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) (polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric polymer. Polarization domains directly written using conducting atomic force microscope probe locally accelerate/decelerate the magnetic domains in the 0.6 nm thick Co film. The change of the magnetic domain wall velocity is consistent with the magnetic anisotropy energy modulation through the polarization upward/downward orientation. Excellent retention is observed. The demonstrated local non-destructive and reversible change of magnetic properties via rewritable patterning of ferroelectric domains could be attractive for exploring the ultimate limit of miniaturization in devices based on ferromagnetic/ferroelectric bilayers.

  5. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation – first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line. PMID:27098108

  6. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S F; Gan, W L; Kwon, J; Luo, F L; Lim, G J; Wang, J B; Lew, W S

    2016-01-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~10(12) A/m(2). Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 10(11) A/m(2). Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation - first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line. PMID:27098108

  7. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-04-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation – first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line.

  8. Quantitative X-Ray Magnetic Microscopy: from parallel stripe domains to buried topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez, Maria; Blanco-Roldan, C.; Quiros, C.; Valdes-Bango, F.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Martin, J. I.; Alameda, J. M.; Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Duch, M.; Torras, N.; Esteve, J.; Sorrentino, A.; Valcarcel, R.; Pereiro, E.; Ferrer, S.

    Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) is a powerful imaging technique that can produce element specific images of magnetic domains with nanometric lateral resolution. Here we present a novel imaging method in which the angular dependence of the magnetic contrast in a series of high resolution TXM images is used to obtain quantitative descriptions of the magnetization (canting angles and sense). This has been applied first to analyze parallel stripe domains in weak perpendicular anisotropy ferromagnetic NdCo5 layers of different thickness, and in NdCo5/Permalloy bilayers. Then, our method has been used to identify complex topological defects (merons or 1/2 skyrmions) in a NdCo5 film that are only partially replicated by the Permalloy overlayer. Meron propagation in trilayers (across the thickness) and in hexagonal networks (across bifurcations) will be discussed in terms of their topological characteristics (chirality and polarity). Work supported by Spanish Grant FIS2013-45469.

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  10. Multiscale medical image fusion in wavelet domain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv; Khare, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Wavelet transforms have emerged as a powerful tool in image fusion. However, the study and analysis of medical image fusion is still a challenging area of research. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a multiscale fusion of multimodal medical images in wavelet domain. Fusion of medical images has been performed at multiple scales varying from minimum to maximum level using maximum selection rule which provides more flexibility and choice to select the relevant fused images. The experimental analysis of the proposed method has been performed with several sets of medical images. Fusion results have been evaluated subjectively and objectively with existing state-of-the-art fusion methods which include several pyramid- and wavelet-transform-based fusion methods and principal component analysis (PCA) fusion method. The comparative analysis of the fusion results has been performed with edge strength (Q), mutual information (MI), entropy (E), standard deviation (SD), blind structural similarity index metric (BSSIM), spatial frequency (SF), and average gradient (AG) metrics. The combined subjective and objective evaluations of the proposed fusion method at multiple scales showed the effectiveness and goodness of the proposed approach. PMID:24453868

  11. Meta-Stable Magnetic Domain States That Prevent Reliable Absolute Palaeointensity Experiments Revealed By Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, L. V.; Fabian, K.; Bakelaar, I. A.; Dekkers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the absolute palaeointensity of the Earth's magnetic field is notoriously difficult. Many methods to obtain paleointensities from suitable records such as lavas and archeological artifacts involve heating the samples. These heating steps are believed to induce 'magnetic alteration' - a process that is still poorly understood but prevents obtaining correct paleointensity estimates. To observe this magnetic alteration directly we imaged the magnetic domain state of titanomagnetite particles - a common carrier of the magnetic remanence in samples used for paleointensity studies. We selected samples from the 1971-flow of Mt. Etna from a site that systematically yields underestimates of the known intensity of the paleofield - in spite of rigorous testing by various groups. Magnetic Force Microscope images were taken before and after a heating step typically used in absolute palaeointensity experiments. Before heating, the samples feature distinct, blocky domains that sometimes seem to resemble a classical magnetite domain structure. After imparting a partial thermo-remanent magnetization at a temperature often critical to paleointensity experiments (250 °C) the domain state of the same titanomagnetite grains changes into curvier, wavy domains. Furthermore, these structures appeared to be unstable over time: after one-year storage in a magnetic field-free environment the domain states evolved into a viscous remanent magnetization state. Our observations may qualitatively explain reported underestimates from technically successful paleointensity experiments for this site and other sites reported previously. Furthermore the occurrence of intriguing observations such as 'the drawer storage effect' by Shaar et al (EPSL, 2011), and viscous magnetizations observed by Muxworthy and Williams (JGR, 2006) may be (partially) explained by our observations. The major implications of our study for all palaeointensity methods involving heating may be

  12. Domain structures and magnetization reversal in Co/Pd and CoFeB/Pd multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sbiaa, R.; Ranjbar, M.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Domain structures and magnetization reversal of (Co/Pd) and (CoFeB/Pd) multilayers with 7 and 14 repeats were investigated. The Co-based multilayers show much larger coercivities, a better squareness, and a sharper magnetization switching than CoFeB-based multilayers. From magnetic force microscopy observations, both structures show strong reduction in domains size as the number of repeats increases but the magnetic domains for Co-based multilayers are more than one order of magnitude larger than for CoFeB-based multilayers. By imaging domains at different times, breaks in the (CoFeB/Pd) multilayer stripes were observed within only few hours, while no change could be seen for (Co/Pd) multilayers. Although CoFeB single layers are suitable for magnetoresistive devices due to their large spin polarization and low damping constants, their lamination with Pd suffers mainly from thermal instability.

  13. 3D-spectral domain computational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Trevor; Segref, Armin; Frisken, Grant; Ferra, Herman; Lorenser, Dirk; Frisken, Steven

    2016-03-01

    We present a proof-of-concept experiment utilizing a novel "snap-shot" spectral domain OCT technique that captures a phase coherent volume in a single frame. The sample is illuminated with a collimated beam of 75 μm diameter and the back-reflected light is analyzed by a 2-D matrix of spectral interferograms. A key challenge that is addressed is simultaneously maintaining lateral and spectral phase coherence over the imaged volume in the presence of sample motion. Digital focusing is demonstrated for 5.0 μm lateral resolution over an 800 μm axial range.

  14. Stochastic nature of domain nucleation process in magnetization reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Fischer, Peter; Shin, S.-C.

    2007-06-01

    Whether domain configurations that occur during magnetization reversal processes on a nanoscale are deterministic or nondeterministic is both fundamentally of great interest and technologically of utmost relevance[1]. However, due to the limited spatial resolution of the microscopic measurement techniques employed so far, no direct observation on the stochastic behavior of local domain nucleation during magnetization reversal in real space at the nanometer scale has yet been reported. In this work, we have investigated a stochastic nature of domain nucleation process during magnetization reversal by utilizing magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy with high spatial resolution of 15 nm [2]. The sample used in our study is CoCrPt alloy film,which is the promising candidate for high-density perpendicular magnetic recording media. Typical domain configurations of (Co{sub 83}Cr{sub 17}){sub 87}Pt{sub 13} taken at an applied magnetic field of 383 Oe during three successive hysteretic cycles are illustrated in Fig. 1. Interestingly enough, one clearly notes that the domain nucleation process of CoCrPt alloy film is not deterministic, but stochastic for repeated hysteretic cycles. The stochastic nature was quantitatively confirmed by correlation coefficient, where the correlation coefficients increase as magnetization reversal was progressed. Nanomagnetic simulations considering thermal fluctuations of the magnetic moments of the grains explains the stochastic nature of the domain nucleation behavior observed in CoCrPt alloy film.

  15. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  16. Papyrus imaging with terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, J.; Jackson, J. B.; Pagès-Camagna, S.; Duling, I. N.; Menu, M.; Mourou, G. A.

    2010-09-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopic imaging (THz-TDSI) is a non-ionizing, non-contact and non-destructive measurement technique that has been recently utilized to study cultural heritage artifacts. We will present this technique and the results of non-contact measurements of papyrus texts, including images of hidden papyri. Inks for modern papyrus specimens were prepared using the historical binder, Arabic gum, and two common pigments used to write ancient texts, carbon black and red ochre. The samples were scanned in reflection at normal incidence with a pulse with a spectral range between 0.1 and 1.5 THz. Temporal analysis of the signals provides the depths of the layers, and their frequency spectra give information about the inks.

  17. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The author succeeds in making the physical phenomena of MR imaging quite comprehensible. The chapters on imaging sequences and parameters and the effects of pathologic conditions on MR images are written in a way that helps the beginner. MR artifacts are discussed in a special chapter. The atlas, which makes up 60% of the book; includes a detailed imaging guide with protocols concentrating mainly on the head, neck and brain. MR imaging of the chest is discussed as well as abdomen, pelvis and hips, and the spine, breast, and knee. The book ends with a list of MR equipment manufacturers, specifications of nine major commercial MR imagers, and a glossary of MR terminology.

  19. Domain Collapse in Grooved Magnetic Garnet Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peredo, J.; Fedyunin, Y.; Patterson, G.

    1995-01-01

    Domain collapse fields in grooved garnet material were investigated by experimental observation and numerical simulation. The results indicate that the change in domain collapse field is largely due to magnetostatic effects produced by the groove edge. A simplified model based on the effective field produced at a groove edge, and local changes in the material thickness explain the observed trends very well.!.

  20. Current driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in permalloy nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masamitsu

    The significant advances in micro-fabrication techniques opened the door to access interesting properties in solid state physics. With regard to magnetic materials, geometrical confinement of magnetic structures alters the defining parameters that govern magnetism. For example, development of single domain nano-pillars made from magnetic multilayers led to the discovery of electrical current controlled magnetization switching, which revealed the existence of spin transfer torque. Magnetic domain walls (DWs) are boundaries in magnetic materials that divide regions with distinct magnetization directions. DWs play an important role in the magnetization reversal processes of both bulk and thin film magnetic materials. The motion of DW is conventionally controlled by magnetic fields. Recently, it has been proposed that spin polarized current passed across the DW can also control the motion of DWs. Current in most magnetic materials is spin-polarized, due to spin-dependent scattering of the electrons, and thus can deliver spin angular momentum to the DW, providing a "spin transfer" torque on the DW which leads to DW motion. In addition, owing to the development of micro-fabrication techniques, geometrical confinement of magnetic materials enables creation and manipulation of a "single" DW in magnetic nanostructures. New paradigms for DW-based devices are made possible by the direct manipulation of DWs using spin polarized electrical current via spin transfer torque. This dissertation covers research on current induced DW motion in magnetic nanowires. Fascinating effects arising from the interplay between DWs with spin polarized current will be revealed.

  1. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of the self structured multilayered bubble domain memory as a mass memory medium for satellite applications is examined. Theoretical considerations of multilayer bubble supporting materials are presented, in addition to the experimental evaluation of current accessed circuitry for various memory functions. The design, fabrication, and test of four device designs is described, and a recommended memory storage area configuration is presented. Memory functions which were demonstrated include the current accessed propagation of bubble domains and stripe domains, pinning of stripe domain ends, generation of single and double bubbles, generation of arrays of coexisting strip and bubble domains in a single garnet layer, and demonstration of different values of the strip out field for single and double bubbles indicating adequate margins for data detection. All functions necessary to develop a multilayer self structured bubble memory device were demonstrated in individual experiments.

  2. Mirror Domain Structures Induced by Interlayer Magnetic Wall Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Hatton, D. C.; Bland, J. A.

    2003-05-01

    We have found that during giant magnetoresistance measurements in ˜10×10 mm2 NiFe/Cu/Co continuous film spin-valve structures, the resistance value suddenly drops to its absolute minimum during the NiFe reversal. The results reveal that the alignment of all magnetic domains in the NiFe film follow exactly that of corresponding domains in the Co film for an appropriate applied field strength. This phenomenon is caused by trapping of the NiFe domain walls through the magnetostatic interaction with the Co domain-wall stray fields. Consequently, the interlayer domain-wall coupling induces a mirror domain structure in the magnetic trilayer.

  3. Domain structure and magnetization loss in a toroidal core based on an Fe-based amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Daichi; Hasegawa, Ryusuke; Saito, Shin; Takahashi, Migaku

    2012-04-01

    By utilizing a wide-view Kerr-effect magnetic domain observation system designed for domain observation on curved surfaces, domain images were taken on the surface of a toroidal core based on an Fe-based amorphous alloy. The results of the observation are discussed in terms of Bertotti's eddy-current loss model, helping to clarify the concept of magnetic objects proposed by the model.

  4. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    PubMed

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  5. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    PubMed Central

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  6. Microseismic source imaging in a compressed domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Rodriguez, Ismael; Sacchi, Mauricio D.

    2014-08-01

    Microseismic monitoring is an essential tool for the characterization of hydraulic fractures. Fast estimation of the parameters that define a microseismic event is relevant to understand and control fracture development. The amount of data contained in the microseismic records however, poses a challenge for fast continuous detection and evaluation of the microseismic source parameters. Work inspired by the emerging field of Compressive Sensing has showed that it is possible to evaluate source parameters in a compressed domain, thereby reducing processing time. This technique performs well in scenarios where the amplitudes of the signal are above the noise level, as is often the case in microseismic monitoring using downhole tools. This paper extends the idea of the compressed domain processing to scenarios of microseismic monitoring using surface arrays, where the signal amplitudes are commonly at the same level as, or below, the noise amplitudes. To achieve this, we resort to the use of an imaging operator, which has previously been found to produce better results in detection and location of microseismic events from surface arrays. The operator in our method is formed by full-waveform elastodynamic Green's functions that are band-limited by a source time function and represented in the frequency domain. Where full-waveform Green's functions are not available, ray tracing can also be used to compute the required Green's functions. Additionally, we introduce the concept of the compressed inverse, which derives directly from the compression of the migration operator using a random matrix. The described methodology reduces processing time at a cost of introducing distortions into the results. However, the amount of distortion can be managed by controlling the level of compression applied to the operator. Numerical experiments using synthetic and real data demonstrate the reductions in processing time that can be achieved and exemplify the process of selecting the

  7. Speckle size in optical Fourier domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouche, G.; Vergnole, S.; Bisaillon, C.-E.; Dufour, M.; Maciejko, R.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2007-06-01

    As in conventional time-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), speckle is inherent to any Optical Fourier Domain Imaging (OFDI) of biological tissue. OFDI is also known as swept-source OCT (SS-OCT). The axial speckle size is mainly determined by the OCT resolution length and the transverse speckle size by the focusing optics illuminating the sample. There is also a contribution from the sample related to the number of scatterers contained within the probed volume. In the OFDI data processing, there is some liberty in selecting the range of wavelengths used and this allows variation in the OCT resolution length. Consequently the probed volume can be varied. By performing measurements on an optical phantom with a controlled density of discrete scatterers and by changing the probed volume with different range of wavelengths in the OFDI data processing, there is an obvious change in the axial speckle size, but we show that there is also a less obvious variation in the transverse speckle size. This work contributes to a better understanding of speckle in OCT.

  8. Domain wall displacements in amorphous films and multilayers studied with a magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhil, Taras G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic force microscope (MFM) was used to study the displacement of domain walls (DW) in amorphous TbFe alloy films and Co/Pd multilayer films with high spatial resolution. The reversible bending of domain wall segments pinned to defects and irreversible, jumplike displacement of domain wall segments were imaged with the MFM in an applied magnetic field. The maximum reversible displacement of domain walls was 50-100 nm and the length of the segments which reversibly curved in the field was about 150 nm. Measurement of the change in radius of curvature of a DW segment in response to an applied field allowed estimation of the DW energy density and self-demagnetizing field of the film acting on the DW. The DW energy density for the TbFe films was about 1 erg/cm2. It was shown that the self-demagnetizing field acting on a domain wall depends on the domain structure surrounding the studied DW segment. For instance, for a film with saturation magnetization 100 G and thickness 80 nm, which exhibited a mazelike domain structure, the demagnetizing field varied from 100 G in the center of a mazelike domain to 400 G near the edge of a domain. The irreversible displacement of a DW was not a continuous process. The 200-400 nm long DW segments exhibited jumplike motion over distances of 100-150 nm.

  9. Remote Teaching Experiments on Magnetic Domains in Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrogowski, W.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskii, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our experience in building a remote laboratory for teaching magnetic domains. Fulfilling the proposed on-line experiments, students can observe and study magnetization processes that are often difficult to explain with written material. It is proposed that networks of remotely accessible laboratories could be integrated in the Global…

  10. Directed Magnetic Particle Transport above Artificial Magnetic Domains Due to Dynamic Magnetic Potential Energy Landscape Transformation.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dennis; Koch, Iris; Burgard, Stefan; Ehresmann, Arno

    2015-07-28

    An approach for a remotely controllable transport of magnetic micro- and/or nanoparticles above a topographically flat exchange-bias (EB) thin film system, magnetically patterned into parallel stripe domains, is presented where the particle manipulation is achieved by sub-mT external magnetic field pulses. Superparamagnetic core-shell particles are moved stepwise by the dynamic transformation of the particles' magnetic potential energy landscape due to the external magnetic field pulses without affecting the magnetic state of the thin film system. The magnetic particle velocity is adjustable in the range of 1-100 μm/s by the design of the substrate's magnetic field landscape (MFL), the particle-substrate distance, and the magnitude of the applied external magnetic field pulses. The agglomeration of magnetic particles is avoided by the intrinsic magnetostatic repulsion of particles due to the parallel alignment of the particles' magnetic moments perpendicular to the transport direction and parallel to the surface normal of the substrate during the particle motion. The transport mechanism is modeled by a quantitative theory based on the precise knowledge of the sample's MFL and the particle-substrate distance. PMID:26134922

  11. Observation of Thermomagnetically Recorded Magnetic Domains in TbFeCo Films with Soft X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Naoyuki; Fischer, Peter; Tsunashima, Shigeru; Kumazawa, Masayuki; Ishida, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hitoshi; Kume, Minoru

    2001-04-01

    We observed thermomagnetically recorded domains of various sizes with magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) in order to clarify the recording characteristics. The domains were recorded on TbFeCo films by laser-pumped magnetic field modulation (LP-MFM) using a 635 nm laser diode. Typical images of magnetic domains in TbFeCo films were taken at the Fe L3-edge, and it was confirmed that the crescent-shaped domains could be recorded with high quality for mark lengths down to 100 nm.

  12. Imaging magnetic structures with a transmission X-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Eimüller, T.; Schütz, G.; Guttmann, P.; Schmahl, G.; Bayreuther, G.

    2000-05-01

    The X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD), i.e., the dependence of the absorption of circularly polarized X-rays on the magnetization of the absorber exhibits at L-edges of transition metals values up to 25%. This can serve as a huge magnetic contrast mechanism in combination with a transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) to image magnetic domains providing a lateral resolution down to about 30 nm. The inherent element-specificity, the possibility to record images in varying external fields within a complete hysteresis loop, the relation of the contrast to local magnetic spin and orbital moments, etc. demonstrate the unique applicability to study the magnetic domain structure in current technical relevant systems like magneto-optics for high density storage media, multilayers for GMR applications or nanostructures for MRAM technology.

  13. Magnetic domains and surface effects in hollow maghemite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Puntes, Victor; Balcells, Lluis; Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amilcar

    2008-09-30

    In the present work, we investigate the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic and non-interacting maghemite hollow nanoparticles obtained by the Kirkendall effect. From the experimental characterization of their magnetic behavior, we find that polycrystalline hollow maghemite nanoparticles exhibit low blocked-to-superparamagnetic transition temperatures, small magnetic moments, significant coercivities and irreversibility fields, and no magnetic saturation on external magnetic fields up to 5 T. These results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural parameters characterizing the maghemite shells by means of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of an individual spherical shell. The model comprises strongly interacting crystallographic domains arranged in a spherical shell with random orientations and anisotropy axis. The Monte Carlo simulation allows discernment between the influence of the polycrystalline structure and its hollow geometry, while revealing the magnetic domain arranggement in the different temperataure regimes.

  14. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  15. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  16. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L C; Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Guiblin, N; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M; Valencia, S

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  17. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  18. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-05-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics.

  19. Traveling wave magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Ruckert, Martin A; Klauer, Peter; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Behr, Volker C

    2014-02-01

    Most 3-D magnetic particle imaging (MPI) scanners currently use permanent magnets to create the strong gradient field required for high resolution MPI. However, using permanent magnets limits the field of view (FOV) due to the large amount of energy required to move the field free point (FFP) from the center of the scanner. To address this issue, an alternative approach called "Traveling Wave MPI" is here presented. This approach employs a novel gradient system, the dynamic linear gradient array, to cover a large FOV while dynamically creating a strong magnetic gradient. The proposed design also enables the use of a so-called line-scanning mode, which simplifies the FFP trajectory to a linear path through the 3-D volume. This results in simplified mathematics, which facilitates the image reconstruction. PMID:24132006

  20. In-situ visualization of stress-dependent bulk magnetic domain formation by neutron grating interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-01-01

    The performance and degree of efficiency of industrial transformers are directly influenced by the magnetic properties of high-permeability steel laminations (HPSLs). Industrial transformer cores are built of stacks of single HPSLs. While the insulating coating on each HPSL reduces eddy-current losses in the transformer core, the coating also induces favorable inter-granular tensile stresses that significantly influence the underlying magnetic domain structure. Here, we show that the neutron dark-field image can be used to analyze the influence of the coating on the volume and supplementary surface magnetic domain structures. To visualize the stress effect of the coating on the bulk domain formation, we used an uncoated HPSL and stepwise increased the applied external tensile stress up to 20 MPa. We imaged the domain configuration of the intermediate stress states and were able to reproduce the original domain structure of the coated state. Furthermore, we were able to visualize how the applied stresses lead to a refinement of the volume domain structure and the suppression and reoccurrence of supplementary domains.

  1. Majorana Fermion Rides on a Magnetic Domain Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tewari, Sumanta; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    Owing to the recent progress on endowing the electronic structure of magnetic nanowires with topological properties, the associated topological solitons in the magnetic texture--magnetic domain walls--appear as very natural hosts for exotic electronic excitations. Here, we propose to use the magnetic domain walls to engender Majorana fermions, which has several notable advantages compared to the existing approaches. First of all, the local tunneling density-of-states anomaly associated with the Majorana zero mode bound to a smooth magnetic soliton is immune to most of parasitic artifacts associated with the abrupt physical ends of a wire, which mar the existing experimental probes. Second, a viable route to move and braid Majorana fermions is offered by domain-wall motion. In particular, we envision the recently demonstrated heat-current induced motion of domain walls in insulating ferromagnets as a promising tool for nonintrusive displacement of Majorana modes. This leads us to propose a feasible scheme for braiding domain walls within a magnetic nanowire network, which manifests the nob-Abelian exchange statistics within the Majorana subspace. This work has been supported in part by the U.S. DOE-BES, FAME, and AFOSR grants.

  2. Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Richard J.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Putnis, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic microstructure of a natural, finely exsolved intergrowth of submicron magnetite blocks in an ulvöspinel matrix is characterized by using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. Single-domain and vortex states in individual blocks, as well as magnetostatic interaction fields between them, are imaged at a spatial resolution approaching the nanometer scale. The images reveal an extremely complicated magnetic structure dominated by the shapes of the blocks and magnetostatic interactions. Magnetic superstates, in which clusters of magnetite blocks act collectively to form vortex and multidomain states that have zero net magnetization, are observed directly. PMID:12482930

  3. Stochastic magnetization dynamics in single domain particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Stefano; Dusch, Yannick; Tiercelin, Nicolas; Pernod, Philippe; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic particles are largely utilized in several applications ranging from magnetorheological fluids to bioscience and from nanothechnology to memories or logic devices. The behavior of each single particle at finite temperature (under thermal stochastic fluctuations) plays a central role in determining the response of the whole physical system taken into consideration. Here, the magnetization evolution is studied through the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert formalism and the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics is introduced with the Langevin and Fokker-Planck methodologies. As result of the combination of such techniques we analyse the stochastic magnetization dynamics and we numerically determine the convergence time, measuring the velocity of attainment of thermodynamic equilibrium, as function of the system temperature.

  4. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  5. Direction detectable static magnetic field imaging by frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy with an AC magnetic field driven soft magnetic tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hitoshi; Ito, Ryoichi; Egawa, Genta; Li, Zhenghua; Yoshimura, Satoru

    2011-04-01

    Direction detectable static magnetic field imaging, which directly distinguishes the up and down direction of static perpendicular magnetic field from a sample surface and the polarity of magnetic charges on the surface, was demonstrated for CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular magnetic recording media based on a frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy (FM-MFM), which uses a frequency modulation of the cantilever oscillation induced by an alternating force from the tip-sample magnetic interaction. In this study, to generate the alternating force, we used a NiFe soft magnetic tip driven by the ac magnetic field of a soft ferrite core and imaged the direction and the amplitude of the static magnetic field from the recorded bits. This method enables measurement of the static magnetic field near a sample surface, which is masked by short range forces of the surface. The present method will be effective in analyzing the microscopic magnetic domain structure of hard magnetic samples.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of glioblastoma using aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjune; Yang, Jaemoon; Hwang, Myeonghwan; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2012-10-01

    Here we introduce a new class of smart imaging probes hybridizing polysorbate 80 coated-magnetic nanoparticles with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-targetable aptamer for specific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of angiogenesis from glioblastoma.

  7. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  8. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    PubMed

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  9. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    PubMed Central

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  10. Magnetic Field Induced Changes Of Domain Structure Grating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziewski, A.; Stankiewicz, A.

    1987-10-01

    A stripe domain grating (SDG) has been theoretically analysed to combine some magnetic field changeable grating parameters with a magnetic sample material parameters. The alterable grating properties were discussed for different types of fiber-optic switch device. The quality and prefered directions of SDG have been quantitatively investigated using unconventional set-up based on the light diffraction effect. The gratings have been induced by the magnetic field with different orientations and values. SDG quality was significantly improved applying nontypically oriented magnetic field. We focused our attention on SDG static properties.

  11. Imaging scattering orientation with spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Rice, Tyler; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques based on multiple light scattering generally have poor sensitivity to the orientation and direction of microscopic light scattering structures. In order to address this limitation, we introduce a spatial frequency domain method for imaging contrast from oriented scattering structures by measuring the angular-dependence of structured light reflectance. The measurement is made by projecting sinusoidal patterns of light intensity on a sample, and measuring the degree to which the patterns are blurred as a function of the projection angle. We derive a spatial Fourier domain solution to an anisotropic diffusion model. This solution predicts the effects of bulk scattering orientation on the amplitude and phase of the projected patterns. We introduce a new contrast function based on a scattering orientation index (SOI) which is sensitive to the degree to which light scattering is directionally dependent. We validate the technique using tissue simulating phantoms, and ex vivo samples of muscle and brain. Our results show that SOI is independent of the overall amount of bulk light scattering and absorption, and that isotropic versus oriented scattering structures can be clearly distinguished. We determine the orientation of subsurface microscopic scattering structures located up to 600 μm beneath highly scattering (μ′s = 1.5 mm−1) material. PMID:22191918

  12. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K; Kákay, A; Schultheiss, K; Henschke, A; Sebastian, T; Schultheiss, H

    2016-05-01

    In the research field of magnonics, it is envisaged that spin waves will be used as information carriers, promoting operation based on their wave properties. However, the field still faces major challenges. To become fully competitive, novel schemes for energy-efficient control of spin-wave propagation in two dimensions have to be realized on much smaller length scales than used before. In this Letter, we address these challenges with the experimental realization of a novel approach to guide spin waves in reconfigurable, nano-sized magnonic waveguides. For this purpose, we make use of two inherent characteristics of magnetism: the non-volatility of magnetic remanence states and the nanometre dimensions of domain walls formed within these magnetic configurations. We present the experimental observation and micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave propagation inside nano-sized domain walls and realize a first step towards a reconfigurable domain-wall-based magnonic nanocircuitry. PMID:26828849

  13. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, K.; Kákay, A.; Schultheiss, K.; Henschke, A.; Sebastian, T.; Schultheiss, H.

    2016-05-01

    In the research field of magnonics, it is envisaged that spin waves will be used as information carriers, promoting operation based on their wave properties. However, the field still faces major challenges. To become fully competitive, novel schemes for energy-efficient control of spin-wave propagation in two dimensions have to be realized on much smaller length scales than used before. In this Letter, we address these challenges with the experimental realization of a novel approach to guide spin waves in reconfigurable, nano-sized magnonic waveguides. For this purpose, we make use of two inherent characteristics of magnetism: the non-volatility of magnetic remanence states and the nanometre dimensions of domain walls formed within these magnetic configurations. We present the experimental observation and micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave propagation inside nano-sized domain walls and realize a first step towards a reconfigurable domain-wall-based magnonic nanocircuitry.

  14. Domain walls in the (Ga,Mn)as diluted magnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Akira; Kasai, H; Tonomura, A; Brown, P D; Campion, R P; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Zemen, J; Jungwirth, T

    2008-02-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic domain walls in an in-plane magnetized (Ga,Mn)As dilute moment ferromagnetic semiconductor. Our high-resolution electron holography technique provides direct images of domain wall magnetization profiles. The experiments are interpreted based on microscopic calculations of the micromagnetic parameters and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations. We find that the competition of uniaxial and biaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropies in the film is directly reflected in orientation dependent wall widths, ranging from approximately 40 to 120 nm. The domain walls are of the Néel type and evolve from near-90 degrees walls at low temperatures to large angle [11[over ]0]-oriented walls and small angle [110]-oriented walls at higher temperatures. PMID:18352324

  15. A magnetic source imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgovskiy, V.; Fescenko, I.; Sekiguchi, N.; Colombo, S.; Lebedev, V.; Zhang, J.; Weis, A.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a magnetic source imaging camera (MSIC) allowing a direct dynamic visualization of the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the individual components Bx(x ,y ), By(x ,y ) and Bz(x ,y ) of a magnetic field. The field patterns allow—in principle—a reconstruction of the distribution of sources that produce the field B → by inverse problem analysis. We compare experimentally recorded point-spread functions, i.e., field patterns produced by point-like magnetic dipoles of different orientations with anticipated field patterns. Currently, the MSIC can resolve fields of ≈10 pT (1 s measurement time) range in a field of view up to ˜20 × 20 mm2. The device has a large range of possible applications. As an example, we demonstrate the MSIC's use for recording the spatially resolved Néel magnetorelaxation of blocked magnetic nanoparticles.

  16. Vortex confinement by magnetic domains in superconductor-ferromagnet bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Konczykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.; Cheng, X. M.

    2013-03-01

    We use a line of miniature Hall sensors to study the effect of magnetic-domain-induced vortex confinement on the flux dynamics in a superconductor/ferromagnet bilayer. A single tunable bilayer is built of a ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a superconducting Nb layer, with the insulating layer in between to avoid proximity effect. The magnetic domain patterns of various geometries are reversibly predefined in the Co/Pt multilayer using the appropriate magnetization procedure. The magnetic domain geometry strongly affects vortex dynamics, leading to geometry-dependent trapping of vortices at the sample edge, nonuniform flux penetration, and strongly nonuniform critical current density. With the decreasing temperature the magnetic pinning increases but this increase is substantially weaker than that of the intrinsic pinning. The analysis of the initial flux penetration suggests that vortices may form various vortex structures, including disordered Abrikosov lattice or single and double vortex chains, in which minimal vortex-vortex distance is comparable to the magnetic penetration depth. Supported by Polish NCS grant 2011/01/B/ST3/00462, by the French-Polish Program PICS 2012, by EU grant POIG.01.01.02-00-108/09, and by NSF grants DMR05-20491 and DMR-1053854.

  17. Computational and experimental investigations of magnetic domain structures in patterned magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulan; Xu, Ke; Hu, Shenyang; Suter, Jon; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Johnson, Bradley R.; McCloy, John

    2015-08-01

    The use of nondestructive magnetic signatures for continuous monitoring of the degradation of structural materials in nuclear reactors is a promising yet challenging application for advanced functional materials behavior modeling and measurement. In this work, a numerical model, which is based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of magnetization dynamics and the phase field approach, was developed to study the impact of defects such as nonmagnetic precipitates and/or voids, free surfaces and crystal orientation on magnetic domain structures and magnetic responses in magnetic materials, with the goal of exploring the correlation between microstructures and magnetic signatures. To validate the model, single crystal iron thin films (~240 nm thickness) were grown on MgO substrates and a focused ion beam was used to pattern micrometer-scale specimens with different geometries. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was used to measure magnetic domain structure and its field-dependence. Numerical simulations were constructed with the same geometry as the patterned specimens and under similar applied magnetic field conditions as tested by MFM. The results from simulations and experiments show that 1) magnetic domain structures strongly depend on the film geometry and the external applied field and 2) the predicted magnetic domain structures from the simulations agree quantitatively with those measured by MFM. The results demonstrate the capability of the developed model, used together with key experiments, for improving the understanding of the signal physics in magnetic sensing, thereby providing guidance to the development of advanced nondestructive magnetic techniques.

  18. Image encryption in the wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Long; Zhou, Yicong; Chen, C. L. Philip

    2013-05-01

    Most existing image encryption algorithms often transfer the original image into a noise-like image which is an apparent visual sign indicating the presence of an encrypted image. Motivated by the data hiding technologies, this paper proposes a novel concept of image encryption, namely transforming an encrypted original image into another meaningful image which is the final resulting encrypted image and visually the same as the cover image, overcoming the mentioned problem. Using this concept, we introduce a new image encryption algorithm based on the wavelet decomposition. Simulations and security analysis are given to show the excellent performance of the proposed concept and algorithm.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  1. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation determined that current accessed self structured bubble memory devices have the potential of meeting projected data density and speed requirements. Device concepts analyzed include multilayer ferrimagnetic devices where the top layer contains a domain structure which defines the data location and the second contains the data. Current aperture and permalloy assisted current propagation devices were evaluated. Based on the result of this work more detailed device research was initiated. Detailed theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the difference in strip and threshold between a single bubble in the control layer and a double bubble which would exist in both the control layer and data layer is adequate to allow for detection of data. Detailed detector designs were investigated.

  2. Magnetic properties and magnetic domains of Nd-Fe-B thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. L.; Liu, W.; Zhang, Z. D.; Gunaratne, G. H.

    2008-01-15

    Anisotropic Nd-Fe-B thin films are fabricated by direct current magnetron sputtering on Si substrates heated to temperatures over a wide range. Surface morphology and magnetic domains of the Nd-Fe-B thin films prepared at different sputtering temperatures (25-600 deg. C) are observed by a scanning probe microscopy. The magnetic domains exhibit a rich variety of textures, changing from striped via maze to cloudlike as the sputtering temperature is increased. Variations in magnetic domains with substrate temperature are discussed using phase components and magnetic anisotropies of the thin films. In addition, patterns of magnetic domains are analyzed using the 'disorder functions', a set of characterizations of complex patterns with labyrinthine structures. The disorder function {delta}(1) and the structure factor {delta}k do not change appreciably until a substrate temperature of 350 deg. C, but increases significantly beyond 400 deg. C. The disorder in magnetic domains increases with increasing sputtering temperature. A simultaneous enhancement of the anisotropic c texture and the hard-magnetic properties of the thin films are observed. The significant change of the disorder function at T{sub s}=400 deg. C appears to be a precursor to the hardening of the Nd-Fe-B film. The most disordered magnetic domains of the film with the substrate temperature of 600 deg. C correspond to the optimum magnetic properties, with the maximum energy product (BH){sub max} of 22.4 MG Oe.

  3. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  4. Emergent Rotational Symmetries in Disordered Magnetic Domain Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Run; Seu, Keoki A.; Parks, Daniel; Kan, Jimmy J.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Stephen D.

    2011-12-01

    Uniaxial systems often form labyrinthine domains that exhibit short-range order but are macroscopically isotropic and would not be expected to exhibit precise symmetries. However, their underlying frustration results in a multitude of metastable configurations of comparable energy, and driving such a system externally might lead to pattern formation. We find that soft x-ray speckle diffraction patterns of the labyrinthine domains in CoPd/IrMn heterostructures reveal a diverse array of hidden rotational symmetries about the magnetization axis, thereby suggesting an unusual form of emergent order in an otherwise disordered system. These symmetries depend on applied magnetic field, magnetization history, and scattering wave vector. Maps of rotational symmetry exhibit intriguing structures that can be controlled by manipulating the applied magnetic field in concert with the exchange bias condition.

  5. Nanoscale imaging and control of domain-wall hopping with a nitrogen-vacancy center microscope.

    PubMed

    Tetienne, J-P; Hingant, T; Kim, J-V; Diez, L Herrera; Adam, J-P; Garcia, K; Roch, J-F; Rohart, S; Thiaville, A; Ravelosona, D; Jacques, V

    2014-06-20

    The control of domain walls in magnetic wires underpins an emerging class of spintronic devices. Propagation of these walls in imperfect media requires defects that pin them to be characterized on the nanoscale. Using a magnetic microscope based on a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, we report domain-wall imaging on a 1-nanometer-thick ferromagnetic nanowire and directly observe Barkhausen jumps between two pinning sites spaced 50 nanometers apart. We further demonstrate in situ laser control of these jumps, which allows us to drag the domain wall along the wire and map the pinning landscape. Our work demonstrates the potential of NV microscopy to study magnetic nano-objects in complex media, whereas controlling domain walls with laser light may find an application in spintronic devices. PMID:24948732

  6. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  7. Optimization of polarizer azimuth in improving domain image contrast in magneto-optical Kerr microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lian, J.; Li, P.; Li, X.; Li, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y. X.

    2016-02-01

    The magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a widely used technique in magnetic domain imaging for its high surface sensitivity and external magnetic compatibility. In this work, we use the generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry technique to study the influence of polarizer and analyzer azimuth on domain image contrast in the Kerr microscope. Results show that the image contrasts around the extinction place are larger than other area. When the polarizer and analyzer are set slightly deviated from the extinction condition (0.35°,89.7°), the maximum image contrast can be obtained. The color map of image contrast on polarizer and analyzer angle is given by measuring the MOKE response of 200 nm permalloy. Results verify the validity of the conclusion.

  8. Ferroelectric control of magnetic domains in ultra-thin cobalt layers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N.; Bernand-Mantel, A.; Borrel, J.; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L.; Herrera Diez, L.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.; Boulle, O.

    2013-11-25

    Non-volatile ferroelectric control of magnetic domains has been demonstrated in ultra-thin cobalt layers at room temperature. The sensitivity of magnetic anisotropy energy to the electronic structure in a few atomic layers adjacent to the interface allows for ferroelectric control of coercivity and magnetic domain dynamics. These effects have been monitored and quantified using magneto-optical Kerr effect. In particular, the regimes, where the ferroelectric domains enhance/inhibit the magnetic domain nucleation or increase/reduce domain wall velocity, have been explored. Thus, non-destructive and reversible ferroelectric domain writing provides a tool to define the magnetic domain paths, create nucleation sites, or control domain movement.

  9. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G; Robbins, J M; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-12-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  10. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G.; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  12. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall.

    PubMed

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation. PMID:27312315

  13. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  14. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The AB–BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation. PMID:27312315

  15. A 5 Tesla imaging magnet for imaging laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Carolan, J.L.; Burns, W.A.; Green, M.A.

    1989-03-01

    This is a report on the construction of the first of a series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) imaging magnets for laboratory animals. The first NCC magnet has a 33 centimeter warm bore with a design central induction of 5.5 T without active shielding and 5.0 T with active shielding. The magnet will be used for both imaging and spectroscopy of living animals. The active shield system is designed so that the 5 Gauss line is less than 3 meters from the magnet center when the magnet operates at design field. This permits the magnet to be used within an experimental space commonly available within a university building.

  16. Designing magnetic superlattices that are composed of single domain nanomagnets

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Feodor V; Kovács, Endre

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: The complex nature of the magnetic interactions between any number of nanosized elements of a magnetic superlattice can be described by the generic behavior that is presented here. The hysteresis characteristics of interacting elliptical nanomagnets are described by a quasi-static method that identifies the critical boundaries between magnetic phases. A full dynamical analysis is conducted in complement to this and the deviations from the quasi-static analysis are highlighted. Each phase is defined by the configuration of the magnetic moments of the chain of single domain nanomagnets and correspondingly the existence of parallel, anti-parallel and canting average magnetization states. Results: We give examples of the phase diagrams in terms of anisotropy and coupling strength for two, three and four magnetic layers. Each phase diagrams character is defined by the shape of the magnetic hysteresis profile for a system in an applied magnetic field. We present the analytical solutions that enable one to define the “phase” boundaries between the emergence of spin-flop, anti-parallel and parallel configurations. The shape of the hysteresis profile is a function of the coupling strength between the nanomagnets and examples are given of how it dictates a systems magnetic response. Many different paths between metastable states can exist and this can lead to instabilities and fluctuations in the magnetization. Conclusion: With these phase diagrams one can find the most stable magnetic configurations against perturbations so as to create magnetic devices. On the other hand, one may require a magnetic system that can easily be switched between phases, and so one can use the information herein to design superlattices of the required shape and character by choosing parameters close to the phase boundaries. This work will be useful when designing future spintronic devices, especially those manipulating the properties of CoFeB compounds. PMID:25161831

  17. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  18. Observations of charge-ordered and magnetic domains in LuFe2O4 using transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, T.; Murakami, Y.; Shindo, D.; Abe, N.; Arima, T.

    2012-08-01

    Both charge-ordered and magnetic domains produced in LuFe2O4, which have attracted significant attention due to the interplay of electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom, have been studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques. Dark-field images, obtained using a weak satellite reflection, revealed the nanometer-scale charge-ordered domains, which were observed over a wide temperature range below TCO (critical temperature of charge ordering; ˜310 K). Electron holography demonstrated an aspect of the long-range magnetic order wherein the magnetic flux lines were completely parallel to the c axis of LuFe2O4, in a specimen cooled to 17 K under an applied magnetic field. In contrast, there was no appreciable magnetic signal observed in a specimen cooled in a negligible magnetic field. These observations provide useful information for further understanding of the complex magnetic phase transitions in this compound.

  19. Frequency Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Techniques in Eye Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtkowski, M.; Kowalczyk, A.; Targowski, P.; Gorczyñska, I.

    2000-12-01

    This contribution presents an application of frequency-domain optical tomography to ophthalmology. Essential theoretical foundations of time-domain and frequency-domain optical tomography are presented. Images of sections through the anterior chamber, the corneo-scleral angle and fundus of the eye are reconstructed from the spectral fringes. The morphological information gained by tomograms is important for diagnosing and planning of a treatment of glaucoma.

  20. Dissipative dynamics of composite domain walls in magnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O.; Bazaliy, Ya. B.; Tchernyshyov, O.

    2007-03-01

    We describe the dynamics of domain walls in thin magnetic nanostrips of submicron width under the action of magnetic field. Once the fast precession of magnetization is averaged out, the dynamics reduces to purely dissipative motion where the system follows the direction of the local energy gradient (Glauber's model A) [1]. We then apply the method of collective coordinates [2] to our variational model of the domain wall [3] reducing the dynamics to the evolution of two collective coordinates (the location of the vortex core). In weak magnetic fields the wall moves steadily. The calculated velocity is in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations (no adjustable parameters were used). In higher fields the steady motion breaks down and acquires an oscillatory character caused by periodic creation and annihilation of topological defects comprising the domain wall [3]. Numerical simulations uncover at least two different modes of oscillation. [1] C. J. Garc'ia-Cervera and W. E, J. Appl. Phys. 90, 370 (2001). [2] A. S'anchez and A. R. Bishop, SIAM Rev. 40, 579 (1998). [3] Preceding talk by O. Tchernyshyov.

  1. Ghost imaging in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Barbier, Margaux; Friberg, Ari T.; Dudley, John M.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-03-01

    Ghost imaging is a novel technique that produces the image of an object by correlating the intensity of two light beams, neither of which independently carries information about the shape of the object. Ghost imaging has opened up new perspectives to obtain highly resolved images, even in the presence of noise and turbulence. Here, by exploiting the duality between light propagation in space and time, we demonstrate the temporal analogue of ghost imaging. We use a conventional fast detector that does not see the temporal ‘object’ to be characterized and a slow integrating ‘bucket’ detector that does see the object but without resolving its temporal structure. Our experiments achieve temporal resolution at the picosecond level and are insensitive to the temporal distortion that may occur after the object. The approach is scalable, can be integrated on-chip, and offers great promise for dynamic imaging of ultrafast waveforms.

  2. Fourier domain OCT imaging of American cockroach nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Gorczynska, Iwona; Ruminski, Daniel; Karnowski, Karol; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Maria; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    In this pilot study we demonstrate results of structural Fourier domain OCT imaging of the nervous system of Periplaneta americana L. (American cockroach). The purpose of this research is to develop an OCT apparatus enabling structural imaging of insect neural system. Secondary purpose of the presented research is to develop methods of the sample preparation and handling during the OCT imaging experiments. We have performed imaging in the abdominal nerve cord excised from the American cockroach. For this purpose we have developed a Fourier domain / spectral OCT system operating at 820 nm wavelength range.

  3. Performance analysis of image fusion methods in transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonsuk; Sharifahmadian, Ershad; Latifi, Shahram

    2013-05-01

    Image fusion involves merging two or more images in such a way as to retain the most desirable characteristics of each. There are various image fusion methods and they can be classified into three main categories: i) Spatial domain, ii) Transform domain, and iii) Statistical domain. We focus on the transform domain in this paper as spatial domain methods are primitive and statistical domain methods suffer from a significant increase of computational complexity. In the field of image fusion, performance analysis is important since the evaluation result gives valuable information which can be utilized in various applications, such as military, medical imaging, remote sensing, and so on. In this paper, we analyze and compare the performance of fusion methods based on four different transforms: i) wavelet transform, ii) curvelet transform, iii) contourlet transform and iv) nonsubsampled contourlet transform. Fusion framework and scheme are explained in detail, and two different sets of images are used in our experiments. Furthermore, various performance evaluation metrics are adopted to quantitatively analyze the fusion results. The comparison results show that the nonsubsampled contourlet transform method performs better than the other three methods. During the experiments, we also found out that the decomposition level of 3 showed the best fusion performance, and decomposition levels beyond level-3 did not significantly affect the fusion results.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, D.; Smith, M.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the physics underlying magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; pulse sequences; image production; equipment; aspects of clinical imaging; and the imaging of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and musculoskeletal system; and MR imaging. The book provides about 150 examples of MR images that give an overview of the pathologic conditions imaged. There is a discussion of the physics of MR imaging and also on the spin echo.

  5. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    PubMed Central

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  6. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Nataf, G F; Grysan, P; Guennou, M; Kreisel, J; Martinotti, D; Rountree, C L; Mathieu, C; Barrett, N

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  7. Magnetic domain walls of relic fermions as Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yajnik, Urjit A.

    2005-12-02

    We show that relic fermions of the Big Bang can enter a ferromagnetic state if they possess a magnetic moment and satisfy the requirements of Stoner theory of itinerant ferromagnetism. The domain walls of this ferromagnetism can successfully simulate Dark Energy over the observable epoch spanning {approx} 10 billion years. We obtain conditions on the anomalous magnetic moment of such fermions and their masses. Known neutrinos fail to satisfy the requirements thus pointing to the possibility of a new ultralight sector in Particle Physics.

  8. Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation Based Contourlet Domain Image Denoising Framework

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Dong, Fangmin; Ren, Xuhong; Feng, Shiyu; Gao, Bruce Zhi

    2016-01-01

    A contourlet domain image denoising framework based on a novel Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation is proposed, where the difference of subbands in contourlet domain is taken into account. In detail: (1). A novel Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation (IRKT) is proposed to calculate the direction statistic of the image; The validity of the IRKT is verified by the corresponding extracted edge information comparing with the state-of-the-art edge detection algorithm. (2). The direction statistic represents the difference between subbands and is introduced to the threshold function based contourlet domain denoising approaches in the form of weights to get the novel framework. The proposed framework is utilized to improve the contourlet soft-thresholding (CTSoft) and contourlet bivariate-thresholding (CTB) algorithms. The denoising results on the conventional testing images and the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) medical images show that the proposed methods improve the existing contourlet based thresholding denoising algorithm, especially for the medical images. PMID:27148597

  9. Domain wall mobility, stability and Walker breakdown in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, A.; Cormier, M.; Adam, J. P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Ferré, J.

    2007-06-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the velocity of a single 180° domain wall in a magnetic structure with reduced thickness and/or lateral dimension under the combined action of an external applied magnetic field and an electrical current. As for the case of field-induced domain wall propagation in thick films, two motion regimes with different mobilities are obtained, below and far above the so-called Walker field. Additionally, for the case of current induced motion, a Walker-like current density threshold is defined. The threshold field and current density, stating the wall's internal structure stability, differ from those in thick films; both are reduced by the same geometrical demagnetising factor which accounts for the confinement. This points out the fact that the velocity dependence over an extended field/current range and the knowledge of the Walker breakdown are mandatory to draw conclusions about the phenomenological Gilbert damping parameter tuning the magnetisation dynamics.

  10. Microstructural, Magnetic Anisotropy, and Magnetic Domain Structure Correlations in Epitaxial FePd Thin Films with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skuza, J. R.; Clavero, C.; Yang, K.; Wincheski, B.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    L1(sub 0)-ordered FePd epitaxial thin films were prepared using dc magnetron sputter deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The films were grown with varying thickness and degree of chemical order to investigate the interplay between the microstructure, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic domain structure. The experimentally measured domain size/period and magnetic anisotropy in this high perpendicular anisotropy system were found to be correlated following the analytical energy model proposed by Kooy and Enz that considers a delicate balance between the domain wall energy and the demagnetizing stray field energy.

  11. Study of magnetic domain evolution in an auxetic plane of Galfenol using Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunath, Ganesh; Flatau, Alison B.

    2015-05-01

    Galfenol (FexGa100-x), a magnetostrictive alloy (3/2λ 110-400 ppm) of Iron and Gallium exhibits an in-plane auxetic response in the ⟨110⟩ crystallographic direction. Negative Poisson's ratios have been observed in response to application of stress fields, where values of as low as -0.7 have been reported for compositions of greater than roughly 20% Ga [Zhang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 108(2), 023513 (2010)] and in response to application of magnetic fields, where values of as low as -2.5 have been reported to be expected for compositions of less than roughly 20% Ga [G. Raghunath and A. B. Flatau, IEEE Trans. Magn. (in press)]. Several models have been proposed to understand these two distinct phenomena. Galfenol samples with less than 20% Ga also exhibit an unusual response to an increasing magnetic field applied along the ⟨110⟩ direction. The longitudinal strain which increases initially with applied field experiences a dip (until ˜10 mT) before increasing again to reach saturation. The transverse strain increases and reaches a maximum value (at the same field of ˜10 mT) and then drops from the maximum by 5%-10% as magnetic saturation is approached [G. Raghunath and A. B. Flatau, IEEE Trans. Magn. (in press)].This work deals with discussing the evolution of magnetic domains in a 16 at. % Ga single crystal Galfenol sample when subjected to magnetic fields in the ⟨110⟩ direction in the (100) plane. The magnetic domains on the surface of mechanically polished Galfenol samples were imaged using Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect microscopy. Simultaneously, the strains along the longitudinal and transverse ⟨110⟩ directions were recorded using a bi-directional strain gauge rosette mounted on the unpolished bottom surface of the planar samples. The energy from the applied magnetic field is expected to grow the ⟨110⟩ oriented domains at the expense of domains oriented along all other directions. But since the plane has an easy ⟨100⟩ axis, we expect the

  12. Effects of domain, grain, and magnetic anisotropy distributions on magnetic permeability: Monte-Carlo approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Jones, Anthony M.; McCloy, John S.

    2012-07-23

    Existing approaches for prediction of the tensor permeability of polycrystalline ferrites may not provide reasonable estimates of demagnetized permeability below the spin resonance (i.e., low-field loss region) or in cases of partial magnetization. We propose an approach which solves the coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the dynamic magnetic fields including the minimization of free energy to determine the equilibrium magnetization direction. Unlike previous models, we employ a Monte-Carlo approach to easily calculate the (ensemble) averages of permeability over various domain/grain structures and magnetic anisotropy conditions. Material differences, such as those resulting from different preparation methods, are expressed by using probability density functions (p.d.f.) for anisotropy angle (easy axis angle), grain demagnetization factor (ng), and domain demagnetization factor (nd). Effects on the permeability tensor of grain and domain demagnetization factors and anisotropy field relative to saturation magnetization are discussed for the partially magnetized states for polycrystalline ferrites. It is found that the grain structure (i.e., grain demagnetization distribution) has a smaller effect on the frequency dependent permeability than does the same distribution of domains (i.e., domain demagnetization distribution).

  13. Domain-specific magnetization reversals on a Permalloy square ring array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. R.; Freeland, J. W.; Srajer, G.; Metlushko, V.; You, Chun-Yeol

    2004-06-01

    We present domain-specific magnetization reversals extracted from soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements on a Permalloy square ring array. The extracted domain-specific hysteresis loops reveal that the magnetization of the domain parallel to the field is strongly pinned, while those of other domains rotate continuously. In comparison with the micromagnetic simulation, the hysteresis loop on the pinned domain indicates a possibility of the coexistence of the square rings with the vortex and onion states.

  14. Model of bound interface dynamics for coupled magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politi, P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Stamps, R. L.; Ferré, J.

    2011-08-01

    A domain wall in a ferromagnetic system will move under the action of an external magnetic field. Ultrathin Co layers sandwiched between Pt have been shown to be a suitable experimental realization of a weakly disordered 2D medium in which to study the dynamics of 1D interfaces (magnetic domain walls). The behavior of these systems is encapsulated in the velocity-field response v(H) of the domain walls. In a recent paper [P. J. Metaxas , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.237206 104, 237206 (2010)] we studied the effect of ferromagnetic coupling between two such ultrathin layers, each exhibiting different v(H) characteristics. The main result was the existence of bound states over finite-width field ranges, wherein walls in the two layers moved together at the same speed. Here we discuss in detail the theory of domain wall dynamics in coupled systems. In particular, we show that a bound creep state is expected for vanishing H and we give the analytical, parameter free expression for its velocity which agrees well with experimental results.

  15. Oscillatory Decay of Magnetization Induced by Domain-Wall Stray Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Luc; Luening, Jan; Scholl, Andreas; Nolting, Frithjof; Anders, Simone; Stoehr, Joachim; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2000-04-10

    The demagnetization of a hard ferromagnetic layer via the fringing fields of domain walls created by reversing the moment of a neighboring soft ferromagnetic layer is explored experimentally. An unusual oscillatory decay of the magnetic moment of the hard layer is observed using structures in which the demagnetization occurs after a few hundred cycles. This surprising observation is confirmed on a microscopic scale by detailed imaging of the magnetization of the hard layer using high resolution photoemission electron microscopy and by micromagnetic simulations. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Analysis of thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets using magnetic domain observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Masaaki; Ikeda, Soichiro; Morimoto, Yuji; Kabashima, Hisayuki

    2016-05-01

    We used magnetic domain observation to statistically observe the thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets at elevated temperatures up to 150 °C. Simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred adjacent grains occurred at 90 °C because of the magnetic interaction among the grains beyond grain boundaries in the Dysprosium (Dy)-free low-coercivity magnet. Conversely, simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred grains did not occur in the Dy-added high-coercivity magnets, and the demagnetizing ratio steadily increased with temperature. Furthermore, the addition of Dy induced high thermal stability by eliminating the simultaneous thermal demagnetization, which was caused by the magnetic interaction among the grains.

  17. A compact surface decontamination system for surface-sensitive magnetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Konoto, M; Akoh, H; Tokura, Y

    2009-08-01

    A surface decontamination system for application in surface sensitive magnetic imaging tools, such as a spin-polarized scanning electron microscope, is described. Adsorbed contaminant is chemically decomposed with the use of active oxygen in a compact vacuum chamber mounted in a microscope. The present method is especially suitable for fragile magnetic surfaces of complex oxide materials to which the conventional physical etching widely used for magnetic metals could cause serious structural damage. We have succeeded in detecting magnetic signals from a decontaminated oxide surface and visualizing domain images with sufficient magnetic contrast to analyze detailed domain structures. PMID:19725685

  18. A compact surface decontamination system for surface-sensitive magnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Konoto, M.; Akoh, H.; Tokura, Y.

    2009-08-15

    A surface decontamination system for application in surface sensitive magnetic imaging tools, such as a spin-polarized scanning electron microscope, is described. Adsorbed contaminant is chemically decomposed with the use of active oxygen in a compact vacuum chamber mounted in a microscope. The present method is especially suitable for fragile magnetic surfaces of complex oxide materials to which the conventional physical etching widely used for magnetic metals could cause serious structural damage. We have succeeded in detecting magnetic signals from a decontaminated oxide surface and visualizing domain images with sufficient magnetic contrast to analyze detailed domain structures.

  19. Magnetized Plasma for Reconfigurable Subdiffraction Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shuang; Xiong Yi; Bartal, Guy; Yin Xiaobo; Zhang Xiang

    2011-06-17

    We show that magnetized plasma with appropriately designed parameters supports nearly diffractionless propagation of electromagnetic waves along the direction of the applied magnetic field, arising from their unbounded equifrequency contour in the magnetized plasma. Such a unique feature can be utilized to construct subdiffraction imaging devices, which is confirmed by detailed numerical investigations. Subdiffraction imaging devices based on magnetic plasma do not require microfabrication normally entailed by construction of metamaterials; more importantly, they can be dynamically reconfigured by tuning the applied magnetic field or the plasma density, and therefore they represent a facile and powerful route for imaging applications.

  20. Quantitative magnetic imaging at the nanometer scale by ballistic electron magnetic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Herve, M.; Tricot, S.; Guezo, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lepine, B.; Schieffer, P.; Turban, P.

    2013-06-21

    We demonstrate quantitative ballistic electron magnetic microscopy (BEMM) imaging of simple model Fe(001) nanostructures. We use in situ nanostencil shadow mask resistless patterning combined with molecular beam epitaxy deposition to prepare under ultra-high vacuum conditions nanostructured epitaxial Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) spin-valves. In this epitaxial system, the magnetization of the bottom Fe/GaAs(001) electrode is parallel to the [110] direction, defining accurately the analysis direction for the BEMM experiments. The large hot-electron magnetoresistance of the Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) epitaxial spin-valve allows us to image various stable magnetic configurations on the as-grown Fe(001) microstructures with a high sensitivity, even for small misalignments of both magnetic electrodes. The angular dependence of the hot-electron magnetocurrent is used to convert magnetization maps calculated by micromagnetic simulations into simulated BEMM images. The calculated BEMM images and magnetization rotation profiles show quantitative agreement with experiments and allow us to investigate the magnetic phase diagram of these model Fe(001) microstructures. Finally, magnetic domain reversals are observed under high current density pulses. This opens the way for further BEMM investigations of current-induced magnetization dynamics.

  1. THz time-domain spectroscopy imaging for mail inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liquan; Wang, Zhongdong; Ma, Yanmei; Hao, Erjuan

    2011-08-01

    Acquiring messages from the mail but not destroying the envelope is a big challenge in the war of intelligence. If one can read the message of the mail when the envelope is closed, he will benefit from the message asymmetry and be on a good wicket in the competition. In this paper, we presented a transmitted imaging system using THz time-domain spectroscopy technology. We applied the system to image the mail inside an envelope by step-scanning imaging technology. The experimental results show that the THz spectroscopy can image the mail in an envelope. The words in the paper can be identified easily from the background. We also present the THz image of a metal blade in the envelope, in which we can see the metal blade clearly. The results show that it is feasible of THz Time-Domain Spectroscopy Imaging for mail inspection applications.

  2. Optical magnetic imaging of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Sage, D.; Arai, K.; Glenn, D. R.; DeVience, S. J.; Pham, L. M.; Rahn-Lee, L.; Lukin, M. D.; Yacoby, A.; Komeili, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological and physical systems. However, existing techniques either have poor spatial resolution compared to optical microscopy and are hence not generally applicable to imaging of sub-cellular structure (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]1), or entail operating conditions that preclude application to living biological samples while providing sub-micron resolution (e.g., scanning superconducting quantum interference device [SQUID] microscopy2, electron holography3, and magnetic resonance force microscopy [MRFM]4). Here we demonstrate magnetic imaging of living cells (magnetotactic bacteria) under ambient laboratory conditions and with sub-cellular spatial resolution (400 nm), using an optically-detected magnetic field imaging array consisting of a nanoscale layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres implanted at the surface of a diamond chip. With the bacteria placed on the diamond surface, we optically probe the NV quantum spin states and rapidly reconstruct images of the vector components of the magnetic field created by chains of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) produced in the bacteria, and spatially correlate these magnetic field maps with optical images acquired in the same apparatus. Wide-field sCMOS acquisition allows parallel optical and magnetic imaging of multiple cells in a population with sub-micron resolution and >100 micron field-of-view. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the bacteria confirm that the correlated optical and magnetic images can be used to locate and characterize the magnetosomes in each bacterium. The results provide a new capability for imaging bio-magnetic structures in living cells under ambient conditions with high spatial resolution, and will enable the mapping of a wide range of magnetic signals within cells and cellular networks5, 6. PMID:23619694

  3. Optical magnetic imaging of living cells.

    PubMed

    Le Sage, D; Arai, K; Glenn, D R; DeVience, S J; Pham, L M; Rahn-Lee, L; Lukin, M D; Yacoby, A; Komeili, A; Walsworth, R L

    2013-04-25

    Magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological and physical systems. However, existing techniques either have poor spatial resolution compared to optical microscopy and are hence not generally applicable to imaging of sub-cellular structure (for example, magnetic resonance imaging), or entail operating conditions that preclude application to living biological samples while providing submicrometre resolution (for example, scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy, electron holography and magnetic resonance force microscopy). Here we demonstrate magnetic imaging of living cells (magnetotactic bacteria) under ambient laboratory conditions and with sub-cellular spatial resolution (400 nanometres), using an optically detected magnetic field imaging array consisting of a nanometre-scale layer of nitrogen-vacancy colour centres implanted at the surface of a diamond chip. With the bacteria placed on the diamond surface, we optically probe the nitrogen-vacancy quantum spin states and rapidly reconstruct images of the vector components of the magnetic field created by chains of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) produced in the bacteria. We also spatially correlate these magnetic field maps with optical images acquired in the same apparatus. Wide-field microscopy allows parallel optical and magnetic imaging of multiple cells in a population with submicrometre resolution and a field of view in excess of 100 micrometres. Scanning electron microscope images of the bacteria confirm that the correlated optical and magnetic images can be used to locate and characterize the magnetosomes in each bacterium. Our results provide a new capability for imaging bio-magnetic structures in living cells under ambient conditions with high spatial resolution, and will enable the mapping of a wide range of magnetic signals within cells and cellular networks. PMID:23619694

  4. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  5. Magnetic domain structure and thermal stabilization of laser treatment zones in soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudov, V. I.; Dragoshanskii, Yu. N.

    2016-02-01

    A combined effect of laser treatment and introduced fine-grained weakly magnetic impurity Mg-P-B defects on the magnetic structure and physical properties of anisotropic electrotechnical materials has been investigated. Specific features of changes in the type and behavior of the magnetic domain structure under different types of deformation (laser irradiation, scratching, and introduction of interstitial defects) have been revealed. The physical basis and optimum conditions of increase in thermal stability of local laser treatment zones in soft magnetic alloys have been determined. The obtained results open the prospects of decreasing magnetic losses in soft magnetic alloys and producing magnetic materials with a high level of physical and mechanical properties that are more resistant to operating conditions.

  6. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  7. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  8. Ferroelectric domain imaging by defect-luminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierolf, V.; Sandmann, C.; Kim, S.; Gopalan, V.; Polgar, K.

    2003-02-01

    In order to study the role of defects within the domain inversion process in ferroelectric LiNbO3 crystals, we investigated the optical properties of intentionally introduced Er3+ defect complexes across a 180° domain wall produced at room temperature by electric-field poling. Using site-selective excitation-emission spectroscopy for well chosen excitation energies, we found drastic differences in the Er3+ emission, which are due to a rearrangement of the defect complexes. We used these changes in a confocal luminescence microscope to image ferroelectric-domain structures. This powerful imaging method with a 700 nm, 50 ms spatial and temporal resolution can be used to study real-time dynamics of domain walls.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  10. Magnetic domain wall induced ferroelectricity in double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhao, Hong Jian E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Xiang Ming E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Wen Qing

    2015-04-13

    Recently, a magnetically induced ferroelectricity occurring at magnetic domain wall of double perovskite Lu{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} has been reported experimentally. However, there exists a conflict whether the electric polarization is along b or c direction. Here, by first-principles calculations, we show that the magnetic domain wall (with ↑↑↓↓ spin configuration) can lead to the ferroelectric displacements of R{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 4+}, and O{sup 2−} ions in double perovskites R{sub 2}NiMnO{sub 6} (R = rare earth ion) via exchange striction. The resulted electric polarization is along b direction with the P2{sub 1} symmetry. We further reveal the origin of the ferroelectric displacements as that: (1) on a structural point of view, such displacements make the two out-of-plane Ni-O-Mn bond angles as well as Ni-Mn distance unequal, and (2) on an energy point of view, such displacements weaken the out-of-plane Ni-Mn super-exchange interaction obviously. Finally, our calculations show that such a kind of ferroelectric order is general in ferromagnetic double perovskites.

  11. Magnetization reversal process and domain wall resistance in a water drop shape ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. C.; Chiang, D. P.; Yao, Y. D.

    2006-03-01

    Patterned permalloy (Ni80-Fe20) materials have been fabricated by e-beam lithography in the shape of water drop ring. A tip is intentionally added into ring as geometrical defects to interrupt the continuity of magnetization reversal process, in order to create domain wall. Image from Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with real- time external field confirmed this domain structure. As a result of magneto- resistance (MR) measurement, the ratio of MR is about 0.137 ˜ 0.233% and 0.23 ˜ 0.71% at sweeping angles of samples and sweeping external field, respectively. The ratio of the change in the electric resistance which is measured by I-V curve is just about the value of domain wall MR ratio which is measured by sweeping angles and external field. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated that the domain wall motion along the direction of perimeter in a ferromagnetic ring at its onion state; and the critical field to form onion state is near 200 Oe and the lowest field which can still drag the domain wall is between 100 and 50 Oe.

  12. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Herps, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion. PMID:24919162

  13. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, J. H.; Herps, M.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion.

  14. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Poddubny, Alexander N; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Kozachenko, Alexander V; Dubrovina, Irina A; Melchakova, Irina V; Kivshar, Yuri S; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-03-01

    It is revealed that the unique properties of ultrathin metasurface resonators can improve magnetic resonance imaging dramatically. A metasurface formed when an array of metallic wires is placed inside a scanner under the studied object and a substantial enhancement of the radio-frequency magnetic field is achieved by means of subwavelength manipulation with the metasurface, also allowing improved image resolution. PMID:26754827

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  17. Ferromagnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and transformation of domain structure in CoFeB film with growth induced anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, S. A.; Grishin, A. M.; Munakata, M.

    2011-04-01

    Field dependence of magnetic susceptibility in nanocrystalline CoFeB film was studied in a wide frequency range from 500 kHz to 15 GHz. Anomalies of the susceptibility were detected exciting CoFeB film with a solenoidal coil, microwave strip line, in the tunable microwave cavity as well as employing magneto-optical domains imaging. Critical spin fluctuations in the form of "soft" modes were observed in a whole range of orientations of magnetic field perpendicular to the "easy" magnetic axis. A sequence of domain structure transformations was extensively examined in a "hard" direction in in-plane magnetic field reduced below the field of uniaxial anisotropy Hp = 535 Oe. At first, uniformly magnetized state in CoFeB film transforms to stripe domains separated by low angle Néel domain walls (DWs) parallel to the "hard"-axis. Then, at critical field Hcr = 232 Oe, Néel DWs gradually convert to the"easy"-axis oriented Bloch DWs loaded with vertical Bloch lines (VBLs). After field reversal at H = -Hcr, backward conversion of VBL-loaded Bloch DWs to Néel DWs results in instantaneous energy release and sharp anomaly of magnetic susceptibility. Appearance of critical spin fluctuations accomplishes domains transformation to the uniformly magnetized state at H = -535 Oe.

  18. Ferrohydrodynamic relaxometry for magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwill, P. W.; Tamrazian, A.; Croft, L. R.; Lu, C. D.; Johnson, E. M.; Pidaparthi, R.; Ferguson, R. M.; Khandhar, A. P.; Krishnan, K. M.; Conolly, S. M.

    2011-06-01

    The ferrohydrodynamic properties of magnetic nanoparticles govern resolution and signal strength in magnetic particle imaging (MPI), a medical imaging modality with applications in small animals and humans. Here, we discuss the development and key results of a magnetic particle relaxometer that measures the core diameter and relaxation constant of magnetic nanoparticles. This instrument enables us to directly measure the one-dimensional MPI point spread function. To elucidate our results, we develop a simplified ferrohydrodynamic model that assumes nanoparticles respond to time varying magnetic fields according to a Debeye model of Brownian relaxation, which we verify with experimental data.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.

    1988-01-01

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE SPINE thoroughly demonstrates the advantages of this new radiologic modality in diagnosing spinal disorders. The book begins with an introductory chapter on the basic physics and technical considerations of magnetic resonance in general and magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in particular. The second chapter covers normal spinal anatomy, and features color photos of multi-planar sections of spinal anatomy.

  20. Angle-domain imaging condition for elastic reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, R.; Xie, X.; Wu, R.

    2010-12-01

    In exploration seismology, elastic reverse time migration (RTM) has spurred much interest in recent years because of the increased imaging challenges posed by complex subsurface targets and affordable computer resources such as Linux clusters. Elastic RTM reconstructs the source wavefields forward in time and receiver wavefields backward in time by finite difference method. It then applies an imaging condition that evaluates the match between source and receiver wavefields. To construct the image which describes the physical property of the medium, we prefer to separate the wavefields into P and S modes, and implement the imaging condition as cross-correlation of pure wave mode rather than of Cartesian component of the displacement wavefields. However, simple cross-correlation can cause some image problems which impede the further seismic interpretation. For example, PP image is contaminated by strong artifacts resulted from unwanted cross-correlation between diving wave, turning wave or back-scattered wave and their time-reversed counterpart; PS image suffers from polarization problem due to the polarity reversal of converted S-wave. We found it necessary to apply certain intrinsic properties (e.g., the wave propagation directions and particle motion information) in reconstructed wavefields in order to solve the problems exhibited in elastic RTM image. This paper presents a procedure to decompose the source and receiver wavefields into local plane waves in pure P and S modes. We generate the partial PP and PS images in angle domain by cross-correlating any combination of decomposed plane wave component, and then formulate an imaging condition as a product of an angle-domain operator and the partial images. The new angle-domain imaging condition substantially reduces the artifacts in the PP image and produces the PS image with correct polarizations. Synthetic examples demonstrate that the imaging condition works very well on producing clean and consistent image

  1. Holographic security system based on image domain joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Michael; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bondarev, Leonid A.; Kurakin, Sergey V.; Matveyev, Sergey V.; Belyaev, V. S.

    2002-04-01

    We describe holographic security system providing machine reading of the holographic information and matching it with the reference one by optical means. The security holographic mark includes several test holograms and should be applied to a carrier: ID-card, paper seal etc. Each of the holograms stores a part of entire image, stored in the reference hologram. Image domain JTC is used to match the images retrieved from the holograms. Being recorded and retrieved, the images provides correlation peaks with special positions, with a strict dependence on the tested and reference holograms mutual shifts. The system proposed works like usual JTC with a few useful differences. The image domain recognizing is a result of Fresnel holographic technique of the images recording. It provides more effective usage of the light addressed SLM (LASLM) work pupil and resolution in more simple and compact device. Few correlation peaks enhances the device recognizing probability. We describe the real-time experimental arrangement based on LASLM. The experimental results are in a good correspondence with computer simulations. We also show in practice that good results may be obtained while using the image domain JTC technique in despite of the low LASLM resolution and the device compact size.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of single domain magnetic Josephson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Mazin; Niedzielski, Bethany; Gingrich, Erich; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William, Jr.; Birge, Norman

    2015-03-01

    A nice effect that can be observed in Ferromagnetic (F) Josephson junctions is the crossover from a standard Josephson junction (0-junction) to a `` π-junction'' as a function of the thickness of the F layer, dF. This observation is interesting not only from the scientific point of view but also from a practical point of view, as it could be used in cryogenic memory, for example. In this work we are fabricating and measuring micron-scale Josephson junctions containing a soft magnetic material such as NiFe. Such junctions exhibit clear switching of the single-domain magnetic element as a function of applied field. We will report on our recent progress. Northrop Grumman.

  3. Magneto-optic imaging of domain walls in ferrimagnetic garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, H.; Bekeris, V.; Johansen, T. H.

    2007-09-01

    Magneto-optic (MO) imaging is based on Faraday rotation of a linearly polarized incident light beam illuminating a sensitive MO layer (MOL) placed in close contact to the sample. For in-plane magnetized layers of Lu 3-xBi xFe 5-yGa yO 12 ferrimagnetic garnet films, zig-zag domain formation occurs whenever the sample stray parallel field component, H∥, changes sign. Considering the anisotropy, exchange and magnetostatic energies in the Néel tails, and the contribution of an applied magnetic field, it is possible to describe the zig-zag walls that separate domains with opposite in-plane magnetization. The size of the walls decreases with the spatial derivative of H∥. We studied the evolution of these domains as we steadily forced the change in sign of H∥ to shorter length scales, from hundreds to a few microns. We describe the samples used to control the change in sign of H∥ at the MOL plane, and we analyze the images that evolve from zig-zag walls to much more complex closed domain structures.

  4. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads® MyOne™) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔBdep = 4.5-27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  5. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads{sup ®} MyOne{sup ™}) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔB{sub dep} = 4.5–27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  6. Interplay between intrinsic and stacking-fault magnetic domains in bi-layered manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, M.A; Burkhardt, Mark H.; Sarkar, S.; Ohldag, H.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Scholl, A.; Young, A.T.; Doran, A.; Dessau, D.S.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J.F.; Durr, H.A.; Stohr, J.

    2012-09-11

    We present a low temperature X-ray photoemission electron microscopy study of the bi-layered manganite compound La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} (BL-LSMO) to investigate the influence of stacking faults, which are structurally and magnetically different from the bi-layered host. In BL-LSMO small magnetic moment persists to T* = 300K, well above the Curie temperature of 120K (T{sub C}). Our magnetic images show that 3D stacking faults are responsible for the T* transition. Furthermore, close to the T{sub C}, stacking faults are well coupled to the bi-layered host with latter magnetic domains controlling the spin direction of the stacking faults. Contrary to recent reports, we find that stacking faults do not seed magnetic domains in the host via an exchange spring mechanism and the intrinsic T{sub C} of the BL-LSMO is not lower than 120K.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications.

    PubMed

    Low, Keynes T A; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahi, H.; Khorramdin, A.; Isapour, Gh.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants.

  10. Development of a Magnetic Nanoparticle Susceptibility Magnitude Imaging Array

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over 5 dilutions (R2 > 0.98, p <0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 nm and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe/ml mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution. PMID:24504184

  11. Development of a magnetic nanoparticle susceptibility magnitude imaging array.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Bradley W; Nadar, Priyanka M; Hoopes, P Jack; Diamond, Solomon G

    2014-02-21

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over five dilutions (R(2) > 0.98, p < 0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe ml(-1) mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution. PMID:24504184

  12. Development of a magnetic nanoparticle susceptibility magnitude imaging array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-02-01

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over five dilutions (R2 > 0.98, p < 0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe ml-1 mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution.

  13. Notch-Boosted Domain Wall Propagation in Magnetic Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang Rong; Yuan, Hauiyang

    Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion along a nanowire underpins many proposals of spintronic devices. High DW propagation velocity is obviously important because it determines the device speed. Thus it is interesting to search for effective control knobs of DW dynamics. We report a counter-intuitive finding that notches in an otherwise homogeneous magnetic nanowire can boost current-induced domain wall (DW) propagation. DW motion in notch-modulated wires can be classified into three phases: 1) A DW is pinned around a notch when the current density is below the depinning current density. 2) DW propagation velocity above the depinning current density is boosted by notches when non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque strength is smaller than the Gilbert damping constant. The boost can be many-fold. 3) DW propagation velocity is hindered when non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque strength is larger than the Gilbert damping constant. This work was supported by Hong Kong GRF Grants (Nos. 163011151 and 605413) and the Grant from NNSF of China (No. 11374249).

  14. Domain wall motion in sub-100 nm magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Saima; Dutta, Sumit; Currivan, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline; Baldo, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices such as racetrack memory rely on the manipulation of domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanowires, and scaling of these devices requires an understanding of domain wall behavior as a function of the wire width. Due to the increased importance of edge roughness and magnetostatic interaction, DW pinning increases dramatically as the wire dimensions decrease and stochastic behavior is expected depending on the distribution of pinning sites. We report on the field driven DW statistics in sub-100 nm wide nanowires made from Co films with very small edge roughness. The nanowires were patterned in the form of a set of concentric rings of 10 μm diameter. Two different width nanowires with two different spacings have been studied. The rings were first saturated in plane to produce onion states and then the DWs were translated in the wires using an orthogonal in-plane field. The position of the DWs in the nanowires was determined with magnetic force microscopy. From the positions of the DWs in the nanowires, the strength of the extrinsic pinning sites was identified and they follow two different distributions in two different types of nanowire rings. For the closely spaced wires, magnetostatic interactions led to correlated movement of DWs in neighboring wires. The implications of DW pinning and interaction in nanoscale DW devices will be discussed.

  15. Effect of residual strain in Fe-based amorphous alloys on field induced magnetic anisotropy and domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Daichi; Hasegawa, Ryusuke; Saito, Shin; Takahashi, Migaku

    2013-05-01

    Field induced magnetic anisotropy in two Fe-based amorphous alloys with different saturation induction levels (1.56 T and 1.64 T) was investigated by varying magnetic field strength and annealing temperature and domain images were taken on these samples. Residual strain was evaluated by measuring coercivities of the materials after stress-relief annealing. These results are discussed, clarifying the difference between the two Fe-based amorphous alloys.

  16. Regular and chaotic precession of magnetization in magnetic films with a stripe domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutyĭ, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    Based on a numerical solution of the equations of motion found over a wide range of frequencies of an alternating magnetic field, the nonlinear precession dynamics of magnetization are studied in thin-film structures of the (100) type with a stripe domain structure in a perpendicular bias field. The conditions are determined under which high-amplitude regular and chaotic dynamic regimes occur. Bifurcational variations in the precession of coupled magnetic moments and dynamic-bistability states are detected. The specific features of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and of time analogs of Poincaré cross sections of trajectories in chaotic regimes are considered.

  17. Rotationally induced magnetic chirality in clusters of single-domain permalloy islands and gapped nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Jie; Bartell, Jason; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent; Schiffer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We have studied magnetic moment configurations of clusters of single-domain ferromagnetic islands in different geometries. The magnetic moments of these clusters are imaged by MFM after rotational demagnetization, following our previous protocols. We observed that two types of the clusters showed a significant imbalance of their two-fold degenerate ground states after demagnetization, and this inequality is correlated to the rotational direction of the demagnetization. A similar imbalance was also found in nano-scale rings with a small gap: the chirality of their magnetic state can be precisely controlled by the rotational direction during demagnetization. We acknowledge the financial support from DOE and Army Research Office. We are grateful to Prof. Chris Leighton and Mike Erickson for assistance with sample preparation.

  18. High-speed optical frequency-domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Iftimia, N.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate high-speed, high-sensitivity, high-resolution optical imaging based on optical frequency-domain interferometry using a rapidly-tuned wavelength-swept laser. We derive and show experimentally that frequency-domain ranging provides a superior signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional time-domain ranging as used in optical coherence tomography. A high sensitivity of −110 dB was obtained with a 6 mW source at an axial resolution of 13.5 µm and an A-line rate of 15.7 kHz, representing more than an order-of-magnitude improvement compared with previous OCT and interferometric imaging methods. PMID:19471415

  19. Wavelet smoothing of functional magnetic resonance images: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucier, Bradley J.

    2003-11-01

    Functional (time-dependent) Magnetic Resonance Imaging can be used to determine which parts of the brain are active during various limited activities; these parts of the brain are called activation regions. In this preliminary study we describe some experiments that are suggested from the following questions: Does one get improved results by analyzing the complex image data rather than just the real magnitude image data? Does wavelet shrinkage smoothing improve images? Should one smooth in time as well as within and between slices? If so, how should one model the relationship between time smoothness (or correlations) and spatial smoothness (or correlations). The measured data is really the Fourier coefficients of the complex image---should we remove noise in the Fourier domain before computing the complex images? In this preliminary study we describe some experiments related to these questions.

  20. Reliable absolute palaeointensities independent of magnetic domain state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekkers, Mark J.; Böhnel, Harald N.

    2006-08-01

    Knowledge of palaeointensity variation is required for determining the full vector variation of the geomagnetic field as a function of geological time. This provides essential constraints for numerical geodynamo models. To date, most palaeointensity determination methods are laborious, characterised by rather low success rates, and demand substantial processing time. The rocks under investigation must obey stringent criteria to yield faithful palaeointensities: the magnetic particles must be single domain, the natural remanent magnetisation must be a thermoremanent magnetisation, and during the successive heating steps in the laboratory no chemical alteration should occur. Here, we describe a new method that allows all magnetic domain states to be processed, i.e. it does not require single domain particles. The method makes use of the linearity of partial thermoremanent magnetisation (pTRM) with the applied laboratory field. Multiple specimens are used so that every sample is exposed only once to a laboratory field, warranting that all samples experienced the same magnetic history. Through the limited number of thermal steps alteration effects are reduced as well. The laboratory pTRM and natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) of the specimens are oriented parallel to minimise the effects of high-temperature tails that affect multidomain minerals. The pTRM acquisition temperature is selected below the temperature at which chemical alteration sets in and above the temperature trajectory where secondary viscous NRM components occur. The procedure requires a lower number of steps than any other palaeointensity method, reducing significantly the total time needed per rock unit. We propose to name the new protocol 'multispecimen parallel differential pTRM method'. It provides the correct answer to ˜ 5% for artificial samples and natural rocks containing multidomain magnetic particles that were given a laboratory TRM of known intensity. Application to the Paricutin

  1. Quality assessment for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Paranjape, Amit S.; Elmaanaoui, Badr; Dewelle, Jordan; Rylander, H. Grady, III; Markey, Mia K.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, a measure of glaucoma progression, can be measured in images acquired by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation, however, is affected by the quality of the OCT images. In this paper, a new parameter, signal deviation (SD), which is based on the standard deviation of the intensities in OCT images, is introduced for objective assessment of OCT image quality. Two other objective assessment parameters, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and signal strength (SS), are also calculated for each OCT image. The results of the objective assessment are compared with subjective assessment. In the subjective assessment, one OCT expert graded the image quality according to a three-level scale (good, fair, and poor). The OCT B-scan images of the retina from six subjects are evaluated by both objective and subjective assessment. From the comparison, we demonstrate that the objective assessment successfully differentiates between the acceptable quality images (good and fair images) and poor quality OCT images as graded by OCT experts. We evaluate the performance of the objective assessment under different quality assessment parameters and demonstrate that SD is the best at distinguishing between fair and good quality images. The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation is improved significantly after poor quality OCT images are rejected by automated objective assessment using the SD, SNR, and SS.

  2. An efficient multiple exposure image fusion in JPEG domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbalaguppe, Ramya; Kakarala, Ramakrishna

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method to fuse multiple images taken with varying exposure times in the JPEG domain. The proposed algorithm finds its application in HDR image acquisition and image stabilization for hand-held devices like mobile phones, music players with cameras, digital cameras etc. Image acquisition at low light typically results in blurry and noisy images for hand-held camera's. Altering camera settings like ISO sensitivity, exposure times and aperture for low light image capture results in noise amplification, motion blur and reduction of depth-of-field respectively. The purpose of fusing multiple exposures is to combine the sharp details of the shorter exposure images with high signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of the longer exposure images. The algorithm requires only a single pass over all images, making it efficient. It comprises of - sigmoidal boosting of shorter exposed images, image fusion, artifact removal and saturation detection. Algorithm does not need more memory than a single JPEG macro block to be kept in memory making it feasible to be implemented as the part of a digital cameras hardware image processing engine. The Artifact removal step reuses the JPEGs built-in frequency analysis and hence benefits from the considerable optimization and design experience that is available for JPEG.

  3. Natural language processing and visualization in the molecular imaging domain.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, P Karina; Tao, Ying; Millar, William S; Zanzonico, Pat; Kolbert, Katherine; Xu, Hua; Yu, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Lussier, Yves A; Friedman, Carol

    2007-06-01

    Molecular imaging is at the crossroads of genomic sciences and medical imaging. Information within the molecular imaging literature could be used to link to genomic and imaging information resources and to organize and index images in a way that is potentially useful to researchers. A number of natural language processing (NLP) systems are available to automatically extract information from genomic literature. One existing NLP system, known as BioMedLEE, automatically extracts biological information consisting of biomolecular substances and phenotypic data. This paper focuses on the adaptation, evaluation, and application of BioMedLEE to the molecular imaging domain. In order to adapt BioMedLEE for this domain, we extend an existing molecular imaging terminology and incorporate it into BioMedLEE. BioMedLEE's performance is assessed with a formal evaluation study. The system's performance, measured as recall and precision, is 0.74 (95% CI: [.70-.76]) and 0.70 (95% CI [.63-.76]), respectively. We adapt a JAVA viewer known as PGviewer for the simultaneous visualization of images with NLP extracted information. PMID:17084109

  4. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses radio waves, a magnetic field and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the spine and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  7. Magnetic domain wall shift registers for data storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Dan; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Sampaio, J.; Thevenard, L.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2009-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through permalloy (Py) nanowires have been proposed [Allwood et al. Science 309, 1688 (2005), S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004)] and have attracted a great deal of attention. We experimentally demonstrate such a device using shift registers constructed from magnetic NOT gates used in combination with a globally applied rotating magnetic field. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable Py nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Electrical data writing is achieved using the Oersted field due to current pulses in gold stripes (4 μm wide, 150 nm thick), patterned on top of and perpendicular to the nanowires. The conduit-like properties of the nanowires allow the propagation of data sequences over distances greater than 100 μm. Using spatially resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements we can directly detect the propagation of single DWs in individual nanostructures without requiring data averaging. Electrical readout was demonstrated by detecting the presence of DWs at deliberately introduced pinning sites in the wire.

  8. Domain decomposition methods for solving an image problem

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, W.K.; Tong, C.S.

    1994-12-31

    The domain decomposition method is a technique to break up a problem so that ensuing sub-problems can be solved on a parallel computer. In order to improve the convergence rate of the capacitance systems, pre-conditioned conjugate gradient methods are commonly used. In the last decade, most of the efficient preconditioners are based on elliptic partial differential equations which are particularly useful for solving elliptic partial differential equations. In this paper, the authors apply the so called covering preconditioner, which is based on the information of the operator under investigation. Therefore, it is good for various kinds of applications, specifically, they shall apply the preconditioned domain decomposition method for solving an image restoration problem. The image restoration problem is to extract an original image which has been degraded by a known convolution process and additive Gaussian noise.

  9. DANCING WITH THE ELECTRONS: TIME-DOMAIN AND CW IN VIVO EPR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the development of imaging the distribution of unpaired electrons in living systems and the functional and the potential diagnostic dimensions of such an imaging process, using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging (EPRI), is traced from its origins with emphasis on our own work. The importance of EPR imaging stems from the fact that many paramagnetic probes show oxygen dependent spectral broadening. Assessment of in vivo oxygen concentration is an important factor in radiation oncology in treatment-planning and monitoring treatment-outcome. The emergence of narrow-line trairylmethyl based, bio-compatible spin probes has enabled the development of radiofrequency time-domain EPRI. Spectral information in time-domain EPRI can be achieved by generating a time sequence of T2* or T2 weighted images. Progress in CW imaging has led to the use of rotating gradients, more recently rapid scan with direct detection, and a combination of all the three. Very low field MRI employing Dynamic Nuclear polarization (Overhauser effect) is also employed for monitoring tumor hypoxia, and re-oxygenation in vivo. We have also been working on the co-registration of MRI and time domain EPRI on mouse tumor models at 300 MHz using a specially designed resonator assembly. The mapping of the unpaired electron distribution and unraveling the spectral characteristics by using magnetic resonance in presence of stationary and rotating gradients in indeed ‘dancing with the (unpaired) electrons’, metaphorically speaking. PMID:22025900

  10. Imaging of Spin Dynamics in Closure Domain and Vortex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. P.; Eames, P.; Engebretson, D. M.; Berezovsky, J.; Crowell, P. A.

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved Kerr microscopy is used to study the excitations of individual micron-scale ferromagnetic thin film elements in their remnant state. Thin (18 nm) square elements with edge dimensions between 1 and 10 μm form closure domain structures with 90 degree Néel walls between domains. We identify two classes of excitations in these systems. The first corresponds to precession of the magnetization about the local demagnetizing field in each quadrant, while the second excitation is localized in the domain walls. Two modes are also identified in ferromagnetic disks with thicknesses of 60 nm and diameters from 2 μm down to 500 nm. The equilibrium state of each disk is a vortex with a singularity at the center. As in the squares, the higher frequency mode is due to precession about the internal field, but in this case the lower frequency mode corresponds to gyrotropic motion of the entire vortex. The effect of a non-zero magnetic field on the excitation spectrum of vortices is also explored. Although an applied field shifts the position of the vortex core, it has only a small effect on the excitation spectrum. These results demonstrate clearly the existence of well-defined excitations in inhomogeneously magnetized microstructures. This work was supported by NSF DMR 99-83777, the Research Corporation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the University of Minnesota MRSEC (DMR 98-09364), and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  11. Magneto-optical imaging of vortex domain deformation in pinning sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, R.; Frey, J. A.; Berezovsky, J.

    2015-05-01

    We use a sensitive magneto-optical microscopy technique to image the magnetization response of micron-scale ferromagnetic disks to changes in applied magnetic field. This differential technique relies on a modulated applied magnetic field which allows us to measure changes in magnetization < 1 % with sub-micron resolution. The disks are magnetized in single vortex domains, with defects in the material serving to pin the vortex core at particular positions. By applying a small AC magnetic field, we measure the deformation of the magnetization while the core remains pinned. We can also characterize the strength of the pinning site by increasing the AC magnetic field to unpin the vortex core. While pinned, we find that the magnetization away from the core reorients slightly to better align with an applied field. Additionally, an applied field causes the pinned core itself to tilt in the direction of the field. Once the field is large enough to unpin the core, this tilt disappears, and the core instead translates across the disk.

  12. Accelerating Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Lung Tumor Tracking Based on Low-Rank Decomposition in the Spatial–Temporal Domain: A Feasibility Study Based on Simulation and Preliminary Prospective Undersampled MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Manoj; Hu, Peng; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Ennis, Daniel; Thomas, Albert; Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Sheng, Ke

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a low-rank decomposition method to reconstruct down-sampled k-space data for the purpose of tumor tracking. Methods and Materials: Seven retrospective lung cancer patients were included in the simulation study. The fully-sampled k-space data were first generated from existing 2-dimensional dynamic MR images and then down-sampled by 5 × -20 × before reconstruction using a Cartesian undersampling mask. Two methods, a low-rank decomposition method using combined dynamic MR images (k-t SLR based on sparsity and low-rank penalties) and a total variation (TV) method using individual dynamic MR frames, were used to reconstruct images. The tumor trajectories were derived on the basis of autosegmentation of the resultant images. To further test its feasibility, k-t SLR was used to reconstruct prospective data of a healthy subject. An undersampled balanced steady-state free precession sequence with the same undersampling mask was used to acquire the imaging data. Results: In the simulation study, higher imaging fidelity and low noise levels were achieved with the k-t SLR compared with TV. At 10 × undersampling, the k-t SLR method resulted in an average normalized mean square error <0.05, as opposed to 0.23 by using the TV reconstruction on individual frames. Less than 6% showed tracking errors >1 mm with 10 × down-sampling using k-t SLR, as opposed to 17% using TV. In the prospective study, k-t SLR substantially reduced reconstruction artifacts and retained anatomic details. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance reconstruction using k-t SLR on highly undersampled dynamic MR imaging data results in high image quality useful for tumor tracking. The k-t SLR was superior to TV by better exploiting the intrinsic anatomic coherence of the same patient. The feasibility of k-t SLR was demonstrated by prospective imaging acquisition and reconstruction.

  13. Mobile metallic domain walls in an all-in-all-out magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Eric Yue; Cui, Yong-Tao; Ueda, Kentaro; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Wu, Phillip M.; Fujioka, Jun; Tokura, Yoshinori; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic domain walls are boundaries between regions with different configurations of the same magnetic order. In a magnetic insulator, where the magnetic order is tied to its bulk insulating property, it has been postulated that electrical properties are drastically different along the domain walls, where the order is inevitably disturbed. Here we report the discovery of highly conductive magnetic domain walls in a magnetic insulator, Nd2Ir2O7, that has an unusual all-in-all-out magnetic order, via transport and spatially resolved microwave impedance microscopy. The domain walls have a virtually temperature-independent sheet resistance of ~1 kilohm per square, show smooth morphology with no preferred orientation, are free from pinning by disorders, and have strong thermal and magnetic field responses that agree with expectations for all-in-all-out magnetic order.

  14. Mobile metallic domain walls in an all-in-all-out magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Eric Yue

    Magnetic domain walls are boundaries between regions with different configurations of the same magnetic order. In a magnetic insulator where the magnetic order is tied to its bulk insulating property, it has been postulated that electrical properties are drastically different along the domain walls, where the order is inevitably disturbed. Here we report the discovery of highly conductive magnetic domain walls in a magnetic insulator Nd2Ir2O7, which has an unusual all-in-all-out magnetic order, via transport and spatially resolved microwave impedance microscopy. The domain walls have a virtually temperature-independent sheet resistance (averaged over mesoscopic distances) of ~1 kilohm per square, show smooth morphology with no preferred orientation, are free from pinning by disorders, and have strong thermal and magnetic field responses that agree with expectations for all-in-all-out magnetic order. This work is supported by funding from NSF, Moore Foundation, JSPS, NSFC and DOE.

  15. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  16. Frequency Domain Magnetic Measurements from Kilohertz to Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, John F.

    "......we applied much prolonged labor on investigating the magnetical forces; so wonderful indeed are they, compared with the forces in all other minerals, surpassing even the virtues of all bodies around us. Nor have we found this labor idle or unfruitful; since daily in our experimenting new unexpected properties came to light."William Gilbert, De Magnete, 1600Abstract. This review deals with practical aspects of making frequency-domain measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic losses from 200 kHz up to 10 GHz. It sets out the types of measurement concerned, distinguishing resonant from nonresonant phenomena. The techniques available are categorized according to suitability for the different frequency regimes and types of investigation. Practical recipes are provided for undertaking such experiments across the entire frequency range. Marginal oscillator spectrometry is discussed which is applicable across the whole frequency range. Different instruments are presented, and particular emphasis is placed on designs which function on the Robinson principle. Analysis of oscillation condition and signal-to-noise performance is dealt with, also sample considerations such as filling factor. Practical circuits are presented and their merits and demerits evaluated. Layout and radio-frequency design considerations are dealt with. Ultrahigh/microwave frequency marginal oscillator spectrometry is given special treatment and several practical designs are given. The essentials of good microwave design are emphasized. A general discussion of resonant structures is included which treats multiple layer coil design, slow wave line structures, stripline and cavities. Unusual cavity designs such as the rhumbatron are treated. Use of striplines with microwave marginal spectrometry is described and compared with conventional network-analysis techniques. The use of parameter matrices for high-frequency analysis is alluded to. Some details of good construction practice are

  17. Unexpected Magnetic Domain Behavior in LTP-MnBi

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, PK; Jin, S; Berkowitz, AE

    2013-07-01

    Low-temperature-phase MnBi (LTP-MnBi) has attracted much interest as a potential rare-earth-free permanent magnet material because of its high uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy at room temperature, K approximate to 10(7) ergs/cc, and the unusual increase of anisotropy with increasing temperature, with an accompanying increasing coercive force (H-C) with temperature. However, due to the complex Mn-Bi phase diagram, bulk samples of LTP-MnBi with the optimum saturation moment, similar to 75-76 emu/g have been achieved only with zone-refined single crystals. We have prepared polycrystalline samples of LTP-MnBi by induction melting and annealing at 300 degrees C. The moment in 70 kOe is 73.5 emu/g, but H-C is only 50 Oe. This is quite surprising-the high saturation moment indicates the dominating presence of LTP-MnBi. Therefore, an H-C c of some significant fraction of 2K/M-S approximate to 30 kOe would seem reasonable in this polycrystalline sample. By examining "Bitter" patterns, we show that the sample is composed of similar to 50 - 100 mu m crystallites. The randomly oriented crystallites exhibit the variety of magnetic domain structures and orientations expected from the hexagonal-structured MnBi with its strong uniaxial anisotropy. Clearly, the reversal of magnetization in the sample proceeds by the low-field nucleation of reversed magnetization in each crystallite, rather than by a wall-pinning mechanism. When the annealed sample was milled into fine particles, H-C increased by several orders of magnitude, as expected.

  18. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure

    PubMed Central

    Murapaka, C.; Sethi, P.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated. PMID:26839036

  19. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murapaka, C.; Sethi, P.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-02-01

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated.

  20. Coronary Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:19269527

  1. 2D magnetic nanoparticle imaging using magnetization response second harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Murata, Hayaki; Oishi, Tomoya; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Zhang, Yi

    2015-06-01

    A detection method and an imaging technique for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated. In MNP detection and in magnetic particle imaging (MPI), the most commonly employed method is the detection of the odd harmonics of the magnetization response. We examined the advantage of using the second harmonic response when applying an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field. If the magnetization response is detected by a Cu-wound-coil detection system, the output voltage from the coil is proportional to the change in the flux, dϕ/dt. Thus, the dependence of the derivative of the magnetization, M, on an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field were calculated and investigated. The calculations were in good agreement with the experimental results. We demonstrated that the use of the second harmonic response for the detection of MNPs has an advantage compared with the usage of the third harmonic response, when the Cu-wound-coil detection system is employed and the amplitude of the ratio of the AC modulation field and a knee field Hac/Hk is less than 2. We also constructed a 2D MPI scanner using a pair of permanent ring magnets with a bore of ϕ80 mm separated by 90 mm. The magnets generated a gradient of Gz=3.17 T/m transverse to the imaging bore and Gx=1.33 T/m along the longitudinal axis. An original concentrated 10 μl Resovist solution in a ϕ2×3 mm2 vessel was used as a sample, and it was imaged by the scanner. As a result, a 2D contour map image could be successfully generated using the method with a lock-in amplifier.

  2. Instability of Walker propagating domain wall in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Wang, X R

    2013-07-12

    The stability of the well-known Walker propagating domain wall (DW) solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is analytically investigated. Surprisingly, a propagating DW is always dressed with spin waves so that the Walker rigid-body propagating DW mode does not occur in reality. In the low field region only stern spin waves are emitted while both stern and bow waves are generated under high fields. In a high enough field, but below the Walker breakdown field, the Walker solution could be convective or absolute unstable if the transverse magnetic anisotropy is larger than a critical value, corresponding to a significant modification of the DW profile and DW propagating speed. PMID:23889437

  3. Classification of similar medical images in the lifting domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallee, Chad W.; Tashakkori, Rahman

    2002-03-01

    In this paper lifting is used for similarity analysis and classification of sets of similar medical images. The lifting scheme is an invertible wavelet transform that maps integers to integers. Lifting provides efficient in-place calculation of transfer coefficients and is widely used for analysis of similar image sets. Images of a similar set show high degrees of correlation with one another. The inter-set redundancy can be exploited for the purposes of prediction, compression, feature extraction, and classification. This research intends to show that there is a higher degree of correlation between images of a similar set in the lifting domain than in the pixel domain. Such a high correlation will result in more accurate classification and prediction of images in a similar set. Several lifting schemes from Calderbank-Daubechies-Fauveue's family were used in this research. The research shows that some of these lifting schemes decorrelates the images of similar sets more effectively than others. The research presents the statistical analysis of the data in scatter plots and regression models.

  4. Giant Effect of Uniaxial Pressure on Magnetic Domain Populations in Multiferroic Bismuth Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, M.; Ratcliff, W., II; Yi, H. T.; Sirenko, A. A.; Cheong, S.-W.; Kiryukhin, V.

    2011-08-01

    Neutron diffraction is used to show that small (˜7MPa, or 70 bar) uniaxial pressure produces significant changes in the populations of magnetic domains in a single crystal of 2% Nd-doped bismuth ferrite. The magnetic easy plane of the domains converted by the pressure is rotated 60° relative to its original position. These results demonstrate extreme sensitivity of the magnetic properties of multiferroic bismuth ferrite to tiny (less than 10-4) elastic strain, as well as weakness of the forces pinning the domain walls between the cycloidal magnetic domains in this material.

  5. Approach to breast magnetic resonance imaging interpretation.

    PubMed

    Palestrant, Sarah; Comstock, Christopher E; Moy, Linda

    2014-05-01

    With the increasing use of breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging comes the expectation that the breast radiologist is as fluent in its interpretation as in that of mammography and breast ultrasonography. Knowledge of who should be included for imaging and how to perform the imaging are as essential as interpreting the images. When reading the examination, the radiologist should approach the images from both a global and focused perspective, synthesizing findings into a report that includes a management plan. This article reviews a systematic and organized approach to breast MR imaging interpretation. PMID:24792657

  6. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, J.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Bayer, D.; Kurde, J.; Heitkamp, B.; Piantek, M.; Kronast, F.; Aeschlimann, M.; Dürr, H. A.; Kuch, W.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  7. Bi-directional magnetic domain wall shift register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D. E.; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2010-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through ferromagnetic nanowires have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years [1,2]. Here we experimentally demonstrate a shift register based on an open-ended chain of ferromagnetic NOT gates. When used in combination with a globally applied magnetic field such devices can support bi-directional data flow [3]. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable NiFe nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Up to eight data bits are electrically input to the device, stored for extended periods without power supplied to the device, and then output using either a first in first out or a last in first out mode of operation. Compared to traditional electronic transistor-based circuits, the inherent bi-directionality afforded by these DW logic gates offers a range of devices that are reversible and not limited to only one mode of operation. [1] S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004) [2] D. A. Allwod, et al., Science 309 (5741), 1688 (2005) [3] L. O'Brien, et al. accepted for publication in APL (2009)

  8. Effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of nonstoichiometric pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Kasama, Takeshi; Williams, Wyn; Damsgaard, Christian; Frandsen, Cathrine; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) grains in the pseudo-single-domain (PSD) size range is investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirm the precursor grains as Fe3O4 ranging from ˜150 to ˜250 nm in diameter, whilst Mössbauer spectrometry suggests the grains are initially near-stoichiometric. The Fe3O4 grains are heated to increasing reaction temperatures of 120-220°C to investigate their oxidation to maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). High-angle annular dark field imaging and localized electron-energy loss spectroscopy reveal slightly oxidized Fe3O4 grains, heated to 140°C, exhibit higher oxygen content at the surface. Off-axis electron holography allows for construction of magnetic induction maps of individual Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 grains, revealing their PSD (vortex) nature, which is supported by magnetic hysteresis measurements, including first-order reversal curve analysis. The coercivity of the grains is shown to increase with reaction temperature up to 180°C, but subsequently decreases after heating above 200°C; this magnetic behavior is attributed to the growth of a γ-Fe2O3 shell with magnetic properties distinct from the Fe3O4 core. It is suggested there is exchange coupling between these separate components that results in a vortex state with reduced vorticity. Once fully oxidized to γ-Fe2O3, the domain states revert back to vortices with slightly reduced coercivity. It is argued that due to a core/shell coupling mechanism during maghemization, the directional magnetic information will still be correct; however, the intensity information will not be retained.

  9. Effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, T.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Kasama, T.; Williams, W.; Damsgaard, C.; Frandsen, C.; Pennycook, T. J.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.

    2015-12-01

    During formation, magnetic minerals record the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field. Paleomagnetists use this information to investigate, for example, past tectonic plate motion and geodynamo evolution. However, subsequent to formation the constituent magnetic minerals are commonly exposed to a range of weathering conditions and environments. One of the most common weathering processes is maghemization, which is the oxidation of magnetite (Fe3O4) at ambient temperatures, i.e., the slow oxidation of Fe3O4 to maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), and is known to alter the original remanent magnetization. Of the constituent magnetic minerals, particles in the single domain (SD) grain size range (< 100 nm) are regarded as ideal paleomagnetic recorders because of their strong remanence and high magnetic stability, with potential relaxation times greater than that of the age of the Universe. However, magnetic signals from rocks are often dominated by small grains with non-uniform magnetization that exhibit magnetic recording fidelities similar to those of SD grains (termed pseudo-SD (PSD)). In this context, the effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of Fe3O4 grains in the PSD size range is investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirms the precursor grains as Fe3O4 ranging from ~ 150 nm to ~ 250 nm in diameter, whilst Mössbauer spectrometry suggests the grains are initially near-stoichiometric. The Fe3O4 grains are heated to increasing reaction temperatures of 120 - 220 ºC to investigate their oxidation to γ-Fe2O3. High-angle annular dark field imaging and localized electron energy-loss spectroscopy reveals slightly oxidized Fe3O4 grains, heated to 140 ºC, exhibit higher oxygen content at the surface. Off-axis electron holography allows for construction of magnetic induction maps of individual Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 grains, revealing their PSD (vortex) nature, which is supported by

  10. Magnetic anisotropy and domain patterning of amorphous films by He-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McCord, Jeffrey; Gemming, Thomas; Schultz, Ludwig; Fassbender, Juergen; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Frommberger, Michael; Quandt, Eckhard

    2005-04-18

    The magnetic anisotropy in amorphous soft magnetic FeCoSiB films was modified by He-ion irradiation. A rotation of uniaxial anisotropy depending on the applied field direction in the irradiated areas is observed by magnetometry and complementary domain observation by Kerr microscopy. No significant degradation in magnetic properties relative to the as-deposited state is found from the magnetization loops on nonpatterned films. Using irradiation together with photolithography, the films were treated locally, resulting in 'anisotropy patterned' structures. Complicated periodic domain patterns form due to the locally varying anisotropy distribution. Overall magnetic properties and domain patterns are adjusted.