Science.gov

Sample records for magnetic domain imaging

  1. Imaging Domains In Magnetic Garnets By Use Of TSMFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.; Wu, Jiin-Chuan; Stadler, Henry L.; Rice, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Tunneling-stabilized magnetic-force microscopy (TSMFM) demonstrated to yield images of magnetic domains in low-coercivity magnetic garnets with perpendicular anisotropy. Ability to generate images of domain walls and minute vertical Bloch lines aids study of vertical-Bloch-line magnetic memory devices that contain garnets. TSMFM provides desired resolution because its resolution not limited by diffraction.

  2. Imaging of magnetic domains by transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Eimüller, T.; Schütz, G.; Guttmann, P.; Schmahl, G.; Pruegl, K.; Bayreuther, G.

    1998-03-01

    The combination of the high-resolution transmission x-ray microscope (TXM) based on the zone plate technique with the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) providing a huge magnetic contrast is a new technique to image magnetic domain structures. It is inherently element specific and contains information on the local spin and orbital moments of the absorbing species that can be obtained by applying magneto-optical sum rules. A lateral spatial resolution depending on the quality of the zone plates down to 30 nm can be achieved. We report on first results at the Fe 0022-3727/31/6/012/img9 edges of Fe both in amorphous and in multilayered Gd-Fe systems. With a TXM set-up at BESSY I adapted to record magnetic images in varying magnetic fields the evolution of magnetic domains within a complete hysteresis loop and magnetic aftereffects have been studied.

  3. Layer Resolved Imaging of Magnetic Domain Motion in Epitaxial Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Sioan; Choi, Yongseong; Love, David; Mansell, Rhodri; Barnes, Crispin; Keavney, David; Rosenberg, Richard

    We use X-ray Excited Luminescence Microscopy (XELM) to image the elemental and layer resolved magnetic domain structure of an epitaxial Fe/Cr wedge/Co heterostructure in the presence of large magnetic fields. The observed magnetic domains exhibit several unique behaviors that depend on the Cr thickness (tCr) modulated interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) strength. For Cr thickness tCr??1.5?nm, strongly coupled parallel Co-Fe reversal and weakly coupled layer independent reversal are observed, respectively. The transition between these two reversal mechanisms for 0.34?domain wall motion and stationary zig zag domain walls. We observe domain walls nucleated at switching field minima are guided by IEC spatial gradients and collapse at switching field maxima.

  4. Dual-domain denoising in three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Zhou, Jiliu; Wu, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Denoising is a crucial preprocessing procedure for three dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D MRI). Existing denoising methods are predominantly implemented in a single domain, ignoring information in other domains. However, denoising methods are becoming increasingly complex, making analysis and implementation challenging. The present study aimed to develop a dual-domain image denoising (DDID) algorithm for 3D MRI that encapsulates information from the spatial and transform domains. In the present study, the DDID method was used to distinguish signal from noise in the spatial and frequency domains, after which robust accurate noise estimation was introduced for iterative filtering, which is simple and beneficial for computation. In addition, the proposed method was compared quantitatively and qualitatively with existing methods for synthetic and in vivo MRI datasets. The results of the present study suggested that the novel DDID algorithm performed well and provided competitive results, as compared with existing MRI denoising filters. PMID:27446257

  5. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huettner, Andrew M.; Mickevicius, Nikolai J.; Ersoz, Ali; Koch, Kevin M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Nencka, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF) pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517262

  6. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Huettner, Andrew M; Mickevicius, Nikolai J; Ersoz, Ali; Koch, Kevin M; Muftuler, L Tugan; Nencka, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF) pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517262

  7. X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-06-20

    We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

  8. Imaging and Tailoring the Chirality of Domain Walls in Magnetic Films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K

    2015-10-14

    Electric-current-induced magnetization switching is a keystone concept in the development of spintronics devices. In the last few years this field has experienced a significant boost with the discovery of ultrafast domain wall motions and very low threshold currents in structures designed to stabilize chiral spin textures. Imaging domain-wall spin textures in situ, while fabricating magnetic multilayer structures, is a powerful way to investigate the forces stabilizing this type of chirality, and informs strategies to engineer structures with controlled spin textures. Here, recent results applying spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy to image chiral domain walls in magnetic multilayer films are summarized. Providing a way to measure the strength of the asymmetric exchange interaction that causes the chirality, this approach can be used to tailor the texture and handedness of magnetic domain walls by interface engineering. These results advance understanding of the underlying physics and offer new insights toward the design of spintronic devices. PMID:26032892

  9. Centimeter-order view for magnetic domain imaging with local magnetization direction by longitudinal Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Sakae; Akahane, Koichi; Saito, Shin

    2016-05-01

    An observation system of centimeter-order of view of magnetic domain with local magnetization direction was developed by designing a telecentric optical system of finite design through the extension of microscope technology. The field of view realized in the developed system was 1.40 × 1.05 cm as suppressing defocus and distortion. Detection of the local magnetization direction has become possible by longitudinal Kerr observation from the orthogonal two directions. This system can be applied to the domain observation of rough surface samples and time resolved analysis for soft magnetic materials such as amorphous foil strips and soft magnetic thin films.

  10. Image characterization by fractal descriptors in variational mode decomposition domain: Application to brain magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2016-08-01

    The main purpose of this work is to explore the usefulness of fractal descriptors estimated in multi-resolution domains to characterize biomedical digital image texture. In this regard, three multi-resolution techniques are considered: the well-known discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and; the newly introduced; variational mode decomposition mode (VMD). The original image is decomposed by the DWT, EMD, and VMD into different scales. Then, Fourier spectrum based fractal descriptors is estimated at specific scales and directions to characterize the image. The support vector machine (SVM) was used to perform supervised classification. The empirical study was applied to the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) affected with Alzheimer disease (AD). Our results demonstrate that fractal descriptors estimated in VMD domain outperform those estimated in DWT and EMD domains; and also those directly estimated from the original image.

  11. X-ray holographic imaging of magnetic order in meander domain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzani, Carlo; Popescu, Horia; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Tortarolo, Marina; Jaouen, Nicolas; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    We performed x-ray holography experiments using synchrotron radiation. By analyzing the scattering of coherent circularly polarized x-rays tuned at the Co-2p resonance, we imaged perpendicular magnetic domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. We compare results obtained for continuous and laterally confined films.

  12. Magneto-optical imaging of magnetic domain pattern produced by intense femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Jaivarhan; Mohan, Shyam; Banerjee, S. S.; Kahaly, S.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2009-03-01

    An important and intriguing area of research is laser plasma generated giant magnetic field pulses. Interaction of ultrashort high intensity laser pulses with matter involves several mechanisms for generating ultrastrong magnetic fields. By irradiating a magnetic recordable tape constituting of γ-Fe2O3 particles with an intense p-polarized femtosecond laser pulses (˜ 10^16 W cm-2, 100fs), we have found complex magnetic field patterns stored in the tape. We image the local magnetic field distribution around the irradiated region [1] using the high sensitivity magneto-optical imaging technique. We understand the complex magnetic domains patterns recoded on the tape in terms of interesting instabilities [1] generated in the plasma produced during the irradiation of the tape with intense laser pulses. [0pt] [1] Jaivardhan Sinha, Shyam Mohan, S. S Banerjee, S. Kahaly, G. Ravindra Kumar, Phys. Rev. E 77, 046118(2008). *satyajit@iitk.ac.in

  13. Four-channel magnetic resonance imaging receiver using frequency domain multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wang; Qin, Xu; Jiejing, Ren; Gengying, Li

    2007-01-01

    An alternative technique that uses frequency domain multiplexing to acquire phased array magnetic resonance images is discussed in detail. The proposed method has advantages over traditional independent receiver chains in that it utilizes an analog-to-digital converter and a single-chip multicarrier receiver with high performance to reduce the size and cost of the phased array receiver system. A practical four-channel digital receiver using frequency domain multiplexing was implemented and verified on a home-built 0.3T magnetic resonance imaging system. The experimental results confirmed that the cross talk between each channel was below -60dB, the phase fluctuations were about 1°, and there was no obvious signal-to-noise ratio degradation. It is demonstrated that the frequency domain multiplexing is a valuable and economical technique, particularly for array coil systems where the multichannel receiver is indispensable and dynamic range is not a critical problem.

  14. Magnetic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford-Long, A. K.

    Spin-transport effects, such as giant magnetoresistance, rely on the fact that there is a difference in scattering between the spin-up and spin-down electrons in a ferromagnetic material. The degree to which each electron channel is scattered depends on the magnetisation direction within the material, and thus on the local magnetic domain structure. It is therefore of importance when analysing spin-transport devices to understand their magnetic domain structure, both as a bulk property and locally. The aim of this chapter is to review a number of the techniques currently used to image magnetic domain structure in materials. Although a considerable amount of information about the magnetic properties and behaviour of a piece of material, for example a thin ferromagnetic film, can be obtained from bulk magnetometry measurements, it is often extremely useful to image the magnetic domain structure of the film and thus gain information about its magnetic properties at a local level. The various magnetic imaging techniques yet to be described can be extended, by the application of in-situ magnetic fields which allow not only the magnetic domains but also the magnetisation reversal process to be followed in real-time.

  15. Analytical modelling and x-ray imaging of oscillations of a single magnetic domain wall

    SciTech Connect

    Bocklage, Lars; Kruger, Benjamin; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2009-07-10

    Domain-wall oscillation in a pinnig potential is described analytically in a one dimensional model for the feld-driven case. For a proper description the pinning potential has to be extended by nonharmonic contributions. Oscillations of a domain wall are observed on its genuine time scale by magnetic X-ray microscopy. It is shown that the nonharmonic terms are present in real samples with a strong restoring potential. In the framework of our model we gain deep insight into the domain-wall motion by looking at different phase spaces. The corrections of the harmonic potential can change the motion of the domain wall significantly. The damping parameter of permalloy is determined via the direct imaging technique.

  16. Nucleation, imaging, and motion of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, S., Col; Jamet, S.; StaÅo, M.; Trapp, B.; Le Denmat, S.; Cagnon, L.; Toussaint, J. C.; Fruchart, O.

    2016-08-01

    We report several procedures for the robust nucleation of magnetic domain walls in cylindrical permalloy nanowires. Specific features of the magnetic force microscopy (MFM) contrast of such wires are discussed, to avoid the misinterpretation of the magnetization states. The domain walls moved under quasistatic magnetic fields in the range 0.1-10 mT, as evidenced by MFM at remanence at different stages of their motion.

  17. Direct Imaging of Thermally Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wanjun; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Fan, Yabin; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Minsheng; Chang, Li-Te; Lang, Murong; Wong, Kin L.; Lewis, Mark; Lin, Yen-Ting; Tang, Jianshi; Cherepov, Sergiy; Zhou, Xuezhi; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Schwartz, Robert N.; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-04-01

    Thermally induced domain wall motion in a magnetic insulator was observed using spatiotemporally resolved polar magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. The following results were found: (i) the domain wall moves towards hot regime; (ii) a threshold temperature gradient (5K/mm), i.e., a minimal temperature gradient required to induce domain wall motion; (iii) a finite domain wall velocity outside of the region with a temperature gradient, slowly decreasing as a function of distance, which is interpreted to result from the penetration of a magnonic current into the constant temperature region; and (iv) a linear dependence of the average domain wall velocity on temperature gradient, beyond a threshold thermal bias. Our observations can be qualitatively explained using a magnonic spin transfer torque mechanism, which suggests the utility of magnonic spin transfer torque for controlling magnetization dynamics.

  18. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ~40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides.

  19. Imaging the Fine Structure of a Magnetic Domain Wall in a Ni Nanocylinder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We present the first experimental imaging of the internal DW structure in 55 and 85 nm diameter Ni nanocylinders, using electron holography combined with micromagnetic calculations. We demonstrate the magnetic transition from a hybrid magnetic state with both vortex and transverse DW in 85 nm diameter Ni nanocylinders to a pure transverse wall in thinner nanowires. This is particularly important as DWs in nanocylinders are model systems to go beyond the classical Walker limit. PMID:23586647

  20. Compression and denoising in magnetic resonance imaging via SVD on the Fourier domain using computer algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Felipe

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) data reconstruction can be computationally a challenging task. The signal-to-noise ratio might also present complications, especially with high-resolution images. In this sense, data compression can be useful not only for reducing the complexity and memory requirements, but also to reduce noise, even to allow eliminate spurious components.This article proposes the use of a system based on singular value decomposition of low order for noise reconstruction and reduction in MR imaging system. The proposed method is evaluated using in vivo MRI data. Rebuilt images with less than 20 of the original data and with similar quality in terms of visual inspection are presented. Also a quantitative evaluation of the method is presented.

  1. Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Vakoc, Benjamin; Yun, Seok Hyun

    In this chapter, we discuss a frequency-domain approach, optical frequency-domain imaging (OFDI), which is based on optical frequency-domain reflectometry and uses a wavelength-swept laser and standard single-element photodetectors. The chapter begins with an overview of the fundamental aspects of the technology, including the detected signal, sensitivity, depth range, and resolution, and then goes on to discuss specific component technologies including the light source, interferometer and acquisition electronics, and image processing. The final section of the chapter provides a brief glimpse at some of the biomedical applications that most directly take advantage of the improved speed and sensitivity of OFDI.

  2. Trajectory dependent particle response for anisotropic mono domain particles in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeser, M.; Bente, K.; Neumann, A.; Buzug, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    In magnetic particle imaging, scanners use different spatial sampling techniques to cover the field of view (FOV). As spatial encoding is realized by a selective low field region (a field-free-point, or field-free-line), this region has to be moved through the FOV on specific sampling trajectories. To achieve these trajectories complex time dependent magnetic fields are necessary. Due to the superposition of the selection field and the homogeneous time dependent fields, particles at different spatial positions experience different field sequences. As a result, the dynamic behaviour of those particles can be strongly spatially dependent. So far, simulation studies that determined the trajectory quality have used the Langevin function to model the particle response. This however, neglects the dynamic relaxation of the particles, which is highly affected by magnetic anisotropy. More sophisticated models based on stochastic differential equations that include these effects were only used for one dimensional excitation. In this work, a model based on stochastic differential equations is applied to two-dimensional trajectory field sequences, and the effects of these field sequences on the particle response are investigated. The results show that the signal of anisotropic particles is not based on particle parameters such as size and shape alone, but is also determined by the field sequence that a particle ensemble experiences at its spatial position. It is concluded, that the particle parameters can be optimized in terms of the used trajectory.

  3. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide

    PubMed Central

    Taniuchi, T.; Motoyui, Y.; Morozumi, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Fortuna, F.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Shin, S.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  4. Imaging of room-temperature ferromagnetic nano-domains at the surface of a non-magnetic oxide.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, T; Motoyui, Y; Morozumi, K; Rödel, T C; Fortuna, F; Santander-Syro, A F; Shin, S

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases at oxide surfaces or interfaces show exotic ordered states of matter, like superconductivity, magnetism or spin-polarized states, and are a promising platform for alternative oxide-based electronics. Here we directly image a dense population of randomly distributed ferromagnetic domains of ∼40 nm typical sizes at room temperature at the oxygen-deficient surface of SrTiO3, a non-magnetic transparent insulator in the bulk. We use laser-based photoemission electron microscopy, an experimental technique that gives selective spin detection of the surface carriers, even in bulk insulators, with a high spatial resolution of 2.6 nm. We furthermore find that the Curie temperature in this system is as high as 900 K. These findings open perspectives for applications in nano-domain magnetism and spintronics using oxide-based devices, for instance through the nano-engineering of oxygen vacancies at surfaces or interfaces of transition-metal oxides. PMID:27283225

  5. Magnetic field dependence of magnetic domains in Co doped Mn2Sb using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vikram; Saha, Pampi; Kushwaha, Pallavi; Thamizhavel, A.; Rawat, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic domains in the ferrimagnetic state of Co doped Mn2Sb single crystal has been visualized using Magnetic Force Microscopy. It shows fractal like domain structure. With the application of magnetic field, single domain state is achieved around 2000 Oe. The MFM images collected during field increasing and decreasing cycles show different morphology for same field value.

  6. Magnetic surface domain imaging of uncapped epitaxial FeRh(001) thin films across the temperature-induced metamagnetic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianzhong; Matthes, Frank; Bürgler, Daniel E.; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    The surface magnetic domain structure of uncapped epitaxial FeRh/MgO(001) thin films was imaged by in-situ scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA) at various temperatures between 122 and 450 K. This temperature range covers the temperature-driven antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition in the body of the films that was observed in-situ by means of the more depth-sensitive magneto-optical Kerr effect. The SEMPA images confirm that the interfacial ferromagnetism coexisting with the antiferromagnetic phase inside the film is an intrinsic property of the FeRh(001) surface. Furthermore, the SEMPA data display a reduction of the in-plane magnetization occuring well above the phase transition temperature which, thus, is not related to the volume expansion at the phase transition. This observation is interpreted as a spin reorientation of the surface magnetization for which we propose a possible mechanism based on temperature-dependent tetragonal distortion due to different thermal expansion coefficients of MgO and FeRh.

  7. Time-domain imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolliver, C. L.

    1989-01-01

    The quest for the highest resolution microwave imaging and principle of time-domain imaging has been the primary motivation for recent developments in time-domain techniques. With the present technology, fast time varying signals can now be measured and recorded both in magnitude and in-phase. It has also enhanced our ability to extract relevant details concerning the scattering object. In the past, the interface of object geometry or shape for scattered signals has received substantial attention in radar technology. Various scattering theories were proposed to develop analytical solutions to this problem. Furthermore, the random inversion, frequency swept holography, and the synthetic radar imaging, have two things in common: (1) the physical optic far-field approximation, and (2) the utilization of channels as an extra physical dimension, were also advanced. Despite the inherent vectorial nature of electromagnetic waves, these scalar treatments have brought forth some promising results in practice with notable examples in subsurface and structure sounding. The development of time-domain techniques are studied through the theoretical aspects as well as experimental verification. The use of time-domain imaging for space robotic vision applications has been suggested.

  8. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  9. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  10. Magnetically mediated thermoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaohua; Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, alternating magnetic field is explored for inducing thermoacoustic effect on dielectric objects. Termed as magnetically mediated thermo-acoustic (MMTA) effect that provides a contrast in conductivity, this approach employs magnetic resonance for delivering energy to a desired location by applying a large transient current at radio frequency below 50MHz to a compact magnetically resonant coil. The alternating magnetic field induces large electric field inside conductive objects, which then undergoes joule heating and emanates acoustic signal thermo-elastically. The magnetic mediation approach with low radio frequency can potentially provide deeper penetration than microwave radiation due to the non-magnetic nature of human body and therefore extend thermoacoustic imaging to deep laid organs. Both incoherent time domain method that applies a pulsed radio frequency current and coherent frequency domain approach that employs a linear chirp signal to modulate the envelop of the current are discussed. Owing to the coherent processing nature, the latter approach is capable of achieving much better signal to noise ratio and therefore potential for portable imaging system. Phantom experiments are carried out to demonstrate the signal generation together with some preliminary imaging results. Ex-vivo tissue studies are also investigated.

  11. Magnetic bubble domain memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ypma, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Some attractive features of Bubble Domain Memory and its relation to existing technologies are discussed. Two promising applications are block access mass memory and tape recorder replacement. The required chip capabilities for these uses are listed, and the specifications for a block access mass memory designed to fit between core and HPT disk are presented. A feasibility model for a tape recorder replacement is introduced.

  12. MISTRAL: a transmission soft X-ray microscopy beamline for cryo nano-tomography of biological samples and magnetic domains imaging.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Nicolás, Josep; Valcárcel, Ricardo; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Rosanes, Marc; Avila, Jose; Tkachuk, Andrei; Irwin, Jeff; Ferrer, Salvador; Pereiro, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The performance of MISTRAL is reported, the soft X-ray transmission microscopy beamline at the ALBA light source (Barcelona, Spain) which is primarily dedicated to cryo soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) for three-dimensional visualization of whole unstained cells at spatial resolutions down to 30 nm (half pitch). Short acquisition times allowing for high-throughput and correlative microscopy studies have promoted cryo-SXT as an emerging cellular imaging tool for structural cell biologists bridging the gap between optical and electron microscopy. In addition, the beamline offers the possibility of imaging magnetic domains in thin magnetic films that are illustrated here with an example. PMID:26134819

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  14. Frequency Domain Sampling Using Biomedical Imaging Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Gun Ha; Chung, Minji; Kyung, Richard

    2015-04-01

    In magnetic resonance image analysis using physical and computational method, the process of transformation from frequency domain to image domain requires significant amount time because Inverse Fourier Transformation (IFT) takes every frequency points to determine the final output image. This paper shows the mechanisms and physics of image formation using the selectivity of proper k-space by removing different amounts of high or low frequencies to create the most optimal magnetic resonance image of a human tibial bone. Originally, square unit step function, N/2-N/10:N/2 + N/10 = 1, was used during the Fourier Transformations. And Gaussian filter, y = exp(-t2/40n) , where t = h-L/2, h = [0,M], L =2*7*N/40, the size of frequency matrix (M, N) = (365,557) was tested. Also circle equations as a filter, r = sqrt((x-M/2)2 + (y-N/2)2) , were tested in creating the images of the human tibial bone to find an efficient filter. The best efficiency occurred when the exponent n in the proposed Gaussian filter equation is in between 3 and 8, and therefore, a new algorithm is needed to find the exact number since the number is not only an integer.

  15. Time series analysis in the time domain and resampling methods for studies of functional magnetic resonance brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Locascio, J J; Jennings, P J; Moore, C I; Corkin, S

    1997-01-01

    Although functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods yield rich temporal and spatial data for even a single subject, universally accepted data analysis techniques have not been developed that use all the potential information from fMRI of the brain. Specifically, temporal correlations and confounds are a problem in assessing change within pixels. Spatial correlations across pixels are a problem in determining regions of activation and in correcting for multiple significance tests. We propose methods that address these issues in the analysis of task-related changes in mean signal intensity for individual subjects. Our approach to temporally based problems within pixels is to employ a model based on autoregressive-moving average (ARMA or "Box-Jenkins") time series methods, which we call CARMA (Contrasts and ARMA). To adjust for performing multiple significance tests across pixels, taking into account between-pixel correlations, we propose adjustment of P values with "resampling methods." Our objective is to produce two- or three-dimensional brain maps that provide, at each pixel in the map, an estimated P value with absolute meaning. That is, each P value approximates the probability of having obtained by chance the observed signal effect at that pixel, given that the null hypothesis is true. Simulated and real data examples are provided. PMID:20408214

  16. Domain wall manipulation with a magnetic tip.

    PubMed

    Stapelfeldt, T; Wieser, R; Vedmedenko, E Y; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-07-01

    A theoretical concept of local manipulation of magnetic domain walls is introduced. In the proposed procedure, a domain wall is driven by a spin-polarized current induced by a magnetic tip, as used in a scanning tunneling microscope, placed above a magnetic nanostripe and then moved along its long axis with a current flowing through the vacuum barrier. The angular momentum from the spin-polarized current exerts a torque on the magnetic moments underneath the tip and leads to a displacement of the domain wall. Particularly, the manipulation of a ferromagnetic 180° transverse domain wall has been studied by means of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Different relative orientations of the tip and the sample magnetization have been considered. PMID:21797636

  17. Magnetic domains in nanostructured media studied with M-TXM.

    PubMed

    Fischer, P; Eimüller, T; Schütz, G; Bayreuther, G; Tsunashima, S; Takagi, N; Denbeaux, G; Attwood, D

    2001-03-01

    Combining X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) with a transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) allows to image element-specifically magnetic domain structures with 25nm lateral resolution. Both in-plane and out-of-plane systems can be studied in applied magnetic fields. Thus field-dependent parameters, as individual nucleation fields in magnetic nanostructures can be deduced and related to morphology. Images of thermomagnetically written bits in magneto-optical TbFeCo media proof the reliability of the writing process and the importance of an exact thermal design of the systems. Domains observed at corresponding Co L edges proof the chemical sensitivity of M-TXM and its potential to image few monolayer systems. PMID:11512768

  18. Domain adaptation for microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Becker, Carlos; Christoudias, C Mario; Fua, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    Electron and light microscopy imaging can now deliver high-quality image stacks of neural structures. However, the amount of human annotation effort required to analyze them remains a major bottleneck. While machine learning algorithms can be used to help automate this process, they require training data, which is time-consuming to obtain manually, especially in image stacks. Furthermore, due to changing experimental conditions, successive stacks often exhibit differences that are severe enough to make it difficult to use a classifier trained for a specific one on another. This means that this tedious annotation process has to be repeated for each new stack. In this paper, we present a domain adaptation algorithm that addresses this issue by effectively leveraging labeled examples across different acquisitions and significantly reducing the annotation requirements. Our approach can handle complex, nonlinear image feature transformations and scales to large microscopy datasets that often involve high-dimensional feature spaces and large 3D data volumes. We evaluate our approach on four challenging electron and light microscopy applications that exhibit very different image modalities and where annotation is very costly. Across all applications we achieve a significant improvement over the state-of-the-art machine learning methods and demonstrate our ability to greatly reduce human annotation effort. PMID:25474809

  19. Photographic observation of magnetic domain structure with three-dimensional local magnetization direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Sakae; Akahane, Koichi; Saito, Shin

    2016-07-01

    The direction of magnetization of a magnetic material is possibly oriented three-dimensionally because of the presence of magnetic anisotropy field, self-demagnetizing field, and stray field. Therefore, the three-dimensional detection of the direction of magnetization is required. The method of magnetic domain observation by photographic imaging utilizing the Kerr effect is widely used. If the perpendicular magnetization components exist, there is a problem that obliquely incident light has superimposed longitudinal Kerr and polar Kerr effects. To perform the three-dimensional detection of magnetization direction, it is necessary to eliminate the influence of the polar Kerr effect from the Kerr effect of obliquely incident light. We report the photographic observation of the magnetic domain structure and the detection of the three-dimensional local magnetization direction using the Kerr effect, applying only an in-plane saturation magnetic field.

  20. Magnetic Domain Confinement by Anisotropy Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. P.; Lew, W. S.; Bland, J. A.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C. A.; Natali, M.; Chen, Y.

    2002-02-01

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a ``natural'' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic wall-the ``anisotropy constrained'' magnetic wall.

  1. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P.; Allwood, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300 nm wide, 24 nm thick Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} nanowire. Both transverse and vortex type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences, or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  2. Observation of field-induced domain wall propagation in magnetic nanowires by magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fischer, P. J.; Allwood, D. A.

    2008-04-01

    Magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy (M-TXM) is used to image domain walls in magnetic ring structures formed by a 300nm wide, 24nm thick Ni81Fe19 nanowire. Both transverse- and vortex-type domain walls are observed after application of different field sequences. Domain walls can be observed by comparing images obtained from opposite field sequences or else domain wall propagation observed by comparing successive images in a particular field sequence. This demonstrates the potential use of M-TXM in developing and understanding planar magnetic nanowire behavior.

  3. Magnetic domain wall motion by spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grollier, Julie; Chanthbouala, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Anane, A.; Cros, V.; Nguyen van Dau, F.; Fert, Albert

    2011-04-01

    The discovery that a spin polarized current can exert a large torque on a ferromagnet through a transfusion of spin angular momentum, offers a new way to control a magnetization by simple current injection, without the help of an applied external field. Spin transfer can be used to induce magnetization reversals and oscillations, or to control the position of a magnetic domain wall. In this review, we focus on this last mechanism, which is today the subject of an extensive research, both because the microscopic details for its origin are still debated, but also because promising applications are at stake for non-volatile magnetic memories.

  4. [Magnetic particle imaging (MPI)].

    PubMed

    Haegele, J; Sattel, T; Erbe, M; Luedtke-Buzug, K; Taupitz, M; Borgert, J; Buzug, T M; Barkhausen, J; Vogt, F M

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) displays the spatial distribution and concentration of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs). It is a quantitative, tomographic imaging method with high temporal and spatial resolution and allows work with high sensitivity yet without ionizing radiation. Thus, it may be a very promising tool for medical imaging. In this review, we describe the physical and technical basics and various concepts for clinical scanners. Furthermore, clinical applications such as cardiovascular imaging, interventional procedures, imaging and therapy of malignancies as well as molecular imaging are presented. PMID:22198836

  5. Domain wall transformations and hopping in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) nanostructures imaged with high resolution x-ray magnetic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Finizio, S; Foerster, M; Krüger, B; Vaz, C A F; Miyawaki, T; Mawass, M A; Peña, L; Méchin, L; Hühn, S; Moshnyaga, V; Büttner, F; Bisig, A; Le Guyader, L; El Moussaoui, S; Valencia, S; Kronast, F; Eisebitt, S; Kläui, M

    2014-11-12

    We investigate the effect of electric current pulse injection on domain walls in La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO(3) (LSMO) half-ring nanostructures by high resolution x-ray magnetic microscopy at room temperature. Due to the easily accessible Curie temperature of LSMO, we can employ reasonable current densities to induce the Joule heating necessary to observe effects such as hopping of the domain walls between different pinning sites and nucleation/annihilation events. Such effects are the dominant features close to the Curie temperature, while spin torque is found to play a small role close to room temperature. We are also able to observe thermally activated domain wall transformations and we find that, for the analyzed geometries, the vortex domain wall configuration is energetically favored, in agreement with micromagnetic simulations. PMID:25336527

  6. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Mitsunobu Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  8. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  9. Domain wall dynamics of periodic magnetic domain patterns in Co2MnGe-Heusler microstripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, K.; Westerholt, K.; Zabel, H.

    2016-03-01

    Highly symmetric periodic domain patterns were obtained in Co2MnGe-Heusler microstripes as a result of the competition between growth-induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy and shape anisotropy. Zero field magnetic configurations and magnetic field-induced domain wall (DW) motion were studied by magnetic force microscopy-image technique for two different cases: dominant uniaxial- and dominant cubic in-plane anisotropy. We implemented a magneto-optical Kerr effect susceptometer to investigate the DW dynamics of periodic domain structures by measuring the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the Kerr signal as a function of magnetic field frequency and amplitude. The DW dynamics for fields applied transversally to the long stripe axis was found to be dominated by viscous slide motion. We used the inherent symmetry/periodicity properties of the magnetic domain structure to fit the experimental results with a theoretical model allowing to extract the DW mobility for the case of transverse DWs (μ TDW = 1.1 m s-1 Oe-1) as well as for vortex-like DWs (μ VDW = 8.7 m s-1 Oe-1). Internal spin structure transformations may cause a reduction of DW mobility in TDWs as observed by OMMFF simulations.

  10. Constricted nanowire with stabilized magnetic domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbiaa, R.; Al Bahri, M.

    2016-08-01

    Domain wall (DW)-based magnetic memory offers the possibility for increasing the storage capacity. However, stability of DW remains the major drawback of this scheme. In this letter, we propose a stepped nanowire for pinning DW in a desirable position. From micromagnetic simulation, the proposed design applied to in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows that by adjusting the nanowire step size and its width it is possible to stabilize DW for a desirable current density range. In contrast, only a movement of DW could be seen for conventional nanowire. An extension to a multi-stepped nanowire could be used for multi-bit per cell magnetic memory.

  11. Simplified technique demonstrates magnetic domain switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Light from a conventional photographic light source is polarized and projected through thin samples of gadolinium iron garnet and then observed with a conventional polarizing microscope. A distinctive change in color from red to yellow is observed as the magnetic domains are switched.

  12. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  13. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  14. X-ray study of aligned magnetic stripe domains in perpendicular multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hellwig, O.; Denbeaux, G.P.; Kortright, J.B.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2003-03-03

    We have investigated the stripe domain structure and the magnetic reversal of perpendicular Co/Pt based multilayers at room temperature using magnetometry, magnetic imaging and magnetic x-ray scattering. In-plane field cycling aligns the stripe domains along the field direction. In magnetic x-ray scattering the parallel stripe domains act as a magnetic grating resulting in observed Bragg reflections up to 5th order. We model the scattering profile to extract and quantify the domain as well as domain wall widths. Applying fields up to {approx}1.2 kOe perpendicular to the film reversibly changes the relative width of up versus down domains while maintaining the overall stripe periodicity. Fields above 1.2 kOe introduce irreversible changes into the domain structure by contracting and finally annihilating individual stripe domains. We compare the current results with modeling and previous measurements of films with perpendicular anisotropy.

  15. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Danby, G.

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager includes a generator for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager also includes a sensor for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object. 25 figs.

  16. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James; Reich, Morris; Danby, Gordon

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager 10 includes a generator 18 for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager 10 also includes a sensor 20 for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object.

  17. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. F.; Wu, J.; Niu, D. X.; Chen, L.; Morton, S. A.; Scholl, A.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Zhang, W.; Will, I.; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, R.; van der Laan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 1011 A.m−2) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of “Barkhausen jumps”. A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime. PMID:24170087

  18. Dynamic domain wall chirality rectification by rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisig, Andre; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Stärk, Martin; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Gliga, Sebastian; Weigand, Markus; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    We report on the observation of magnetic vortex domain wall chirality reversal in ferromagnetic rings that is controlled by the sense of rotation of a magnetic field. We use time-resolved X-ray microscopy to dynamically image the chirality-switching process and perform micromagnetic simulations to deduce the switching details from time-resolved snapshots. We find experimentally that the switching occurs within less than 4 ns and is observed in all samples with ring widths ranging from 0.5 μm to 2 μm, ring diameters between 2 μm and 5 μm, and a thickness of 30 nm, where a vortex domain wall is present in the magnetic onion state of the ring. From the magnetic contrast in the time-resolved images, we can identify effects of thermal activation, which plays a role for the switching process. Moreover, we find that the process is highly reproducible so that the domain wall chirality can be set with high fidelity.

  19. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes.

  20. Periodic magnetic domains in single-crystalline cobalt filament arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Wang, Fan; Jia, Fei; Li, Jingning; Liu, Kai; Huang, Sunxiang; Luan, Zhongzhi; Wu, Di; Chen, Yanbin; Zhu, Jianmin; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic structures with controlled domain wall pattern may be applied as potential building blocks for three-dimensional magnetic memory and logic devices. Using a unique electrochemical self-assembly method, we achieve regular single-crystalline cobalt filament arrays with specific geometric profile and crystallographic orientation, and the magnetic domain configuration can be conveniently tailored. We report the transition of periodic antiparallel magnetic domains to compressed vortex magnetic domains depending on the ratio of height to width of the wires. A "phase diagram" is obtained to describe the dependence of the type of magnetic domain and the geometrical profiles of the wires. Magnetoresistance of the filaments demonstrates that the contribution of a series of 180∘ domain walls is over 0.15 % of the zero-field resistance ρ (H =0 ) . These self-assembled magnetic nanofilaments, with controlled periodic domain patterns, offer an interesting platform to explore domain-wall-based memory and logic devices.

  1. Birdsong dialect patterns explained using magnetic domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, James; Kenney, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The songs and calls of many bird species, like human speech, form distinct regional dialects. We suggest that the process of dialect formation is analogous to the physical process of magnetic domain formation. We take the coastal breeding grounds of the Puget Sound white crowned sparrow as an example. Previous field studies suggest that birds of this species learn multiple songs early in life, and when establishing a territory for the first time, retain one of these dialects in order to match the majority of their neighbors. We introduce a simple lattice model of the process, showing that this matching behavior can produce single dialect domains provided the death rate of adult birds is sufficiently low. We relate death rate to thermodynamic temperature in magnetic materials, and calculate the critical death rate by analogy with the Ising model. Using parameters consistent with the known behavior of these birds we show that coastal dialect domain shapes may be explained by viewing them as low-temperature "stripe states."

  2. Birdsong dialect patterns explained using magnetic domains.

    PubMed

    Burridge, James; Kenney, Steven

    2016-06-01

    The songs and calls of many bird species, like human speech, form distinct regional dialects. We suggest that the process of dialect formation is analogous to the physical process of magnetic domain formation. We take the coastal breeding grounds of the Puget Sound white crowned sparrow as an example. Previous field studies suggest that birds of this species learn multiple songs early in life, and when establishing a territory for the first time, retain one of these dialects in order to match the majority of their neighbors. We introduce a simple lattice model of the process, showing that this matching behavior can produce single dialect domains provided the death rate of adult birds is sufficiently low. We relate death rate to thermodynamic temperature in magnetic materials, and calculate the critical death rate by analogy with the Ising model. Using parameters consistent with the known behavior of these birds we show that coastal dialect domain shapes may be explained by viewing them as low-temperature "stripe states." PMID:27415293

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    PubMed

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  4. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C K; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ). PMID:26689141

  5. Chiral damping of magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jué, Emilie; Safeer, C. K.; Drouard, Marc; Lopez, Alexandre; Balint, Paul; Buda-Prejbeanu, Liliana; Boulle, Olivier; Auffret, Stephane; Schuhl, Alain; Manchon, Aurelien; Miron, Ioan Mihai; Gaudin, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    Structural symmetry breaking in magnetic materials is responsible for the existence of multiferroics, current-induced spin-orbit torques and some topological magnetic structures. In this Letter we report that the structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) gives rise to a chiral damping mechanism, which is evidenced by measuring the field-driven domain-wall (DW) motion in perpendicularly magnetized asymmetric Pt/Co/Pt trilayers. The DW dynamics associated with the chiral damping and those with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) exhibit identical spatial symmetry. However, both scenarios are differentiated by their time reversal properties: whereas DMI is a conservative effect that can be modelled by an effective field, the chiral damping is purely dissipative and has no influence on the equilibrium magnetic texture. When the DW motion is modulated by an in-plane magnetic field, it reveals the structure of the internal fields experienced by the DWs, allowing one to distinguish the physical mechanism. The chiral damping enriches the spectrum of physical phenomena engendered by the SIA, and is essential for conceiving DW and skyrmion devices owing to its coexistence with DMI (ref. ).

  6. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Yurii P; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-05-24

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. PMID:27138460

  7. Accessible magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, L; Arakawa, M; Hale, J; Rothschild, P; Carlson, J; Hake, K; Kramer, D; Lu, W; Van Heteren, J

    1989-10-01

    The cost of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is driven by magnetic field strength. Misperceptions as to the impact of field strength on performance have led to systems that are more expensive than they need to be. Careful analysis of all the factors that affect diagnostic quality lead to the conclusion that field strength per se is not a strong determinant of system performance. Freed from the constraints imposed by high-field operation, it is possible to exploit a varied set of opportunities afforded by low-field operation. In addition to lower costs and easier siting, we can take advantage of shortened T1 times, higher contrast, reduced sensitivity to motion, and reduced radiofrequency power deposition. These conceptual advantages can be made to coalesce onto practical imaging systems. We describe a low-cost MRI system that utilizes a permanent magnet of open design. Careful optimization of receiving antennas and acquisition sequences permit performance levels consistent with those needed for an effective diagnostic unit. Ancillary advantages include easy access to the patient, reduced claustrophobia, quiet and comfortable operation, and absence of a missile effect. The system can be sited in 350 sq ft and consumes a modest amount of electricity. MRI equipment of this kind can widen the population base than can access this powerful and beneficial diagnostic modality. PMID:2640910

  8. Polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging system for endobronchial imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; de Lange, Joop; Daniels, Johannes M A; Grünberg, Katrien; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-01

    A polarization sensitive endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI) system with a motorized distal scanning catheter is demonstrated. It employs a passive polarization delay unit to multiplex two orthogonal probing polarization states in depth, and a polarization diverse detection unit to detect interference signal in two orthogonal polarization channels. Per depth location four electro-magnetic field components are measured that can be represented in a complex 2x2 field matrix. A Jones matrix of the sample is derived and the sample birefringence is extracted by eigenvalue decomposition. The condition of balanced detection and the polarization mode dispersion are quantified. A complex field averaging method based on the alignment of randomly pointing field phasors is developed to reduce speckle noise. The variation of the polarization states incident on the tissue due to the circular scanning and catheter sheath birefringence is investigated. With this system we demonstrated imaging of ex vivo chicken muscle, in vivo pig lung and ex vivo human lung specimens. PMID:25836196

  9. Correlation Between Domain Behavior and Magnetic Properties of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Scott Leib

    2003-05-31

    Correlation between length scales in the field of magnetism has long been a topic of intensive study. The long-term desire is simple: to determine one theory that completely describes the magnetic behavior of matter from an individual atomic particle all the way up to large masses of material. One key piece to this puzzle is connecting the behavior of a material's domains on the nanometer scale with the magnetic properties of an entire large sample or device on the centimeter scale. In the first case study involving the FeSiAl thin films, contrast and spacing of domain patterns are clearly related to microstructure and stress. Case study 2 most clearly demonstrates localized, incoherent domain wall motion switching with field applied along an easy axis for a square hysteresis loop. In case study 3, axis-specific images of the complex Gd-Si-Ge material clearly show the influence of uniaxial anisotropy. Case study 4, the only study with the sole intent of creating domain structures for imaging, also demonstrated in fairly simple terms the effects of increasing stress on domain patterns. In case study 5, it was proven that the width of magnetoresistance loops could be quantitatively predicted using only MFM. When all of the case studies are considered together, a dominating factor seems to be that of anisotropy, both magneticrostaylline and stress induced. Any quantitative bulk measurements heavily reliant on K coefficients, such as the saturation fields for the FeSiAl films, H{sub c} in cases 1, 3, and 5, and the uniaxial character of the Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}), transferred to and from the domain scale quite well. In-situ measurements of domain rotation and switching, could also be strongly correlated with bulk magnetic properties, including coercivity, M{sub s}, and hysteresis loop shape. In most cases, the qualitative nature of the domain structures, when properly considered, matched quite well to what might have been expected from theory and calculation

  10. Magnetization process and domain structure in the near-surface region of conventional amorphous wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriac, Horia; Lostun, Mihaela; Óvári, Tibor-Adrian

    2011-04-01

    Results on the study of the surface magnetization process and domain structure by magneto-optical Kerr effect in conventional rapidly quenched amorphous magnetic wires are reported. Domain imaging confirms the presence of a bamboo-type structure in the near-surface region of these materials. Surface Kerr loops show that the overall magnetization in the near-surface region has a large axial component, besides the circular one. A bistable magnetic behavior on the axial direction has been emphasized. A circularly applied field leads to the disappearance of axial magnetic bistability. Kerr loops are changed by the presence of 180° interdomain walls in the near-surface region.

  11. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties.

  12. Third type of domain wall in soft magnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, V. D.; Fruchart, O.; Pizzini, S.; Vogel, J.; Toussaint, J.-C.; Rougemaille, N.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic domain walls (DWs) in nanostructures are low-dimensional objects that separate regions with uniform magnetisation. Since they can have different shapes and widths, DWs are an exciting playground for fundamental research, and became in the past years the subject of intense works, mainly focused on controlling, manipulating, and moving their internal magnetic configuration. In nanostrips with in-plane magnetisation, two DWs have been identified: in thin and narrow strips, transverse walls are energetically favored, while in thicker and wider strips vortex walls have lower energy. The associated phase diagram is now well established and often used to predict the low-energy magnetic configuration in a given magnetic nanostructure. However, besides the transverse and vortex walls, we find numerically that another type of wall exists in permalloy nanostrips. This third type of DW is characterised by a three-dimensional, flux closure micromagnetic structure with an unusual length and three internal degrees of freedom. Magnetic imaging on lithographically-patterned permalloy nanostrips confirms these predictions and shows that these DWs can be moved with an external magnetic field of about 1 mT. An extended phase diagram describing the regions of stability of all known types of DWs in permalloy nanostrips is provided.

  13. Nucleation of reversed domain and pinning effect on domain wall motion in nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. B.; Shen, B. G.; Niu, E.; Sun, J. R.

    2013-08-01

    The magnetization behaviors show a strong pinning effect on domain wall motion in optimally melt-spun Pr8Fe87B5 ribbons at room temperature. According to analysis, the coercivity is determined by the nucleation field of reversed domain, and the pinning effect, which results from the weak exchange coupling at interface, makes domain nucleation processes independent and leads to non-uniform magnetization reversals. At a temperature of 60 K, owing to the weak exchange coupling between soft-hard grains, magnetization reversal undergoes processes of spring domain nucleation in soft grains and irreversible domain nucleation in hard grains, and the pinning effect remains strong among hard grains.

  14. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls.

    PubMed

    Dugaev, V K; Berakdar, J; Barnaś, J

    2006-02-01

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g., upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomenon is shown to be utilizable to manipulate the spin density in the domain vicinity. The domain wall parameters are readily controllable, and the predicted effect is hence exploitable in spintronic devices. PMID:16486888

  15. Image domain propeller fast spin echo☆

    PubMed Central

    Skare, Stefan; Holdsworth, Samantha J.; Lilja, Anders; Bammer, Roland

    2013-01-01

    A new pulse sequence for high-resolution T2-weighted (T2-w) imaging is proposed –image domain propeller fast spin echo (iProp-FSE). Similar to the T2-w PROPELLER sequence, iProp-FSE acquires data in a segmented fashion, as blades that are acquired in multiple TRs. However, the iProp-FSE blades are formed in the image domain instead of in the k-space domain. Each iProp-FSE blade resembles a single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequence with a very narrow phase-encoding field of view (FOV), after which N rotated blade replicas yield the final full circular FOV. Our method of combining the image domain blade data to a full FOV image is detailed, and optimal choices of phase-encoding FOVs and receiver bandwidths were evaluated on phantom and volunteers. The results suggest that a phase FOV of 15–20%, a receiver bandwidth of ±32–63 kHz and a subsequent readout time of about 300 ms provide a good tradeoff between signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency and T2 blurring. Comparisons between iProp-FSE, Cartesian FSE and PROPELLER were made on single-slice axial brain data, showing similar T2-w tissue contrast and SNR with great anatomical conspicuity at similar scan times –without colored noise or streaks from motion. A new slice interleaving order is also proposed to improve the multislice capabilities of iProp-FSE. PMID:23200683

  16. Engineered magnetic domain textures in exchange bias bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Alexander; Hankemeier, Sebastian; Holzinger, Dennis; Müglich, Nicolas David; Staeck, Philipp; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter; Ehresmann, Arno

    2016-07-01

    A magnetic domain texture has been deterministically engineered in a topographically flat exchange-biased (EB) thin film system. The texture consists of long-range periodically arranged unit cells of four individual domains, characterized by individual anisotropies, individual geometry, and with non-collinear remanent magnetizations. The texture has been engineered by a sequence of light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning of the EB layer system. The magnetic texture's in-plane spatial magnetization distribution and the corresponding domain walls have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). The influence of magnetic stray fields emerging from neighboring domain walls and the influence of the different anisotropies of the adjacent domains on the Néel type domain wall core's magnetization rotation sense and widths were investigated. It is shown that the usual energy degeneracy of clockwise and counterclockwise rotating magnetization through the walls is revoked, suppressing Bloch lines along the domain wall. Estimates of the domain wall widths for different domain configurations based on material parameters determined by vibrating sample magnetometry were quantitatively compared to the SEMPA data.

  17. Observation of thermomagnetically recorded domains with high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunashima, S.; Takagi, Nayuki; Yamaguchi, Atushi; Kume, Minoru; Fischer, P.; Kumazawa, M.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic domains were thermomagnetically recorded on TbFeCo films using laser pulsed magnetic field modulation (LP-MFM) and light intensity modulation (LIM). The domains were observed with high resolution magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) before and after the heat treatment in order to clarify the recording characteristics and the thermal stability of recorded domains. From the results of M-TXM images, it was found that isolated single marks whose lengths are much smaller than 100 nm can be recorded by LP-MFM but their mark lengths become often longer than designed. It was further confirmed that the heat treatment at 120 degree C for 50 hours does not influence significantly the crescent-shaped magnetic domains of 100 nm in width recorded using LP-MFM method and circular domains of 150 nm in diameter recorded using LIM method.

  18. Magnetic configuration of submicron-sized magnetic patterns in domain wall motion memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, Norikazu; Numata, Hideaki; Fukami, Shunsuke; Nagahara, Kiyokazu; Suzuki, Tetsuhiro; Ishiwata, Nobuyuki; Fukumoto, Keiki; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Ono, Teruo

    2010-05-01

    We observed magnetic configuration and its change by external magnetic fields in submicron-sized U- and H-shaped NiFe patterns with an x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscope. The microscope images showed the formation of a single domain wall (DW) with transverse structure at one corner of the U- and H-shaped patterns by applying the magnetic field from the oblique direction. By applying the magnetic field from the direction parallel to a horizontal bar in the patterns, the magnetic configuration in the U-shaped pattern was changed and four patterns were formed: (1) the DW moved from one trap site to another, (2) the DW moved beyond the trap site and formed a single domain, (3) the DW moved and stopped between the trap sites, and (4) the DW remained at the initial position. Only pattern (1) showed reversible DW motion, although pattern (2) was predominantly formed. In contrast, the magnetization configurations showed pattern (1), and reversible DW motion was observed for more than 80% of the H-shaped patterns. Micromagnetic simulation revealed that the DW in the U-shaped pattern was not sufficiently fixed at the corner and easily moved and vanished at the edge of the patterns because the magnetization in the two parallel bars rotated with a magnetic field. The DW was trapped with sufficient strength at the corner, and DW motion occurred only between the trap sites for the H-shaped patterns. The DW motion process was observed with an in situ magnetic field using the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscope and the process could be optimized by controlling the pattern shape.

  19. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  20. Frequency domain analysis of knock images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yunliang; He, Xin; Wang, Zhi; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-12-01

    High speed imaging-based knock analysis has mainly focused on time domain information, e.g. the spark triggered flame speed, the time when end gas auto-ignition occurs and the end gas flame speed after auto-ignition. This study presents a frequency domain analysis on the knock images recorded using a high speed camera with direct photography in a rapid compression machine (RCM). To clearly visualize the pressure wave oscillation in the combustion chamber, the images were high-pass-filtered to extract the luminosity oscillation. The luminosity spectrum was then obtained by applying fast Fourier transform (FFT) to three basic colour components (red, green and blue) of the high-pass-filtered images. Compared to the pressure spectrum, the luminosity spectra better identify the resonant modes of pressure wave oscillation. More importantly, the resonant mode shapes can be clearly visualized by reconstructing the images based on the amplitudes of luminosity spectra at the corresponding resonant frequencies, which agree well with the analytical solutions for mode shapes of gas vibration in a cylindrical cavity.

  1. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Devolder, Thibaut; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  2. Increased magnetic damping of a single domain wall and adjacent magnetic domains detected by spin torque diode in a nanostripe

    SciTech Connect

    Lequeux, Steven; Sampaio, Joao; Bortolotti, Paolo; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2015-11-02

    Spin torque resonance has been used to simultaneously probe the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall and of magnetic domains in a nanostripe magnetic tunnel junction. Due to the large associated resistance variations, we are able to analyze quantitatively the resonant properties of these single nanoscale magnetic objects. In particular, we find that the magnetic damping of both the domains and the domain wall is doubled compared to the damping value of the host magnetic layer. We estimate the contributions to the damping arising from the dipolar couplings between the different layers in the junction and from the intralayer spin pumping effect, and find that they cannot explain the large damping enhancement that we observe. We conclude that the measured increased damping is intrinsic to large amplitudes excitations of spatially localized modes or solitons such as vibrating or propagating domain walls.

  3. AC driven magnetic domain quantification with 5 nm resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenghua; Li, Xiang; Dong, Dapeng; Liu, Dongping; Saito, H; Ishio, S

    2014-01-01

    As the magnetic storage density increases in commercial products, e.g. the hard disc drives, a full understanding of dynamic magnetism in nanometer resolution underpins the development of next-generation products. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Moreover, the dynamic magnetism cannot be characterized because MFM is only sensitive to the static magnetic fields. Here, we develop a side-band magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to locally observe the alternating magnetic fields in nanometer length scales at an operating distance of 1 nm. Variations in alternating magnetic fields and their relating time-variable magnetic domain reversals have been demonstrated by the side-band MFM. The magnetic domain wall motions, relating to the periodical rotation of sample magnetization, are quantified via micromagnetics. Based on the side-band MFM, the magnetic moment can be determined locally in a volume as small as 5 nanometers. The present technique can be applied to investigate the microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic materials, and allows a wide range of future applications, for example, in data storage and biomedicine. PMID:25011670

  4. Non-volatile polarization switch of magnetic domain wall velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N.; Bernand-Mantel, A.; Schott, Marine; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.

    2015-12-21

    Controlled propagation speed of individual magnetic domains in metal channels at the room temperature is obtained via the non-volatile field effect associated with the switchable polarization of P(VDF-TrFE) (polyvinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric polymer. Polarization domains directly written using conducting atomic force microscope probe locally accelerate/decelerate the magnetic domains in the 0.6 nm thick Co film. The change of the magnetic domain wall velocity is consistent with the magnetic anisotropy energy modulation through the polarization upward/downward orientation. Excellent retention is observed. The demonstrated local non-destructive and reversible change of magnetic properties via rewritable patterning of ferroelectric domains could be attractive for exploring the ultimate limit of miniaturization in devices based on ferromagnetic/ferroelectric bilayers.

  5. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-04-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation – first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line.

  6. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. F.; Gan, W. L.; Kwon, J.; Luo, F. L.; Lim, G. J.; Wang, J. B.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~1012 A/m2. Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 1011 A/m2. Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation – first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line. PMID:27098108

  7. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S F; Gan, W L; Kwon, J; Luo, F L; Lim, G J; Wang, J B; Lew, W S

    2016-01-01

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~10(12) A/m(2). Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 10(11) A/m(2). Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation - first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line. PMID:27098108

  8. Quantitative X-Ray Magnetic Microscopy: from parallel stripe domains to buried topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez, Maria; Blanco-Roldan, C.; Quiros, C.; Valdes-Bango, F.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Martin, J. I.; Alameda, J. M.; Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Duch, M.; Torras, N.; Esteve, J.; Sorrentino, A.; Valcarcel, R.; Pereiro, E.; Ferrer, S.

    Magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) is a powerful imaging technique that can produce element specific images of magnetic domains with nanometric lateral resolution. Here we present a novel imaging method in which the angular dependence of the magnetic contrast in a series of high resolution TXM images is used to obtain quantitative descriptions of the magnetization (canting angles and sense). This has been applied first to analyze parallel stripe domains in weak perpendicular anisotropy ferromagnetic NdCo5 layers of different thickness, and in NdCo5/Permalloy bilayers. Then, our method has been used to identify complex topological defects (merons or 1/2 skyrmions) in a NdCo5 film that are only partially replicated by the Permalloy overlayer. Meron propagation in trilayers (across the thickness) and in hexagonal networks (across bifurcations) will be discussed in terms of their topological characteristics (chirality and polarity). Work supported by Spanish Grant FIS2013-45469.

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  10. Multiscale medical image fusion in wavelet domain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajiv; Khare, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Wavelet transforms have emerged as a powerful tool in image fusion. However, the study and analysis of medical image fusion is still a challenging area of research. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a multiscale fusion of multimodal medical images in wavelet domain. Fusion of medical images has been performed at multiple scales varying from minimum to maximum level using maximum selection rule which provides more flexibility and choice to select the relevant fused images. The experimental analysis of the proposed method has been performed with several sets of medical images. Fusion results have been evaluated subjectively and objectively with existing state-of-the-art fusion methods which include several pyramid- and wavelet-transform-based fusion methods and principal component analysis (PCA) fusion method. The comparative analysis of the fusion results has been performed with edge strength (Q), mutual information (MI), entropy (E), standard deviation (SD), blind structural similarity index metric (BSSIM), spatial frequency (SF), and average gradient (AG) metrics. The combined subjective and objective evaluations of the proposed fusion method at multiple scales showed the effectiveness and goodness of the proposed approach. PMID:24453868

  11. Meta-Stable Magnetic Domain States That Prevent Reliable Absolute Palaeointensity Experiments Revealed By Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, L. V.; Fabian, K.; Bakelaar, I. A.; Dekkers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the absolute palaeointensity of the Earth's magnetic field is notoriously difficult. Many methods to obtain paleointensities from suitable records such as lavas and archeological artifacts involve heating the samples. These heating steps are believed to induce 'magnetic alteration' - a process that is still poorly understood but prevents obtaining correct paleointensity estimates. To observe this magnetic alteration directly we imaged the magnetic domain state of titanomagnetite particles - a common carrier of the magnetic remanence in samples used for paleointensity studies. We selected samples from the 1971-flow of Mt. Etna from a site that systematically yields underestimates of the known intensity of the paleofield - in spite of rigorous testing by various groups. Magnetic Force Microscope images were taken before and after a heating step typically used in absolute palaeointensity experiments. Before heating, the samples feature distinct, blocky domains that sometimes seem to resemble a classical magnetite domain structure. After imparting a partial thermo-remanent magnetization at a temperature often critical to paleointensity experiments (250 °C) the domain state of the same titanomagnetite grains changes into curvier, wavy domains. Furthermore, these structures appeared to be unstable over time: after one-year storage in a magnetic field-free environment the domain states evolved into a viscous remanent magnetization state. Our observations may qualitatively explain reported underestimates from technically successful paleointensity experiments for this site and other sites reported previously. Furthermore the occurrence of intriguing observations such as 'the drawer storage effect' by Shaar et al (EPSL, 2011), and viscous magnetizations observed by Muxworthy and Williams (JGR, 2006) may be (partially) explained by our observations. The major implications of our study for all palaeointensity methods involving heating may be

  12. Domain structures and magnetization reversal in Co/Pd and CoFeB/Pd multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sbiaa, R.; Ranjbar, M.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-05-07

    Domain structures and magnetization reversal of (Co/Pd) and (CoFeB/Pd) multilayers with 7 and 14 repeats were investigated. The Co-based multilayers show much larger coercivities, a better squareness, and a sharper magnetization switching than CoFeB-based multilayers. From magnetic force microscopy observations, both structures show strong reduction in domains size as the number of repeats increases but the magnetic domains for Co-based multilayers are more than one order of magnitude larger than for CoFeB-based multilayers. By imaging domains at different times, breaks in the (CoFeB/Pd) multilayer stripes were observed within only few hours, while no change could be seen for (Co/Pd) multilayers. Although CoFeB single layers are suitable for magnetoresistive devices due to their large spin polarization and low damping constants, their lamination with Pd suffers mainly from thermal instability.

  13. 3D-spectral domain computational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Trevor; Segref, Armin; Frisken, Grant; Ferra, Herman; Lorenser, Dirk; Frisken, Steven

    2016-03-01

    We present a proof-of-concept experiment utilizing a novel "snap-shot" spectral domain OCT technique that captures a phase coherent volume in a single frame. The sample is illuminated with a collimated beam of 75 μm diameter and the back-reflected light is analyzed by a 2-D matrix of spectral interferograms. A key challenge that is addressed is simultaneously maintaining lateral and spectral phase coherence over the imaged volume in the presence of sample motion. Digital focusing is demonstrated for 5.0 μm lateral resolution over an 800 μm axial range.

  14. Stochastic nature of domain nucleation process in magnetization reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Fischer, Peter; Shin, S.-C.

    2007-06-01

    Whether domain configurations that occur during magnetization reversal processes on a nanoscale are deterministic or nondeterministic is both fundamentally of great interest and technologically of utmost relevance[1]. However, due to the limited spatial resolution of the microscopic measurement techniques employed so far, no direct observation on the stochastic behavior of local domain nucleation during magnetization reversal in real space at the nanometer scale has yet been reported. In this work, we have investigated a stochastic nature of domain nucleation process during magnetization reversal by utilizing magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy with high spatial resolution of 15 nm [2]. The sample used in our study is CoCrPt alloy film,which is the promising candidate for high-density perpendicular magnetic recording media. Typical domain configurations of (Co{sub 83}Cr{sub 17}){sub 87}Pt{sub 13} taken at an applied magnetic field of 383 Oe during three successive hysteretic cycles are illustrated in Fig. 1. Interestingly enough, one clearly notes that the domain nucleation process of CoCrPt alloy film is not deterministic, but stochastic for repeated hysteretic cycles. The stochastic nature was quantitatively confirmed by correlation coefficient, where the correlation coefficients increase as magnetization reversal was progressed. Nanomagnetic simulations considering thermal fluctuations of the magnetic moments of the grains explains the stochastic nature of the domain nucleation behavior observed in CoCrPt alloy film.

  15. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  16. Papyrus imaging with terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, J.; Jackson, J. B.; Pagès-Camagna, S.; Duling, I. N.; Menu, M.; Mourou, G. A.

    2010-09-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopic imaging (THz-TDSI) is a non-ionizing, non-contact and non-destructive measurement technique that has been recently utilized to study cultural heritage artifacts. We will present this technique and the results of non-contact measurements of papyrus texts, including images of hidden papyri. Inks for modern papyrus specimens were prepared using the historical binder, Arabic gum, and two common pigments used to write ancient texts, carbon black and red ochre. The samples were scanned in reflection at normal incidence with a pulse with a spectral range between 0.1 and 1.5 THz. Temporal analysis of the signals provides the depths of the layers, and their frequency spectra give information about the inks.

  17. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elster, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The author succeeds in making the physical phenomena of MR imaging quite comprehensible. The chapters on imaging sequences and parameters and the effects of pathologic conditions on MR images are written in a way that helps the beginner. MR artifacts are discussed in a special chapter. The atlas, which makes up 60% of the book; includes a detailed imaging guide with protocols concentrating mainly on the head, neck and brain. MR imaging of the chest is discussed as well as abdomen, pelvis and hips, and the spine, breast, and knee. The book ends with a list of MR equipment manufacturers, specifications of nine major commercial MR imagers, and a glossary of MR terminology.

  19. Domain Collapse in Grooved Magnetic Garnet Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peredo, J.; Fedyunin, Y.; Patterson, G.

    1995-01-01

    Domain collapse fields in grooved garnet material were investigated by experimental observation and numerical simulation. The results indicate that the change in domain collapse field is largely due to magnetostatic effects produced by the groove edge. A simplified model based on the effective field produced at a groove edge, and local changes in the material thickness explain the observed trends very well.!.

  20. Current driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in permalloy nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masamitsu

    The significant advances in micro-fabrication techniques opened the door to access interesting properties in solid state physics. With regard to magnetic materials, geometrical confinement of magnetic structures alters the defining parameters that govern magnetism. For example, development of single domain nano-pillars made from magnetic multilayers led to the discovery of electrical current controlled magnetization switching, which revealed the existence of spin transfer torque. Magnetic domain walls (DWs) are boundaries in magnetic materials that divide regions with distinct magnetization directions. DWs play an important role in the magnetization reversal processes of both bulk and thin film magnetic materials. The motion of DW is conventionally controlled by magnetic fields. Recently, it has been proposed that spin polarized current passed across the DW can also control the motion of DWs. Current in most magnetic materials is spin-polarized, due to spin-dependent scattering of the electrons, and thus can deliver spin angular momentum to the DW, providing a "spin transfer" torque on the DW which leads to DW motion. In addition, owing to the development of micro-fabrication techniques, geometrical confinement of magnetic materials enables creation and manipulation of a "single" DW in magnetic nanostructures. New paradigms for DW-based devices are made possible by the direct manipulation of DWs using spin polarized electrical current via spin transfer torque. This dissertation covers research on current induced DW motion in magnetic nanowires. Fascinating effects arising from the interplay between DWs with spin polarized current will be revealed.

  1. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of the self structured multilayered bubble domain memory as a mass memory medium for satellite applications is examined. Theoretical considerations of multilayer bubble supporting materials are presented, in addition to the experimental evaluation of current accessed circuitry for various memory functions. The design, fabrication, and test of four device designs is described, and a recommended memory storage area configuration is presented. Memory functions which were demonstrated include the current accessed propagation of bubble domains and stripe domains, pinning of stripe domain ends, generation of single and double bubbles, generation of arrays of coexisting strip and bubble domains in a single garnet layer, and demonstration of different values of the strip out field for single and double bubbles indicating adequate margins for data detection. All functions necessary to develop a multilayer self structured bubble memory device were demonstrated in individual experiments.

  2. Mirror Domain Structures Induced by Interlayer Magnetic Wall Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Hatton, D. C.; Bland, J. A.

    2003-05-01

    We have found that during giant magnetoresistance measurements in ˜10×10 mm2 NiFe/Cu/Co continuous film spin-valve structures, the resistance value suddenly drops to its absolute minimum during the NiFe reversal. The results reveal that the alignment of all magnetic domains in the NiFe film follow exactly that of corresponding domains in the Co film for an appropriate applied field strength. This phenomenon is caused by trapping of the NiFe domain walls through the magnetostatic interaction with the Co domain-wall stray fields. Consequently, the interlayer domain-wall coupling induces a mirror domain structure in the magnetic trilayer.

  3. Domain structure and magnetization loss in a toroidal core based on an Fe-based amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Daichi; Hasegawa, Ryusuke; Saito, Shin; Takahashi, Migaku

    2012-04-01

    By utilizing a wide-view Kerr-effect magnetic domain observation system designed for domain observation on curved surfaces, domain images were taken on the surface of a toroidal core based on an Fe-based amorphous alloy. The results of the observation are discussed in terms of Bertotti's eddy-current loss model, helping to clarify the concept of magnetic objects proposed by the model.

  4. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    PubMed

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  5. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization

    PubMed Central

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  6. Microseismic source imaging in a compressed domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera Rodriguez, Ismael; Sacchi, Mauricio D.

    2014-08-01

    Microseismic monitoring is an essential tool for the characterization of hydraulic fractures. Fast estimation of the parameters that define a microseismic event is relevant to understand and control fracture development. The amount of data contained in the microseismic records however, poses a challenge for fast continuous detection and evaluation of the microseismic source parameters. Work inspired by the emerging field of Compressive Sensing has showed that it is possible to evaluate source parameters in a compressed domain, thereby reducing processing time. This technique performs well in scenarios where the amplitudes of the signal are above the noise level, as is often the case in microseismic monitoring using downhole tools. This paper extends the idea of the compressed domain processing to scenarios of microseismic monitoring using surface arrays, where the signal amplitudes are commonly at the same level as, or below, the noise amplitudes. To achieve this, we resort to the use of an imaging operator, which has previously been found to produce better results in detection and location of microseismic events from surface arrays. The operator in our method is formed by full-waveform elastodynamic Green's functions that are band-limited by a source time function and represented in the frequency domain. Where full-waveform Green's functions are not available, ray tracing can also be used to compute the required Green's functions. Additionally, we introduce the concept of the compressed inverse, which derives directly from the compression of the migration operator using a random matrix. The described methodology reduces processing time at a cost of introducing distortions into the results. However, the amount of distortion can be managed by controlling the level of compression applied to the operator. Numerical experiments using synthetic and real data demonstrate the reductions in processing time that can be achieved and exemplify the process of selecting the

  7. Speckle size in optical Fourier domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouche, G.; Vergnole, S.; Bisaillon, C.-E.; Dufour, M.; Maciejko, R.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2007-06-01

    As in conventional time-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT), speckle is inherent to any Optical Fourier Domain Imaging (OFDI) of biological tissue. OFDI is also known as swept-source OCT (SS-OCT). The axial speckle size is mainly determined by the OCT resolution length and the transverse speckle size by the focusing optics illuminating the sample. There is also a contribution from the sample related to the number of scatterers contained within the probed volume. In the OFDI data processing, there is some liberty in selecting the range of wavelengths used and this allows variation in the OCT resolution length. Consequently the probed volume can be varied. By performing measurements on an optical phantom with a controlled density of discrete scatterers and by changing the probed volume with different range of wavelengths in the OFDI data processing, there is an obvious change in the axial speckle size, but we show that there is also a less obvious variation in the transverse speckle size. This work contributes to a better understanding of speckle in OCT.

  8. Domain wall displacements in amorphous films and multilayers studied with a magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhil, Taras G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic force microscope (MFM) was used to study the displacement of domain walls (DW) in amorphous TbFe alloy films and Co/Pd multilayer films with high spatial resolution. The reversible bending of domain wall segments pinned to defects and irreversible, jumplike displacement of domain wall segments were imaged with the MFM in an applied magnetic field. The maximum reversible displacement of domain walls was 50-100 nm and the length of the segments which reversibly curved in the field was about 150 nm. Measurement of the change in radius of curvature of a DW segment in response to an applied field allowed estimation of the DW energy density and self-demagnetizing field of the film acting on the DW. The DW energy density for the TbFe films was about 1 erg/cm2. It was shown that the self-demagnetizing field acting on a domain wall depends on the domain structure surrounding the studied DW segment. For instance, for a film with saturation magnetization 100 G and thickness 80 nm, which exhibited a mazelike domain structure, the demagnetizing field varied from 100 G in the center of a mazelike domain to 400 G near the edge of a domain. The irreversible displacement of a DW was not a continuous process. The 200-400 nm long DW segments exhibited jumplike motion over distances of 100-150 nm.

  9. Remote Teaching Experiments on Magnetic Domains in Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrogowski, W.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskii, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our experience in building a remote laboratory for teaching magnetic domains. Fulfilling the proposed on-line experiments, students can observe and study magnetization processes that are often difficult to explain with written material. It is proposed that networks of remotely accessible laboratories could be integrated in the Global…

  10. Directed Magnetic Particle Transport above Artificial Magnetic Domains Due to Dynamic Magnetic Potential Energy Landscape Transformation.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dennis; Koch, Iris; Burgard, Stefan; Ehresmann, Arno

    2015-07-28

    An approach for a remotely controllable transport of magnetic micro- and/or nanoparticles above a topographically flat exchange-bias (EB) thin film system, magnetically patterned into parallel stripe domains, is presented where the particle manipulation is achieved by sub-mT external magnetic field pulses. Superparamagnetic core-shell particles are moved stepwise by the dynamic transformation of the particles' magnetic potential energy landscape due to the external magnetic field pulses without affecting the magnetic state of the thin film system. The magnetic particle velocity is adjustable in the range of 1-100 μm/s by the design of the substrate's magnetic field landscape (MFL), the particle-substrate distance, and the magnitude of the applied external magnetic field pulses. The agglomeration of magnetic particles is avoided by the intrinsic magnetostatic repulsion of particles due to the parallel alignment of the particles' magnetic moments perpendicular to the transport direction and parallel to the surface normal of the substrate during the particle motion. The transport mechanism is modeled by a quantitative theory based on the precise knowledge of the sample's MFL and the particle-substrate distance. PMID:26134922

  11. Observation of Thermomagnetically Recorded Magnetic Domains in TbFeCo Films with Soft X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Naoyuki; Fischer, Peter; Tsunashima, Shigeru; Kumazawa, Masayuki; Ishida, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hitoshi; Kume, Minoru

    2001-04-01

    We observed thermomagnetically recorded domains of various sizes with magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) in order to clarify the recording characteristics. The domains were recorded on TbFeCo films by laser-pumped magnetic field modulation (LP-MFM) using a 635 nm laser diode. Typical images of magnetic domains in TbFeCo films were taken at the Fe L3-edge, and it was confirmed that the crescent-shaped domains could be recorded with high quality for mark lengths down to 100 nm.

  12. Magnetic domains and surface effects in hollow maghemite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Puntes, Victor; Balcells, Lluis; Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amilcar

    2008-09-30

    In the present work, we investigate the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic and non-interacting maghemite hollow nanoparticles obtained by the Kirkendall effect. From the experimental characterization of their magnetic behavior, we find that polycrystalline hollow maghemite nanoparticles exhibit low blocked-to-superparamagnetic transition temperatures, small magnetic moments, significant coercivities and irreversibility fields, and no magnetic saturation on external magnetic fields up to 5 T. These results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural parameters characterizing the maghemite shells by means of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of an individual spherical shell. The model comprises strongly interacting crystallographic domains arranged in a spherical shell with random orientations and anisotropy axis. The Monte Carlo simulation allows discernment between the influence of the polycrystalline structure and its hollow geometry, while revealing the magnetic domain arranggement in the different temperataure regimes.

  13. Imaging magnetic structures with a transmission X-ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Eimüller, T.; Schütz, G.; Guttmann, P.; Schmahl, G.; Bayreuther, G.

    2000-05-01

    The X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD), i.e., the dependence of the absorption of circularly polarized X-rays on the magnetization of the absorber exhibits at L-edges of transition metals values up to 25%. This can serve as a huge magnetic contrast mechanism in combination with a transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) to image magnetic domains providing a lateral resolution down to about 30 nm. The inherent element-specificity, the possibility to record images in varying external fields within a complete hysteresis loop, the relation of the contrast to local magnetic spin and orbital moments, etc. demonstrate the unique applicability to study the magnetic domain structure in current technical relevant systems like magneto-optics for high density storage media, multilayers for GMR applications or nanostructures for MRAM technology.

  14. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  15. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  16. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  17. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, L. C.; Cherifi, R. O.; Ivanovskaya, V.; Zobelli, A.; Infante, I. C.; Jacquet, E.; Guiblin, N.; Ünal, A. A.; Kronast, F.; Dkhil, B.; Barthélémy, A.; Bibes, M.; Valencia, S.

    2015-05-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics.

  18. Local electrical control of magnetic order and orientation by ferroelastic domain arrangements just above room temperature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, L C; Cherifi, R O; Ivanovskaya, V; Zobelli, A; Infante, I C; Jacquet, E; Guiblin, N; Ünal, A A; Kronast, F; Dkhil, B; Barthélémy, A; Bibes, M; Valencia, S

    2015-01-01

    Ferroic materials (ferromagnetic, ferroelectric, ferroelastic) usually divide into domains with different orientations of their order parameter. Coupling between different ferroic systems creates new functionalities, for instance the electrical control of macroscopic magnetic properties including magnetization and coercive field. Here we show that ferroelastic domains can be used to control both magnetic order and magnetization direction at the nanoscale with a voltage. We use element-specific X-ray imaging to map the magnetic domains as a function of temperature and voltage in epitaxial FeRh on ferroelastic BaTiO3. Exploiting the nanoscale phase-separation of FeRh, we locally interconvert between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states with a small electric field just above room temperature. Imaging and ab initio calculations show the antiferromagnetic phase of FeRh is favoured by compressive strain on c-oriented BaTiO3 domains, and the resultant magnetoelectric coupling is larger and more reversible than previously reported from macroscopic measurements. Our results emphasize the importance of nanoscale ferroic domain structure and the promise of first-order transition materials to achieve enhanced coupling in artificial multiferroics. PMID:25969926

  19. Traveling wave magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Patrick; Ruckert, Martin A; Klauer, Peter; Kullmann, Walter H; Jakob, Peter M; Behr, Volker C

    2014-02-01

    Most 3-D magnetic particle imaging (MPI) scanners currently use permanent magnets to create the strong gradient field required for high resolution MPI. However, using permanent magnets limits the field of view (FOV) due to the large amount of energy required to move the field free point (FFP) from the center of the scanner. To address this issue, an alternative approach called "Traveling Wave MPI" is here presented. This approach employs a novel gradient system, the dynamic linear gradient array, to cover a large FOV while dynamically creating a strong magnetic gradient. The proposed design also enables the use of a so-called line-scanning mode, which simplifies the FFP trajectory to a linear path through the 3-D volume. This results in simplified mathematics, which facilitates the image reconstruction. PMID:24132006

  20. Majorana Fermion Rides on a Magnetic Domain Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tewari, Sumanta; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    Owing to the recent progress on endowing the electronic structure of magnetic nanowires with topological properties, the associated topological solitons in the magnetic texture--magnetic domain walls--appear as very natural hosts for exotic electronic excitations. Here, we propose to use the magnetic domain walls to engender Majorana fermions, which has several notable advantages compared to the existing approaches. First of all, the local tunneling density-of-states anomaly associated with the Majorana zero mode bound to a smooth magnetic soliton is immune to most of parasitic artifacts associated with the abrupt physical ends of a wire, which mar the existing experimental probes. Second, a viable route to move and braid Majorana fermions is offered by domain-wall motion. In particular, we envision the recently demonstrated heat-current induced motion of domain walls in insulating ferromagnets as a promising tool for nonintrusive displacement of Majorana modes. This leads us to propose a feasible scheme for braiding domain walls within a magnetic nanowire network, which manifests the nob-Abelian exchange statistics within the Majorana subspace. This work has been supported in part by the U.S. DOE-BES, FAME, and AFOSR grants.

  1. In-situ visualization of stress-dependent bulk magnetic domain formation by neutron grating interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Rauscher, P.; Harti, R. P.; Schäfer, R.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Kaestner, A.; Hovind, J.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.

    2016-01-01

    The performance and degree of efficiency of industrial transformers are directly influenced by the magnetic properties of high-permeability steel laminations (HPSLs). Industrial transformer cores are built of stacks of single HPSLs. While the insulating coating on each HPSL reduces eddy-current losses in the transformer core, the coating also induces favorable inter-granular tensile stresses that significantly influence the underlying magnetic domain structure. Here, we show that the neutron dark-field image can be used to analyze the influence of the coating on the volume and supplementary surface magnetic domain structures. To visualize the stress effect of the coating on the bulk domain formation, we used an uncoated HPSL and stepwise increased the applied external tensile stress up to 20 MPa. We imaged the domain configuration of the intermediate stress states and were able to reproduce the original domain structure of the coated state. Furthermore, we were able to visualize how the applied stresses lead to a refinement of the volume domain structure and the suppression and reoccurrence of supplementary domains.

  2. Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Richard J.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Putnis, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic microstructure of a natural, finely exsolved intergrowth of submicron magnetite blocks in an ulvöspinel matrix is characterized by using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. Single-domain and vortex states in individual blocks, as well as magnetostatic interaction fields between them, are imaged at a spatial resolution approaching the nanometer scale. The images reveal an extremely complicated magnetic structure dominated by the shapes of the blocks and magnetostatic interactions. Magnetic superstates, in which clusters of magnetite blocks act collectively to form vortex and multidomain states that have zero net magnetization, are observed directly. PMID:12482930

  3. Stochastic magnetization dynamics in single domain particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Stefano; Dusch, Yannick; Tiercelin, Nicolas; Pernod, Philippe; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic particles are largely utilized in several applications ranging from magnetorheological fluids to bioscience and from nanothechnology to memories or logic devices. The behavior of each single particle at finite temperature (under thermal stochastic fluctuations) plays a central role in determining the response of the whole physical system taken into consideration. Here, the magnetization evolution is studied through the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert formalism and the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics is introduced with the Langevin and Fokker-Planck methodologies. As result of the combination of such techniques we analyse the stochastic magnetization dynamics and we numerically determine the convergence time, measuring the velocity of attainment of thermodynamic equilibrium, as function of the system temperature.

  4. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  5. Direction detectable static magnetic field imaging by frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy with an AC magnetic field driven soft magnetic tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hitoshi; Ito, Ryoichi; Egawa, Genta; Li, Zhenghua; Yoshimura, Satoru

    2011-04-01

    Direction detectable static magnetic field imaging, which directly distinguishes the up and down direction of static perpendicular magnetic field from a sample surface and the polarity of magnetic charges on the surface, was demonstrated for CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular magnetic recording media based on a frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy (FM-MFM), which uses a frequency modulation of the cantilever oscillation induced by an alternating force from the tip-sample magnetic interaction. In this study, to generate the alternating force, we used a NiFe soft magnetic tip driven by the ac magnetic field of a soft ferrite core and imaged the direction and the amplitude of the static magnetic field from the recorded bits. This method enables measurement of the static magnetic field near a sample surface, which is masked by short range forces of the surface. The present method will be effective in analyzing the microscopic magnetic domain structure of hard magnetic samples.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of glioblastoma using aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjune; Yang, Jaemoon; Hwang, Myeonghwan; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2012-10-01

    Here we introduce a new class of smart imaging probes hybridizing polysorbate 80 coated-magnetic nanoparticles with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-targetable aptamer for specific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of angiogenesis from glioblastoma.

  7. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  8. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    PubMed

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  9. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices

    PubMed Central

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism. PMID:27008975

  10. Magnetic Field Induced Changes Of Domain Structure Grating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziewski, A.; Stankiewicz, A.

    1987-10-01

    A stripe domain grating (SDG) has been theoretically analysed to combine some magnetic field changeable grating parameters with a magnetic sample material parameters. The alterable grating properties were discussed for different types of fiber-optic switch device. The quality and prefered directions of SDG have been quantitatively investigated using unconventional set-up based on the light diffraction effect. The gratings have been induced by the magnetic field with different orientations and values. SDG quality was significantly improved applying nontypically oriented magnetic field. We focused our attention on SDG static properties.

  11. Imaging scattering orientation with spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Konecky, Soren D.; Rice, Tyler; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging techniques based on multiple light scattering generally have poor sensitivity to the orientation and direction of microscopic light scattering structures. In order to address this limitation, we introduce a spatial frequency domain method for imaging contrast from oriented scattering structures by measuring the angular-dependence of structured light reflectance. The measurement is made by projecting sinusoidal patterns of light intensity on a sample, and measuring the degree to which the patterns are blurred as a function of the projection angle. We derive a spatial Fourier domain solution to an anisotropic diffusion model. This solution predicts the effects of bulk scattering orientation on the amplitude and phase of the projected patterns. We introduce a new contrast function based on a scattering orientation index (SOI) which is sensitive to the degree to which light scattering is directionally dependent. We validate the technique using tissue simulating phantoms, and ex vivo samples of muscle and brain. Our results show that SOI is independent of the overall amount of bulk light scattering and absorption, and that isotropic versus oriented scattering structures can be clearly distinguished. We determine the orientation of subsurface microscopic scattering structures located up to 600 μm beneath highly scattering (μ′s = 1.5 mm−1) material. PMID:22191918

  12. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Wagner, K; Kákay, A; Schultheiss, K; Henschke, A; Sebastian, T; Schultheiss, H

    2016-05-01

    In the research field of magnonics, it is envisaged that spin waves will be used as information carriers, promoting operation based on their wave properties. However, the field still faces major challenges. To become fully competitive, novel schemes for energy-efficient control of spin-wave propagation in two dimensions have to be realized on much smaller length scales than used before. In this Letter, we address these challenges with the experimental realization of a novel approach to guide spin waves in reconfigurable, nano-sized magnonic waveguides. For this purpose, we make use of two inherent characteristics of magnetism: the non-volatility of magnetic remanence states and the nanometre dimensions of domain walls formed within these magnetic configurations. We present the experimental observation and micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave propagation inside nano-sized domain walls and realize a first step towards a reconfigurable domain-wall-based magnonic nanocircuitry. PMID:26828849

  13. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, K.; Kákay, A.; Schultheiss, K.; Henschke, A.; Sebastian, T.; Schultheiss, H.

    2016-05-01

    In the research field of magnonics, it is envisaged that spin waves will be used as information carriers, promoting operation based on their wave properties. However, the field still faces major challenges. To become fully competitive, novel schemes for energy-efficient control of spin-wave propagation in two dimensions have to be realized on much smaller length scales than used before. In this Letter, we address these challenges with the experimental realization of a novel approach to guide spin waves in reconfigurable, nano-sized magnonic waveguides. For this purpose, we make use of two inherent characteristics of magnetism: the non-volatility of magnetic remanence states and the nanometre dimensions of domain walls formed within these magnetic configurations. We present the experimental observation and micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave propagation inside nano-sized domain walls and realize a first step towards a reconfigurable domain-wall-based magnonic nanocircuitry.

  14. Domain walls in the (Ga,Mn)as diluted magnetic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Akira; Kasai, H; Tonomura, A; Brown, P D; Campion, R P; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Zemen, J; Jungwirth, T

    2008-02-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic domain walls in an in-plane magnetized (Ga,Mn)As dilute moment ferromagnetic semiconductor. Our high-resolution electron holography technique provides direct images of domain wall magnetization profiles. The experiments are interpreted based on microscopic calculations of the micromagnetic parameters and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations. We find that the competition of uniaxial and biaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropies in the film is directly reflected in orientation dependent wall widths, ranging from approximately 40 to 120 nm. The domain walls are of the Néel type and evolve from near-90 degrees walls at low temperatures to large angle [11[over ]0]-oriented walls and small angle [110]-oriented walls at higher temperatures. PMID:18352324

  15. Vortex confinement by magnetic domains in superconductor-ferromagnet bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Konczykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.; Cheng, X. M.

    2013-03-01

    We use a line of miniature Hall sensors to study the effect of magnetic-domain-induced vortex confinement on the flux dynamics in a superconductor/ferromagnet bilayer. A single tunable bilayer is built of a ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a superconducting Nb layer, with the insulating layer in between to avoid proximity effect. The magnetic domain patterns of various geometries are reversibly predefined in the Co/Pt multilayer using the appropriate magnetization procedure. The magnetic domain geometry strongly affects vortex dynamics, leading to geometry-dependent trapping of vortices at the sample edge, nonuniform flux penetration, and strongly nonuniform critical current density. With the decreasing temperature the magnetic pinning increases but this increase is substantially weaker than that of the intrinsic pinning. The analysis of the initial flux penetration suggests that vortices may form various vortex structures, including disordered Abrikosov lattice or single and double vortex chains, in which minimal vortex-vortex distance is comparable to the magnetic penetration depth. Supported by Polish NCS grant 2011/01/B/ST3/00462, by the French-Polish Program PICS 2012, by EU grant POIG.01.01.02-00-108/09, and by NSF grants DMR05-20491 and DMR-1053854.

  16. A magnetic source imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgovskiy, V.; Fescenko, I.; Sekiguchi, N.; Colombo, S.; Lebedev, V.; Zhang, J.; Weis, A.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a magnetic source imaging camera (MSIC) allowing a direct dynamic visualization of the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the individual components Bx(x ,y ), By(x ,y ) and Bz(x ,y ) of a magnetic field. The field patterns allow—in principle—a reconstruction of the distribution of sources that produce the field B → by inverse problem analysis. We compare experimentally recorded point-spread functions, i.e., field patterns produced by point-like magnetic dipoles of different orientations with anticipated field patterns. Currently, the MSIC can resolve fields of ≈10 pT (1 s measurement time) range in a field of view up to ˜20 × 20 mm2. The device has a large range of possible applications. As an example, we demonstrate the MSIC's use for recording the spatially resolved Néel magnetorelaxation of blocked magnetic nanoparticles.

  17. Computational and experimental investigations of magnetic domain structures in patterned magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulan; Xu, Ke; Hu, Shenyang; Suter, Jon; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Johnson, Bradley R.; McCloy, John

    2015-08-01

    The use of nondestructive magnetic signatures for continuous monitoring of the degradation of structural materials in nuclear reactors is a promising yet challenging application for advanced functional materials behavior modeling and measurement. In this work, a numerical model, which is based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of magnetization dynamics and the phase field approach, was developed to study the impact of defects such as nonmagnetic precipitates and/or voids, free surfaces and crystal orientation on magnetic domain structures and magnetic responses in magnetic materials, with the goal of exploring the correlation between microstructures and magnetic signatures. To validate the model, single crystal iron thin films (~240 nm thickness) were grown on MgO substrates and a focused ion beam was used to pattern micrometer-scale specimens with different geometries. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was used to measure magnetic domain structure and its field-dependence. Numerical simulations were constructed with the same geometry as the patterned specimens and under similar applied magnetic field conditions as tested by MFM. The results from simulations and experiments show that 1) magnetic domain structures strongly depend on the film geometry and the external applied field and 2) the predicted magnetic domain structures from the simulations agree quantitatively with those measured by MFM. The results demonstrate the capability of the developed model, used together with key experiments, for improving the understanding of the signal physics in magnetic sensing, thereby providing guidance to the development of advanced nondestructive magnetic techniques.

  18. Image encryption in the wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Long; Zhou, Yicong; Chen, C. L. Philip

    2013-05-01

    Most existing image encryption algorithms often transfer the original image into a noise-like image which is an apparent visual sign indicating the presence of an encrypted image. Motivated by the data hiding technologies, this paper proposes a novel concept of image encryption, namely transforming an encrypted original image into another meaningful image which is the final resulting encrypted image and visually the same as the cover image, overcoming the mentioned problem. Using this concept, we introduce a new image encryption algorithm based on the wavelet decomposition. Simulations and security analysis are given to show the excellent performance of the proposed concept and algorithm.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  1. Investigation of multilayer magnetic domain lattice file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torok, E. J.; Kamin, M.; Tolman, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation determined that current accessed self structured bubble memory devices have the potential of meeting projected data density and speed requirements. Device concepts analyzed include multilayer ferrimagnetic devices where the top layer contains a domain structure which defines the data location and the second contains the data. Current aperture and permalloy assisted current propagation devices were evaluated. Based on the result of this work more detailed device research was initiated. Detailed theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the difference in strip and threshold between a single bubble in the control layer and a double bubble which would exist in both the control layer and data layer is adequate to allow for detection of data. Detailed detector designs were investigated.

  2. Magnetic properties and magnetic domains of Nd-Fe-B thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. L.; Liu, W.; Zhang, Z. D.; Gunaratne, G. H.

    2008-01-15

    Anisotropic Nd-Fe-B thin films are fabricated by direct current magnetron sputtering on Si substrates heated to temperatures over a wide range. Surface morphology and magnetic domains of the Nd-Fe-B thin films prepared at different sputtering temperatures (25-600 deg. C) are observed by a scanning probe microscopy. The magnetic domains exhibit a rich variety of textures, changing from striped via maze to cloudlike as the sputtering temperature is increased. Variations in magnetic domains with substrate temperature are discussed using phase components and magnetic anisotropies of the thin films. In addition, patterns of magnetic domains are analyzed using the 'disorder functions', a set of characterizations of complex patterns with labyrinthine structures. The disorder function {delta}(1) and the structure factor {delta}k do not change appreciably until a substrate temperature of 350 deg. C, but increases significantly beyond 400 deg. C. The disorder in magnetic domains increases with increasing sputtering temperature. A simultaneous enhancement of the anisotropic c texture and the hard-magnetic properties of the thin films are observed. The significant change of the disorder function at T{sub s}=400 deg. C appears to be a precursor to the hardening of the Nd-Fe-B film. The most disordered magnetic domains of the film with the substrate temperature of 600 deg. C correspond to the optimum magnetic properties, with the maximum energy product (BH){sub max} of 22.4 MG Oe.

  3. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  4. Emergent Rotational Symmetries in Disordered Magnetic Domain Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Run; Seu, Keoki A.; Parks, Daniel; Kan, Jimmy J.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Stephen D.

    2011-12-01

    Uniaxial systems often form labyrinthine domains that exhibit short-range order but are macroscopically isotropic and would not be expected to exhibit precise symmetries. However, their underlying frustration results in a multitude of metastable configurations of comparable energy, and driving such a system externally might lead to pattern formation. We find that soft x-ray speckle diffraction patterns of the labyrinthine domains in CoPd/IrMn heterostructures reveal a diverse array of hidden rotational symmetries about the magnetization axis, thereby suggesting an unusual form of emergent order in an otherwise disordered system. These symmetries depend on applied magnetic field, magnetization history, and scattering wave vector. Maps of rotational symmetry exhibit intriguing structures that can be controlled by manipulating the applied magnetic field in concert with the exchange bias condition.

  5. Nanoscale imaging and control of domain-wall hopping with a nitrogen-vacancy center microscope.

    PubMed

    Tetienne, J-P; Hingant, T; Kim, J-V; Diez, L Herrera; Adam, J-P; Garcia, K; Roch, J-F; Rohart, S; Thiaville, A; Ravelosona, D; Jacques, V

    2014-06-20

    The control of domain walls in magnetic wires underpins an emerging class of spintronic devices. Propagation of these walls in imperfect media requires defects that pin them to be characterized on the nanoscale. Using a magnetic microscope based on a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond, we report domain-wall imaging on a 1-nanometer-thick ferromagnetic nanowire and directly observe Barkhausen jumps between two pinning sites spaced 50 nanometers apart. We further demonstrate in situ laser control of these jumps, which allows us to drag the domain wall along the wire and map the pinning landscape. Our work demonstrates the potential of NV microscopy to study magnetic nano-objects in complex media, whereas controlling domain walls with laser light may find an application in spintronic devices. PMID:24948732

  6. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Leliaert, J.; Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L.; Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van; Laurson, L.; Durin, G.

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  7. Optimization of polarizer azimuth in improving domain image contrast in magneto-optical Kerr microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lian, J.; Li, P.; Li, X.; Li, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y. X.

    2016-02-01

    The magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a widely used technique in magnetic domain imaging for its high surface sensitivity and external magnetic compatibility. In this work, we use the generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry technique to study the influence of polarizer and analyzer azimuth on domain image contrast in the Kerr microscope. Results show that the image contrasts around the extinction place are larger than other area. When the polarizer and analyzer are set slightly deviated from the extinction condition (0.35°,89.7°), the maximum image contrast can be obtained. The color map of image contrast on polarizer and analyzer angle is given by measuring the MOKE response of 200 nm permalloy. Results verify the validity of the conclusion.

  8. Ferroelectric control of magnetic domains in ultra-thin cobalt layers

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Stolichnov, I.; Setter, N.; Bernand-Mantel, A.; Borrel, J.; Pizzini, S.; Ranno, L.; Herrera Diez, L.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.; Boulle, O.

    2013-11-25

    Non-volatile ferroelectric control of magnetic domains has been demonstrated in ultra-thin cobalt layers at room temperature. The sensitivity of magnetic anisotropy energy to the electronic structure in a few atomic layers adjacent to the interface allows for ferroelectric control of coercivity and magnetic domain dynamics. These effects have been monitored and quantified using magneto-optical Kerr effect. In particular, the regimes, where the ferroelectric domains enhance/inhibit the magnetic domain nucleation or increase/reduce domain wall velocity, have been explored. Thus, non-destructive and reversible ferroelectric domain writing provides a tool to define the magnetic domain paths, create nucleation sites, or control domain movement.

  9. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G; Robbins, J M; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-12-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  10. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G.; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  12. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall.

    PubMed

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation. PMID:27312315

  13. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  14. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The AB–BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation. PMID:27312315

  15. A 5 Tesla imaging magnet for imaging laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Carolan, J.L.; Burns, W.A.; Green, M.A.

    1989-03-01

    This is a report on the construction of the first of a series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) imaging magnets for laboratory animals. The first NCC magnet has a 33 centimeter warm bore with a design central induction of 5.5 T without active shielding and 5.0 T with active shielding. The magnet will be used for both imaging and spectroscopy of living animals. The active shield system is designed so that the 5 Gauss line is less than 3 meters from the magnet center when the magnet operates at design field. This permits the magnet to be used within an experimental space commonly available within a university building.

  16. Designing magnetic superlattices that are composed of single domain nanomagnets

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Feodor V; Kovács, Endre

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: The complex nature of the magnetic interactions between any number of nanosized elements of a magnetic superlattice can be described by the generic behavior that is presented here. The hysteresis characteristics of interacting elliptical nanomagnets are described by a quasi-static method that identifies the critical boundaries between magnetic phases. A full dynamical analysis is conducted in complement to this and the deviations from the quasi-static analysis are highlighted. Each phase is defined by the configuration of the magnetic moments of the chain of single domain nanomagnets and correspondingly the existence of parallel, anti-parallel and canting average magnetization states. Results: We give examples of the phase diagrams in terms of anisotropy and coupling strength for two, three and four magnetic layers. Each phase diagrams character is defined by the shape of the magnetic hysteresis profile for a system in an applied magnetic field. We present the analytical solutions that enable one to define the “phase” boundaries between the emergence of spin-flop, anti-parallel and parallel configurations. The shape of the hysteresis profile is a function of the coupling strength between the nanomagnets and examples are given of how it dictates a systems magnetic response. Many different paths between metastable states can exist and this can lead to instabilities and fluctuations in the magnetization. Conclusion: With these phase diagrams one can find the most stable magnetic configurations against perturbations so as to create magnetic devices. On the other hand, one may require a magnetic system that can easily be switched between phases, and so one can use the information herein to design superlattices of the required shape and character by choosing parameters close to the phase boundaries. This work will be useful when designing future spintronic devices, especially those manipulating the properties of CoFeB compounds. PMID:25161831

  17. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature. PMID:25745524

  18. Observations of charge-ordered and magnetic domains in LuFe2O4 using transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, T.; Murakami, Y.; Shindo, D.; Abe, N.; Arima, T.

    2012-08-01

    Both charge-ordered and magnetic domains produced in LuFe2O4, which have attracted significant attention due to the interplay of electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom, have been studied using transmission electron microscopy techniques. Dark-field images, obtained using a weak satellite reflection, revealed the nanometer-scale charge-ordered domains, which were observed over a wide temperature range below TCO (critical temperature of charge ordering; ˜310 K). Electron holography demonstrated an aspect of the long-range magnetic order wherein the magnetic flux lines were completely parallel to the c axis of LuFe2O4, in a specimen cooled to 17 K under an applied magnetic field. In contrast, there was no appreciable magnetic signal observed in a specimen cooled in a negligible magnetic field. These observations provide useful information for further understanding of the complex magnetic phase transitions in this compound.

  19. Frequency Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Techniques in Eye Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtkowski, M.; Kowalczyk, A.; Targowski, P.; Gorczyñska, I.

    2000-12-01

    This contribution presents an application of frequency-domain optical tomography to ophthalmology. Essential theoretical foundations of time-domain and frequency-domain optical tomography are presented. Images of sections through the anterior chamber, the corneo-scleral angle and fundus of the eye are reconstructed from the spectral fringes. The morphological information gained by tomograms is important for diagnosing and planning of a treatment of glaucoma.

  20. Dissipative dynamics of composite domain walls in magnetic nanostrips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O.; Bazaliy, Ya. B.; Tchernyshyov, O.

    2007-03-01

    We describe the dynamics of domain walls in thin magnetic nanostrips of submicron width under the action of magnetic field. Once the fast precession of magnetization is averaged out, the dynamics reduces to purely dissipative motion where the system follows the direction of the local energy gradient (Glauber's model A) [1]. We then apply the method of collective coordinates [2] to our variational model of the domain wall [3] reducing the dynamics to the evolution of two collective coordinates (the location of the vortex core). In weak magnetic fields the wall moves steadily. The calculated velocity is in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations (no adjustable parameters were used). In higher fields the steady motion breaks down and acquires an oscillatory character caused by periodic creation and annihilation of topological defects comprising the domain wall [3]. Numerical simulations uncover at least two different modes of oscillation. [1] C. J. Garc'ia-Cervera and W. E, J. Appl. Phys. 90, 370 (2001). [2] A. S'anchez and A. R. Bishop, SIAM Rev. 40, 579 (1998). [3] Preceding talk by O. Tchernyshyov.

  1. Ghost imaging in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryczkowski, Piotr; Barbier, Margaux; Friberg, Ari T.; Dudley, John M.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-03-01

    Ghost imaging is a novel technique that produces the image of an object by correlating the intensity of two light beams, neither of which independently carries information about the shape of the object. Ghost imaging has opened up new perspectives to obtain highly resolved images, even in the presence of noise and turbulence. Here, by exploiting the duality between light propagation in space and time, we demonstrate the temporal analogue of ghost imaging. We use a conventional fast detector that does not see the temporal ‘object’ to be characterized and a slow integrating ‘bucket’ detector that does see the object but without resolving its temporal structure. Our experiments achieve temporal resolution at the picosecond level and are insensitive to the temporal distortion that may occur after the object. The approach is scalable, can be integrated on-chip, and offers great promise for dynamic imaging of ultrafast waveforms.

  2. Fourier domain OCT imaging of American cockroach nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Gorczynska, Iwona; Ruminski, Daniel; Karnowski, Karol; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Stankiewicz, Maria; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    In this pilot study we demonstrate results of structural Fourier domain OCT imaging of the nervous system of Periplaneta americana L. (American cockroach). The purpose of this research is to develop an OCT apparatus enabling structural imaging of insect neural system. Secondary purpose of the presented research is to develop methods of the sample preparation and handling during the OCT imaging experiments. We have performed imaging in the abdominal nerve cord excised from the American cockroach. For this purpose we have developed a Fourier domain / spectral OCT system operating at 820 nm wavelength range.

  3. Performance analysis of image fusion methods in transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonsuk; Sharifahmadian, Ershad; Latifi, Shahram

    2013-05-01

    Image fusion involves merging two or more images in such a way as to retain the most desirable characteristics of each. There are various image fusion methods and they can be classified into three main categories: i) Spatial domain, ii) Transform domain, and iii) Statistical domain. We focus on the transform domain in this paper as spatial domain methods are primitive and statistical domain methods suffer from a significant increase of computational complexity. In the field of image fusion, performance analysis is important since the evaluation result gives valuable information which can be utilized in various applications, such as military, medical imaging, remote sensing, and so on. In this paper, we analyze and compare the performance of fusion methods based on four different transforms: i) wavelet transform, ii) curvelet transform, iii) contourlet transform and iv) nonsubsampled contourlet transform. Fusion framework and scheme are explained in detail, and two different sets of images are used in our experiments. Furthermore, various performance evaluation metrics are adopted to quantitatively analyze the fusion results. The comparison results show that the nonsubsampled contourlet transform method performs better than the other three methods. During the experiments, we also found out that the decomposition level of 3 showed the best fusion performance, and decomposition levels beyond level-3 did not significantly affect the fusion results.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, D.; Smith, M.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the physics underlying magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; pulse sequences; image production; equipment; aspects of clinical imaging; and the imaging of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and musculoskeletal system; and MR imaging. The book provides about 150 examples of MR images that give an overview of the pathologic conditions imaged. There is a discussion of the physics of MR imaging and also on the spin echo.

  5. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Nataf, G F; Grysan, P; Guennou, M; Kreisel, J; Martinotti, D; Rountree, C L; Mathieu, C; Barrett, N

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  6. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    PubMed Central

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  7. Magnetic domain walls of relic fermions as Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Yajnik, Urjit A.

    2005-12-02

    We show that relic fermions of the Big Bang can enter a ferromagnetic state if they possess a magnetic moment and satisfy the requirements of Stoner theory of itinerant ferromagnetism. The domain walls of this ferromagnetism can successfully simulate Dark Energy over the observable epoch spanning {approx} 10 billion years. We obtain conditions on the anomalous magnetic moment of such fermions and their masses. Known neutrinos fail to satisfy the requirements thus pointing to the possibility of a new ultralight sector in Particle Physics.

  8. Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation Based Contourlet Domain Image Denoising Framework

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Dong, Fangmin; Ren, Xuhong; Feng, Shiyu; Gao, Bruce Zhi

    2016-01-01

    A contourlet domain image denoising framework based on a novel Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation is proposed, where the difference of subbands in contourlet domain is taken into account. In detail: (1). A novel Improved Rotating Kernel Transformation (IRKT) is proposed to calculate the direction statistic of the image; The validity of the IRKT is verified by the corresponding extracted edge information comparing with the state-of-the-art edge detection algorithm. (2). The direction statistic represents the difference between subbands and is introduced to the threshold function based contourlet domain denoising approaches in the form of weights to get the novel framework. The proposed framework is utilized to improve the contourlet soft-thresholding (CTSoft) and contourlet bivariate-thresholding (CTB) algorithms. The denoising results on the conventional testing images and the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) medical images show that the proposed methods improve the existing contourlet based thresholding denoising algorithm, especially for the medical images. PMID:27148597

  9. Domain wall mobility, stability and Walker breakdown in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, A.; Cormier, M.; Adam, J. P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Ferré, J.

    2007-06-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the velocity of a single 180° domain wall in a magnetic structure with reduced thickness and/or lateral dimension under the combined action of an external applied magnetic field and an electrical current. As for the case of field-induced domain wall propagation in thick films, two motion regimes with different mobilities are obtained, below and far above the so-called Walker field. Additionally, for the case of current induced motion, a Walker-like current density threshold is defined. The threshold field and current density, stating the wall's internal structure stability, differ from those in thick films; both are reduced by the same geometrical demagnetising factor which accounts for the confinement. This points out the fact that the velocity dependence over an extended field/current range and the knowledge of the Walker breakdown are mandatory to draw conclusions about the phenomenological Gilbert damping parameter tuning the magnetisation dynamics.

  10. Microstructural, Magnetic Anisotropy, and Magnetic Domain Structure Correlations in Epitaxial FePd Thin Films with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skuza, J. R.; Clavero, C.; Yang, K.; Wincheski, B.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    L1(sub 0)-ordered FePd epitaxial thin films were prepared using dc magnetron sputter deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The films were grown with varying thickness and degree of chemical order to investigate the interplay between the microstructure, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic domain structure. The experimentally measured domain size/period and magnetic anisotropy in this high perpendicular anisotropy system were found to be correlated following the analytical energy model proposed by Kooy and Enz that considers a delicate balance between the domain wall energy and the demagnetizing stray field energy.

  11. Study of magnetic domain evolution in an auxetic plane of Galfenol using Kerr microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunath, Ganesh; Flatau, Alison B.

    2015-05-01

    Galfenol (FexGa100-x), a magnetostrictive alloy (3/2λ 110-400 ppm) of Iron and Gallium exhibits an in-plane auxetic response in the ⟨110⟩ crystallographic direction. Negative Poisson's ratios have been observed in response to application of stress fields, where values of as low as -0.7 have been reported for compositions of greater than roughly 20% Ga [Zhang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 108(2), 023513 (2010)] and in response to application of magnetic fields, where values of as low as -2.5 have been reported to be expected for compositions of less than roughly 20% Ga [G. Raghunath and A. B. Flatau, IEEE Trans. Magn. (in press)]. Several models have been proposed to understand these two distinct phenomena. Galfenol samples with less than 20% Ga also exhibit an unusual response to an increasing magnetic field applied along the ⟨110⟩ direction. The longitudinal strain which increases initially with applied field experiences a dip (until ˜10 mT) before increasing again to reach saturation. The transverse strain increases and reaches a maximum value (at the same field of ˜10 mT) and then drops from the maximum by 5%-10% as magnetic saturation is approached [G. Raghunath and A. B. Flatau, IEEE Trans. Magn. (in press)].This work deals with discussing the evolution of magnetic domains in a 16 at. % Ga single crystal Galfenol sample when subjected to magnetic fields in the ⟨110⟩ direction in the (100) plane. The magnetic domains on the surface of mechanically polished Galfenol samples were imaged using Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect microscopy. Simultaneously, the strains along the longitudinal and transverse ⟨110⟩ directions were recorded using a bi-directional strain gauge rosette mounted on the unpolished bottom surface of the planar samples. The energy from the applied magnetic field is expected to grow the ⟨110⟩ oriented domains at the expense of domains oriented along all other directions. But since the plane has an easy ⟨100⟩ axis, we expect the

  12. Effects of domain, grain, and magnetic anisotropy distributions on magnetic permeability: Monte-Carlo approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Jones, Anthony M.; McCloy, John S.

    2012-07-23

    Existing approaches for prediction of the tensor permeability of polycrystalline ferrites may not provide reasonable estimates of demagnetized permeability below the spin resonance (i.e., low-field loss region) or in cases of partial magnetization. We propose an approach which solves the coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the dynamic magnetic fields including the minimization of free energy to determine the equilibrium magnetization direction. Unlike previous models, we employ a Monte-Carlo approach to easily calculate the (ensemble) averages of permeability over various domain/grain structures and magnetic anisotropy conditions. Material differences, such as those resulting from different preparation methods, are expressed by using probability density functions (p.d.f.) for anisotropy angle (easy axis angle), grain demagnetization factor (ng), and domain demagnetization factor (nd). Effects on the permeability tensor of grain and domain demagnetization factors and anisotropy field relative to saturation magnetization are discussed for the partially magnetized states for polycrystalline ferrites. It is found that the grain structure (i.e., grain demagnetization distribution) has a smaller effect on the frequency dependent permeability than does the same distribution of domains (i.e., domain demagnetization distribution).

  13. Domain-specific magnetization reversals on a Permalloy square ring array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. R.; Freeland, J. W.; Srajer, G.; Metlushko, V.; You, Chun-Yeol

    2004-06-01

    We present domain-specific magnetization reversals extracted from soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements on a Permalloy square ring array. The extracted domain-specific hysteresis loops reveal that the magnetization of the domain parallel to the field is strongly pinned, while those of other domains rotate continuously. In comparison with the micromagnetic simulation, the hysteresis loop on the pinned domain indicates a possibility of the coexistence of the square rings with the vortex and onion states.

  14. Model of bound interface dynamics for coupled magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politi, P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Stamps, R. L.; Ferré, J.

    2011-08-01

    A domain wall in a ferromagnetic system will move under the action of an external magnetic field. Ultrathin Co layers sandwiched between Pt have been shown to be a suitable experimental realization of a weakly disordered 2D medium in which to study the dynamics of 1D interfaces (magnetic domain walls). The behavior of these systems is encapsulated in the velocity-field response v(H) of the domain walls. In a recent paper [P. J. Metaxas , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.237206 104, 237206 (2010)] we studied the effect of ferromagnetic coupling between two such ultrathin layers, each exhibiting different v(H) characteristics. The main result was the existence of bound states over finite-width field ranges, wherein walls in the two layers moved together at the same speed. Here we discuss in detail the theory of domain wall dynamics in coupled systems. In particular, we show that a bound creep state is expected for vanishing H and we give the analytical, parameter free expression for its velocity which agrees well with experimental results.

  15. Oscillatory Decay of Magnetization Induced by Domain-Wall Stray Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Luc; Luening, Jan; Scholl, Andreas; Nolting, Frithjof; Anders, Simone; Stoehr, Joachim; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2000-04-10

    The demagnetization of a hard ferromagnetic layer via the fringing fields of domain walls created by reversing the moment of a neighboring soft ferromagnetic layer is explored experimentally. An unusual oscillatory decay of the magnetic moment of the hard layer is observed using structures in which the demagnetization occurs after a few hundred cycles. This surprising observation is confirmed on a microscopic scale by detailed imaging of the magnetization of the hard layer using high resolution photoemission electron microscopy and by micromagnetic simulations. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Analysis of thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets using magnetic domain observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Masaaki; Ikeda, Soichiro; Morimoto, Yuji; Kabashima, Hisayuki

    2016-05-01

    We used magnetic domain observation to statistically observe the thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets at elevated temperatures up to 150 °C. Simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred adjacent grains occurred at 90 °C because of the magnetic interaction among the grains beyond grain boundaries in the Dysprosium (Dy)-free low-coercivity magnet. Conversely, simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred grains did not occur in the Dy-added high-coercivity magnets, and the demagnetizing ratio steadily increased with temperature. Furthermore, the addition of Dy induced high thermal stability by eliminating the simultaneous thermal demagnetization, which was caused by the magnetic interaction among the grains.

  17. A compact surface decontamination system for surface-sensitive magnetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Konoto, M; Akoh, H; Tokura, Y

    2009-08-01

    A surface decontamination system for application in surface sensitive magnetic imaging tools, such as a spin-polarized scanning electron microscope, is described. Adsorbed contaminant is chemically decomposed with the use of active oxygen in a compact vacuum chamber mounted in a microscope. The present method is especially suitable for fragile magnetic surfaces of complex oxide materials to which the conventional physical etching widely used for magnetic metals could cause serious structural damage. We have succeeded in detecting magnetic signals from a decontaminated oxide surface and visualizing domain images with sufficient magnetic contrast to analyze detailed domain structures. PMID:19725685

  18. A compact surface decontamination system for surface-sensitive magnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Konoto, M.; Akoh, H.; Tokura, Y.

    2009-08-15

    A surface decontamination system for application in surface sensitive magnetic imaging tools, such as a spin-polarized scanning electron microscope, is described. Adsorbed contaminant is chemically decomposed with the use of active oxygen in a compact vacuum chamber mounted in a microscope. The present method is especially suitable for fragile magnetic surfaces of complex oxide materials to which the conventional physical etching widely used for magnetic metals could cause serious structural damage. We have succeeded in detecting magnetic signals from a decontaminated oxide surface and visualizing domain images with sufficient magnetic contrast to analyze detailed domain structures.

  19. Magnetized Plasma for Reconfigurable Subdiffraction Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shuang; Xiong Yi; Bartal, Guy; Yin Xiaobo; Zhang Xiang

    2011-06-17

    We show that magnetized plasma with appropriately designed parameters supports nearly diffractionless propagation of electromagnetic waves along the direction of the applied magnetic field, arising from their unbounded equifrequency contour in the magnetized plasma. Such a unique feature can be utilized to construct subdiffraction imaging devices, which is confirmed by detailed numerical investigations. Subdiffraction imaging devices based on magnetic plasma do not require microfabrication normally entailed by construction of metamaterials; more importantly, they can be dynamically reconfigured by tuning the applied magnetic field or the plasma density, and therefore they represent a facile and powerful route for imaging applications.

  20. THz time-domain spectroscopy imaging for mail inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liquan; Wang, Zhongdong; Ma, Yanmei; Hao, Erjuan

    2011-08-01

    Acquiring messages from the mail but not destroying the envelope is a big challenge in the war of intelligence. If one can read the message of the mail when the envelope is closed, he will benefit from the message asymmetry and be on a good wicket in the competition. In this paper, we presented a transmitted imaging system using THz time-domain spectroscopy technology. We applied the system to image the mail inside an envelope by step-scanning imaging technology. The experimental results show that the THz spectroscopy can image the mail in an envelope. The words in the paper can be identified easily from the background. We also present the THz image of a metal blade in the envelope, in which we can see the metal blade clearly. The results show that it is feasible of THz Time-Domain Spectroscopy Imaging for mail inspection applications.

  1. Quantitative magnetic imaging at the nanometer scale by ballistic electron magnetic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Herve, M.; Tricot, S.; Guezo, S.; Delhaye, G.; Lepine, B.; Schieffer, P.; Turban, P.

    2013-06-21

    We demonstrate quantitative ballistic electron magnetic microscopy (BEMM) imaging of simple model Fe(001) nanostructures. We use in situ nanostencil shadow mask resistless patterning combined with molecular beam epitaxy deposition to prepare under ultra-high vacuum conditions nanostructured epitaxial Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) spin-valves. In this epitaxial system, the magnetization of the bottom Fe/GaAs(001) electrode is parallel to the [110] direction, defining accurately the analysis direction for the BEMM experiments. The large hot-electron magnetoresistance of the Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) epitaxial spin-valve allows us to image various stable magnetic configurations on the as-grown Fe(001) microstructures with a high sensitivity, even for small misalignments of both magnetic electrodes. The angular dependence of the hot-electron magnetocurrent is used to convert magnetization maps calculated by micromagnetic simulations into simulated BEMM images. The calculated BEMM images and magnetization rotation profiles show quantitative agreement with experiments and allow us to investigate the magnetic phase diagram of these model Fe(001) microstructures. Finally, magnetic domain reversals are observed under high current density pulses. This opens the way for further BEMM investigations of current-induced magnetization dynamics.

  2. Optical magnetic imaging of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Sage, D.; Arai, K.; Glenn, D. R.; DeVience, S. J.; Pham, L. M.; Rahn-Lee, L.; Lukin, M. D.; Yacoby, A.; Komeili, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological and physical systems. However, existing techniques either have poor spatial resolution compared to optical microscopy and are hence not generally applicable to imaging of sub-cellular structure (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]1), or entail operating conditions that preclude application to living biological samples while providing sub-micron resolution (e.g., scanning superconducting quantum interference device [SQUID] microscopy2, electron holography3, and magnetic resonance force microscopy [MRFM]4). Here we demonstrate magnetic imaging of living cells (magnetotactic bacteria) under ambient laboratory conditions and with sub-cellular spatial resolution (400 nm), using an optically-detected magnetic field imaging array consisting of a nanoscale layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres implanted at the surface of a diamond chip. With the bacteria placed on the diamond surface, we optically probe the NV quantum spin states and rapidly reconstruct images of the vector components of the magnetic field created by chains of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) produced in the bacteria, and spatially correlate these magnetic field maps with optical images acquired in the same apparatus. Wide-field sCMOS acquisition allows parallel optical and magnetic imaging of multiple cells in a population with sub-micron resolution and >100 micron field-of-view. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the bacteria confirm that the correlated optical and magnetic images can be used to locate and characterize the magnetosomes in each bacterium. The results provide a new capability for imaging bio-magnetic structures in living cells under ambient conditions with high spatial resolution, and will enable the mapping of a wide range of magnetic signals within cells and cellular networks5, 6. PMID:23619694

  3. Optical magnetic imaging of living cells.

    PubMed

    Le Sage, D; Arai, K; Glenn, D R; DeVience, S J; Pham, L M; Rahn-Lee, L; Lukin, M D; Yacoby, A; Komeili, A; Walsworth, R L

    2013-04-25

    Magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological and physical systems. However, existing techniques either have poor spatial resolution compared to optical microscopy and are hence not generally applicable to imaging of sub-cellular structure (for example, magnetic resonance imaging), or entail operating conditions that preclude application to living biological samples while providing submicrometre resolution (for example, scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy, electron holography and magnetic resonance force microscopy). Here we demonstrate magnetic imaging of living cells (magnetotactic bacteria) under ambient laboratory conditions and with sub-cellular spatial resolution (400 nanometres), using an optically detected magnetic field imaging array consisting of a nanometre-scale layer of nitrogen-vacancy colour centres implanted at the surface of a diamond chip. With the bacteria placed on the diamond surface, we optically probe the nitrogen-vacancy quantum spin states and rapidly reconstruct images of the vector components of the magnetic field created by chains of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) produced in the bacteria. We also spatially correlate these magnetic field maps with optical images acquired in the same apparatus. Wide-field microscopy allows parallel optical and magnetic imaging of multiple cells in a population with submicrometre resolution and a field of view in excess of 100 micrometres. Scanning electron microscope images of the bacteria confirm that the correlated optical and magnetic images can be used to locate and characterize the magnetosomes in each bacterium. Our results provide a new capability for imaging bio-magnetic structures in living cells under ambient conditions with high spatial resolution, and will enable the mapping of a wide range of magnetic signals within cells and cellular networks. PMID:23619694

  4. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  5. Magnetic domain structure and thermal stabilization of laser treatment zones in soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudov, V. I.; Dragoshanskii, Yu. N.

    2016-02-01

    A combined effect of laser treatment and introduced fine-grained weakly magnetic impurity Mg-P-B defects on the magnetic structure and physical properties of anisotropic electrotechnical materials has been investigated. Specific features of changes in the type and behavior of the magnetic domain structure under different types of deformation (laser irradiation, scratching, and introduction of interstitial defects) have been revealed. The physical basis and optimum conditions of increase in thermal stability of local laser treatment zones in soft magnetic alloys have been determined. The obtained results open the prospects of decreasing magnetic losses in soft magnetic alloys and producing magnetic materials with a high level of physical and mechanical properties that are more resistant to operating conditions.

  6. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  7. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOEpatents

    Engelstad, Barry L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Huberty, John P.; White, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided.

  8. Ferroelectric domain imaging by defect-luminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierolf, V.; Sandmann, C.; Kim, S.; Gopalan, V.; Polgar, K.

    2003-02-01

    In order to study the role of defects within the domain inversion process in ferroelectric LiNbO3 crystals, we investigated the optical properties of intentionally introduced Er3+ defect complexes across a 180° domain wall produced at room temperature by electric-field poling. Using site-selective excitation-emission spectroscopy for well chosen excitation energies, we found drastic differences in the Er3+ emission, which are due to a rearrangement of the defect complexes. We used these changes in a confocal luminescence microscope to image ferroelectric-domain structures. This powerful imaging method with a 700 nm, 50 ms spatial and temporal resolution can be used to study real-time dynamics of domain walls.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  10. Magnetic domain wall induced ferroelectricity in double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhao, Hong Jian E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Xiang Ming E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Wen Qing

    2015-04-13

    Recently, a magnetically induced ferroelectricity occurring at magnetic domain wall of double perovskite Lu{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} has been reported experimentally. However, there exists a conflict whether the electric polarization is along b or c direction. Here, by first-principles calculations, we show that the magnetic domain wall (with ↑↑↓↓ spin configuration) can lead to the ferroelectric displacements of R{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 4+}, and O{sup 2−} ions in double perovskites R{sub 2}NiMnO{sub 6} (R = rare earth ion) via exchange striction. The resulted electric polarization is along b direction with the P2{sub 1} symmetry. We further reveal the origin of the ferroelectric displacements as that: (1) on a structural point of view, such displacements make the two out-of-plane Ni-O-Mn bond angles as well as Ni-Mn distance unequal, and (2) on an energy point of view, such displacements weaken the out-of-plane Ni-Mn super-exchange interaction obviously. Finally, our calculations show that such a kind of ferroelectric order is general in ferromagnetic double perovskites.

  11. Magnetization reversal process and domain wall resistance in a water drop shape ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D. C.; Chiang, D. P.; Yao, Y. D.

    2006-03-01

    Patterned permalloy (Ni80-Fe20) materials have been fabricated by e-beam lithography in the shape of water drop ring. A tip is intentionally added into ring as geometrical defects to interrupt the continuity of magnetization reversal process, in order to create domain wall. Image from Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with real- time external field confirmed this domain structure. As a result of magneto- resistance (MR) measurement, the ratio of MR is about 0.137 ˜ 0.233% and 0.23 ˜ 0.71% at sweeping angles of samples and sweeping external field, respectively. The ratio of the change in the electric resistance which is measured by I-V curve is just about the value of domain wall MR ratio which is measured by sweeping angles and external field. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated that the domain wall motion along the direction of perimeter in a ferromagnetic ring at its onion state; and the critical field to form onion state is near 200 Oe and the lowest field which can still drag the domain wall is between 100 and 50 Oe.

  12. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls.

    PubMed

    Franken, J H; Herps, M; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion. PMID:24919162

  13. Tunable chiral spin texture in magnetic domain-walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, J. H.; Herps, M.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic domain-walls (DWs) with a preferred chirality exhibit very efficient current-driven motion. Since structural inversion asymmetry (SIA) is required for their stability, the observation of chiral domain walls in highly symmetric Pt/Co/Pt is intriguing. Here, we tune the layer asymmetry in this system and observe, by current-assisted DW depinning experiments, a small chiral field which sensitively changes. Moreover, we convincingly link the observed efficiency of DW motion to the DW texture, using DW resistance as a direct probe for the internal orientation of the DW under the influence of in-plane fields. The very delicate effect of capping layer thickness on the chiral field allows for its accurate control, which is important in designing novel materials for optimal spin-orbit-torque-driven DW motion.

  14. Enhancement of Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P; Poddubny, Alexander N; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Kozachenko, Alexander V; Dubrovina, Irina A; Melchakova, Irina V; Kivshar, Yuri S; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-03-01

    It is revealed that the unique properties of ultrathin metasurface resonators can improve magnetic resonance imaging dramatically. A metasurface formed when an array of metallic wires is placed inside a scanner under the studied object and a substantial enhancement of the radio-frequency magnetic field is achieved by means of subwavelength manipulation with the metasurface, also allowing improved image resolution. PMID:26754827

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  17. Ferromagnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and transformation of domain structure in CoFeB film with growth induced anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, S. A.; Grishin, A. M.; Munakata, M.

    2011-04-01

    Field dependence of magnetic susceptibility in nanocrystalline CoFeB film was studied in a wide frequency range from 500 kHz to 15 GHz. Anomalies of the susceptibility were detected exciting CoFeB film with a solenoidal coil, microwave strip line, in the tunable microwave cavity as well as employing magneto-optical domains imaging. Critical spin fluctuations in the form of "soft" modes were observed in a whole range of orientations of magnetic field perpendicular to the "easy" magnetic axis. A sequence of domain structure transformations was extensively examined in a "hard" direction in in-plane magnetic field reduced below the field of uniaxial anisotropy Hp = 535 Oe. At first, uniformly magnetized state in CoFeB film transforms to stripe domains separated by low angle Néel domain walls (DWs) parallel to the "hard"-axis. Then, at critical field Hcr = 232 Oe, Néel DWs gradually convert to the"easy"-axis oriented Bloch DWs loaded with vertical Bloch lines (VBLs). After field reversal at H = -Hcr, backward conversion of VBL-loaded Bloch DWs to Néel DWs results in instantaneous energy release and sharp anomaly of magnetic susceptibility. Appearance of critical spin fluctuations accomplishes domains transformation to the uniformly magnetized state at H = -535 Oe.

  18. Ferrohydrodynamic relaxometry for magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwill, P. W.; Tamrazian, A.; Croft, L. R.; Lu, C. D.; Johnson, E. M.; Pidaparthi, R.; Ferguson, R. M.; Khandhar, A. P.; Krishnan, K. M.; Conolly, S. M.

    2011-06-01

    The ferrohydrodynamic properties of magnetic nanoparticles govern resolution and signal strength in magnetic particle imaging (MPI), a medical imaging modality with applications in small animals and humans. Here, we discuss the development and key results of a magnetic particle relaxometer that measures the core diameter and relaxation constant of magnetic nanoparticles. This instrument enables us to directly measure the one-dimensional MPI point spread function. To elucidate our results, we develop a simplified ferrohydrodynamic model that assumes nanoparticles respond to time varying magnetic fields according to a Debeye model of Brownian relaxation, which we verify with experimental data.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.

    1988-01-01

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE SPINE thoroughly demonstrates the advantages of this new radiologic modality in diagnosing spinal disorders. The book begins with an introductory chapter on the basic physics and technical considerations of magnetic resonance in general and magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in particular. The second chapter covers normal spinal anatomy, and features color photos of multi-planar sections of spinal anatomy.

  20. Angle-domain imaging condition for elastic reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, R.; Xie, X.; Wu, R.

    2010-12-01

    In exploration seismology, elastic reverse time migration (RTM) has spurred much interest in recent years because of the increased imaging challenges posed by complex subsurface targets and affordable computer resources such as Linux clusters. Elastic RTM reconstructs the source wavefields forward in time and receiver wavefields backward in time by finite difference method. It then applies an imaging condition that evaluates the match between source and receiver wavefields. To construct the image which describes the physical property of the medium, we prefer to separate the wavefields into P and S modes, and implement the imaging condition as cross-correlation of pure wave mode rather than of Cartesian component of the displacement wavefields. However, simple cross-correlation can cause some image problems which impede the further seismic interpretation. For example, PP image is contaminated by strong artifacts resulted from unwanted cross-correlation between diving wave, turning wave or back-scattered wave and their time-reversed counterpart; PS image suffers from polarization problem due to the polarity reversal of converted S-wave. We found it necessary to apply certain intrinsic properties (e.g., the wave propagation directions and particle motion information) in reconstructed wavefields in order to solve the problems exhibited in elastic RTM image. This paper presents a procedure to decompose the source and receiver wavefields into local plane waves in pure P and S modes. We generate the partial PP and PS images in angle domain by cross-correlating any combination of decomposed plane wave component, and then formulate an imaging condition as a product of an angle-domain operator and the partial images. The new angle-domain imaging condition substantially reduces the artifacts in the PP image and produces the PS image with correct polarizations. Synthetic examples demonstrate that the imaging condition works very well on producing clean and consistent image

  1. Fabrication and characterization of single domain magnetic Josephson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Mazin; Niedzielski, Bethany; Gingrich, Erich; Loloee, Reza; Pratt, William, Jr.; Birge, Norman

    2015-03-01

    A nice effect that can be observed in Ferromagnetic (F) Josephson junctions is the crossover from a standard Josephson junction (0-junction) to a `` π-junction'' as a function of the thickness of the F layer, dF. This observation is interesting not only from the scientific point of view but also from a practical point of view, as it could be used in cryogenic memory, for example. In this work we are fabricating and measuring micron-scale Josephson junctions containing a soft magnetic material such as NiFe. Such junctions exhibit clear switching of the single-domain magnetic element as a function of applied field. We will report on our recent progress. Northrop Grumman.

  2. Holographic security system based on image domain joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Michael; Odinokov, Sergey B.; Bondarev, Leonid A.; Kurakin, Sergey V.; Matveyev, Sergey V.; Belyaev, V. S.

    2002-04-01

    We describe holographic security system providing machine reading of the holographic information and matching it with the reference one by optical means. The security holographic mark includes several test holograms and should be applied to a carrier: ID-card, paper seal etc. Each of the holograms stores a part of entire image, stored in the reference hologram. Image domain JTC is used to match the images retrieved from the holograms. Being recorded and retrieved, the images provides correlation peaks with special positions, with a strict dependence on the tested and reference holograms mutual shifts. The system proposed works like usual JTC with a few useful differences. The image domain recognizing is a result of Fresnel holographic technique of the images recording. It provides more effective usage of the light addressed SLM (LASLM) work pupil and resolution in more simple and compact device. Few correlation peaks enhances the device recognizing probability. We describe the real-time experimental arrangement based on LASLM. The experimental results are in a good correspondence with computer simulations. We also show in practice that good results may be obtained while using the image domain JTC technique in despite of the low LASLM resolution and the device compact size.

  3. Magneto-optic imaging of domain walls in ferrimagnetic garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, H.; Bekeris, V.; Johansen, T. H.

    2007-09-01

    Magneto-optic (MO) imaging is based on Faraday rotation of a linearly polarized incident light beam illuminating a sensitive MO layer (MOL) placed in close contact to the sample. For in-plane magnetized layers of Lu 3-xBi xFe 5-yGa yO 12 ferrimagnetic garnet films, zig-zag domain formation occurs whenever the sample stray parallel field component, H∥, changes sign. Considering the anisotropy, exchange and magnetostatic energies in the Néel tails, and the contribution of an applied magnetic field, it is possible to describe the zig-zag walls that separate domains with opposite in-plane magnetization. The size of the walls decreases with the spatial derivative of H∥. We studied the evolution of these domains as we steadily forced the change in sign of H∥ to shorter length scales, from hundreds to a few microns. We describe the samples used to control the change in sign of H∥ at the MOL plane, and we analyze the images that evolve from zig-zag walls to much more complex closed domain structures.

  4. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads® MyOne™) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔBdep = 4.5-27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  5. Magnetic bead detection using domain wall-based nanosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Corte-León, H.; Krzysteczko, P.; Schumacher, H. W.; Manzin, A.; Cox, D.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the effect of a single magnetic bead (MB) on the domain wall (DW) pinning/depinning fields of a DW trapped at the corner of an L-shaped magnetic nanodevice. DW propagation across the device is investigated using magnetoresistance measurements. DW pinning/depinning fields are characterized in as-prepared devices and after placement of a 1 μm-sized MB (Dynabeads{sup ®} MyOne{sup ™}) at the corner. The effect of the MB on the DW dynamics is seen as an increase in the depinning field for specific orientations of the device with respect to the external magnetic field. The shift of the depinning field, ΔB{sub dep} = 4.5–27.0 mT, is highly stable and reproducible, being significantly above the stochastic deviation which is about 0.5 mT. The shift in the deppinning field is inversely proportional to the device width and larger for small negative angles between the device and the external magnetic field. Thus, we demonstrate that DW-based devices can be successfully used for detection of single micron size MB.

  6. Interplay between intrinsic and stacking-fault magnetic domains in bi-layered manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, M.A; Burkhardt, Mark H.; Sarkar, S.; Ohldag, H.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Scholl, A.; Young, A.T.; Doran, A.; Dessau, D.S.; Zheng, H.; Mitchell, J.F.; Durr, H.A.; Stohr, J.

    2012-09-11

    We present a low temperature X-ray photoemission electron microscopy study of the bi-layered manganite compound La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} (BL-LSMO) to investigate the influence of stacking faults, which are structurally and magnetically different from the bi-layered host. In BL-LSMO small magnetic moment persists to T* = 300K, well above the Curie temperature of 120K (T{sub C}). Our magnetic images show that 3D stacking faults are responsible for the T* transition. Furthermore, close to the T{sub C}, stacking faults are well coupled to the bi-layered host with latter magnetic domains controlling the spin direction of the stacking faults. Contrary to recent reports, we find that stacking faults do not seed magnetic domains in the host via an exchange spring mechanism and the intrinsic T{sub C} of the BL-LSMO is not lower than 120K.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications.

    PubMed

    Low, Keynes T A; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahi, H.; Khorramdin, A.; Isapour, Gh.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants.

  10. Notch-Boosted Domain Wall Propagation in Magnetic Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang Rong; Yuan, Hauiyang

    Magnetic domain wall (DW) motion along a nanowire underpins many proposals of spintronic devices. High DW propagation velocity is obviously important because it determines the device speed. Thus it is interesting to search for effective control knobs of DW dynamics. We report a counter-intuitive finding that notches in an otherwise homogeneous magnetic nanowire can boost current-induced domain wall (DW) propagation. DW motion in notch-modulated wires can be classified into three phases: 1) A DW is pinned around a notch when the current density is below the depinning current density. 2) DW propagation velocity above the depinning current density is boosted by notches when non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque strength is smaller than the Gilbert damping constant. The boost can be many-fold. 3) DW propagation velocity is hindered when non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque strength is larger than the Gilbert damping constant. This work was supported by Hong Kong GRF Grants (Nos. 163011151 and 605413) and the Grant from NNSF of China (No. 11374249).

  11. Domain wall motion in sub-100 nm magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Saima; Dutta, Sumit; Currivan, Jean Anne; Ross, Caroline; Baldo, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Nonvolatile memory devices such as racetrack memory rely on the manipulation of domain wall (DW) in magnetic nanowires, and scaling of these devices requires an understanding of domain wall behavior as a function of the wire width. Due to the increased importance of edge roughness and magnetostatic interaction, DW pinning increases dramatically as the wire dimensions decrease and stochastic behavior is expected depending on the distribution of pinning sites. We report on the field driven DW statistics in sub-100 nm wide nanowires made from Co films with very small edge roughness. The nanowires were patterned in the form of a set of concentric rings of 10 μm diameter. Two different width nanowires with two different spacings have been studied. The rings were first saturated in plane to produce onion states and then the DWs were translated in the wires using an orthogonal in-plane field. The position of the DWs in the nanowires was determined with magnetic force microscopy. From the positions of the DWs in the nanowires, the strength of the extrinsic pinning sites was identified and they follow two different distributions in two different types of nanowire rings. For the closely spaced wires, magnetostatic interactions led to correlated movement of DWs in neighboring wires. The implications of DW pinning and interaction in nanoscale DW devices will be discussed.

  12. Development of a Magnetic Nanoparticle Susceptibility Magnitude Imaging Array

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over 5 dilutions (R2 > 0.98, p <0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 nm and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe/ml mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution. PMID:24504184

  13. Development of a magnetic nanoparticle susceptibility magnitude imaging array.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Bradley W; Nadar, Priyanka M; Hoopes, P Jack; Diamond, Solomon G

    2014-02-21

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over five dilutions (R(2) > 0.98, p < 0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe ml(-1) mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution. PMID:24504184

  14. Development of a magnetic nanoparticle susceptibility magnitude imaging array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-02-01

    There are several emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) in medicine. This study examines the potential for developing an mNP imager that meets these emerging clinical needs with a low cost imaging solution that uses arrays of digitally controlled drive coils in a multiple-frequency, continuous-wave operating mode and compensated fluxgate magnetometers. The design approach is described and a mathematical model is developed to support measurement and imaging. A prototype is used to demonstrate active compensation of up to 185 times the primary applied magnetic field, depth sensitivity up to 2.5 cm (p < 0.01), and linearity over five dilutions (R2 > 0.98, p < 0.001). System frequency responses show distinguishable readouts for iron oxide mNPs with single magnetic domain core diameters of 10 and 40 nm, and multi-domain mNPs with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm. Tomographic images show a contrast-to-noise ratio of 23 for 0.5 ml of 12.5 mg Fe ml-1 mNPs at 1 cm depth. A demonstration involving the injection of mNPs into pork sausage shows the potential for use in biological systems. These results indicate that the proposed mNP imaging approach can potentially be extended to a larger array system with higher-resolution.

  15. Regular and chaotic precession of magnetization in magnetic films with a stripe domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutyĭ, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    Based on a numerical solution of the equations of motion found over a wide range of frequencies of an alternating magnetic field, the nonlinear precession dynamics of magnetization are studied in thin-film structures of the (100) type with a stripe domain structure in a perpendicular bias field. The conditions are determined under which high-amplitude regular and chaotic dynamic regimes occur. Bifurcational variations in the precession of coupled magnetic moments and dynamic-bistability states are detected. The specific features of the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents and of time analogs of Poincaré cross sections of trajectories in chaotic regimes are considered.

  16. Effect of residual strain in Fe-based amorphous alloys on field induced magnetic anisotropy and domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Daichi; Hasegawa, Ryusuke; Saito, Shin; Takahashi, Migaku

    2013-05-01

    Field induced magnetic anisotropy in two Fe-based amorphous alloys with different saturation induction levels (1.56 T and 1.64 T) was investigated by varying magnetic field strength and annealing temperature and domain images were taken on these samples. Residual strain was evaluated by measuring coercivities of the materials after stress-relief annealing. These results are discussed, clarifying the difference between the two Fe-based amorphous alloys.

  17. Rotationally induced magnetic chirality in clusters of single-domain permalloy islands and gapped nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Jie; Bartell, Jason; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent; Schiffer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    We have studied magnetic moment configurations of clusters of single-domain ferromagnetic islands in different geometries. The magnetic moments of these clusters are imaged by MFM after rotational demagnetization, following our previous protocols. We observed that two types of the clusters showed a significant imbalance of their two-fold degenerate ground states after demagnetization, and this inequality is correlated to the rotational direction of the demagnetization. A similar imbalance was also found in nano-scale rings with a small gap: the chirality of their magnetic state can be precisely controlled by the rotational direction during demagnetization. We acknowledge the financial support from DOE and Army Research Office. We are grateful to Prof. Chris Leighton and Mike Erickson for assistance with sample preparation.

  18. High-speed optical frequency-domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Iftimia, N.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate high-speed, high-sensitivity, high-resolution optical imaging based on optical frequency-domain interferometry using a rapidly-tuned wavelength-swept laser. We derive and show experimentally that frequency-domain ranging provides a superior signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional time-domain ranging as used in optical coherence tomography. A high sensitivity of −110 dB was obtained with a 6 mW source at an axial resolution of 13.5 µm and an A-line rate of 15.7 kHz, representing more than an order-of-magnitude improvement compared with previous OCT and interferometric imaging methods. PMID:19471415

  19. Wavelet smoothing of functional magnetic resonance images: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucier, Bradley J.

    2003-11-01

    Functional (time-dependent) Magnetic Resonance Imaging can be used to determine which parts of the brain are active during various limited activities; these parts of the brain are called activation regions. In this preliminary study we describe some experiments that are suggested from the following questions: Does one get improved results by analyzing the complex image data rather than just the real magnitude image data? Does wavelet shrinkage smoothing improve images? Should one smooth in time as well as within and between slices? If so, how should one model the relationship between time smoothness (or correlations) and spatial smoothness (or correlations). The measured data is really the Fourier coefficients of the complex image---should we remove noise in the Fourier domain before computing the complex images? In this preliminary study we describe some experiments related to these questions.

  20. Reliable absolute palaeointensities independent of magnetic domain state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekkers, Mark J.; Böhnel, Harald N.

    2006-08-01

    Knowledge of palaeointensity variation is required for determining the full vector variation of the geomagnetic field as a function of geological time. This provides essential constraints for numerical geodynamo models. To date, most palaeointensity determination methods are laborious, characterised by rather low success rates, and demand substantial processing time. The rocks under investigation must obey stringent criteria to yield faithful palaeointensities: the magnetic particles must be single domain, the natural remanent magnetisation must be a thermoremanent magnetisation, and during the successive heating steps in the laboratory no chemical alteration should occur. Here, we describe a new method that allows all magnetic domain states to be processed, i.e. it does not require single domain particles. The method makes use of the linearity of partial thermoremanent magnetisation (pTRM) with the applied laboratory field. Multiple specimens are used so that every sample is exposed only once to a laboratory field, warranting that all samples experienced the same magnetic history. Through the limited number of thermal steps alteration effects are reduced as well. The laboratory pTRM and natural remanent magnetisation (NRM) of the specimens are oriented parallel to minimise the effects of high-temperature tails that affect multidomain minerals. The pTRM acquisition temperature is selected below the temperature at which chemical alteration sets in and above the temperature trajectory where secondary viscous NRM components occur. The procedure requires a lower number of steps than any other palaeointensity method, reducing significantly the total time needed per rock unit. We propose to name the new protocol 'multispecimen parallel differential pTRM method'. It provides the correct answer to ˜ 5% for artificial samples and natural rocks containing multidomain magnetic particles that were given a laboratory TRM of known intensity. Application to the Paricutin

  1. Quality assessment for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Paranjape, Amit S.; Elmaanaoui, Badr; Dewelle, Jordan; Rylander, H. Grady, III; Markey, Mia K.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, a measure of glaucoma progression, can be measured in images acquired by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation, however, is affected by the quality of the OCT images. In this paper, a new parameter, signal deviation (SD), which is based on the standard deviation of the intensities in OCT images, is introduced for objective assessment of OCT image quality. Two other objective assessment parameters, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and signal strength (SS), are also calculated for each OCT image. The results of the objective assessment are compared with subjective assessment. In the subjective assessment, one OCT expert graded the image quality according to a three-level scale (good, fair, and poor). The OCT B-scan images of the retina from six subjects are evaluated by both objective and subjective assessment. From the comparison, we demonstrate that the objective assessment successfully differentiates between the acceptable quality images (good and fair images) and poor quality OCT images as graded by OCT experts. We evaluate the performance of the objective assessment under different quality assessment parameters and demonstrate that SD is the best at distinguishing between fair and good quality images. The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation is improved significantly after poor quality OCT images are rejected by automated objective assessment using the SD, SNR, and SS.

  2. An efficient multiple exposure image fusion in JPEG domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbalaguppe, Ramya; Kakarala, Ramakrishna

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method to fuse multiple images taken with varying exposure times in the JPEG domain. The proposed algorithm finds its application in HDR image acquisition and image stabilization for hand-held devices like mobile phones, music players with cameras, digital cameras etc. Image acquisition at low light typically results in blurry and noisy images for hand-held camera's. Altering camera settings like ISO sensitivity, exposure times and aperture for low light image capture results in noise amplification, motion blur and reduction of depth-of-field respectively. The purpose of fusing multiple exposures is to combine the sharp details of the shorter exposure images with high signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of the longer exposure images. The algorithm requires only a single pass over all images, making it efficient. It comprises of - sigmoidal boosting of shorter exposed images, image fusion, artifact removal and saturation detection. Algorithm does not need more memory than a single JPEG macro block to be kept in memory making it feasible to be implemented as the part of a digital cameras hardware image processing engine. The Artifact removal step reuses the JPEGs built-in frequency analysis and hence benefits from the considerable optimization and design experience that is available for JPEG.

  3. Natural language processing and visualization in the molecular imaging domain.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, P Karina; Tao, Ying; Millar, William S; Zanzonico, Pat; Kolbert, Katherine; Xu, Hua; Yu, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Lussier, Yves A; Friedman, Carol

    2007-06-01

    Molecular imaging is at the crossroads of genomic sciences and medical imaging. Information within the molecular imaging literature could be used to link to genomic and imaging information resources and to organize and index images in a way that is potentially useful to researchers. A number of natural language processing (NLP) systems are available to automatically extract information from genomic literature. One existing NLP system, known as BioMedLEE, automatically extracts biological information consisting of biomolecular substances and phenotypic data. This paper focuses on the adaptation, evaluation, and application of BioMedLEE to the molecular imaging domain. In order to adapt BioMedLEE for this domain, we extend an existing molecular imaging terminology and incorporate it into BioMedLEE. BioMedLEE's performance is assessed with a formal evaluation study. The system's performance, measured as recall and precision, is 0.74 (95% CI: [.70-.76]) and 0.70 (95% CI [.63-.76]), respectively. We adapt a JAVA viewer known as PGviewer for the simultaneous visualization of images with NLP extracted information. PMID:17084109

  4. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the inside of ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses radio waves, a magnetic field and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the spine and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  7. Magnetic domain wall shift registers for data storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Dan; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Sampaio, J.; Thevenard, L.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2009-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through permalloy (Py) nanowires have been proposed [Allwood et al. Science 309, 1688 (2005), S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004)] and have attracted a great deal of attention. We experimentally demonstrate such a device using shift registers constructed from magnetic NOT gates used in combination with a globally applied rotating magnetic field. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable Py nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Electrical data writing is achieved using the Oersted field due to current pulses in gold stripes (4 μm wide, 150 nm thick), patterned on top of and perpendicular to the nanowires. The conduit-like properties of the nanowires allow the propagation of data sequences over distances greater than 100 μm. Using spatially resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements we can directly detect the propagation of single DWs in individual nanostructures without requiring data averaging. Electrical readout was demonstrated by detecting the presence of DWs at deliberately introduced pinning sites in the wire.

  8. Domain decomposition methods for solving an image problem

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, W.K.; Tong, C.S.

    1994-12-31

    The domain decomposition method is a technique to break up a problem so that ensuing sub-problems can be solved on a parallel computer. In order to improve the convergence rate of the capacitance systems, pre-conditioned conjugate gradient methods are commonly used. In the last decade, most of the efficient preconditioners are based on elliptic partial differential equations which are particularly useful for solving elliptic partial differential equations. In this paper, the authors apply the so called covering preconditioner, which is based on the information of the operator under investigation. Therefore, it is good for various kinds of applications, specifically, they shall apply the preconditioned domain decomposition method for solving an image restoration problem. The image restoration problem is to extract an original image which has been degraded by a known convolution process and additive Gaussian noise.

  9. Imaging of Spin Dynamics in Closure Domain and Vortex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. P.; Eames, P.; Engebretson, D. M.; Berezovsky, J.; Crowell, P. A.

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved Kerr microscopy is used to study the excitations of individual micron-scale ferromagnetic thin film elements in their remnant state. Thin (18 nm) square elements with edge dimensions between 1 and 10 μm form closure domain structures with 90 degree Néel walls between domains. We identify two classes of excitations in these systems. The first corresponds to precession of the magnetization about the local demagnetizing field in each quadrant, while the second excitation is localized in the domain walls. Two modes are also identified in ferromagnetic disks with thicknesses of 60 nm and diameters from 2 μm down to 500 nm. The equilibrium state of each disk is a vortex with a singularity at the center. As in the squares, the higher frequency mode is due to precession about the internal field, but in this case the lower frequency mode corresponds to gyrotropic motion of the entire vortex. The effect of a non-zero magnetic field on the excitation spectrum of vortices is also explored. Although an applied field shifts the position of the vortex core, it has only a small effect on the excitation spectrum. These results demonstrate clearly the existence of well-defined excitations in inhomogeneously magnetized microstructures. This work was supported by NSF DMR 99-83777, the Research Corporation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the University of Minnesota MRSEC (DMR 98-09364), and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  10. DANCING WITH THE ELECTRONS: TIME-DOMAIN AND CW IN VIVO EPR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the development of imaging the distribution of unpaired electrons in living systems and the functional and the potential diagnostic dimensions of such an imaging process, using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging (EPRI), is traced from its origins with emphasis on our own work. The importance of EPR imaging stems from the fact that many paramagnetic probes show oxygen dependent spectral broadening. Assessment of in vivo oxygen concentration is an important factor in radiation oncology in treatment-planning and monitoring treatment-outcome. The emergence of narrow-line trairylmethyl based, bio-compatible spin probes has enabled the development of radiofrequency time-domain EPRI. Spectral information in time-domain EPRI can be achieved by generating a time sequence of T2* or T2 weighted images. Progress in CW imaging has led to the use of rotating gradients, more recently rapid scan with direct detection, and a combination of all the three. Very low field MRI employing Dynamic Nuclear polarization (Overhauser effect) is also employed for monitoring tumor hypoxia, and re-oxygenation in vivo. We have also been working on the co-registration of MRI and time domain EPRI on mouse tumor models at 300 MHz using a specially designed resonator assembly. The mapping of the unpaired electron distribution and unraveling the spectral characteristics by using magnetic resonance in presence of stationary and rotating gradients in indeed ‘dancing with the (unpaired) electrons’, metaphorically speaking. PMID:22025900

  11. Magneto-optical imaging of vortex domain deformation in pinning sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, R.; Frey, J. A.; Berezovsky, J.

    2015-05-01

    We use a sensitive magneto-optical microscopy technique to image the magnetization response of micron-scale ferromagnetic disks to changes in applied magnetic field. This differential technique relies on a modulated applied magnetic field which allows us to measure changes in magnetization < 1 % with sub-micron resolution. The disks are magnetized in single vortex domains, with defects in the material serving to pin the vortex core at particular positions. By applying a small AC magnetic field, we measure the deformation of the magnetization while the core remains pinned. We can also characterize the strength of the pinning site by increasing the AC magnetic field to unpin the vortex core. While pinned, we find that the magnetization away from the core reorients slightly to better align with an applied field. Additionally, an applied field causes the pinned core itself to tilt in the direction of the field. Once the field is large enough to unpin the core, this tilt disappears, and the core instead translates across the disk.

  12. Accelerating Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Lung Tumor Tracking Based on Low-Rank Decomposition in the Spatial–Temporal Domain: A Feasibility Study Based on Simulation and Preliminary Prospective Undersampled MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Manoj; Hu, Peng; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Ennis, Daniel; Thomas, Albert; Lee, Percy; Kupelian, Patrick; Sheng, Ke

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a low-rank decomposition method to reconstruct down-sampled k-space data for the purpose of tumor tracking. Methods and Materials: Seven retrospective lung cancer patients were included in the simulation study. The fully-sampled k-space data were first generated from existing 2-dimensional dynamic MR images and then down-sampled by 5 × -20 × before reconstruction using a Cartesian undersampling mask. Two methods, a low-rank decomposition method using combined dynamic MR images (k-t SLR based on sparsity and low-rank penalties) and a total variation (TV) method using individual dynamic MR frames, were used to reconstruct images. The tumor trajectories were derived on the basis of autosegmentation of the resultant images. To further test its feasibility, k-t SLR was used to reconstruct prospective data of a healthy subject. An undersampled balanced steady-state free precession sequence with the same undersampling mask was used to acquire the imaging data. Results: In the simulation study, higher imaging fidelity and low noise levels were achieved with the k-t SLR compared with TV. At 10 × undersampling, the k-t SLR method resulted in an average normalized mean square error <0.05, as opposed to 0.23 by using the TV reconstruction on individual frames. Less than 6% showed tracking errors >1 mm with 10 × down-sampling using k-t SLR, as opposed to 17% using TV. In the prospective study, k-t SLR substantially reduced reconstruction artifacts and retained anatomic details. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance reconstruction using k-t SLR on highly undersampled dynamic MR imaging data results in high image quality useful for tumor tracking. The k-t SLR was superior to TV by better exploiting the intrinsic anatomic coherence of the same patient. The feasibility of k-t SLR was demonstrated by prospective imaging acquisition and reconstruction.

  13. Mobile metallic domain walls in an all-in-all-out magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Eric Yue; Cui, Yong-Tao; Ueda, Kentaro; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Wu, Phillip M.; Fujioka, Jun; Tokura, Yoshinori; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic domain walls are boundaries between regions with different configurations of the same magnetic order. In a magnetic insulator, where the magnetic order is tied to its bulk insulating property, it has been postulated that electrical properties are drastically different along the domain walls, where the order is inevitably disturbed. Here we report the discovery of highly conductive magnetic domain walls in a magnetic insulator, Nd2Ir2O7, that has an unusual all-in-all-out magnetic order, via transport and spatially resolved microwave impedance microscopy. The domain walls have a virtually temperature-independent sheet resistance of ~1 kilohm per square, show smooth morphology with no preferred orientation, are free from pinning by disorders, and have strong thermal and magnetic field responses that agree with expectations for all-in-all-out magnetic order.

  14. Mobile metallic domain walls in an all-in-all-out magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Eric Yue

    Magnetic domain walls are boundaries between regions with different configurations of the same magnetic order. In a magnetic insulator where the magnetic order is tied to its bulk insulating property, it has been postulated that electrical properties are drastically different along the domain walls, where the order is inevitably disturbed. Here we report the discovery of highly conductive magnetic domain walls in a magnetic insulator Nd2Ir2O7, which has an unusual all-in-all-out magnetic order, via transport and spatially resolved microwave impedance microscopy. The domain walls have a virtually temperature-independent sheet resistance (averaged over mesoscopic distances) of ~1 kilohm per square, show smooth morphology with no preferred orientation, are free from pinning by disorders, and have strong thermal and magnetic field responses that agree with expectations for all-in-all-out magnetic order. This work is supported by funding from NSF, Moore Foundation, JSPS, NSFC and DOE.

  15. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  16. Frequency Domain Magnetic Measurements from Kilohertz to Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, John F.

    "......we applied much prolonged labor on investigating the magnetical forces; so wonderful indeed are they, compared with the forces in all other minerals, surpassing even the virtues of all bodies around us. Nor have we found this labor idle or unfruitful; since daily in our experimenting new unexpected properties came to light."William Gilbert, De Magnete, 1600Abstract. This review deals with practical aspects of making frequency-domain measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic losses from 200 kHz up to 10 GHz. It sets out the types of measurement concerned, distinguishing resonant from nonresonant phenomena. The techniques available are categorized according to suitability for the different frequency regimes and types of investigation. Practical recipes are provided for undertaking such experiments across the entire frequency range. Marginal oscillator spectrometry is discussed which is applicable across the whole frequency range. Different instruments are presented, and particular emphasis is placed on designs which function on the Robinson principle. Analysis of oscillation condition and signal-to-noise performance is dealt with, also sample considerations such as filling factor. Practical circuits are presented and their merits and demerits evaluated. Layout and radio-frequency design considerations are dealt with. Ultrahigh/microwave frequency marginal oscillator spectrometry is given special treatment and several practical designs are given. The essentials of good microwave design are emphasized. A general discussion of resonant structures is included which treats multiple layer coil design, slow wave line structures, stripline and cavities. Unusual cavity designs such as the rhumbatron are treated. Use of striplines with microwave marginal spectrometry is described and compared with conventional network-analysis techniques. The use of parameter matrices for high-frequency analysis is alluded to. Some details of good construction practice are

  17. Unexpected Magnetic Domain Behavior in LTP-MnBi

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, PK; Jin, S; Berkowitz, AE

    2013-07-01

    Low-temperature-phase MnBi (LTP-MnBi) has attracted much interest as a potential rare-earth-free permanent magnet material because of its high uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy at room temperature, K approximate to 10(7) ergs/cc, and the unusual increase of anisotropy with increasing temperature, with an accompanying increasing coercive force (H-C) with temperature. However, due to the complex Mn-Bi phase diagram, bulk samples of LTP-MnBi with the optimum saturation moment, similar to 75-76 emu/g have been achieved only with zone-refined single crystals. We have prepared polycrystalline samples of LTP-MnBi by induction melting and annealing at 300 degrees C. The moment in 70 kOe is 73.5 emu/g, but H-C is only 50 Oe. This is quite surprising-the high saturation moment indicates the dominating presence of LTP-MnBi. Therefore, an H-C c of some significant fraction of 2K/M-S approximate to 30 kOe would seem reasonable in this polycrystalline sample. By examining "Bitter" patterns, we show that the sample is composed of similar to 50 - 100 mu m crystallites. The randomly oriented crystallites exhibit the variety of magnetic domain structures and orientations expected from the hexagonal-structured MnBi with its strong uniaxial anisotropy. Clearly, the reversal of magnetization in the sample proceeds by the low-field nucleation of reversed magnetization in each crystallite, rather than by a wall-pinning mechanism. When the annealed sample was milled into fine particles, H-C increased by several orders of magnitude, as expected.

  18. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure

    PubMed Central

    Murapaka, C.; Sethi, P.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated. PMID:26839036

  19. Reconfigurable logic via gate controlled domain wall trajectory in magnetic network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murapaka, C.; Sethi, P.; Goolaup, S.; Lew, W. S.

    2016-02-01

    An all-magnetic logic scheme has the advantages of being non-volatile and energy efficient over the conventional transistor based logic devices. In this work, we present a reconfigurable magnetic logic device which is capable of performing all basic logic operations in a single device. The device exploits the deterministic trajectory of domain wall (DW) in ferromagnetic asymmetric branch structure for obtaining different output combinations. The programmability of the device is achieved by using a current-controlled magnetic gate, which generates a local Oersted field. The field generated at the magnetic gate influences the trajectory of the DW within the structure by exploiting its inherent transverse charge distribution. DW transformation from vortex to transverse configuration close to the output branch plays a pivotal role in governing the DW chirality and hence the output. By simply switching the current direction through the magnetic gate, two universal logic gate functionalities can be obtained in this device. Using magnetic force microscopy imaging and magnetoresistance measurements, all basic logic functionalities are demonstrated.

  20. Coronary Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:19269527

  1. Instability of Walker propagating domain wall in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Wang, X R

    2013-07-12

    The stability of the well-known Walker propagating domain wall (DW) solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is analytically investigated. Surprisingly, a propagating DW is always dressed with spin waves so that the Walker rigid-body propagating DW mode does not occur in reality. In the low field region only stern spin waves are emitted while both stern and bow waves are generated under high fields. In a high enough field, but below the Walker breakdown field, the Walker solution could be convective or absolute unstable if the transverse magnetic anisotropy is larger than a critical value, corresponding to a significant modification of the DW profile and DW propagating speed. PMID:23889437

  2. 2D magnetic nanoparticle imaging using magnetization response second harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Murata, Hayaki; Oishi, Tomoya; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Zhang, Yi

    2015-06-01

    A detection method and an imaging technique for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated. In MNP detection and in magnetic particle imaging (MPI), the most commonly employed method is the detection of the odd harmonics of the magnetization response. We examined the advantage of using the second harmonic response when applying an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field. If the magnetization response is detected by a Cu-wound-coil detection system, the output voltage from the coil is proportional to the change in the flux, dϕ/dt. Thus, the dependence of the derivative of the magnetization, M, on an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field were calculated and investigated. The calculations were in good agreement with the experimental results. We demonstrated that the use of the second harmonic response for the detection of MNPs has an advantage compared with the usage of the third harmonic response, when the Cu-wound-coil detection system is employed and the amplitude of the ratio of the AC modulation field and a knee field Hac/Hk is less than 2. We also constructed a 2D MPI scanner using a pair of permanent ring magnets with a bore of ϕ80 mm separated by 90 mm. The magnets generated a gradient of Gz=3.17 T/m transverse to the imaging bore and Gx=1.33 T/m along the longitudinal axis. An original concentrated 10 μl Resovist solution in a ϕ2×3 mm2 vessel was used as a sample, and it was imaged by the scanner. As a result, a 2D contour map image could be successfully generated using the method with a lock-in amplifier.

  3. Classification of similar medical images in the lifting domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallee, Chad W.; Tashakkori, Rahman

    2002-03-01

    In this paper lifting is used for similarity analysis and classification of sets of similar medical images. The lifting scheme is an invertible wavelet transform that maps integers to integers. Lifting provides efficient in-place calculation of transfer coefficients and is widely used for analysis of similar image sets. Images of a similar set show high degrees of correlation with one another. The inter-set redundancy can be exploited for the purposes of prediction, compression, feature extraction, and classification. This research intends to show that there is a higher degree of correlation between images of a similar set in the lifting domain than in the pixel domain. Such a high correlation will result in more accurate classification and prediction of images in a similar set. Several lifting schemes from Calderbank-Daubechies-Fauveue's family were used in this research. The research shows that some of these lifting schemes decorrelates the images of similar sets more effectively than others. The research presents the statistical analysis of the data in scatter plots and regression models.

  4. Giant Effect of Uniaxial Pressure on Magnetic Domain Populations in Multiferroic Bismuth Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, M.; Ratcliff, W., II; Yi, H. T.; Sirenko, A. A.; Cheong, S.-W.; Kiryukhin, V.

    2011-08-01

    Neutron diffraction is used to show that small (˜7MPa, or 70 bar) uniaxial pressure produces significant changes in the populations of magnetic domains in a single crystal of 2% Nd-doped bismuth ferrite. The magnetic easy plane of the domains converted by the pressure is rotated 60° relative to its original position. These results demonstrate extreme sensitivity of the magnetic properties of multiferroic bismuth ferrite to tiny (less than 10-4) elastic strain, as well as weakness of the forces pinning the domain walls between the cycloidal magnetic domains in this material.

  5. Approach to breast magnetic resonance imaging interpretation.

    PubMed

    Palestrant, Sarah; Comstock, Christopher E; Moy, Linda

    2014-05-01

    With the increasing use of breast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging comes the expectation that the breast radiologist is as fluent in its interpretation as in that of mammography and breast ultrasonography. Knowledge of who should be included for imaging and how to perform the imaging are as essential as interpreting the images. When reading the examination, the radiologist should approach the images from both a global and focused perspective, synthesizing findings into a report that includes a management plan. This article reviews a systematic and organized approach to breast MR imaging interpretation. PMID:24792657

  6. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, J.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.; Bayer, D.; Kurde, J.; Heitkamp, B.; Piantek, M.; Kronast, F.; Aeschlimann, M.; Dürr, H. A.; Kuch, W.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  7. Bi-directional magnetic domain wall shift register

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, D. E.; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2010-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through ferromagnetic nanowires have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years [1,2]. Here we experimentally demonstrate a shift register based on an open-ended chain of ferromagnetic NOT gates. When used in combination with a globally applied magnetic field such devices can support bi-directional data flow [3]. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable NiFe nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Up to eight data bits are electrically input to the device, stored for extended periods without power supplied to the device, and then output using either a first in first out or a last in first out mode of operation. Compared to traditional electronic transistor-based circuits, the inherent bi-directionality afforded by these DW logic gates offers a range of devices that are reversible and not limited to only one mode of operation. [1] S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004) [2] D. A. Allwod, et al., Science 309 (5741), 1688 (2005) [3] L. O'Brien, et al. accepted for publication in APL (2009)

  8. Effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of nonstoichiometric pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Kasama, Takeshi; Williams, Wyn; Damsgaard, Christian; Frandsen, Cathrine; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) grains in the pseudo-single-domain (PSD) size range is investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirm the precursor grains as Fe3O4 ranging from ˜150 to ˜250 nm in diameter, whilst Mössbauer spectrometry suggests the grains are initially near-stoichiometric. The Fe3O4 grains are heated to increasing reaction temperatures of 120-220°C to investigate their oxidation to maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). High-angle annular dark field imaging and localized electron-energy loss spectroscopy reveal slightly oxidized Fe3O4 grains, heated to 140°C, exhibit higher oxygen content at the surface. Off-axis electron holography allows for construction of magnetic induction maps of individual Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 grains, revealing their PSD (vortex) nature, which is supported by magnetic hysteresis measurements, including first-order reversal curve analysis. The coercivity of the grains is shown to increase with reaction temperature up to 180°C, but subsequently decreases after heating above 200°C; this magnetic behavior is attributed to the growth of a γ-Fe2O3 shell with magnetic properties distinct from the Fe3O4 core. It is suggested there is exchange coupling between these separate components that results in a vortex state with reduced vorticity. Once fully oxidized to γ-Fe2O3, the domain states revert back to vortices with slightly reduced coercivity. It is argued that due to a core/shell coupling mechanism during maghemization, the directional magnetic information will still be correct; however, the intensity information will not be retained.

  9. Effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, T.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Kasama, T.; Williams, W.; Damsgaard, C.; Frandsen, C.; Pennycook, T. J.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.

    2015-12-01

    During formation, magnetic minerals record the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field. Paleomagnetists use this information to investigate, for example, past tectonic plate motion and geodynamo evolution. However, subsequent to formation the constituent magnetic minerals are commonly exposed to a range of weathering conditions and environments. One of the most common weathering processes is maghemization, which is the oxidation of magnetite (Fe3O4) at ambient temperatures, i.e., the slow oxidation of Fe3O4 to maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), and is known to alter the original remanent magnetization. Of the constituent magnetic minerals, particles in the single domain (SD) grain size range (< 100 nm) are regarded as ideal paleomagnetic recorders because of their strong remanence and high magnetic stability, with potential relaxation times greater than that of the age of the Universe. However, magnetic signals from rocks are often dominated by small grains with non-uniform magnetization that exhibit magnetic recording fidelities similar to those of SD grains (termed pseudo-SD (PSD)). In this context, the effect of maghemization on the magnetic properties of Fe3O4 grains in the PSD size range is investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirms the precursor grains as Fe3O4 ranging from ~ 150 nm to ~ 250 nm in diameter, whilst Mössbauer spectrometry suggests the grains are initially near-stoichiometric. The Fe3O4 grains are heated to increasing reaction temperatures of 120 - 220 ºC to investigate their oxidation to γ-Fe2O3. High-angle annular dark field imaging and localized electron energy-loss spectroscopy reveals slightly oxidized Fe3O4 grains, heated to 140 ºC, exhibit higher oxygen content at the surface. Off-axis electron holography allows for construction of magnetic induction maps of individual Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 grains, revealing their PSD (vortex) nature, which is supported by

  10. Magnetic anisotropy and domain patterning of amorphous films by He-ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McCord, Jeffrey; Gemming, Thomas; Schultz, Ludwig; Fassbender, Juergen; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Frommberger, Michael; Quandt, Eckhard

    2005-04-18

    The magnetic anisotropy in amorphous soft magnetic FeCoSiB films was modified by He-ion irradiation. A rotation of uniaxial anisotropy depending on the applied field direction in the irradiated areas is observed by magnetometry and complementary domain observation by Kerr microscopy. No significant degradation in magnetic properties relative to the as-deposited state is found from the magnetization loops on nonpatterned films. Using irradiation together with photolithography, the films were treated locally, resulting in 'anisotropy patterned' structures. Complicated periodic domain patterns form due to the locally varying anisotropy distribution. Overall magnetic properties and domain patterns are adjusted.

  11. A symmetrical image encryption scheme in wavelet and time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuling; Du, Minghui; Liu, Junxiu

    2015-02-01

    There has been an increasing concern for effective storages and secure transactions of multimedia information over the Internet. Then a great variety of encryption schemes have been proposed to ensure the information security while transmitting, but most of current approaches are designed to diffuse the data only in spatial domain which result in reducing storage efficiency. A lightweight image encryption strategy based on chaos is proposed in this paper. The encryption process is designed in transform domain. The original image is decomposed into approximation and detail components using integer wavelet transform (IWT); then as the more important component of the image, the approximation coefficients are diffused by secret keys generated from a spatiotemporal chaotic system followed by inverse IWT to construct the diffused image; finally a plain permutation is performed for diffusion image by the Logistic mapping in order to reduce the correlation between adjacent pixels further. Experimental results and performance analysis demonstrate the proposed scheme is an efficient, secure and robust encryption mechanism and it realizes effective coding compression to satisfy desirable storage.

  12. A Time Domain Fluorescence Tomography System for Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Scott B.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Boas, David A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the application of a time domain diffuse fluorescence tomography system for whole body small animal imaging. The key features of the system are the use of point excitation in free space using ultrashort laser pulses and noncontact detection using a gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Mouse shaped epoxy phantoms, with embedded fluorescent inclusions, were used to verify the performance of a recently developed asymptotic lifetime-based tomography algorithm. The asymptotic algorithm is based on a multiexponential analysis of the decay portion of the data. The multiexponential model is shown to enable the use of a global analysis approach for a robust recovery of the lifetime components present within the imaging medium. The surface boundaries of the imaging volume were acquired using a photogrammetric camera integrated with the imaging system, and implemented in a Monte-Carlo model of photon propagation in tissue. The tomography results show that the asymptotic approach is able to separate axially located fluorescent inclusions centered at depths of 4 and 10 mm from the surface of the mouse phantom. The fluorescent inclusions had distinct lifetimes of 0.5 and 0.95 ns. The inclusions were nearly overlapping along the measurement axis and shown to be not resolvable using continuous wave (CW) methods. These results suggest the practical feasibility and advantages of a time domain approach for whole body small animal fluorescence molecular imaging, particularly with the use of lifetime as a contrast mechanism. PMID:18672432

  13. High-speed time domain terahertz security imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimdars, David; White, Jeffrey; Williamson, Steven; Stuk, G.

    2005-05-01

    Terahertz imaging has the potential to reveal concealed explosives; metallic and non-metallic weapons (such as ceramic, plastic or composite guns and knives); flammables; biological agents; chemical weapons and other threats hidden in packages or on personnel. Time domain terahertz imaging can be employed in reflection mode to image with sub millimeter resolution. Previously, single pixel acquisition times for THz waveforms was typically 20 Hz with time records of approx 80 picoseconds, which typically restricted imaging time to hours for areas on the order of 1 square foot, limiting the field practicality of the equipment. We describe and demonstrate advanced imagers with 100 Hz --> 320 picosecond, and 4000 Hz -- 20 picosecond waveform records. These systems have been demonstrated to image >600 pixels/second from a single channel. Such a system, combined with a 32 channel linear THz array, could image a 1 square foot area with 1 mm resolution in <5 seconds, performing a shoe explosives detection image in a short period of time.

  14. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  15. Magnetic Hardening from the Suppression of Domain Walls by Nonmagnetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-03-07

    Magnetic domain switching and hysteresis loops in a single crystal α-iron with and without nonmagnetic particles were simulated based on the magnetization dynamics of the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. It is found that the 360o Bloch domain wall is the easiest nucleation site for an anti-direction domain. The nucleation occurs by splitting the 360o Bloch domain wall into two 180o domain walls. However, the existence of nonmagnetic particles destroys the 180o domain walls and prevents the formation of 360o Bloch domain walls. Simulation results demonstrate that the impact of nonmagnetic particle on the formation of the 360o Bloch domain wall is a magnetic hardening mechanism.

  16. Artifacts in Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Marina-Portia; Nguyen, Dustin; Friedlander, Lauren; Mango, Victoria; Wynn, Ralph; Ha, Richard

    2016-01-01

    As breast magnetic resonance imaging has evolved to become a routine part of clinical practice, so too has the need for radiologists to be aware of its potential pitfalls and limitations. Unique challenges arise in the identification and remedy of artifacts in breast magnetic resonance imaging, and it is important that radiologists and technicians work together to optimize protocols and monitor examinations such that these may be minimized or avoided entirely. This article presents patient-related and technical artifacts that may give rise to reduced image quality and ways to recognize and reduce them. PMID:26343534

  17. Pelvic applications of diffusion magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Antonio C; Krishnaraj, Arun; Pires, Cintia E; Bittencourt, Leonardo K; Guimarães, Alexander R

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a powerful imaging technique in neuroimaging; its value in abdominal and pelvic imaging has only recently been appreciated as a result of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging technology. There is growing interest in the use of DWI for evaluating pathology in the pelvis. Its ability to noninvasively characterize tissues and to depict changes at a cellular level allows DWI to be an effective complement to conventional sequences of pelvic imaging, especially in oncologic patients. The addition of DWI may obviate contrast material in those with renal insufficiency or contrast material allergy. PMID:21129639

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  19. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging--first human images in Australia.

    PubMed

    Baddeley, H; Doddrell, D M; Brooks, W M; Field, J; Irving, M; Williams, J E

    1986-10-20

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging, in the demonstration of internal human anatomy and in the diagnosis of disease, has the major advantages that the technique is noninvasive, does not require the use of ionizing radiation and that it can demonstrate neurological and cardiovascular lesions that cannot be diagnosed easily by other imaging methods. Magnetic resonance imaging is derived from the principle that certain atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field will absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy; when the pulse is finished the nuclei will emit radiowaves at the same frequency. These radiowaves are received by specially designed aerials or coils and the information is collected by a computer which reconstructs an image of internal anatomy in a similar way to that of x-ray computed tomography (CT). By changing the strength of the magnetic fields and the frequency of the radiowave pulses, it is possible to examine different sections within the body. The first magnetic resonance images of humans were obtained in Australia in October 1985 on the research instrument of the Queensland Medical Magnetic Resonance Research Centre, which is based at the Mater Hospital in Brisbane, and is part of the University of Queensland's Department of Radiology. PMID:3020385

  1. Image contrast enhancement in angular domain optical imaging of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Fartash; Kaminska, Bozena; Chapman, Glenn H; Carson, Jeffrey J L

    2008-12-22

    Imaging structures within a turbid medium using Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) employs an angular filter array to separate weakly scattered photons from those that are highly scattered. At high scattering coefficients, ADI contrast declines due to the large fraction of non-uniform background scattered light still within the acceptance angle. This paper demonstrates various methods to enhance the image contrast in ADI. Experiments where a wedge prism was used to deviate the laser source so that scattered photons could be imaged and subtracted from the image obtained by standard ADI provided the greatest improvement in image contrast. PMID:19104579

  2. Effect of substrate rotation on domain structure and magnetic relaxation in magnetic antidot lattice arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, Sougata; Mallik, Srijani; Bedanta, Subhankar

    2015-08-28

    Microdimensional triangular magnetic antidot lattice arrays were prepared by varying the speed of substrate rotation. The pre-deposition patterning has been performed using photolithography technique followed by a post-deposition lift-off. Surface morphology taken by atomic force microscopy depicted that the growth mechanism of the grains changes from chain like formation to island structures due to the substrate rotation. Study of magnetization reversal via magneto optic Kerr effect based microscopy revealed reduction of uniaxial anisotropy and increase in domain size with substrate rotation. The relaxation measured under constant magnetic field becomes faster with rotation of the substrate during deposition. The nature of relaxation for the non-rotating sample can be described by a double exponential decay. However, the relaxation for the sample with substrate rotation is well described either by a double exponential or a Fatuzzo-Labrune like single exponential decay, which increases in applied field.

  3. `Anomalous' magnetic fabrics of dikes in the stable single domain/superparamagnetic threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, Carles; Beamud, Elisabet; Garcés, Miguel; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-02-01

    `Anomalous' magnetic fabrics in dikes that appear to indicate flow into the wall confound many workers. Here, we present extensive magnetic data on five dikes from Tenerife, Canary Islands, and use these to interpret the causes of the anomalous fabrics. Comparison of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anhysteretic magnetization (AARM) results show that, in some cases, the anomalous fabrics are caused by single-domain grains, which produce AMS fabrics perpendicular to the grain elongation, whereas AARM fabrics are parallel. To check this, hysteresis experiments were used to characterize the domain state. These show most are mixtures of pseudo-single-domain or single-domain plus multi-domain particles, but many have wasp-waisted hysteresis loops, likely indicating mixed populations of stable single-domain and superparamagnetic grains. First-order reversal curves were used to better characterize this and show mixtures of stable single-domain and superparamagnetic grains dominate the magnetic signal. Magnetic particles at the stable single-domain/superparamagnetic threshold are unstable at timespans relevant to the analytical techniques, so they produce complicated results. This suggests that anomalous AMS fabrics in dikes cannot simply be attributed to elongated stable single-domain particles and that mixtures of the different grain types can produce hybrid fabrics, in which the fabrics are neither perpendicular or parallel to the dike plane, that are difficult to interpret without extensive magnetic analysis.

  4. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  5. Geomorphic domains and linear features on Landsat images, Circle Quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    A remote sensing study using Landsat images was undertaken as part of the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP). Geomorphic domains A and B, identified on enhanced Landsat images, divide Circle quadrangle south of Tintina fault zone into two regional areas having major differences in surface characteristics. Domain A is a roughly rectangular, northeast-trending area of relatively low relief and simple, widely spaced drainages, except where igneous rocks are exposed. In contrast, domain B, which bounds two sides of domain A, is more intricately dissected showing abrupt changes in slope and relatively high relief. The northwestern part of geomorphic domain A includes a previously mapped tectonostratigraphic terrane. The southeastern boundary of domain A occurs entirely within the adjoining tectonostratigraphic terrane. The sharp geomorphic contrast along the southeastern boundary of domain A and the existence of known faults along this boundary suggest that the southeastern part of domain A may be a subdivision of the adjoining terrane. Detailed field studies would be necessary to determine the characteristics of the subdivision. Domain B appears to be divisible into large areas of different geomorphic terrains by east-northeast-trending curvilinear lines drawn on Landsat images. Segments of two of these lines correlate with parts of boundaries of mapped tectonostratigraphic terranes. On Landsat images prominent north-trending lineaments together with the curvilinear lines form a large-scale regional pattern that is transected by mapped north-northeast-trending high-angle faults. The lineaments indicate possible lithlogic variations and/or structural boundaries. A statistical strike-frequency analysis of the linear features data for Circle quadrangle shows that northeast-trending linear features predominate throughout, and that most northwest-trending linear features are found south of Tintina fault zone. A major trend interval of N.64-72E. in the linear

  6. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the

  7. Influence of magnetic domain landscape on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamus, Z.; Cieplak, Marta Z.; Kończykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-02-01

    We use a line of miniature Hall sensors to study the influence of the magnetic domain distribution on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers. Two bilayers are built of a ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a superconducting Nb layer, with the insulating layer in-between to avoid proximity effect. The magnetic domain patterns of various geometries are reversibly predefined in the Co/Pt multilayers using the appropriate magnetization procedure. The Pt thickness is different in the two bilayers, resulting in different width and length of the domains, which profoundly affects vortex dynamics. We show that narrow short domains lead to strong confinement of vortices at the sample edge, while narrow elongated domains of uniform width induce smaller confinement and easy vortex entry. Large enhancement of flux pinning and critical current density, by a factor of more than 7, is observed in the last case, while the former results in smaller enhancement. When domains are wide, the disorder in the domain widths becomes beneficial for larger enhancement of pinning, while more uniform distribution of domain widths results in a precipitous drop of the enhancement. The analysis of these results suggests that with increasing domain width, a transition occurs from vortex chains pinned by narrow domains to disordered triangular vortex lattice pinned by a maze of multiply interconnected magnetic domains.

  8. Antiphase domains and reverse thermoremanent magnetism in ilmenite-hematite minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawson, C.A.; Nord, G.L., Jr.; Dowty, Eric; Hargraves, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Examination of synthetic ilmenite-hematite samples by transmission electron microscopy has for the first time revealed the presence of well-defined antiphase domains and antiphase domain boundaries in this mineral system. Samples quenched from 1300??C have a high density of domain boundaries, whereas samples quenched from 900??C have a much lower density. Only the high-temperature samples acquire reverse thermoremanent magnetism when cooled in an applied magnetic field. The presence of a high density of domain boundaries seems to be a necessary condition for the acquisition of reverse thermoremanent magnetism.

  9. Magneto-optical imaging of thin magnetic films using spins in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, David A.; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; McCoey, Julia M.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Hall, Liam T.; Petrou, Steven; Scholten, Robert E.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging the fields of magnetic materials provides crucial insight into the physical and chemical processes surrounding magnetism, and has been a key ingredient in the spectacular development of magnetic data storage. Existing approaches using the magneto-optic Kerr effect, x-ray and electron microscopy have limitations that constrain further development, and there is increasing demand for imaging and characterisation of magnetic phenomena in real time with high spatial resolution. Here we show how the magneto-optical response of an array of negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond can be used to image and map the sub-micron stray magnetic field patterns from thin ferromagnetic films. Using optically detected magnetic resonance, we demonstrate wide-field magnetic imaging over 100 × 100 μm2 with sub-micron spatial resolution at video frame rates, under ambient conditions. We demonstrate an all-optical spin relaxation contrast imaging approach which can image magnetic structures in the absence of an applied microwave field. Straightforward extensions promise imaging with sub-μT sensitivity and sub-optical spatial and millisecond temporal resolution. This work establishes practical diamond-based wide-field microscopy for rapid high-sensitivity characterisation and imaging of magnetic samples, with the capability for investigating magnetic phenomena such as domain wall and skyrmion dynamics and the spin Hall effect in metals. PMID:26972730

  10. Magneto-optical imaging of thin magnetic films using spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, David A.; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; McCoey, Julia M.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Hall, Liam T.; Petrou, Steven; Scholten, Robert E.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging the fields of magnetic materials provides crucial insight into the physical and chemical processes surrounding magnetism, and has been a key ingredient in the spectacular development of magnetic data storage. Existing approaches using the magneto-optic Kerr effect, x-ray and electron microscopy have limitations that constrain further development, and there is increasing demand for imaging and characterisation of magnetic phenomena in real time with high spatial resolution. Here we show how the magneto-optical response of an array of negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond can be used to image and map the sub-micron stray magnetic field patterns from thin ferromagnetic films. Using optically detected magnetic resonance, we demonstrate wide-field magnetic imaging over 100 × 100 μm2 with sub-micron spatial resolution at video frame rates, under ambient conditions. We demonstrate an all-optical spin relaxation contrast imaging approach which can image magnetic structures in the absence of an applied microwave field. Straightforward extensions promise imaging with sub-μT sensitivity and sub-optical spatial and millisecond temporal resolution. This work establishes practical diamond-based wide-field microscopy for rapid high-sensitivity characterisation and imaging of magnetic samples, with the capability for investigating magnetic phenomena such as domain wall and skyrmion dynamics and the spin Hall effect in metals.

  11. Magneto-optical imaging of thin magnetic films using spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David A; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; McCoey, Julia M; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Hall, Liam T; Petrou, Steven; Scholten, Robert E; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2016-01-01

    Imaging the fields of magnetic materials provides crucial insight into the physical and chemical processes surrounding magnetism, and has been a key ingredient in the spectacular development of magnetic data storage. Existing approaches using the magneto-optic Kerr effect, x-ray and electron microscopy have limitations that constrain further development, and there is increasing demand for imaging and characterisation of magnetic phenomena in real time with high spatial resolution. Here we show how the magneto-optical response of an array of negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond can be used to image and map the sub-micron stray magnetic field patterns from thin ferromagnetic films. Using optically detected magnetic resonance, we demonstrate wide-field magnetic imaging over 100 × 100 μm(2) with sub-micron spatial resolution at video frame rates, under ambient conditions. We demonstrate an all-optical spin relaxation contrast imaging approach which can image magnetic structures in the absence of an applied microwave field. Straightforward extensions promise imaging with sub-μT sensitivity and sub-optical spatial and millisecond temporal resolution. This work establishes practical diamond-based wide-field microscopy for rapid high-sensitivity characterisation and imaging of magnetic samples, with the capability for investigating magnetic phenomena such as domain wall and skyrmion dynamics and the spin Hall effect in metals. PMID:26972730

  12. Chapter 4: Regional magnetic domains of the Circum-Arctic: A framework for geodynamic interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Miller, E.L.; Gaina, C.; Brown, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    We identify and discuss 57 magnetic anomaly pattern domains spanning the Circum-Arctic. The domains are based on analysis of a new Circum-Arctic data compilation. The magnetic anomaly patterns can be broadly related to general geodynamic classification of the crust into stable, deformed (magnetic and nonmagnetic), deep magnetic high, oceanic and large igneous province domains. We compare the magnetic domains with topography/bathymetry, regional geology, regional free air gravity anomalies and estimates of the relative magnetic 'thickness' of the crust. Most of the domains and their geodynamic classification assignments are consistent with their topographic/bathymetric and geological expression. A few of the domains are potentially controversial. For example, the extent of the Iceland Faroe large igneous province as identified by magnetic anomalies may disagree with other definitions for this feature. Also the lack of definitive magnetic expression of oceanic crust in Baffin Bay, the Norwegian-Greenland Sea and the Amerasian Basin is at odds with some previous interpretations. The magnetic domains and their boundaries provide clues for tectonic models and boundaries within this poorly understood portion of the globe. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  13. AC driven magnetic domain quantification with 5 nm resolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenghua; Li, Xiang; Dong, Dapeng; Liu, Dongping; Saito, H.; Ishio, S.

    2014-01-01

    As the magnetic storage density increases in commercial products, e.g. the hard disc drives, a full understanding of dynamic magnetism in nanometer resolution underpins the development of next-generation products. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Moreover, the dynamic magnetism cannot be characterized because MFM is only sensitive to the static magnetic fields. Here, we develop a side-band magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to locally observe the alternating magnetic fields in nanometer length scales at an operating distance of 1 nm. Variations in alternating magnetic fields and their relating time-variable magnetic domain reversals have been demonstrated by the side-band MFM. The magnetic domain wall motions, relating to the periodical rotation of sample magnetization, are quantified via micromagnetics. Based on the side-band MFM, the magnetic moment can be determined locally in a volume as small as 5 nanometers. The present technique can be applied to investigate the microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic materials, and allows a wide range of future applications, for example, in data storage and biomedicine. PMID:25011670

  14. Suppression of the intrinsic stochastic pinning of domain walls in magnetic nanostripes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Prieto, José L

    2011-01-01

    Nanofabrication has allowed the development of new concepts such as magnetic logic and race-track memory, both of which are based on the displacement of magnetic domain walls on magnetic nanostripes. One of the issues that has to be solved before devices can meet the market demands is the stochastic behaviour of the domain wall movement in magnetic nanostripes. Here we show that the stochastic nature of the domain wall motion in permalloy nanostripes can be suppressed at very low fields (0.6-2.7 Oe). We also find different field regimes for this stochastic motion that match well with the domain wall propagation modes. The highest pinning probability is found around the precessional mode and, interestingly, it does not depend on the external field in this regime. These results constitute an experimental evidence of the intrinsic nature of the stochastic pinning of domain walls in soft magnetic nanostripes. PMID:22127058

  15. Clinical skin imaging using color spatial frequency domain imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Moy, Austin J.; Reichenberg, Jason; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-02-01

    Skin diseases are typically associated with underlying biochemical and structural changes compared with normal tissues, which alter the optical properties of the skin lesions, such as tissue absorption and scattering. Although widely used in dermatology clinics, conventional dermatoscopes don't have the ability to selectively image tissue absorption and scattering, which may limit its diagnostic power. Here we report a novel clinical skin imaging technique called color spatial frequency domain imaging (cSFDI) which enhances contrast by rendering color spatial frequency domain (SFD) image at high spatial frequency. Moreover, by tuning spatial frequency, we can obtain both absorption weighted and scattering weighted images. We developed a handheld imaging system specifically for clinical skin imaging. The flexible configuration of the system allows for better access to skin lesions in hard-to-reach regions. A total of 48 lesions from 31 patients were imaged under 470nm, 530nm and 655nm illumination at a spatial frequency of 0.6mm^(-1). The SFD reflectance images at 470nm, 530nm and 655nm were assigned to blue (B), green (G) and red (R) channels to render a color SFD image. Our results indicated that color SFD images at f=0.6mm-1 revealed properties that were not seen in standard color images. Structural features were enhanced and absorption features were reduced, which helped to identify the sources of the contrast. This imaging technique provides additional insights into skin lesions and may better assist clinical diagnosis.

  16. Ultrahigh speed spectral/Fourier domain ophthalmic OCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potsaid, Benjamin; Gorczynska, Iwona; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Chen, Yueli; Liu, Jonathan; Jiang, James; Cable, Alex; Duker, Jay S.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrahigh speed spectral / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using a CMOS line scan camera with acquisition rates of 70,000 - 312,500 axial scans per second is investigated. Several design configurations are presented to illustrate trade-offs between acquisition speed, sensitivity, resolution and sensitivity roll-off performance. We demonstrate: extended imaging range and improved sensitivity roll-off at 70,000 axial scans per second , high speed and ultrahigh resolution imaging at 106,382 axial scans per second, and ultrahigh speed imaging at 250,000-312,500 axial scans per second. Each configuration is characterized through optical testing and the trade-offs demonstrated with in vivo imaging of the fovea and optic disk in the human retina. OCT fundus images constructed from 3D-OCT data acquired at 250,000 axial scans per second have no noticeable discontinuity of retinal features and show that there are minimal motion artifacts. The fine structures of the lamina cribrosa can be seen. Long cross sectional scans are acquired at 70,000 axial scans per second for imaging large areas of the retina, including the fovea and optic disk. Rapid repeated imaging of a small volume (4D-OCT) enables time resolved visualization of the capillary network surrounding the INL and may show individual red blood cells. The results of this study suggest that high speed CMOS cameras can achieve a significant improvement in performance for ophthalmic imaging. This promises to have a powerful impact in clinical applications by improving early diagnosis, reproducibility of measurements and enabling more sensitive assessment of disease progression or response to therapy.

  17. F-k Domain Imaging for Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hendrik J; van Neer, Paul L M J; Mota, Mariana Melo; Verweij, Martin D; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Volker, Arno W F

    2016-01-01

    Spatial resolution in medical ultrasound images is a key component in image quality and an important factor for clinical diagnosis. In early systems, the lateral resolution was optimal in the focus but rapidly decreased outside the focal region. Improvements have been found in, e.g., dynamic-receive beamforming, in which the entire image is focused in receive, but this requires complex processing of element data and is not applicable for mechanical scanning of single-element images. This paper exploits the concept of two-stage beamforming based on virtual source-receivers, which reduces the front-end computational load while maintaining a similar data rate and frame rate compared to dynamic-receive beamforming. We introduce frequency-wavenumber domain data processing to obtain fast second-stage data processing while having similarly high lateral resolution as dynamic-receive beamforming and processing in time-space domain. The technique is very suitable in combination with emerging technologies such as application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), hand-held devices, and wireless data transfer. The suggested method consists of three steps. In the first step, single-focused RF line data are shifted in time to relocate the focal point to a new origin t' = 0, z' = 0. This new origin is considered as an array of virtual source/receiver pairs, as has been suggested previously in literature. In the second step, the dataset is efficiently processed in the wavenumber-frequency domain to form an image that is in focus throughout its entire depth. In the third step, the data shift is undone to obtain a correct depth axis in the image. The method has been tested first with a single-element scanning system and second in a tissue-mimicking phantom using a linear array. In both setups, the method resulted in a −6-dB lateral point spread function (PSF) which was constant over the entire depth range, and similar to dynamic-receive beamforming and synthetic aperture sequential

  18. Electric resistance of magnetic domain wall in NiFe wires with CoSm pinning pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahama, T.; Mibu, K.; Shinjo, T.

    2000-05-01

    The contribution of a magnetic domain wall to electric resistivity was measured using NiFe wires (width: 1 μm) partially covered with hard magnetic pads (CoSm). When the wire is covered with N pinning pads, 2N domain walls can be produced in the wire by reversing the magnetization only at the uncovered parts. The resistance for the magnetically saturated state (no domain wall structure) and that for the magnetic structure with 2N domain walls were compared at zero applied field. It was found that the resistance is smaller when magnetic domain walls exist, and that the domain wall resistance is almost temperature independent.

  19. Towards Single Biomolecule Imaging via Optical Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Alberto; Rosa, Lorenzo; Castelletto, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a physical marvel in which electromagnetic radiation is charged and discharged by nuclei in a magnetic field. In conventional NMR, the specific nuclei resonance frequency depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the magnetic properties of the isotope of the atoms. NMR is routinely utilized in clinical tests by converting nuclear spectroscopy in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and providing 3D, noninvasive biological imaging. While this technique has revolutionized biomedical science, measuring the magnetic resonance spectrum of single biomolecules is still an intangible aspiration, due to MRI resolution being limited to tens of micrometers. MRI and NMR have, however, recently greatly advanced, with many breakthroughs in nano-NMR and nano-MRI spurred by using spin sensors based on an atomic impurities in diamond. These techniques rely on magnetic dipole-dipole interactions rather than inductive detection. Here, novel nano-MRI methods based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond are highlighted, that provide a solution to the imaging of single biomolecules with nanoscale resolution in-vivo and in ambient conditions. PMID:26113221

  20. Domain wall motion driven by spin Hall effect—Tuning with in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rushforth, A. W.

    2014-04-21

    This letter investigates the effects of in-plane magnetic anisotropy on the current induced motion of magnetic domain walls in systems with dominant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where accumulated spins from the spin Hall effect in an adjacent heavy metal layer are responsible for driving the domain wall motion. It is found that that the sign and magnitude of the domain wall velocity in the uniform flow regime can be tuned significantly by the in-plane magnetic anisotropy. These effects are sensitive to the ratio of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin transfer torque parameters and are robust in the presence of pinning and thermal fluctuations.

  1. Demonstration of Time Domain Multiplexed Readout for Magnetically Coupled Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porst, J.-P.; Adams, J. S.; Balvin, M.; Bandler, S.; Beyer, J.; Busch, S. E.; Drung, D.; Seidel, G. M.; Smith, S. J.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically coupled calorimeters (MCC) have extremely high potential for x-ray applications due to the inherent high energy resolution capability and being non-dissipative. Although very high energy-resolution has been demonstrated, until now there has been no demonstration of multiplexed read-out. We report on the first realization of a time domain multiplexed (TDM) read-out. While this has many similarities with TDM of transition-edge-sensors (TES), for MGGs the energy resolution is limited by the SQUID read-out noise and requires the well established scheme to be altered in order to minimize degradation due to noise aliasing effects. In cur approach, each pixel is read out by a single first stage SQUID (SQ1) that is operated in open loop. The outputs of the SQ1 s are low-pass filtered with an array of low cross-talk inductors, then fed into a single-stage SQUID TD multiplexer. The multiplexer is addressed from room temperature and read out through a single amplifier channel. We present results achieved with a new detector platform. Noise performance is presented and compared to expectations. We have demonstrated multiplexed X-ray spectroscopy at 5.9keV with delta_FWHM=10eV. In an optimized setup, we show it is possible to multiplex 32 detectors without significantly degrading the Intrinsic detector resolution.

  2. CHOROIDAL IMAGING USING SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Regatieri, Caio V.; Branchini, Lauren; Fujimoto, James G.; Duker, Jay S.

    2012-01-01

    Background A structurally and functionally normal choroidal vasculature is essential for retinal function. Therefore, a precise clinical understanding of choroidal morphology should be important for understanding many retinal and choroidal diseases. Methods PUBMED (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed) was used for most of the literature search for this article. The criterion for inclusion of an article in the references for this review was that it included materials about both the clinical and the basic properties of choroidal imaging using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Results Recent reports show successful examination and accurate measurement of choroidal thickness in normal and pathologic states using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography systems. This review focuses on the principles of the new technology that make choroidal imaging using optical coherence tomography possible and on the changes that subsequently have been documented to occur in the choroid in various diseases. Additionally, it outlines future directions in choroidal imaging. Conclusion Optical coherence tomography is now proven to be an effective noninvasive tool to evaluate the choroid and to detect choroidal changes in pathologic states. Additionally, choroidal evaluation using optical coherence tomography can be used as a parameter for diagnosis and follow-up. PMID:22487582

  3. Mirror-image-induced magnetic modes.

    PubMed

    Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Shi, Lei; Tuzer, Umut; Fenollosa, Roberto; Ramiro-Manzano, Fernando; Quidant, Romain; Meseguer, Francisco

    2013-01-22

    Reflection in a mirror changes the handedness of the real world, and right-handed objects turn left-handed and vice versa (M. Gardner, The Ambidextrous Universe, Penguin Books, 1964). Also, we learn from electromagnetism textbooks that a flat metallic mirror transforms an electric charge into a virtual opposite charge. Consequently, the mirror image of a magnet is another parallel virtual magnet as the mirror image changes both the charge sign and the curl handedness. Here we report the dramatic modification in the optical response of a silicon nanocavity induced by the interaction with its image through a flat metallic mirror. The system of real and virtual dipoles can be interpreted as an effective magnetic dipole responsible for a strong enhancement of the cavity scattering cross section. PMID:23194368

  4. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  5. Emergency Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Musculoskeletal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kumaravel, Manickam; Weathers, William M

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) trauma is commonly encountered in the emergency department. Computed tomography and radiography are the main forms of imaging assessment, but the use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become more common in the emergency room (ER) setting for evaluation of low-velocity/sports-related injury and high-velocity injury. The superior soft tissue contrast and detail provided by MR imaging gives clinicians a powerful tool in the management of acute MSK injury in the ER. This article provides an overview of techniques and considerations when using MR imaging in the evaluation of some of the common injuries seen in the ER setting. PMID:27150325

  6. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. PMID:26614130

  7. Optimized cobalt nanowires for domain wall manipulation imaged by in situ Lorentz microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, L. A.; Magen, C.; Snoeck, E.; Gatel, C.; Serrano-Ramon, L.; and others

    2013-01-14

    Direct observation of domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation in focused electron beam induced deposited Co nanowires as a function of their dimensions was carried out by Lorentz microscopy (LTEM) upon in situ application of magnetic field. Optimal dimensions favoring the unambiguous DW nucleation/propagation required for applications were found in 500-nm-wide and 13-nm-thick Co nanowires, with a maximum nucleation field and the largest gap between nucleation and propagation fields. The internal DW structures were resolved using the transport-of-intensity equation formalism in LTEM images and showed that the optimal nanowire dimensions correspond to the crossover between the nucleation of transverse and vortex walls.

  8. Uniform rotating field network structure to efficiently package a magnetic bubble domain memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfshagen, Ronald G. (Inventor); Ypma, John E. (Inventor); Murray, Glen W. (Inventor); Chen, Thomas T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A unique and compact open coil rotating magnetic field network structure to efficiently package an array of bubble domain devices is disclosed. The field network has a configuration which effectively enables selected bubble domain devices from the array to be driven in a vertical magnetic field and in an independent and uniform horizontal rotating magnetic field. The field network is suitably adapted to minimize undesirable inductance effects, improve capabilities of heat dissipation, and facilitate repair or replacement of a bubble device.

  9. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kenya Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  10. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl2 to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The "MPI value" was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  11. Image Coding By Vector Quantization In A Transformed Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labit, C.; Marescq, J. P...

    1986-05-01

    Using vector quantization in a transformed domain, TV images are coded. The method exploit spatial redundancies of small 4x4 blocks of pixel : first, a DCT (or Hadamard) trans-form is performed on these blocks. A classification algorithm ranks them into visual and transform properties-based classes. For each class, high energy carrying coefficients are retained and using vector quantization, a codebook is built for the AC remaining part of the transformed blocks. The whole of the codeworks are referenced by an index. Each block is then coded by specifying its DC coefficient and associated index.

  12. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  13. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Magnetic domain structure and magnetization reversal in submicron-scale Co dots

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C J; Fernandez, A; Gibbons, M; Wall, M A

    1998-09-24

    We present a magnetic force microscopy (MFM) analysis of arrays of submicron-scale Co dots fabricated by interference lithography. The dots are thin (180--300 Å) and elliptical in shape. MFM reveals that these structures relax into highly ordered remanent states whose symmetry and configuration are governed by their shape anisotropy. In particular, when the dots are saturated along their long-axis, a uniformly magnetized state persists at remanence. However, when the dots are saturated along their short-axis, they relax into a single-vortex state in which the circulation can have either sign. Both states are characterized by smoothly varying magnetization patterns and a high degree of uniformity across the array. We attribute the ordered behavior of these.structures to the film microstructure, which allows the shape anisotropy to dominate over magnetocrystalline anjsotropy. By imaging a series of minor-loop remanent states, we show that magnetization reversal in these structures occurs via the nucleation and annihilation of a single vortex. Magnetic hysteresis loop measurements are consistent with these observations and provide additional details. Furthermore, we present the results of micromagnetic simulations, which are in excellent agreement with both the MFM images and the hysteresis loop measurements. © 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ultrasound breast imaging using frequency domain reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, O.; Zuberi, M. A. H.; Pratt, R. G.; Duric, N.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ultrasonography reconstruction techniques, such as B-mode, are based on a simple wave propagation model derived from a high frequency approximation. Therefore, to minimize model mismatch, the central frequency of the input pulse is typically chosen between 3 and 15 megahertz. Despite the increase in theoretical resolution, operating at higher frequencies comes at the cost of lower signal-to-noise ratio. This ultimately degrades the image contrast and overall quality at higher imaging depths. To address this issue, we investigate a reflection imaging technique, known as reverse time migration, which uses a more accurate propagation model for reconstruction. We present preliminary simulation results as well as physical phantom image reconstructions obtained using data acquired with a breast imaging ultrasound tomography prototype. The original reconstructions are filtered to remove low-wavenumber artifacts that arise due to the inclusion of the direct arrivals. We demonstrate the advantage of using an accurate sound speed model in the reverse time migration process. We also explain how the increase in computational complexity can be mitigated using a frequency domain approach and a parallel computing platform.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, A. O.; Rojas, R.; Barrios, F. A.

    2001-10-01

    MR imaging has experienced an important growth worldwide and in particular in the USA and Japan. This imaging technique has also shown an important rise in the number of MR imagers in Mexico. However, the development of MRI has followed a typical way of Latin American countries, which is very different from the path shown in the industrialised countries. Despite the fact that Mexico was one the very first countries to install and operate MR imagers in the world, it still lacks of qualified clinical and technical personnel. Since the first MR scanner started to operate, the number of units has grown at a moderate space that now sums up approximately 60 system installed nationwide. Nevertheless, there are no official records of the number of MR units operating, physicians and technicians involved in this imaging modality. The MRI market is dominated by two important companies: General Electric (approximately 51%) and Siemens (approximately 17.5%), the rest is shared by other five companies. According to the field intensity, medium-field systems (0.5 Tesla) represent 60% while a further 35% are 1.0 T or higher. Almost all of these units are in private hospitals and clinics: there is no high-field MR imagers in any public hospital. Because the political changes in the country, a new public plan for health care is still in the process and will be published soon this year. This plan will be determined by the new Congress. North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and president Fox. Experience acquired in the past shows that the demand for qualified professionals will grow in the new future. Therefore, systematic training of clinical and technical professionals will be in high demand to meet the needs of this technique. The National University (UNAM) and the Metropolitan University (UAM-Iztapalapa) are collaborating with diverse clinical groups in private facilities to create a systematic training program and carry out research and development in MRI

  17. Tracer design for magnetic particle imaging (invited)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses safe iron oxide nanoparticle tracers to offer fundamentally new capabilities for medical imaging, in applications as vascular imaging and ultra-sensitive cancer therapeutics. MPI is perhaps the first medical imaging platform to intrinsically exploit nanoscale material properties. MPI tracers contain magnetic nanoparticles whose tunable, size-dependent magnetic properties can be optimized by selecting a particular particle size and narrow size-distribution. In this paper we present experimental MPI measurements acquired using a homemade MPI magnetometer: a zero-dimensional MPI imaging system designed to characterize tracer performance by measuring the derivative of the time-varying tracer magnetization, M’(H(t)), at a driving frequency of 25 kHz. We show that MPI performance is optimized by selecting phase-pure magnetite tracers of a particular size and narrow size distribution; in this work, tracers with 20 nm median diameter, log-normal distribution shape parameter, σv, equal to 0.26, and hydrodynamic diameter equal to 30 nm showed the best performance. Furthermore, these optimized MPI tracers show 4 × greater signal intensity (measured at the third harmonic) and 20% better spatial resolution compared with commercial nanoparticles developed for MRI. PMID:22434939

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers on technological advancement and diagnostic uses g magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative evaluation with computerized tomography is presented. Topics covered are imaging principles g magnetic resonance;instrumentation of magnetic resonance (MR);pathophysiology;quality and limitations g images;NMR imaging of brain and spinal cord;MR spectroscopy and its applications;neuroanatomy;Congenital malformations of brain and MR imaging;planning g MR imaging of spine and head and neck imaging.

  19. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-05-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  20. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  1. Investigating the role of superdiffusive currents in laser induced demagnetization of ferromagnets with nanoscale magnetic domains

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, N.; Malinowski, G.; Mauchain, J.; Hehn, M.; Vodungbo, B.; Lüning, J.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Thiaville, A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the loss of magnetic order and the microscopic mechanisms involved in laser induced magnetization dynamics is one of the most challenging topics in today's magnetism research. While scattering between spins, phonons, magnons and electrons have been proposed as sources for dissipation of spin angular momentum, ultrafast spin dependent transport of hot electrons has been pointed out as a potential candidate to explain ultrafast demagnetization without resorting to any spin dissipation channel. Here we use time resolved magneto-optical Kerr measurements to extract the influence of spin dependent transport on the demagnetization dynamics taking place in magnetic samples with alternating domains with opposite magnetization directions. We unambiguously show that whatever the sample magnetic configuration, the demagnetization takes place during the same time, demonstrating that hot electrons spin dependent transfer between neighboring domains does not alter the ultrafast magnetization dynamics in our systems with perpendicular anisotropy and 140 nm domain sizes. PMID:24722395

  2. Discovery of hard-magnetic domains in two-dimensional arrays of soft-magnetic Fe3O4 nanocubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Shuangshuang; Wang, Tiantian; Chen, Kezheng

    2015-08-01

    In this study, abnormal hard-magnetic domains were discovered in Fe3O4@C composite material, in which well-ordered 16-nm-sized Fe3O4 cubes were tightly embedded into carbon sheets of tens of nanometers thick. It was found that ca. 40 columns of Fe3O4 nanocubes magnetically self-assembled into a single strip-type domain with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. More strikingly, remarkable domain misalignments, which were very similar to common edge dislocations among atomic planes in crystal lattices, were clearly observed and termed as "domain dislocation" in this work. The hard-magnetic properties of Fe3O4@C material, including large coercivity of 2150 Oe, high MR/MS value of 0.9, and strong anisotropy energy of 3.772 × 105 erg/cm3, were further ascertained by carefully designed electromagnetic absorption contrast experiments. It is anticipated that the discovery of hard-magnetic domains and domain dislocations within 2-D arrays of soft-magnetic nanomaterials will shed new light on the development of high-density perpendicular magnetic recording industry.

  3. Quantification of magnetic nanoparticles with broadband measurements of magnetic susceptibility in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto; An, Zhisheng; Chang, Hong; Qiang, Xiaoke

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of low-field magnetic susceptibility over a wide band of frequencies spanning four orders of magnitude is a useful method for the assessment of the grain size distribution of ultrafine magnetic particles smaller than the SP/SSD boundary. This method has been applied to a loess/paleosol sequence at Luochuan in the Chinese Loess Plateau. The studied succession consists of sequences from the latest paleosol unit to the upper part of the loess unit, spanning the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Reconstructed grain size distributions (GSDs) consist of volume fractions on the order of 10-24 m3, and the mean GSDs are modal but with distinctive skewness among the loess, the weakly developed paleosol (weak paleosol), and the mature paleosol. This indicates that the mean volume of SP particles in this sequence tends to increase during the transition from the loess to the paleosol. An index, defined as the difference between χ130 at the lowest (130 Hz) and χ500k at the highest (500 kHz) frequencies normalized to χ130, is judged to be a more suitable index than previous frequency dependence parameters for the concentration of SP particles. This index has a strong correlation with χ130, showing a continuous 'growth curve' with the rate of increase being highest for the loess, moderate for the weak paleosol, and saturated for the paleosol. The characteristic curve suggests that smaller SP particles are preferentially formed in the earlier stage of pedogenesis rather than the later phase when even larger particles are formed in the mature paleosol. These results demonstrate that the broad-band-frequency susceptibility measurement will be useful for the quantitative assessment of magnetic nanoparticles in soils and sediments. Additionally, we point out that the measurement in the frequency domain generally requires time and may not be most suitable to routine measurements. We thus propose an alternative manner, the measurement in the time domain that can be

  4. Image encryption using random sequence generated from generalized information domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia-Yan, Zhang; Guo-Ji, Zhang; Xuan, Li; Ya-Zhou, Ren; Jie-Hua, Wu

    2016-05-01

    A novel image encryption method based on the random sequence generated from the generalized information domain and permutation–diffusion architecture is proposed. The random sequence is generated by reconstruction from the generalized information file and discrete trajectory extraction from the data stream. The trajectory address sequence is used to generate a P-box to shuffle the plain image while random sequences are treated as keystreams. A new factor called drift factor is employed to accelerate and enhance the performance of the random sequence generator. An initial value is introduced to make the encryption method an approximately one-time pad. Experimental results show that the random sequences pass the NIST statistical test with a high ratio and extensive analysis demonstrates that the new encryption scheme has superior security.

  5. Monitoring electrical and thermal burns with Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica

    2011-10-01

    Thermal and electrical injuries are devastating and hard-to-treat clinical lesions. The pathophysiology of these injuries is not fully understood to this day. Further elucidating the natural history of this form of tissue injury could be helpful in offering stage-appropriate therapy. Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) is a novel non-invasive technique that can be used to determine optical properties of biological media. We have developed an experimental apparatus based on SFDI aimed at monitoring parameters of clinical interest such as tissue oxygen saturation, methemoglobin volume fraction, and hemoglobin volume fraction. Co- registered Laser Doppler images of the lesions are also acquired to assess tissue perfusion. Results of experiments conducted on a rat model and discussions on the systemic changes in tissue optical properties before and after injury will be presented.

  6. Robustness of magnetic and electric domains against charge carrier doping in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, E.; Wegmayr, V.; Schaab, J.; Yan, Z.; Bourret, E.; Lottermoser, Th; Fiebig, M.; Meier, D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the effect of chemical doping on the electric and magnetic domain pattern in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO3. Hole- and electron doping are achieved through the growth of Er1‑x Ca x MnO3 and Er1‑x Zr x MnO3 single crystals, which allows for a controlled introduction of divalent and tetravalent ions, respectively. Using conductance measurements, piezoresponse force microscopy and nonlinear optics we study doping-related variations in the electronic transport and image the corrsponding ferroelectric and antiferromagnetic domains. We find that moderate doping levels allow for adjusting the electronic conduction properties of ErMnO3 without destroying its characteristic domain patterns. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of chemical doping for non-perturbative property-engineering of intrinsic domain states in this important class of multiferroics.

  7. Investigation of Static and Dynamic Stability of the Deformable Dynamic Spiral Magnetic Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'tsev, V. N.; Nesterenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The dependence of the stability of a spiral domain in an ac magnetic field on the allowable deformations of the domain shape has been investigated within the phenomenological model. The allowable deformations of the domain are characterized by some set of free parameters from the total number of parameters determining the domain shape. It has been shown that, in this model, the possible scenarios of the existence and disappearance of the spiral domain, some of which are implemented in experiments, can be established. Factors that determine the life span of the spiral domain have also been established within this model.

  8. Neurosurgical uses for intraprocedural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mutchnick, Ian S; Moriarty, Thomas M

    2005-10-01

    Neurosurgical procedures demand precision, and efforts to create accurate neurosurgical navigation have been central to the profession through its history. Magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided navigation offers the possibility of real-time, image-based stereotactic information for the neurosurgeon, which makes possible a number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This article will review both current options for intraoperative MRI operative suite arrangements and the current therapeutic/diagnostic uses of intraoperative MRI. PMID:16924171

  9. NMR study of domain wall pinning in a magnetically ordered material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshakov, I. V.; Popov, P. S.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.; Dudkin, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance in the form of spin echo in combination with magnetic field pulses applied to a magnetically ordered material sample offers a convenient tool for studying characteristics of the centers of domain-wall pinning. Possibilities of this method have been demonstrated in experiments with lithium-zinc ferrite.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Guneyli, Serkan; Erdem, Cemile Zuhal; Erdem, Lutfi Oktay

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the causes of cancer-related deaths. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the best soft tissue resolution and plays an important role in the management of prostate cancer patients. It is the recommended imaging modality for patients with prostate cancer, and it is clinically indicated for diagnosis, staging, tumor localization, detection of tumor aggressiveness, follow-up, and MRI-guided interventions. Multiparametric MRI includes T1- and high-resolution T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. We evaluated MR images of patients with prostate cancer who underwent multiparametric endorectal MRI on a 3.0-T scanner and presented demonstrative images. PMID:27317204

  11. Magnetic stripe domains of [Pt/Co/Cu]10 multilayer near spin reorientation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Liang, J. H.; Xiao, X.; Zhou, C.; Chen, G.; Huo, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The dependence of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic domain patterns and magnetization reversal processes in [Pt/Co(tCo)/Cu]10 film stack epitaxied on Cu (111) substrate have been studied as a function of the Co layer thickness tCo, by magneto-optic polar Kerr magnetometry and microscopy. We find the film undergoes spin reorientation transition from out-of-plane to in-plane as tCo increases. The SRT thickness is verified by Rotating-field Magneto-Optic Kerr effect method. The film exhibits the stripe domain structures at remanence with the width decreasing while tCo approaches SRT. As demonstrated by the first order reversal curve measurement, the magnetization reversal process encompasses irreversible domain nucleation, domain annihilation at large field and reversible domain switching near remanence.

  12. Scaling Behavior of the First Arrival Time of a Random-Walking Magnetic Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, M.-Y.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Fischer, P.; Shin, S.-C.

    2008-04-01

    We report a universal scaling behavior of the first arrival time of a traveling magnetic domain wall into a finite space-time observation window of a magneto-optical microscope enabling direct visualization of a Barkhausen avalanche in real time. The first arrival time of the traveling magnetic domain wall exhibits a nontrivial fluctuation and its statistical distribution is described by universal power-law scaling with scaling exponents of 1.34±0.07 for CoCr and CoCrPt films, despite their quite different domain evolution patterns. Numerical simulation of the first arrival time with an assumption that the magnetic domain wall traveled as a random walker well matches our experimentally observed scaling behavior, providing an experimental support for the random-walking model of traveling magnetic domain walls.

  13. Scaling behavior of the first arrival time of a random-walking magnetic domain.

    PubMed

    Im, M-Y; Lee, S-H; Kim, D-H; Fischer, P; Shin, S-C

    2008-04-25

    We report a universal scaling behavior of the first arrival time of a traveling magnetic domain wall into a finite space-time observation window of a magneto-optical microscope enabling direct visualization of a Barkhausen avalanche in real time. The first arrival time of the traveling magnetic domain wall exhibits a nontrivial fluctuation and its statistical distribution is described by universal power-law scaling with scaling exponents of 1.34+/-0.07 for CoCr and CoCrPt films, despite their quite different domain evolution patterns. Numerical simulation of the first arrival time with an assumption that the magnetic domain wall traveled as a random walker well matches our experimentally observed scaling behavior, providing an experimental support for the random-walking model of traveling magnetic domain walls. PMID:18518241

  14. Scaling Behavior of the First Arrival Time of a Random-Walking Magnetic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Im, M.-Y.; Lee, S.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Fischer, P.; Shin, S.-C.

    2008-02-04

    We report a universal scaling behavior of the first arrival time of a traveling magnetic domain wall into a finite space-time observation window of a magneto-optical microscope enabling direct visualization of a Barkhausen avalanche in real time. The first arrival time of the traveling magnetic domain wall exhibits a nontrivial fluctuation and its statistical distribution is described by universal power-law scaling with scaling exponents of 1.34 {+-} 0.07 for CoCr and CoCrPt films, despite their quite different domain evolution patterns. Numerical simulation of the first arrival time with an assumption that the magnetic domain wall traveled as a random walker well matches our experimentally observed scaling behavior, providing an experimental support for the random-walking model of traveling magnetic domain walls.

  15. Magnetic thin-film split-domain current sensor-recorder

    DOEpatents

    Hsieh, Edmund J.

    1979-01-01

    A sensor-recorder for recording a representation of the direction and peak amplitude of a transient current. A magnetic thin film is coated on a glass substrate under the influence of a magnetic field so that the finished film is magnetically uniaxial and anisotropic. The film is split into two oppositely magnetized contiguous domains with a central boundary by subjecting adjacent portions of the film simultaneously to magnetic fields that are opposed 180.degree.. With the split-domain sensor-recorder placed with the film plane and domain boundary either perpendicular or parallel to the expected conductive path of a transient current, the occurrence of the transient causes switching of a portion of one domain to the direction of the other domain. The amount of the switched domain portion is indicative of the amplitude of the peak current of the transient, while the particular domain that is switched is indicative of the direction of the current. The resulting domain patterns may be read with a passive magnetic tape viewer.

  16. Multi-dimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here we propose the multi-dimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel RF coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. PMID:22926830

  17. Imaging small-amplitude magnetization dynamics in a longitudinally magnetized microwire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyak, V. V.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Delchini, M.; Hicken, R. J.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    We have used time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy to study spin waves in a magnetic microwire subjected to a bias magnetic field applied parallel to its long axis. The spin-wave spectra obtained from different points near one end of the wire reveal several normal modes. We found that modes of a higher frequency occupied regions located further from the end of the wire. This was interpreted in terms of the confinement of the spin-wave modes by a nonuniform demagnetizing field. Furthermore, at a particular distance from the end of the wire, two or more modes occupying different regions along the width of the wire were observed. This was interpreted in terms of the confinement of the spin-wave modes due to an asymmetric variation in the local angle between the static magnetization and the effective direction of the wave vector of the confined modes. Images of the dynamic magnetization that are acquired at fixed pump-probe time delays revealed stripes lying perpendicular to the long axis of the wire and, hence, to the applied magnetic field. We interpret the stripe pattern in terms of a collective mode of the quasiperiodic system of ripple domains existing within the polycrystalline sample. Our results give an additional insight into the connection between the nonuniform static magnetic state in small magnetic elements and their precessional dynamics, which is fundamentally important for the design of future high-speed switching and spin-wave logic devices of magnonics.

  18. Optical imaging through non-transparent small aquatic creatures with angular-domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rongen L. K.; Tsui, Polly B. L.; Chiang, Gary; Chapman, Glenn H.

    2011-03-01

    When imaging through small aquatic creatures, scattered photons produce problems in image quality and resolution. Angular Domain Imaging (ADI) reduces scattered photons and improves the image quality and resolution. ADI is an imaging technique which utilizes the angular spectrum of photons to filter multiple-scattered photons and accept only photons with small angular deviation from their original trajectory. Advantages of the ADI technique are that it is insensitive to wavelength and the sources are not required to be high optical quality, coherent, or pulsed, as with OCT or time domain. Our target is to image a small species called Branchiostoma lanceolatum, a lancet that is 5-8cm long and 5mm thick, by using ADI to remove the scattering in order to image internal structures. A laser illuminates the lancelet in a water-filled container and a spatiofrequency filter removes the scattered photons before the imager. Experimentally, a coherent Nd:Yag second harmonic (533nm) laser creates images but also optical interference occuring within the internal structures of the lancelet. Conversely, an incoherent broad-band white light source eliminates the structural interference effect; however, the wavelength variation of the scattering coefficient combined with the limitation of the image sensor's dynamic range limit the ability to distinguish the internal structures in many areas. Thus, an IR diode laser (780nm) is used to lower the scattering coefficient as compared to conventional visible light source and to diminish the interference effects due to its shorter coherence length.

  19. Sports Health Magnetic Resonance Imaging Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Gary A.; Stadnick, Michael E.; Awh, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc ligament complex are often suspected, particularly in the setting of midfoot pain without radiographic abnormality. Knowledge of the anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging findings of injuries to this region is helpful for the diagnosing and treating physicians. PMID:23015984

  20. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-03-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection processes.

  1. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  2. Magnetic Images & A Novel Stable Ferro-Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huaizhou

    In 2010 the Physics Nobel prize was awarded to A.K. Geim and K. Novoselov [1], famous for their spectacular demonstrations of diamagnetically levitated living animals. My MS research is an investigation to develop a novel magnetic suspension capable of operating under ambient conditions without any cryogenics. The physical problem is to freely suspended an object, the proof mass (PM) in stable equilibrium under the combined actions of gravity and magnetic forces. Earshaws's theorem enunciated in 1842 prohibits such a possibility. After the discovery of diamagnetism by Michael Faraday, Lord Kelvin predicted that diamagnetic systems are immune to this theorem. As the Bohr_Van Leeuwen's theorem proved that the origin of magnetism is quantum mechanical, however, many aspects of magnetic behavior can be treated classically. Recently, Berry, Geim and collaborators [Eur J Phy, 18, 307 (1997); J. of Appld. Phys 87, 6200 (2000)] showed that stability of a diamagnetic PM, or a magnetized PM. The proof masses in this work can be even be unmagnetized still we show that with an appropriate diamagnetic stabilizer equilibrium is achieved along all three Cartesian axes. The forces follow the Bio-Savart field due to localized current loops but at short distances are well represented by algebraic power laws. Experimental procedures for direct measurements of the magnetic image forces and physical modeling will be discussed.

  3. Phase-field simulation of strain-induced domain switching in magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Sheng, G.; Zhang, J. X.; Nan, C. W.; Chen, L. Q.

    2011-03-01

    The strain-induced magnetic domain switching in epitaxial CoFe2O4 (CFO) thin films was studied using phase-field method. In particular, we investigated the domain switching from an initial in-plane direction to out-of-plane under the action of in-plane elastic strains. An abrupt switching feature is observed for a single-domain film while the switching of a multidomain CFO thin film is gradual. Typical magnetic domain structures as a result of the biaxial isotropic in-plane strains are presented.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging with an optical atomicmagnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Rochester, Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2006-05-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive andversatile methodology that has been applied in many disciplines1,2. Thedetection sensitivity of conventional Faraday detection of MRI depends onthe strength of the static magnetic field and the sample "fillingfactor." Under circumstances where only low magnetic fields can be used,and for samples with low spin density or filling factor, the conventionaldetection sensitivity is compromised. Alternative detection methods withhigh sensitivity in low magnetic fields are thus required. Here we showthe first use of a laser-based atomic magnetometer for MRI detection inlow fields. Our technique also employs remote detection which physicallyseparates the encoding and detection steps3-5, to improve the fillingfactor of the sample. Potentially inexpensive and using a compactapparatus, our technique provides a novel alternative for MRI detectionwith substantially enhanced sensitivity and time resolution whileavoiding the need for cryogenics.

  5. Magnetic domain-wall motion study under an electric field in a Finemet® thin film on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ngo Thi; Mercone, Silvana; Moulin, Johan; Bahoui, Anouar El; Faurie, Damien; Zighem, Fatih; Belmeguenai, Mohamed; Haddadi, Halim

    2015-01-01

    We study the influence of applied in-plane elastic strains on the static magnetic configuration of a 530 nm magnetostrictive FeCuNbSiB (Finemet®) thin film. The in-plane strains are induced via the application of a voltage to a piezoelectric actuator on which the film/substrate system was glued. A quantitative characterization of the voltage dependence of the induced-strain at the surface of the film was performed using a digital image correlation technique. Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) images at remanence (H=0 Oe and U=0 V) clearly reveal the presence of weak stripe domains. The effect of the voltage-induced strain shows the existence of a voltage threshold value for the strike configuration break. For a maximum strain of εXX ~ 0.5 ×10-3 we succeed in destabilizing the stripes configuration helping the setting up of a complete homogeneous magnetic pattern.

  6. TOPOLOGICAL MATTER. Observation of chiral currents at the magnetic domain boundary of a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y H; Kirtley, J R; Katmis, F; Jarillo-Herrero, P; Moodera, J S; Moler, K A

    2015-08-28

    A magnetic domain boundary on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator is predicted to host a chiral edge state, but direct demonstration is challenging. We used a scanning superconducting quantum interference device to show that current in a magnetized topological insulator heterostructure (EuS/Bi2Se3) flows at the edge when the Fermi level is gate-tuned to the surface band gap. We further induced micrometer-scale magnetic structures on the heterostructure and detected a chiral edge current at the magnetic domain boundary. The chirality of the current was determined by magnetization of the surrounding domain, and its magnitude by the local chemical potential rather than the applied current. Such magnetic structures provide a platform for detecting topological magnetoelectric effects and may enable progress in quantum information processing and spintronics. PMID:26272905

  7. Metabolite specific proton magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, R.E.; Freeman, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    An imaging method is described that makes use of proton double quantum nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to construct images based on selected metabolites such as lactic acid. The optimization of the method is illustrated in vitro, followed by in vivo determination of lactic acid distribution in a solid tumor model. Water suppression and editing of lipid signals are such that two-dimensional spectra of lactic acid may be obtained from a radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor in under 1 min and lactic acid images from the same tumor in under 1 hr at 2.0 T. This technique provides a fast and reproducible method at moderate magnetic field strength for mapping biologically relevant metabolites.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in ADNI

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R.; Barnes, Josephine; Bernstein, Matt A.; Borowski, Bret J.; Brewer, James; Clegg, Shona; Dale, Anders M.; Carmichael, Owen; Ching, Christopher; DeCarli, Charles; Desikan, Rahul S.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fjell, Anders M.; Fletcher, Evan; Fox, Nick C.; Gunter, Jeff; Gutman, Boris A.; Holland, Dominic; Hua, Xue; Insel, Philip; Kantarci, Kejal; Killiany, Ron J.; Krueger, Gunnar; Leung, Kelvin K.; Mackin, Scott; Maillard, Pauline; Molone, Ian; Mattsson, Niklas; McEvoy, Linda; Modat, Marc; Mueller, Susanne; Nosheny, Rachel; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schuff, Norbert; Senjem, Matthew L.; Simonson, Alix; Thompson, Paul M.; Rettmann, Dan; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Walhovd, Kristine; Zhao, Yansong; Zuk, Samantha; Weiner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ADNI is now in its 10th year. The primary objective of the MRI core of ADNI has been to improve methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. METHODS We review the contributions of the MRI core from present and past cycles of ADNI (ADNI 1, GO and 2). We also review plans for the future – ADNI 3. RESULTS Contributions of the MRI core include creating standardized acquisition protocols and quality control methods; examining the effect of technical features of image acquisition and analysis on outcome metrics; deriving sample size estimates for future trials based on those outcomes; and piloting the potential utility of MR perfusion, diffusion, and functional connectivity measures in multicenter clinical trials. DISCUSSION Over the past decade the MRI core of ADNI has fulfilled its mandate of improving methods for clinical trials in Alzheimer’s disease and will continue to do so in the future. PMID:26194310

  9. No-reference image quality assessment in the spatial domain.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Anish; Moorthy, Anush Krishna; Bovik, Alan Conrad

    2012-12-01

    We propose a natural scene statistic-based distortion-generic blind/no-reference (NR) image quality assessment (IQA) model that operates in the spatial domain. The new model, dubbed blind/referenceless image spatial quality evaluator (BRISQUE) does not compute distortion-specific features, such as ringing, blur, or blocking, but instead uses scene statistics of locally normalized luminance coefficients to quantify possible losses of "naturalness" in the image due to the presence of distortions, thereby leading to a holistic measure of quality. The underlying features used derive from the empirical distribution of locally normalized luminances and products of locally normalized luminances under a spatial natural scene statistic model. No transformation to another coordinate frame (DCT, wavelet, etc.) is required, distinguishing it from prior NR IQA approaches. Despite its simplicity, we are able to show that BRISQUE is statistically better than the full-reference peak signal-to-noise ratio and the structural similarity index, and is highly competitive with respect to all present-day distortion-generic NR IQA algorithms. BRISQUE has very low computational complexity, making it well suited for real time applications. BRISQUE features may be used for distortion-identification as well. To illustrate a new practical application of BRISQUE, we describe how a nonblind image denoising algorithm can be augmented with BRISQUE in order to perform blind image denoising. Results show that BRISQUE augmentation leads to performance improvements over state-of-the-art methods. A software release of BRISQUE is available online: http://live.ece.utexas.edu/research/quality/BRISQUE_release.zip for public use and evaluation. PMID:22910118

  10. Observation of the Dynamic Behavior of Magnetic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, R.

    1978-01-01

    Explains magneto-optical effects and describes techniques which may be used, in conjunction with certain materials, to reveal domain structures. In addition, simple experiments are described which enable domains to be observed under various conditions of applied fields. (Author/GA)

  11. Magnetic domain-wall dynamics in wide permalloy strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, Virginia; Laurson, Lasse

    2016-02-01

    Domain walls in soft permalloy strips may exhibit various equilibrium micromagnetic structures depending on the width and thickness of the strip, ranging from the well-known transverse and vortex walls in narrow and thin strips to double and triple vortex walls recently reported in wider strips [V. Estévez and L. Laurson, Phys. Rev. B 91, 054407 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.054407]. Here, we analyze the field driven dynamics of such domain walls in permalloy strips of widths from 240 nm up to 6 μ m , using the known equilibrium domain wall structures as initial configurations. Our micromagnetic simulations show that the domain wall dynamics in wide strips is very complex, and depends strongly on the geometry of the system, as well as on the magnitude of the driving field. We discuss in detail the rich variety of the dynamical behaviors found, including dynamic transitions between different domain wall structures, periodic dynamics of a vortex core close to the strip edge, transitions towards simpler domain wall structures of the multi-vortex domain walls controlled by vortex polarity, and the fact that for some combinations of the strip geometry and the driving field the system cannot support a compact domain wall.

  12. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanovic, J.; Frandsen, C.; Beleggia, M.; Schiøtz, J.

    2015-07-28

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic “superspin.” Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder, which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results.

  13. X-ray holographic imaging of magnetic order in patterned Co/Pd multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzani, Carlo; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Popescu, Horia; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    We address the role of lateral confinement in determining the micromagnetic structure of small objects featuring perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We have imaged the spatial distribution of magnetic domains in Co/Pd multilayered objects by x-ray holography in transmission mode, a technique based on resonant coherent scattering of polarized x rays. In addition to high spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity, x-ray holography features chemical selectivity and probes the entire bulk of the magnetic sample. By analyzing and comparing images of several magnetic objects (squares and rectangles with 0.4-3-μm lateral sizes) that underwent the same preparation procedure and magnetic history, we highlight the influence of the object shape and of its orientation with respect to an external field in determining the remanent magnetic microstructure. The discussion of our results is backed by micromagnetic calculations.

  14. Evolution of microwave ferromagnetic resonance with magnetic domain structure in FeCoBSi antidot arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peiheng; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Tao; Xie, Jianliang; Deng, Longjiang

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic domain structure of FeCoBSi antidot array thin films of varying thickness were characterized using surface magneto-optic Kerr effect. Vibrating sample magnetometry and microstrip transmission line measurements helped to associate the microwave magnetic analysis of the antidot arrays with hysteresis studies. The domain structure evolution from quasi-continuous domains to strip domains induced by the competing exchange and dipolar interaction resulted in the change of ferromagnetic resonance from multi-band to single-band. Hence, the mechanisms of multi-resonance are proposed to be related to domain wall motion, natural resonance and spin wave modes. This phenomenon can be used to control the magnetization dynamics in spin wave devices.

  15. Foundations of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan; Newbould, Rexford; Liu, Chunlei; Thijs, Vincent; Ropele, Stefan; Clayton, David B.; Krueger, Gunnar; Moseley, Michael E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: During the past decade, major breakthroughs in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality were made by means of quantum leaps in scanner hardware and pulse sequences. Some advanced MRI techniques have truly revolutionized the detection of disease states and MRI can now—within a few minutes—acquire important quantitative information noninvasively from an individual in any plane or volume at comparatively high resolution. This article provides an overview of the most common advanced MRI methods including diffusion MRI, perfusion MRI, functional MRI, and the strengths and weaknesses of MRI at high magnetic field strengths. PMID:15897944

  16. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ. PMID:26590206

  17. Spectrally balanced detection for optical frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yueli; de Bruin, Daniel M; Kerbage, Charles; de Boer, Johannes F

    2007-12-10

    In optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) or swept-source optical coherence tomography, balanced detection is required to suppress relative intensity noise (RIN). A regular implementation of balanced detection by combining reference and sample arm signal in a 50/50 coupler and detecting the differential output with a balanced receiver is however, not perfect. Since the splitting ratio of the 50/50 coupler is wavelength dependent, RIN is not optimally canceled at the edges of the wavelength sweep. The splitting ratio has a nearly linear shift of 0.4% per nanometer. This brings as much as +/-12% deviation at the margins of wavelength-swept range centered at 1060nm. We demonstrate a RIN suppression of 33dB by spectrally corrected balanced detection, 11dB more that regular balanced detection. PMID:19550929

  18. GPU acceleration of time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gang; Nowotny, Thomas; Chen, Yu; Li, David Day-Uei

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) plays a significant role in biological sciences, chemistry, and medical research. We propose a graphic processing unit (GPU) based FLIM analysis tool suitable for high-speed, flexible time-domain FLIM applications. With a large number of parallel processors, GPUs can significantly speed up lifetime calculations compared to CPU-OpenMP (parallel computing with multiple CPU cores) based analysis. We demonstrate how to implement and optimize FLIM algorithms on GPUs for both iterative and noniterative FLIM analysis algorithms. The implemented algorithms have been tested on both synthesized and experimental FLIM data. The results show that at the same precision, the GPU analysis can be up to 24-fold faster than its CPU-OpenMP counterpart. This means that even for high-precision but time-consuming iterative FLIM algorithms, GPUs enable fast or even real-time analysis.

  19. Nonlinear Susceptibility Magnitude Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2 = 0.99, CNR = 84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2 > 0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI. PMID:25505816

  20. Electrically driven magnetic domain wall rotation in multiferroic heterostructures to manipulate suspended on-chip magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Hyunmin; Nowakowski, Mark E; Liang, Cheng-yen; Hockel, Joshua L; Wetzlar, Kyle; Keller, Scott; McLellan, Brenda M; Marcus, Matthew A; Doran, Andrew; Young, Anthony; Kläui, Mathias; Carman, Gregory P; Bokor, Jeffrey; Candler, Robert N

    2015-05-26

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrate deterministic electrically driven, strain-mediated domain wall (DW) rotation in ferromagnetic Ni rings fabricated on piezoelectric [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.66-[PbTiO3]0.34 (PMN-PT) substrates. While simultaneously imaging the Ni rings with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy, an electric field is applied across the PMN-PT substrate that induces strain in the ring structures, driving DW rotation around the ring toward the dominant PMN-PT strain axis by the inverse magnetostriction effect. The DW rotation we observe is analytically predicted using a fully coupled micromagnetic/elastodynamic multiphysics simulation, which verifies that the experimental behavior is caused by the electrically generated strain in this multiferroic system. Finally, this DW rotation is used to capture and manipulate micrometer-scale magnetic beads in a fluidic environment to demonstrate a proof-of-concept energy-efficient pathway for multiferroic-based lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25906195

  1. Dynamic in situ visualization of voltage-driven magnetic domain evolution in multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Wu, Liang; Nan, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising solution to the excessive heating in spintronic devices. Direct observation of voltage-modulated magnetic domain evolution dynamics is desirable for studying the mechanism of the voltage control of magnetism at mesoscale, but has remained challenging. Here we explored a characterization method for the dynamic in situ evolution of pure voltage modulated magnetic domains in the heterostructures by employing the scanning Kerr microscopy function in the magneto optic Kerr effect system. The local magnetization reorientation of a Ni/PMN-PT heterostructure were characterized under sweeping applied voltage on the PMN-PT single crystal, and the results show that the magnetization rotation angle in the local regions is much greater than that obtained from macroscopic magnetization hysteresis loops.

  2. Dynamic in situ visualization of voltage-driven magnetic domain evolution in multiferroic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Wu, Liang; Nan, C W

    2015-12-23

    Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising solution to the excessive heating in spintronic devices. Direct observation of voltage-modulated magnetic domain evolution dynamics is desirable for studying the mechanism of the voltage control of magnetism at mesoscale, but has remained challenging. Here we explored a characterization method for the dynamic in situ evolution of pure voltage modulated magnetic domains in the heterostructures by employing the scanning Kerr microscopy function in the magneto optic Kerr effect system. The local magnetization reorientation of a Ni/PMN-PT heterostructure were characterized under sweeping applied voltage on the PMN-PT single crystal, and the results show that the magnetization rotation angle in the local regions is much greater than that obtained from macroscopic magnetization hysteresis loops. PMID:26613293

  3. Magnetic domain tuning and the emergence of bubble domains in the bilayer manganite La2–2xSr1+2xMn2O7(x=0.32)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jeong, Juyoung; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Ayala-Valenzuela, Oscar E.; Wulferding, Dirk; Zhou, J. -S.; Goodenough, John B.; de Lozanne, Alex; Mitchell, J. F.; Leon, Neliza; et al

    2015-08-17

    We report a magnetic force microscopy study of the magnetic domain evolution in the layered manganite La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 (with x=0.32). This strongly correlated electron compound is known to exhibit a wide range of magnetic phases, including a recently uncovered biskyrmion phase. We observe a continuous transition from dendritic to stripelike domains, followed by the formation of magnetic bubbles due to a field- and temperature-dependent competition between in-plane and out-of-plane spin alignments. The magnetic bubble phase appears at comparable field and temperature ranges as the biskyrmion phase, suggesting a close relation between both phases. Based on our real-space images we construct amore » temperature-field phase diagram for this composition.« less

  4. Coupled Néel domain wall motion in sandwiched perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Purnama, I.; Kerk, I. S.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The operating performance of a domain wall-based magnetic device relies on the controlled motion of the domain walls within the ferromagnetic nanowires. Here, we report on the dynamics of coupled Néel domain wall in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) nanowires via micromagnetic simulations. The coupled Néel domain wall is obtained in a sandwich structure, where two PMA nanowires that are separated by an insulating layer are stacked vertically. Under the application of high current density, we found that the Walker breakdown phenomenon is suppressed in the sandwich structure. Consequently, the coupled Néel domain wall of the sandwich structure is able to move faster as compared to individual domain walls in a single PMA nanowire. PMID:25736593

  5. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging: Current role in prostate cancer management.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshiko; Tamada, Tsutomu; Bist, Vipul; Reinhold, Caroline; Miyake, Hideaki; Tanaka, Utaru; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Sugimura, Kazuro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    Digital rectal examination, serum prostate-specific antigen screening and transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy are conventionally used as screening, diagnostic and surveillance tools for prostate cancer. However, they have limited sensitivity and specificity. In recent years, the role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has steadily grown, and is now part of the standard clinical management in many institutions. In multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, the morphological assessment of T2-weighted imaging is correlated with diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging perfusion and/or magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is currently regarded as the most sensitive and specific imaging technique for the evaluation of prostate cancer, including detection, staging, localization and aggressiveness evaluation. This article presents an overview of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and discusses the current role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the different fields of prostate cancer management. PMID:27184019

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging: present and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donald L.; Liu, Peter; Wismer, Gary L.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Stark, David D.; New, Paul F.J.; Okada, Robert D.; Brady, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has created considerable excitement in the medical community, largely because of its great potential to diagnose and characterize many different disease processes. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that, because MR imaging is similar to computed tomography (CT) scanning in identifying structural disorders and because it is more costly and difficult to use, this highly useful technique must be judged against CT before it can become an accepted investigative tool. At present MR imaging has demonstrated diagnostic superiority over CT in a limited number of important, mostly neurologic, disorders and is complementary to CT in the diagnosis of certain other disorders. For most of the remaining organ systems its usefulness is not clear, but the lack of ionizing radiation and MR's ability to produce images in any tomographic plane may eventually prove to be advantageous. The potential of MR imaging to display in-vivo spectra, multinuclear images and blood-flow data makes it an exciting investigative technique. At present, however, MR imaging units should be installed only in medical centres equipped with the clinical and basic research facilities that are essential to evaluate the ultimate role of this technique in the care of patients. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:3884120

  7. Domain faceting in an in-plane magnetic reorientation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovo, E.; Mentes, T.O.; Sadowski, J.T.; Ablett, J.M.; Nino, M.A.; Locatelli, A.

    2010-11-04

    The microscopic structure of the 90{sup o} in-plane magnetic reorientation transition in Fe(110) films is examined using photoemission x-ray microscopy. At the nanoscale, sharp magnetic boundaries are detected. They are indicative of a first-order transition and are consistent with Fe magnetic anisotropy constants. At the micron scale, the magnetic boundary breaks up into triangular patterns whose characteristic angular dependence is revealed by experiments on conical microwedges. This effect, fully accounted by micromagnetic simulations, opens the possibility to control the sharpness of the transition at the microscopic scale.

  8. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  10. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging in cancer.

    PubMed

    Haris, Mohammad; Yadav, Santosh K; Rizwan, Arshi; Singh, Anup; Wang, Ena; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder; Marincola, Francesco M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to identify key biomolecules and molecular changes associated with cancer malignancy and the capacity to monitor the therapeutic outcome against these targets is critically important for cancer treatment. Recent developments in molecular imaging based on magnetic resonance (MR) techniques have provided researchers and clinicians with new tools to improve most facets of cancer care. Molecular imaging is broadly described as imaging techniques used to detect molecular signature at the cellular and gene expression levels. This article reviews both established and emerging molecular MR techniques in oncology and discusses the potential of these techniques in improving the clinical cancer care. It also discusses how molecular MR, in conjunction with other structural and functional MR imaging techniques, paves the way for developing tailored treatment strategies to enhance cancer care. PMID:26394751

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-10-28

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  13. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J.; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors. PMID:26883893

  14. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors. PMID:26883893

  15. Tunable short-wavelength spin wave excitation from pinned magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wiele, Ben; Hämäläinen, Sampo J.; Baláž, Pavel; Montoncello, Federico; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-01

    Miniaturization of magnonic devices for wave-like computing requires emission of short-wavelength spin waves, a key feature that cannot be achieved with microwave antennas. In this paper, we propose a tunable source of short-wavelength spin waves based on highly localized and strongly pinned magnetic domain walls in ferroelectric-ferromagnetic bilayers. When driven into oscillation by a microwave spin-polarized current, the magnetic domain walls emit spin waves with the same frequency as the excitation current. The amplitude of the emitted spin waves and the range of attainable excitation frequencies depend on the availability of domain wall resonance modes. In this respect, pinned domain walls in magnetic nanowires are particularly attractive. In this geometry, spin wave confinement perpendicular to the nanowire axis produces a multitude of domain wall resonances enabling efficient spin wave emission at frequencies up to 100 GHz and wavelengths down to 20 nm. At high frequency, the emission of spin waves in magnetic nanowires becomes monochromatic. Moreover, pinning of magnetic domain wall oscillators onto the same ferroelectric domain boundary in parallel nanowires guarantees good coherency between spin wave sources, which opens perspectives towards the realization of Mach-Zehnder type logic devices and sensors.

  16. The effect of creep on magnetic domain structure of heat resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Z.; Tu, S. T.

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic domain and magnetic properties of heat resistant steels including 10CrMo910, P91 and 23CrMoNiWV88 are investigated in the present work. The magnetic properties characterized by magnetic hysteresis loop of the three materials under 500-600°C are measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The magnetic domain structure of as-received and crept specimens is observed by magnetic force microscope (MFM). The magnetic domain of ferrite phase change from initial stripe pattern to maze pattern during creep. The black and white fringes and stripe-like pattern have also been found in the P91 and 23CrMoNiWV88 specimens, respectively. The experimental results reveal that the magnetic domain structure is strongly influenced by microstructures with different distributions of the carbides. It is shown that the coercivity and remanence of each material although has a remarkable decrease at 500-600°C especially for P91 almost 64% decrease, it's still the same magnitude as the one at room temperature. All the short-term crept specimens with different creep damage have a linear increase in coercivity and remanence comparing to the as-received 10CrMo910 specimens. These results indicate that it should be possible to develop an in-situ monitoring technology for creep damage based on magnetism measurement.

  17. Highly asymmetric magnetic domain wall propagation due to coupling to a periodic pinning potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, R. L.; Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Weil, R.; Ferré, J.; Mougin, A.; Rohart, S.; Stamps, R. L.; Zermatten, P.-J.; Gaudin, G.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.

    2015-06-01

    Magneto-optical microscopy and magnetometry have been used to study magnetization reversal in an ultrathin magnetically soft (Pt/Co)2 ferromagnetic film coupled to an array of magnetically harder (Co/Pt)4 nanodots via a predominantly dipolar interaction across a 3 nm Pt spacer. This interaction generates a spatially periodic pinning potential for domain walls propagating through the continuous magnetic film. When reversing the applied field with respect to the static nanodot array magnetization orientation, strong asymmetries in the wall velocity and switching fields are observed. Asymmetric switching fields mean that hysteresis of the film is characterized by a large bias field of dipolar origin which is linked to the wall velocity asymmetry. This latter asymmetry, though large at low fields, vanishes at high fields where the domains become round and compact. A field-polarity-controlled transition from dendritic to compact faceted domain structures is also seen at intermediate fields and a model is proposed to interpret the transition.

  18. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are “stiffness weighted” and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery. PMID:18777934

  19. Spin-wave-driven high-speed domain-wall motions in soft magnetic nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jaehak; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2015-10-28

    We report on a micromagnetic simulation study of interactions between propagating spin waves and a head-to-head domain wall in geometrically confined magnetic nanotubes. We found that incident spin waves of specific frequencies can lead to sufficiently high-speed (on the order of a few hundreds of m/s or higher) domain-wall motions in the same direction as that of the incident spin-waves. The domain-wall motions and their speed vary remarkably with the frequency and the amplitude of the incident spin-waves. High-speed domain-wall motions originate from the transfer torque of spin waves' linear momentum to the domain wall, through the partial or complete reflection of the incident spin waves from the domain wall. This work provides a fundamental understanding of the interaction of the spin waves with a domain wall in the magnetic nanotubes as well as a route to all-magnetic control of domain-wall motions in the magnetic nanoelements.

  20. Imaging Ferroelectric Domains and Domain Walls Using Charge Gradient Microscopy: Role of Screening Charges.

    PubMed

    Tong, Sheng; Jung, Il Woong; Choi, Yoon-Young; Hong, Seungbum; Roelofs, Andreas

    2016-02-23

    Advanced scanning probe microscopies (SPMs) open up the possibilities of the next-generation ferroic devices that utilize both domains and domain walls as active elements. However, current SPMs lack the capability of dynamically monitoring the motion of domains and domain walls in conjunction with the transport of the screening charges that lower the total electrostatic energy of both domains and domain walls. Charge gradient microscopy (CGM) is a strong candidate to overcome these shortcomings because it can map domains and domain walls at high speed and mechanically remove the screening charges. Yet the underlying mechanism of the CGM signals is not fully understood due to the complexity of the electrostatic interactions. Here, we designed a semiconductor-metal CGM tip, which can separate and quantify the ferroelectric domain and domain wall signals by simply changing its scanning direction. Our investigation reveals that the domain wall signals are due to the spatial change of polarization charges, while the domain signals are due to continuous removal and supply of screening charges at the CGM tip. In addition, we observed asymmetric CGM domain currents from the up and down domains, which are originated from the different debonding energies and the amount of the screening charges on positive and negative bound charges. We believe that our findings can help design CGM with high spatial resolution and lead to breakthroughs in information storage and energy-harvesting devices. PMID:26751281

  1. Charge ordering, ferroelectric, and magnetic domains in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} observed by scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, I. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Kim, Jeehoon; Lee, S. H.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2015-04-13

    LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is a multiferroic system which exhibits charge order, ferroelectricity, and ferrimagnetism simultaneously below ∼230 K. The ferroelectric/charge order domains of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} are imaged with both piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), while the magnetic domains are characterized by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Comparison of PFM and EFM results suggests that the proposed ferroelectricity in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is not of usual displacive type but of electronic origin. Simultaneous characterization of ferroelectric/charge order and magnetic domains by EFM and MFM, respectively, on the same surface of LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} reveals that both domains have irregular patterns of similar shape, but the length scales are quite different. The domain size is approximately 100 nm for the ferroelectric domains, while the magnetic domain size is much larger and gets as large as 1 μm. We also demonstrate that the origin of the formation of irregular domains in LuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is not extrinsic but intrinsic.

  2. Cardiac imaging using gated magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzer, P.; Botvinick, E.H.; Schiller, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of magnetic resonance (MR) cardiac imaging using nongated data acquisition, three methods for acquiring a gating signal, which could be applied in the presence of a magnetic field, were tested; an air-filled plethysmograph, a laser-Doppler capillary perfusion flowmeter, and an electrocardiographic gating device. The gating signal was used for timing of MR imaging sequences (IS). Application of each gating method yielded significant improvements in structural MR image resolution of the beating heart, although with both plethysmography and laser-Doppler velocimetry it was difficult to obtain cardiac images from the early portion of the cardiac cycle due to an intrinsic delay between the ECG R wave and peripheral detection of the gating signal. Variations in the temporal relationship between the R wave and plethysmographic and laser-Doppler signals produced inconsistencies in the timing of IS. Since the ECG signal is virtually free of these problems, the preferable gating technique is IS synchronization with an electrocardiogram. The gated images acquired with this method provide sharp definition of internal cardiac morphology and can be temporarily referenced to end diastole and end systole or intermediate points.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in central pontine myelinolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, P D; Miller, D; Gledhill, R F; Rossor, M N

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in two patients in whom a clinical diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) had been made. MRI showed lesions in the pons in both cases about 2 years after the illness, at a time when the spastic quadriparesis and pseudobulbar palsy had recovered. The persisting abnormal signals in CPM are likely to be due to fibrillary gliosis. Persistence of lesions on MRI means that the diagnosis of CPM may be electively, after the acute illness has resolved. Images PMID:2732743

  5. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedgire, Sandeep S; Oei, Tamara N; McDermott, Shaunagh; Cao, Kai; Patel M, Zena; Harisinghani, Mukesh G

    2012-07-01

    In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up. PMID:23599562

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Kubal, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the management of patients with acute stroke syndrome, with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. A multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in the emergency setting can address both primary goals of neuroimaging (ie, detection of infarction and exclusion of hemorrhage) and secondary goals of neuroimaging (ie, identifying the site of arterial occlusion, tissue characterization for defining infarct core and penumbra, and determining stroke cause/mechanism). MR imaging provides accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and can differentiate AIS from other potential differential diagnoses. PMID:27150320

  7. New magnetic resonance imaging methods in nephrology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morrell, Glen; Rusinek, Henry; Sigmund, Eric; Chandarana, Hersh; Lerman, Lilach O.; Prasad, Pottumarthi Vara; Niles, David; Artz, Nathan; Fain, Sean; Vivier, Pierre H.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2013-01-01

    Established as a method to study anatomic changes, such as renal tumors or atherosclerotic vascular disease, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to interrogate renal function has only recently begun to come of age. In this review, we briefly introduce some of the most important MRI techniques for renal functional imaging, and then review current findings on their use for diagnosis and monitoring of major kidney diseases. Specific applications include renovascular disease, diabetic nephropathy, renal transplants, renal masses, acute kidney injury and pediatric anomalies. With this review, we hope to encourage more collaboration between nephrologists and radiologists to accelerate the development and application of modern MRI tools in nephrology clinics. PMID:24067433

  8. Magnetic source imaging studies of dyslexia interventions.

    PubMed

    Simos, Panagiotis G; Fletcher, Jack M; Denton, Carolyn; Sarkari, Shirin; Billingsley-Marshall, Rebecca; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2006-01-01

    Rapidly accumulating evidence from functional brain imaging studies indicates that developmental reading disability is associated with a functional disruption of the brain circuits that normally develop to support reading-related processes. This article briefly overviews recent advances in methods that capture the anatomical outline and temporal (dynamic) features of regional brain activation during performance of reading tasks. One of these methods, magnetoencephalography (MEG) or magnetic sources imaging (MSI) is described in more detail in the context of investigations of changes in spatiotemporal patterns of brain activity associated with improvement in reading skills in response to various types of educational interventions. PMID:16925476

  9. High-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging with spectral domain phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yangzhi; Ding, Zhihua; Shen, Yi; Chen, Zhiyan; Zhao, Chen; Ni, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Spectral domain phase microscopy for high-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging is presented. The phase retrieval is realized in the depth domain to maintain a high sensitivity, while the phase information obtained in the spectral domain is exploited to extend the dynamic range of optical path difference. Sensitivity advantage of phase retrieved in the depth domain over that in the spectral domain is thoroughly investigated. The performance of the proposed depth domain phase based approach is illustrated by phase imaging of a resolution target and an onion skin. PMID:24216799

  10. Underground imaging by frequency-domain electromagnetic migration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, M.S.; Traynin, P.; Booker, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    A new method of the resistivity imaging based on frequency-domain electromagnetic migration is developed. Electromagnetic (EM) migration involves downward diffusion of observed EM fields whose time flow has been reversed. Unlike downward analytical continuation, migration is a stable procedure that accurately restores the phase of the upgoing field inside the Earth. This method is indented for the processing and interpretation of EM data collected for both TE and TM modes of plane-wave excitation. Until recently, the method could be applied only for determining the position of anomalous structures and for finding interfaces between layers of different conductivity. There were no well developed approaches to the resistivity imaging, which is the key problem in the inversion of EM data. The authors provide a novel approach to determining not only the position of anomalous structures but their resistivity as well. The main difficulty in the practical realization of this approach is determining the background resistivity distribution for migration. They discuss the method of the solution of this problem based on differential transformation of apparent resistivity curves. The final goal of migration is to provide a first order interpretation using a computational effort equivalent to a forward modeling calculation.

  11. Axial standing-wave illumination frequency-domain imaging (SWIF)

    PubMed Central

    Judkewitz, Benjamin; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    Despite their tremendous contribution to biomedical research and diagnosis, conventional spatial sampling techniques such as wide-field, point scanning or selective plane illumination microscopy face inherent limiting trade-offs between spatial resolution, field-of-view, phototoxicity and recording speed. Several of these trade-offs are the result of spatial sampling with diffracting beams. Here, we introduce a new strategy for fluorescence imaging, SWIF, which instead encodes the axial profile of a sample in the Fourier domain. We demonstrate how this can be achieved with propagation-invariant illumination patterns that extend over several millimeters and robustly propagate through layers of varying refractive index. This enabled us to image a lateral field-of-view of 0.8 mm x 1.5 mm with an axial resolution of 2.4 µm – greatly exceeding the lateral field-of-view of conventional illumination techniques (~100 µm) at comparable resolution. Thus, SWIF allowed us to surpass the limitations of diffracting illumination beams and untangle lateral field-of-view from resolution. PMID:24921798

  12. Visible spatial frequency domain imaging with a digital light microprojector

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Alexander J.; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Konecky, Soren D.; Cui, Haotian; Rice, Tyler B.; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. There is a need for cost effective, quantitative tissue spectroscopy and imaging systems in clinical diagnostics and pre-clinical biomedical research. A platform that utilizes a commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) based projector, cameras, and scaled Monte Carlo model for calculating tissue optical properties is presented. These components are put together to perform spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI), a model-based reflectance technique that measures and maps absorption coefficients (μa) and reduced scattering coefficients (μs′) in thick tissue such as skin or brain. We validate the performance of the flexible LED and modulation element (FLaME) system at 460, 530, and 632 nm across a range of physiologically relevant μa values (0.07 to 1.5  mm−1) in tissue-simulating intralipid phantoms, showing an overall accuracy within 11% of spectrophotometer values for μa and 3% for μs′. Comparison of oxy- and total hemoglobin fits between the FLaME system and a spectrophotometer (450 to 1000 nm) is differed by 3%. Finally, we acquire optical property maps of a mouse brain in vivo with and without an overlying saline well. These results demonstrate the potential of FLaME to perform tissue optical property mapping in visible spectral regions and highlight how the optical clearing effect of saline is correlated to a decrease in μs′ of the skull. PMID:24005154

  13. Retinal Imaging of Infants on Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vinekar, Anand; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Jayadev, Chaitra; Maldonado, Ramiro S.; Bauer, Noel; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral domain coherence tomography (SD OCT) has become an important tool in the management of pediatric retinal diseases. It is a noncontact imaging device that provides detailed assessment of the microanatomy and pathology of the infant retina with a short acquisition time allowing office examination without the requirement of anesthesia. Our understanding of the development and maturation of the infant fovea has been enhanced by SD OCT allowing an in vivo assessment that correlates with histopathology. This has helped us understand the critical correlation of foveal development with visual potential in the first year of life and beyond. In this review, we summarize the recent literature on the clinical applications of SD OCT in studying the pathoanatomy of the infant macula, its ability to detect subclinical features, and its correlation with disease and vision. Retinopathy of prematurity and macular edema have been discussed in detail. The review also summarizes the current status of SD OCT in other infant retinal conditions, imaging the optic nerve, the choroid, and the retinal nerve fibre in infants and children, and suggests future areas of research. PMID:26221606

  14. Fundamental physics of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Villafana, T

    1988-07-01

    Although similar to computerized tomography, in that cross-sectional images are produced, the physical principles underlying magnetic resonance are entirely different. The MRI process, as commonly implemented, involves the excitation of hydrogen nuclei and the analysis of how these nuclei recover to the original equilibrium steady states that they had prior to excitation. This article discusses that process, that is, preparatory alignment, RF excitation, relaxation and signal measurement, and spatial localization. PMID:3380941

  15. A Tunable Magnetic Domain Wall Conduit Regulating Nanoparticle Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tierno, Pietro; Johansen, Tom H; Sancho, José M

    2016-08-10

    We demonstrate a general and robust method to confine on a plane strongly diffusing nanoparticles in water by using size tunable magnetic channels. These virtual conduits are realized with pairs of movable Bloch walls located within an epitaxially grown ferrite garnet film. We show that once inside the magnetic conduit the particles experience an effective local parabolic potential in the transverse direction, while freely diffusing along the conduit. The stiffness of the magnetic potential is determined as a function of field amplitude that varies the width of the magnetic channel. Precise control of the degree of confinement is demonstrated by tuning the applied field. The magnetic conduit is then used to realize single files of nonpassing particles and to induce periodic condensation of an ensemble of particles into parallel stripes in a completely controllable and reversible manner. PMID:27434042

  16. Multichannel tunable imager architecture for hyperspectral imaging in relevant spectral domains.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Chhavi; Semeter, Joshua; Noto, John; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Riccobono, Juanita; Migliozzi, Mike; Dahlgren, Hanna; Marshall, Robert; Kapali, Sudha; Hirsch, Michael; Hampton, Donald; Akbari, Hassanali

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we present a technique for dimensionality reduction in hyperspectral imaging during the data collection process. A four-channel hyperspectral imager using liquid crystal Fabry-Perot etalons has been built and used to verify this method for four applications: auroral imaging, plant study, landscape classification, and anomaly detection. This imager is capable of making measurements simultaneously in four wavelength ranges while being tunable within those ranges, and thus can be used to measure narrow contiguous bands in four spectral domains. In this paper, we describe the design, concept of operation, and deployment of this instrument. The results from preliminary testing of this instrument are discussed and are promising and demonstrate this instrument as a good candidate for hyperspectral imaging. PMID:27140081

  17. MAGNETIC STRUCTURE AND MAGNETIC IMAGING OF RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (RE=Nd,Pr) PERMANENT MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    ZHU,Y.; VOLKOV,V.V.

    2000-04-20

    This chapter aims to review the magnetic structures observed in the RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (RE = Nd, Pr) system using various TEM magnetic imaging techniques. The authors focus on studies of die-upset Nd-based permanent magnets conducted mainly at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the past several years. Investigations on Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets and single crystals, as well as Pr-Fe-B die-upset magnets also will be covered. In Sec.2 and Sec.3 they review the microstructure, including grain alignment and secondary phases of the materials, and grain boundary structure and composition of the intergranular phase. Sec.4 is devoted to the domain structure, such as the width of domain and domain wall and domain-wall energy. Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of demagnetization fields will be presented in Sec.5. In-situ experiments on the dynamic behavior of domain reorientation as a function of temperature, pinning, grain boundary nucleation related to coercivity under various fields are described in Sec.6. Finally, in Sec.7 the correlation between microstructure and properties are discussed.

  18. Magneto-optic gradient effect in domain-wall images: At the crossroads of magneto-optics and micromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kambersky, V.; Schaefer, R.

    2011-07-15

    An anomalous symmetry of magneto-optical images of ferromagnetic domain walls was reported by Schaefer and Hubert [Phys. Status Solidi A 118, 271 (1990)] and interpreted in terms of light amplitudes proportional to the magnetization gradient. We present analytic and numerical calculations supporting such proportionality under additional conditions implied by classical rules of micromagnetics and address some objections presented by Banno [Phys. Rev. A 77, 033818 (2008)] against such proportionality.

  19. On the theory of domain structure in ferromagnetic phase of diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanovich, V. A.

    2006-09-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of domain structure formation in ferromagnetic phase of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) of p-type. Our analysis is carried out on the base of effective magnetic free energy of DMS calculated by us earlier [Yu.G. Semenov, V.A. Stephanovich, Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003) 195203]. This free energy, substituting DMS (a disordered magnet) by effective ordered substance, permits to apply the standard phenomenological approach to domain structure calculation. Using coupled system of Maxwell equations with those obtained by minimization of above free energy functional, we show the existence of critical ratio ν of concentration of charge carriers and magnetic ions such that sample critical thickness L (such that at Lν the sample is monodomain. This feature makes DMS different from conventional ordered magnets as it gives a possibility to control the sample critical thickness and emerging domain structure period by variation of ν. As concentration of magnetic impurities grows, ν→∞ restoring conventional behavior of ordered magnets. Above facts have been revealed by examination of the temperature of transition to inhomogeneous magnetic state (stripe domain structure) in a slab of finite thickness L of p-type DMS. Our theory can be easily generalized for arbitrary temperature and DMS shape.

  20. Nanomechanical control of the activity of enzymes immobilized on single-domain magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Yu. I.; Gribanovskii, S. L.; Klyachko, N. L.; Kabanov, A. V.

    2014-06-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are used to analyze the main regularities of deformation of biologically active molecules caused by the nonthermal effect of low-frequency magnetic field on single-domain magnetic nanoparticles to the surfaces of which the macromolecules are chemically bound.

  1. Demonstration of magnetic domain boundary movement using an easily assembled videocam-microscope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are to build and demonstrate a low cost and highly flexible TV microscope facility and then use it to view the motion of magnetic domain boundaries as the local magnetic field is varied. The expense of an optical microscope and the videocam adapters sold for them is largely avoided by using the facility described below. The equipment, supplies, and procedure are presented.

  2. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: New phenomena in the low-frequency dynamics of magnetic domain ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurova, Gerta S.

    2002-10-01

    Research into the phenomenon of dynamic self-organization and the excited ('anger') state of multidomain magnetic films with perpendicular anisotropy is reviewed. The phenomenon was dicsovered in 1988 when studying the domain structure of iron garnet films in low-frequency (0.1-10 kHz) ac magnetic fields.

  3. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  4. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.

    2010-01-18

    Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures and their fast dynamics is scientifically interesting and technologically of highest relevance. The combination of circularly polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect at characteristic X-ray absorption edges, with a high resolution soft X-ray microscope utilizing Fresnel zone plate optics allows to study in a unique way the stochastical behavior in the magnetization reversal process of thin films and the ultrafast dynamics of magnetic vortices and domain walls in confined ferromagnetic structures. Future sources of fsec short and high intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of magnetic imaging down to fundamental magnetic length and time scales.

  5. Spin waves and domain wall modes in curved magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Bocklage, Lars; Motl-Ziegler, Sandra; Topp, Jesco; Matsuyama, Toru; Meier, Guido

    2014-07-01

    The confinement of spin waves in inhomogeneous fields and spin wave interaction with domain walls has attracted interest due to possible applications in magnonics. We investigate spin waves in curved ferromagnetic nanowires. The field dispersion and localization of spin waves is revealed by comparison to known modes in stripes and taking into account the specific field reversal of the curved wire. In small wires we find a strongly altered mode spectrum in a certain field regime. Micromagnetic simulations show an extended domain wall within the wire in this field region. The domain wall shows several dynamic modes and changes the remaining spin wave modes. We find mode suppression as well as newly arising modes due to the strong inhomogenous internal field of the wall. PMID:24911994

  6. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  7. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  8. Imaging the Alboran Domain from a marine MT survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, X.; Evans, R.; Elsenbeck, J.; Jegen, M.

    2012-04-01

    On the Western edge of the Mediterranean, the slow convergence of the Iberian and African plates is marked by very intricate tectonic activity, marked by a combination of small-scale subduction and sub-lithospheric downwelling. Delamination or convective instability has also been proposed to have occurred beneath this domain during the past 25 My. And different geodynamic models have been proposed to explain the lithospheric structure of the arc-shaped belt (Betic and Rif orogenies) and the opening of the Alboran Basin. As part of several international projects carried out in this area, magnetotelluric (MT) methods have been used to explore the crust and upper mantle. The measurements of mantle electrical conductivity are a well known complement to measurements of seismic velocity. Conductivity is sensitive to temperature, composition and hydration of the mantle, and therefore MT is widely used to provide constraints on mantle processes. We present results of electromagnetic studies in the Western Mediterranean, focusing specially in the recently work on the Alboran sea as part of a marine MT survey. Land MT studies have already imaged an area of low resistivity coincident with an area of low velocities without earthquake hypocenters, interpreted as asthenospheric material intruded by the lateral lithospheric tearing and breaking-off of the east-directed subducting Ligurian slab under the Alboran Domain. The marine data show complex MT response functions with strong distortion due to seafloor topography and coast effect, suggesting a fairly resistive lithosphere beneath the seafloor. The marine MT data also shows an anomalous conductive slab towards the Eastern Alboran basin, suggesting a possible hydration of mantle material from an Eastward subducting slab. Both the land and marine MT data suggest that the most likely scenario for the opening of the Alboran Basin is related to the westward rollback of the Ligurian subducting slab.

  9. Fast Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in a Ring-Shaped Nanowire Driven by a Voltage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Yang, Tiannan; Momeni, Kasra; Cheng, Xiaoxing; Chen, Lei; Lei, Shiming; Zhang, Shujun; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Carman, Gregory P; Nan, Ce-Wen; Chen, Long-Qing

    2016-04-13

    Magnetic domain-wall motion driven by a voltage dissipates much less heat than by a current, but none of the existing reports have achieved speeds exceeding 100 m/s. Here phase-field and finite-element simulations were combined to study the dynamics of strain-mediated voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion in curved nanowires. Using a ring-shaped, rough-edged magnetic nanowire on top of a piezoelectric disk, we demonstrate a fast voltage-driven magnetic domain-wall motion with average velocity up to 550 m/s, which is comparable to current-driven wall velocity. An analytical theory is derived to describe the strain dependence of average magnetic domain-wall velocity. Moreover, one 180° domain-wall cycle around the ring dissipates an ultrasmall amount of heat, as small as 0.2 fJ, approximately 3 orders of magnitude smaller than those in current-driven cases. These findings suggest a new route toward developing high-speed, low-power-dissipation domain-wall spintronics. PMID:27002341

  10. The influence of magnetic domain landscape on the flux pinning in ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Konczykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2009-03-01

    A line of miniature Hall sensors has been used to study the influence of the disorder in the magnetic domain landscape on flux pinning in the ferromagnetic/superconducting (F/S) bilayers. The bilayers consist of Nb as the S layer and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the F layer, separated by a Si buffer layer to avoid the proximity effect. By changing of the Pt layer thickness, the magnetic domain landscape with different degree of disorder, ranging from uniformly distributed narrow domains (quasi-ordered landscape) to highly disordered landscape with domains of different sizes, can be predefined in the F layer. The flux behavior is then measured in the superconducting state using the Hall sensors. It is found that the quasi-ordered landscape with domains width comparable to the magnetic penetration depth produces large enhancement of the vortex pinning and smooth flux penetration. The more disordered magnetic domain patterns cause less pinning and create large edge barrier for vortex entry followed by strongly inhomogeneous flux penetration. The possible origins of this behavior will be discussed.

  11. Adiabatic spin-transfer-torque-induced domain wall creep in a magnetic metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttagupta, S.; Fukami, S.; Zhang, C.; Sato, H.; Yamanouchi, M.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of elastic interfaces is a general field of interest in statistical physics, where magnetic domain wall has served as a prototypical example. Domain wall `creep’ under the action of sub-threshold driving forces with thermal activation is known to be described by a scaling law with a certain universality class, which represents the mechanism of the interaction of domain walls with the applied forces over the disorder of the system. Here we show different universality classes depending on the driving forces, magnetic field or spin-polarized current, in a metallic system, which have hitherto been seen only in a magnetic semiconductor. We reveal that an adiabatic spin-transfer torque plays a major role in determining the universality class of current-induced creep, which does not depend on the intricacies of material disorder. Our results shed light on the physics of the creep motion of domain walls and other elastic systems.

  12. Pinning induced by inter-domain wall interactions in planar magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T.J.; Bryan, M.T.; Fry, P.W.; Fundi, P.M.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D.A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-10-30

    We have investigated pinning potentials created by inter-domain wall magnetostatic interactions in planar magnetic nanowires. We show that these potentials can take the form of an energy barrier or an energy well depending on the walls' relative monopole moments, and that the applied magnetic fields required to overcome these potentials are significant. Both transverse and vortex wall pairs are investigated and it is found that transverse walls interact more strongly due to dipolar coupling between their magnetization structures. Simple analytical models which allow the effects of inter-domain wall interactions to be estimated are also presented.

  13. Magnetic signature of large exhumed mantle domains of the Southwest Indian Ridge: results from a deep-tow geophysical survey over 0 to 11 Ma old seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, A.; Sauter, D.; Munschy, M.; Carlut, J.; Searle, R.; Cannat, M.; Manatschal, G.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the magnetic signature of an ultramafic seafloor in the eastern part of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). There, detachment faulting, continuous over 11 Myrs, exhumed large areas of mantle derived rocks. These exhumed mantle domains occur in the form of a smooth rounded topography with broad ridges locally covered by a thin highly discontinuous volcanic carapace. We present high-resolution data combining deep-tow magnetics, side-scan sonar images and dredged samples collected within two exhumed mantle domains between 62° E and 65° E. We show that, despite an ultraslow spreading rate, volcanic areas within robust magmatic segments are characterized by well defined seafloor spreading anomalies. By contrast, the exhumed mantle domains, including a few thin volcanic patches, reveal a weak and highly variable magnetic pattern. The analysis of the magnetic properties of the dredged samples and careful comparison between the nature of the seafloor, the deep-tow magnetic anomalies and the seafloor equivalent magnetization suggest that the serpentinized peridotites do not carry a sufficiently stable remanent magnetization to produce seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies in exhumed mantle domains.

  14. Magnetic signature of large exhumed mantle domains of the Southwest Indian Ridge - results from a deep-tow geophysical survey over 0 to 11 Ma old seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, A.; Sauter, D.; Munschy, M.; Carlut, J.; Searle, R.; Cannat, M.; Manatschal, G.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the magnetic signature of ultramafic seafloor in the eastern part of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). There, detachment faulting, continuous over 11 Myr, exhumed large areas of mantle-derived rocks. These exhumed mantle domains occur in the form of a smooth rounded topography with broad ridges locally covered by a thin highly discontinuous volcanic carapace. We present high-resolution data combining deep-tow magnetics, side-scan sonar images and dredged samples collected within two exhumed mantle domains between 62° E and 65° E. We show that, despite an ultra-slow spreading rate, volcanic areas within robust magmatic segments are characterized by well-defined seafloor spreading anomalies. By contrast, the exhumed mantle domains, including a few thin volcanic patches, reveal a weak and highly variable magnetic pattern. The analysis of the magnetic properties of the dredged samples and careful comparison between the nature of the seafloor, the deep-tow magnetic anomalies and the seafloor equivalent magnetization suggest that the serpentinized peridotites do not carry a sufficiently stable remanent magnetization to produce seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies in exhumed mantle domains.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in Leber's optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, A G; Moseley, I F; Kendall, B E; Miller, D H; MacManus, D G; McDonald, W I

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen males with Leber's optic neuropathy had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, and in eight the optic nerves were imaged using STIR (Short Time Inversion Recovery) sequences. All optic nerve scans were abnormal. In seven with bilateral visual loss four showed bilateral increased optic nerve signal and three unilateral increase. The involvement was of the mid and posterior intra-orbital sections over three 5 mm slices or more with sparing of the anterior portion. One patient with unilateral visual loss had increased signal only on the affected side. Brain MRI was normal, in marked contrast to the findings in clinically isolated optic neuritis in which multiple white matter lesions are seen in the majority. Images PMID:2732742

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  18. The magnetic resonance imaging-linac system.

    PubMed

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; van Vulpen, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The current image-guided radiotherapy systems are suboptimal in the esophagus, pancreas, kidney, rectum, lymph node, etc. These locations in the body are not easily accessible for fiducials and cannot be visualized sufficiently on cone-beam computed tomographies, making daily patient set-up prone to geometrical uncertainties and hinder dose optimization. Additional interfraction and intrafraction uncertainties for those locations arise from motion with breathing and organ filling. To allow real-time imaging of all patient tumor locations at the actual treatment position a fully integrated 1.5-T, diagnostic quality, magnetic resonance imaging with a 6-MV linear accelerator is presented. This system must enable detailed dose painting at all body locations. PMID:24931095

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in medicine

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, C S

    1986-01-01

    Using the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, MR, MRI), the first images displaying pathology in humans were published in 1980.1 Since then, there has been a rapid extension in the use of the technique, with an estimated 225 machines in use in the USA at the end of 1985.2 Considerable enthusiasm has been expressed for this new imaging technique,3 although awareness of its high cost in the present economic climate has led to reservations being expressed in other quarters.2 The aim of this article is to give an outline of the present state of NMR, and indicate some possible future developments. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3(a)Fig 3 (b)Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7 (a)Fig 7 (b)Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10 PMID:3811023

  20. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized. PMID:18465447

  1. Control and braiding of Majorana fermions bound to magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tewari, Sumanta; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the recent progress on endowing the electronic structure of magnetic nanowires with topological properties, the associated topological solitons in the magnetic texture—magnetic domain walls—appear as very natural hosts for exotic electronic excitations. Here, we propose to use the magnetic domain walls to engender Majorana fermions, which has several notable advantages compared to the existing approaches. First of all, the local tunneling density-of-states anomaly associated with the Majorana zero mode bound to a smooth magnetic soliton is immune to most of parasitic artifacts associated with the abrupt physical ends of a wire, which mar the existing experimental probes. Second, a viable route to move and braid Majorana fermions is offered by domain-wall motion. In particular, we envision the recently demonstrated heat-current induced motion of domain walls in insulating ferromagnets as a promising tool for nonintrusive displacement of Majorana modes. This leads us to propose a feasible scheme for braiding domain walls within a magnetic nanowire network, which manifests the nob-Abelian exchange statistics within the Majorana subspace.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.; Sheldon, P.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-02-01

    The role of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the kidney was analyzed in 18 persons (6 normal volunteers, 3 patients with pelvocaliectasis, 2 with peripelvic cysts, 1 with renal sinus lipomatosis, 3 with renal failure, 1 with glycogen storage disease, and 2 with polycystic kidney disease). Ultrasound and/or computed tomography (CT) studies were available for comparison in every case. In the normal kidney distinct anatomical structures were clearly differentiated by NMR. The best anatomical detail ws obtained with spin echo (SE) imaging, using a pulse sequence interval of 1,000 msec and an echo delay time of 28 msec. However, in the evaluation of normal and pathological conditions, all four intensity images (SE 500/28, SE 500/56, SE 1,000/28, and SE 1,000/56) have to be analyzed. No definite advantage was found in using SE imaging with a pulse sequence interval of 1,500 msec. Inversion recovery imaging enhanced the differences between the cortex and medulla, but it had a low signal-to-noise level and, therefore, a suboptimal overall resolution. The advantages of NMR compared with CT and ultrasound are discussed, and it is concluded that NMR imaging will prove to be a useful modality in the evaluation of renal disease.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultra-high fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques. PMID:24686229

  4. Stability of a pinned magnetic domain wall as a function of its internal configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, F.; Duluard, A.; Briones, J.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-01-14

    It is shown that there are many stable configurations for a domain wall pinned by a notch along a magnetic stripe. The stability of several of these configurations is investigated numerically as a function of the thickness of the magnetic film. The depinning mechanism depends on the structure of the domain wall and on the thickness of the magnetic film. In the case of a spin-valve structure, it appears that the stray fields emerging from the hard layer at the notch location influence the stability of the micromagnetic configuration. Different depinning mechanisms are thus observed for the same film thickness depending on the magnetization orientation of the propagating domain. This conclusion qualitatively explains experimental magnetoresistance measurements.

  5. Suppression of Walker breakdown in magnetic domain wall propagation through structural control of spin wave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, David M.; Atkinson, Del

    2013-06-01

    The control of individual magnetic domain walls has potential for future spintronic memory and data processing applications. The speed and reliability of such devices are determined by the dynamic properties of the domain walls. Typically, spin precession limitations lead to Walker breakdown, limiting wall velocity resulting in low mobility. Here, we show the suppression of Walker breakdown by the careful design of small amplitude periodic nanowire structuring to match the periodicity of domain wall spin structure transformations. This opens up a channel for energy dissipation via spin wave emission, allowing a domain wall to maintain its spin structure during propagation.

  6. Electric-field-controlled suppression of Walker breakdown and chirality switching in magnetic domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Bo; Li, You-Quan

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall controlled by an electric field in the presence of the spin flexoelectric interaction. We reveal that this interaction generates an effective spin torque and results in significant changes in the current-driven domain wall motion. In particular, the electric field can stabilize the domain wall motion, leading to strong suppression of the current-induced Walker breakdown and thus allowing a higher maximum wall velocity. We can furthermore use this electric-field control to efficiently switch the chirality of a moving domain wall in the steady regime.

  7. Reconstruction of sectional images in frequency-domain based photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Banghe; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2011-11-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is based upon the generation of an ultrasound pulse arising from subsurface tissue absorption due to pulsed laser excitation, and measurement of its surface time-of-arrival. Expensive and bulky pulsed lasers with high peak fluence powers may provide shortcomings for applications of PA imaging in medicine and biology. These limitations may be overcome with the frequency-domain PA measurements, which employ modulated rather than pulsed light to generate the acoustic wave. In this contribution, we model the single modulation frequency based PA pressures on the measurement plane through the diffraction approximation and then employ a convolution approach to reconstruct the sectional image slices. The results demonstrate that the proposed method with appropriate data post-processing is capable of recovering sectional images while suppressing the defocused noise resulting from the other sections. PMID:22109207

  8. Angle correction for small animal tumor imaging with spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Piracha, Shaheer; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Viapiano, Mariano; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a widefield imaging technique that allows for the quantitative extraction of tissue optical properties. SFDI is currently being explored for small animal tumor imaging, but severe imaging artifacts occur for highly curved surfaces (e.g. the tumor edge). We propose a modified Lambertian angle correction, adapted from the Minnaert correction method for satellite imagery, to account for tissue surface angles up to 75°. The method was tested in a hemisphere phantom study as well as a small animal tumor model. The proposed method reduced µa and µs` extraction errors by an average of 64% and 16% respectively compared to performing no angle correction, and provided more physiologically agreeable optical property and chromophore values on tumors. PMID:27375952

  9. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques. PMID:25835585

  10. Tools for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Cheong, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In less than fifteen years, as a non-invasive imaging option, cardiovascular MR has grown from a being a mere curiosity to becoming a widely used clinical tool for evaluating cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is now routinely used to study myocardial structure, cardiac function, macro vascular blood flow, myocardial perfusion, and myocardial viability. For someone entering the field of cardiac MR, this rapid pace of development in the field of CMRI might make it difficult to identify a cohesive starting point. In this brief review, we have attempted to summarize the key cardiovascular imaging techniques that have found widespread clinical acceptance. In particular, we describe the essential cardiac and respiratory gating techniques that form the backbone of all cardiovascular imaging methods. It is followed by four sections that discuss: (I) the gradient echo techniques that are used to assess ventricular function; (II) black-blood turbo spin echo (SE) methods used for morphologic assessment of the heart; (III) phase-contrast based techniques for the assessment of blood flow; and (IV) CMR methods for the assessment of myocardial ischemia and viability. In each section, we briefly summarize technical considerations relevant to the clinical use of these techniques, followed by practical information for its clinical implementation. In each of those four areas, CMRI is considered either as the benchmark imaging modality against which the diagnostic performance of other imaging modalities are compared against, or provides a complementary capability to existing imaging techniques. We have deliberately avoided including cutting-edge CMR imaging techniques practiced at few academic centers, and restricted our discussion to methods that are widely used and are likely to be available in a clinical setting. Our hope is that this review would propel an interested reader toward more comprehensive reviews in the literature. PMID:24834409

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal injury.

    PubMed

    Tracy, P T; Wright, R M; Hanigan, W C

    1989-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 30 patients following spinal injury (SI). Spin-echo sequences and surface coils were used for all patients. Plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomography (CT), and MRI were compared for the delineation of bone, disc, and ligament injury, measurement of sagittal spinal canal diameter and subluxation, epidural hematoma, and spinal cord structure. Myelography or intrathecal contrast-enhanced CT were not performed on any of these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging accurately delineated intraspinal pathology in two of four patients with acute penetrating SI, and was normal in the other two patients. In 16 patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, MRI was superior to CT for visualizing injuries to discs, ligaments, and the spinal cord, while CT was superior to MRI in characterizing bony injury. Computed tomography and MRI provided similar measurements of subluxation in six of six patients and of sagittal spinal canal diameter in three of four patients. In ten patients with chronic SI, MRI demonstrated post-traumatic cysts, myelomalacia, spinal cord edema, and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression. In patients with acute penetrating SI and chronic SI, MRI provided comprehensive clinical information. In patients with acute nonpenetrating SI, the information obtained by MRI complemented the data given by plain radiographs and CT, allowing clinical decisions to be made without the need of invasive imaging modalities. PMID:2711244

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for lung cancer screen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Lo, Gladys G; Yuan, Jing; Larson, Peder E Z; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2014-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death throughout the world. Lung cancer is an example of a disease for which a large percentage of the high-risk population can be easily identified via a smoking history. This has led to the investigation of lung cancer screening with low-dose helical/multi-detector CT. Evidences suggest that early detection of lung cancer allow more timely therapeutic intervention and thus a more favorable prognosis for the patient. The positive relationship of lesion size to likelihood of malignancy has been demonstrated previously, at least 99% of all nodules 4 mm or smaller are benign, while noncalcified nodules larger than 8 mm diameter bear a substantial risk of malignancy. In the recent years, the availability of high-performance gradient systems, in conjunction with phased-array receiver coils and optimized imaging sequences, has made MR imaging of the lung feasible. It can now be assumed a threshold size of 3-4 mm for detection of lung nodules with MRI under the optimal conditions of successful breath-holds with reliable gating or triggering. In these conditions, 90% of all 3-mm nodules can be correctly diagnosed and that nodules 5 mm and larger are detected with 100% sensitivity. Parallel imaging can significantly shorten the imaging acquisition time by utilizing the diversity of sensitivity profile of individual coil elements in multi-channel radiofrequency receive coil arrays or transmit/receive coil arrays to reduce the number of phase encoding steps required in imaging procedure. Compressed sensing technique accelerates imaging acquisition from dramatically undersampled data set by exploiting the sparsity of the images in an appropriate transform domain. With the combined imaging algorithm of parallel imaging and compressed sensing and advanced 32-channel or 64-channel RF hardware, overall imaging acceleration of 20 folds or higher can then be expected, ultimately achieve free-breathing and no ECG gating acquisitions

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging for lung cancer screen

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Gladys G.; Yuan, Jing; Larson, Peder E. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death throughout the world. Lung cancer is an example of a disease for which a large percentage of the high-risk population can be easily identified via a smoking history. This has led to the investigation of lung cancer screening with low-dose helical/multi-detector CT. Evidences suggest that early detection of lung cancer allow more timely therapeutic intervention and thus a more favorable prognosis for the patient. The positive relationship of lesion size to likelihood of malignancy has been demonstrated previously, at least 99% of all nodules 4 mm or smaller are benign, while noncalcified nodules larger than 8 mm diameter bear a substantial risk of malignancy. In the recent years, the availability of high-performance gradient systems, in conjunction with phased-array receiver coils and optimized imaging sequences, has made MR imaging of the lung feasible. It can now be assumed a threshold size of 3-4 mm for detection of lung nodules with MRI under the optimal conditions of successful breath-holds with reliable gating or triggering. In these conditions, 90% of all 3-mm nodules can be correctly diagnosed and that nodules 5 mm and larger are detected with 100% sensitivity. Parallel imaging can significantly shorten the imaging acquisition time by utilizing the diversity of sensitivity profile of individual coil elements in multi-channel radiofrequency receive coil arrays or transmit/receive coil arrays to reduce the number of phase encoding steps required in imaging procedure. Compressed sensing technique accelerates imaging acquisition from dramatically undersampled data set by exploiting the sparsity of the images in an appropriate transform domain. With the combined imaging algorithm of parallel imaging and compressed sensing and advanced 32-channel or 64-channel RF hardware, overall imaging acceleration of 20 folds or higher can then be expected, ultimately achieve free-breathing and no ECG gating acquisitions

  14. [Indications for magnetic resonance imaging in pneumology].

    PubMed

    Arrivé, L

    1997-04-19

    Tissue mobilization caused by respiration and heart beat and lower spacial resolution than with computed tomography has limited use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pneumology. Nevertheless, because of the high-quality of spontaneous contrast and the non irradiation nature of the examination, there are selected indications. For bronchogenic cancer, MRI is reserved for selected cases to evaluate tumor extension. For tumors of the mediastinum, MRI is particularly useful for evaluating extension of neurogenic tumors. MRI also gives a better visualization of processes involving the diaphragm than computed tomography. The development of magnetic resonance angiography is a major progress for exploration of pulmonary embolism as repeated acquisitions can be obtained without injection of a contrast medium. Several studies have shown that MRI visualizes well solitary lung nodules, clearly distinguishing fat content from vascularized nodules. For the pulmonary parenchyma, further advances are necessary before MRI can become a routine exploration technique. PMID:9180867

  15. Holographic imaging based on time-domain data of natural-fiber-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Kyle J.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-09-04

    Methods and apparatuses for imaging material properties in natural-fiber-containing materials can utilize time-domain data. In particular, images can be constructed that provide quantified measures of localized moisture content. For example, one or more antennas and at least one transceiver can be configured to collect time-domain data from radiation interacting with the natural-fiber-containing materials. The antennas and the transceivers are configured to transmit and receive electromagnetic radiation at one or more frequencies, which are between 50 MHz and 1 THz, according to a time-domain impulse function. A computing device is configured to transform the time-domain data to frequency-domain data, to apply a synthetic imaging algorithm for constructing a three-dimensional image of the natural-fiber-containing materials, and to provide a quantified measure of localized moisture content based on a pre-determined correlation of moisture content to frequency-domain data.

  16. Shaping nanoscale magnetic domain memory in exchange-coupled ferromagnets by field cooling

    PubMed Central

    Chesnel, Karine; Safsten, Alex; Rytting, Matthew; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2016-01-01

    The advance of magnetic nanotechnologies relies on detailed understanding of nanoscale magnetic mechanisms in materials. Magnetic domain memory (MDM), that is, the tendency for magnetic domains to repeat the same pattern during field cycling, is important for magnetic recording technologies. Here we demonstrate MDM in [Co/Pd]/IrMn films, using coherent X-ray scattering. Under illumination, the magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] produce a speckle pattern, a unique fingerprint of their nanoscale configuration. We measure MDM by cross-correlating speckle patterns throughout magnetization processes. When cooled below its blocking temperature, the film exhibits up to 100% MDM, induced by exchange-coupling with the underlying IrMn layer. The degree of MDM drastically depends on cooling conditions. If the film is cooled under moderate fields, MDM is high throughout the entire magnetization loop. If the film is cooled under nearly saturating field, MDM vanishes, except at nucleation and saturation. Our findings show how to fully control the occurrence of MDM by field cooling. PMID:27248368

  17. Shaping nanoscale magnetic domain memory in exchange-coupled ferromagnets by field cooling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chesnel, Karine; Safsten, Alex; Rytting, Matthew; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2016-06-01

    The advance of magnetic nanotechnologies relies on detailed understanding of nanoscale magnetic mechanisms in materials. Magnetic domain memory (MDM), that is, the tendency for magnetic domains to repeat the same pattern during field cycling, is important for magnetic recording technologies. Here we demonstrate MDM in [Co/Pd]/IrMn films, using coherent X-ray scattering. Under illumination, the magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] produce a speckle pattern, a unique fingerprint of their nanoscale configuration. We measure MDM by cross-correlating speckle patterns throughout magnetization processes. When cooled below its blocking temperature, the film exhibits up to 100% MDM, induced by exchange-coupling with the underlying IrMn layer.more » The degree of MDM drastically depends on cooling conditions. If the film is cooled under moderate fields, MDM is high throughout the entire magnetization loop. Lastly, if the film is cooled under nearly saturating field, MDM vanishes, except at nucleation and saturation. Our findings show how to fully control the occurrence of MDM by field cooling.« less

  18. Shaping nanoscale magnetic domain memory in exchange-coupled ferromagnets by field cooling.

    PubMed

    Chesnel, Karine; Safsten, Alex; Rytting, Matthew; Fullerton, Eric E

    2016-01-01

    The advance of magnetic nanotechnologies relies on detailed understanding of nanoscale magnetic mechanisms in materials. Magnetic domain memory (MDM), that is, the tendency for magnetic domains to repeat the same pattern during field cycling, is important for magnetic recording technologies. Here we demonstrate MDM in [Co/Pd]/IrMn films, using coherent X-ray scattering. Under illumination, the magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] produce a speckle pattern, a unique fingerprint of their nanoscale configuration. We measure MDM by cross-correlating speckle patterns throughout magnetization processes. When cooled below its blocking temperature, the film exhibits up to 100% MDM, induced by exchange-coupling with the underlying IrMn layer. The degree of MDM drastically depends on cooling conditions. If the film is cooled under moderate fields, MDM is high throughout the entire magnetization loop. If the film is cooled under nearly saturating field, MDM vanishes, except at nucleation and saturation. Our findings show how to fully control the occurrence of MDM by field cooling. PMID:27248368

  19. Shaping nanoscale magnetic domain memory in exchange-coupled ferromagnets by field cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnel, Karine; Safsten, Alex; Rytting, Matthew; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2016-06-01

    The advance of magnetic nanotechnologies relies on detailed understanding of nanoscale magnetic mechanisms in materials. Magnetic domain memory (MDM), that is, the tendency for magnetic domains to repeat the same pattern during field cycling, is important for magnetic recording technologies. Here we demonstrate MDM in [Co/Pd]/IrMn films, using coherent X-ray scattering. Under illumination, the magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] produce a speckle pattern, a unique fingerprint of their nanoscale configuration. We measure MDM by cross-correlating speckle patterns throughout magnetization processes. When cooled below its blocking temperature, the film exhibits up to 100% MDM, induced by exchange-coupling with the underlying IrMn layer. The degree of MDM drastically depends on cooling conditions. If the film is cooled under moderate fields, MDM is high throughout the entire magnetization loop. If the film is cooled under nearly saturating field, MDM vanishes, except at nucleation and saturation. Our findings show how to fully control the occurrence of MDM by field cooling.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of intramammary metastases.

    PubMed

    Wienbeck, Susanne; Herzog, Aimee; Kinner, Sonja; Surov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of intramammary metastases (IM). We identified 8 cases with IM, which were investigated by breast MRI (1.5T). In every case, the diagnosis of IM was proven histopathologically on breast biopsy specimens. Overall, 187 IM were identified. IM had inconsistent MRI features, which cannot be clearly classify as benign or malignant. IM should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of breast lesions to avoid possible misinterpretations. PMID:27133668

  1. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  2. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian

    1993-01-01

    A number of physiological changes were demonstrated in bone, muscle, and blood from exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long-duration space missions is an important NASA goal. Historically, NASA has had to rely on tape measures, x-ray, and metabolic balance studies with collection of excreta and blood specimens to obtain this information. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of greatly extending these early studies in ways not previously possible; MRI is also non-invasive and safe; i.e., no radiation exposure. MRI provides both superb anatomical images for volume measurements of individual structures and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. This investigation will apply MRI technology to measure muscle, intervertebral disc, and bone marrow changes resulting from exposure to microgravity.

  5. Dynamics of the magnetic moments for chain of dipoles in domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutyıˇ, Anatoliy M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of the magnetic moment numerically simulated for a chain of the magnetic nanodots coupled through the dipole-dipole interaction and in the presence of the magnetic anisotropy of various types. It is shown that a static field applied to the system causes specific fluctuations of the transverse components of the magnetic moment leading to a sequence of the oscillation trains observed in the domain wall. Various oscillation modes governed by the external alternating field are revealed. The influence of the unidirectional and uniaxial anisotropy ("easy-plane" and "easy axis" anisotropy) on the system behavior is described.

  6. Magnetic Field Imaging of the Spinel MnV2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolin, Brian; Naibert, Tyler; Byrum, Taylor; Gleason, Samuel; Zhou, Haidong; Cooper, S. Lance; Budakian, Raffi

    2014-03-01

    The complex interplay of spin, orbital degeneracy, and lattice degrees of freedom result in many intriguing behaviors in condensed matter systems. Due to its simple lattice structure and extensive theoretical work, the spinel MnV2O4 is a prime candidate for archetypal study of these phenomena. We perform magnetic force microscopy imaging on single crystal samples of MnV2O4 at variable temperature and magnetic field. Our results show previously unobserved magnetic structure and behavior (including stripes and domain switching) as the phase diagram is explored. These represent the first direct imaging of the magnetic properties of a vanadium oxide spinel and inform the current debate over the low temperature magnetic phases of MnV2O4. Supported by US Department of Energy grant DE-FG02-07ER46453

  7. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Li, David Day-Uei; Ameer-Beg, Simon; Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Walker, Richard; Matthews, Daniel R.; Visitkul, Viput; Richardson, Justin; Henderson, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD)-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber) are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast. PMID:22778606

  8. Packaging of a large capacity magnetic bubble domain spacecraft recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, F. J.; Stermer, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    A Solid State Spacecraft Data Recorder (SSDR), based on bubble domain technology, having a storage capacity of 10 to the 8th power bits, was designed and is being tested. The recorder consists of two memory modules each having 32 cells, each cell containing sixteen 100 kilobit serial bubble memory chips. The memory modules are interconnected to a Drive and Control Unit (DCU) module containing four microprocessors, 500 integrated circuits, a RAM core memory and two PROM's. The two memory modules and DCU are housed in individual machined aluminum frames, are stacked in brick fashion and through bolted to a base plate assembly which also houses the power supply.

  9. Torsion constraints from cosmological magnetic field and QCD domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2014-10-01

    Earlier Kostelecky [Phys. Rev. D 69, 105009 (2004)] has investigated the role of gravitational sector in Riemann-Cartan (RC) spacetime with torsion, in Lorentz and CPT violating (LV) Standard Model extension (SME). In his paper use of quantum electrodynamic (QED) extension in RC spacetime is made. More recently L. C. Garcia de Andrade [Phys. Lett. B 468, 28 (2011)] obtained magnetic field galactic dynamo seeds in the bosonic sector with massless photons, which proved to decay faster than necessary [Phys. Lett. B 711, 143 (2012)] to be able to seed galactic dynamos. In this paper it is shown that by using the fermionic sector of Kostelecky-Lagrangian and torsion written as a chiral current, one obtains torsion and magnetic fields explicitly from a Heisenberg-Ivanenko form of Dirac equation whose solution allows us to express torsion in terms of LV coefficients and magnetic field in terms of fermionic matter fields. When minimal coupling between electromagnetic and torsion fields is used it is shown that the fermionic sector of QED with torsion leads to resonantly amplify magnetic fields which mimics an α2-dynamo mechanism. Fine-tuning of torsion is shown to result in the dynamo reversal, a phenomenon so important in solar physics and geophysics. Of course this is only an analogy since torsion is very weak in solar and geophysics contexts. An analogous expression for the α-effect of mean-field dynamos is also obtained where the α-effect is mimic by torsion. Similar resonant amplification mechanisms connected to early universe have been considered by Finelli and Gruppuso.

  10. Enhancement of magnetic domain topologies in Co/Pt thin films by fine tuning the magnetic field path throughout the hysteresis loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westover, Andrew S.; Chesnel, Karine; Hatch, Kelsey; Salter, Philip; Hellwig, Olav

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the influence of magnetic history on the topology of perpendicular magnetic domains in a thin ferromagnetic film made of [Co(8 Å)/Pt(7 Å)]50 multilayers. More specifically, we have followed the morphological changes in the domain pattern when applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the layer, throughout minor and major magnetization loops, and in the resulting remanent state. We carried out this study by using MFM microscopy with an in-situ magnetic field. We find that the morphology of the magnetic domain pattern is greatly influenced by the magnetic history of the material and that some features, such as the degree of bubbliness (i.e., the extent of bubble domain formation) and density of isolated domains can be enhanced by fine tuning the magnetic field path within the major hysteresis loop towards different remanent states. In particular, we see how hysteresis is correlated to irreversible changes in the domain morphology. More interestingly, we find that the magnetic domain morphology at remanence can be changed from an interconnected labyrinthine stripe state to a state of many separated bubble domains by fine tuning the magnitude of the field previously applied to the material. These results agree well with other findings, such as the magnetic reversal behavior and magnetic memory effects in Co/Pt multilayers, and provide opportunities for potential technological applications.

  11. Direct observation of stochastic domain-wall depinning in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Mi-Young; Bocklage, Lars; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2008-11-01

    The stochastic field-driven depinning of a domain wall pinned at a notch in a magnetic nanowire is directly observed using magnetic X-ray microscopy with high lateral resolution down to 15 nm. The depinning-field distribution in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanowires considerably depends on the wire width and the notch depth. The difference in the multiplicity of domain-wall types generated in the vicinity of a notch is responsible for the observed dependence of the stochastic nature of the domain wall depinning field on the wire width and the notch depth. Thus the random nature of the domain wall depinning process is controllable by an appropriate design of the nanowire.

  12. All-in-all-out magnetic domain wall conduction in a pyrochlore iridate heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T. C.; Uchida, M.; Kozuka, Y.; Sano, W.; Tsukazaki, A.; Arima, T.; Kawasaki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Pyrochlore oxides possessing "all-in-all-out" spin ordering have attracted burgeoning interest as a rich ground of emergent states. This ordering has two distinct types of magnetic domains (all-in-all-out or all-out-all-in) with broken time-reversal symmetry, and a nontrivial metallic surface state has been theoretically demonstrated to appear at their domain wall. Here, we report on the observation of this metallic conduction at the single all-in-all-out/all-out-all-in magnetic domain wall formed at the heterointerface of two pyrochlore iridates. By utilizing the different magnetoresponses of them with different lanthanide ions, the domain wall is controllably inserted at the heterointerface, the surface state being detected as an anomalous conduction enhancement with a ferroic hysteresis. Our establishment paves the way for further investigation and manipulation of this new type of surface transport.

  13. Modulated helical metals at magnetic domain walls of pyrochlore iridium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breakings, metal-insulator transitions, and transport properties of magnetic-domain-wall states in pyrochlore iridium oxides are studied by employing a symmetry-adapted effective Hamiltonian with a slab perpendicular to the (111) direction of the pyrochlore structure. Emergent metallic domain wall, which has an unconventional topological nature with a controllable and mobile metallic layer, is shown to host Fermi surfaces with modulated helical spin textures resembling Rashba metals. The helical nature of the domain-wall Fermi surfaces is experimentally detectable by anomalous Hall conductivity, circular dichroism, and optical Hall conductivity under external magnetic fields. Possible applications of the domain-wall metals to spin-current generation and "half-metallic" conduction are also discussed.

  14. Tuning vortex confinement by magnetic domains in a superconductor/ferromagnet bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Kończykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Cheng, X. M.; Chien, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    We use a line of miniature Hall sensors to study the effect of magnetic-domain-induced vortex confinement on the flux dynamics in a superconductor/ferromagnet bilayer. A single tunable bilayer is built of a ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a superconducting Nb layer, with the insulating layer in-between to avoid the proximity effect. The magnetic-domain patterns of various geometries are reversibly predefined in the Co/Pt multilayer using the appropriate magnetization procedure. The magnetic-domain geometry strongly affects vortex dynamics, leading to geometry-dependent trapping of vortices at the sample edge, nonuniform flux penetration, and strongly nonuniform critical current density. With the decreasing temperature, the magnetic pinning increases, but this increase is substantially weaker than that of the intrinsic pinning. The analysis of the initial flux penetration suggests that vortices may form various vortex structures, including disordered Abrikosov lattice or single and double vortex chains, in which minimal vortex-vortex distance is comparable to the magnetic penetration depth.

  15. From exchange coupling to magnetic memory: how domains remembers at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnel, Karine; Nelson, Joseph; Wilcken, Brian; Kevan, Steve; Carey, Matthew; Fullerton, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Magnetic memory, the ability of a material to remember its magnetic domain configuration throughout magnetization, offers potential technological interest for the data storage industry. One way to quantify the magnetic memory is to use Coherent X-ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering (XRMS) tools, at synchrotron facilities. The light is tuned to resonant edges of magnetic element to optimize the magneto-optical contrast. When illuminated by coherent beam, the sample produces speckle patterns. Our approach is to cross-correlate patterns recorded at different field values throughout the magnetization cycle, and at different temperatures. We have studied the return point memory (RPM) that characterizes the memory after a full cycle, and developed a q-selective correlation analysis to study the spatial dependency of the memory. We will give here an overview of different type of memory behaviors, first showing disorder induced memory in thin CoPt films and influence of roughness, then demonstrating the ability to control the magnetic memory by inducing exchange bias [1]. We will see how the local exchange couplings pin the magnetic domain in the ferromagnetic layer and lead the large memory enhancement at different spatial scales. [0pt] [1] K.Chesnel et al, PRB 78, 132409 (2008)

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ≥25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ≥25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ≥1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ≥25 mm. PMID:26175631

  17. PLANTAR THROMBOPHLEBITIS: MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FINDINGS

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Frederico Celestino; Carneiro, Renato Duarte; Longo, Carlos Henrique; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Rosemberg, Laércio Alberto; de Gusmão Funari, Marcelo Buarque

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in plantar thrombophlebitis. Methods: Retrospective review of twenty patients with pain in the plantar region of the foot, in which the MRI findings indicated plantar thrombophlebitis. Results: A total of fourteen men and six women, mean age 46.7 years were evaluated. Eight of these patients also underwent Doppler ultrasonography, which confirmed the thrombophlebitis. The magnetic resonance images were evaluated in consensus by two radiologists with experience in musculoskeletal radiology (more than 10 years each), showing perivascular edema in all twenty patients (100%) and muscle edema in nineteen of the twenty patients (95%). All twenty patients had intraluminal intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted (100%) and venous ectasia was present in seventeen of the twenty cases (85%). Collateral veins were visualized in one of the twenty patients (5%). All fourteen cases (100%), in which intravenous contrast was administered, showed perivenular tissues enhancement and intraluminal filling defect. Venous ectasia, loss of compressibility and no flow on Doppler ultrasound were also observed in all eight cases examined by the method. Conclusion: MRI is a sensitive in the evaluation of plant thrombophlebitis in patients with plantar foot pain. PMID:27047898

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pektas, Ayhan; Olgunturk, Rana; Cevik, Ayhan; Terlemez, Semiha; Kacar, Emre; Oner, Yusuf Ali

    2015-06-01

    The present study aims to determine the efficacy and reliability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in establishing the diagnosis and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension in children. This is a retrospective comparison of 25 children with pulmonary hypertension and a control group comprising 19 healthy children. The diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension was made when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was ≥25 mmHg by catheter angiography. The children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly lower body mass indices than did the healthy children (P=0.048). In addition, the children with pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main pulmonary artery diameters and ascending aortic diameters (both P=0.001) but statistically similar ratios of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aortic diameter. If the main pulmonary artery diameter was ≥25 mm, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 72% sensitivity and 84% specificity. In the event that the ratio of main pulmonary artery diameter-to-ascending aorta diameter was ≥1, pediatric pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed with 60% sensitivity and 53% specificity. When compared with children who had New York Heart Association functional class II pulmonary hypertension, the children with functional class III pulmonary hypertension had significantly larger main (P=0.046), right (P=0.036), and left (P=0.003) pulmonary arteries. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis of children with pulmonary hypertension. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension can be diagnosed with high sensitivity and specificity when the main pulmonary artery diameter measures ≥25 mm. PMID:26175631

  19. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  20. Quantifying Mixing using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Emilio J.; McCarthy, Kathryn L.; Bacca, Lori A.; Hartt, William H.; McCarthy, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media 1, 2. The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile 1H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  1. Imaging the magnetic nanodomains in Nd2Fe14B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lunan; Taufour, Valentin; Lamichhane, T. N.; Schrunk, Benjamin; Bud'ko, Sergei L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-03-01

    We study magnetic domains in Nd2Fe14B single crystals using high resolution magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Previous MFM studies and small angle neutron scattering experiments suggested the presence of nanoscale domains in addition to optically detected micrometer-scale ones. We find, in addition to the elongated, wavy nanodomains reported by a previous MFM study, that the micrometer-sized, star-shaped fractal pattern is constructed of an elongated network of nanodomains ˜20 nm in width, with resolution-limited domain walls thinner than 2 nm. While the microscopic domains exhibit significant resilience to an external magnetic field, some of the nanodomains are sensitive to the magnetic field of the MFM tip.

  2. On-chip Brownian relaxation measurements of magnetic nanobeads in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-06-01

    We present and demonstrate a new method for on-chip Brownian relaxation measurements on magnetic nanobeads in the time domain using magnetoresistive sensors. The beads are being magnetized by the sensor self-field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors and thus no external magnetic fields are needed. First, the method is demonstrated on Brownian relaxation measurements of beads with nominal sizes of 40, 80, 130, and 250 nm. The results are found to compare well to those obtained by an already established measurement technique in the frequency domain. Next, we demonstrate the time and frequency domain methods on Brownian relaxation detection of clustering of streptavidin coated magnetic beads in the presence of different concentrations of biotin-conjugated bovine serum albumin and obtain comparable results. In the time domain, a measurement is carried out in less than 30 s, which is about six times faster than in the frequency domain. This substantial reduction of the measurement time allows for continuous monitoring of the bead dynamics vs. time and opens for time-resolved studies, e.g., of binding kinetics.

  3. Magnetic and magneto-optical properties and domain structure of Co/Pd multilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadetsky, S.; Wu, Teho; Suzuki, T.; Mansuripur, M.

    1993-01-01

    The domain structure of Co/Pd(1.6/6.3 A)xN multilayers and its relation to the bulk magnetic properties of the samples were studied. The Co/Pd multilayers were deposited by rf and dc magnetron sputtering onto different substrates. It was found that magnetic and magnetooptical properties and domain structure of the multilayers were affected by total film thickness and substrate condition. Magnetization, coercivity, and anisotropy of the films decreased significantly as the film thickness dropped below 100 A. However, Kerr rotation angle had a maximum at the same thickness. The width of the domain structure increased with the decrease of the film thickness attaining the single domain state at N = 10. The initial curves in Co/Pd multilayers were found to depend on demagnetization process. The samples demagnetized by inplane field showed the largest difference between initial curves and the corresponding parts of the loops. Different domain structures were observed in the samples demagnetized by perpendicular and in-plane magnetic fields.

  4. The creation of 360 degree domain walls in ferromagnetic nanorings by circular applied magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Jessica; Smith, Spencer; Aidala, Katherine

    2014-03-01

    360° domain walls (DWs) are the proposed transition state of ferromagnetic nanorings which are candidate devices for magnetic memory. Using micromagnetic simulations, we examine the formation of 360° DWs created by the application of a circular Oersted field for the transition of a 5nm thick ring from a CCW to a CW vortex. The magnetic reversal begins by canting of the magnetization either inward or outward. As the spin continues to rotate, exchange interactions result in the rotation of adjacent spins. Finally, the rotate spin aligns with the applied magnetic field, creating a transition state made of two 180° DWs of opposite winding number. As the center of the rotated domain grows, the 180° walls of adjacent domains meet. Adjacent domains cant in opposite directions to lower the magnetostatic energy relative to canting in the same direction. Therefore 180° DWs at the boundaries have the same winding number and combine to form 360° DWs. Each pair of rotated domains results in a pair of two 360° DWs of opposite winding number. This work provides better understanding of the formation of 360° DWs and may lead to the ability to control the formation of DWs via geometry.

  5. Dynamics of domain walls in thin films with out-of-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhfudz, Imam; Krüger, Benjamin; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2010-03-01

    A thin magnetic film with a strong easy-axis anisotropy favoring the out-of-plane direction breaks up into mesoscopic magnetic domains separated by Bloch domain walls. Depending on magnetic history, these domains can form ordered stripes or disordered labyrinthine patterns. The physics of these domain walls is strongly influenced by dipolar interactions that mediate a long-range interaction between domain walls and make the wall tension negative [1]. Here we point out that the dominance of the gyrotropic force over the viscous one makes the dynamics of Bloch walls rather unusual. Low-frequency waves on such a wall are chiral: the speed of propagation is different for the two directions along the wall. The puzzling star-shaped trajectory of a magnetic bubble noted in [2] is a result of superposition of two waves with the same wavenumber and different frequencies running in opposite directions along the wall that surrounds the bubble. We point out a similarity to the edges of a quantum Hall state. [1] S. A. Langer, R. E. Goldstein, and D. P. Jackson, Phys. Rev. A 46, 4894 (1992). [2] C. Moutafis, S. Komineas, and J. A. C. Bland, Phys. Rev. B 79, 224429 (2009).

  6. Magnetization reversal of the domain structure in the anti-perovskite nitride Co3FeN investigated by high-resolution X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajiri, T.; Finizio, S.; Vafaee, M.; Kuroki, Y.; Ando, H.; Sakakibara, H.; Kleibert, A.; Howald, L.; Kronast, F.; Ueda, K.; Asano, H.; Kläui, M.

    2016-05-01

    We performed X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) photoemission electron microscopy imaging to reveal the magnetic domain structure of anti-perovskite nitride Co3FeN exhibiting a negative spin polarization. In square and disc patterns, we systematically and quantitatively determined the statistics of the stable states as a function of geometry. By direct imaging during the application of a magnetic field, we revealed the magnetic reversal process in a spatially resolved manner. We compared the hysteresis on the continuous area and the square patterns from the magnetic field-dependent XMCD ratio, which can be explained as resulting from the effect of the shape anisotropy, present in nanostructured thin films.

  7. Nanopatterning of magnetic domains: Fe coverage of self-assembled alumina nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qibin; Wang, Bo -Yao; Lin, Wen -Chin; Gai, Zheng; Lin, Minn -Tsong; Wu, Chii -Bin

    2015-08-19

    Nanosized ultrathin magnetic films were prepared by controlling the deposition of Fe onto an oxidized NiAl(001) surface with an alumina nanostructure on it. Because the ultrathin ferromagnetic Fe films on the bare NiAl(001) surface are separated by paramagnetic Fe nanoparticles on the alumina stripes, as determined by scanning electron microscopy with spin analysis, they form rectangular domains with sizes ranging from tens of nanometer to larger than a micrometer. Furthermore, magnetic domain patterning can thus be achieved by controlling the Fe coverage and nanostructured template.

  8. Electric field driven magnetic domain wall motion in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Laurson, Lasse; Franke, Kévin J. A.; Dijken, Sebastiaan van

    2014-01-06

    We investigate magnetic domain wall (MDW) dynamics induced by applied electric fields in ferromagnetic-ferroelectric thin-film heterostructures. In contrast to conventional driving mechanisms where MDW motion is induced directly by magnetic fields or electric currents, MDW motion arises here as a result of strong pinning of MDWs onto ferroelectric domain walls (FDWs) via local strain coupling. By performing extensive micromagnetic simulations, we find several dynamical regimes, including instabilities such as spin wave emission and complex transformations of the MDW structure. In all cases, the time-averaged MDW velocity equals that of the FDW, indicating the absence of Walker breakdown.

  9. Optical patterning of magnetic domains and defects in ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Andrew J.; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2015-08-01

    A promising approach in designing composite materials with an unusual physical behavior combines solid nanostructures and orientationally ordered soft matter at the mesoscale. Such composites can not only inherit properties of their constituents but also can exhibit emergent behavior such as ferromagnetic ordering of colloidal metal nanoparticles forming mesoscopic magnetization domains when dispersed in a nematic liquid crystal. Here, we demonstrate the optical patterning of domain structures and topological defects in such ferromagnetic liquid crystal colloids, which allows for altering their response to magnetic fields. Our findings reveal the nature of the defects in this soft matter system which is different as compared to non-polar nematics and ferromagnets alike.

  10. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-02-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1-x Si x induced by the influence of an "edge" of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion "Σ7" domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders. PMID:26933690

  11. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1−xSix induced by the influence of an “edge” of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion “Σ7” domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders. PMID:26933690

  12. Massive subchorionic thrombosis followed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Yuki; Okumura, Ryosuke; Tsuji, Natsuki; Nagano, Tadayoshi; Fujimoto, Masakazu; Yamaoka, Toshihide; Kohno, Shigene

    2012-01-01

    Massive subchorionic thrombosis is a rare condition, defined as a large thrombus confined to the subchorionic space. It is associated with poor perinatal prognosis. However, prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is often difficult. We report a case of massive subchorionic thrombosis developing dermatomyositis after the delivery, followed by magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, we review other 4 cases assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging is very useful for confirmation of diagnosis and follow-up in combination with ultrasonography. PMID:22592619

  13. Chaotic dynamics of magnetic domain walls in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivano, A.; Dolocan, V. O.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a transverse domain wall (TDW) in permalloy and nickel nanostrips with two artificially patterned pinning centers is studied numerically up to rf frequencies. The phase diagram frequency-driving amplitude shows a rich variety of dynamical behaviors depending on the material parameters and the type and shape of pinning centers. We find that T-shaped traps (antinotches) create a classical double well Duffing potential that leads to a small chaotic region in the case of nickel and a large one for Py. In contrast, the rectangular constrictions (notches) create an exponential potential that leads to larger chaotic regions interspersed with periodic windows for both Py and Ni. The influence of temperature manifests itself by enlarging the chaotic region and activating thermal jumps between the pinning sites while reducing the depinning field at low frequency in the notched strips.

  14. Domain wall oscillations induced by spin torque in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sbiaa, R.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2015-02-07

    Using micromagnetic simulations, the effects of the non-adiabatic spin torque (β) and the geometry of nanowires on domain wall (DW) dynamics are investigated. For the case of in-plane anisotropy nanowire, it is observed that the type of DW and its dynamics depends on its dimension. For a fixed length, the critical switching current decreases almost exponentially with the width W, while the DW speed becomes faster for larger W. For the case of perpendicular anisotropy nanowire, it was observed that DW dynamics depends strongly on β. For small values of β, oscillations of DW around the center of nanowire were revealed even after the current is switched off. In addition to nanowire geometry and intrinsic material properties, β could provide a way to control DW dynamics.

  15. Coupled domain wall oscillations in magnetic cylindrical nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Murapaka, Chandrasekhar; Goolaup, S.; Purnama, I.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-02-07

    We report on transverse domain wall (DW) dynamics in two closely spaced cylindrical nanowires. The magnetostatically coupled DWs are shown to undergo an intrinsic oscillatory motion along the nanowire length in addition to their default rotational motion. In the absence of external forces, the amplitude of the DW oscillation is governed by the change in the frequency of the DW rotation. It is possible to sustain the DW oscillations by applying spin-polarized current to the nanowires to balance the repulsive magnetostatic coupling. The current density required to sustain the DW oscillation is found to be in the order of 10{sup 5 }A/cm{sup 2}. Morover, our analysis of the oscillation reveals that the DWs in cylindrical nanowires possess a finite mass.

  16. Magnetic properties and domain structures in primary recrystallized thin-gauge Si-Fe with orientation near (110)[001

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, N.; Iwasaki, M. . Technical Development Bureau); Ushigami, Y.; Nozawa, T. . Technical Development Bureau)

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic properties and features of magnetic domain structures of newly developed grain-oriented 15--50 [mu]m thickness 3% Si-Fe with very high permeability were investigated. The induction of these materials was 1.70--1.95 T at 800 A/m. These high inductions developed low core losses. The losses of toroidal cores made of 50 [mu]m thick material were W15/400 = 8 W/kg. Despite very small primary recrystallized grain size, they consist of simple magnetic domains with 180[degree] domain walls and ac magnetization is achieved by simple main domain wall displacement.

  17. Lesion insertion in projection domain for computed tomography image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baiyu; Ma, Chi; Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    To perform task-based image quality assessment in CT, it is desirable to have a large number of realistic patient images with known diagnostic truth. One effective way to achieve this objective is to create hybrid images that combine patient images with simulated lesions. Because conventional hybrid images generated in the image-domain fails to reflect the impact of scan and reconstruction parameters on lesion appearance, this study explored a projection-domain approach. Liver lesion models were forward projected according to the geometry of a commercial CT scanner to acquire lesion projections. The lesion projections were then inserted into patient projections (decoded from commercial CT raw data with the assistance of the vendor) and reconstructed to acquire hybrid images. To validate the accuracy of the forward projection geometry, simulated images reconstructed from the forward projections of a digital ACR phantom were compared to physically acquired ACR phantom images. To validate the hybrid images, lesion models were inserted into patient images and visually assessed. Results showed that the simulated phantom images and the physically acquired phantom images had great similarity in terms of HU accuracy and high-contrast resolution. The lesions in the hybrid image had a realistic appearance and merged naturally into the liver background. In addition, the inserted lesion demonstrated reconstruction-parameter-dependent appearance. Compared to conventional image-domain approach, our method enables more realistic hybrid images for image quality assessment.

  18. In-plane rotation of magnetic stripe domains in Fe1 -xGax thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fin, S.; Tomasello, R.; Bisero, D.; Marangolo, M.; Sacchi, M.; Popescu, H.; Eddrief, M.; Hepburn, C.; Finocchio, G.; Carpentieri, M.; Rettori, A.; Pini, M. G.; Tacchi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The in-plane rotation of magnetic stripe domains in a 65-nm magnetostrictive Fe0.8Ga0.2 epitaxial film was investigated combining magnetic force microscopy, vibration sample magnetometry, and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements. We analyzed the behavior of the stripe pattern under the application of a bias magnetic field along the in-plane direction perpendicular to the stripe axis, and made a comparison with the analogous behavior at remanence. The experimental results have been explained by means of micromagnetic simulations, supported by energy balance considerations. Fields smaller than ˜400 Oe do not induce any stripe rotation; rather, a deformation of the closure domains pattern was evidenced. Larger fields produce a sudden rotation of the stripe structure.

  19. Imaging of isolated magnetic cluster switching in thin CoCrPt films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czoschke, Peter; Nazarov, Alexey V.; McKinlay, Shaun E.; Singleton, Eric W.; Pant, Bharat B.

    2008-04-01

    Thin film permanent magnet materials are a vital component of magnetic recording read elements. However, local variations in the magnetic microstructure inherent in such devices can have numerous consequences on the magnetic state of the films. In this study, magnetic force microscopy is used to image the domains in thin nanocrystalline CoCrPt films that are part of a patterned read sensor device. The films were imaged before and after being subjected to stress fields of 1000-2000Oe (less than the sheet-film coercivity of the CoCrPt) transverse to the original magnet set direction. Subtraction of the images reveals that the magnetization of isolated magnetic clusters irreversibly rotates in the film. These data show that the mechanism for net moment rotation in such films is not a uniform grain moment rotation. The change in net magnetization occurs in discrete local moment switching similar to Barkhausen jumps, where moments of weakly coupled grains irreversibly rotate at fields that are lower than the bulk coercive field of the film. This technique yields a two-dimensional map of grain moment rotations from which such weak grains can be identified.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiac amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Bott-Silverman, C.; Feiglin, D.H.; Salcedo, E.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Primary amyloidosis (AL) involves the myocardium in 90% of cases and may present as apparent ischemia, vascular disease, or congestive heart failure. Two-dimensional echocardiography (echo) has proven useful in the diagnosis, particularly in differentiating AL from constrictive pericarditis. The findings of thickened RV and LV myocardium, normal LV cavity dimension, and a diffuse hyperrefractile ''granular sparkling'' appearance are virtually diagnostic. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may improve the resolution of anatomic changes seen in cardiac AL and has the potential to provide more specific information based on biochemical tissue alterations. In this preliminary study, the authors obtained both MR and echo images in six patients with AL and biopsy-proven myocardial involvement. 5/6 patients also had Tc-99 PYP myocardial studies including emission tomography (SPECT). MR studies utilized a 0.6 Tesla superconductive magnet. End diastolic gated images were obtained with TE=30msec and TR=R-R interval on the ECG. 6/6 pts. showed LV wall thickening which was concentric and included the septum. Papillary muscles were identified in all and were enlarged in 3/6. 4/6 pts. showed RV wall thickening but to a lesser degree than LV. Pericardial effusions were present in 4 cases. These findings correlated well with the results of echo although MR gave better RV free wall resolution. PYP scans were positive in 3 pts. but there was no correlation with degree of LV thickening. The authors conclude that there are no identifiable MR findings in patients with cardiac AL which encourage further attempts to characterize myocardial involvement by measurement of MR relaxation times in vivo.

  1. Magnetic domain wall propagation in a submicron spin-valve stripe: Influence of the pinned layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briones, J.; Montaigne, F.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Carey, M. J.; Childress, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The propagation of a domain wall in a submicron ferromagnetic spin-valve stripe is investigated using giant magnetoresistance. A notch in the stripe efficiently traps an injected wall stopping the domain propagation. The authors show that the magnetic field at which the wall is depinned displays a stochastic nature. Moreover, the depinning statistics are significantly different for head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls. This is attributed to the dipolar field generated in the vicinity of the notch by the pinned layer of the spin valve.

  2. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Biederer, J; Heussel, C P; Puderbach, M; Wielpuetz, M O

    2014-02-01

    Beyond being a substitute for X-ray, computed tomography, and scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inherently combines morphologic and functional information more than any other technology. Lung perfusion: The most established method is first-pass contrast-enhanced imaging with bolus injection of gadolinium chelates and time-resolved gradient-echo (GRE) sequences covering the whole lung (1 volume/s). Images are evaluated visually or semiquantitatively, while absolute quantification remains challenging due to the nonlinear relation of T1-shortening and contrast material concentration. Noncontrast-enhanced perfusion imaging is still experimental, either based on arterial spin labeling or Fourier decomposition. The latter is used to separate high- and low-frequency oscillations of lung signal related to the effects of pulsatile blood flow. Lung ventilation: Using contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion, lung ventilation deficits are indirectly identified by hypoxic vasoconstriction. More direct but still experimental approaches use either inhalation of pure oxygen, an aerosolized contrast agent, or hyperpolarized noble gases. Fourier decomposition MRI based on the low-frequency lung signal oscillation allows for visualization of ventilation without any contrast agent. Respiratory mechanics: Time-resolved series with high background signal such as GRE or steady-state free precession visualize the movement of chest wall, diaphragm, mediastinum, lung tissue, tracheal wall, and tumor. The assessment of volume changes allows drawing conclusions on regional ventilation. With this arsenal of functional imaging capabilities at high spatial and temporal resolution but without radiation burden, MRI will find its role in regional functional lung analysis and will therefore overcome the sensitivity of global lung function analysis for repeated short-term treatment monitoring. PMID:24481761

  3. Formation and structure of 360 and 540 degree domain walls in thin magnetic stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Youngman; Bowden, S. R.; Mascaro, Mark; Unguris, J.; Ross, C. A.

    2012-02-01

    360°, 540°, and other complex transverse domain walls have been created in narrow cobalt wires connected to injection pads by cycling a magnetic field perpendicular to the wire length. The composite walls, formed by impingement of 180° transverse walls of alternating chirality, are stable over a wide field range. The structure of the walls observed at remanence by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis and by magnetic force microscopy is in good quantitative agreement with the prediction of micromagnetic simulations.

  4. Movement of magnetic domain walls induced by single femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandig, O.; Shokr, Y. A.; Vogel, J.; Valencia, S.; Kronast, F.; Kuch, W.

    2016-08-01

    We present a microscopic investigation of how the magnetic domain structure in ultrathin films changes after direct excitation by single ultrashort laser pulses. Using photoelectron emission microscopy in combination with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in the resonant absorption of soft x rays, we find that individual laser pulses of ≈60 fs duration and a central wavelength of 800 nm lead to clear changes in the domain structure of a Co layer of three atomic monolayers thickness in an epitaxial Co/Cu/Ni trilayer on a Cu(001) single-crystal substrate. A relatively small enhancement of the sample base temperature by 40 K is sufficient to lower the threshold of laser fluence for domain wall motion by about a factor of two. Pump-probe measurements with a laser fluence just below this threshold indicate that the laser-induced demagnetization of the sample is far from complete in these experiments. Although the domain wall motion appears similar to thermal domain wall fluctuations, quantitatively it cannot be explained by pure thermal activation of domain wall motion by the transient rise of sample temperature after the laser pulse, but it is likely to be triggered by a laser-induced depinning of domain walls.

  5. Geometrically pinned magnetic domain wall for multi-bit per cell storage memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, M. Al; Sbiaa, R.

    2016-06-01

    Spintronic devices currently rely on magnetic switching or controlled motion of domain walls (DWs) by an external magnetic field or a spin-polarized current. Controlling the position of DW is essential for defining the state/information in a magnetic memory. During the process of nanowire fabrication, creating an off-set of two parts of the device could help to pin DW at a precise position. Micromagnetic simulation conducted on in-plane magnetic anisotropy materials shows the effectiveness of the proposed design for pinning DW at the nanoconstriction region. The critical current for moving DW from one state to the other is strongly dependent on nanoconstricted region (width and length) and the magnetic properties of the material. The DW speed which is essential for fast writing of the data could reach values in the range of hundreds m/s. Furthermore, evidence of multi-bit per cell memory is demonstrated via a magnetic nanowire with more than one constriction.

  6. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Peng, Bin; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging structured reporting in infertility.

    PubMed

    Montoliu-Fornas, Guillermina; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to define and propose a standardized magnetic resonance (MR) imaging structured report in patients with infertility to have clinical completeness on possible diagnosis and severity. Patients should be studied preferable on 3T equipment with a surface coil. Standard MR protocol should include high-resolution fast spin-echo T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted images and gradient-echo T1-weighted fat suppression images. The report should include ovaries (polycystic, endometrioma, tumor), oviduct (hydrosalpinx, hematosalpinx, pyosalpinx, peritubal anomalies), uterus (agenesia, hypoplasia, unicornuate, uterus didelphys, bicornuate, septate uterus), myometrium (leiomyomas, adenomyosis), endometrium (polyps, synechia, atrophy, neoplasia), cervix and vagina (isthmoceles, mucosal-parietal irregularity, stenosis, neoplasia), peritoneum (deep endometriosis), and urinary system-associated abnormalities. To be clinically useful, radiology reports must be structured, use standardized terminology, and convey actionable information. The structured report must comprise complete, comprehensive, and accurate information, allowing radiologists to continuously interact with patients and referring physicians to confirm that the information is used properly to affect the decision making process. PMID:27105717

  8. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2003-07-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed.

  10. Stereotactic localization using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Walton, L; Hampshire, A; Forster, D M; Kemeny, A A

    1995-01-01

    A phantom study has been carried out to assess the accuracy of stereotactic localisation, using magnetic resonance imaging. The stereotactic coordinates of an array of Perspex rods within the phantom were determined and compared with measured values, in a series of transverse, coronal and sagittal images. In the transverse plane, the maximum errors experienced were X = 2.3 mm and Y = 10.7 mm. If the third fiducial plate, at the front of the frame, were not used in the scaling of the images, there was considerable improvement in the Y direction (maximum error Y = 2.1 mm). However, some deterioration in the accuracy in the X direction resulted, particularly at the extremes of Z (maximum error X = 3.5 mm). In the coronal plane, the maximum errors were X = 1.8 mm and Z = 8.0 mm. With the third plate off, the errors decreased to X = 1.9 mm and Z = 3.3 mm. In the sagittal plane, the maximum errors recorded were Y = 1.1 mm and Z = 7.5 mm. It is not possible to calibrate in this plane without the third plate. PMID:8584823

  11. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Imaging Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobukai, Saho; Baheza, Richard; Cobb, Jared G.; Virostko, Jack; Xie, Jingping; Gillman, Amelie; Koktysh, Dmitry; Kerns, Denny; Does, Mark; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIOs) nanoparticles and investigate the migration of SPIO-labeled dendritic cells (DCs) in a syngeneic mouse model using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The size of the dextran-coated SPIO is roughly 30 nm, and the DCs are capable of independent uptake of these particles, although not at levels comparable to particle uptake in the presence of a transfecting reagent. On average, with the assistance of polylysine, the particles were efficiently delivered inside DCs within one hour of incubation. The SPIO particles occupy approximately 0.35% of cell surface and are equivalent to 34.6 pg of iron per cell. In vivo imaging demonstrated that the labeled cells migrated from the injection site in the footpad to the corresponding popliteal lymph node. The homing of labeled cells in the lymph nodes resulted in a signal drop of up to 79%. Furthermore, labeling DCs with SPIO particles did not compromise cell function, we demonstrated that SPIO-enhanced MR imaging can be used to track the migration of DCs effectively in vivo. Magn Reson Med 63:1383–1390, 2010. PMID:20432309

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Guneyli, Serkan; Ward, Emily; Thomas, Stephen; Yousuf, Ambereen Nehal; Trilisky, Igor; Peng, Yahui; Antic, Tatjana; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in middle-aged and older men and negatively affects the quality of life. An ultrasound classification for BPH based on a previous pathologic classification was reported, and the types of BPH were classified according to different enlargement locations in the prostate. Afterwards, this classification was demonstrated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The classification of BPH is important, as patients with different types of BPH can have different symptoms and treatment options. BPH types on MRI are as follows: type 0, an equal to or less than 25 cm3 prostate showing little or no zonal enlargements; type 1, bilateral transition zone (TZ) enlargement; type 2, retrourethral enlargement; type 3, bilateral TZ and retrourethral enlargement; type 4, pedunculated enlargement; type 5, pedunculated with bilateral TZ and/or retrourethral enlargement; type 6, subtrigonal or ectopic enlargement; type 7, other combinations of enlargements. We retrospectively evaluated MRI images of BPH patients who were histologically diagnosed and presented the different types of BPH on MRI. MRI, with its advantage of multiplanar imaging and superior soft tissue contrast resolution, can be used in BPH patients for differentiation of BPH from prostate cancer, estimation of zonal and entire prostatic volumes, determination of the stromal/glandular ratio, detection of the enlargement locations, and classification of BPH types which may be potentially helpful in choosing the optimal treatment. PMID:27015442

  13. From exchange coupling to magnetic memory: how domains remember at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Karine; Nelson, Joseph; Fullerton, Eric; Carey, Matt; Kevan, Steve

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic memory, the ability of a material to remember its magnetic domain configuration throughout magnetization, offers potential technological interest for the data storage industry. One way to quantify the magnetic memory is to use Coherent X-ray Resonant Magnetic Scattering (XRMS), at synchrotron facilities. The light is tuned to resonant edges to optimize the magneto-optical contrast. When illuminated by coherent beam, the sample produces speckle patterns. Our approach is to cross-correlate patterns recorded at different field values throughout the magnetization cycle, and at different temperatures. We have studied the return point memory (RPM) that characterizes the memory after a full cycle, and developed a q-selective correlation analysis to study the spatial dependency of the memory. We will give here an overview of different type of memory behaviors, first showing disorder induced memory in thin CoPt films and influence of roughness, then demonstrating the ability to control the magnetic memory by inducing exchange bias (1). We will see how the local exchange couplings pin the magnetic domain in the ferromagnetic layer and lead the large memory enhancement at different spatial scales and under different field cooling conditions. (1) K.Chesnel et al, PRB 78, 132409 (2008)

  14. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L.; Alejos, Ó.; Martínez, E.; Muñoz, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current.

  15. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis), tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis) and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy). In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis), and the spine (spondylitis). In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27446601

  16. Content-based image retrieval in homomorphic encryption domain.

    PubMed

    Bellafqira, Reda; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Bouslimi, Dalel; Quellec, Gwenole

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a secure implementation of a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) method that makes possible diagnosis aid systems to work in externalized environment and with outsourced data as in cloud computing. This one works with homomorphic encrypted images from which it extracts wavelet based image features next used for subsequent image comparison. By doing so, our system allows a physician to retrieve the most similar images to a query image in an outsourced database while preserving data confidentiality. Our Secure CBIR is the first one that proposes to work with global image features extracted from encrypted images and does not induce extra communications in-between the client and the server. Experimental results show it achieves retrieval performance as good as if images were processed non-encrypted. PMID:26736909

  17. Magnetic microscopy and topological stability of homochiral Néel domain walls in a Pt/Co/AlOx trilayer

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, M. J.; Hrabec, A.; Mihai, A. P.; Moore, T. A.; Burnell, G.; McGrouther, D.; Marrows, C. H.; McVitie, S.

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic magnetization variation in magnetic domain walls in thin films is a crucial property when considering the torques driving their dynamic behaviour. For films possessing out-of-plane anisotropy normally the presence of Néel walls is not favoured due to magnetostatic considerations. However, they have the right structure to respond to the torques exerted by the spin Hall effect. Their existence is an indicator of the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI). Here we present direct imaging of Néel domain walls with a fixed chirality in device-ready Pt/Co/AlOx films using Lorentz transmission electron and Kerr microscopies. It is shown that any independently nucleated pair of walls in our films form winding pairs when they meet that are difficult to annihilate with field, confirming that they all possess the same topological winding number. The latter is enforced by the DMI. The field required to annihilate these winding wall pairs is used to give a measure of the DMI strength. Such domain walls, which are robust against collisions with each other, are good candidates for dense data storage. PMID:26642936

  18. Magnetic microscopy and topological stability of homochiral Néel domain walls in a Pt/Co/AlOx trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez, M. J.; Hrabec, A.; Mihai, A. P.; Moore, T. A.; Burnell, G.; McGrouther, D.; Marrows, C. H.; McVitie, S.

    2015-12-01

    The microscopic magnetization variation in magnetic domain walls in thin films is a crucial property when considering the torques driving their dynamic behaviour. For films possessing out-of-plane anisotropy normally the presence of Néel walls is not favoured due to magnetostatic considerations. However, they have the right structure to respond to the torques exerted by the spin Hall effect. Their existence is an indicator of the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Here we present direct imaging of Néel domain walls with a fixed chirality in device-ready Pt/Co/AlOx films using Lorentz transmission electron and Kerr microscopies. It is shown that any independently nucleated pair of walls in our films form winding pairs when they meet that are difficult to annihilate with field, confirming that they all possess the same topological winding number. The latter is enforced by the DMI. The field required to annihilate these winding wall pairs is used to give a measure of the DMI strength. Such domain walls, which are robust against collisions with each other, are good candidates for dense data storage.

  19. Changes in magnetic domain structure during twin boundary motion in single crystal Ni-Mn-Ga exhibiting magnetic shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopecký, V.; Fekete, L.; Perevertov, O.; Heczko, O.

    2016-05-01

    The complexity of Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal originates from the interplay between ferromagnetic domain structure and ferroelastic twinned microstructure. Magnetic domain structure in the vicinity of single twin boundary was studied using magneto-optical indicator film and magnetic force microscopy technique. The single twin boundary of Type I was formed mechanically and an initial magnetization state in both variants were restored by local application of magnetic field (≈40 kA/m). The differently oriented variants exhibited either stripe or labyrinth magnetic domain pattern in agreement with the uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the martensite. The twin boundary was then moved by compressive or tensile stress. The passage of the boundary resulted in the formation of granular or rake domains, respectively. Additionally, the specific magnetic domains pattern projected by twin boundary gradually vanished during twin boundary motion.

  20. Stripe-to-bubble transition of magnetic domains at the spin reorientation of (Fe/Ni)/Cu/Ni/Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Choi, J.; Won, C.; Wu, Y. Z.; Scholl, A.; Doran, A.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z.

    2010-06-09

    Magnetic domain evolution at the spin reorientation transition (SRT) of (Fe/Ni)/Cu/Ni/Cu(001) is investigated using photoemission electron microscopy. While the (Fe/Ni) layer exhibits the SRT, the interlayer coupling of the perpendicularly magnetized Ni layer to the (Fe/Ni) layer serves as a virtual perpendicular magnetic field exerted on the (Fe/Ni) layer. We find that the perpendicular virtual magnetic field breaks the up-down symmetry of the (Fe/Ni) stripe domains to induce a net magnetization in the normal direction of the film. Moreover, as the virtual magnetic field increases to exceed a critical field, the stripe domain phase evolves into a bubble domain phase. Although the critical field depends on the Fe film thickness, we show that the area fraction of the minority domain exhibits a universal value that determines the stripe-to-bubble phase transition.

  1. Annealing effects on the microstructure and magnetic domain structures of duplex stainless steel studied by in situ technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. Q.; Zhao, X. M.; Li, M.; Zhang, W. J.; Bai, Y.; Qiao, L. J.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of annealing temperature on the microstructure and the magnetic domain structures of duplex stainless steel 2507 were investigated by the magnetic force microscopy (MFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The MFM and XRD results indicated that the volume fraction of ferrite phase increased with increasing annealing temperature, but the lattice constants kept constant. Moreover, with the rise of annealing temperature, the magnetic domain structure in the ferrite phase varied gradually, where the magnetic domain became thinner and the distribution turned more homogeneous. These results gave a direct evidence for the changes of microstructure and magnetic domain structure induced by the annealing treatment. EBSD analysis showed that the orientation of ferrite grains changed after annealing treatments, which coincided with the changes of the microstructure and the magnetic domain structures.

  2. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric practice

    PubMed Central

    Köşüş, Aydın; Köşüş, Nermin; Usluoğulları, Betül; Duran, Müzeyyen; Turhan, Nilgün Öztürk; Tekşam, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary imaging method for prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities since its discovery. Although it is the primary method of fetal imaging, it cannot provide sufficient information about the fetus in some conditions such as maternal obesity, oligohydramnios and engagement of the fetal head. At this stage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitates examination by providing more specific information. The need and importance of fetal MRI applications further increased by the intrauterine surgery which is currently gaining popularity. Some advantages of fetal MRI over USG are the good texture of contrast, a greater study area and visualization of the lesion and neighbourhood relations, independence of the operators. Also it is not affected by maternal obesity and severe oligohydramnios. However, MRI is inadequate in detecting fetal limb and cardiac abnormalities when compared to USG. MRI is not used routinely in pregnancy. It is used in situations where nonionizing imaging methods are inadequate or ionizing radiation is required in pregnant women. It is not recommended during the first trimester. Contrast agent (Godalinium) is not used during pregnancy. It is believed that MRI is not harmful to the fetus, although the biological risk of MRI application is not known. MRI technique is superior to USG in the detection of corpus callosum dysgenesis, third-trimester evaluation of posterior fossa malformations, bilateral renal agenesis, diaphragmatic hernia and assessment of lung maturation. Especially, it is the method of choice for evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities. Fetal MRI has a complementary role with USG. It provides important information for prenatal diagnosis, increases diagnostic accuracy, and in turn affects the prenatal treatment, prenatal interventions and birth plan. PMID:24591956

  3. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging in obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    Köşüş, Aydın; Köşüş, Nermin; Usluoğulları, Betül; Duran, Müzeyyen; Turhan, Nilgün Öztürk; Tekşam, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography (USG) is the primary imaging method for prenatal diagnosis of fetal abnormalities since its discovery. Although it is the primary method of fetal imaging, it cannot provide sufficient information about the fetus in some conditions such as maternal obesity, oligohydramnios and engagement of the fetal head. At this stage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilitates examination by providing more specific information. The need and importance of fetal MRI applications further increased by the intrauterine surgery which is currently gaining popularity. Some advantages of fetal MRI over USG are the good texture of contrast, a greater study area and visualization of the lesion and neighbourhood relations, independence of the operators. Also it is not affected by maternal obesity and severe oligohydramnios. However, MRI is inadequate in detecting fetal limb and cardiac abnormalities when compared to USG. MRI is not used routinely in pregnancy. It is used in situations where nonionizing imaging methods are inadequate or ionizing radiation is required in pregnant women. It is not recommended during the first trimester. Contrast agent (Godalinium) is not used during pregnancy. It is believed that MRI is not harmful to the fetus, although the biological risk of MRI application is not known. MRI technique is superior to USG in the detection of corpus callosum dysgenesis, third-trimester evaluation of posterior fossa malformations, bilateral renal agenesis, diaphragmatic hernia and assessment of lung maturation. Especially, it is the method of choice for evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities. Fetal MRI has a complementary role with USG. It provides important information for prenatal diagnosis, increases diagnostic accuracy, and in turn affects the prenatal treatment, prenatal interventions and birth plan. PMID:24591956

  4. Small Animal Imaging with Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Driehuys, Bastiaan; Nouls, John; Badea, Alexandra; Bucholz, Elizabeth; Ghaghada, Ketan; Petiet, Alexandra; Hedlund, Laurence W.

    2009-01-01

    Small animal magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) has evolved significantly from testing the boundaries of imaging physics to its expanding use today as a tool in non-invasive biomedical investigations. This review is intended to capture the state-of-the-art in MRM for scientists who may be unfamiliar with this modality, but who want to apply its capabilities to their research. We therefore include a brief review of MR concepts and methods of animal handling and support before covering a range of MRM applications including the heart, lung, brain, and the emerging field of MR histology. High-resolution anatomical imaging reveals increasingly exquisite detail in healthy animals and subtle architectural aberrations that occur in genetically altered models. Resolution of 100 µm in all dimensions is now routinely attained in living animals, and 10 µm3 is feasible in fixed specimens. Such images almost rival conventional histology while allowing the object to be viewed interactively in any plane. MRM is now increasingly used to provide functional information in living animals. Images of the beating heart, breathing lung, and functioning brain can be recorded. While clinical MRI focuses on diagnosis, MRM is used to reveal fundamental biology or to non-invasively measure subtle changes in the structure or function of organs during disease progression or in response to experimental therapies. The ability of MRM to provide a detailed functional and anatomical picture in rats and mice, and to track this picture over time, makes it a promising platform with broad applications in biomedical research. PMID:18172332

  5. A magnetic anti-cancer compound for magnet-guided delivery and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Haruki; Umemura, Masanari; Kurotani, Reiko; Fukumura, Hidenobu; Sato, Itaru; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Hoshino, Yujiro; Lee, Jin; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Sato, Motohiko; Hirata, Kunio; Singh, David J.; Masuda, Takatsugu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Urano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Keiichiro; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sato, Mamoru; Inoue, Seiichi; Aoki, Ichio; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Research on controlled drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy has focused mainly on ways to deliver existing anti-cancer drug compounds to specified targets, e.g., by conjugating them with magnetic particles or encapsulating them in micelles. Here, we show that an iron-salen, i.e., μ-oxo N,N'- bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine iron (Fe(Salen)), but not other metal salen derivatives, intrinsically exhibits both magnetic character and anti-cancer activity. X-Ray crystallographic analysis and first principles calculations based on the measured structure support this. It promoted apoptosis of various cancer cell lines, likely, via production of reactive oxygen species. In mouse leg tumor and tail melanoma models, Fe(Salen) delivery with magnet caused a robust decrease in tumor size, and the accumulation of Fe(Salen) was visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Fe(Salen) is an anti-cancer compound with magnetic property, which is suitable for drug delivery and imaging. We believe such magnetic anti-cancer drugs have the potential to greatly advance cancer chemotherapy for new theranostics and drug-delivery strategies. PMID:25779357

  6. A magnetic anti-cancer compound for magnet-guided delivery and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Haruki; Umemura, Masanari; Kurotani, Reiko; Fukumura, Hidenobu; Sato, Itaru; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Hoshino, Yujiro; Lee, Jin; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Sato, Motohiko; Hirata, Kunio; Singh, David J; Masuda, Takatsugu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Urano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Keiichiro; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sato, Mamoru; Inoue, Seiichi; Aoki, Ichio; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Research on controlled drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy has focused mainly on ways to deliver existing anti-cancer drug compounds to specified targets, e.g., by conjugating them with magnetic particles or encapsulating them in micelles. Here, we show that an iron-salen, i.e., μ-oxo N,N'- bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine iron (Fe(Salen)), but not other metal salen derivatives, intrinsically exhibits both magnetic character and anti-cancer activity. X-Ray crystallographic analysis and first principles calculations based on the measured structure support this. It promoted apoptosis of various cancer cell lines, likely, via production of reactive oxygen species. In mouse leg tumor and tail melanoma models, Fe(Salen) delivery with magnet caused a robust decrease in tumor size, and the accumulation of Fe(Salen) was visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Fe(Salen) is an anti-cancer compound with magnetic property, which is suitable for drug delivery and imaging. We believe such magnetic anti-cancer drugs have the potential to greatly advance cancer chemotherapy for new theranostics and drug-delivery strategies. PMID:25779357

  7. A magnetic anti-cancer compound for magnet-guided delivery and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Haruki; Umemura, Masanari; Kurotani, Reiko; Fukumura, Hidenobu; Sato, Itaru; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Hoshino, Yujiro; Lee, Jin; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Sato, Motohiko; Hirata, Kunio; Singh, David J.; Masuda, Takatsugu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Urano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Keiichiro; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sato, Mamoru; Inoue, Seiichi; Aoki, Ichio; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-01

    Research on controlled drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy has focused mainly on ways to deliver existing anti-cancer drug compounds to specified targets, e.g., by conjugating them with magnetic particles or encapsulating them in micelles. Here, we show that an iron-salen, i.e., μ-oxo N,N'- bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine iron (Fe(Salen)), but not other metal salen derivatives, intrinsically exhibits both magnetic character and anti-cancer activity. X-Ray crystallographic analysis and first principles calculations based on the measured structure support this. It promoted apoptosis of various cancer cell lines, likely, via production of reactive oxygen species. In mouse leg tumor and tail melanoma models, Fe(Salen) delivery with magnet caused a robust decrease in tumor size, and the accumulation of Fe(Salen) was visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Fe(Salen) is an anti-cancer compound with magnetic property, which is suitable for drug delivery and imaging. We believe such magnetic anti-cancer drugs have the potential to greatly advance cancer chemotherapy for new theranostics and drug-delivery strategies.

  8. Direct imaging of domain wall interactions in Ni80Fe20 planar nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T. J.; Bryan, M. T.; Fry, P. W.; Fundi, P. M.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Allwood, D. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2010-01-18

    We have investigated magnetostatic interactions between domain walls in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar nanowires using magnetic soft x-ray microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. In addition to significant monopole-like attraction and repulsion effects we observe that there is coupling of the magnetization configurations of the walls. This is explained in terms of an interaction energy that depends not only on the distance between the walls, but also upon their internal magnetization structure.

  9. Evaluation of Experimental Concepts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snehota, M.; Cislerova, M.; Gao Amin, M. H.; Hall, L. D.

    2003-04-01

    Laboratory experiments on undisturbed soil cores are an invaluable source of information in the field of soil hydraulics. Good definition of the flow domain and freedom in selection of boundary conditions are the major advantages. In the current study the infiltration-outflow experiments were continuously scanned by the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The experimental concept was based on the vertical downward flow through an undisturbed soil core [Snehota et al., 2002]. The constant pressure was applied at the top surface of the sample by a customized infiltration disc. The tension infiltrations are arranged using the NYBOLT membrane attached. For small positive pressure head (ponded infiltration) the same disc was used with few modifications. At the bottom, the support perforated plate is considered as a seepage face boundary condition. Inflow, outflow and important pressures were recorded by the data acquisition system. Three soil cores of coarse sandy loam soil (Korkusova Hut, Czech Republic) were studied. The set of experiments was performed in the whole-body MR unit. The imaging involved the low-resolution vertical 2D projection of rapid changes during transient parts of an experiment. Horizontal 2D imaging was performed across the whole sample volume during the steady state and the equilibrium stages. MR properties of studied soil allow visualizing water in large pores. Due to high heterogeneity of the soil under study the preferential flow prevails close to saturation. Similar patterns came out from dye tracer experiment. As the result, the MR images were obtained together with the hydraulic and mass balance measurements. In analyzed experiments, the MR signal distribution changes appeared to be higher in the upper part of the sample, as the result of the change in the upper boundary condition. Flow through the bottom of the sample seemed to be restricted by the hydraulics of the support plate. Based on MR imaging analyses modifications at the bottom

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of heterotaxis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoeckelhuber, Beate M; Eckey, Thomas; Buchholz, Michael; Kapsimalakou, Smaragda; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild

    2008-12-20

    Failure to establish normal left-right body axis (LRA) formation during embryogenesis results in heterotaxis, a multi-malformation syndrome. We report on a 20-year-old young woman who presented to the emergency room with upper abdominal pain. On chest X-ray, dextrocardia was noted. Ultrasound was inconclusive. Barium studies demonstrated non-rotation of the intestine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen confirmed heterotaxis with abnormal arrangement of abdominal organs and vasculature. This is the first radiographic description of LRA in MRI. It provides a unique contribution to the wide morphological variety of lateralization defects in a single examination within 15 min and without the risks of ionizing radiation. In addition, a literature overview over the genetic aspects, broad morphological spectrum, and possible therapeutic consequences is given. PMID:18835766

  11. [Prostate biopsy under magnetic resonance imaging guidance].

    PubMed

    Kuplevatskiy, V I; CherkashiN, M A; Roshchin, D A; Berezina, N A; Vorob'ev, N A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most important problems in modern oncology. According to statistical data, PC ranks second in the cancer morbidity structure in the Russian Federation and developed countries and its prevalence has been progressively increasing over the past decade. A need for early diagnosis and maximally accurate morphological verification of the diagnosis in difficult clinical cases (inconvenient tumor location for standard transrectal biopsy; gland scarring changes concurrent with prostatitis and hemorrhage; threshold values of prostate-specific antigen with unclear changes in its doubling per unit time; suspicion of biochemical recurrence or clinical tumor progression after special treatment) leads to revised diagnostic algorithms and clinically introduced new high-tech invasive diagnostic methods. This paper gives the first analysis of literature data on Russian practice using one of the new methods to verify prostate cancer (transrectal prostate cancer under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance). The have sought the 1995-2015 data in the MEDLINE and Pubmed. PMID:27192773

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Perianal Fistula.

    PubMed

    Tolan, Damian J M

    2016-08-01

    Perianal fistulas and other inflammatory diseases of the anus and perianal soft tissues are a cause of substantial morbidity, and are a major part of the practice of any colorectal surgeon. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a key role in the assessment of patients for the extent of fistulizing Crohn disease, complications related to fistulas, and to assist in confirming the diagnosis or proposing an alternative. Technique is critical and in particular, the selection of sequences for diagnosis and characterization of abnormalities with the main choices being between standard anatomical sequences (T1 or T2), assessing for edema (FS T2 or STIR), assessing abnormal contrast enhancement (FS T1), and assessing for abnormal diffusion or a combination of these. Guidance on MRI sequence selection, classification of fistulas, the current guidance on the role of MRI in assessing patients, and advice on how to provide useful structured reports, as well as how to detect complications of perianal sepsis are included. PMID:27342895

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hash, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords high-resolution visualization of the soft tissue structures (menisci, ligaments, cartilage, etc) and bone marrow of the knee. Evidence Acquisition: Pertinent clinical and research articles in the orthopaedic and radiology literature over the past 30 years using PubMed. Results: Ligament tears can be accurately assessed with MRI, but distinguishing partial tears from ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be challenging. Determining the extent of a partial tear is often extremely difficult to accurately assess. The status of the posterolateral corner structures, menisci, and cartilage can be accurately evaluated, although limitations in the evaluation of certain structures exist. Patellofemoral joint, marrow, tibiofibular joint, and synovial pathology can supplement physical examination findings and provide definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: MRI provides an accurate noninvasive assessment of knee pathology. PMID:24381701

  14. Nanoscale Imaging of Caveolin-1 Membrane Domains In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, Kristin A.; Kim, Dahan; Kim, Carol H.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy enables noninvasive imaging of fluorescent species in biological specimens, but resolution is generally limited by diffraction to ~200–250 nm. Many biological processes occur on smaller length scales, highlighting the importance of techniques that can image below the diffraction limit and provide valuable single-molecule information. In recent years, imaging techniques have been developed which can achieve resolution below the diffraction limit. Utilizing one such technique, fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy (FPALM), we demonstrated its ability to construct super-resolution images from single molecules in a living zebrafish embryo, expanding the realm of previous super-resolution imaging to a living vertebrate organism. We imaged caveolin-1 in vivo, in living zebrafish embryos. Our results demonstrate the successful image acquisition of super-resolution images in a living vertebrate organism, opening several opportunities to answer more dynamic biological questions in vivo at the previously inaccessible nanoscale. PMID:25646724

  15. Fast domain wall propagation under an optimal field pulse in magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Z; Schliemann, J

    2010-01-22

    We investigate field-driven domain wall (DW) propagation in magnetic nanowires in the framework of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new strategy to speed up the DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire by using an optimal space-dependent field pulse synchronized with the DW propagation. Depending on the damping parameter, the DW velocity can be increased by about 2 orders of magnitude compared to the standard case of a static uniform field. Moreover, under the optimal field pulse, the change in total magnetic energy in the nanowire is proportional to the DW velocity, implying that rapid energy release is essential for fast DW propagation. PMID:20366681

  16. Depinning field of domain walls with a misaligned grain boundary in iron-based soft magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Keisuke; Irie, Shota; Murayama, Soh; Nakatani, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    We report on the domain wall (DW) depinning in an iron-based soft magnet with a misaligned grain boundary (GB) using micromagnetic simulations. The results show that the depinning magnetic field decreases with increasing roughness of the misaligned GB. This effect can be explained from the ratio of the overlapping areas of the GB to the DW when the DW is depinned from the GB. The results presented here offer a promising route to the design of soft magnets to decrease coercive force.

  17. Magnetic domain wall manipulation in (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures for spintronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Figielski, Tadeusz; Olender, Karolina; Wrobel, Jerzy

    2014-02-21

    Ring-shaped nanostructures have been designed and fabricated by electron-beam lithography patterning and chemical etching from thin epitaxial layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. The nanostructures, in a form of planar rings with a slit, were supplied with four electrical terminals and subjected to magneto-transport studies under planar weak magnetic field. Magnetoresistive effects caused by manipulation of magnetic domain walls and magnetization reversal in the nanostructures have been investigated and possible applications of the nanostructures as four-terminal spintronic devices are discussed.

  18. An x-space magnetic particle imaging scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwill, Patrick W.; Lu, Kuan; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an imaging modality with great promise for high-contrast, high-sensitivity imaging of iron oxide tracers in animals and humans. In this paper, we present the first x-space MPI hardware and reconstruction software; show experimentally measured signals; detail our reconstruction technique; and present images of resolution and "angiography" phantoms.

  19. Image watermarking extraction using Fourier domain Wiener filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, Philip; Pavlidis, Marios; Panwar, Ankit; Nnamadim, Ozoemena; Kypraios, Ioannis; Mitra, Bhargav; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2008-03-01

    Digital watermarking is a vital process for protecting the copyright of images. This paper presents a method of embedding a private robust watermark into a digital image. The full complex form the Wiener filter is used to extract the signal from the watermarked image. This is shown to outperform the more conventional approximate notation. The results are shown to be extremely noise insensitive.

  20. Co-registration of ultrasound and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar images and image improvement for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the co-registration of ultrasound (US) and frequency domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) images with significant image improvement from applying image normalization, filtering and amplification techniques. Achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial Ultrasound instrument could accelerate clinical acceptance and use. Experimental results presented demonstrate live animal testing and show enhancements in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast and spatial resolution. The co-registered image produced from the US and phase PA images, provides more information than both images independently.