Science.gov

Sample records for magnetic field calculations

  1. A self-consistent calculation of rotating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, J.L.; Glassman, A.J.; Moses, K.G.; Quon, B.H.

    1986-07-01

    A self-consistent method is described for determining the static magnetic-field reduction in a magnetized plasma with a specified density profile by radio-frequency (rf)-driven rotating magnetic fields (RMFs). Electron-ion collisions and transport losses are included in the analysis. Application of RMF current drive to tandem mirrors and rotomak reactors is considered. The results of the calculations show that magnetic wells can be produced in mirror configurations, and reversal of applied static magnetic fields can be generated in rotomark geometrics by RMF for modest investments of rf power at frequencies for which the rf technology is economically attractive.

  2. Solenoid magnetic fields calculated from superposed semi-infinite solenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Flax, L.

    1966-01-01

    Calculation of a thick solenoid coils magnetic field components is made by a superposition of the fields produced by four solenoids of infinite length and zero inner radius. The field produced by this semi-infinite solenoid is dependent on only two variables, the radial and axial field point coordinates.

  3. [Magnetic field numerical calculation and analysis for magnetic coupling of centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulation].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Lu, Lijun; Zhang, Tianyi; Chen, Zhenglong; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-01

    This paper mainly studies the driving system of centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulation, with the core being disc magnetic coupling. Structure parameters of disc magnetic coupling are related to the ability of transferring magnetic torque. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out disc magnetic coupling permanent magnet pole number (n), air gap length (L(g)), permanent magnet thickness (L(m)), permanent magnet body inside diameter (R(i)) and outside diameter (R(o)), etc. thoroughly. This paper adopts the three-dimensional static magnetic field edge element method of Ansys for numerical calculation, and analyses the relations of magnetic coupling each parameter to transmission magnetic torque. It provides a good theory basis and calculation method for further optimization of the disc magnetic coupling. PMID:24645605

  4. Magnetic field calculations for iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Ricardo; Mendez Rojas, Miguel; Dies Suarez, Pilar; Hidalgo Tobón, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The susceptibility effects of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) functionalized with triethylenglycol (TREG) and Polyethylen Glycol (PEG) has been studied, those nanoparticles have the necessary properties to be used in the clinic as contrast media in imaging by MRI[1-3]. We are considering the behavior of the magnetic field as plane wave to explain the electrical and magnetic field produced by SPIONs. Images were acquired on a 1.5T imager Philips, using mFFE Sequence. Three glass capillary tubes with a) TREG (10nm) concentration of 300 ?g/ml, and PEGCOOH 6000(10nm) with 300 ?g/ml, and 2% agarosa. Magnetic field simulations were calculated in Matlab. The plane wave that comes in contact with a sphere of radius a, an propagation constant k1, and it is in an homogeneous space k2. We consider that the electric field is linearly polarized on x-direction, with a propagation on z-positive-axis. The secondary induced field can be explained from the interior of the sphere and valid exterior points. The referred waves are transmitted and reflected, this is valid only when the wavelength is smaller than the radius of the sphere. The obtained vibrational mode is an answer of the electrical oscillation and this is projection of the disturbed magnetic field. TREG-SPIONs produce more serious susceptibility artefacts compared to PEG-SPIONs. This study is promissory due to the concordance of the results of the simulations and the inhomogeneities showed in the MR images.

  5. Calculation of the magnetic field in the active zone of a hysteresis clutch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ermilov, M. A.; Glukhov, O. M.

    1977-01-01

    The initial distribution of magnetic induction in the armature stationary was calculated relative to the polar system of a hysteresis clutch. Using several assumptions, the problem is reduced to calculating the static magnetic field in the ferromagnetic plate with finite and continuous magnetic permeability placed in the air gap between two identical, parallel semiconductors with rack fixed relative to the tooth or slot position.

  6. Parallel computation of automatic differentiation applied to magnetic field calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkins, R.L. |

    1994-09-01

    The author presents a parallelization of an accelerator physics application to simulate magnetic field in three dimensions. The problem involves the evaluation of high order derivatives with respect to two variables of a multivariate function. Automatic differentiation software had been used with some success, but the computation time was prohibitive. The implementation runs on several platforms, including a network of workstations using PVM, a MasPar using MPFortran, and a CM-5 using CMFortran. A careful examination of the code led to several optimizations that improved its serial performance by a factor of 8.7. The parallelization produced further improvements, especially on the MasPar with a speedup factor of 620. As a result a problem that took six days on a SPARC 10/41 now runs in minutes on the MasPar, making it feasible for physicists at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to simulate larger magnets.

  7. Classical calculation of radiative lifetimes of atomic hydrogen in a homogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Horbatsch, M.W.; Hessels, E.A.; Horbatsch, M.

    2005-09-15

    Radiative lifetimes of hydrogenic atoms in a homogeneous magnetic field of moderate strength are calculated on the basis of classical radiation. The modifications of the Keplerian orbits due to the magnetic field are incorporated by classical perturbation theory. The model is complemented by a classical radiative decay calculation using the radiated Larmor power. A recently derived highly accurate formula for the transition rate of a field-free hydrogenic state is averaged over the angular momentum oscillations caused by the magnetic field. The resulting radiative lifetimes for diamagnetic eigenstates classified by n,m and the diamagnetic energy shift C compare well with quantum results.

  8. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jair C. C.; Scopel, Wanderlã L.; Paz, Wendel S.; Bernardes, Leandro V.; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E.; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitani?, Ton?i; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-10-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at 13C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18-21?T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials.

  9. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Jair C C; Scopel, Wanderlã L; Paz, Wendel S; Bernardes, Leandro V; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitani?, Ton?i; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at (13)C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18-21?T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials. PMID:26434597

  10. Determination of the hyperfine magnetic field in magnetic carbon-based materials: DFT calculations and NMR experiments

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Jair C. C.; Scopel, Wanderlã L.; Paz, Wendel S.; Bernardes, Leandro V.; Cunha-Filho, Francisco E.; Speglich, Carlos; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Pelc, Damjan; Cvitani?, Ton?i; Požek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of carbon-based magnetic materials is of immense fundamental and practical importance, and information on atomic-scale features is required for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to carbon magnetism. Here we report the first direct detection of the microscopic magnetic field produced at 13C nuclei in a ferromagnetic carbon material by zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Electronic structure calculations carried out in nanosized model systems with different classes of structural defects show a similar range of magnetic field values (18–21?T) for all investigated systems, in agreement with the NMR experiments. Our results are strong evidence of the intrinsic nature of defect-induced magnetism in magnetic carbons and establish the magnitude of the hyperfine magnetic field created in the neighbourhood of the defects that lead to magnetic order in these materials. PMID:26434597

  11. METHOD FOR CALCULATING ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS IN TEM CELLS AT ELF (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method is presented whereby the electric and magnetic field distributions within rectangular strip transmission lines (TEM cells) can be calculated. Quasi-static approximations are employed, thereby restricting the validity of the results to operational frequencies well below t...

  12. Magnetic field calculation for a 10 MeV positron emission tomography cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Dezhi; Liu Kaifeng; Yang Jun; Li Dong; Qin Bin; Xiong Yongqian; Chen Zihao

    2013-05-15

    The magnetic field calculation and correction for a 10 MeV positron emission tomography cyclotron is presented. 3D TOSCA analysis results are compared with the measured data, and the calculation error is used to calibrate the B-H curve to obtain a very precise finite element method estimator, which is used to predict the correction of the magnet pole for achieving the isochronous field. The isochronous field error is approximated with the effects of a set of standard patches. On the assumption that the effect of each small patch is proportional to its surface, the correction of the magnet pole is found by solving a system of equations using the least square scheme. The magnet shimming is performed and the measured magnetic field is found in good agreement with the prediction, with an error less than 2 G.

  13. Calculating the 3D magnetic field of ITER for European TBM studies

    E-print Network

    Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Bergmans, Thijs; Gagliardi, Mario; Galabert, Jose; Hirvijoki, Eero; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Sipilä, Seppo; Snicker, Antti

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic perturbation due to the ferromagnetic test blanket modules (TBMs) may deteriorate fast ion confinement in ITER. This effect must be quantified by numerical studies in 3D. We have implemented a combined finite element method (FEM) -- Biot-Savart law integrator method (BSLIM) to calculate the ITER 3D magnetic field and vector potential in detail. Unavoidable geometry simplifications changed the mass of the TBMs and ferritic inserts (FIs) up to 26%. This has been compensated for by modifying the nonlinear ferromagnetic material properties accordingly. Despite the simplifications, the computation geometry and the calculated fields are highly detailed. The combination of careful FEM mesh design and using BSLIM enables the use of the fields unsmoothed for particle orbit-following simulations. The magnetic field was found to agree with earlier calculations and revealed finer details. The vector potential is intended to serve as input for plasma shielding calculations.

  14. Calculation of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field using LOCV technique

    E-print Network

    Bordbar, G H

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we are interested in the properties of nuclear matter at zero temperature in the presence of strong magnetic fields using the lowest order constraint variational (LOCV) method employing $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. Our results indicate that in the absence of a magnetic field, the energy per particle is a symmetric function of the spin polarization parameter. This shows that for the nuclear matter, the spontaneous phase transition to a ferromagnetic state does not occur. However, we have found that for the magnetic fields $ B\\gtrsim 10 ^ {18}\\ G$, the symmetry of energy is broken and the energy has a minimum at a positive value of the spin polarization parameter. We have also found that the effect of magnetic field on the value of energy is more significant at the low densities. Our calculations show that at lower densities, the spin polarization parameter is more sensitive to the magnetic field.

  15. Comparison of measured and calculated magnetic fields along the Ulysses orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirzhevsky, N. S.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Svirzhevskaya, A. K.; Stozhkov, Yu. I.

    2015-02-01

    The existence of close relations between the temperature, density and velocity of the solar plasma and the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) was shown along the space probe Ulysses orbit. A simple mathematical formula describing a relation between the HMF and the solar plasma temperature and density was introduced and the expected values of the HMF were calculated using daily and hourly Ulysses data. Correlation coefficients and regression equation between the values of the measured and calculated magnetic fields have been defined. An origin of the peaks in the magnetic field which are observed in the heliospheric sector zone near the corotating interaction regions is discussed as well as the specific role of plasma density and temperature in the formation of magnetic peaks.

  16. Calculations of lightning return stroke electric and magnetic fields above ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uman, M. A.; Lin, Y. T.; Standler, R. B.; Master, M. J.; Fisher, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A lightning return stroke model with which the two station electric and magnetic fields measured at ground level can be reproduced is used to compute fields at altitudes up to 10 km and at ranges from 20 m to 10 km. These calculations provide the first detailed estimates of the return strokes fields that are encountered by aircraft in flight. With the advent of modern aircraft utilizing low voltage digital electronics and reduced electromagnetic shielding by way of structures containing advanced composite materials, these calculations are of considerable practical interest. Further, since airborne electric and magnetic field measurements are presently being attempted, a comparison of the calculations presented with appropriate experimental data, when they are available, will constitute a test of the return stroke model.

  17. Magnetic design calculation and FRC formation modeling for the field reversed experiment liner

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T. P.; Renneke, R.; Hsu, S. C.; Wurden, G. A.; Awe, T.; Siemon, R.; Semenov, V. E.

    2008-10-01

    Integrated magnetic modeling and design are important to meet the requirements for (1) formation, (2) translation, and (3) compression of a field reversed configuration (FRC) for magnetized target fusion. Off-the-shelf solutions do not exist for many generic design issues. A predictive capability for time-dependent magnetic diffusion in realistically complicated geometry is essential in designing the experiment. An eddy-current code was developed and used to compute the mutual inductances between driven magnetic coils and passive magnetic shields (flux excluder plates) to calculate the self-consistent axisymmetric magnetic fields during the first two stages. The plasma in the formation stage was modeled as an immobile solid cylinder with selectable constant resistivity and magnetic flux that was free to readjust itself. It was concluded that (1) use of experimentally obtained anomalously large plasma resistivity in magnetic diffusion simulations is sufficient to predict magnetic reconnection and FRC formation, (2) comparison of predicted and experimentally observed timescales for FRC Ohmic decay shows good agreement, and (3) for the typical range of resistivities, the magnetic null radius decay rate scales linearly with resistivity. The last result can be used to predict the rate of change in magnetic flux outside of the separatrix (equal to the back-emf loop voltage), and thus estimate a minimum {theta}-coil loop voltage required to form an FRC.

  18. Calculating the magnetic field of the infinite solenoid and understanding the Ampere circuital law from the magnetic field of moving charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Mai-Lin; Wang, Teng

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic field of the infinite solenoid is calculated using a new method. An infinitely long charged line moving along a closed curve on the plane perpendicular to the infinite line will generate an electric current and so the magnetic field of the infinite solenoid. Through the electric-magnetic field relation, the magnetic field of the infinite solenoid is simply obtained and the reason why the magnetic field is a constant is clearly shown. Further, Ampere’s circuital law is analyzed from the particle point of view using the electric-magnetic field relation. These discussions are helpful to the understanding of the magnetic field of the infinite solenoid and Ampere’s circuital law for students and teachers of electromagnetism.

  19. Calculated non-linear magnetic field penetration of plasma opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.; Wilson, D.C.; Bergman, C.; Thiem, K. ); Grossmann, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F. )

    1990-06-15

    We examine magnetic field penetration in the Plasma Opening Switch, exploring, in particular, advective field penetration arising in conjunction with radial density gradients across the cathode anode gap. Our calculations have been completed with the implicit multi-fluid, ANTHEM code. We show favored penetration along a radial density jump, unstable plain wave penetration for a 1/(y {minus} y{sub {alpha}+{epsilon}}) density dependence (with y measured from cathode to anode at Y{sub {alpha}}) in planar switches, and the penetration of finger-like magnetic field perturbations, when the fill plasmas bears initial sinusoidal disturbances on its generator interface. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Accurate 2d finite element calculations for hydrogen in magnetic fields of arbitrary strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Wunner, G.

    2014-02-01

    Recent observations of hundreds of hydrogen-rich magnetic white dwarf stars with magnetic fields up to 105 T (103 MG) have called for more comprehensive and accurate databases for wavelengths and oscillator strengths of the H atom in strong magnetic fields for all states evolving from the field-free levels with principal quantum numbers n?10. We present a code to calculate the energy eigenvalues and wave functions of such states which is capable of covering the entire regime of field strengths B=0 T to B˜109 T. We achieve this high flexibility by using a two-dimensional finite element expansion of the wave functions in terms of B-splines in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, instead of using asymptotically valid basis expansions in terms of spherical harmonics or Landau orbitals. We have paid special attention to the automation of the program such that the data points for the magnetic field strengths at which the energy of a given state are calculated can be selected automatically. Furthermore, an elaborate method for varying the basis parameters is applied to ensure that the results reach a pre-selected precision, which also can be adjusted freely. Energies and wave functions are stored in a convenient format for further analysis, e.g. for the calculation of transition energies and oscillator strengths. The code has been tested to work for 300 states with an accuracy of better than 10-6 Rydberg across several symmetry subspaces over the entire regime of magnetic field strengths.

  1. Electric-field control of magnetism in graphene quantum dots: Ab initio calculations

    PubMed Central

    Agapito, Luis A.; Kioussis, Nicholas; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2011-01-01

    Employing ab initio calculations we predict that the magnetic states of hydrogenated diamond-shaped zigzag graphene quantum dots (GQDs), each exhibiting unique electronic structure, can be selectively tuned with gate voltage, through Stark or hybridization electric-field modulation of the spatial distribution and energy of the spin-polarized molecular orbitals, leading to transitions between these states. Electrical read-out of the GQD magnetic state can be accomplished by exploiting the distinctive electrical properties of the various magnetic configurations. PMID:21765631

  2. Calculations of lightning return stroke electric and magnetic fields above ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Master, M. J.; Uman, M. A.; Ling, Y. T.; Standler, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Lin et al., (1980) presented a lightning return stroke model with which return stroke electric and magnetic fields measured at ground level could be reproduced. This model and a modified version of it, in which the initial current peak decays with height above ground, are used to compute waveforms for altitudes from 0-10 km and at ranges of 20 m to 10 km. Both the original and modified models gave accurate predictions of measured ground-based fields. The use of the calculated fields in calibrating airborne field measurements from simultaneous ground and airborne data is discussed.

  3. Loss calculations in a CICC solenoid exposed to rapidly changing magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciotti, M.; Di Zenobio, A.; Gislon, P.; Muzzi, L.; Spadoni, M.; Turtù, S.

    2002-08-01

    Losses in multifilamentary superconducting conductors depend both on internal magnetic field amplitude and its changing rate, which determine the magnetization of the sample during a field cycle. Analytical computation of hysteresis and coupling losses is possible whenever the internal field can be assumed to be equal to the external one; otherwise, approximate solutions for the internal field time dependence have to be assumed when the conductor time constants are comparable with field variation periods. The internal field profile, the changing rate and the losses associated to an external field rapidly varying as compared to the coupling time constant of a cable-in-conduit conductor solenoid, have been calculated. The results have been compared with the losses measured for various field amplitudes and ramp rates. The calculations showed that a `saturated regime' is reached during ramping up and down. In this situation, no more coupling currents can be activated in part of the conductor, as the external strands are saturated at Ic, and the external field variations are followed by the internal field. Experimental evidence of the saturated regime is reported.

  4. Density-Functional-Theory Calculations of Matter in Strong Magnetic Fields: I. Atoms and Molecules

    E-print Network

    Zach Medin; Dong Lai

    2007-01-05

    We present new ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of various atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields ranging from B=10^12 G to 2x10^15 G, appropriate for radio pulsars and magnetars. For these field strengths, the magnetic forces on the electrons dominate over the Coulomb forces, and to a good approximation the electrons are confined to the ground Landau level. Our calculations are based on the density functional theory, and use a local magnetic exchange-correlation function which is tested to be reliable in the strong field regime. Numerical results of the ground-state energies are given for H_N (up to N=10), He_N (up to N=8), C_N (up to N=5) and Fe_N (up to N=3), as well as for various ionized atoms. Fitting formulae for the B-dependence of the energies are also given. In general, as N increases, the binding energy per atom in a molecule, |E_N|/N, increases and approaches a constant value. For all the field strengths considered in this paper, hydrogen, helium, and carbon molecules are found to be bound relative to individual atoms (although for B less than a few x 10^12 G, the relative binding between C and C_2 is small). Iron molecules are not bound at Batoms at larger field strengths.

  5. Lunar magnetic field measurements, electrical conductivity calculations and thermal profile inferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    Steady magnetic field measurements of magnitude 30 to 100 gamma on the lunar surface impose problems of interpretation when coupled with the nondetectability of a lunar field at 0.4 lunar radius altitude and the limb induced perturbations of the solar wind at the Explorer orbit. The lunar time-varying magnetic field clearly indicates the presence of eddy currents in the lunar interior and permits calculation of an electrical conductivity profile. The problem is complicated by the day-night asymmetry of the moon's electromagnetic environment, the possible presence of the transverse magnetic mode, and the variable wave directions of the driving function. The electrical conductivity is calculated to be low near the surface, rising to a peak of .006/ohm meter at 250 km, dropping steeply inwards to a value of about .00005/ohm meter, and then rising toward the interior. A transition at 250 km depth from a high conductivity to a low conductivity material is inferred, suggesting an olivine-like core at approximately 800 C, although other models are possible.

  6. Calculation of the linear force-free magnetic field above a solar active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, V. I.

    1997-08-01

    Modeling the linear force-free fields above solar active regions involves the use of either Fourier transforms or Green functions. The modeling results depend on the a priori conditions specified for the edges of the volume studied. However, none of the methods that have been developed allow direct specification of the values for the field at the nonphotospheric boundaries of the volume. A method that allows this would make it possible to study the influence of lateral boundary conditions on the solution inside the volume of interest and to use a priori information about the field in the corona. Here, an algorithm is presented for calculation of the linear force-free field in a limited volume (in the shape of a parallelepiped, Omega) using the distribution of the Bz component of the field at all boundaries of Omega and the distribution of Bx and Bv in a frame made up by the intersection of a lateral surface of Omega and a single arbitrarily chosen plane z = const. The algorithm is verified using a numerical model, permitting calculation of the linear force-free field of a dipole in a half-space using exact formulas. The rms deviation of the calculated and analytical solutions at each layer along the z axis does not exceed 1 percent. Substituting potential boundary conditions for force-free conditions at the nonphotospheric border of the Omega volume leads to a substantial change in the resulting magnetic configuration.

  7. An approach to 3D magnetic field calculation using numerical and differential algebra methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.; Brady, V.O.

    1992-07-17

    Motivated by the need for new means for specification and determination of 3D fields that are produced by electromagnetic lens elements in the region interior to coil windings and seeking to obtain techniques that will be convenient for accurate conductor placement and dynamical study of particle motion, we have conveniently gene the representation of a 2D magnetic field to 3D. We have shown that the 3 dimensioal magnetic field components of a multipole magnet in the curl-fire divergence-fire region near the axis r=0 can be derived from one dimensional functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives (part 1). In the region interior to coil windings of accelerator magnets the three spatial components of magnet fields can be expressed in terms of harmonic components'' proportional to functions sin (n{theta}) or cos (n{theta}) of the azimuthal angle. The r,z dependence of any such component can then be expressed in terms of powers of r times functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives. For twodimensional configurations B{sub z} of course is identically zero, the derivatives of A{sub n}(z) vanish, and the harmonic components of the transverse field then acquire a simple proportionality B{sub r,n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} sin (n{theta}),B{sub {theta},n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} cos (n{theta}), whereas in a 3-D configuration the more complex nature of the field gives rise to additional so-called psuedomultipole'' components as judged by additional powers of r required in the development of the field. Computation of the 3-D magnetic field arising at a sequence of field points, as a direct result of a specified current configuration or coil geometry, can be calculated explicitly through use of the Biot-Savart law and from such data the coefficients can then be derived for a general development of the type indicated above. We indicate, discuss, and illustrate two means by which this development may be performed.

  8. 862 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 26, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2011 Analytical Method for Magnetic Field Calculation in

    E-print Network

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    -pole 60-slot double-rotor axial-flux PM motor was proposed for electric vehicles [4]. In these machines for Magnetic Field Calculation in a Low-Speed Permanent-Magnet Harmonic Machine Linni Jian, Member, IEEE, IEEE Abstract--Magnetic-gearing effect has become increasingly at- tractive when designing direct

  9. Robustness of the filamentation instability in arbitrarily oriented magnetic field: Full three dimensional calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2014-02-15

    The filamentation (Weibel) instability plays a key role in the formation of collisionless shocks which are thought to produce Gamma-Ray-Bursts and High-Energy-Cosmic-Rays in astrophysical environments. While it has been known for long that a flow-aligned magnetic field can completely quench the instability, it was recently proved in 2D that in the cold regime, such cancelation is possible if and only if the field is perfectly aligned. Here, this result is finally extended to a 3D geometry. Calculations are conducted for symmetric and asymmetric counter-streaming relativistic plasma shells. 2D results are retrieved in 3D: the instability can never be completely canceled for an oblique magnetic field. In addition, the maximum growth-rate is always larger for wave vectors lying in the plan defined by the flow and the oblique field. On the one hand, this bears consequences on the orientation of the generated filaments. On the other hand, it certifies 2D simulations of the problem can be performed without missing the most unstable filamentation modes.

  10. Torque analysis and measurements of a permanent magnet type Eddy current brake with a Halbach magnet array based on analytical magnetic field calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min-Gyu; Choi, Jang-Young; Shin, Hyeon-Jae; Jang, Seok-Myeong

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the torque analysis and measurements of a permanent magnet (PM) type eddy current brake (ECB) with a Halbach magnet array based on analytical magnetic field calculations. On the basis of a magnetic vector potential and using a two-dimensional (2D) polar coordinate system, the analytical solution for magnetic flux density, including the eddy current reaction is evaluated. Based on these solutions, the magnetic torque is also determined analytically. A 2D finite element analysis is employed to validate the method used. Practical issues in the analytical study of the PM type ECBs, such as the maximum braking torque, the required rotor speed, and the segment-dependent, are fully discussed. Finally, the braking torque as a function of the rotor speed is measured to verify the results of the analytical study.

  11. A Green's function method for calculating the potential magnetic field in solar active regions in a spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, V. M.; Zimovets, I. V.

    2014-05-01

    A Green's function solution of Laplace's equation for the potential magnetic field in an external spherical region is found using the derivative of the potential along a selected direction as a boundary condition. A set of programs applying this solution to construct the potential magnetic-field lines in solar active regions based on the photospheric line-of-sight field component has been developed. The method is tested using some model fields, and the optimal step size is found for realistic conditions. The developed software is applied to four real solar active regions, adopting HMI/SDO magnetograms as the boundary conditions. The potential magnetic field in the chromosphere and corona have been reconstructed for the selected regions. The calculated field lines are compared with flux tubes observed by AIA/SDO in the EUV. This comparison is used as a basis to discuss the applicability of a potential field approximation to the magnetic fields in solar active regions.

  12. Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Schöller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we give a brief introduction into the use of the Zeeman effect in astronomy and the general detection of magnetic fields in stars, concentrating on the use of FORS2 for longitudinal magnetic field measurements.

  13. A General Method for Calculating the External Magnetic Field from a Cylindrical Magnetic Source using Toroidal Functions

    SciTech Connect

    J Selvaggi; S Salon; O Kwon CVK Chari

    2006-02-14

    An alternative method is developed to compute the magnetic field from a circular cylindrical magnetic source. Specifically, a Fourier series expansion whose coefficients are toroidal functions is introduced which yields an alternative to the more familiar spherical harmonic solution or the Elliptic integral solution. This alternate formulation coupled with a method called charge simulation allows one to compute the external magnetic field from an arbitrary magnetic source in terms of a toroidal expansion. This expansion is valid on any finite hypothetical external observation cylinder. In other words, the magnetic scalar potential or the magnetic field intensity is computed on a exterior cylinder which encloses the magnetic source. This method can be used to accurately compute the far field where a finite element formulation is known to be inaccurate.

  14. Calculation of energies of three-electron systems in a strong magnetic field using Explicitly Correlated Gaussian Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Jorge; Varga, Kalman

    2015-03-01

    Strong magnetic fields can significantly alter the properties of atoms and allow the formation of stable negative ions such as He-. We have calculated the energies of systems comprised of three electrons in the presence of strong magnetic fields by using the Stochastic Variational Method with deformed Explicitly Correlated Gaussian basis. This approach yields accurate values for three-electron systems and predicts that the He- ion in a strong magnetic field has stable states, within the non-relativistic framework, in the infinite nuclear mass approximation. The energy spectrum and the properties of three-electron systems as a function of the strength of the magnetic field show the effect of the rivalry between the Coulomb interaction and the magnetic confinement.

  15. Calculation methods and detection techniques for electric and magnetic fields from power lines with measurement verification 

    E-print Network

    Mamishev, Alexander V

    1994-01-01

    of extremely low frequency magnetic fields in the direct proximity of the conductors of power lines, situated well above the ground level. Conventional approximation of a sagged wire as a straight horizontal conductor of infinite length has been substituted...

  16. Electronic and magnetic structures of Fe3O4 ferrimagnetic investigated by first principle, mean field and series expansions calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masrour, R.; Hlil, E. K.; Hamedoun, M.; Benyoussef, A.; Mounkachi, O.; El Moussaoui, H.

    2015-03-01

    Self-consistent ab initio calculations, based on density functional theory (DFT) approach and using a full potential linear augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method, are performed to investigate both electronic and magnetic properties of the Fe3O4. Polarized spin and spin-orbit coupling are included in calculations within the framework of the antiferromagnetic state between two adjacent Fe plans. Magnetic moment considered to lie along (010) axes are computed. Obtained data from ab initio calculations are used as input for the high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) calculations to compute other magnetic parameters. The exchange interactions between the magnetic atoms Fe-Fe in Fe3O4 are given using the mean field theory. The high temperature series expansions (HTSEs) of the magnetic susceptibility of with the magnetic moments, mFe in Fe3O4 is given up to seventh order series in (1/kBT). The Néel temperature TN is obtained by HTSEs of the magnetic susceptibility series combined with the Padé approximant method. The critical exponent ? associated with the magnetic susceptibility is deduced as well.

  17. 3D field calculation of the GEM prototype magnet and comparison with measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, R.J.

    1983-10-28

    The proposed 4 GeV Electron Microtron (GEM) is designed to fill the existing buildings left vacant by the demise of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) accelerator. One of the six large dipole magnets is shown as well as the first 10 electron orbits. A 3-orbit prototype magnet has been built. The stepped edge of the magnet is to keep the beam exiting perpendicular to the pole. The end guards that wrap around the main coils are joined together by the 3 shield plates. The auxiliary coils are needed to keep the end guards and shield plates from saturating. A 0.3 cm Purcell filter air gap exists between the pole and the yoke. Can anyone question this being a truly three-dimensional magnetostatic problem. The computer program TOSCA, developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory by the Computing Applications Group, was used to calculate this magnet and the results have been compared with measurements.

  18. Semi-classical calculation of the number of photons emitted by a relativistic neutrino with mass and magnetic moment passing through a transverse magnetic field

    E-print Network

    J. D. Jackson

    2002-01-09

    A classical calculation, modified by Compton-recoil kinematics, of the radiation emitted by a relativistic neutrino with mass and a magnetic moment passing through a transverse magnetic field. The calculation is performed in the neutrinos rest frame by the method of virtual quanta. The total number N of virtual quanta scattered by the neutrino is determined. The semi-classical result for the analog of the Klein-Nishina formula is compared with a QED calculation of the photon scattering cross section. The different angular distributions, both strongly peaked, lead to a factor of two difference between the QED and semi-classical results for N.

  19. On the calculation of magnetic fields based on multipole modeling of focal biological current sources.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, G; Curio, G

    1997-01-01

    Spatially restricted biological current distributions, like the primary neuronal response in the human somatosensory cortex evoked by electric nerve stimulation, can be described adequately by a current multipole expansion. Here analytic formulas are derived for computing magnetic fields induced by current multipoles in terms of an nth-order derivative of the dipole field. The required differential operators are given in closed form for arbitrary order. The concept is realized in different forms for an expansion of the scalar as well as the dyadic Green's function, the latter allowing for separation of those multipolar source components that are electrically silent but magnetically detectable. The resulting formulas are generally applicable for current sources embedded in arbitrarily shaped volume conductors. By using neurophysiologically relevant source parameters, examples are provided for a spherical volume conductor with an analytically given dipole field. An analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio for multipole coefficients up to the octapolar term indicates that the lateral extent of cortical current sources can be detected by magnetoencephalographic recordings. PMID:9284293

  20. Density-Functional-Theory Calculations of Matter in Strong Magnetic Fields: II. Infinite Chains and Condensed Matter

    E-print Network

    Zach Medin; Dong Lai

    2007-01-05

    We present new, ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of one-dimensional infinite chains and three-dimensional condensed matter in strong magnetic fields ranging from B=10^12 G to 2x10^15 G, appropriate for observed magnetic neutron stars. At these field strengths, the magnetic forces on the electrons dominate over the Coulomb forces, and to a good approximation the electrons are confined to the ground Landau level. Our calculations are based on the density functional theory, and use a local magnetic exchange-correlation function appropriate in the strong field regime. The band structures of electrons in different Landau orbitals are computed self-consistently. Numerical results of the ground-state energies and electron work functions are given for one-dimensional chains of H, He, C, and Fe. Fitting formulae for the B-dependence of the energies are also provided. For all the field strengths considered in this paper, hydrogen, helium, and carbon chains are found to be bound relative to individual atoms (although for B less than a few x 10^12 G, the relative binding between C and C_infinity is small). Iron chains are significantly bound for B>10^14 G and are weakly bound if at all at B<10^13 G. We also study the cohesive property of three-dimensional condensed matter of H, He, C, and Fe at zero pressure, constructed from interacting chains in a body-centered tetragonal lattice. Such three-dimensional condensed matter is found to be bound relative to individual atoms, with the cohesive energy increasing rapidly with increasing B.

  1. Benchmark calculations of nonconservative charged-particle swarms in dc electric and magnetic fields crossed at arbitrary angles.

    PubMed

    Dujko, S; White, R D; Petrovi?, Z Lj; Robson, R E

    2010-04-01

    A multiterm solution of the Boltzmann equation has been developed and used to calculate transport coefficients of charged-particle swarms in gases under the influence of electric and magnetic fields crossed at arbitrary angles when nonconservative collisions are present. The hierarchy resulting from a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the Boltzmann equation in the hydrodynamic regime is solved numerically by representing the speed dependence of the phase-space distribution function in terms of an expansion in Sonine polynomials about a Maxwellian velocity distribution at an internally determined temperature. Results are given for electron swarms in certain collisional models for ionization and attachment over a range of angles between the fields and field strengths. The implicit and explicit effects of ionization and attachment on the electron-transport coefficients are considered using physical arguments. It is found that the difference between the two sets of transport coefficients, bulk and flux, resulting from the explicit effects of nonconservative collisions, can be controlled either by the variation in the magnetic field strengths or by the angles between the fields. In addition, it is shown that the phenomena of ionization cooling and/or attachment cooling/heating previously reported for dc electric fields carry over directly to the crossed electric and magnetic fields. The results of the Boltzmann equation analysis are compared with those obtained by a Monte Carlo simulation technique. The comparison confirms the theoretical basis and numerical integrity of the moment method for solving the Boltzmann equation and gives a set of well-established data that can be used to test future codes and plasma models. PMID:20481843

  2. Numerical calculation of dynamical friction in electron cooling systems, including magnetic field perturbations and finite time effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sobol, A.V.; Fedotov, A.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Bell, G.I.; Litvinenko, V.

    2010-09-24

    The orders-of-magnitude higher luminosities required by future electron-ion collider concepts require a dissipative force to counteract the numerous factors acting to gradually increase the phase space volume of relativistic ion beams. High-energy electron cooling systems could provide the necessary dissipation via dynamical friction, but will have to be designed for new parameter regimes. It is expected that magnetic field errors, finite interaction time and other effects will reduce the dynamical friction and hence increase the cooling time, so improved understanding of the underlying dynamics is important. We present a generalized form of the classical field-free friction force equation, which conveniently captures some of these effects. Previous work (Bell et al 2008 J. Comput. Phys. 227 8714) shows both numerical and conceptual subtleties associated with undersampling of strong collisions, and we present a rigorous mathematical treatment of such difficulties, based on the use of a modified Pareto distribution for the electron-ion impact parameters. We also present a very efficient numerical algorithm for calculating the dynamical friction on a single ion in the field free case. For the case of arbitrary magnetic field errors, we present numerical simulation results, showing agreement with our generalized friction force formula.

  3. Power-Factor Calculation under Consideration of Cross Saturation of the Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong T; Burress, Timothy A; Hsu, John S

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for calculating the power factor with consideration of the cross saturation between the direct-axis (d-axis) and the quadrature-axis (q-axis) of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM). The conventional two-axis IPMSM model is modified to include the cross-saturation effect by adding the cross-coupled inductance terms. This paper also contains the new method of calculating the cross-coupled inductance values as well as self-inductance values in d- and q-axes. The analyzed motor is a high-speed brushless field excitation machine that offers high torque per ampere per core length at low speed and weakened flux at high speed, which was developed for the traction motor of a hybrid electric vehicle.

  4. Hartree-Fock-Roothaan calculations for many-electron atoms and ions in neutron-star magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Dirk; Wunner, Günter

    2008-09-01

    The quantitative analysis of the electromagnetic spectra of isolated neutron stars by means of model atmosphere calculations requires extensive data sets of atomic energy values and transition probabilities in intense magnetic fields. We present a method for the fast computation of wave functions, energies, and oscillator strengths of medium- Z atoms and ions at neutron star magnetic field strengths B?107T which strikes a balance between numerical accuracy and computing times. We use a Hartree-Fock ansatz in which each single-electron orbital is expanded in terms of Landau states with one longitudinal expansion function, and each Landau level contributes with a different weight to the orbital. Both the longitudinal expansion functions and the Landau weights are determined in a doubly self-consistent way. Hartree-Fock equations are solved by decomposing the z axis in finite elements and expanding the longitudinal wave functions in terms of sixth-order B -splines. The contributions of the eight lowest Landau levels are taken into account. The procedure can be efficiently parallelized. Results are presented for the ground states and different excited states of atoms and ions for nuclear charges Z=2,…,26 and N=2,…,26 electrons, and for oscillator strengths. Wherever possible, a comparison with the results of previous calculations is made.

  5. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  6. Neptune's magnetic field - Calculation of field geometric invariants derived from the I8E1 GSFC/BRI model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Ness, N. F.

    1993-01-01

    L shell values along the Voyager 2 encounter trajectory and those associated with the N1 through N6 moons and N1R through N6R rings of Neptune are computed numerically on the basis of a simplified description of the Neptunian magnetic field derived from the Goddard Space Flight Center/Bartol Research Institute I8E1 model, which includes internal terms up to and including the octupole (but no external terms). Like Uranus, the large tilt between the dipole term and the rotation axis causes the moons and rings to sweep a very large range of L shells. Their orbital motion introduces additional periodicities, causing the maxima and minima in L space to vary systematically with time.

  7. Development of the female voxel phantom, NAOMI, and its application to calculations of induced current densities and electric fields from applied low frequency magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2005-03-01

    This paper outlines the development of a 2 mm resolution voxel model, NAOMI (aNAtOMIcal model), designed to be representative of the average adult female. The primary medical imaging data were derived from a high-resolution MRI scan of a 1.65 m tall, 23 year old female subject with a mass of 58 kg. The model was rescaled to a height of 1.63 m and a mass of 60 kg, the dimensions of the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference adult female. There are 41 tissue types in the model. The application of NAOMI to the calculations of induced current densities and electric fields from applied low frequency magnetic and electric fields is described. Comparisons are made with values from the male voxel model, NORMAN. The calculations were extended from 50 Hz up to 10 MHz. External field reference levels are compared with the ICNIRP guidelines.

  8. Fixed-phase correlation-function quantum Monte Carlo calculations for ground and excited states of helium in neutron-star magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Dirk; Boblest, Sebastian; Wunner, Günter

    2013-03-01

    We apply the correlation-function quantum Monte Carlo (CFQMC) method to the calculation of the energies of ground and excited states for helium in neutron-star magnetic fields. The method has been successfully applied by Jones, Ortiz, and Ceperley to the calculation of helium in white dwarf magnetic fields [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.55.6202 55, 6202 (1997)]. We extend the accessible range of magnetic field strengths by introducing a fixed-phase variant of the CFQMC method. We find that with growing magnetic field strength the variances increase significantly and put a limit to the applicability of the method for atoms in strong magnetic fields. The behavior of the variances is traced back to the logarithmic divergence of the energy of the bosonic ground state with increasing magnetic field strength. We use basis sets, which account for the growing dominance of the cylindrical symmetry as the magnetic field is increased and incorporate them into the CFQMC algorithm. These basis sets are taken from Hartree-Fock calculations, performed using a B-Spline and Landau expansion beyond the adiabatic approximation.

  9. Evolution of twisted magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, E.G.; Boozer, A.H.

    1985-02-01

    The magnetic field of the solar corona evolves quasistatically in response to slowly changing photospheric boundary conditions. The magnetic topology is preserved by the low resistivity of the solar atmosphere. We show that a magnetic flux coordinate system simplifies the problem of calculating field evolution with invariant topology. As an example, we calculate the equilibrium of a thin magnetic flux tube with small twist per unit length.

  10. Spherical polar co-ordinate calculations of induced fields in the retina and head for applied magnetic fields at 50 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2011-07-01

    This paper sets out to explore the effects of voxel resolution, from 2 mm down to 0.1 mm for Cartesian co-ordinates and the differences between Cartesian and spherical polar co-ordinates for a standardized test-bed model of the eye. This model was taken from the work of Yoriyaz et al (2005 Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 115 316-9) who have developed a detailed geometric description of the eye including choroid, retina, sclera, lens, cornea, anterior chamber, vitreous humour and optic nerve for ophthalmic brachytherapy. The spherical co-ordinate model has radial and angular steplengths of 0.1 mm and 0.25°, respectively. The current density averaged over 1 cm2 and the 99th percentile value of the induced electric field have been calculated in the retina and central nervous system for uniform magnetic fields. The Cartesian co-ordinate calculations proceed in a sequence of grids at 2, 1, 0.5, 0.2 and 0.1 mm resolution with the potentials from the previous calculation at a coarser grid providing the boundary conditions on the finer grid. The 0.2 mm grid provides the boundary conditions for the spherical polar calculations. Comparisons are made with the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection reference levels.

  11. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  12. Calculated Hanle transmission and absorption spectra of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line with residual magnetic field for arbitrarily polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Moon, Han Seb

    2010-09-15

    This paper reports a theoretical study on the transmission spectra of an arbitrarily polarized laser beam through a rubidium cell with or without a buffer gas in Hanle-type coherent population trapping (CPT). This study examined how laser polarization, transverse magnetic field, and collisions with buffer gas affects the spectrum. The transmission spectrum due to CPT and the absorption spectrum due to the level crossing absorption (LCA) were calculated according to the laser polarization. The results show that the LCA is strongly dependent on the transverse magnetic field and interaction time of the atoms with a laser light via collisions with the buffer gas. In addition, the spectral shape of the calculated Hanle spectrum is closely related to the direction between the (stray) transverse magnetic field and polarization of the laser.

  13. The induced magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Islas, Rafael; Heine, Thomas; Merino, Gabriel

    2012-02-21

    Aromaticity is indispensable for explaining a variety of chemical behaviors, including reactivity, structural features, relative energetic stabilities, and spectroscopic properties. When interpreted as the spatial delocalization of ?-electrons, it represents the driving force for the stabilization of many planar molecular structures. A delocalized electron system is sensitive to an external magnetic field; it responds with an induced magnetic field having a particularly long range. The shape of the induced magnetic field reflects the size and strength of the system of delocalized electrons and can have a large influence on neighboring molecules. In 2004, we proposed using the induced magnetic field as a means of estimating the degree of electron delocalization and aromaticity in planar as well as in nonplanar molecules. We have since tested the method on aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic compounds, and a refinement now allows the individual treatment of core-, ?-, and ?-electrons. In this Account, we describe the use of the induced magnetic field as an analytical probe for electron delocalization and its application to a large series of uncommon molecules. The compounds include borazine; all-metal aromatic systems Al(4)(n-); molecular stars Si(5)Li(n)(6-n); electronically stabilized planar tetracoordinate carbon; planar hypercoordinate atoms inside boron wheels; and planar boron wheels with fluxional internal boron cluster moieties. In all cases, we have observed that planar structures show a high degree of electron delocalization in the ?-electrons and, in some examples, also in the ?-framework. Quantitatively, the induced magnetic field has contributions from the entire electronic system of a molecule, but at long range the contributions arising from the delocalized electronic ?-system dominate. The induced magnetic field can only indirectly be confirmed by experiment, for example, through intermolecular contributions to NMR chemical shifts. We show that calculating the induced field is a useful method for understanding any planar organic or inorganic system, as it corresponds to the intuitive Pople model for explaining the anomalous proton chemical shifts in aromatic molecules. Indeed, aromatic, antiaromatic, and nonaromatic molecules show differing responses to an external field; that is, they reduce, augment, or do not affect the external field at long range. The induced field can be dissected into different orbital contributions, in the same way that the nucleus-independent chemical shift or the shielding function can be separated into component contributions. The result is a versatile tool that is particularly useful in the analysis of planar, densely packed systems with strong orbital contributions directly atop individual atoms. PMID:21848282

  14. Magnetic field mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, R. M.; Stenger, F. J.

    1969-01-01

    Magnetic field mapper locates imperfections in cadmium sulphide solar cells by detecting and displaying the variations of the normal component of the magnetic field resulting from current density variations. It can also inspect for nonuniformities in other electrically conductive materials.

  15. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)??G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)??GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  16. Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet

    E-print Network

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet produces a magnetic field, B Set up a B field two ways: Moving electrically charged particles Current in a wire Intrinsic magnetic field Basic characteristic of elementary particles such as an electron #12;Magnetic Fields Magnetic field lines Direction

  17. Magnetic field effects on the vestibular system: calculation of the pressure on the cupula due to ionic current-induced Lorentz force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, A.; Glover, P. M.; Li, Y.; Mian, O. S.; Day, B. L.

    2012-07-01

    Large static magnetic fields may be employed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At high magnetic field strengths (usually from about 3 T and above) it is possible for humans to perceive a number of effects. One such effect is mild vertigo. Recently, Roberts et al (2011 Current Biology 21 1635-40) proposed a Lorentz-force mechanism resulting from the ionic currents occurring naturally in the endolymph of the vestibular system. In the present work a more detailed calculation of the forces and resulting pressures in the vestibular system is carried out using a numerical model. Firstly, realistic 3D finite element conductivity and fluid maps of the utricle and a single semi-circular canal containing the current sources (dark cells) and sinks (hair cells) of the utricle and ampulla were constructed. Secondly, the electrical current densities in the fluid are calculated. Thirdly, the developed Lorentz force is used directly in the Navier-Stokes equation and the trans-cupular pressure is computed. Since the driving force field is relatively large in comparison with the advective acceleration, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform an approximation in the Navier-Stokes equations that reduces the problem to solving a simpler Poisson equation. This simplification allows rapid and easy calculation for many different directions of applied magnetic field. At 7 T a maximum cupula pressure difference of 1.6 mPa was calculated for the combined ampullar (0.7 µA) and utricular (3.31 µA) distributed current sources, assuming a hair-cell resting current of 100 pA per unit. These pressure values are up to an order of magnitude lower than those proposed by Roberts et al using a simplistic model and calculation, and are in good agreement with the estimated pressure values for nystagmus velocities in caloric experiments. This modeling work supports the hypothesis that the Lorentz force mechanism is a significant contributor to the perception of magnetic field induced vertigo.

  18. Reconnection of stressed magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassam, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that magnetized plasma configurations under magnetic stress relax irreversibly to the state of minimum stress at a rate that is essentially Alfvenic provided a magnetic null is present. The relaxation is effected by the reconnection at the field null and proceeds at a rate proportional to the absolute value of ln(eta) exp-1, where eta is the resistivity. An analytic calculation in the linear regime is presented.

  19. Influence of free parameters on time delay calculations using magnetic field-based methods for solar wind propagation simulation from a single spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A. V.

    2009-12-01

    Space weather modeling and forecasting techniques are important for a variety of applications, such as satellite operations,GPS navigation, magnetosphere and ionosphere modeling etc. The work described here is intended to help provide a better IMF data forecast near the Earth's magnetosphere by measurements at L1 Lagrange point. Theory, as well as observations made from different satellites simultaneously, shows that the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) may consist of current layers and wave fronts along which changes in magnetic field are small in the scale of the diameter of the ACE satellite's orbit. The knowledge about current layers and wave fronts along which the changes of IMF are minimal would significantly improve IMF forecast near the Earth by measurements at L1 Lagrange point. Many methods have been developed to determine these structures using measurements at a single spacecraft, based on different fundamental properties of the solar wind and IMF. However, most solar wind parameters, such as density and velocity, cannot be measured with sufficient time resolution comparable with magnetic field measurements. For this reason, methods based on the magnetic field are most frequently used for practical calculations and forecasting. There are two known methods for IMF calculations, MVAB-0 and the upstream-downstream magnetic field cross-product method. In this work, we propose two new methods based on physical laws of the solar wind and magnetic field measurements. We demonstrate their usefulness through comparison of data on the ACE and WIND satellites over long continuous periods of time. We used model skill analysis base on RMS and correlation between the model and measurements. All of these methods depend on a series of 4-6 free parameters, depending on the method. We analyzed all free parameters across a wide range. All analysis was performed on massive parallel computers. Computations reveled that there is no set of constant parameters that allow optimum results across all different satellite positions and IMF parameters. Instead, we introduced the concept of stable areas in parameter space. These stable parameters provide satisfactory results for all time intervals. Model skill and correlation demonstrate irregular behavior in free parameter space. Analysis of this can help to improve the methods significantly if we can determine how free parameters should be chosen depending on measured solar wind conditions.

  20. Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schep, T.J.

    2004-03-15

    Plasmas and magnetic fields are inseparably related in numerous physical circumstances. This is not only the case in natural occurring plasmas like the solar corona and the earth magnetic tail, but also in laboratory plasmas like tokamaks and stellarators.

  1. MATLAB-based program for optimization of quantum cascade laser active region parameters and calculation of output characteristics in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiljani?, J.; Žeželj, M.; Milanovi?, V.; Radovanovi?, J.; Stankovi?, I.

    2014-03-01

    A strong magnetic field applied along the growth direction of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) active region gives rise to a spectrum of discrete energy states, the Landau levels. By combining quantum engineering of a QCL with a static magnetic field, we can selectively inhibit/enhance non-radiative electron relaxation process between the relevant Landau levels of a triple quantum well and realize a tunable surface emitting device. An efficient numerical algorithm implementation is presented of optimization of GaAs/AlGaAs QCL region parameters and calculation of output properties in the magnetic field. Both theoretical analysis and MATLAB implementation are given for LO-phonon and interface roughness scattering mechanisms on the operation of QCL. At elevated temperatures, electrons in the relevant laser states absorb/emit more LO-phonons which results in reduction of the optical gain. The decrease in the optical gain is moderated by the occurrence of interface roughness scattering, which remains unchanged with increasing temperature. Using the calculated scattering rates as input data, rate equations can be solved and population inversion and the optical gain obtained. Incorporation of the interface roughness scattering mechanism into the model did not create new resonant peaks of the optical gain. However, it resulted in shifting the existing peaks positions and overall reduction of the optical gain. Catalogue identifier: AERL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 37763 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2757956 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB. Computer: Any capable of running MATLAB version R2010a or higher. Operating system: Any platform supporting MATLAB version R2010a or higher. RAM: Minimum required is 1 GB. Memory usage increases for less intense magnetic fields. Classification: 15. Nature of problem: The nature of the problem is to provide an efficient numerical algorithm implementation for optimization of GaAs/AlGaAs QCL active region parameters and calculation of output properties in the magnetic field. Solution method: The optimization of the QCL laser performance at selected wavelength is performed at entire free-parameters space using simulated annealing algorithm. The scattering rates are calculated in the presence and without magnetic field and used as coefficients in rate equations. The standard MATLAB procedures were used to solve iteratively this system of equations and obtain distribution of electron densities over electronic states. Restrictions: The machine must provide the necessary main memory which decreases roughly quadratically with the increase of the magnetic field intensity. Running time: Optimization time on Intel 3 GHz processor is about 2×104 s. The calculation time of laser output properties for values set automatically in GUI is 5×104 s.

  2. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank (Shoreham, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  3. Magnetic Field & Right Hand Rule

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Magnetic Field & Right Hand Rule Academic Resource Center #12;Magnetic Fields And Right Hand Rules By: Anthony Ruth #12;Magnetic Fields vs Electric Fields · Magnetic fields are similar to electric charges and stationary charges. · In addition, magnetic fields create a force only on moving charges

  4. A New Method for Calculating Arrival Distribution of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays above 10^19 eV with Modifications by the Galactic Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    H. Yoshiguchi; S. Nagataki; K. Sato

    2003-07-02

    We present a new method for calculating arrival distribution of UHECRs including modifications by the galactic magnetic field. We perform numerical simulations of UHE anti-protons, which are injected isotropically at the earth, in the Galaxy and record the directions of velocities at the earth and outside the Galaxy for all of the trajectories. We then select some of them so that the resultant mapping of the velocity directions outside the Galaxy of the selected trajectories corresponds to a given source location scenario, applying Liouville's theorem. We also consider energy loss processes of UHE protons in the intergalactic space. Applying this method to our source location scenario which is adopted in our recent study and can explain the AGASA observation above 4 \\times 10^{19} eV, we calculate the arrival distribution of UHECRs including lower energy (E>10^19 eV) ones. We find that our source model can reproduce the large-scale isotropy and the small-scale anisotropy on UHECR arrival distribution above 10^19 eV observed by the AGASA. We also demonstrate the UHECR arrival distribution above 10^19 eV with the event number expected by future experiments in the next few years. The interesting feature of the resultant arrival distribution is the arrangement of the clustered events in the order of their energies, reflecting the directions of the galactic magnetic field. This is also pointed out by Alvarez-Muniz et al.(2002). This feature will allow us to obtain some kind of information about the composition of UHECRs and the magnetic field with increasing amount of data.

  5. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

  6. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  7. Numerical calculations of magnetic properties of nanostructures

    E-print Network

    Kapitan, Vitalii; Nefedev, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy data could be used to test computer numerical models of magnetism. The elaborated numerical model of a face-centered lattice Ising spins is based on pixel distribution in the image of magnetic nanostructures obtained by using scanning microscope. Monte Carlo simulation of the magnetic structure model allowed defining the temperature dependence of magnetization; calculating magnetic hysteresis curves and distribution of magnetization on the surface of submonolayer and monolayer nanofilms of cobalt, depending on the experimental conditions. Our developed package of supercomputer parallel software destined for a numerical simulation of the magnetic-force experiments and allows obtaining the distribution of magnetization in one-dimensional arrays of nanodots and on their basis. There has been determined interpretation of magneto-force microscopy images of magnetic nanodots states. The results of supercomputer simulations and numerical calculations are in...

  8. Electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS2 nanoribbons under both external strain and electric field, studied by first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ting; Zhou, Jian; Dong, Jinming; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-08-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of armchair edge MoS2 nanoribbons (MoS2-ANRs) underboth the external strain and transverse electric field (Et) have been systematically investigated by using the first-principles calculations. It is found that: (1) If no electric field is applied, an interesting structural phase transition would appear under a large tensile strain, leading to a new phase MoS2-A'NR, and inducing a big jump peak of the band gap in the transition region. But, the band gap response to compressive strains is much different from that to tensile strain, showing no the structural phase transition. (2) Under the small tensile strains (<10%), the combined Et and tensile strain give rise to a positive superposition (resonant) effect on the band gap reduction at low Et (<3 V/nm), and oppositely a negative superposition (antiresonant) one at high Et (>4 V/nm). On the other hand, the external compressive strains have always presented the resonant effect on the band gap reduction, induced by the electric field. (3) After the structural phase transition, an external large tensile strain could greatly reduce the critical field Etc causing the band gap closure, and make the system become a ferromagnetic (FM) metal at a relative low Et (e.g., <4 V/nm), which is very helpful for its promising applications in nano-mechanical spintronics devices. (4) At high Et (>10 V/nm), the magnetic moments of both the MoS2-ANR and MoS2-A'NR in their FM states could be enhanced greatly by a tensile strain. Our numerical results of effectively tuning physical properties of MoS2-ANRs by combined external strain and electric field may open their new potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  9. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  10. Magnetosheath magnetic field variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    A case study using simulations IRM and CCE observations demonstrates that transient magnetospheric events correspond to pressure pulses in the magnetosheath, inward bow shock motion, and magnetopause compression. Statistical surveys indicate that the magnetosheath magnetic field orientation rarely remains constant during periods of magnetopause and bow shock motion (both characterized by periods of 1 to 10 min). There is no tendency for bow shock motion to occur for southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations.

  11. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27?989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap and to provide a program which allows users to calculate as comprehensively as possible energies, wavelengths, and oscillator strengths of medium-Z atoms and ions up to Z=26 in neutron star magnetic field strengths. Obviously, the method for achieving this goal must be highly efficient since for the calculation of synthetic spectra data of many thousands or even millions of atomic transitions may be required. Solution method: As in previous work on the problem (cf. [3,7]) we exploit the fact that a strong magnetic field results in an approximate decoupling of the dynamics of the electrons parallel and perpendicular to the field. In this adiabatic approximation the single-particle wave functions take the form: ?(?,?,z)=?(?,?)?P(z), where ?(?,?) are Landau wave functions, describing the (fast) motion perpendicular to the field, and the P(z) are the longitudinal wave functions, describing the (slow) bound motion along the direction of the field. The spins of the electrons are all aligned antiparallel to the magnetic field and need not be accounted for explicitly. The total N-electron wave function is constructed as a Slater determinant of the single-particle wave functions, and the unknown longitudinal wave functions are determined from the Hartree-Fock equations, which follow from inserting the total N-electron wave function into Schrödinger's variational principle for the total energy. The novel feature of our approach [8] is to use finite-element and B-spline techniques to solve the Hartree-Fock equations for atoms in strong magnetic fields. This is accomplished through the following steps: 1) decomposition of the z-axis into finite elements with quadratically widening element borders; 2) sixth-order B-spline expansion of the single-particle wave functions on the individual finite elements; 3) formulation of the variational principle equivalent to the Hartree-Fock equations in terms of the expansion coefficients. This leads to a simple system of linear equations for the expansion coefficients, which is solved numerically, and, since the direct and

  12. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2014-05-01

    Our previously published code for calculating energies and bound-bound transitions of medium-Z elements at neutron star magnetic field strengths [D. Engel, M. Klews, G. Wunner, Comp. Phys. Comm. 180, 3-2-311 (2009)] was based on the adiabatic approximation. It assumes a complete decoupling of the (fast) gyration of the electrons under the action of the magnetic field and the (slow) bound motion along the field under the action of the Coulomb forces. For the single-particle orbitals this implied that each is a product of a Landau state and an (unknown) longitudinal wave function whose B-spline coefficients were determined self-consistently by solving the Hartree-Fock equations for the many-electron problem on a finite-element grid. In the present code we go beyond the adiabatic approximation, by allowing the transverse part of each orbital to be a superposition of Landau states, while assuming that the longitudinal part can be approximated by the same wave function in each Landau level. Inserting this ansatz into the energy variational principle leads to a system of coupled equations in which the B-spline coefficients depend on the weights of the individual Landau states, and vice versa, and which therefore has to be solved in a doubly self-consistent manner. The extended ansatz takes into account the back-reaction of the Coulomb motion of the electrons along the field direction on their motion in the plane perpendicular to the field, an effect which cannot be captured by the adiabatic approximation. The new code allows for the inclusion of up to 8 Landau levels. This reduces the relative error of energy values as compared to the adiabatic approximation results by typically a factor of three (1/3 of the original error) and yields accurate results also in regions of lower neutron star magnetic field strengths where the adiabatic approximation fails. Further improvements in the code are a more sophisticated choice of the initial wave functions, which takes into account the shielding of the core potential for outer electrons by inner electrons, and an optimal finite-element decomposition of each individual longitudinal wave function. These measures largely enhance the convergence properties compared to the previous code and lead to speed-ups by factors up to two orders of magnitude compared with the implementation of the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method used by Engel and Wunner in [D. Engel, G. Wunner, Phys. Rev. A 78, 032515 (2008)].

  13. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  14. Power-Factor and Torque Calculation under Consideration of Cross Saturation of the Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong T; Burress, Timothy A; Tolbert, Leon M

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for calculating the power factor and output torque by considering the cross saturation between direct-axis (d-axis) and quadrature-axis (q-axis) of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM). The conventional two-axis IPMSM model is modified to include the cross saturation effect by adding the cross-coupled inductance terms. This paper also contains the new method of calculating the cross-coupled inductance values as well as self-inductance values in d- and q-axes. The analyzed motor is a high-speed brushless field excitation machine that offers high torque per ampere per core length at low speed and weakened flux at high speed, which was developed for the traction motor of a hybrid electric vehicle. The conventional two-axis IPMSM model was modified to include the cross-saturation effect by adding the cross-coupled inductance terms Ldq and Lqd. By the advantage of the excited structure of the experimental IPMSM, the analyzing works were performed under two conditions, the highest and lowest excited conditions. Therefore, it is possible to investigate the cross-saturation effect when a machine has higher magnetic flux from its rotor. The following is a summary of conclusions that may be drawn from this work: (1) Considering cross saturation of an IPMSM offers more accurate expected values of motor parameters in output torque calculation, especially when negative d-axis current is high; (2) A less saturated synchronous machine could be more affected by the cross-coupled saturation effect; (3) Both cross-coupled inductances, L{sub qd} and L{sub dq}, are mainly governed by d-axis current rather than q-axis current; (4) The modified torque equation, can be used for the dynamic model of an IPMSM for developing a better control model or control strategy; and (5) It is possible that the brushless field excitation structure has a common magnetic flux path on both d- and q-axis, and as a result, the reluctance torque of the machine could be reduced.

  15. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  16. Magnetic field effect on charged Brownian swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, M.; Velasco, R. M.; Jiménez-Aquino, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the effective diffusion of a spherical self-propelled charged particle swimming at low Reynolds number, and subject to a time-dependent magnetic field and thermal agitation. We find that the presence of an external magnetic field may reduce or enhance (depending on the type of swimming and magnetic field applied) the swimmer's effective diffusion, hence we get another possible strategy to control its displacement. For swimmers performing reciprocal motion, and under an oscillating time-dependent magnetic field, mechanical resonance appears when the swimmer and magnetic frequencies coincide, thus enhancing the particle's effective diffusion. Our analytical results are compared with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement.

  17. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  18. Comparison of different methods for calculating the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of nuclear spins as a function of the magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belorizky, Elie; Fries, Pascal H.; Helm, Lothar; Kowalewski, Jozef; Kruk, Danuta; Sharp, Robert R.; Westlund, Per-Olof

    2008-02-01

    The enhancement of the spin-lattice relaxation rate for nuclear spins in a ligand bound to a paramagnetic metal ion [known as the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)] arises primarily through the dipole-dipole (DD) interaction between the nuclear spins and the electron spins. In solution, the DD interaction is modulated mostly by reorientation of the nuclear spin-electron spin axis and by electron spin relaxation. Calculations of the PRE are in general complicated, mainly because the electron spin interacts so strongly with the other degrees of freedom that its relaxation cannot be described by second-order perturbation theory or the Redfield theory. Three approaches to resolve this problem exist in the literature: The so-called slow-motion theory, originating from Swedish groups [Benetis et al., Mol. Phys. 48, 329 (1983); Kowalewski et al., Adv. Inorg. Chem. 57, (2005); Larsson et al., J. Chem. Phys. 101, 1116 (1994); T. Nilsson et al., J. Magn. Reson. 154, 269 (2002)] and two different methods based on simulations of the dynamics of electron spin in time domain, developed in Grenoble [Fries and Belorizky, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 204503 (2007); Rast et al., ibid. 115, 7554 (2001)] and Ann Arbor [Abernathy and Sharp, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 9032 (1997); Schaefle and Sharp, ibid. 121, 5387 (2004); Schaefle and Sharp, J. Magn. Reson. 176, 160 (2005)], respectively. In this paper, we report a numerical comparison of the three methods for a large variety of parameter sets, meant to correspond to large and small complexes of gadolinium(III) and of nickel(II). It is found that the agreement between the Swedish and the Grenoble approaches is very good for practically all parameter sets, while the predictions of the Ann Arbor model are similar in a number of the calculations but deviate significantly in others, reflecting in part differences in the treatment of electron spin relaxation. The origins of the discrepancies are discussed briefly.

  19. Magnetic fields at uranus.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Behannon, K W; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1986-07-01

    The magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft revealed a strong planetary magnetic field of Uranus and an associated magnetosphere and fully developed bipolar masnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the solar wind supersonic flow was observed upstream at 23.7 Uranus radii (1 R(U) = 25,600 km) and the magnetopause boundary at 18.0 R(U), near the planet-sun line. A miaximum magnetic field of 413 nanotesla was observed at 4.19 R(U ), just before closest approach. Initial analyses reveal that the planetary magnetic field is well represented by that of a dipole offset from the center of the planet by 0.3 R(U). The angle between Uranus' angular momentum vector and the dipole moment vector has the surprisingly large value of 60 degrees. Thus, in an astrophysical context, the field of Uranus may be described as that of an oblique rotator. The dipole moment of 0.23 gauss R(3)(U), combined with the large spatial offset, leads to minimum and maximum magnetic fields on the surface of the planet of approximately 0.1 and 1.1 gauss, respectively. The rotation period of the magnetic field and hence that of the interior of the planet is estimated to be 17.29+/- 0.10 hours; the magnetotail rotates about the planet-sun line with the same period. Thelarge offset and tilt lead to auroral zones far from the planetary rotation axis poles. The rings and the moons are embedded deep within the magnetosphere, and, because of the large dipole tilt, they will have a profound and diurnally varying influence as absorbers of the trapped radiation belt particles. PMID:17812894

  20. Mercury's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury is the only inner solar system body other than Earth to possess an active core dynamo-driven magnetic field and the only planet with a small, highly dynamic magnetosphere. Measurements made by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have provided a wealth of data on Mercury's magnetic field environment. Mercury's weak magnetic field was discovered 40 years ago by the Mariner 10 spacecraft, but its large-scale geometry, strength and origin could not be definitively established. MESSENGER data have shown that the field is dynamo-generated and can be described as an offset axisymmetric dipole field (hereafter OAD): the magnetic equator lies ~0.2 RM (RM = 2440 km) north of the geographic equator and the dipole moment is 2.8 x1019 Am2 (~0.03% that of Earth's). The weak internal field and the high, but variable, solar wind ram pressure drive vigorous magnetospheric dynamics and result in an average distance from the planet center to the sub-solar magnetopause of only 1.42 RM. Magnetospheric models developed with MESSENGER data have allowed re-analysis of the Mariner 10 observations, establishing that there has been no measureable secular variation in the internal field over 40 years. Together with spatial power spectra for the OAD, this provides critical constraints for viable dynamo models. Time-varying magnetopause fields induce secondary core fields, the magnitudes of which confirm the core radius estimated from MESSENGER gravity and Earth-based radar data. After accounting for large-scale magnetospheric fields, residual signatures are dominated by additional external fields that are organized in the local time frame and that vary with magnetospheric activity. Birkeland currents have been identified, which likely close in the planetary interior at depths below the base of the crust. Near-periapsis magnetic field measurements at altitudes greater than 200 km have tantalizing hints of crustal fields, but crustal sources cannot be distinguished from core fields, nor cleanly separated from external fields. I will report on recent data acquired at altitudes as low as 25 km that have the potential to resolve these issues. The presence of remanent crustal fields would have profound implications for Mercury's thermal and dynamical histories.

  1. A New Method for Calculating Arrival Distribution of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays above 10^19 eV with Modifications by the Galactic Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Yoshiguchi, H; Sato, K

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for calculating arrival distribution of UHECRs including modifications by the galactic magnetic field. We perform numerical simulations of UHE anti-protons, which are injected isotropically at the earth, in the Galaxy and record the directions of velocities at the earth and outside the Galaxy for all of the trajectories. We then select some of them so that the resultant mapping of the velocity directions outside the Galaxy of the selected trajectories corresponds to a given source location scenario, applying Liouville's theorem. We also consider energy loss processes of UHE protons in the intergalactic space. Applying this method to our source location scenario which is adopted in our recent study and can explain the AGASA observation above 4 times 10^{19} eV, we calculate the arrival distribution of UHECRs including lower energy (E>10^19 eV) ones. We find that our source model can reproduce the large-scale isotropy and the small-scale anisotropy on UHECR arrival distribution above 10^...

  2. HMI Magnetic Field Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, Jon T.; HMI Magnetic Field Team

    2013-07-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on SDO has measured magnetic field, velocity, and intensity in the photosphere over the full disk continuously since May 2010 with arc-second resolution. Scalar images are measured every 45 seconds. From these basic observables the pipeline automatically identifies and tracks active regions on the solar disk. The vector magnetic field and a variety of summary quantities are determined every 720s in these tracked Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARPS). Synoptic and synchronic maps are constructed daily and after each Carrington Rotation Most data products are available with definitive scientific calibration after a few day deal at and in a quick-look near-real-time version a few minutes after the observations are made. Uncertainties are determined for the derived products. All of the magnetic field products along with movies and images suitable for browsing are available at http:://Hmi.stanford.edu/magnetic. Other products, e.g. coronal field over active regions, can be computed on demand.

  3. Electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons under both external strain and electric field, studied by first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ting; Dong, Jinming; Zhou, Jian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-08-14

    The electronic and magnetic properties of armchair edge MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons (MoS{sub 2}-ANRs) underboth the external strain and transverse electric field (E{sub t}) have been systematically investigated by using the first-principles calculations. It is found that: (1) If no electric field is applied, an interesting structural phase transition would appear under a large tensile strain, leading to a new phase MoS{sub 2}-A'NR, and inducing a big jump peak of the band gap in the transition region. But, the band gap response to compressive strains is much different from that to tensile strain, showing no the structural phase transition. (2) Under the small tensile strains (<10%), the combined E{sub t} and tensile strain give rise to a positive superposition (resonant) effect on the band gap reduction at low E{sub t} (<3?V/nm), and oppositely a negative superposition (antiresonant) one at high E{sub t} (>4?V/nm). On the other hand, the external compressive strains have always presented the resonant effect on the band gap reduction, induced by the electric field. (3) After the structural phase transition, an external large tensile strain could greatly reduce the critical field E{sub tc} causing the band gap closure, and make the system become a ferromagnetic (FM) metal at a relative low E{sub t} (e.g., <4?V/nm), which is very helpful for its promising applications in nano-mechanical spintronics devices. (4) At high E{sub t} (>10?V/nm), the magnetic moments of both the MoS{sub 2}-ANR and MoS{sub 2}-A'NR in their FM states could be enhanced greatly by a tensile strain. Our numerical results of effectively tuning physical properties of MoS{sub 2}-ANRs by combined external strain and electric field may open their new potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  4. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2012-07-01

    Our previously published code for calculating energies and bound-bound transitions of medium-Z elements at neutron star magnetic field strengths [D. Engel, M. Klews, G. Wunner, Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 302-311] was based on the adiabatic approximation. It assumes a complete decoupling of the (fast) gyration of the electrons under the action of the magnetic field and the (slow) bound motion along the field under the action of the Coulomb forces. For the single-particle orbitals this implied that each is a product of a Landau state and an (unknown) longitudinal wave function whose B-spline coefficients were determined self-consistently by solving the Hartree-Fock equations for the many-electron problem on a finite-element grid. In the present code we go beyond the adiabatic approximation, by allowing the transverse part of each orbital to be a superposition of Landau states, while assuming that the longitudinal part can be approximated by the same wave function in each Landau level. Inserting this ansatz into the energy variational principle leads to a system of coupled equations in which the B-spline coefficients depend on the weights of the individual Landau states, and vice versa, and which therefore has to be solved in a doubly self-consistent manner. The extended ansatz takes into account the back-reaction of the Coulomb motion of the electrons along the field direction on their motion in the plane perpendicular to the field, an effect which cannot be captured by the adiabatic approximation. The new code allows for the inclusion of up to 8 Landau levels. This reduces the relative error of energy values as compared to the adiabatic approximation results by typically a factor of three (1/3 of the original error), and yields accurate results also in regions of lower neutron star magnetic field strengths where the adiabatic approximation fails. Further improvements in the code are a more sophisticated choice of the initial wave functions, which takes into account the shielding of the core potential for outer electrons by inner electrons, and an optimal finite-element decomposition of each individual longitudinal wave function. These measures largely enhance the convergence properties compared to the previous code, and lead to speed-ups by factors up to two orders of magnitude compared with the implementation of the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method used by Engel and Wunner in [D. Engel, G. Wunner, Phys. Rev. A 78 (2008) 032515]. New version program summaryProgram title: HFFER II Catalogue identifier: AECC_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: v 55 130 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 293 700 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: Cluster of 1-13 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Linux Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI directives. RAM: 1 GByte per node Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, BLAS, FMlib (included in the package) Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECC_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 302 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Quantitative modellings of features observed in the X-ray spectra of isolated magnetic neutron stars are hampered by the lack of sufficiently large and accurate databases for atoms and ions up to the last fusion product, iron, at strong magnetic field strengths. Our code is intended to provide a powerful tool for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of medium-Z atoms and ions at neutron star magnetic field strengths with sufficient accuracy in a routine way to create such databases. Solution method: The Slater determinants of the atomic wave functions are constructed from single-particle orbitals

  5. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  6. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  7. Magnetic fields at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The conclusions drawn regarding the structure, behavior and composition of the Uranian magnetic field and magnetosphere as revealed by Voyager 2 data are summarized. The planet had a bipolar magnetotail and a bow shock wave which was observed 23.7 Uranus radii (UR) upstream and a magnetopause at 18.0 UR. The magnetic field observed can be represented by a dipole offset from the planet by 0.3 UR. The field vector and the planetary angular momentum vector formed a 60 deg angle, permitting Uranus to be categorized as an oblique rotator, with auroral zones occurring far from the rotation axis polar zones. The surface magnetic field was estimated to lie between 0.1-1.1 gauss. Both the field and the magnetotail rotated around the planet-sun line in a period of about 17.29 hr. Since the ring system is embedded within the magnetosphere, it is expected that the rings are significant absorbers of radiation belt particles.

  8. Magnetic fields at Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1986-07-01

    The conclusions drawn regarding the structure, behavior and composition of the Uranian magnetic field and magnetosphere as revealed by Voyager 2 data are summarized. The planet had a bipolar magnetotail and a bow shock wave which was observed 23.7 Uranus radii (UR) upstream and a magnetopause at 18.0 UR. The magnetic field observed can be represented by a dipole offset from the planet by 0.3 UR. The field vector and the planetary angular momentum vector formed a 60 deg angle, permitting Uranus to be categorized as an oblique rotator, with auroral zones occurring far from the rotation axis polar zones. The surface magnetic field was estimated to lie between 0.1-1.1 gauss. Both the field and the magnetotail rotated around the planet-sun line in a period of about 17.29 hr. Since the ring system is embedded within the magnetosphere, it is expected that the rings are significant absorbers of radiation belt particles.

  9. Radial magnetic field in magnetic confinement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hao; Liu, Ming-Hai; Chen, Ming; Rao, Bo; Chen, Jie; Chen, Zhao-Quan; Xiao, Jin-Shui; Hu, Xi-Wei

    2015-09-01

    The intrinsic radial magnetic field (Br) in a tokamak is explored by the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation in axisymmetric configurations through an expansion of the four terms of the magnetic surfaces. It can be inferred from the simulation results that at the core of the device, the tokamak should possess a three-dimensional magnetic field configuration, which could be reduced to a two-dimensional one when the radial position is greater than 0.6a. The radial magnetic field and the amzimuthal magnetic field have the same order of magnitude at the core of the device. These results can offer a reference for the analysis of the plasma instability, the property of the core plasma, and the magnetic field measurement. Project supported by the Special Domestic Program of ITER, China (Grant No. 2009GB105003).

  10. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  11. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  12. Five years of magnetic field management

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, C.J.; Fogarty, R.P.; Halleran, T.M.; Mark, Dr. D.A.; Mukhopadhyay, A.

    1995-01-01

    The extensive publicity of epidemiological studies inferring correlation between 60 Hz magnetic fields and childhood leukemia prompted world wide research programs that have as a goal to determine if low frequency magnetic fields represent any risk for the general population, children or utility workers. While supporting this research effort through EPRI, Con Edison embarked on a technical research program aimed to: characterize magnetic fields as to intensity and variation in time; and investigate practical means to manage these magnetic fields through currently known methods. The final goal of these research projects is to establish viable methods to reduce magnetic field intensity to desired values at reasonable distances from the sources. This goal was pursued step by step, starting with an inventory of the main sources of magnetic fields in substations, distribution and transmission facilities and generating plants. The characterization of the sources helped to identify typical cases and select specific cases, far practical applications. The next step was to analyze the specific cases and develop design criteria for managing the magnetic fields in new installations. These criteria included physical arrangement of equipment based oil calculation of magnetic fields, cancellation effect, desired maximum field intensity at specific points and shielding with high magnetic permeability metals (mu-metal and steel). This paper summarizes the authors` experiences and shows the results of the specific projects completed in recent years.

  13. The Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R.

    2012-12-01

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength ?20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  14. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticle motion in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, N. A.; Liubimov, B. Ya

    2015-07-01

    A set of equations describing the motion of a free magnetic nanoparticle in an external magnetic field in a vacuum, or in a medium with negligibly small friction forces is postulated. The conservation of the total particle momentum, i.e. the sum of the mechanical and the total spin momentum of the nanoparticle is taken into account explicitly. It is shown that for the motion of a nanoparticle in uniform magnetic field there are three different modes of precession of the unit magnetization vector and the director that is parallel the particle easy anisotropy axis. These modes differ significantly in the precession frequency. For the high-frequency mode the director points approximately along the external magnetic field, whereas the frequency and the characteristic relaxation time of the precession of the unit magnetization vector are close to the corresponding values for conventional ferromagnetic resonance. On the other hand, for the low-frequency modes the unit magnetization vector and the director are nearly parallel and rotate in unison around the external magnetic field. The characteristic relaxation time for the low-frequency modes is remarkably long. This means that in a rare assembly of magnetic nanoparticles there is a possibility of additional resonant absorption of the energy of alternating magnetic field at a frequency that is much smaller compared to conventional ferromagnetic resonance frequency. The scattering of a beam of magnetic nanoparticles in a vacuum in a non-uniform external magnetic field is also considered taking into account the precession of the unit magnetization vector and director.

  16. Magnetic force of piezoelectric cantilever energy harvesters with external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D.; Leng, Y. G.; Gao, Y. J.

    2015-11-01

    In piezoelectric cantilever energy harvesters with external magnetic field, one of the difficulties is the impact of the external magnetic field or magnetic force on vibration response and energy harvesting efficiency. Here we use the magnetizing current and magnetic dipoles approaches to analyze the magnetic force. The two calculation models are proposed for the energy harvesters. The calculation results of the two methods are compared with a set of experimental data. It has been proved that errors are produced with both methods while the magnet interval is sufficiently small. However, the calculation result achieved from magnetic dipoles approach is closer to experimental measurements than the one of magnetizing current approach. Consequently, the magnetic dipoles approach can be chosen preferably to calculate the magnetic force of piezoelectric cantilever energy harvesters with external magnetic field.

  17. Planetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, David J.

    2003-03-01

    The past several years have seen dramatic developments in the study of planetary magnetic fields, including a wealth of new data, mainly from the Galilean satellites and Mars, together with major improvements in our theoretical modeling effort of the dynamo process believed responsible for large planetary fields. These dynamos arise from thermal or compositional convection in fluid regions of large radial extent. The relevant electrical conductivities range from metallic values to values that may be only about 1% or less that of a typical metal, appropriate to ionic fluids and semiconductors. In all planets, the Coriolis force is dynamically important, but slow rotation may be more favorable for a dynamo than fast rotation. The maintenance and persistence of convection appears to be easy in gas giants and ice-rich giants, but is not assured in terrestrial planets because the quite high electrical conductivity of iron-rich cores guarantees a high thermal conductivity (through the Wiedemann-Franz law), which allows for a large core heat flow by conduction alone. In this sense, high electrical conductivity is unfavorable for a dynamo in a metallic core. Planetary dynamos mostly appear to operate with an internal field ˜(2 ??/ ?) 1/2 where ? is the fluid density, ? is the planetary rotation rate and ? is the conductivity (SI units). Earth, Ganymede, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and maybe Mercury have dynamos, Mars has large remanent magnetism from an ancient dynamo, and the Moon might also require an ancient dynamo. Venus is devoid of a detectable global field but may have had a dynamo in the past. The presence or absence of a dynamo in a terrestrial body (including Ganymede) appears to depend mainly on the thermal histories and energy sources of these bodies, especially the convective state of the silicate mantle and the existence and history of a growing inner solid core. Induced fields observed in Europa and Callisto indicate the strong likelihood of water oceans in these bodies.

  18. The electronic structure calculations of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Agnieszka; Heine, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Transition-metal dichalcogenides TX2 (T = W, Mo; X = S, Se, Te) are layered materials that are available in ultrathin forms such as mono-, bi- and multilayers, which are commonly known as two-dimensional materials. They have an intrinsic band gap in the range of some 500 meV to 2 eV, depending on the composition and number of layers, and giant intrinsic spin-orbit splittings for odd layer numbers, and, in conjunction with their high chemical and mechanical stability, they qualify as candidate materials for two-dimensional flexible electronics and spintronics. The electronic structure of each TX2 material is very sensitive to external factors, in particular towards electric and magnetic fields. A perpendicular electric field reduces the band gap, and for some structures semiconductor-metal transitions could be possible. Moreover, the electric field triggers the spin-orbit splitting for bilayers. A magnetic field applied normal to the layers causes the Hall effect, which in some cases may result in a quantum (spin) Hall effect and thus in magnetic switches. Finally, we discuss how valleytronics is possible in these materials by selective interaction of electrons in the different valleys using polarized light. PMID:25529067

  19. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  20. Calculation of gravity and magnetic anomalies along profiles with end corrections and inverse solutions for density and magnetization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cady, John W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program is presented which performs, for one or more bodies, along a profile perpendicular to strike, both forward calculations for the magnetic and gravity anomaly fields and independent gravity and magnetic inverse calculations for density and susceptibility or remanent magnetization.

  1. Magnetic field therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Markov, Marko S

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing interest in using permanent magnets for therapeutic purposes encouraged by basic science publications and clinical reports. Magnetotherapy provides a non invasive, safe, and easy method to directly treat the site of injury, the source of pain and inflammation, and other types of disease. The physiological bases for the use of magnetic fields for tissue repair as well as physical principles of dosimetry and application of various magnetic fields are subjects of this review. Analysis of the magnetic and electromagnetic stimulation is followed by a discussion of the advantage of magnetic field stimulation compared with electric current and electric field stimulation. PMID:17454079

  2. The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance

    E-print Network

    V. I. Klyukhin; N. Amapane; V. Andreev; A. Ball; B. Curé; A. Hervé; A. Gaddi; H. Gerwig; V. Karimaki; R. Loveless; M. Mulders; S. Popescu; L. I. Sarycheva; T. Virdee

    2011-10-04

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field values. The value of the field at a given point of a volume is obtained by interpolation from a regular grid of values resulting from a TOSCA calculation or, when available, from a parameterization. The results of the measurements and calculations are presented, compared and discussed.

  3. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  4. What Are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Print this page Share What are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF) Electric and Magnetic Fields Electricity is an essential part of our ... we take for granted. What are electric and magnetic fields? Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) are invisible ...

  5. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  6. Magnetic Propeller for Uniform Magnetic Field Levitation

    E-print Network

    Krinker, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Three new approaches to generating thrust in uniform magnetic fields are proposed. The first direction is based on employing Lorentz force acting on partial magnetically shielded 8-shaped loop with current in external magnetic field, whereby a net force rather than a torque origins. Another approach, called a Virtual Wire System, is based on creating a magnetic field having an energetic symmetry (a virtual wire), with further superposition of external field. The external field breaks the symmetry causing origination of a net force. Unlike a wire with current, having radial energetic symmetry, the symmetry of the Virtual Wire System is closer to an axial wire. The third approach refers to the first two. It is based on creation of developed surface system, comprising the elements of the first two types. The developed surface approach is a way to drastically increase a thrust-to-weight ratio. The conducted experiments have confirmed feasibility of the proposed approaches.

  7. Magnetic Propeller for Uniform Magnetic Field Levitation

    E-print Network

    Mark Krinker; Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-07-12

    Three new approaches to generating thrust in uniform magnetic fields are proposed. The first direction is based on employing Lorentz force acting on partial magnetically shielded 8-shaped loop with current in external magnetic field, whereby a net force rather than a torque origins. Another approach, called a Virtual Wire System, is based on creating a magnetic field having an energetic symmetry (a virtual wire), with further superposition of external field. The external field breaks the symmetry causing origination of a net force. Unlike a wire with current, having radial energetic symmetry, the symmetry of the Virtual Wire System is closer to an axial wire. The third approach refers to the first two. It is based on creation of developed surface system, comprising the elements of the first two types. The developed surface approach is a way to drastically increase a thrust-to-weight ratio. The conducted experiments have confirmed feasibility of the proposed approaches.

  8. Leptogenesis and primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Andrew J.; Sabancilar, Eray; Vachaspati, Tanmay E-mail: eray.sabancilar@asu.edu

    2014-02-01

    The anomalous conversion of leptons into baryons during leptogenesis is shown to produce a right-handed helical magnetic field; in contrast, the magnetic field produced during electroweak baryogenesis is known to be left-handed. If the cosmological medium is turbulent, the magnetic field evolves to have a present day coherence scale ? 10 pc and field strength ? 10{sup ?18} Gauss. This result is insensitive to the energy scale at which leptogenesis took place. Observations of the amplitude, coherence scale, and helicity of the intergalactic magnetic field promise to provide a powerful probe of physics beyond the Standard Model and the very early universe.

  9. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  10. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  11. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  12. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  13. Calculations of magnetization configurations of SPT head using micromagnetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Suzuki, A.; Yanagihara, H.

    2005-02-01

    The whole magnetization configurations of single-pole-type (SPT) head and double-layered medium are calculated using a micromagnetic model, taking into account the magnetostatic interactions between an SPT head and a medium. This method enable us to obtain nano-scale magnetic structures formed in an SPT head which could not be obtained with a conventional method using a macromodel such as B-H curves. The head-field strength at a spacing of 7.5 nm beneath the main pole, with Ms=2.0 Wb/m2, reaches 950 kA/m including the image field of soft under-layer. Very complicated vortex-like magnetic domains and walls appear in the main pole and the return pole. Especially, at the edges of the return pole, the magnetizations have a large component normal to the air-bearing surface and this results in localized strong stray fields from the wings of return pole. The stray fields might erase the recorded bits on the neighboring tracks. Also, it is estimated that the delay time of a head field to the excitation field is 0.4 ns under the calculation conditions examined.

  14. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  15. Theory of cosmological seed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Saleem, H.

    2007-07-15

    A theory for the generation of seed magnetic field and plasma flow on cosmological scales driven by externally given baroclinic vectors is presented. The Beltrami-like plasma fields can grow from zero values at initial time t=0 from a nonequilibrium state. Exact analytical solutions of the set of two-fluid equations are obtained that are valid for large plasma {beta}-values as well. Weaknesses of previous models for seed magnetic field generation are also pointed out. The analytical calculations predict the galactic seed magnetic field generated by this mechanism to be of the order of 10{sup -14} G, which may be amplified later by the {alpha}{omega} dynamo (or by some other mechanism) to the present observed values of the order of {approx}(2-10) {mu}G. The theory has been applied to laser-induced plasmas as well and the estimate of the magnetic field's magnitude is in agreement with the experimentally observed values.

  16. Heating of magnetic fluid systems driven by circularly polarized magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Atalar, Ergin

    to calculate the heat dissipation of a magnetic suspension, a ferrofluid, driven by circularly polarizedHeating of magnetic fluid systems driven by circularly polarized magnetic field Osman O. Ahsen Received in revised form 3 May 2010 Available online 27 May 2010 Keywords: Circular magnetic field

  17. Relativistic stars with purely toroidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kiuchi, Kenta; Yoshida, Shijun

    2008-08-15

    We investigate the effects of the purely toroidal magnetic field on the equilibrium structures of the relativistic stars. The basic equations for obtaining equilibrium solutions of relativistic rotating stars containing purely toroidal magnetic fields are derived for the first time. To solve these basic equations numerically, we extend the Cook-Shapiro-Teukolsky scheme for calculating relativistic rotating stars containing no magnetic field to incorporate the effects of the purely toroidal magnetic fields. By using the numerical scheme, we then calculate a large number of the equilibrium configurations for a particular distribution of the magnetic field in order to explore the equilibrium properties. We also construct the equilibrium sequences of the constant baryon mass and/or the constant magnetic flux, which model the evolution of an isolated neutron star as it loses angular momentum via the gravitational waves. Important properties of the equilibrium configurations of the magnetized stars obtained in this study are summarized as follows: (1) For the nonrotating stars, the matter distribution of the stars is prolately distorted due to the toroidal magnetic fields. (2) For the rapidly rotating stars, the shape of the stellar surface becomes oblate because of the centrifugal force. But, the matter distribution deep inside the star is sufficiently prolate for the mean matter distribution of the star to be prolate. (3) The stronger toroidal magnetic fields lead to the mass shedding of the stars at the lower angular velocity. (4) For some equilibrium sequences of the constant baryon mass and magnetic flux, the stars can spin up as they lose angular momentum.

  18. External-field-free magnetic biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanpeng; Wang, Yi; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) detection scheme without the presence of any external magnetic field. The proposed magnetic sensor uses a patterned groove structure within the sensor so that no external magnetic field is needed to magnetize the MNPs. An example is given based on a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing device with a spin valve structure. For this structure, the detection of MNPs located inside the groove and near the free layer is demonstrated under no external magnetic field. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to calculate the signal to noise level of this detection scheme. A maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 18.6?dB from one iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle with 8?nm radius is achieved. As proof of concept, this external-field-free GMR sensor with groove structure of 200?nm?×?200?nm is fabricated using a photo and an electron beam integrated lithography process. Using this sensor, the feasibility demonstration of the detection SNR of 9.3?dB is achieved for 30??l magnetic nanoparticles suspension (30?nm iron oxide particles, 1?mg/ml). This proposed external-field-free sensor structure is not limited to GMR devices and could be applicable to other magnetic biosensing devices.

  19. Mean-field theory for Bose-Hubbard model under a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Oktel, M. Oe.; Tanatar, B.; Nita, M.

    2007-01-15

    We consider the superfluid-insulator transition for cold bosons under an effective magnetic field. We investigate how the applied magnetic field affects the Mott transition within mean-field theory and find that the critical hopping strength (t/U){sub c} increases with the applied field. The increase in the critical hopping follows the bandwidth of the Hofstadter butterfly at the given value of the magnetic field. We also calculate the magnetization and superfluid density within mean-field theory.

  20. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bryan K; Roberts, Dale C; Della Santina, Charles C; Carey, John P; Zee, David S

    2015-04-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice, and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  1. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  2. Inclined magnetic structure of iron borate P rxY1 -xF e3(BO3)4 : A neutron diffraction study and crystal-field calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, C.; Pankrats, A. I.; Demidov, A. A.; Velikanov, D. A.; Temerov, V. L.; Gudim, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic structure of the mixed rare-earth system P rxY1 -xF e3(BO3)4 has been studied by elastic neutron powder diffraction and magnetic measurements. A spin reorientation from easy axis to easy plane occurs in the concentration range x =0.67 -0.45 through the formation of inclined magnetic structures. The inclination of the Fe moments from the basal plane depends on the Pr content and ranges from 67(2)° for x =0.67 to 16 (4) ? for x =0.45 at T =3 K . A nonmonotonic change of the inclination angle with temperature is found for all compounds but there is no sign of a spontaneous spin reorientation in the temperature range of magnetic order. An approach based on a crystal-field model for the P r3 + ion and on the molecular-field approximation is used to describe the magnetic characteristics of the system P rxY1 -xF e3(BO3)4 . A good agreement between the experimental and calculated temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibilities and the angle of inclination of Fe moments from the basal plane has been achieved.

  3. Distortion of magnetic field and magnetic force of a brushless dc motor due to deformed rubber magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. J.; Jang, G. H.

    2008-04-01

    This paper investigates the distortion of magnetic field of a brushless dc (BLDC) motor due to deformed rubber magnet. Global or local deformation of rubber magnet in the BLDC motor is mathematically modeled by using the Fourier series. Distorted magnetic field is calculated by using the finite element method, and unbalanced magnetic force is calculated by using the Maxwell stress tensor. When the rubber magnet is globally or locally deformed, the unbalanced magnetic force has the frequencies with the first harmonic and the harmonics of slot number ±1. However, the harmonic deformation with multiple of common divisor of pole and slot does not generate unbalanced magnetic force due to the rotational symmetry.

  4. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  5. Discontinuities in the magnetic field near Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sven; Saur, Joachim; Treeck, Shari C.; Kriegel, Hendrik; Dougherty, Michele K.

    2014-05-01

    The plasma interaction of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus generates a hemisphere coupling current system that directly connects the giant planet's northern and southern polar magnetosphere. Based on Cassini magnetometer observations from all 20 targeted Enceladus flybys between 2004 and 2014, we study the magnetic field discontinuities associated with these hemisphere coupling currents. We identify a total number of 11 events during which the magnetic field was discontinuous at the surface of the Enceladus flux tube (defined by the bundle of magnetic field lines tangential to the solid body of the moon). A minimum variance analysis is applied to calculate the surface normals of these discontinuities. In agreement with theoretical expectations, the normals are found to be perpendicular to the surface of the Enceladus flux tube. The variation of the hemisphere coupling currents with Enceladean longitude leaves a clear imprint in the strengths of the observed magnetic field jumps as well.

  6. Discontinuities in the Magnetic Field near Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S.; Saur, J.; van Treeck, S.; Kriegel, H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The plasma interaction of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus generates a hemisphere coupling current system that directly connects the giant planet's northern and southern polar magnetosphere. Based on Cassini magnetometer observations from all 20 targeted Enceladus flybys between 2004 and 2014, we study the magnetic field discontinuities associated with these hemisphere coupling currents. We identify a total number of 11 events during which the magnetic field was discontinuous at the surface of the Enceladus fluxtube (defined by the bundle of magnetic field lines tangential to the solid body of the moon). A Minimum Variance Analysis is applied to calculate the surface normals of these discontinuities. In agreement with theoretical expectations, the normals are found to be perpendicular to the surface of the Enceladus fluxtube. The variation of the hemisphere coupling currents with Enceladean longitude leaves a clear imprint in the strengths of the observed magnetic field jumps as well.

  7. Levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Gong, Y. M.; Wang, G.; Zhou, D. J.; Zhao, L. F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying high and low magnetic fields generated from a superconducting magnet were investigated. The magnetic field intensity of the superconducting magnet was measured when the exciting current was 90 A. The magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field were both calculated. The YBCO bulk was cooled by liquid nitrogen in field-cooling (FC) and zero-field-cooling (ZFC) condition. The results showed that the levitation forces increased with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Moreover, the levitation forces were more dependent on magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field than magnetic field intensity.

  8. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  9. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  10. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-06-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  11. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  12. Intergalactic Magnetic Fields from Quasar Outflows

    E-print Network

    Steven Furlanetto; Abraham Loeb

    2001-02-05

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function of size and magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We generically find that by a redshift z=3, about 5-20% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density >10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at T=10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the field strength observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification. The intergalactic magnetic field could also provide a nonthermal contribution to the pressure of the photo-ionized gas that may account for the claimed discrepancy between the simulated and observed Doppler width distributions of the Ly-alpha forest.

  13. Numerical Object Oriented Quantum Field Theory Calculations

    E-print Network

    M. Williams

    2009-05-07

    The qft++ package is a library of C++ classes that facilitate numerical (not algebraic) quantum field theory calculations. Mathematical objects such as matrices, tensors, Dirac spinors, polarization and orbital angular momentum tensors, etc. are represented as C++ objects in qft++. The package permits construction of code which closely resembles quantum field theory expressions, allowing for quick and reliable calculations.

  14. Attenuation of Coronal Magnetic Fields in Solar Microwave Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guangli; Li, Jianping; Song, Qiwu; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Yu; Wu, Zhao

    2015-06-01

    Based on the observed data by the Nobeyama Radio Observatory and the nonthermal gyrosynchrotron theory, the calculated magnetic field in a loop-like radio source of the 2001 October 23 flare attenuates from hundreds to tens of Gauss, except in the region with very weak magnetic fields. Meanwhile, the viewing angle between the magnetic field and line of sight has a similar attenuation from tens to around ten degrees, implying that the transverse magnetic component attenuates much faster than the longitudinal one. All of these results can be understood by the magnetic energy release process in solar flares. Moreover, the column density of nonthermal electrons decreases from 109-10 to 107-8 cm-2 during the flare, except in the region with very weak magnetic fields, where its value is larger than that with strong magnetic fields due to the mirroring effect. The calculated error and harmonic number of gyrofrequency better suit the region with strong magnetic fields.

  15. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    E-print Network

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  16. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  17. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  18. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields.

  19. Neutron scattering in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The use of magnetic fields in neutron scattering experimentation is reviewed briefly. Two general areas of application can be distinguished. In one the field acts to change the properties of the scattering sample; in the second the field acts on the neutron itself. Several examples are discussed. Precautions necessary for high precision polarized beam measurements are reviewed. 33 references.

  20. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  1. Numerical calculations in quantum field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Rebbi, C.

    1984-01-01

    Four lecture notes are included: (1) motivation for numerical calculations in Quantum Field Theory; (2) numerical simulation methods; (3) Monte Carlo studies of Quantum Chromo Dynamics; and (4) systems with fermions. 23 references. (WHK)

  2. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  3. Anomalous currents in dense matter under a magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Deog Ki Hong

    2010-12-31

    We consider fermionic dense matter under a magnetic field, where fermions couple minimally to gauge fields, and calculate anomalous currents at one loop. We find anomalous currents are spontaneously generated along the magnetic field but fermions only in the lowest Landau level contribute to anomalous currents. We then show that there are no more corrections to the anomalous currents from two or higher loops.

  4. Complex polarization propagator calculations of magnetic circular dichroism spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, Harald; Ruud, Kenneth; Coriani, Sonia; Norman, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    It is demonstrated that the employment of the nonlinear complex polarization propagator enables the calculation of the complete magnetic circular dichroism spectra of closed-shell molecules, including at the same time both the so-called Faraday A and B terms. In this approach, the differential absorption of right and left circularly polarized light in the presence of a static magnetic field is determined from the real part of the magnetic field-perturbed electric dipole polarizability. The introduction of the finite lifetimes of the electronically excited states into the theory results in response functions that are well behaved in the entire spectral region, i.e., the divergencies that are found in conventional response theory approaches at the transition energies of the system are not present. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated by calculations of the ultraviolet magnetic circular dichroism spectra of para-benzoquinone, tetrachloro-para-benzoquinone, and cyclopropane. The present results are obtained with the complex polarization propagator approach in conjunction with Kohn-Sham density functional theory and the standard adiabatic density functionals B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP, and BHLYP.

  5. Black Holes and Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Filip Hejda; Ji?í Bi?ák

    2015-10-01

    We briefly summarise the basic properties of spacetimes representing rotating, charged black holes in strong axisymmetric magnetic fields. We concentrate on extremal cases, for which the horizon surface gravity vanishes. We investigate their properties by finding simpler spacetimes that exhibit their geometries near degenerate horizons. Employing the simpler geometries obtained by near-horizon limiting description we analyse the Meissner effect of magnetic field expulsion from extremal black holes.

  6. Magnetic fields on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1981-01-01

    Synoptic observations of solar magnetic fields are discussed. Seen in long-term averages, the magnetic fields of the Sun show distinctive behavior. The active-region latitudes are characterized by magnetic fields of preceding polarity. The flow of following polarity fields to make up the polar fields is episodic, not continuous. This field motion is a directed poleward flow and is not due to diffusion. The total magnetic flux on the solar surface, which is related linearly to the calcium emission in integrated sunlight, varies from activity minimum to maximum by a factor of 2 or 3. Nearly all this flux is seen at active-region latitudes-only about 1% is at the poles. The total flux of the Sun disappears from the surface at a very rapid rate and is replaced by new flux. All the field and flux patterns that we see originate in active-region latitudes. The polar magnetic fields of the Sun were observed to change polarity recently. The variations of the full-disk solar flux are shown to lead to the proper rotation rate of the Sun, but the phase of the variations is constant for only a year or two at most.

  7. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  8. Magnetic field effect on hemin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoszek, Mariola; Balanda, Maria; Skrzypek, Danuta; Drzazga, Zofia

    2001-12-01

    Magnetic behaviour of hemin has been investigated by means of magnetostatic methods, AC-susceptibility measurements and EPR spectroscopy. The measurements were made using polycrystalline and oriented samples of hemin in the temperature range 2.3-292 K and in magnetic fields up to 6 T. In the paramagnetic region, the susceptibility obeys the Curie-Weiss law with positive Curie-Weiss temperature. At low temperature, a rapid increase of the susceptibility is noticed but up to 2 K no long-range correlations are observed. The studies show that the iron ion in hemin exists in two spin states ( S= {5}/{2} and {1}/{2}). The applied magnetic field increases the occupation of the low-spin state. Hemin shows high-field-induced magnetic anisotropy which, similar to the susceptibility, increases with decreasing temperature.

  9. Primordial magnetic fields from self-ordering scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-04-01

    A symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe could have led to the formation of cosmic defects. Because these defects dynamically excite not only scalar and tensor type cosmological perturbations but also vector type ones, they may serve as a source of primordial magnetic fields. In this study, we calculate the time evolution and the spectrum of magnetic fields that are generated by a type of cosmic defects, called global textures, using the non-linear sigma (NLSM) model. Based on the standard cosmological perturbation theory, we show, both analytically and numerically, that a vector-mode relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids is induced by textures, which inevitably leads to the generation of magnetic fields over a wide range of scales. We find that the amplitude of the magnetic fields is given by B~10?9((1+z)/103)?2.5(v/mpl)2(k/Mpc?1)3.5/?N Gauss in the radiation dominated era for klesssim 1 Mpc?1, with v being the vacuum expectation value of the O(N) symmetric scalar fields. By extrapolating our numerical result toward smaller scales, we expect that B~ 10?14.5((1+z)/103)1/2(v/mpl)2(k/Mpc?1)1/2/?N Gauss on scales of kgtrsim 1 Mpc?1 at redshift 0zgtrsim 110. This might be a seed of the magnetic fields observed on large scales today.

  10. Neutrino dispersion in external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, A. V.; Mikheev, N. V.; Vassilevskaya, L. A.; Raffelt, G. G.

    2006-01-15

    We calculate the neutrino self-energy operator {sigma}(p) in the presence of a magnetic field B. In particular, we consider the weak-field limit eB<field' m{sub l}{sup 2}<field, we show that it is crucial to include the contributions from all Landau levels of the intermediate charged lepton, not just the ground state. For the conditions of the early universe where the background medium consists of a charge-symmetric plasma, the pure B-field contribution to the neutrino dispersion relation is proportional to (eB){sup 2} and thus comparable to the contribution of the magnetized plasma.

  11. Vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Teuber, D.; West, E. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Henze, W., Jr.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) guest investigation to determine the vertical gradients of sunspot magnetic fields for the first time from coordinated observations of photospheric and transition-region fields are described. Descriptions are given of both the photospheric vector field of a sunspot, derived from observations using the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograph, and of the line-of-sight component in the transition region, obtained from the SMM Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter instrument. On the basis of these data, vertical gradients of the line-of-sight magnetic field component are calculated using three methods. It is found that the vertical gradient of Bz is lower than values from previous studies and that the transition-region field occurs at a height of approximately 4000-6000 km above the photosphere.

  12. Magnetic fields in quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the axial fields in high-latitude quiescent prominences is considered. The fact that almost all quiescent prominences obey the same hemisphere-dependent rule strongly suggests that the solar differential rotation plays an important role in producing the axial fields. However, the observations are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the axial fields are produced by differential rotation acting on an existing coronal magnetic field. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are considered. The possibility that the sign of the axial field depends on the topology of the magnetic field in which the prominence is embedded is examined, as is the possibility that the neutral line is tilted with respect to the east-west direction, so that differential rotation causes the neutral line also to rotate with time. The possibility that the axial fields of quiescent prominences have their origin below the solar surface is also considered.

  13. Magnetic properties of the nucleon in a uniform background field

    E-print Network

    Thomas Primer; Waseem Kamleh; Derek Leinweber; Matthias Burkardt

    2013-07-05

    We present results for the magnetic moment and magnetic polarisability of the neutron and the magnetic moment of the proton. These results are calculated using the uniform background field method on 32^3 x 64 dynamical QCD lattices provided by the PACS-CS collaboration as part of the ILDG. We use a uniform background magnetic field quantised by the periodic spatial volume. We investigate ways to improve the effective energy plots used to calculate magnetic polarisabilities, including the use of correlation matrix techniques with various source smearings.

  14. IR photodetector based on rectangular quantum wire in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Nandan

    2014-04-24

    In this paper we study rectangular quantum wire based IR detector with magnetic field applied along the wires. The energy spectrum of a particle in rectangular box shows level repulsions and crossings when external magnetic field is applied. Due to this complex level dynamics, we can tune the spacing between any two levels by varying the magnetic field. This method allows user to change the detector parameters according to his/her requirements. In this paper, we numerically calculate the energy sub-band levels of the square quantum wire in constant magnetic field along the wire and quantify the possible operating wavelength range that can be obtained by varying the magnetic field. We also calculate the photon absorption probability at different magnetic fields and give the efficiency for different wavelengths if the transition is assumed between two lowest levels.

  15. Measurement of the CMS Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    V. I. Klyukhin; A. Ball; F. Bergsma; D. Campi; B. Curé; A. Gaddi; H. Gerwig; A. Hervé; J. Korienek; F. Linde; C. Lindenmeyer; R. Loveless; M. Mulders; T. Nebel; R. P. Smith; D. Stickland; G. Teafoe; L. Veillet; J. K. Zimmerman

    2011-10-03

    The measurement of the magnetic field in the tracking volume inside the superconducting coil of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector under construction at CERN is done with a fieldmapper designed and produced at Fermilab. The fieldmapper uses 10 3-D B-sensors (Hall probes) developed at NIKHEF and calibrated at CERN to precision 0.05% for a nominal 4 T field. The precise fieldmapper measurements are done in 33840 points inside a cylinder of 1.724 m radius and 7 m long at central fields of 2, 3, 3.5, 3.8, and 4 T. Three components of the magnetic flux density at the CMS coil maximum excitation and the remanent fields on the steel-air interface after discharge of the coil are measured in check-points with 95 3-D B-sensors located near the magnetic flux return yoke elements. Voltages induced in 22 flux-loops made of 405-turn installed on selected segments of the yoke are sampled online during the entire fast discharge (190 s time-constant) of the CMS coil and integrated offline to provide a measurement of the initial magnetic flux density in steel at the maximum field to an accuracy of a few percent. The results of the measurements made at 4 T are reported and compared with a three-dimensional model of the CMS magnet system calculated with TOSCA.

  16. The magnetic field of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.

    1987-01-01

    Aspherical harmonic model of the planetary magnetic field of Uranus is obtained from the Voyager 2 encounter observations using generalized inverse techniques which allow partial solutions to complex (underdetermined) problems. The Goddard Space Flight Center 'Q3' model is characterized by a large dipole tilt (58.6 deg) relative to the rotation axis, a dipole moment of 0.228 G R(Uranus radii cubed) and an unusually large quadrupole moment. Characteristics of this complex model magnetic field are illustrated using contour maps of the field on the planet's surface and discussed in the context of possible dynamo generation in the relatively poorly conducting 'ice' mantle.

  17. Transport Properties of Equilibrium Argon Plasma in a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Laricchiuta, A.; Chikhaoui, A.; Kustova, E. V.; Giordano, D.

    2005-05-16

    Electron electrical conductivity coefficients of equilibrium Argon plasma in a magnetic field are calculated up to the 12th Chapman-Enskog approximation at pressure of 1 atm and 0.1 atm for temperatures 500K-20000K; the magnetic Hall parameter spans from 0.01 to 100. The collision integrals used in the calculations are discussed. The convergence properties of the different approximations are assessed. The degree of anisotropy introduced by the presence of the magnetic field is evaluated. Differences with the isotropic case can be very substantial. The biggest effects are visible at high ionization degrees, i.e. high temperatures, and at strong magnetic fields.

  18. CALCULATIONS FOR A MERCURY JET TARGET IN A SOLENOID MAGNET CAPTURE SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    production surrounds the mercury target. As the liquid metal jet enters or exits the field eddy currents are induced. We calculate the effects that a liquid metal jet experiences in entering and exiting the magnetic effects of a liquid metal target moving in a solenoid magnetic field. This paper is based in part

  19. Magnetic field fluctuations during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Before a magnetospheric substorm and during its early phases the magnetic field magnitude in the geomagnetic tail increases and field lines in the nighttime hemisphere assume a more tail-like configuration. Before the substorm onset a minimum amount of magnetic flux is observed to cross the neutral sheet which means that the neutral sheet currents attain their most earthward locations and their greatest current densities. This configuration apparently results from an increased transport of magnetic flux to the tail caused by a southward interplanetary magnetic field. The field begins relaxing toward a more dipolar configuration at the time of a substorm onset with the recovery probably occurring first between 6 and 10 R sub E. This recovery must be associated with magnetospheric convection which restores magnetic flux to the dayside hemisphere. Field aligned currents appear to be required to connect magnetospheric currents to the auroral electrojets, implying that a net current flows in a limited range of longitudes. Space measurements supporting current systems are limited. More evidence exists for the occurrence of double current sheets which do not involve net current at a given longitude.

  20. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  1. QED Effective Action in Magnetic Field Backgrounds and Electromagnetic Duality

    E-print Network

    Sang Pyo Kim

    2011-09-06

    In the in-out formalism we advance a method of the inverse scattering matrix for calculating effective actions in pure magnetic field backgrounds. The one-loop effective actions are found in a localized magnetic field of Sauter type and approximately in a general magnetic field by applying the uniform semiclassical approximation. The effective actions exhibit the electromagnetic duality between a constant electric field and a constant magnetic field and between $E(x) = E sech^2 (x/L)$ and $B(x) = B sech^2 (x/L)$.

  2. Magnetic field dependent measurement techniques of surface tension of magnetic fluid at an air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Nishant; Virpura, Hiral; Patel, Rajesh

    2015-06-01

    We describe here two measurement techniques to determine surface tension of magnetic fluid. (i) magneti c field dependent capillary rise method and (ii) Taylor wavelength method in which the distance between the consecutive stable spikes was measured and then surface tension was calculated. The surface tension measurements from both the methods are compared. It is observed that surface tension of magnetic fluid increases with increase in magnetic field due to field dependent structure formation in magnetic fluid at an air interface. We have also measured magnetic susceptibility and surface tension for different volume fractions. The measurement of magnetic susceptibility is carried out using Quincke's experimental techniques.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip

    2010-12-15

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific loss power of PNIPAM-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was peculiarly high, and the heat loss mechanism of this material remains to be elucidated. Since thermocatalysis is a long-term goal of this project, we also investigated the effects of the oscillating magnetic field system for the synthesis of 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid. Application of an oscillating magnetic field in the presence of magnetic particles with high thermal response was found to effectively increase the reaction rate of the uncatalyzed synthesis of the coumarin derivative compared to the room temperature control.

  4. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  5. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing hallways with different kinds of pillars, doors and elevators. All in all, this dissertation contributes the following: 1) provides a framework for understanding the presence of ambient magnetic fields indoors and utilizing them to solve the indoor localization problem; 2) develops an application that is independent of the user and the smart phones and 3) requires no other infrastructure since it is deployed on a device that encapsulates the sensing, computing and inferring functionalities, thereby making it a novel contribution to the mobile and pervasive computing domain.

  6. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE PROPAGATION OF NUCLEAR FLAMES IN MAGNETIC WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuna, Masamichi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2012-04-10

    We investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the propagation of laminar flames of nuclear reactions taking place in white dwarfs with masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit. We calculate the velocities of laminar flames parallel and perpendicular to uniform magnetic fields as eigenvalues of steady solutions for magnetic hydrodynamical equations. As a result, we find that even when the magnetic pressure does not dominate the entire pressure it is possible for the magnetic field to suppress the flame propagation through the thermal conduction. Above the critical magnetic field, the flame velocity decreases with increasing magnetic field strength as v {approx} B{sup -1}. In media with densities of 10{sup 7}, 10{sup 8}, and 10{sup 9} g cm{sup -3}, the critical magnetic fields are orders of {approx}10{sup 10}, 10{sup 11}, and 10{sup 12} G, respectively.

  7. Pressure, chaotic magnetic fields, and magnetohydrodynamic equilibria S. R. Hudsona

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Stuart

    Pressure, chaotic magnetic fields, and magnetohydrodynamic equilibria S. R. Hudsona and N. Nakajima the simplest model capable of approximating macroscopic force balance. Ideal force balance is when the pressure and not suitable for numerical calculations. If the pressure and magnetic field are continuous, the only nontrivial

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations Applied to Magnetic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Engelhardt

    2006-08-09

    We have calculated the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of Heisenberg spin systems using a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method. We have used some of these systems as models to describe recently synthesized magnetic molecules, and-upon comparing the results of these calculations with experimental data-have obtained accurate estimates for the basic parameters of these models. We have also performed calculations for other systems that are of more general interest, being relevant both for existing experimental data and for future experiments. Utilizing the concept of importance sampling, these calculations can be carried out in an arbitrarily large quantum Hilbert space, while still avoiding any approximations that would introduce systematic errors. The only errors are statistical in nature, and as such, their magnitudes are accurately estimated during the course of a simulation. Frustrated spin systems present a major challenge to the QMC method, nevertheless, in many instances progress can be made. In this chapter, the field of magnetic molecules is introduced, paying particular attention to the characteristics that distinguish magnetic molecules from other systems that are studied in condensed matter physics. We briefly outline the typical path by which we learn about magnetic molecules, which requires a close relationship between experiments and theoretical calculations. The typical experiments are introduced here, while the theoretical methods are discussed in the next chapter. Each of these theoretical methods has a considerable limitation, also described in Chapter 2, which together serve to motivate the present work. As is shown throughout the later chapters, the present QMC method is often able to provide useful information where other methods fail. In Chapter 3, the use of Monte Carlo methods in statistical physics is reviewed, building up the fundamental ideas that are necessary in order to understand the method that has been used in this work. With these ideas in hand, we then provide a detailed explanation of the current QMC method in Chapter 4. The remainder of the thesis is devoted to presenting specific results: Chapters 5 and 6 contain articles in which this method has been used to answer general questions that are relevant to broad classes of systems. Then, in Chapter 7, we provide an analysis of four different species of magnetic molecules that have recently been synthesized and studied. In all cases, comparisons between QMC calculations and experimental data allow us to distinguish a viable microscopic model and make predictions for future experiments. In Chapter 8, the infamous ''negative sign problem'' is described in detail, and we clearly indicate the limitations on QMC that are imposed by this obstacle. Finally, Chapter 9 contains a summary of the present work and the expected directions for future research.

  9. Geometric Phase in Fluctuating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. S.

    2009-08-01

    Geometric phase in a two-level atom with a fluctuating magnetic field is calculated by a nonunit vector ray in a complex projective Hilbert space, where the nonunit vector is a map connecting with density matrices of a quantum open system. We find that the Pancharatnam phase oscillates with evolving time. The Berry phase depends on the fluctuating parameter but it is proportional to the area spanned in the Bloch parameter space.

  10. Magnetic Field Issues in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, Labros Spiridon

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging depend on the capability of the available hardware. Specifically, for the main magnet configuration, using derivative constraints, we can create a static magnetic field with reduced levels of inhomogeneity over a prescribed imaging volume. In the gradient coil, the entire design for the axial elliptical coil, and the mathematical foundation for the transverse elliptical coil have been presented. Also, the design of a self-shielded cylindrical gradient coil with a restricted length has been presented. In order to generate gradient coils adequate for head imaging without including the human shoulders in the design, asymmetric cylindrical coils in which the gradient center is shifted axially towards the end of a finite cylinder have been introduced and theoretical as well as experimental results have been presented. In order to eliminate eddy current effects in the design of the non-shielded asymmetric gradient coils, the self-shielded asymmetric cylindrical gradient coil geometry has been introduced. Continuing the development of novel geometries for the gradient coils, the complete set of self-shielded cylindrical gradient coils, which are designed such that the x component of the magnetic field varies linearly along the three traditional gradient axes, has been presented. In order to understand the behavior of the rf field inside a dielectric object, a mathematical model is briefly presented. Although specific methods can provide an indication of the rf behavior inside a loosely dielectric object, finite element methodology is the ultimate approach for modeling the human torso and generating an accurate picture for the shape of the rf field inside this dielectric object. For this purpose we have developed a 3D finite element model, using the Coulomb gauge condition as a constraint. Agreement with the heterogeneous multilayer planar model has been established, while agreement with theoretical results from the spherical model and experimental results from the cylindrical model at 170 M H z is very good and provides an encouraging sign for using this finite element approach for modeling the rf inside the human body. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  11. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N.R., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on small-scale and large-scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields during 1987-1990 is reviewed, focusing on observational studies. Particular attention is given to the new techniques, which include the correlation tracking of granules, the use of highly Zeeman-sensitive infrared spectral lines and multiple lines to deduce small-scale field strength, the application of long integration times coupled with good seeing conditions to study weak fields, and the use of high-resolution CCD detectors together with computer image-processing techniques to obtain images with unsurpassed spatial resolution. Synoptic observations of large-scale fields during the sunspot cycle are also discussed. 101 refs.

  12. Effects of non-linearities on magnetic field generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nalson, Ellie; Malik, Karim A.; Christopherson, Adam J. E-mail: achristopherson@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic fields are present on all scales in the Universe. While we understand the processes which amplify the fields fairly well, we do not have a ''natural'' mechanism to generate the small initial seed fields. By using fully relativistic cosmological perturbation theory and going beyond the usual confines of linear theory we show analytically how magnetic fields are generated. This is the first analytical calculation of the magnetic field at second order, using gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory, and including all the source terms. To this end, we have rederived the full set of governing equations independently. Our results suggest that magnetic fields of the order of 10{sup -30}- 10{sup -27} G can be generated (although this depends on the small scale cut-off of the integral), which is largely in agreement with previous results that relied upon numerical calculations. These fields are likely too small to act as the primordial seed fields for dynamo mechanisms.

  13. Cryogenic magnet case and distributed structural materials for high-field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, L.T.; Miller, J.R.; Kerns, J.A.; Myall, J.O.

    1987-10-09

    The superconducting magnets of the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER II) will generate high magnetic fields over large bores. The resulting electromagnetic forces require the use of large volumes of distributed steel and thick magnet case for structural support. Here we review the design allowables, calculated loads and forces, and structural materials selection for TIBER II. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. CALCULATIONS FOR A MERCURY JET TARGET IN A SOLENOID MAGNET CAPTURE SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; PALMER, R.B.; THIEBERGER, P.; WEGGEL, R.J.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-06-18

    A mercury jet is being considered as the production target for a muon storage ring facility to produce an intense neutrino beam. A 20 T solenoid magnet that captures pions for muon production surrounds the mercury target. As the liquid metal jet enters or exits the field eddy currents are induced. We calculate the effects that a liquid metal jet experiences in entering and exiting the magnetic field for the magnetic configuration considered in the Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study II.

  15. Magnetic fields around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our Newtonian results are excellent approximations for slowly spinning black holes. We proceed to address the issue of the spin dependence of the Blandford & Znajek power. The result we choose to highlight is our finding that given the validity of our assumption for the dynamical behavior of the so-called plunge region in black hole accretors, rotating black holes produce maximum Poynting flux via the Blandford & Znajek process for a black hole spin parameter of about a [approximate] 0.8. This is contrary to the conventional claim that the maximum electromagnetic flux is achieved for highest black hole spin.

  16. Quark-gluon plasma in an external magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Levkova, L; DeTar, C

    2014-01-10

    Using numerical simulations of lattice QCD we calculate the effect of an external magnetic field on the equation of state of the quark-gluon plasma. The results are obtained using a Taylor expansion of the pressure with respect to the magnetic field for the first time. The coefficients of the expansion are computed to second order in the magnetic field. Our setup for the external magnetic field avoids complications arising from toroidal boundary conditions, making a Taylor series expansion straightforward. This study is exploratory and is meant to serve as a proof of principle. PMID:24483888

  17. Electromagnetic radiation by quark-gluon plasma in magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Kirill Tuchin

    2012-06-03

    The electromagnetic radiation by quark-gluon plasma in strong magnetic field is calculated. The contributing processes are synchrotron radiation and one--photon annihilation. It is shown that in relativistic heavy--ion collisions at RHIC and LHC synchrotron radiation dominates over the annihilation. Moreover, it constitutes a significant part of all photons produced by the plasma at low transverse momenta; its magnitude depends on the plasma temperature and the magnetic field strength. Electromagnetic radiation in magnetic field is probably the missing piece that resolves a discrepancy between the theoretical models and the experimental data. It is argued that electromagnetic radiation increases with the magnetic field strength and plasma temperature.

  18. The effect of magnetic field on the electrical breakdown characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radmilovic-Radjenovic, Marija; Radjenovic, Branislav

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a simple phenomenological model and detailed simulation studies of the breakdown of a gas under the simultaneous action of electric and magnetic fields. In deriving expressions for the breakdown voltage variations of both the ionization coefficient and the secondary electron yield in a magnetic field are taken into account. Calculations were carried out by using the XOOPIC code with the old and the improved secondary emission models adjusted to involve the influence of the magnetic field on the secondary electron production. It was shown that the incorporation of the variation of the secondary electron yield with magnetic field leads to the better agreement with existing experimental results.

  19. Supplementary Notes: 1. Simulated magnetic field pattern

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    magnetic field B0 and the MNP- labeled cell's magnetization vector: || = = ! "# $ !% & '. (3 here, under a 400 G magnetizing field B0) uniformly distributed on a 15-µm diameter spherical cell with the applied bias magnetic field B0 to create a characteristic 2-lobed shape common to all labeled cells

  20. Core shifts, magnetic fields and magnetization of extragalactic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Sikora, Marek; Pjanka, Patryk; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the effect of radio-jet core shift, which is a dependence of the position of the jet radio core on the observational frequency. We derive a new method of measuring the jet magnetic field based on both the value of the shift and the observed radio flux, which complements the standard method that assumes equipartition. Using both methods, we re-analyse the blazar sample of Zamaninasab et al. We find that equipartition is satisfied only if the jet opening angle in the radio core region is close to the values found observationally, ?0.1-0.2 divided by the bulk Lorentz factor, ?j. Larger values, e.g. 1/?j, would imply magnetic fields much above equipartition. A small jet opening angle implies in turn the magnetization parameter of ?1. We determine the jet magnetic flux taking into account this effect. We find that the transverse-averaged jet magnetic flux is fully compatible with the model of jet formation due to black hole (BH) spin-energy extraction and the accretion being a magnetically arrested disc (MAD). We calculate the jet average mass-flow rate corresponding to this model and find it consists of a substantial fraction of the mass accretion rate. This suggests the jet composition with a large fraction of baryons. We also calculate the average jet power, and find it moderately exceeds the accretion power, dot{M} c^2, reflecting BH spin energy extraction. We find our results for radio galaxies at low Eddington ratios are compatible with MADs but require a low radiative efficiency, as predicted by standard accretion models.

  1. Crystal field and magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

  2. Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

  3. Heliospheric Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Adrian Sabin

    2007-09-01

    From the Maxwell equations in the local Minkowski spacetime chart (derived from the DEUS topology) we obtain the relations to be particularized for a solar type star and a massive star, and later to be used for a 3D representation of the electric and magnetic field topology (in heliosphere or in a stellar atmosphere) and of its evolution with the cosmological time.

  4. Finite Beta Boundary Magnetic Fields of NCSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, A.; Kaiser, T.; Mioduszewski, P.

    2004-11-01

    The magnetic field between the plasma surface and wall of the National Compact Stellarator (NCSX), which uses quasi-symmetry to combine the best features of the tokamak and stellarator in a configuration of low aspect ratio is mapped via field line tracing in a range of finite beta in which part of the rotational transform is generated by the bootstrap current. We adopt the methodology developed for W7-X, in which an equilibrium solution is computed by an inverse equilibrium solver based on an energy minimizing variational moments code, VMEC2000[1], which solves directly for the shape of the flux surfaces given the external coils and their currents as well as a bootstrap current provided by a separate transport calculation. The VMEC solution and the Biot-Savart vacuum fields are coupled to the magnetic field solver for finite-beta equilibrium (MFBE2001)[2] code to determine the magnetic field on a 3D grid over a computational domain. It is found that the edge plasma is more stellarator-like, with a complex 3D structure, and less like the ordered 2D symmetric structure of a tokamak. The field lines make a transition from ergodically covering a surface to ergodically covering a volume, as the distance from the last closed magnetic surface is increased. The results are compared with the PIES[3] calculations. [1] S.P. Hirshman et al. Comput. Phys. Commun. 43 (1986) 143. [2] E. Strumberger, et al. Nucl. Fusion 42 (2002) 827. [3] A.H. Reiman and H.S. Greenside, Comput. Phys. Commun. 43, 157 (1986).

  5. Separation of magnetic field lines

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2012-11-15

    The field lines of magnetic fields that depend on three spatial coordinates are shown to have a fundamentally different behavior from those that depend on two coordinates. Unlike two-coordinate cases, a flux tube in a magnetic field that depends on all three spatial coordinates that has a circular cross section at one location along the tube characteristically has a highly distorted cross section at other locations. In an ideal evolution of a magnetic field, the current densities typically increase. Crudely stated, if the current densities increase by a factor {sigma}, the ratio of the long to the short distance across a cross section of a flux tube characteristically increases by e{sup 2{sigma}}, and the ratio of the longer distance to the initial radius increases as e{sup {sigma}}. Electron inertia prevents a plasma from isolating two magnetic field structures on a distance scale shorter than c/{omega}{sub pe}, which is about 10 cm in the solar corona, and reconnection must be triggered if {sigma} becomes sufficiently large. The radius of the sun, R{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm is about e{sup 23} times larger, so when {sigma} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 23, two lines separated by c/{omega}{sub pe} at one location can be separated by the full scale of any magnetic structures in the corona at another. The conditions for achieving a large exponentiation, {sigma}, are derived, and the importance of exponentiation is discussed.

  6. Primordial magnetic fields from the string network

    E-print Network

    Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic strings are a type of cosmic defect formed by a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe. Individual strings would have gathered to build a network, and their dynamical motion would induce scalar--, vector-- and tensor--type perturbations. In this paper, we focus on the vector mode perturbations arising from the string network based on the one scale model and calculate the time evolution and the power spectrum of the associated magnetic fields. We show that the relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids induced by the string network can generate magnetic fields over a wide range of scales based on standard cosmology. We obtain the magnetic field spectrum before recombination as $a^2B(k,z)\\sim4\\times10^{-16}G\\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{4.25}(k/{\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{3.5}$ Gauss on super-horizon scales, and $a^2B(k,z)\\sim2.4\\times10^{-17}G\\mu/((1+z)/1000)^{3.5}(k/{\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^{2.5}$ Gauss on sub-horizon scales in co-moving coordinates. This magnetic field grows up to the end of recombination, ...

  7. Magnetic fields in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The observed properties of solar magnetic fields are reviewed, with particular reference to the complexities imposed on the field by motions of the highly conducting gas. Turbulent interactions between gas and field lead to heating or cooling of the gas according to whether the field energy density is less or greater than the maximum kinetic energy density in the convection zone. The field strength above which cooling sets in is 700 gauss. A weak solar dipole field may be primeval, but dynamo action is also important in generating new flux. The dynamo is probably not confined to the convection zone, but extends throughout most of the volume of the sun. Planetary tides appear to play a role in driving the dynamo.

  8. Radiation from Relativistic Shocks with Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkawa, K.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Niemiec, J.; Mizuno, A.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Oka, M.; Fishman, J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-positron (electron-ion) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs at shocked region. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons in turbulent magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. New recent calculation of spectra with various different Lorentz factors of jets (two electrons) and initial magnetic fields. New spectra based on small simulations will be presented.

  9. The magnetic field of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper is concerned mainly with the intrinsic planetary field which dominates the inner magnetosphere up to a distance of 10 to 12 Jovian radii where other phenomena, such as ring currents and diamagnetic effects of trapped charged particles, become significant. The main magnetic field of Jupiter as determined by in-situ observations by Pioner 10 and 11 is found to be relatively more complex than a simple offset tilted dipole. Deviations from a simple dipole geometry lead to distortions of the charged particle L shells and warping of the magnetic equator. Enhanced absorption effects associated with Io and Amalthea are predicted. The results are consistent with the conclusions derived from extensive radio observations at decimetric and decametric wavelengths for the planetary field.

  10. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  11. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of the broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  12. Bacterial Growth in Weak Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina

    2015-03-01

    We study the growth of bacteria in a weak magnetic field. Computational analysis of experimental data shows that the growth rate of bacteria is affected by the magnetic field. The effect of magnetic field depends on the strength and type of magnetic field. It also depends on the type of bacteria. We mainly study gram positive and gram negative bacteria of rod type as well as spherical bacteria. Preliminary results show that the weak magnetic field enhances the growth of rod shape gram negative bacteria. Gram positive bacteria can be even killed in the inhomogeneous magnetic field.

  13. Non-axisymmetric magnetic modes of neutron stars with purely poloidal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Hidetaka; Lee, Umin; Yoshida, Shijun

    2016-01-01

    We calculate non-axisymmetric oscillations of neutron stars magnetized by purely poloidal magnetic fields. We use polytropes of index n = 1 and 1.5 as a background model, where we ignore the equilibrium deformation due to the magnetic field. Since separation of variables is not possible for the oscillation of magnetized stars, we employ finite series expansions for the perturbations using spherical harmonic functions. Solving the oscillation equations as the boundary and eigenvalue problem, we find two kinds of discrete magnetic modes, that is, stable (oscillatory) magnetic modes and unstable (monotonically growing) magnetic modes. For isentropic models, the frequency or the growth rate of the magnetic modes is exactly proportional to BS, the strength of the field at the surface. The oscillation frequency and the growth rate are affected by the buoyant force in the interior, and the stable stratification tends to stabilize the unstable magnetic modes.

  14. Director Field of Disclination Line in Uniaxial Nematic Liquid Crystal in the Presence of Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadivar, Erfan

    Using the Oseen-Zöcher-Frank theory, in the steady state, I study the distortion energy of a disclination line in nematic liquid crystal in the presence of an external magnetic field. The director field around a disclination line is exactly calculated by minimizing the total free energy. The behavior of total free energy as a function of magnetic field for two kinds of nematic material (positive and negative magnetic anisotropy) are discussed. In the short distance limit, the total free energy per unit length is calculated. In this case, the magnetic dependence of total free energy is discussed.

  15. Magnetic fields in gaps surrounding giant protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Sarah L.; Wardle, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Giant protoplanets evacuate a gap in their host protoplanetary disc, which gas must cross before it can be accreted. A magnetic field is likely carried into the gap, potentially influencing the flow. Gap crossing has been simulated with varying degrees of attention to field evolution [pure hydrodynamical, ideal, and resistive magnetohydrodynamical (MHD)], but as yet there has been no detailed assessment of the role of the field accounting for all three key non-ideal MHD effects: Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall drift. We present a detailed investigation of gap magnetic field structure as determined by non-ideal effects. We assess susceptibility to turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and angular momentum loss from large-scale fields. As full non-ideal simulations are computationally expensive, we take an a posteriori approach, estimating MHD quantities from the pure hydrodynamical gap-crossing simulation by Tanigawa, Ohtsuki & Machida. We calculate the ionization fraction and estimate field strength and geometry to determine the strength of non-ideal effects. We find that the protoplanetary disc field would be easily drawn into the gap and circumplanetary disc. Hall drift dominates, so that much of the gap is conditionally MRI unstable depending on the alignment of the field and disc rotation axes. Field alignment also influences the strong toroidal field component permeating the gap. Large-scale magnetic forces are small in the circumplanetary disc, indicating that they cannot drive accretion there. However, turbulence will be key during satellite growth as it affects critical disc features, such as the location of the ice line.

  16. Superposition of DC magnetic fields by cascading multiple magnets in magnetic loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2015-09-01

    A novel method that can effectively collect the DC magnetic field produced by multiple separated magnets is proposed. With the proposed idea of a magnetic loop, the DC magnetic field produced by these separated magnets can be effectively superimposed together. The separated magnets can be cascaded in series or in parallel. A novel nested magnetic loop is also proposed to achieve a higher DC magnetic field in the common air region without increasing the DC magnetic field in each magnetic loop. The magnetic loop can be made by a magnetic hose, which is designed by transformation optics and can be realized by the combination of super-conductors and ferromagnetic materials.

  17. Magnetic holes in the solar wind. [(interplanetary magnetic fields)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, J. M.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Lemaire, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of high resolution interplanetary magnetic field measurements from the magnetometer on Explorer 43 which showed that low magnetic field intensities in the solar wind at 1 AU occur as distinct depressions or 'holes'. These magnetic holes are new kinetic-scale phenomena, having a characteristic dimension on the order of 20,000 km. They occurred at a rate of 1.5/day in the 18-day time span (March 18 to April 6, 1971) that was analyzed. Most of the magnetic holes are characterized by both a depression in the absolute value of the magnetic field, and a change in the magnetic field direction; some of these are possibly the result of magnetic merging. However, in other cases the magnetic field direction does not change; such holes are not due to magnetic merging, but might be a diamagnetic effect due to localized plasma inhomogeneities.

  18. Thermal evolution of neutron stars with decaying magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Xi-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Rotochemical heating originates in the deviation from beta equilibrium due to spin-down compression, which is closely related to the dipole magnetic field. We numerically calculate the deviation from chemical equilibrium and thermal evolution of neutron stars with decaying magnetic fields. We find that the power-law long term decay of the magnetic field slightly affects the deviation from chemical equilibrium and surface temperature. However, the magnetic decay leads to older neutron stars that could have a different surface temperature with the same magnetic field strength. That is, older neutron stars with a low magnetic field (108 G) could have a lower temperature even with rotochemical heating in operation, which probably explains the lack of other observations on older millisecond pulsars with higher surface temperature, except millisecond pulsar J0437–4715.

  19. Explaining Mercury's peculiar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Johannes; Cao, Hao; Heyner, Daniel; Dietrich, Wieland; Christensen, Ulrich R.

    2014-05-01

    MESSENGER magnetometer data revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is not only particularly weak but also has a peculiar geometry. The MESSENGER team finds that the location of the magnetic equator always lies significantly north of the geographic equator, is largely independent of the distance to the planet, and also varies only weakly with longitude. The field is best described by an axial dipole that is offset to the north by about 20% of the planetary radius. In terms of classical Gauss coefficients, this translates into a low axial dipole component of g10= -190 nT but a relatively large axial quadrupole contribution that amounts to roughly 40% of this value. The axial octupole is also sizable while higher harmonic contributions are much weaker. Very remarkable is also the fact that the equatorial dipole contribution is very small, consistent with a dipole tilt below 0.8 degree, and this is also true for the other non-axisymmetic field contributions. We analyze several numerical dynamos concerning their capability of explaining Mercury's magnetic field. Classical schemes geared to model the geomagnetic field typically show a much weaker quadrupole component and thus a smaller offset. The onset only becomes larger when the dynamo operates in the multipolar regime at higher Rayleigh numbers. However, since the more complex dynamics generally promotes all higher multipole contributions the location of the magnetic equator varies strongly with longitude and distance to the planet. The situation improves when introducing a stably stratified outer layer in the dynamo region, representing either a rigid FeS layer or a sub-adiabatic core-mantle boundary heat flux. This layer filters out the higher harmonic contributions and the field not only becomes sufficiently weak but also assumes a Mercury like offset geometry during a few percent of the simulation time. To increase the likelihood for the offset configuration, the north-south symmetry must be permanently broken and we explore two scenarios. Increasing the heat flux through the northern hemisphere of the core-mantle boundary is an obvious choice but is not supported by current models for Mercury's mantle. We find that a combination of internal rather than bottom driving and an increased heat flux through the equatorial region of the core-mantle boundary also promotes the required symmetry breaking and results in very Mercury like fields. The reason is that the imposed heat flux pattern, though being equatorially symmetric, lowers the critical Rayleigh number for the onset of equatorially anti-symmetric convection modes. In both scenarios, a stably stratified layer or a feedback coupling to the magnetospheric field is required for lowering the field strength to Mercury-like values.

  20. Modified methods of stellar magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The standard methods of the magnetic field measurement, based on an analysis of the relation between the Stokes V-parameter and the first derivative of the total line profile intensity, were modified by applying a linear integral operator \\hat{L} to both sides of this relation. As the operator \\hat{L}, the operator of the wavelet transform with DOG-wavelets is used. The key advantage of the proposed method is an effective suppression of the noise contribution to the line profile and the Stokes parameter V. The efficiency of the method has been studied using model line profiles with various noise contributions. To test the proposed method, the spectropolarimetric observations of the A0 star ?2 CVn, the Of?p star HD 148937, and the A0 supergiant HD 92207 were used. The longitudinal magnetic field strengths calculated by our method appeared to be in good agreement with those determined by other methods.

  1. MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS B. Fornberg,2

    E-print Network

    Fornberg, Bengt

    MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS N. Flyer,1 B Axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields external to a unit sphere are studied as solutions to boundary value to the formation of an azimuthal rope of twisted magnetic field embedded within the global field, and to the energy

  2. Field errors in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.Q.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of this workshop is a discussion of the techniques for tracking particles through arbitrary accelerator field configurations to look for dynamical effects that are suggested by various theoretical models but are not amenable to detailed analysis. A major motivation for this type of study is that many of our accelerator projects are based on the use of superconducting magnets which have field imperfections that are larger and of a more complex nature than those of conventional magnets. Questions such as resonances, uncorrectable closed orbit effects, coupling between planes, and diffusion mechanisms all assume new importance. Since, simultaneously, we are trying to do sophisticated beam manipulations such as stacking, high current accelerator, long life storage, and low loss extraction, we clearly need efficient and accurate tracking programs to proceed with confidence.

  3. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  4. Anisotropic Magnetism in Field-Structured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert A.; Martin, James E.; Odinek, Judy; Venturini, Eugene

    1999-06-24

    Magnetic field-structured-composites (FSCs) are made by structuring magnetic particle suspensions in uniaxial or biaxial (e.g. rotating) magnetic fields, while polymerizing the suspending resin. A uniaxial field produces chain-like particle structures, and a biaxial field produces sheet-like particle structures. In either case, these anisotropic structures affect the measured magnetic hysteresis loops, with the magnetic remanence and susceptibility increased significantly along the axis of the structuring field, and decreased slightly orthogonal to the structuring field, relative to the unstructured particle composite. The coercivity is essentially unaffected by structuring. We present data for FSCs of magnetically soft particles, and demonstrate that the altered magnetism can be accounted for by considering the large local fields that occur in FSCs. FSCS of magnetically hard particles show unexpectedly large anisotropies in the remanence, and this is due to the local field effects in combination with the large crystalline anisotropy of this material.

  5. Field quality aspects of CBA superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S.; Engelmann, R.; Fernow, R.; Greene, A.F.; Herrera, J.; Kirk, H.; Skaritka, J.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1983-01-01

    A series of superconducting dipole magnets for the BNL Colliding Beam Accelerator which were manufactured to have the proper field quality characteristics has been tested. This report presents the analysis of the field harmonics of these magnets.

  6. Three dimensional field analysis for the AGS combined function magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W.; Tanaka, M.

    1993-06-01

    In order to study the particle trajectories in the fringe field of the AGS ring during the single bunch multiple extraction (or fast extraction) from the AGS to the muon g-2 experiment and to the RHIC, the magnetic field of the AGS combined function magnets were calculated b using the TOSCA program. The results are compared with the field maps of the previous measurements. The particle tracking is achieved by using the TOSCA program post-processor.

  7. Three dimensional field analysis for the AGS combined function magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W.; Tanaka, M.

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the particle trajectories in the fringe field of the AGS ring during the single bunch multiple extraction (or fast extraction) from the AGS to the muon g-2 experiment and to the RHIC, the magnetic field of the AGS combined function magnets were calculated b using the TOSCA program. The results are compared with the field maps of the previous measurements. The particle tracking is achieved by using the TOSCA program post-processor.

  8. Minireview: Biological effects of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Mustarelli, P. ); Caprotti, M. )

    1991-01-01

    The literature about the biological effects of magnetic fields is reviewed. The authors begin by discussing the weak and/or time variable fields, responsible for subtle changes in the circadian rhythms of superior animals, which are believed to be induced by same sort of resonant mechanism. The safety issues related with the strong magnetic fields and gradients generated by clinical NMR magnets are then considered. The last portion summarizes the debate about the biological effects of strong and uniform magnetic fields.

  9. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  10. Magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Xiuqing Huang

    2008-12-10

    We investigate the factuality of the hypothetical magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field. It is shown from many aspects that the concept of the massive magnetic monopoles clearly is physically untrue. We argue that the static magnetic field of a bar magnet, in fact, is the static electric field of the periodically quasi-one-dimensional electric-dipole superlattice, which can be well established in some transition metals with the localized d-electron. This research may shed light on the perfect unification of magnetic and electrical phenomena.

  11. Magnetic Moment of Vector Mesons in the Background Field Method

    E-print Network

    Frank X. Lee; Scott Moerschbacher; Walter Wilcox

    2007-10-11

    We report some results for the magnetic moments of vector mesons extracted from mass shifts in the presence of static external magnetic fields. The calculations are done on $24^4$ quenched lattices using standard Wilson actions, with $\\beta$=6.0 and pion mass down to 500 MeV. The results are compared to those from the form factor method.

  12. Van der Waals torque induced by external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel-Sirvent, R.; Cocoletzi, G. H.; Palomino-Ovando, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for inducing and controlling van der Waals torques between two parallel slabs using a constant magnetic field. The torque is calculated using the Barash theory of dispersive torques. In III–IV semiconductors such as InSb, the effect of an external magnetic field is to induce an optical anisotropy, in an otherwise isotropic material, that will in turn induce a torque. The calculations of the torque are done in the Voigt configuration, with the magnetic field parallel to the surface of the slabs. As a case study we consider a slab made of calcite and a second slab made of InSb. In the absence of magnetic field there is no torque. As the magnetic field increases, the optical anisotropy of InSb increases and the torque becomes different from zero, increasing with the magnetic field. The resulting torque is of the same order of magnitude as that calculated using permanent anisotropicmaterials when the magnetic fields is close to 1 T.

  13. Cluster Magnetic Fields from Galactic Outflows

    E-print Network

    J. Donnert; K. Dolag; H. Lesch; E. Müller

    2008-10-24

    We performed cosmological, magneto-hydrodynamical simulations to follow the evolution of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters, exploring the possibility that the origin of the magnetic seed fields are galactic outflows during the star-burst phase of galactic evolution. To do this we coupled a semi-analytical model for magnetized galactic winds as suggested by \\citet{2006MNRAS.370..319B} to our cosmological simulation. We find that the strength and structure of magnetic fields observed in galaxy clusters are well reproduced for a wide range of model parameters for the magnetized, galactic winds and do only weakly depend on the exact magnetic structure within the assumed galactic outflows. Although the evolution of a primordial magnetic seed field shows no significant differences to that of galaxy clusters fields from previous studies, we find that the magnetic field pollution in the diffuse medium within filaments is below the level predicted by scenarios with pure primordial magnetic seed field. We therefore conclude that magnetized galactic outflows and their subsequent evolution within the intra-cluster medium can fully account for the observed magnetic fields in galaxy clusters. Our findings also suggest that measuring cosmological magnetic fields in low-density environments such as filaments is much more useful than observing cluster magnetic fields to infer their possible origin.

  14. Magnetic dipole moment determination by near-field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A method for determining the magnetic moment of a spacecraft from magnetic field data taken in a limited region of space close to the spacecraft. The spacecraft's magnetic field equations are derived from first principles. With measurements of this field restricted to certain points in space, the near-field equations for the spacecraft are derived. These equations are solved for the dipole moment by a least squares procedure. A method by which one can estimate the magnitude of the error in the calculations is also presented. This technique was thoroughly tested on a computer. The test program is described and evaluated, and partial results are presented.

  15. Tunable Polarization of Spin Polarized Current by Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, S.; Kim, K.; Lee, J.; Kim, T.; Rhie, K.; Hong, J.; Shin, K-H.

    2010-10-10

    The spin polarization of a high g-factor bulk semiconductor is theoretically investigated in the presence of a magnetic field parallel to a driving electric field. Calculations have been carried out using the energy-dependent relaxation time approximation in association with spin-flip scattering. As the magnitude of the magnetic field increases, the spin-polarized current alternates between the spin-up and spin-down states for the low spin-scattering system. This implies that the current polarization can be tuned by controlling the magnetic field strength, suggesting possible applications to spintronic devices. An experimental method for investigating alternative current polarization is also considered.

  16. Magnetic field sources and their threat to magnetic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, Steve

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic storage media (tapes, disks, cards, etc.) may be damaged by external magnetic fields. The potential for such damage has been researched, but no objective standard exists for the protection of such media. This paper summarizes a magnetic storage facility standard, Publication 933, that ensures magnetic protection of data storage media.

  17. Bats Respond to Very Weak Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 ?T; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 ?T), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth’s magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years. PMID:25922944

  18. Development of magnetic system with high-anisotropy localized magnetic field for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbite, Solveyga E.; Denisultanov, Alaudi K.; Khodzitsky, Mikhail K.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper magnetic system with a localized high-intensity magnetic field due to giant magnetic anisotropy magnets was proposed for THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic system consists of two hemispheres which are made from two types of magnets. The both hemispheres will be used for an improvement of THz generation and one hemisphere will be used for investigation of spectral and optical properties of an object at strong magnetic field. The proposed magnetic system was numerically calculated in COMSOL MultiPhysics using AC/DC Module. These results may be used for development of real magnetic THz time-domain spectroscopy system.

  19. Simple models for dynamic hysteresis loop calculations of magnetic single-domain nanoparticles: Application to magnetic hyperthermia optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrey, J.; Mehdaoui, B.; Respaud, M.

    2011-04-01

    To optimize the heating properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in magnetic hyperthermia applications, it is necessary to calculate the area of their hysteresis loops in an alternating magnetic field. The separation between "relaxation losses" and "hysteresis losses" presented in several articles is artificial and criticized here. The three types of theories suitable for describing hysteresis loops of MNPs are presented and compared to numerical simulations: equilibrium functions, Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories (SWMBTs), and a linear response theory (LRT) using the Néel-Brown relaxation time. The configuration where the easy axis of the MNPs is aligned with respect to the magnetic field and the configuration of a random orientation of the easy axis are both studied. Suitable formulas to calculate the hysteresis areas of major cycles are deduced from SWMBTs and from numerical simulations; the domain of validity of the analytical formula is explicitly studied. In the case of minor cycles, the hysteresis area calculations are based on the LRT. A perfect agreement between the LRT and numerical simulations of hysteresis loops is obtained. The domain of validity of the LRT is explicitly studied. Formulas are proposed to calculate the hysteresis area at low field that are valid for any anisotropy of the MNP. The magnetic field dependence of the area is studied using numerical simulations: it follows power laws with a large range of exponents. Then analytical expressions derived from the LRT and SWMBTs are used in their domains of validity for a theoretical study of magnetic hyperthermia. It is shown that LRT is only pertinent for MNPs with strong anisotropy and that SWMBTs should be used for weakly anisotropic MNPs. The optimum volume of MNPs for magnetic hyperthermia is derived as a function of material and experimental parameters. Formulas are proposed to allow to the calculation of the optimum volume for any anisotropy. The maximum achievable specific absorption rate (SAR) is calculated as a function of the MNP anisotropy. It is shown that an optimum anisotropy increases the SAR and reduces the detrimental effects of the size distribution of the MNPs. The optimum anisotropy is simple to calculate; it depends only on the magnetic field used in the hyperthermia experiments and the MNP magnetization. The theoretical optimum parameters are compared to those of several magnetic materials. A brief review of experimental results as well as a method to analyze them is proposed. This study helps in the determination of suitable and unsuitable materials for magnetic hyperthermia and provides accurate formulas to analyze experimental data. It is also aimed at providing a better understanding of magnetic hyperthermia to researchers working on this subject.

  20. Magnetic properties of the neutron in a uniform background field

    E-print Network

    Thomas Primer; Waseem Kamleh; Derek Leinweber; Matthias Burkardt

    2012-12-10

    We present calculations of the magnetic moment and magnetic polarisability of the neutron from the background field method. The calculations are performed on $32^3\\times64$ dynamical lattices generated by the PACS-CS collaboration and made available via the ILDG. We consider uniform fields quantised by the periodic spatial volume. We explore different approaches for improving the quality of the fits used in the results. Also included are initial results for the magnetic moment of the lowest lying negative parity nucleon states.

  1. Moving magnetic cloud -1Moving magnetic cloud -1 "Double change of frame" calculation...

    E-print Network

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    #12;19 Moving magnetic cloud - 1Moving magnetic cloud - 1 "Double change of frame" calculation... #12;eb. 2005 -- Cosmic-rays & Particle Acceleration -- E. Parizot (IPN Orsay) 21 Moving magnetic cloud - 2Moving magnetic cloud - 2 #12;Karlsruhe, 23-25 Feb. 2005 -- Cosmic-rays & Particle Acceleration

  2. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  3. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Frank C. (Plano, TX); Spencer, John E. (Plano, TX)

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  4. Spontaneous magnetization of a vacuum in the hot Universe and intergalactic magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Vadim Demchik; Vladimir Skalozub

    2014-06-10

    We review the spontaneous magnetization of the vacuum of non-Abelian gauge fields at high temperature. The standard model of particles is investigated as a particular example. By using both analytic methods of quantum field theory and gauge field theory on a lattice, we determine the Abelian (chromo)magnetic fields in the restored phase of the model at high temperatures $T \\geq T_{ew}$. The fields are stable and temperature dependent, $B = B(T)$. We investigate the mechanisms of the field stabilization in detail. The screening parameters for electric and magnetic fields - the Debye, $m_D(B,T),$ and magnetic, $m_{magn.}(B,T)$, masses - are calculated. It is shown that, in the field presence, the former one is smaller than at zero field. The magnetic mass of the (chromo)magnetic fields is determined to be zero, as for usual $U(1)$ magnetic field. We also show that the vacuum magnetization stops at temperatures below the electroweak phase transition temperature, $T \\leq T_{ew}$, when a scalar condensate creates. These properties make reasonable a possibility that the intergalactic magnetic fields observed recently were spontaneously generated in the hot Universe at the reheating epoch due to vacuum polarization of non-Abelian gauge fields. We present a procedure for estimating the field strengths $B(T)$ at different temperatures. In particular, the value of $B(T_{ew}) \\sim 10^{14} G$, at $T_{ew}$ is estimated with taking into consideration the observed intergalactic magnetic field $B_0 \\sim 10^{- 15} G$. The magnetic field scale is also estimated. Some model dependent peculiarities of the phenomena studied are briefly discussed.

  5. Graphene transparency in weak magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    David Valenzuela; Saúl Hernández-Ortiz; Marcelo Loewe; Alfredo Raya

    2014-10-20

    We carry out an explicit calculation of the vacuum polarization tensor for an effective low-energy model of monolayer graphene in the presence of a weak magnetic field of intensity $B$ perpendicularly aligned to the membrane. By expanding the quasiparticle propagator in the Schwinger proper time representation up to order $(eB)^2$, where $e$ is the unit charge, we find an explicitly transverse tensor, consistent with gauge invariance. Furthermore, assuming that graphene is radiated with monochromatic light of frequency $\\omega$ along the external field direction, from the modified Maxwell's equations we derive the intensity of transmitted light and the angle of polarization rotation in terms of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_{xx}$) and transverse ($\\sigma_{xy}$) conductivities. Corrections to these quantities, both calculated and measured, are of order $(eB)^2/\\omega^4$. Our findings generalize and complement previously known results reported in literature regarding the light absorption problem in graphene from the experimental and theoretical points of view, with and without external magnetic fields.

  6. Analytic representation of cyclotron magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Whiting, G. E.; Davies, W. G.

    1994-07-01

    A model has been developed for the rapid but accurate calculation of the static magnetic field in the Chalk River cyclotron. The field is expressed in terms of elementary functions which can be handled efficiently in differential-algebra trajectory integrations. Maxwell's equations are satisfied exactly. Each of seven subdivisions of the superconducting coils is treated by a moment expansion about a central circle. Each pole is modeled as a uniformly magnetized semi-infinite prism. Monopoles and dipoles at the vertices of the polygonal pole faces correct for departures from the true pole shape. Uniform distributions of dipole strength along the edges of the pole-face polygons correct for the local inappropriateness of the assumption of uniform magnetization. The contributions of the yoke and of other relatively distant parts of the structure to the field in the region of particle acceleration are represented by low-order polynomials. Some of the source parameters are obtained by fitting to the measured values of B(z) in the horizontal plane of symmetry.

  7. Analytical representation of cyclotron magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Whiting, G.E.; Davies, W.G.

    1994-07-01

    A model has been developed for the rapid but accurate calculation of the static magnetic field in the Chalk River cyclotron. The field is expressed in terms of elementary functions which can be handled efficiently in differential-algebra trajectory integrations. Maxwell`s equations are satisfied exactly. Each of seven subdivisions of the superconducting coils is treated by a moment expansion about a central circle. Each pole is modeled as a uniformly magnetized semi-infinite prism. Monopoles and dipoles at the vertices of the polygonal pole faces correct for departures from the true pole shape. Uniform distributions of dipole strength along the edges of the pole-face polygons correct for the local inappropriateness of the assumption of uniform magnetization. The contributions of the yoke and of other relatively distant parts of the structure to the field in the region of particle acceleration are represented by low-order polynomials. Some of the source parameters are obtained by fitting to the measured values of B{sub z} in the horizontal plane of symmetry.

  8. Plasma-satellite interaction driven magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed-ur-Rehman; Marchand, Richard

    2014-09-15

    We report the first fully kinetic quantitative estimate of magnetic field perturbations caused by the interaction of a spacecraft with space environment. Such perturbations could affect measurements of geophysical magnetic fields made with very sensitive magnetometers on-board satellites. Our approach is illustrated with a calculation of perturbed magnetic fields near the recently launched Swarm satellites. In this case, magnetic field perturbations do not exceed 20 pT, and they are below the sensitivity threshold of the on-board magnetometers. Anticipating future missions in which satellites and instruments would be subject to more intense solar UV radiation, however, it appears that magnetic field perturbations associated with satellite interaction with space environment, might approach or exceed instruments' sensitivity thresholds.

  9. Magnetization of the QCD vacuum at large fields

    E-print Network

    Thomas D. Cohen; Elizabeth S. Werbos

    2008-10-28

    The response of the QCD vacuum to very large static external magnetic fields (q B >> Lambda_QCD^2) is studied. In this regime, the magnetization of the QCD vacuum is naturally described via perturbative QCD. Combining pQCD and the Schwinger proper time formalism, we calculate the magnetization of the QCD vacuum due to a strong magnetic field at leading order (one-loop) to be proportional to B log B. We show that the leading perturbative correction (two-loop) vanishes.

  10. Analysis and measurement of the 3D magnetic field in a rotating magnetic field driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2012-10-01

    A translatable three-axis probe was installed on TCSU shortly before its shutdown. The probe has 90 windings that simultaneously measure Br, B?, and Bz at 30 radial positions. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Probe measurements are used to calculate the end-shorting torque and the rotating magnetic field (RMF) torque. The torque applied to the plasma is the RMF torque reduced by the shorting torque. An estimate of the plasma resistivity is made based on the steady state balance between the applied torque and the resistive torque. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Data from even- and odd-parity experiments will be presented. The NIMROD code has been adapted to simulate the TCSU experiment using boundary conditions adjusted to match both even- and odd-parity experimental conditions. A comparison of the n=0 components of the calculated fields to the 3-axis probe measurements shows agreement in the magnetic field structure of the FRC as well as in the jet region.

  11. Spin flip probability of electron in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2012-03-19

    The probability that an electromagnetic wave can flip the spin of an electron is calculated. It is assumed that the electron resides in a uniform magnetic field and interacts with an incoming electromagnetic pulse. The scattering matrix is constructed and the time needed to flip the spin is calculated.

  12. Full 180° Magnetization Reversal with Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J. M.; Ma, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals. PMID:25512070

  13. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  14. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  15. Magnetic Fields above the Surface of aSuperconductor with Internal Magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Hendrik; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC, SSRl

    2007-06-26

    The author presents a method for calculating the magnetic fields near a planar surface of a superconductor with a given intrinsic magnetization in the London limit. He computes solutions for various magnetic domain boundary configurations and derives relations between the spectral densities of the magnetization and the resulting field in the vacuum half space, which are useful if the magnetization can be considered as a statistical quantity and its features are too small to be resolved individually. The results are useful for analyzing and designing magnetic scanning experiments. Application to existing data from such experiments on Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} show that a domain wall would have been detectable, but the magnetic field of randomly oriented small domains and small defects may have been smaller than the experimental noise level.

  16. Magnetic fields of the solar system: A comparative planetology toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, J. B.; Purucker, M. E.; Johnson, C. L.; Sabaka, T. J.; Olsen, N.; Sun, Z.; Al Asad, M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Phillips, R. J.; Solomon, S. C.; Lillis, R. J.; Langlais, B.; Winslow, R. M.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic fields within the solar system provide a strong organizing force for processes active both within a planet or moon, and outside of it. In the interest of stimulating research and education in the field of comparative planetology, we present documented Fortran and MATLAB source codes and benchmarks to the latest models for planets and satellites that host internal magnetic fields. This presentation is made in the context of an interactive website: http://planetary-mag.net. Models are included for Earth (Comprehensive model CM4 of Sabaka et al., 2004, Geophysics J. Int.), Mercury (Anderson et al, 2011, Science), the Moon (Purucker and Nicholas, 2010, JGR), Mars (Lillis et al., 2010, JGR), and the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune (Russell and Dougherty, 2010, Space Science Reviews). All models include magnetic fields of internal origin, and fields of external origin are included in the models for Mercury, the Earth, and the Moon. As models evolve, we intend to include magnetic fields of external origin for the other planets and moons. The website allows the user to select a coordinate system, such as planet-centered, heliocentric, or boundary normal, and the location within that coordinate system, and the vector magnetic field due to each of the component source fields at that location is then calculated and presented. Alternatively, the user can input a range as well as a grid spacing, and the vector magnetic field will be calculated for all points on that grid and be made available as a file for downloading.

  17. Improving the calculation of magnetic coupling constants in MRPT methods.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Mariano; Angeli, Celestino; Calzado, Carmen J; de Graaf, Coen

    2014-09-01

    The magnetic coupling in transition metal compounds with more than one unpaired electron per magnetic center has been studied with multiconfigurational perturbation theory. The usual shortcomings of these methodologies (severe underestimation of the magnetic coupling) have been overcome by describing the Slater determinants with a set of molecular orbitals that maximally resemble the natural orbitals of a high-level multiconfigurational reference configuration interaction calculation. These orbitals have significant delocalization tails onto the bridging ligands and largely increase the coupling strengths in the perturbative calculation. PMID:24992654

  18. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  19. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  20. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  1. Fetal exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cech, R.; Leitgeb, N.; Pediaditis, M.

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the interaction of low frequency electric and magnetic fields with pregnant women and in particular with the fetus, an anatomical voxel model of an 89 kg woman at week 30 of pregnancy was developed. Intracorporal electric current density distributions due to exposure to homogeneous 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields were calculated and results were compared with basic restrictions recommended by ICNIRP guidelines. It could be shown that the basic restriction is met within the central nervous system (CNS) of the mother at exposure to reference level of either electric or magnetic fields. However, within the fetus the basic restriction is considerably exceeded. Revision of reference levels might be necessary.

  2. Thomson scattering in magnetic fields. [of white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    The equation of transfer in Thomson scattering atmospheres with magnetic fields is solved using Monte Carlo methods. Two cases, a plane parallel atmosphere with a magnetic field perpendicular to the atmosphere, and a dipole star, are investigated. The wavelength dependence of polarization from plane-parallel atmosphere is qualitatively similar to that observed in the magnetic white dwarf Grw+70 deg 8247, and the field strength determined by the calculation, 320 MG, is quantitatively similar to that determined from the line spectrum. The dipole model does not resemble the data as well as the single plane-parallel atmosphere.

  3. Magnetic-field-induced breakdown of equivalence of multidimensional motion.

    PubMed

    Baura, Alendu; Sen, Monoj Kumar; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we have studied Brownian motion in multidimension phase space in presence of a magnetic field. The nonequilibrium behavior of thermodynamically inspired quantities along the individual component of motion has been studied in detail. Based on the Fokker-Planck description of the stochastic process and entropy balance equation, we have calculated information entropy production and entropy flux at nonequilibrium state. The dependence of these quantities on time, magnetic field, and thermal bath is studied. In this context, we have observed that there exists extremum behavior in the dynamics and the applied magnetic field breaks the equivalence in motion of the components in the nonequilibrium state. PMID:21230233

  4. Magnetic-field-induced breakdown of equivalence of multidimensional motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baura, Alendu; Sen, Monoj Kumar; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we have studied Brownian motion in multidimension phase space in presence of a magnetic field. The nonequilibrium behavior of thermodynamically inspired quantities along the individual component of motion has been studied in detail. Based on the Fokker-Planck description of the stochastic process and entropy balance equation, we have calculated information entropy production and entropy flux at nonequilibrium state. The dependence of these quantities on time, magnetic field, and thermal bath is studied. In this context, we have observed that there exists extremum behavior in the dynamics and the applied magnetic field breaks the equivalence in motion of the components in the nonequilibrium state.

  5. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    SciTech Connect

    I.Yu. Kostyukov; G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.M. Rax

    2001-12-12

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made.

  6. Analysis of magnetic field levels at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this work is to evaluate the magnetic field levels of distribution systems and other equipment at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Magnetic fields levels in several operational areas and various facilities are investigated. Three dimensional mappings and contour are provided along with the measured data. Furthermore, the portion of magnetic fields generated by the 60 Hz fundamental frequency and the portion generated by harmonics are examined. Finally, possible mitigation techniques for attenuating fields from electric panels are discussed.

  7. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1994-01-01

    The research efforts funded by the Uranus Data Analysis Program (UDAP) grant to the Bartol Research Institute (BRI) involved the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. Upstream wave studies are motivated as a study of the physics of collisionless shocks. Collisionless shocks in plasmas are capable of 'reflecting' a fraction of the incoming thermal particle distribution and directing the resulting energetic particle motion back into the upstream region. Once within the upstream region, the backward streaming energetic particles convey information of the approaching shock to the supersonic flow. This particle population is responsible for the generation of upstream magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations known as 'upstream waves', for slowing the incoming wind prior to the formation of the shock ramp, and for heating of the upstream plasma. The waves produced at Uranus not only differed in several regards from the observations at other planetary bow shocks, but also gave new information regarding the nature of the reflected particle populations which were largely unmeasurable by the particle instruments. Four distinct magnetic field wave types were observed upstream of the Uranian bow shock: low-frequency Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves excited by energetic protons originating at or behind the bow shock; whistler wave bursts driven by gyrating ion distributions within the shock ramp; and two whistler wave types simultaneously observed upstream of the flanks of the shock and argued to arise from resonance with energetic electrons. In addition, observations of energetic particle distributions by the LECP experiment, thermal particle populations observed by the PLS experiment, and electron plasma oscillations recorded by the PWS experiment proved instrumental to this study and are included to some degree in the papers and presentations supported by this grant.

  8. Self-consistent calculation of magnetization in oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.P.; Singh, M. )

    1992-12-01

    In this paper we have calculated the magnetization as function of temperature for oxide superconductors. We have used the three-dimensional Heisenberg model introducing the anisotropy between the antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange coupling constant in the Cu-O plane and perpendicular to the plane. The Green's function method is used to evaluate the magnetization. In the random-phase approximation one gets a self-consistent expression for the magnetization. Using this expression we have calculated the magnetization self-consistently as a function of temperature and have compared our theoretical results with experiments. Good agreement between our theory and experiments are found throughout the temperature range. The parameters used in the calculation are [ital J][sub [ital a][ital b

  9. Pressure, Chaotic Magnetic Fields and MHD Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Hudson & N. Nakajima

    2010-05-12

    Analyzes of plasma behavior often begin with a description of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium, this being the simplest model capable of approximating macroscopic force balance. Ideal force balance is when the pressure gradient is supported by the Lorentz force, ?p = j x B. We discuss the implications of allowing for a chaotic magnetic field on the solutions to this equation. We argue that the solutions are pathological and not suitable for numerical calculations. If the pressure and magnetic Field are continuous, the only non-trivial solutions have an uncountable infinity of discontinuities in the pressure gradient and current. The problems arise from the arbitrarily small length scales in the structure of the field, and the consequence of ideal force balance that the pressure is constant along the Field-lines, B • ?p = 0. A simple method to ameliorate the singularities is to include a small but Finite perpendicular diffusion. A self-consistent set of equilibrium equations is described and some algorithmic approaches aimed at solving these equations are discussed.

  10. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  11. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet ? singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  12. Magnetic field restructuring associated with two successive solar eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Hu, Huidong

    2014-08-20

    We examine two successive flare eruptions (X5.4 and X1.3) on 2012 March 7 in the NOAA active region 11429 and investigate the magnetic field reconfiguration associated with the two eruptions. Using an advanced non-linear force-free field extrapolation method based on the SDO/HMI vector magnetograms, we obtain a stepwise decrease in the magnetic free energy during the eruptions, which is roughly 20%-30% of the energy of the pre-flare phase. We also calculate the magnetic helicity and suggest that the changes of the sign of the helicity injection rate might be associated with the eruptions. Through the investigation of the magnetic field evolution, we find that the appearance of the 'implosion' phenomenon has a strong relationship with the occurrence of the first X-class flare. Meanwhile, the magnetic field changes of the successive eruptions with implosion and without implosion were well observed.

  13. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, Martin S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies.

  14. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, M.S.

    1994-10-25

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies. 2 figs.

  15. On Magnetic Field Generation Mechanisms in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherny, O. G.

    Magnetic chemically peculiar stars (CP stars) are characterized by a strong magnetic field, peculiar chemical composition and slow rotation. Since the origin and evolution of CP stars may be responsible for such unusual features, understanding the mechanisms of generation of the magnetic field is one of the ways to learn more about the CP star characteristics. At present there are two mechanisms of magnetic field generation considered in astrophysics, a fossil field hypothesis and turbulent dynamo theory. However, there is another mechanism of magnetic field generation. All the elementary particles including the most abundant, i. e. the protons, electrons, neutrons, have their own angular momenta and the corresponding magnetic momenta. Microscopic magnetic fields are determined generally by these magnetic momenta. Provided that microscopic magnetic fields are aligned, large-scale magnetic fields may be generated, which has been proved in the experiments of Barnett, Einstein and de Haas. This phenomenon is best illustrated by the experiments with iron. Analysis performed in the current study showed that all the large bodies of the Solar System have both an iron-nickel core and a magnetic field, which is proportional to the planet's core volume and its rotational velocity. We hypothesize that the reason for this phenomenon is a magnetic interaction of ferromagnetic materials, which occurred during the formation of the Solar System. We show that the magnitude of the magnetic field of the Earth and a change of magnetic field polarity can be explained by the gyromagnetic effect. In the beginning of formation of the Solar System the prospective Sun was the main attractive center. Therefore, there is a possibility that the Sun contains a massive (relative to the Earth) iron-nickel core.

  16. The Protogalactic Origin for Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Russell M. Kulsrud; Renyue Cen; Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Dongsu Ryu

    1996-07-28

    It is demonstrated that strong magnetic fields are produced from a zero initial magnetic field during the pregalactic era, when galaxies are first forming. Their development proceeds in three phases. In the first phase, weak magnetic fields are created by the Biermann battery mechanism, acting in shocked parts of the intergalactic medium where caustics form and intersect. In the second phase, these weak magnetic fields are amplified to strong magnetic fields by the Kolmogoroff turbulence endemic to gravitational structure formation of galaxies. During this second phase, the magnetic fields reach saturation with the turbulent power, but they are coherent only on the scale of the smallest eddy. In the third phase, the magnetic field strength increases to equipartition with the turbulent energy, and the coherence length of the magnetic fields increases to the scale of the largest turbulent eddy, comparable to the scale of the entire galaxy. The resulting magnetic field represents a galactic magnetic field of primordial origin. No further dynamo action is necessary, after the galaxy forms, to explain the origin of magnetic fields. However, the magnetic field may be altered by dynamo action once the galaxy and the galactic disk have formed. It is first shown by direct numerical simulations, that thermoelectric currentsassociated with the Biermann battery, build the field up from zero to $10^{-21}$ G in the regions about to collapse into galaxies, by $z\\sim3$. For weak fields, in the absence of dissipation, the cyclotron frequency ${\\bf \\omega_{cyc}}=e{\\bf B } /m_H c $ and $ {\\bf \\omega}/(1+ \\chi )$, where ${\\bf \\omega = \

  17. Kinetic theory of interstellar density and magnetic field fluctuations. Relations between interstellar density and magnetic field fluctuations

    E-print Network

    R. Schlickeiser; I. Lerche

    2002-07-02

    Using linear kinetic plasma theory the relation between electron density and magnetic field fluctuations for low-frequency plasma waves for Maxwellian background distribution functions of arbitrary temperatures in an uniform magnetic field is derived. By taking the non-relativistic temperature limit this relation is calculated for the diffuse intercloud medium in our Galaxy. The diffuse intercloud medium is the dominant phase of the interstellar medium with respect to radio wave propagation, dispersion and rotation measure studies. The differences between the relation of electron density and magnetic field fluctuations from the linear kinetic theory as compared to the classical MHD theory are established and discussed.

  18. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  19. Numerical analyses of trapped field magnet and stable levitation region of HTSC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimoto, M.; Kojima, T.; Waki, H.; Honma, T.

    1995-05-01

    Stable levitation with a permanent magnet and a bulk high {Tc} superconductor (HTSC) is examined numerically by using the critical state model and the frozen field model. Differences between a permanent magnet and a trapped field magnet are first discussed from property of levitation force. Stable levitation region of the HTSC on a ring magnet and on a solenoid coil are calculated with the numerical methods. Obtained results are discussed from difference of the magnetic field configuration.

  20. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  1. Development of a boundary magnetic charge method for computing magnetic fields in a system containing saturated magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, H.; Ishigami, M.; Shimoyama, H.

    2016-01-01

    In previous research, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) boundary magnetic charge method (BMCM) for high-accuracy field calculations in a static magnetic field, even when there exist great differences between the magnitudes of permeability between neighboring magnetic materials. This method, however, cannot be applied to a system that contains saturated magnetic materials. In the present study, therefore, we have developed a novel method that addresses this issue. According to this new method, we divide the region containing the magnetic material into small-volume elements and divide the boundaries between neighboring small-volume elements into small-surface elements, assigning each element an appropriate initial value of permeability. The magnetic field inside and outside of the magnetic material is calculated using this permeability. The value of the permeability of each element is iteratively updated using ?-H data. The updated value of the permeability after the i-th iteration, ?i, is compared with that of the previous value, ?i-1. If the difference between the two values is within a preset range, the iteration process is judged to have converged and the value of ?i is regarded as the final converged value of the permeability. The magnetic field at an arbitrary point in space and/or inside the body of the magnetic material is calculated from the converged permeability of each element. As a result, we have succeeded in developing a novel BMCM for the calculation of a static magnetic field with high accuracy in a system containing saturated magnetic materials.

  2. Representation of magnetic fields in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Several methods by which a magnetic field in space can be represented are reviewed with particular attention to problems of the observed geomagnetic field. Time dependence is assumed to be negligible, and five main classes of representation are described by vector potential, scalar potential, orthogonal vectors, Euler potentials, and expanded magnetic field.

  3. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  4. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  5. Static uniform magnetic fields and amoebae

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, S.G.; Srikanth, S.; Mahajan, S.M.; Ventrice, C.A.

    1997-03-01

    Three species of potentially pathogenic amoebae were exposed to 71 and 106.5 mT from constant homogeneous magnetic fields and examined for inhibition of population growth. The number of amoebae for three species was significantly less than controls after a 72 h exposure to the magnetic fields when the temperature was 20 C or above. Axenic cultures, i.e., cultures grown without bacteria, were significantly affected after only 24 h. In 20 of 21 tests using the three species, the magnetic field significantly inhibited the growth of amoebae. In one test in which the temperature was 20 C for 48 h, exposure to the magnetic field was not inhibitory. Final numbers of magnetic field-exposed amoebae ranged from 9 to 72% lower than the final numbers of unexposed controls, depending on the species. This research may lead to disinfection strategies utilizing magnetic fields for surfaces on which pathogenic amoebae may proliferate.

  6. High-resolution calculations of the solar global convection with the reduced speed of sound technique. I. The structure of the convection and the magnetic field without the rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, H.; Yokoyama, T.; Rempel, M.

    2014-05-01

    We carry out non-rotating high-resolution calculations of the solar global convection, which resolve convective scales of less than 10 Mm. To cope with the low Mach number conditions in the lower convection zone, we use the reduced speed of sound technique (RSST), which is simple to implement and requires only local communication in the parallel computation. In addition, the RSST allows us to expand the computational domain upward to about 0.99 R {sub ?}, as it can also handle compressible flows. Using this approach, we study the solar convection zone on the global scale, including small-scale near-surface convection. In particular, we investigate the influence of the top boundary condition on the convective structure throughout the convection zone as well as on small-scale dynamo action. Our main conclusions are as follows. (1) The small-scale downflows generated in the near-surface layer penetrate into deeper layers to some extent and excite small-scale turbulence in the region >0.9 R {sub ?}, where R {sub ?} is the solar radius. (2) In the deeper convection zone (<0.9 R {sub ?}), the convection is not influenced by the location of the upper boundary. (3) Using a large eddy simulation approach, we can achieve small-scale dynamo action and maintain a field of about 0.15B {sub eq}-0.25B {sub eq} throughout the convection zone, where B {sub eq} is the equipartition magnetic field to the kinetic energy. (4) The overall dynamo efficiency varies significantly in the convection zone as a consequence of the downward directed Poynting flux and the depth variation of the intrinsic convective scales.

  7. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed research efforts funded by the UDAP grant to the BRI involve the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. This is a collaborative venture bringing together investigators at the BRI, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In addition, other collaborations have been formed with investigators granted UDAP funds for similar studies and with investigators affiliated with other Voyager experiments. These investigations and the corresponding collaborations are included in the report. The proposed effort as originally conceived included an examination of waves downstream from the shock within the magnetosheath. However, the observations of unexpected complexity and diversity within the upstream region have necessitated that we confine our efforts to those observations recorded upstream of the bow shock on the inbound and outbound legs of the encounter by the Voyager 2 spacecraft.

  8. SOLIS/VSM Polar Magnetic Field Data

    E-print Network

    Bertello, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) instrument on the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) telescope is designed to obtain high-quality magnetic field observations in both the photosphere and chromosphere by measuring the Zeeman-induced polarization of spectral lines. With 1$^{\\prime \\prime}$ spatial resolution (1.14$^{\\prime \\prime}$ before 2010) and 0.05\\AA\\ spectral resolution, the VSM provides, among other products, chromospheric full-disk magnetograms using the CaII 854.2 nm spectral line and both photospheric full-disk vector and longitudinal magnetograms using the FeI 630.15 nm line. Here we describe the procedure used to compute daily weighted averages of the photospheric radial polar magnetic field at different latitude bands from SOLIS/VSM longitudinal full-disk observations. Time series of these measurements are publicly available from the SOLIS website at http://solis.nso.edu/0/vsm/vsm\\_plrfield.html. Future plans include the calculation of the mean polar field strength fr...

  9. Magnetic field effects on plasma ionization balance

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    Magnetic fields give rise to several phenomena that can significantly affect ionization balance in a plasma. Theoretical models commonly used to determine the charge state distribution (viz., ) of ions in non-magnetized plasmas are reviewed first, for both equilibrium and non-equilibrium situations. Then, after a brief survey of laboratory and cosmic plasmas with strong fields, B > 10{sup 6} Gauss, some of the ways such magnetic fields influence are highlighted. Most key problems have yet to be tackled.

  10. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  11. Neutral $?$ and $A$ mesons in magnetic field in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    E-print Network

    E. V. Luschevskaya; O. V. Larina

    2013-08-09

    Correlators of vector, axial and pseudoscalar currents have been calculated in external strong magnetic field in SU(2) gluodynamics on the lattice. Neutral $\\rho$ and $A$ meson masses with a zero spin projection to the axis parallel to the external magnetic field $B$ are calculated. The mass of the neutral $\\rho$ meson with zero spin decreases with increasing of the magnetic field for available values of the magnetic field $eB\\lesssim 2-2.5\\, \\Gev^2$, such behavior is necessary for a condensation of $\\rho$ mesons in a strong magnetic field.

  12. Magnetic vector field tag and seal

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R.

    2004-08-31

    One or more magnets are placed in a container (preferably on objects inside the container) and the magnetic field strength and vector direction are measured with a magnetometer from at least one location near the container to provide the container with a magnetic vector field tag and seal. The location(s) of the magnetometer relative to the container are also noted. If the position of any magnet inside the container changes, then the measured vector fields at the these locations also change, indicating that the tag has been removed, the seal has broken, and therefore that the container and objects inside may have been tampered with. A hollow wheel with magnets inside may also provide a similar magnetic vector field tag and seal. As the wheel turns, the magnets tumble randomly inside, removing the tag and breaking the seal.

  13. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  14. Magnetic fields in anisotropic relativistic stars

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Folomeev; Vladimir Dzhunushaliev

    2015-02-28

    Relativistic, spherically symmetric configurations consisting of a gravitating magnetized anisotropic fluid are studied. For such configurations, we obtain static equilibrium solutions with an axisymmetric, poloidal magnetic field produced by toroidal electric currents. The presence of such a field results in small deviations of the shape of the configuration from spherical symmetry. This in turn leads to the modification of an equation for the current and correspondingly to changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field for the systems supported by the anisotropic fluid, in contrast to the case of an isotropic fluid, where such deviations do not affect the magnetic field.

  15. Magnetic Fields in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke

    This chapter presents a review of observational studies to determine the magnetic field in the Milky Way, both in the disk and in the halo, focused on recent developments and on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar medium. I discuss some terminology which is confusingly or inconsistently used and try to summarize current status of our knowledge on magnetic field configurations and strengths in the Milky Way. Although many open questions still exist, more and more conclusions can be drawn on the large-scale and small-scale components of the Galactic magnetic field. The chapter is concluded with a brief outlook to observational projects in the near future.

  16. Simulation of optically pumped intersubband laser in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eri?, Marko; Milanovi?, Vitomir; Ikoni?, Zoran; Indjin, Dragan

    2007-06-01

    Simulations of an optically pumped intersubband laser in magnetic field up to 60 T are performed within the steady-state rate equations model. The electron-polar optical phonon scattering is calculated using the confined and interface phonon model. A strong oscillatory optical gain vs. magnetic field dependence is found, with two dominant gain peaks occurring at 20 and 40 T, the fields which bring appropriate states into resonance with optical phonons and thus open additional relaxation paths. The peak at 20 T exceeds the value of gain achieved at zero field.

  17. Swarm: ESA's Magnetic Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, G.; Floberghagen, R.; Menard, Y.; Haagmans, R.

    2013-12-01

    Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission in ESA's Living Planet Programme, and is scheduled for launch in fall 2013. The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best-ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution using a constellation of three identical satellites. The mission shall deliver data that allow access to new insights into the Earth system by improved scientific understanding of the Earth's interior and near-Earth electromagnetic environment. After launch and triple satellite release at an initial altitude of about 490 km, a pair of the satellites will fly side-by-side with slowly decaying altitude, while the third satellite will be lifted to 530 km to complete the Swarm constellation. High-precision and high-resolution measurements of the strength, direction and variation of the magnetic field, complemented by precise navigation, accelerometer and electric field measurements, will provide the observations required to separate and model various sources of the geomagnetic field and near-Earth current systems. The mission science goals are to provide a unique view into Earth's core dynamics, mantle conductivity, crustal magnetisation, ionospheric and magnetospheric current systems and upper atmosphere dynamics - ranging from understanding the geodynamo to contributing to space weather. The scientific objectives and results from recent scientific studies will be presented. In addition the current status of the project, which is presently in the final stage of the development phase, will be addressed. A consortium of European scientific institutes is developing a distributed processing system to produce geophysical (Level 2) data products for the Swarm user community. The setup of the Swarm ground segment and the contents of the data products will be addressed. In case the Swarm satellites are already in orbit, a summary of the on-going mission operations activities will be given. More information on Swarm can be found at www.esa.int/esaLP/LPswarm.html.

  18. Transport properties of high-temperature air in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Capitelli, M.; Catalfamo, C.; Giordano, D.

    2011-01-15

    Transport properties of equilibrium air plasmas in a magnetic field are calculated with the Chapman-Enskog method. The range considered for the temperature is [50-50 000] K and for the magnetic induction is [0-300] T.

  19. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  20. High-field magnetization of polycrystalline praseodymium

    SciTech Connect

    Leyarovski, E.; Mrachkov, J.; Gilewski, A.; Mydlarz, T.

    1987-06-01

    The field dependence of the induced magnetic moment in polycrystalline Pr is studied in impulse magnetic fields up to 45 T at 4.2 K and in stationary magnetic fields up to 18 T at 20 and 30 K. No anomalies in the magnetization have been observed which might be associated with the metamagnetic phase transition in single crystals at 31.5 T (K. A. McEwen, G. J. Cock, L. W. Roeland, and A. R. Mackinstosh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 30, 287 (1973)), as well as with any changes of the orientation of the magnetic moments characteristic for an antiferromagnetic. The observed magnetization is satisfactorily described using a molecular field Hamiltonian including the crystal electric field potential, exchange interactions, and Zeeman-effect term.

  1. High-field magnetization of polycrystalline praseodymium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyarovski, E.; Mrachkov, J.; Gilewski, A.; Mydlarz, T.

    1987-06-01

    The field dependence of the induced magnetic moment in polycrystalline Pr is studied in impulse magnetic fields up to 45 T at 4.2 K and in stationary magnetic fields up to 18 T at 20 and 30 K. No anomalies in the magnetization have been observed which might be associated with the metamagnetic phase transition in single crystals at 31.5 T [K. A. McEwen, G. J. Cock, L. W. Roeland, and A. R. Mackinstosh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 30, 287 (1973)], as well as with any changes of the orientation of the magnetic moments characteristic for an antiferromagnetic. The observed magnetization is satisfactorily described using a molecular field Hamiltonian including the crystal electric field potential, exchange interactions, and Zeeman-effect term.

  2. Image-Optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. I.; Davila, J. M.; Uritsky, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic field dominates many of the most important and puzzling processes in the corona. In the absence of direct measurements, solar physicists have struggled for decades to accurately reconstruct the coronal magnetic field using photospheric magnetograms. Even with today's excellent magnetographs, these reconstructions are plagued by several problems, among them long computation time, and poor agreement with the structures seen in EUV and coronagraph images. However no method exists for systematically improving the agreement between coronal images and magnetic reconstructions. Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus will bring us closer to the sun we have ever been before, but taking full advantage of that opportunity requires accurate coronal magnetic field reconstructions so that we can connect the in situ observations offered by these unique missions to magnetic sources at the surface of the Sun. In this study we propose a method to improve coronal magnetic field reconstructions by optimizing agreement between the reconstructed field and white-light coronagraph images.

  3. Radio Frequency Field Calculations for Plasma Heating Simulations in VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, A. V.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J. P.; Carter, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    (VASIMR)1 is plasma heating by ion-cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). Mathematical simulation helps to design an ICRF antenna, i.e. make maximal absorption of RF power into the plasma in the resonance area. Another goal of a particle simulation is design of a magnetic nozzle and optimize the performance of VASIMR2. field in the plasma, 2) ion density and velocity, 3) ion-cyclotron radio-frequency electromagnetic field. The assumptions of quasineutral and collisionless plasma are based on the range of operating VASIMR parameters. Carlo simulations for systems of million of particles in a reasonable time and without the need for a powerful supercomputer. The particle to grid weighting method is used for calculating the ion density, which is used for recalculation of the electric potential and RF field. dimensional problem to a weighted sum over two-dimensional solutions. Absorption is introduced in the cold plasma model by adding an imaginary collision frequency to the RF driven frequency, which is equivalent to adding an imaginary particle mass in the dielectric tensor elements. static and RF fields using the VASIMR code2. The VASIMR and EMIR codes are then iterated to estimate the ICRF effects on the plasma density. The iteration is performed by calculating the RF fields with the EMIR code, and using these fields to follow nonlinear ion trajectories with the VASIMR code on the gyro-frequency time scale. The ion trajectories are used to generate RF power absorption values and a density input for the next EMIR calculation. The codes are iterated until the density profile becomes reasonably stable, then the collisional absorption parameter in the EMIR code is adjusted and the iteration is continued until the power deposited by the RF system matches the power absorbed by the ion trajectories in a global sense. electric field. The solved algebraic system of equations is represented by ill-conditioned 18-diagonal matrix with complex elements. Since early development of the EMIR code, the frontal method direct solver was used. That solver requires large CPU time and RAM, which both are proportional to Nr Nz2, for a grid of the size Nr x Nz. These requirements make almost impossible to use existent EMIR solver on PC to obtain RF fields with good accuracy. system. The suggested iterative method is Modified Incomplete Cholesky Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient Squared solver4. The solver involves a couple of the control parameters, which let a user tune the code to make iterations converge as fast as possible for a particular grid. Since the iterative solver does not require large RAM, and works much faster than the direct solver, the new algorithm lets us resolve RF fields on a PC with required accuracy. REFERENCES 1. Chang Díaz F.R., "Research Status of The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket", Proc. 39th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics (Pittsburgh, PA, 1997), Bulletin of APS, 42 2057. 2. Ilin A.V., Chang Díaz F.R., Squire J.P. and Carter M.D. "Monte Carlo Particle Dynamics in a Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket", (Proceedings of Open Systems' 98), Transactions of Fusion Technology, 35 330 - 334 (1999). 3. Jaeger E.F., Batchelor D.B., Weitzner H. and Whealton J.H. "ICRF Wave Propagation And Absorption in Tokamak And Mirror Magnetic Fields - A Full-wave Calculation", Computer Physics Com., 40 33 - 64 (1986). 4. Ilin, A. V., Bagheri, B., Scott, L. R., Briggs, J. M., and McCammon, J. A. "Parallelization of Poisson-Boltzmann and Brownian Dynamics calculation", Parallel Computing in Computational Chemistry, ACB Books, Washington D.C., (1995) 170-185.

  4. Magnetic Fields are not ignorable in the dynamics of disks

    E-print Network

    E. Battaner; E. Florido; A. Guijarro

    2000-09-25

    Magnetic fields are considered to be dominant when $\\epsilon_{B}\\geq\\epsilon_{K}$, being $\\epsilon_{B}=B^{2}/8\\pi$ the magnetic energy density and $\\epsilon_{K}=1/2 \\rho\\theta^{2}$ the rotation energy density, for a conventional moderate B= 1 $\\mu$G. They are considered to be negligible when $\\epsilon_{B}<\\epsilon_{K}$ for $B\\sim 10 \\mu$G. With no assumption and no theoretical calculation, we show that magnetic fields cannot be ignored in the outer parts of a galaxy like the Milky Way and in the whole disk of a dwarf galaxy.

  5. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  6. Polarized neutron reflectometry in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    2005-11-15

    A simple method is described to maintain the polarization of a neutron beam on its way through the large magnetic stray fields produced by a vertical field of a cryomagnet with a split-coil geometry. The two key issues are the proper shielding of the neutron spin flippers and an additional radial field component in order to guide the neutron spin through the region of the null point (i.e., point of reversal for the vertical field component). Calculations of the neutron's spin rotation as well as polarized neutron reflectometry experiments on an ErFe{sub 2}/DyFe{sub 2} multilayer show the perfect performance of the used setup. The recently commissioned cryomagnet M5 with a maximum vertical field of up to 7.2 T in asymmetric mode for polarized neutrons and 9 T in symmetric mode for unpolarized neutrons was used on the C5 spectrometer in reflectometry mode, at the NRU reactor in Chalk River, Canada.

  7. Calculations on permanent-magnet quadrupoles with nonrectangular cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.; Merson, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The current trend toward higher frequencies to power drift-tube linacs (DTLs) and coupled-cavity linacs (CCLs) reduces the space available for quadrupole focusing magnets. Similarly, the space available for matching sections between linac sections is limited, and often the matching section bunchers are designed in odd shapes to make them fit. This shaping further restricts focusing magnet space. One approach to attaining sufficient quadrupole strength is such situations is to use rare-earth permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) with cross sections tailored to fill as much of the available space as possible. In this paper, we describe some techniques we have developed to calculate the properties of such magnets both singly and when other magnets are nearby. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Investigation of Magnetic Interference Induced via Gradient Field Coils for Ultra-Low-Field MRI Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, D.; Hatta, J.; Miyamoto, M.; Adachi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Kawai, J.; Fujihira, J.; Tsuyuguchi, N.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing a compact ultra-low-field MRI system that is composed of a SQUID gradiometer and a coil set that generates magnetic fields for capturing MR images. The magnetic interference induced from a power amplifier potentially disturbs MRI measurements. We investigated the path of the interference by experimental measurements and calculation of the magnetic field generated by the coil set. We found that the magnetic field generated from a particular gradient coil affected the SQUID gradiometer and that the level of the interference was strongly dependent on the shape of the gradient coils. When the coils' shapes are designed, minimizing the noise introduced from the power amplifier is crucial, in addition to consideration of the homogeneities of the magnetic field.

  9. The Physics of Attraction and Repulsion: Magnetism and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakotte, Heinz

    2001-11-01

    The development of new materials with improved magnetic properties completely changed the modern world in the past decades. Recent progress is predominantly due to a better understanding of magnetism that has gone far beyond compass needles rotating in a magnetic field and bar magnets attracting or repelling each other. New magnetic materials are used to build smaller and smaller read/write heads and hard disks with increased storage capacity, developments that are responsible the revolution in the computer industry. Another example is the field of magnetic levitation that became feasible for commercial applications with the discovery of new superconducting materials, and a prototype train is under development in Japan. In medicine, the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative to other (destructive) radiation techniques.

  10. Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Graphene Nanoribbon in Sharply Localized Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Abdulaziz D. Alhaidari; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

    2013-03-20

    We study the effect of a sharply localized magnetic field on the electron transport in a strip (ribbon) of graphene sheet, which allows to give results for the transmission and reflection probability through magnetic barriers. The magnetic field is taken as a single and double delta type localized functions, which are treated later as the zero width limit of gaussian fields. For both field configurations, we evaluate analytically and numerically their transmission and reflection coefficients. The possibility of spacial confinement due to the inhomogeneous field configuration is also investigated.

  12. Control of magnetism by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field.

  13. Magnetic field evolution of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, Y. N.; Semerikov, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The flow of a matter, accreting on to a magnetized neutron star, is accompanied by an electric current. The closing of the electric current occurs in the crust of a neutron stars in the polar region across the magnetic field. But the conductivity of the crust along the magnetic field greatly exceeds the conductivity across the field, so the current penetrates deep into the crust down up to the superconducting core. The magnetic field, generated by the accretion current, increases greatly with the depth of penetration due to the Hall conductivity of the crust is also much larger than the transverse conductivity. As a result, the current begins to flow mainly in the toroidal direction, creating a strong longitudinal magnetic field, far exceeding an initial dipole field. This field exists only in the narrow polar tube of r width, narrowing with the depth, i.e. with increasing of the crust density ?, r ? ?-1/4. Accordingly, the magnetic field B in the tube increases with the depth, B??1/2, and reaches the value of about 1017 Gauss in the core. It destroys superconducting vortices in the core of a star in the narrow region of the size of the order of 10 cm. Because of generated density gradient of vortices, they constantly flow into this dead zone and the number of vortices decreases, the magnetic field of a star decreases as well. The attenuation of the magnetic field is exponential, B = B0(1 + t/?)-1. The characteristic time of decreasing of the magnetic field ? is equal to ? ? 103 yr. Thus, the magnetic field of accreted neutron stars decreases to values of 108-109 Gauss during 107-106 yr.

  14. Convergence of Chapman-Enskog calculation of transport coefficients of magnetized argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Catalfamo, C.; Laricchiuta, A.; Giordano, D.; Capitelli, M.

    2006-07-15

    Convergence properties of the Chapman-Enskog method in the presence of a magnetic field for the calculation of the transport properties of nonequilibrium partially ionized argon have been studied emphasizing the role of the different collision integrals. In particular, the Ramsauer minimum of electron-argon cross sections affects the convergence of the Chapman-Enskog method at low temperature, while Coulomb collisions affect the results at higher temperatures. The presence of an applied magnetic field mitigates the slow convergence for the components affected by the field.

  15. Two-axis magnetic field sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jander, Albrecht (Inventor); Nordman, Catherine A. (Inventor); Qian, Zhenghong (Inventor); Smith, Carl H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A ferromagnetic thin-film based magnetic field sensor with first and second sensitive direction sensing structures each having a nonmagnetic intermediate layer with two major surfaces on opposite sides thereof having a magnetization reference layer on one and an anisotropic ferromagnetic material sensing layer on the other having a length in a selected length direction and a smaller width perpendicular thereto and parallel to the relatively fixed magnetization direction. The relatively fixed magnetization direction of said magnetization reference layer in each is oriented in substantially parallel to the substrate but substantially perpendicular to that of the other. An annealing process is used to form the desired magnetization directions.

  16. Energy of magnetic moment of superconducting current in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtovoi, V. L.; Nikulov, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The energy of magnetic moment of the persistent current circulating in superconducting loop in an externally produced magnetic field is not taken into account in the theory of quantization effects because of identification of the Hamiltonian with the energy. This identification misleads if, in accordance with the conservation law, the energy of a state is the energy expended for its creation. The energy of magnetic moment is deduced from a creation history of the current state in magnetic field both in the classical and quantum case. But taking this energy into account demolishes the agreement between theory and experiment. Impartial consideration of this problem discovers the contradiction both in theory and experiment.

  17. Magnetic field perturbations in the systems where only poloidal magnetic field is present*

    E-print Network

    magnetic field is present). Examples include FRC, levitated dipoles, and long diffuse pinches. We consider · Small perturbations in the general geometry · Uniform magnetic field imposed on the levitated dipole an infinitesimal perturbation causes a dramatic change of the magnetic topology: without perturbations, each field

  18. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, M.; Lacerda, A.; Takano, Y.; Boebinger, G. S.

    2006-11-01

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, established in 1990 with support from the National Science Foundation, the State of Florida, and the US Department of Energy, is a facility open to external users around the world. The experimental capabilities are distributed in three campuses. In Tallahassee, Florida, continuous magnetic fields are produced by means of superconducting and resistive magnets reaching fields of up to 33T (resistive), and 45T (hybrid). EMR, ICR, and a 900MHz wide bore NMR magnet are also available. The facility in Gainesville, Florida, is devoted to generating extremely low temperatures in the presence of external magnetic fields (15T, down to 0.4mK), and large MRI imaging capabilities. In Los Alamos, New Mexico, a 9 kV-capable capacitor bank and a number of different liquid Nitrogen-cooled resistive magnets produce repetitive pulses up to 75 T and now a single-shot pulsed up to 300T.

  19. Diffusion of magnetic field via turbulent reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos de Lima, Reinaldo; Lazarian, Alexander; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete M.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2010-05-01

    The diffusion of astrophysical magnetic fields in conducting fluids in the presence of turbulence depends on whether magnetic fields can change their topology via reconnection in highly conducting media. Recent progress in understanding fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of turbulence is reassuring that the magnetic field behavior in computer simulations and turbulent astrophysical environments is similar, as far as magnetic reconnection is concerned. This makes it meaningful to perform MHD simulations of turbulent flows in order to understand the diffusion of magnetic field in astrophysical environments. Our studies of magnetic field diffusion in turbulent medium reveal interesting new phenomena. First of all, our 3D MHD simulations initiated with anti-correlating magnetic field and gaseous density exhibit at later times a de-correlation of the magnetic field and density, which corresponds well to the observations of the interstellar media. While earlier studies stressed the role of either ambipolar diffusion or time-dependent turbulent fluctuations for de-correlating magnetic field and density, we get the effect of permanent de-correlation with one fluid code, i.e. without invoking ambipolar diffusion. In addition, in the presence of gravity and turbulence, our 3D simulations show the decrease of the magnetic flux-to-mass ratio as the gaseous density at the center of the gravitational potential increases. We observe this effect both in the situations when we start with equilibrium distributions of gas and magnetic field and when we follow the evolution of collapsing dynamically unstable configurations. Thus the process of turbulent magnetic field removal should be applicable both to quasi-static subcritical molecular clouds and cores and violently collapsing supercritical entities. The increase of the gravitational potential as well as the magnetization of the gas increases the segregation of the mass and magnetic flux in the saturated final state of the simulations, supporting the notion that the reconnection-enabled diffusivity relaxes the magnetic field + gas system in the gravitational field to its minimal energy state. This effect is expected to play an important role in star formation, from its initial stages of concentrating interstellar gas to the final stages of the accretion to the forming protostar.

  20. Magnetic fields in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Rubinstein, H. R.

    2001-07-01

    This review concerns the origin and the possible effects of magnetic fields in the early Universe. We start by providing the reader with a short overview of the current state of the art of observations of cosmic magnetic fields. We then illustrate the arguments in favor of a primordial origin of magnetic fields in the galaxies and in the clusters of galaxies. We argue that the most promising way to test this hypothesis is to look for possible imprints of magnetic fields on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). With this purpose in mind, we provide a review of the most relevant effects of magnetic fields on the CMBR. A long chapter of this review is dedicated to particle-physics-inspired models which predict the generation of magnetic fields during the early Universe evolution. Although it is still unclear if any of these models can really explain the origin of galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields, we show that interesting effects may arise anyhow. Among these effects, we discuss the consequences of strong magnetic fields on the big-bang nucleosynthesis, on the masses and couplings of the matter constituents, on the electroweak phase transition, and on the baryon and lepton number violating sphaleron processes. Several intriguing common aspects, and possible interplay, of magnetogenesis and baryogenesis are also discussed.

  1. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  2. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, R.O.

    1997-01-21

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis. 10 figs.

  3. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, Roman O. (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis.

  4. MRI Magnetic Field Stimulates Rotational Sensors of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Dale C.; Marcelli, Vincenzo; Gillen, Joseph S.; Carey, John P.; Santina, Charles C. Della; Zee, David S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertigo in and around MRI machines has been noted for years [1, 2]. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain these sensations [3, 4], yet without direct, objective measures, the cause is unknown. We found that all healthy human subjects lying in the static magnetic field of an MRI machine develop a robust nystagmus. Patients lacking labyrinthine function do not. Here we use the pattern of eye movements as a measure of vestibular stimulation to show that the stimulation is static (continuous, proportional to static magnetic field strength, requiring neither head movement nor dynamic change in magnetic field strength) and directional (sensitive to magnetic field polarity and head orientation). Our calculations and geometric model suggest that magnetic vestibular stimulation derives from a Lorentz force due to interaction between the magnetic field and naturally-occurring ionic currents in the labyrinthine endolymph fluid. This force pushes on the semicircular canal cupula, leading to nystagmus. We emphasize that the unique, dual role of endolymph in the delivery of both ionic current and fluid pressure, coupled with the cupula’s function as a pressure sensor, makes magnetic field induced nystagmus and vertigo possible. Such effects could confound fMRI studies of brain behavior, including resting-state brain activity. PMID:21945276

  5. Mesogranulation and the Solar Surface Magnetic Field Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelles Chaouche, L.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Wiegelmann, T.; Bonet, J. A.; Knölker, M.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Schmidt, W.; Solanki, S. K.

    2011-02-01

    The relation of the solar surface magnetic field with mesogranular cells is studied using high spatial (?100 km) and temporal (?30 s) resolution data obtained with the IMaX instrument on board SUNRISE. First, mesogranular cells are identified using Lagrange tracers (corks) based on horizontal velocity fields obtained through local correlation tracking. After ?20 minutes of integration, the tracers delineate a sharp mesogranular network with lanes of width below about 280 km. The preferential location of magnetic elements in mesogranular cells is tested quantitatively. Roughly 85% of pixels with magnetic field higher than 100 G are located in the near neighborhood of mesogranular lanes. Magnetic flux is therefore concentrated in mesogranular lanes rather than intergranular ones. Second, magnetic field extrapolations are performed to obtain field lines anchored in the observed flux elements. This analysis, therefore, is independent of the horizontal flows determined in the first part. A probability density function (PDF) is calculated for the distribution of distances between the footpoints of individual magnetic field lines. The PDF has an exponential shape at scales between 1 and 10 Mm, with a constant characteristic decay distance, indicating the absence of preferred convection scales in the mesogranular range. Our results support the view that mesogranulation is not an intrinsic convective scale (in the sense that it is not a primary energy-injection scale of solar convection), but also give quantitative confirmation that, nevertheless, the magnetic elements are preferentially found along mesogranular lanes.

  6. Structure of magnetic fields in intracluster cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos Nektarios; Braithwaite, Jonathan; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-12-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies show ubiquitous presence of X-ray cavities, presumably blown by the active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets. We consider magnetic field structures of these cavities. Stability requires that they contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, while realistic configurations should have vanishing magnetic field on the boundary. For axisymmetric configurations embedded in unmagnetized plasma, the continuity of poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components on the surface of the bubble then requires solving the elliptical Grad-Shafranov equation with both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. This leads to a double eigenvalue problem, relating the pressure gradients and the toroidal magnetic field to the radius of the bubble. We have found fully analytical stable solutions. This result is confirmed by numerical simulation. We present synthetic X-ray images and synchrotron emission profiles and we evaluate the rotation measure for radiation transversing the bubble.

  7. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    Viganò, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

    2015-01-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  8. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Rea, N.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  9. Diffusion in Electronegative Discharges with Magnetic Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, David Eugene

    Electronegative plasmas are important in a variety of electric discharge applications, such as plasma reactors, negative ion sources, and even electropositive discharges when contaminated with an electronegative impurity. The need for an understanding of the processes and phenomena associated with these electronegative discharges has spurred the development of numerical simulations and models. While many of the devices incorporate various configurations of external magnetic fields, specific attention to the influence of the magnetic field on the discharge operating point, structure, and stability is lacking. To address this deficiency, a collisional model for diffusion in three -component plasmas with an applied magnetic field is developed; it is an extension of Schottky theory allowing for negative ions and a magnetic field. This study analyzes the effect of magnetic fields on diffusion in three-component plasmas; provides an analytic solution for the collisional model in a magnetic field; evaluates the validity of effective diffusion coefficients through an analysis of the afterglow; and provides a regime of validity for the model in terms of magnetic field strength by analytically establishing the critical magnetic field for the onset of "anomalous" diffusion. When a discharge operating at constant current is subjected to an increase in axial magnetic field, the ionization frequency decreases more rapidly in an electronegative discharge than an electropositive discharge, due to negative ions reducing the ambipolar electric field. The model is compared qualitatively to a hydrogen discharge and quantitatively to a sulfur hexafluoride discharge with good agreement. The time-dependent model shows that, for a hydrogen discharge, one can obtain an enhancement of the negative ion density in the afterglow. Electronegative discharges are more unstable with respect to the helical mode instability than electropositive discharges, due to the larger axial electric field and weaker ambipolar electric field in an electronegative discharge.

  10. Pulsed field magnetization characteristics of a holed superconducting bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Igarashi, R.; Togasaki, R.; Oka, T.

    2015-11-01

    We have proposed a holed superconducting bulk magnet to trap the magnetic field efficiently in the high-performance material excited by pulsed field magnetization. Previously, a single pulsed field was applied with varying amplitudes of the magnetic fields and temperatures to a GdBCO bulk material with four 2-mm-diameter holes, and the time responses of flux density on the bulk surface and trapped field distributions were measured. The experimental results suggested that the number of holes was too high because a large distortion appeared in the trapped field distributions. In this paper, we processed only a single hole with a different hole size and investigated the magnetization characteristics. After estimating the trapped field performance by applying a single pulsed field with varying its amplitude and temperature in the original material, a 1-mm-diameter hole was drilled; then the hole was extended to 2 mm in diameter, and the same experiments were carried out in each sample. A total magnetic flux of both 1-mm-diameter hole and 2-mm-diameter hole samples was about 10 percent higher than that of a four-hole sample at a low temperature. On the other hand, the value of a 2-mm-diameter hole sample was the same as that of a four-hole sample at a high temperature. The experimental results suggested that about 1 mm in diameter was proper for the hole size.

  11. Exoplanet Magnetic Fields and Their Detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, S.; Tian, B. Y.; Vilim, R.

    2014-12-01

    The investigation of planetary magnetic fields in our solar system provides a wealth of information on planetary interior structure and dynamics. Satellite magnetic data demonstrates that planetary dynamos can produce a range of magnetic field morphologies and intensities. Numerical dynamo simulations are working towards determining relationships between planetary properties and the resulting magnetic field characteristics. However, with only a handful of planetary dynamos in our solar system, it is challenging to determine specific dependence of magnetic field properties on planetary characteristics. Extrasolar planets therefore provide a unique opportunity by significantly increasing the number of planets for study as well as offering a much larger range of planetary properties to investigate. Although detection of exoplanet magnetic fields is challenging at present, the increasing sophistication of observational tools available to astronomers implies these extrasolar planetary magnetic fields may eventually be detectable. This presentation will discuss potential observational trends for magnetic field strength and morphology for exoplanets based on numerical simulations and interior structure modeling. We will focus on the influence of planetary age, environment, composition and structure.

  12. Accounting for crustal magnetization in models of the core magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    The problem of determining the magnetic field originating in the earth's core in the presence of remanent and induced magnetization is considered. The effect of remanent magnetization in the crust on satellite measurements of the core magnetic field is investigated. The crust as a zero-mean stationary Gaussian random process is modelled using an idea proposed by Parker (1988). It is shown that the matrix of second-order statistics is proportional to the Gram matrix, which depends only on the inner-products of the appropriate Green's functions, and that at a typical satellite altitude of 400 km the data are correlated out to an angular separation of approximately 15 deg. Accurate and efficient means of calculating the matrix elements are given. It is shown that the variance of measurements of the radial component of a magnetic field due to the crust is expected to be approximately twice that in horizontal components.

  13. Axion Dark Matter Coupling to Resonant Photons via Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    McAllister, Ben T; Tobar, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    We show that the magnetic component of the photon field produced by dark matter axions via the two-photon coupling mechanism in a Sikivie Haloscope is an important parameter passed over in previous analysis and experiments. The interaction of the produced photons will be resonantly enhanced as long as they couple to the electric or magnetic mode structure of the Haloscope cavity. For typical Haloscope experiments the electric and magnetic coupling is the same and implicitly assumed in past sensitivity calculations. However, for future planned searches such as those at high frequency, which synchronize multiple cavities, the sensitivity will be altered due to different magnetic and electric couplings. We discuss the implications of the full electromagnetic form factor and propose new experiments using lumped 3D LC resonators (or re-entrant cavities) with separated electric and magnetic fields to probe currently unbounded regions of the axion mass parameter space.

  14. Axion Dark Matter Coupling to Resonant Photons via Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Ben T. McAllister; Stephen R. Parker; Michael E. Tobar

    2015-12-21

    We show that the magnetic component of the photon field produced by dark matter axions via the two-photon coupling mechanism in a Sikivie Haloscope is an important parameter passed over in previous analysis and experiments. The interaction of the produced photons will be resonantly enhanced as long as they couple to the electric or magnetic mode structure of the Haloscope cavity. For typical Haloscope experiments the electric and magnetic coupling is the same and implicitly assumed in past sensitivity calculations. However, for future planned searches such as those at high frequency, which synchronize multiple cavities, the sensitivity will be altered due to different magnetic and electric couplings. We discuss the implications of the full electromagnetic form factor and propose new experiments using lumped 3D LC resonators (or re-entrant cavities) with separated electric and magnetic fields to probe currently unbounded regions of the axion mass parameter space.

  15. The magnetic field of ? Orionis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazère, A.; Neiner, C.; Tkachenko, A.; Bouret, J.-C.; Rivinius, Th.

    2015-10-01

    Context. ? Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. Aims: We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in ? Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field. Methods: Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the least-squares deconvolution technique to extract the magnetic information. Results: We confirm that ? Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component ? Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a period of 6.829 d. This is the only magnetic O supergiant known as of today. With an oblique dipole field model of the Stokes V profiles, we show that the polar field strength is ~140 G. Because the magnetic field is weak and the stellar wind is strong, ? Ori Aa does not host a centrifugally supported magnetosphere. It may host a dynamical magnetosphere. Its companion ? Ori Ab does not show any magnetic signature, with an upper limit on the undetected field of ~300 G. Based on observations obtained at the Télescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Magnetic-field-induced periodic deformations in planar nematic layers.

    PubMed

    Krzyza?ski, D; Derfel, G

    2000-06-01

    Periodic deformations of strongly anchored planar nematic layers subjected to magnetic fields were studied numerically. Two magnetic-field configurations, giving rise to the so-called periodic splay-twist and periodic twist-splay patterns, were taken into account. The stationary director distribution was calculated for various values of elastic anisotropy and magnetic-field strength. Some alternative conclusions that shed light on the properties of the periodic deformations were drawn: (i) the transition from the periodically deformed structure to the homogeneously deformed one, which occurs in high field, is due to the divergence of the spatial period of the deformations to infinity; (ii) the spatial dependence of the angles determining the high-field director distribution strongly deviates from the theoretically predicted functions of sinusoidal form. The diagrams showing the ranges of parameters, for which the periodic deformations can realize, were built. The stable wave-number bands were determined numerically. PMID:11088358

  17. Are pulsars born with a hidden magnetic field?

    E-print Network

    Alejandro Torres-Forné; Pablo Cerdá-Durán; José A. Pons; José A. Font

    2015-11-12

    The observation of several neutron stars in the center of supernova remnants and with significantly lower values of the dipolar magnetic field than the average radio-pulsar population has motivated a lively debate about their formation and origin, with controversial interpretations. A possible explanation requires the slow rotation of the proto-neutron star at birth, which is unable to amplify its magnetic field to typical pulsar levels. An alternative possibility, the hidden magnetic field scenario, considers the accretion of the fallback of the supernova debris onto the neutron star as responsible for the submergence (or screening) of the field and its apparently low value. In this paper we study under which conditions the magnetic field of a neutron star can be buried into the crust due to an accreting, conducting fluid. For this purpose, we consider a spherically symmetric calculation in general relativity to estimate the balance between the incoming accretion flow and the magnetosphere. Our study analyses several models with different specific entropy, composition, and neutron star masses. The main conclusion of our work is that typical magnetic fields of a few times 1e12 G can be buried by accreting only 1e-3 - 1e-2 solar mass, a relatively modest amount of mass. In view of this result, the Central Compact Object scenario should not be considered unusual, and we predict that anomalously week magnetic fields should be common in very young (< few kyr) neutron stars.

  18. Perpendicular magnetic fields in cantilever beam magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Das, A. K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Pampuch, C.; Ney, A.

    2004-09-01

    Cantilever beam magnetometry is a common technique to determine the magnetoelastic (ME) coupling constants of thin films by measuring the stress that develops when the film magnetization is changed. In cantilever beam experiments performed so far the film magnetization was mainly rotated within the film plane. Here we discuss the measurement of the ME coupling constants, when the magnetizing field is chosen so that it rotates the film magnetization out of the film plane. A major stress contribution, which arises additionally to the ME stress, originates in the torque that magnetic dipoles experience in a magnetic field. In order to separate torque effects from ME contributions in cantilever beam experiments a general method is proposed. With this method the ME coupling constants can be quantitatively determined and furthermore the film magnetization as well as its perpendicular anisotropy constant are obtained quantitatively.

  19. Magnetic-field-controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sungjung; Kim, Taeyueb; Shin, Sang Hoon; Lim, Ju Young; Hong, Jinki; Song, Jin Dong; Chang, Joonyeon; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Rhie, Kungwon; Han, Suk Hee; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Johnson, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Logic devices based on magnetism show promise for increasing computational efficiency while decreasing consumed power. They offer zero quiescent power and yet combine novel functions such as programmable logic operation and non-volatile built-in memory. However, practical efforts to adapt a magnetic device to logic suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio and other performance attributes that are not adequate for logic gates. Rather than exploiting magnetoresistive effects that result from spin-dependent transport of carriers, we have approached the development of a magnetic logic device in a different way: we use the phenomenon of large magnetoresistance found in non-magnetic semiconductors in high electric fields. Here we report a device showing a strong diode characteristic that is highly sensitive to both the sign and the magnitude of an external magnetic field, offering a reversible change between two different characteristic states by the application of a magnetic field. This feature results from magnetic control of carrier generation and recombination in an InSb p-n bilayer channel. Simple circuits combining such elementary devices are fabricated and tested, and Boolean logic functions including AND, OR, NAND and NOR are performed. They are programmed dynamically by external electric or magnetic signals, demonstrating magnetic-field-controlled semiconductor reconfigurable logic at room temperature. This magnetic technology permits a new kind of spintronic device, characterized as a current switch rather than a voltage switch, and provides a simple and compact platform for non-volatile reconfigurable logic devices. PMID:23364687

  20. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985. PMID:23787954

  1. Decay of Resonaces in Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We suggest that decay properties (branching ratios) of hadronic resonances may become modified in strong external magnetic field. The behavior of K±*, K0* vector mesons as well as ?* (1520) and ?0* baryonic states is considered in static fields 1013-1015 T. In particular, n = 0 Landau level energy increase of charged particles in the external magnetic field, and the interaction of hadron magnetic moments with the field is taken into account. We suggest that enhanced yield of dileptons and photons from ?0(770) mesons may occur if strong decay channel ?0 ? ?+?- is significantly suppressed. CP - violating ?+?- decays of pseudoscalar ?c and ?(547) mesons in the magnetic field are discussed, and superpositions of quarkonium states ?c,b and ?c,b(nP) with ?(nS), ?(nS) mesons in the external field are considered.

  2. Semiclassical Calculation of Transition Matrix Elements for Atoms in External Fields

    E-print Network

    J. Main; G. Wunner

    1999-02-02

    Closed orbit theory is generalized to the semiclassical calculation of cross-correlated recurrence functions for atoms in external fields. The cross-correlation functions are inverted by a high resolution spectral analyzer to obtain the semiclassical eigenenergies and transition matrix elements. The method is demonstrated for dipole transitions of the hydrogen atom in a magnetic field. This is the first semiclassical calculation of individual quantum transition strengths from closed orbit theory.

  3. Polymer gel dosimetry of an electron beam in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, J.; De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The effect of a strong external magnetic field on 4 MeV electron beam was measured with polymer gel dosimetry. The measured entrance dose distribution was compared with a calculated fluence map. The magnetic field was created by use of two permanent Neodymium (NdFeB) magnets that were positioned perpendicular to the electron beam. The magnetic field between the magnets was measured with Hall sensors. Based on the magnetic field measurement and the law of Biot-Savart, the magnetic field distribution was extrapolated. Electron trajectories were calculated using a relativistic Lorentz force operator. Although the simplified computational model that was applied, the shape and position of the calculated entrance fluence map are found to be in good agreement with the measured dose distribution in the first layer of the phantom. In combination with the development of low density polymer gel dosimeters, these preliminary results show the potential of 3D gel dosimetry in MRI-linac applications.

  4. Skyrmion in a uniform magnetic field

    E-print Network

    He, Bing-Ran

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the skyrmion properties in a uniform magnetic field. Based on the symmetry of the system, we propose an axially symmetric ansatz of a soliton for studying the skyrmion properties. We show the baryon number is always conserved even in a nonzero magnetic background. We find that with increasing magnetic field strength, the static mass of the skyrmion first decreases and then increases as the dominant role shifts from the linear term of the magnetic field to the quadratic term of the magnetic field. On the other hand, the soliton size first increases and then decreases as the magnetic field strength increases. We find that the distribution of the baryon number density and energy density is anisotropic in a uniform magnetic background. Furthermore, the x- and z-axis projection of the radius of the baryon number density is strongly dependent on the increase of the magnetic field, while the energy density does not have this dependency. Finally, in the core part of the magnetar, the equation of state ...

  5. Neutron in a Strong Magnetic Field: Finite Volume Effects

    E-print Network

    Brian C. Tiburzi

    2014-03-04

    We investigate the neutron's response to magnetic fields on a torus with the aid of chiral perturbation theory, and expose effects from non-vanishing holonomies. The determination of such effects necessitates non-perturbative treatment of the magnetic field; and, to this end, a strong-field power counting is employed. Using a novel coordinate-space method, we find the neutron propagates in a coordinate-dependent effective potential that we obtain by integrating out charged pions winding around the torus. Knowledge of these finite volume effects will aid in the extraction of neutron properties from lattice QCD computations in external magnetic fields. In particular, we obtain finite volume corrections to the neutron magnetic moment and magnetic polarizability. These quantities have not been computed correctly in the literature. In addition to effects from non-vanishing holonomies, finite volume corrections depend on the magnetic flux quantum through an Aharonov-Bohm effect. We make a number of observations that demonstrate the importance of non-perturbative effects from strong magnetic fields currently employed in lattice QCD calculations. These observations concern neutron physics in both finite and infinite volume.

  6. Surface magnetic fields across the HR Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstreet, John D.

    2015-10-01

    The past 20 years have seen remarkable advances in spectropolarimetric instrumentation that have allowed us, for the first time, to identify some magnetic stars in most major stages of stellar evolution. We are beginning to see the broad outline of how such fields change during stellar evolution, to confront theoretical hypotheses and models of magnetic field structure and evolution with detailed data, and to understand more of the ways in which the presence of a field in turn affects stellar structure and evolution.

  7. Vector Magnetic Field in Emerging Flux Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Pariat, E.

    A crucial phase in magnetic flux emergence is the rise of magnetic flux tubes through the solar photosphere, which represents a severe transition between the very different environments of the solar interior and corona. Multi-wavelength observations with Flare Genesis, TRACE, SoHO, and more recently with the vector magnetographs at THEMIS and Hida (DST) led to the following conclusions. The fragmented magnetic field in the emergence region - with dipped field lines or bald patches - is directly related with Ellerman bombs, arch filament systems, and overlying coronal loops. Measurements of vector magnetic fields have given evidence that undulating "serpentine" fields are present while magnetic flux tubes cross the photosphere. See the sketch below, and for more detail see Pariat et al. (2004, 2007); Watanabe et al. (2008):

  8. Nonlinear magnetization relaxation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in superimposed ac and dc magnetic bias fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Serguey V.; Déjardin, Pierre-Michel; El Mrabti, Halim; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear ac response of the magnetization M(t) of a uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic nanoparticle subjected to both ac and dc bias magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths and orientations is determined by averaging Gilbert’s equation augmented by a random field with Gaussian white-noise properties in order to calculate exactly the relevant statistical averages. It is shown that the magnetization dynamics of the uniaxial particle driven by a strong ac field applied at an angle to the easy axis of the particle (so that the axial symmetry is broken) alters drastically leading to different nonlinear effects due to coupling of the thermally activated magnetization reversal mode with the precessional modes of M(t) via the driving ac field.

  9. Tuning permanent magnets with adjustable field clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Schermer, R.I.

    1987-01-01

    The effective length of a permanent-magnet assembly can be varied by adjusting the geometrical parameters of a field clamp. This paper presents measurements on a representative dipole and quadrupole as the field clamp is withdrawn axially or radially. The detailed behavior depends upon the magnet multipolarity and geometry. As a rule-of-thumb, a 3-mm-thick iron plate placed at one end plane of the magnet will shorten the length by one-third of the magnet bore radius.

  10. Magnetic fields near Mars - First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Moehlmann, D.; Oraevskii, V. N.; Eroshenko, E.; Slavin, J.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Mars have been measured from Phobos 2 with high temporal resolution in the tail and down to an 850-km altitude. During four successive highly elliptical orbits, the position of the bow shock as well as that of a transition layer, the 'planetopause', were identified. Subsequent circular orbits at 6000-km altitude provided the first high-resolution data in the planetary tail and indicate that the interplanetary magnetic field mainly controls the magnetic tail. Magnetic turbulence was also detected when the spacecraft crossed the orbit of Phobos, indicating the possible existence of a torus near the orbit of this moon.

  11. The Measurement of Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses five experimental methods used by senior high school students to provide an accurate calibration curve of magnet current against the magnetic flux density produced by an electromagnet. Compares the relative merits of the five methods, both as measurements and from an educational viewpoint. (JR)

  12. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘?’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of density factor from 1 to 5. Key Words: Magnetic field, photosphere, corona, solar wind, bursts *Email:drvkdmani@gmail.com

  13. Pulsed field magnets at the United States National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Parkin, D.M.; Crow, J.E.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.; Sullivan, N.S.

    1993-11-01

    The pulsed field facility of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) consists of four components. Now available are (1) explosive driven flux compression, (2) capacitor-driven magnets, and (3) a 20 T superconducting magnet. The fourth component, a 60 T quasi-continuous magnet, has been designed and is scheduled for installation in early 1995. All magnets have He-4 cryostats giving temperatures from room temperature (RT) to 2.2--1.5 K. Dilution refrigerators for the superconducting 20 T magnet and the 50 T pulsed magnet will be installed by early 1994. A wide range of experiments has been completed within the past year.

  14. Diffusion in electronegative discharges with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, David E.

    1993-12-01

    Electronegative plasmas are important in a variety of electric discharge applications, such as plasma reactors, negative ion sources, and even electropositive discharges when contaminated with an electronegative impurity. The need for an understanding of the processes and phenomena associated with these electronegative discharges has spurred the development of numerical simulations and models. While many of the devices incorporate various configurations of external magnetic fields, specific attention to the influence of the magnetic field on the discharge operating point, structure, and stability is lacking. To address this deficiency, a collisional model for diffusion in three-component plasmas with an applied magnetic field is developed; it is an extension of Schottky theory allowing for negative ions and a magnetic field. This study analyzes the effect of magnetic fields on diffusion in three-component plasmas; provides an analytic solution for the collisional model in a magnetic field; evaluates the validity of effective diffusion coefficients through an analysis of the afterglow; and provides a regime of validity for the model in terms of magnetic field strength by looking at the onset of anomalous diffusion.

  15. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1993-05-01

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple ``open`` configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CMEs contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic ``bottles,`` still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CMEs indicate that CMEs generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occurs above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  16. Evolution of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Remote observations of magnetic field topologies in the solar corona and in situ observations of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in interplanetary space are used to examine the temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of open and closed field regions emanating from the Sun. The simple open'' configuration of inward and outward pointing sectors in the IMF is periodically disrupted by magnetically distinct coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which erupt from previously closed magnetic field regions in the corona into interplanetary space. At 1 AU, CMEs contain counterstreaming halo electrons which indicate their distinct magnetic topologies. This topology is generally thought to be: plasmoids that are completely disconnected from the Sun; magnetic bottles,'' still tied to the corona at both ends; or flux ropes which are only partially disconnected. Fully disconnected plasmoids would have no long term effect on the amount of open flux; however, both in situ observations of details of the halo electron distributions and remote coronagraph observations of radial fields following CMEs indicate that CMEs generally do retain at least partial attached to the Sun. Both the magnetic-bottle and flux rope geometries require some mitigating process to close off previously open fields in order to avoid a flux catastrophe. In addition, the average amount of magnetic flux observed in interplanetary space varies over the solar cycle, also indicating that there must be ways in which new flux is opened and previously open flux is closed off. The most likely scenario for closing off open magnetic fields is for reconnection to occurs above helmet streamers, where oppositely directed field regions are juxtaposed in the corona. These events would serve to return closed field arches to the Sun and release open, U-shaped structures into the solar wind.

  17. Magnetic Field Measurement with Ground State Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huirong; Lazarian, A.

    Observational studies of magnetic fields are crucial. We introduce a process "ground state alignment" as a new way to determine the magnetic field direction in diffuse medium. The alignment is due to anisotropic radiation impinging on the atom/ion. The consequence of the process is the polarization of spectral lines resulting from scattering and absorption from aligned atomic/ionic species with fine or hyperfine structure. The magnetic field induces precession and realign the atom/ion and therefore the polarization of the emitted or absorbed radiation reflects the direction of the magnetic field. The atoms get aligned at their low levels and, as the life-time of the atoms/ions we deal with is long, the alignment induced by anisotropic radiation is susceptible to extremely weak magnetic fields (1 G ? B ? 10^{-15} G). In fact, the effects of atomic/ionic alignment were studied in the laboratory decades ago, mostly in relation to the maser research. Recently, the atomic effect has been already detected in observations from circumstellar medium and this is a harbinger of future extensive magnetic field studies. A unique feature of the atomic realignment is that they can reveal the 3D orientation of magnetic field. In this chapter, we shall review the basic physical processes involved in atomic realignment. We shall also discuss its applications to interplanetary, circumstellar and interstellar magnetic fields. In addition, our research reveals that the polarization of the radiation arising from the transitions between fine and hyperfine states of the ground level can provide a unique diagnostics of magnetic fields in the Epoch of Reionization.

  18. Magnetic field spectrum at cosmological recombination revisited

    E-print Network

    Shohei Saga; Kiyotomo Ichiki; Keitaro Takahashi; Naoshi Sugiyama

    2015-06-03

    If vector type perturbations are present in the primordial plasma before recombination, the generation of magnetic fields is known to be inevitable through the Harrison mechanism. In the context of the standard cosmological perturbation theory, non-linear couplings of first-order scalar perturbations create second-order vector perturbations, which generate magnetic fields. Here we reinvestigate the generation of magnetic fields at second-order in cosmological perturbations on the basis of our previous study, and extend it by newly taking into account the time evolution of purely second-order vector perturbations with a newly developed second-order Boltzmann code. We confirm that the amplitude of magnetic fields from the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes is consistent with the result in our previous study. However, we find, both numerically and analytically, that the magnetic fields from the purely second-order vector perturbations partially cancel out the magnetic fields from one of the product-terms of the first-order scalar modes, in the tight coupling regime in the radiation dominated era. Therefore, the amplitude of the magnetic fields on small scales, $k \\gtrsim 10~h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, is smaller than the previous estimates. The amplitude of the generated magnetic fields at cosmological recombination is about $B_{\\rm rec} =5.0\\times 10^{-24}~{\\rm Gauss}$ on $k = 5.0 \\times 10^{-1}~h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. Finally, we discuss the reason of the discrepancies that exist in estimates of the amplitude of magnetic fields among other authors.

  19. How are static magnetic fields detected biologically?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2009-03-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that life, from bacteria to birds to bats, detects magnetic fields, using the fields for orientation or navigation. Indeed there are recent reports (based on Google Earth imagery) that cattle and deer align themselves with the earth's magnetic field. [1]. The development of frog and insect eggs are changed by high magnetic fields, probably through known physical mechanisms. However, the mechanisms for eukaryotic navigation and alignment are not clear. Persuasive published models will be discussed. Evidence, that static magnetic fields might produce therapeutic effects, will be updated [2]. [4pt] [1] S. Begall, et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 105:13451 (2008). [0pt] [2] L. Finegold and B.L. Flamm, BMJ, 332:4 (2006).

  20. Normal glow discharge in axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S.; Shang, J.

    2014-10-01

    Theory and results of mathematical modeling of a glow discharge in a parallel-plate configuration with axial magnetic field is presented. The model consists of continuity equations for electron and ion fluids, the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field. Numerical simulation results are presented for two-dimensional glow discharge at various initial conditions. The results are obtained for molecular nitrogen at pressure 1-5 Torr, emf of power supply 1-2 kV, and magnetic field induction B = 0-0.5 T. It is shown that in the presence of the axial magnetic field the glow discharge is rotated around its axis of symmetry. Nevertheless it is shown that in the investigated range of discharge parameters in an axial magnetic field the law of the normal current density is retained.

  1. Electric-field guiding of magnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically study equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanosized magnetic skyrmions in thin magnetic films with broken inversion symmetry, where an electric field couples to magnetization via spin-orbit coupling. Based on a symmetry-based phenomenology and micromagnetic simulations we show that this electric-field coupling, via renormalizing the micromagnetic energy, modifies the equilibrium properties of the skyrmion. This change, in turn, results in a significant alteration of the current-induced skyrmion motion. Particularly, the speed and direction of the skyrmion can be manipulated by designing a desired energy landscape electrically, which we describe within Thiele's analytical model and demonstrate in micromagnetic simulations including electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy. We additionally use this electric-field control to construct gates for controlling skyrmion motion exhibiting a transistorlike and multiplexerlike function. The proposed electric-field effect can thus provide a low-energy electrical knob to extend the reach of information processing with skyrmions.

  2. The magnetic field of Mercury, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1974-01-01

    An updated analysis and interpretation is presented of the magnetic field observations obtained during the Mariner 10 encounter with the planet Mercury. The combination of data relating to position of the detached bow shock wave and magnetopause, and the geometry and magnitude of the magnetic field within the magnetosphere-like region surrounding Mercury, lead to the conclusion that an internal planetary field exists with dipole moment approximately 5.1 x 10 the 22nd power Gauss sq cm. The dipole axis has a polarity sense similar to earth's and is tilted 7 deg from the normal to Mercury's orbital plane. The magnetic field observations reveal a significant distortion of the modest Hermean field (350 Gamma at the equator) by the solar wind flow and the formation of a magnetic tail and neutral sheet which begins close to the planet on the night side. The composite data is not consistent with a complex induction process driven by the solar wind flow.

  3. ASYMMETRIC DIFFUSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey

    2013-04-20

    Stochasticity of magnetic field lines is important for particle transport properties. Magnetic field lines separate faster than diffusively in turbulent plasma, which is called superdiffusion. We discovered that this superdiffusion is pronouncedly asymmetric, so that the separation of field lines along the magnetic field direction is different from the separation in the opposite direction. While the symmetry of the flow is broken by the so-called imbalance or cross-helicity, the difference between forward and backward diffusion is not directly due to imbalance, but a non-trivial consequence of both imbalance and non-reversibility of turbulence. The asymmetric diffusion perpendicular to the mean magnetic field entails a variety of new physical phenomena, such as the production of parallel particle streaming in the presence of perpendicular particle gradients. Such streaming and associated instabilities could be significant for particle transport in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  4. Non-perturbative calculation of molecular magnetic properties within current-density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tellgren, E. I. Lange, K. K.; Ekström, U.; Helgaker, T.; Teale, A. M.; Furness, J. W.

    2014-01-21

    We present a novel implementation of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory utilizing London atomic orbitals as basis functions. External magnetic fields are treated non-perturbatively, which enable the study of both magnetic response properties and the effects of strong fields, using either standard density functionals or current-density functionals—the implementation is the first fully self-consistent implementation of the latter for molecules. Pilot applications are presented for the finite-field calculation of molecular magnetizabilities, hypermagnetizabilities, and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants, focusing on the impact of current-density functionals on the accuracy of the results. Existing current-density functionals based on the gauge-invariant vorticity are tested and found to be sensitive to numerical details of their implementation. Furthermore, when appropriately regularized, the resulting magnetic properties show no improvement over standard density-functional results. An advantage of the present implementation is the ability to apply density-functional theory to molecules in very strong magnetic fields, where the perturbative approach breaks down. Comparison with high accuracy full-configuration-interaction results show that the inadequacies of current-density approximations are exacerbated with increasing magnetic field strength. Standard density-functionals remain well behaved but fail to deliver high accuracy. The need for improved current-dependent density-functionals, and how they may be tested using the presented implementation, is discussed in light of our findings.

  5. Ultracold atoms in strong synthetic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The Harper Hofstadter Hamiltonian describes charged particles in the lowest band of a lattice at high magnetic fields. This Hamiltonian can be realized with ultracold atoms using laser assisted tunneling which imprints the same phase into the wavefunction of neutral atoms as a magnetic field dose for electrons. I will describe our observation of a bosonic superfluid in a magnetic field with half a flux quantum per lattice unit cell, and discuss new possibilities for implementing spin-orbit coupling. Work done in collaboration with C.J. Kennedy, G.A. Siviloglou, H. Miyake, W.C. Burton, and Woo Chang Chung.

  6. Texturing Nd-Fe-B magnets under high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivoirard, S.; Barthem, V. M. T. S.; Bres, R.; Beaugnon, E.; de Miranda, P. E. V.; Givord, D.

    2008-08-01

    An original approach is explored in the preparation of anisotropic hard magnetic alloys. This constitutes a proof of principle toward the preparation of anisotropic bonded magnets. Nd-Fe-B ribbons (50% Nd2Fe14B+50% Nd-Cu alloy), constituted of Nd2Fe14B grains embedded in a Nd-Cu eutectic matrix, were annealed under an applied magnetic field up to 16 T at various temperatures above the Nd-Cu melting temperature. The grain orientation mechanism is described in terms of a competition between the aligning magnetic field torque acting on the solid magnetic grains and the friction counter torque at the interface between the grains and the liquid matrix. The large temperature effect on the orientation behavior is attributed to the associated increase in the liquid phase volume fraction.

  7. Dynamo Models for Saturn's Axisymmetric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, S.; Tajdaran, K.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic field measurements by the Cassini mission have confirmed the earlier Pioneer 11 and Voyager missions' results that Saturn's observed magnetic field is extremely axisymmetric . For example, Saturn's dipole tilt is less than 0.06 degrees (Cao et al., 2011) . The nearly-perfect axisymmetry of Saturn's dipole is troubling because of Cowling's Theorem which states that an axisymmetric magnetic field cannot be maintained by a dynamo. However, Cowling's Theorem applies to the magnetic field generated inside the dynamo source region and we can avert any contradiction with Cowling's Theorem if we can find reason for a non-axisymmetric field generated inside the dynamo region to have an axisymmetrized potential field observed at satellite altitude. Stevenson (1980) proposed a mechanism for this axisymmetrization. He suggested that differential rotation in a stably-stratified electrically conducting layer (i.e. the helium rain-out layer) surrounding the dynamo could act to shear out the non-axisymmetry and hence produce an axisymmetric observed magnetic field. In previous work, we used three-dimensional self-consistent numerical dynamo models to demonstrate that a thin helium rain-out layer can produce a more axisymmetrized field (Stanley, 2010). We also found that the direction of the zonal flows in the layer is a crucial factor for magnetic field axisymmetry. Here we investigate the influence of the thickness of the helium rain-out layer and the intensity of the thermal winds on the axisymmetrization of the field. We search for optimal regions in parameter space for producing axisymmetric magnetic fields with similar spectral properties to the observed Saturnian field.

  8. [A 3D FEM model for calculation of electromagnetic fields in transmagnetic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Seilwinder, J; Kammer, T; Andrä, W; Bellemann, M E

    2002-01-01

    We developed a realistic finite elements method (FEM) model of the brain for the calculation of electromagnetic fields in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A focal butterfly stimulation coil was X-rayed, parameterized, and modeled. The magnetic field components of the TMS coil were calculated and compared for validation to pointwise measurements of the magnetic fields with a Hall sensor. We found a mean deviation of 7.4% at an axial distance of 20 mm to the coil. A 3D brain model with the biological tissues of white and gray matter, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid was developed. At a current sweep of 1000 A in 120 microseconds, the maximum induced current density in gray matter was 177 mA/m2 and the strongest electric field gradient covered an area of 40 mm x 53 mm. PMID:12451840

  9. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  10. Thomas-Fermi Calculations of Atoms and Matter in Magnetic Neutron Stars II: Finite Temperature Effects

    E-print Network

    A. Thorolfsson; O. E. Rognvaldsson; J. Yngvason; E. H. Gudmundsson

    1997-11-10

    We present numerical calculations of the equation of state for dense matter in high magnetic fields, using a temperature dependent Thomas-Fermi theory with a magnetic field that takes all Landau levels into account. Free energies for atoms and matter are also calculated as well as profiles of the electron density as a function of distance from the atomic nucleus for representative values of the magnetic field strength, total matter density, and temperature. The Landau shell structure, which is so prominent in cold dense matter in high magnetic fields, is still clearly present at finite temperature as long as it is less than approximately one tenth of the cyclotron energy. This structure is reflected in an oscillatory behaviour of the equation of state and other thermodynamic properties of dense matter and hence also in profiles of the density and pressure as functions of depth in the surface layers of magnetic neutron stars. These oscillations are completely smoothed out by thermal effects at temperatures of the order of the cyclotron energy or higher.

  11. Magnetic Field Strengths in Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, Dana S.; Anish Roshi, D.; Jeyakumar, S.; Bania, T. M.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Shitanishi, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We measure carbon radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 5.3 {{GHz}} toward four H ii regions with the Green Bank Telescope to determine the magnetic field strength in the photodissociation region (PDR) that surrounds the ionized gas. Roshi suggests that the non-thermal line widths of carbon RRLs from PDRs are predominantly due to magneto-hydrodynamic waves, thus allowing the magnetic field strength to be derived. We model the PDR with a simple geometry and perform the non-LTE radiative transfer of the carbon RRL emission to solve for the PDR physical properties. Using the PDR mass density from these models and the carbon RRL non-thermal line width we estimate total magnetic field strengths of B? 100{--}300 ? {{G}} in W3 and NGC 6334A. Our results for W49 and NGC 6334D are less well constrained with total magnetic field strengths between B? 200{--}1000 ? {{G}}. H i and OH Zeeman measurements of the line of sight magnetic field strength ({B}{{los}}), taken from the literature, are between a factor of ? 0.5{--}1 of the lower bound of our carbon RRL magnetic field strength estimates. Since | {B}{{los}}| ?slant B, our results are consistent with the magnetic origin of the non-thermal component of carbon RRL widths.

  12. The theory of the Galactic magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1987-01-01

    The paper discusses the role of the magnetic field in determining the large scale structure and dynamics of the interstellar medium. It then discusses the origin and maintenance of the Galactic field. The two major competing theories are that the field is primordial and connected to an intergalactic field or that the field is removed from and regenerated within the Galaxy. Finally, cosmic ray acceleration and confinement in the interstellar medium are discussed.

  13. Longitudinal conductivity of a three-dimensional Dirac electron gas in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proskurin, Igor; Ogata, Masao; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    We discuss a conductivity of a three-dimensional gas of Dirac electrons in the direction of magnetic field in high magnetic fields. Analytical expressions for the zero temperature conductivity are calculated in the linear response theory using the basis of relativistic Landau levels. The impurity scattering is treated in the self-consistent Born approximation which gives Landau level broadening increasing linearly in magnetic field. We demonstrate that in the special case of zero-gap Dirac semimetal this leads to the magnetic field and temperature independent conductivity in high magnetic field limit.

  14. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  15. Magnetic monopoles in field theory and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Rajantie, Arttu

    2012-12-28

    The existence of magnetic monopoles is predicted by many theories of particle physics beyond the standard model. However, in spite of extensive searches, there is no experimental or observational sign of them. I review the role of magnetic monopoles in quantum field theory and discuss their implications for particle physics and cosmology. I also highlight their differences and similarities with monopoles found in frustrated magnetic systems. PMID:23166376

  16. Magnetic field evolution in white dwarfs: The hall effect and complexity of the field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muslimov, A. G.; Van Horn, H. M.; Wood, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of the magnetic fields in white dwarfs, taking into account the Hall effect. Because this effect depends nonlinearly upon the magnetic field strength B, the time dependences of the various multipole field components are coupled. The evolution of the field is thus significantly more complicated than has been indicated by previous investigations. Our calculations employ recent white dwarf evolutionary sequences computed for stars with masses 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 solar mass. We show that in the presence of a strong (up to approximately 10(exp 9) G) internal toroidal magnetic field; the evolution of even the lowest order poloidal modes can be substantially changed by the Hall effect. As an example, we compute the evolution of an initially weak quadrupole component, which we take arbitrarily to be approximately 0.1%-1% of the strength of a dominant dipole field. We find that coupling provided by the Hall effect can produce growth of the ratio of the quadrupole to the dipole component of the surface value of the magnetic field strength by more than a factor of 10 over the 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 10) year cooling lifetime of the white dwarf. Some consequences of these results for the process of magnetic-field evolution in white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  17. Lattice Calculation of the Strangeness Magnetic Moment of the Nucleon

    E-print Network

    S. J. Dong; K. F. Liu; A. G. Williams

    1997-12-22

    We report on a lattice QCD calculation of the strangeness magnetic moment of the nucleon. Our result is $G_M^s(0) = - 0.36 \\pm 0.20 $. The sea contributions from the u and d quarks are about 80% larger. However, they cancel to a large extent due to their electric charges, resulting in a smaller net sea contribution of $ - 0.097 \\pm 0.037 \\mu_N$ to the nucleon magnetic moment. As far as the neutron to proton magnetic moment ratio is concerned, this sea contribution tends to cancel out the cloud-quark effect from the Z-graphs and result in a ratio of $ -0.68 \\pm 0.04$ which is close to the SU(6) relation and the experiment. The strangeness Sachs electric mean-square radius $_E$ is found to be small and negative and the total sea contributes substantially to the neutron electric form factor.

  18. On the helicity of open magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    We reconsider the topological interpretation of magnetic helicity for magnetic fields in open domains, and relate this to the relative helicity. Specifically, our domains stretch between two parallel planes, and each of these ends may be magnetically open. It is demonstrated that, while the magnetic helicity is gauge-dependent, its value in any gauge may be physically interpreted as the average winding number among all pairs of field lines with respect to some orthonormal frame field. In fact, the choice of gauge is equivalent to the choice of reference field in the relative helicity, meaning that the magnetic helicity is no less physically meaningful. We prove that a particular gauge always measures the winding with respect to a fixed frame, and propose that this is normally the best choice. For periodic fields, this choice is equivalent to measuring relative helicity with respect to a potential reference field. However, for aperiodic fields, we show that the potential field can be twisted. We prove by construction that there always exists a possible untwisted reference field.

  19. Coronal Magnetic Fields Derived from Simultaneous Microwave and EUV Observations and Comparison with the Potential Field Model

    E-print Network

    Miyawaki, Shun; Shibasaki, Kiyoto; Shiota, Daikou; Nozawa, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the accuracy of coronal magnetic fields derived from radio observations by comparing them to potential field calculations and the DEM measurements using EUV observations. We derived line of sight component of the coronal magnetic field from polarization observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung in the NOAA active region 11150, observed around 3:00 UT on February 3, 2011 using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. Because the thermal bremsstrahlung intensity at 17 GHz includes both chromospheric and coronal components, we extracted only the coronal component by measuring the coronal emission measure in EUV observations. In addition, we derived only the radio polarization component of the corona by selecting the region of coronal loops and weak magnetic field strength in the chromosphere along the line of sight. The upper limit of the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields were determined as 100 - 210 G. We also calculated the coronal longitudinal magnetic fields from the potential field extrapola...

  20. Juno and Jupiter's Magnetic Field (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloxham, J.; Connerney, J. E.; Jorgensen, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Juno spacecraft, launched in August 2011, will reach Jupiter in early July 2016, where it will enter a polar orbit, with an 11 day period and a perijove altitude of approximately 5000 km. The baseline mission will last for one year during which Juno will complete 32 orbits, evenly spaced in longitude. The baseline mission presents an unparalleled opportunity for investigating Jupiter's magnetic field. In many ways Jupiter is a better planet for studying dynamo-generated magnetic fields than the Earth: there are no crustal fields, of course, which otherwise mask the dynamo-generated field at high degree; and an orbiting spacecraft can get proportionately much closer to the dynamo region. Assuming Jupiter's dynamo extends to 0.8 Rj, Juno at closet approach is only 0.3 Rc above the dynamo, while Earth orbiting magnetic field missions sample the field at least 1 Rc above the dynamo (where Rc is the respective outer core or dynamo region radius). Juno's MAG Investigation delivers magnetic measurements with exceptional vector accuracy (100 ppm) via two FGM sensors, each co-located with a dedicated pair of non-magnetic star cameras for attitude determination at the sensor. We expect to image Jupiter's dynamo with unsurpassed resolution. Accordingly, we anticipate that the Juno magnetic field investigation may place important constraints on Jupiter's interior structure, and hence on the formation and evolution of Jupiter.

  1. CMB spectral distortions from the decay of causally generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Jacques M.; Banerjee, Robi

    2015-12-01

    We improve previous calculations of the cosmic microwave background spectral distortions due to the decay of primordial magnetic fields. We focus our studies on causally generated magnetic fields at the electroweak and QCD phase transitions. We also consider the decay of helical magnetic fields. We show that the decay of nonhelical magnetic fields generated at either the electroweak or QCD scale produce ? - and y -type distortions below 10-8 which are probably not detectable by a future PIXIE-like experiment. We show that magnetic fields generated at the electroweak scale must have a helicity fraction f*>1 0-4 in order to produce detectable ? -type distortions. Hence, a positive detection coming from the decay of magnetic fields would rule out nonhelical primordial magnetic fields and provide a lower bound on the magnetic helicity.

  2. The magnetic field of zeta Orionis A

    E-print Network

    Blazère, A; Tkachenko, A; Bouret, J -C; Rivinius, Th

    2015-01-01

    Zeta Ori A is a hot star claimed to host a weak magnetic field, but no clear magnetic detection was obtained so far. In addition, it was recently shown to be a binary system composed of a O9.5I supergiant and a B1IV star. We aim at verifying the presence of a magnetic field in zeta Ori A, identifying to which of the two binary components it belongs (or whether both stars are magnetic), and characterizing the field.Very high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric data were obtained with Narval at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL) in France. Archival HEROS, FEROS and UVES spectroscopic data were also used. The data were first disentangled to separate the two components. We then analyzed them with the Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) technique to extract the magnetic information. We confirm that zeta Ori A is magnetic. We find that the supergiant component zeta Ori Aa is the magnetic component: Zeeman signatures are observed and rotational modulation of the longitudinal magnetic field is clearly detected with a per...

  3. Magnetic Field Effects in Fermion Pairings

    E-print Network

    Vivian de la Incera

    2013-07-29

    This paper considers various fermion pairings of interest for the QCD phases. The effects of an external magnetic field on the pairing mechanisms, on the realization of new condensates, and on the properties of the magnetized phases are all explored and discussed.

  4. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  5. Understanding the Geometry of Astrophysical Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Broderick, Avery E

    2009-01-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique with which to measure the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13 (RM/rad m^-2)^(1/4) (B/G)^(1/2) MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the ``super-adiabatic regime'' in which the rotation measure is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing rotation measures at high ...

  6. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems is presented in this paper. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed.

  7. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox, Melanie L. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequencies correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic field used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for discerning changes in sensor s response kequency, resistance and amplitude is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminating the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to any form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  8. Lunar magnetic field measurements with a cubesat

    E-print Network

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    We have developed a mission concept that uses 3-unit cubesats to perform new measurements of lunar magnetic fields, less than 100 meters above the Moon’s surface. The mission calls for sending the cubesats on impact ...

  9. Influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic field on the thermal conductivity of magnetic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Ting; Lai, Mei-Feng; Hou, Yun-Fang; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-13

    We investigated the influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of suspended magnetic nanowires. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires was obtained using steady-state Joule heating to measure the change in resistance caused by spontaneous heating. The results showed that the thermal conductivity coefficients of straight and wavy magnetic nanowires decreased with an increase in the magnetic domain wall number, implying that the scattering between magnons and domain walls hindered the heat transport process. In addition, we proved that the magnetic field considerably reduced the thermal conductivity of a magnetic nanowire. The influence of magnetic domain walls and magnetic fields on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline magnetic nanowires can be attributed to the scattering of long-wavelength spin waves mediated by intergrain exchange coupling. PMID:25839230

  10. Tracing Magnetic Fields by Atomic Alignment in Extended Radiation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong; Dong, Le

    2015-05-01

    Tracing magnetic field is crucial as magnetic field plays an important role in many astrophysical processes. Earlier studies have demonstrated that ground state alignment (GSA) is an effective way to detect a weak magnetic field (1G? B? {{10}-15} G) in a diffuse medium. We explore the atomic alignment in the presence of an extended radiation field for both absorption lines and emission lines. The alignment in the circumstellar medium, binary systems, disks, and the local interstellar medium are considered in order to study the alignment in the radiation field where the pumping source has a clear geometric structure. Furthermore, the multipole expansion method is adopted to study GSA induced in the radiation field with unidentified pumping sources. We study the alignment in the dominant radiation components of the general radiation field: the dipole and quadrupole radiation field. We discuss the approximation of GSA in a general radiation field by summing the contribution from the dipole and quadrupole radiation field. We conclude that GSA is a powerful tool for detecting weak magnetic fields in the diffuse medium in general radiation fields.

  11. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  12. Aalborg Universitet An Analytical Equation for Cogging Torque Calculation in Permanent Magnet Motors

    E-print Network

    Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    Aalborg Universitet An Analytical Equation for Cogging Torque Calculation in Permanent Magnet Torque Calculation in Permanent Magnet Motors. Paper presented at 17th International Conference to the prediction of the cogging torque in motors with parallel or radial magnetized permanent magnets. The magnetic

  13. Magnetic fields of the W4 superbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X. Y.; Reich, W.; Reich, P.; Han, J. L.; Kothes, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Superbubbles and supershells are the channels for transferring mass and energy from the Galactic disk to the halo. Magnetic fields are believed to play a vital role in their evolution. Aims: We study the radio continuum and polarized emission properties of the W4 superbubble to determine its magnetic field strength. Methods: New sensitive radio continuum observations were made at ?6 cm, ?11 cm, and ?21 cm. The total intensity measurements were used to derive the radio spectrum of the W4 superbubble. The linear polarization data were analysed to determine the magnetic field properties within the bubble shells. Results: The observations show a multi-shell structure of the W4 superbubble. A flat radio continuum spectrum that stems from optically thin thermal emission is derived from 1.4 GHz to 4.8 GHz. By fitting a passive Faraday screen model and considering the filling factor fne, we obtain the thermal electron density ne = 1,0/??ne (±5%) cm-3 and the strength of the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field B// = 5,0/??ne (±10%) ?G (i.e. pointing away from us) within the western shell of the W4 superbubble. When the known tilted geometry of the W4 superbubble is considered, the total magnetic field Btot in its western shell is greater than 12 ?G. The electron density and the magnetic field are lower and weaker in the high-latitude parts of the superbubble. The rotation measure is found to be positive in the eastern shell but negative in the western shell of the W4 superbubble, which is consistent with the case where the magnetic field in the Perseus arm is lifted up from the plane towards high latitudes. Conclusions: The magnetic field strength and the electron density we derived for the W4 superbubble are important parameters for evolution models of superbubbles breaking out of the Galactic plane.

  14. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ?}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 ?m obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ?0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (? 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  15. Nonlinear diffusion waves in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and the large-scale instabilities arising upon an electrical explosion of conductors in a superstrong (2-3 MG) magnetic field were investigated experimentally on the MIG high-current generator (up to 2.5 peak current, 100 ns current rise time). It was observed that in the nonlinear stage of the process, the wavelength of thermal instabilities (striations) increased with a rate of 1.5-3 km/s.

  16. Magnetic Fields and Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; (Baobab Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Ching, Tao-Chung; Frau, Pau; Chen, How-Huan; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain; Csengeri, Timea; Juárez, Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Massive stars (M > 8 M ?) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 ?m obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of lsim0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (lsim 103 AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  17. Molecules and chains in a strong magnetic field - Statistical treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahams, Andrew M.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1991-01-01

    A Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Weizsaecker statistical model is developed and employed to investigate diatomic molecules and infinite molecular chains in strong magnetic fields. The standard magnetic Thomas-Fermi-Dirac kinetic, potential, and exchange energy functionals are supplemented by a gradient correction to the kinetic energy. The numerical method used for solving this system in two spatial dimensions is detailed. Numerical solutions for a wide range of magnetic strengths and elements are presented to demonstrate the robustness, as well as the limitations, of the statistical approach. These calculations qualitatively reproduce many of the results of detailed quantum mechanical treatments. For example, the fractional binding energy is greatest for low atomic numbers and for strong magnetic fields.

  18. Secondary resonance magnetic force microscopy using an external magnetic field for characterization of magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongzi; Mo, Kangxin; Ding, Xidong; Zhao, Liangbing; Lin, Guocong; Zhang, Yueli; Chen, Dihu

    2015-09-01

    A bimodal magnetic force microscopy (MFM) that uses an external magnetic field for the detection and imaging of magnetic thin films is developed. By applying the external modulation magnetic field, the vibration of a cantilever probe is excited by its magnetic tip at its higher eigenmode. Using magnetic nanoparticle samples, the capacity of the technique which allows single-pass imaging of topography and magnetic forces is demonstrated. For the detection of magnetic properties of thin film materials, its signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity are demonstrated to be superior to conventional MFM in lift mode. The secondary resonance MFM technique provides a promising tool for the characterization of nanoscale magnetic properties of various materials, especially of magnetic thin films with weak magnetism.

  19. Research of weak pulsed magnetic field system derived from the time, displacement, and static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Qian, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    The accurate measurement of dynamic characteristics in weak magnetic sensors is urgently required as a greater number of applications for these devices are found. In this paper, a novel weak pulsed magnetic field system is presented. The underlying principle is to drive a permanent magnet passing another magnet rapidly, producing a pulsed weak magnetic field. The magnitude of the field can be adjusted by changing the velocity and distance between the two magnets. The standard value of the pulsed dynamic magnetic field can be traced back to the accurate measurement of time, displacement, and static magnetic field. In this study a detailed procedure for producing a pulse magnetic field system using the above method is outlined after which a theoretical analysis of the permanent magnet movement is discussed. Using the described apparatus a milli-second level pulse-width with a milli-Tesla magnetic field magnitude is used to study the dynamic characteristics of a giant magnetoresistance sensor. We conclude by suggesting possible improvements to the described apparatus.

  20. Research of weak pulsed magnetic field system derived from the time, displacement, and static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Qian, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    The accurate measurement of dynamic characteristics in weak magnetic sensors is urgently required as a greater number of applications for these devices are found. In this paper, a novel weak pulsed magnetic field system is presented. The underlying principle is to drive a permanent magnet passing another magnet rapidly, producing a pulsed weak magnetic field. The magnitude of the field can be adjusted by changing the velocity and distance between the two magnets. The standard value of the pulsed dynamic magnetic field can be traced back to the accurate measurement of time, displacement, and static magnetic field. In this study a detailed procedure for producing a pulse magnetic field system using the above method is outlined after which a theoretical analysis of the permanent magnet movement is discussed. Using the described apparatus a milli-second level pulse-width with a milli-Tesla magnetic field magnitude is used to study the dynamic characteristics of a giant magnetoresistance sensor. We conclude by suggesting possible improvements to the described apparatus. PMID:26520987

  1. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, Stefan L. (Hamburg, DE)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180.degree. from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180.degree. from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils.

  2. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, S.L.

    1990-02-13

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180[degree] from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180[degree] from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils. 16 figs.

  3. Calculation of a Minimum Total Magnetic Helicity in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, M. K.; Labonte, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    Despite its extreme importance, the calculation of the total magnetic helicity in solar active regions remains an unresolved problem in solar physics. On the other hand, the helicity variations in an active region can be calculated partially, for longitudinal magnetograms, or in full, for vector magnetograms, but only by using coarse, uncertain velocity field maps, calculated by means of correlation tracking techniques. Whether one should apply correlation tracking to magnetograms or white-light continuum images is also unclear, as the two inputs do not yield identical outputs. We present a technique that provides a lower limit of the total magnetic helicity in active regions, without using any velocity fields. The temporal variation of the total helicity can also be calculated in full if a series of vector magnetograms is available. The method relies on a comparison between the best linear force-free approximation and the potential approximation for a given photospheric boundary and begins by demonstrating that a commonly used formula for the magnetic helicity density in the linear force-free approximation is, in fact, erroneous. We have tested our method on vector magnetograms acquired by the Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) of the University of Hawaii. We discuss the pros and cons of our approach and we compare our results for the magnetic helicity variations with results obtained when classical methods are employed.

  4. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  5. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R. (Coram, NY)

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  6. Magnetic Relaxation in Single-Electron Single-Ion Cerium(III) Magnets: Insights from Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Gupta, Tulika; Ungur, Liviu; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2015-09-21

    Detailed ab initio calculations were performed on two structurally different cerium(III) single-molecule magnets (SMMs) to probe the origin of magnetic anisotropy and to understand the mechanism of magnetic relaxations. The complexes [Ce(III){Zn(II)(L)}2(MeOH)]BPh4 (1) and [Li(dme)3][Ce(III)(cot'')2] (1; L=N,N,O,O-tetradentate Schiff base ligand; 2; DME=dimethoxyethane, COT''=1,4-bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclooctatetraenyldianion), which are reported to be zero-field and field-induced SMMs with effective barrier heights of 21.2 and 30?K respectively, were chosen as examples. CASSCF+RASSI/SINGLE_ANISO calculations unequivocally suggest that mJ|±5/2? and |±1/2? are the ground states for complexes 1 and 2, respectively. The origin of these differences is rooted back to the nature of the ligand field and the symmetry around the cerium(III) ions. Ab initio magnetisation blockade barriers constructed for complexes 1 and 2 expose a contrasting energy-level pattern with significant quantum tunnelling of magnetisation between the ground state Kramers doublet in complex 2. Calculations performed on several model complexes stress the need for a suitable ligand environment and high symmetry around the cerium(III) ions to obtain a large effective barrier. PMID:26262751

  7. Asymptotic freedom in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Andreichikov, M A; Orlovsky, V D; Simonov, Yu A

    2013-04-19

    Perturbative gluon exchange interaction between quark and antiquark, or in a 3q system, is enhanced in a magnetic field and may cause vanishing of the total qq[over ¯] or 3q mass, and even unlimited decrease of it-recently called the magnetic collapse of QCD. The analysis of the one-loop correction below shows a considerable softening of this phenomenon due to qq[over ¯] loop contribution, similar to the Coulomb case of QED, leading to approximately logarithmic damping of gluon exchange interaction (?O(1/ln|eB|)) at large magnetic field. PMID:23679595

  8. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  9. Primordial magnetic seed field amplification by gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Betschart, Gerold; Zunckel, Caroline; Dunsby, Peter K.S.; Marklund, Mattias

    2005-12-15

    Using second-order gauge-invariant perturbation theory, a self-consistent framework describing the nonlinear coupling between gravitational waves and a large-scale homogeneous magnetic field is presented. It is shown how this coupling may be used to amplify seed magnetic fields to strengths needed to support the galactic dynamo. In situations where the gravitational wave background is described by an 'almost' Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology we find that the magnitude of the original magnetic field is amplified by an amount proportional to the magnitude of the gravitational wave induced shear anisotropy and the square of the field's initial comoving scale. We apply this mechanism to the case where the seed field and gravitational wave background are produced during inflation and find that the magnitude of the gravitational boost depends significantly on the manner in which the estimate of the shear anisotropy at the end of inflation is calculated. Assuming a seed field of 10{sup -34} G spanning a comoving scale of about 10 kpc today, the shear anisotropy at the end of inflation must be at least as large as 10{sup -40} in order to obtain a generated magnetic field of the same order of magnitude as the original seed. Moreover, contrasting the weak-field approximation to our gauge-invariant approach, we find that while both methods agree in the limit of high conductivity, their corresponding solutions are otherwise only compatible in the limit of infinitely long-wavelength gravitational waves.

  10. ANALYTICAL CALCULATION OF STOKES PROFILES OF ROTATING STELLAR MAGNETIC DIPOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Gonzalez, M. J.

    2012-08-20

    The observation of the polarization emerging from a rotating star at different phases opens up the possibility to map the magnetic field in the stellar surface thanks to the well-known Zeeman-Doppler imaging. When the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, the circular and linear polarization profiles locally in each point of the star are proportional to the first and second derivatives of the unperturbed intensity profile, respectively. We show that the weak-field approximation (for weak lines in the case of linear polarization) can be generalized to the case of a rotating star including the Doppler effect and taking into account the integration on the stellar surface. The Stokes profiles are written as a linear combination of wavelength-dependent terms expressed as series expansions in terms of Hermite polynomials. These terms contain the surface-integrated magnetic field and velocity components. The direct numerical evaluation of these quantities is limited to rotation velocities not larger than eight times the Doppler width of the local absorption profiles. Additionally, we demonstrate that in a rotating star, the circular polarization flux depends on the derivative of the intensity flux with respect to the wavelength and also on the profile itself. Likewise, the linear polarization depends on the profile and on its first and second derivatives with respect to the wavelength. We particularize the general expressions to a rotating dipole.

  11. Fast Reconnection of Weak Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1998-01-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection refers to annihilation or topological rearrangement of magnetic fields on a timescale that is independent (or nearly independent) of the plasma resistivity. The resistivity of astrophysical plasmas is so low that reconnection is of little practical interest unless it is fast. Yet, the theory of fast magnetic reconnection is on uncertain ground, as models must avoid the tendency of magnetic fields to pile up at the reconnection layer, slowing down the flow. In this paper it is shown that these problems can be avoided to some extent if the flow is three dimensional. On the other hand, it is shown that in the limited but important case of incompressible stagnation point flows, every flow will amplify most magnetic fields. Although examples of fast magnetic reconnection abound, a weak, disordered magnetic field embedded in stagnation point flow will in general be amplified, and should eventually modify the flow. These results support recent arguments against the operation of turbulent resistivity in highly conducting fluids.

  12. Magnetic fields in early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunhut, Jason H.; Neiner, Coralie

    2015-10-01

    For several decades we have been cognizant of the presence of magnetic fields in early-type stars, but our understanding of their magnetic properties has recently (over the last decade) expanded due to the new generation of high-resolution spectropolarimeters (ESPaDOnS at CFHT, Narval at TBL, HARPSpol at ESO). The most detailed surface magnetic field maps of intermediate-mass stars have been obtained through Doppler imaging techniques, allowing us to probe the small-scale structure of these stars. Thanks to the effort of large programmes (e.g. the MiMeS project), we have, for the first time, addressed key issues regarding our understanding of the magnetic properties of massive (M > 8 M ?) stars, whose magnetic fields were only first detected about fifteen years ago. In this proceedings article we review the spectropolarimetric observations and statistics derived in recent years that have formed our general understanding of stellar magnetism in early-type stars. We also discuss how these observations have furthered our understanding of the interactions between the magnetic field and stellar wind, as well as the consequences and connections of this interaction with other observed phenomena.

  13. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  14. Laser-Assisted H- Charge Exchange Injection in Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlov, Timofey V; Danilov, Viatcheslav V; Shishlo, Andrei P

    2010-01-01

    The use of stripping foils for charge exchange injection can cause a number of operational problems in high intensity hadron accelerators. A recently proposed three-step method of laser-assisted injection is capable of overcoming these problems. This paper presents advances in the physical model of laser-assisted charge exchange injection of H- beams and covers a wide field of atomic physics. The model allows the calculation of the evolution of an H0 beam taking into account spontaneous emission, field ionization and external electromagnetic fields. Some new data on the hydrogen atom related to the problem are calculated. The numerical calculations in the model use realistic descriptions of laser field and injection beam. Generally, the model can be used for design and optimization of a laser-assisted injection cell within an accelerator lattice. Example calculations of laser-assisted injection for an intermediate experiment at SNS in Oak Ridge and for the PS2 accelerator at CERN are presented. Two different schemes, distinctively characterized by various magnetic fields at the excitation point, are discussed. It was shown that the emittance growth of an injected beam can be drastically decreased by moving excitation point into a strong magnetic field.

  15. Magnetic field decay of magnetars in supernova remnants

    E-print Network

    Gao, Z F; Wang, N; Yuan, J P

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we modify our previous research carefully, and derive a new expression of electron energy density in superhigh magnetic fields. Based on our improved model, we re-compute the electron capture rates and the magnetic fields' evolutionary timescales $t$ of magnetars. According to the calculated results, the superhigh magnetic fields may evolve on timescales $\\sim (10^{6}-10^{7})$ yrs for common magnetars, and the maximum timescale of the field decay, $t\\approx 2.9507 \\times 10^{6}$ yrs, corresponding to an initial internal magnetic field $B_{\\rm 0}= 3.0 \\times 10^ {15}$ G and an initial inner temperature $T_{\\rm 0}= 2.6 \\times 10^ {8}$ K. Motivated by the results of the neutron star-supernova remnant(SNR) association of Zhang $\\&$ Xie(2011), we calculate the maximum $B_{\\rm 0}$ of magnetar progenitors, $B_{\\rm max}\\sim (2.0\\times 10^{14}-2.93 \\times 10^{15})$ G when $T_{\\rm 0}= 2.6 \\times 10^ {8}$ K. When $T_{\\rm 0}\\sim 2.75 \\times 10^ {8}-~1.75 \\times 10^ {8}$ K, the maximum $B_{\\rm 0}$ will ...

  16. POLOIDAL MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY FOR TOKAMAKS WITH CURRENT HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Puerta, Julio; Martin, Pablo; Castro, Enrique

    2009-07-26

    The appearance of hole currents in tokamaks seems to be very important in plasma confinement and on-set of instabilities, and this paper is devoted to study the topology changes of poloidal magnetic fields in tokamaks. In order to determine these fields different models for current profiles can be considered. It seems to us, that one of the best analytic descriptions is given by V. Yavorskij et al., which has been chosen for the calculations here performed. Suitable analytic equations for the family of magnetic field surfaces with triangularity and Shafranov shift are written down here. The topology of the magnetic field determines the amount of trapped particles in the generalized mirror type magnetic field configurations. Here it is found that the number of maximums and minimums of Bp depends mainly on triangularity, but the pattern is also depending of the existence or not of hole currents. Our calculations allow comparing the topology of configurations of similar parameters, but with and without whole currents. These differences are study for configurations with equal ellipticity but changing the triangularity parameters. Positive and negative triangularities are considered and compared between them.

  17. Ring Current Modeling in a Realistic Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Moore, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    A 3-dimensional kinetic model has been developed to study the dynamics of the storm time ring current in a dipole magnetic field. In this paper, the ring current model is extended to include a realistic, time-varying magnetic field model. The magnetic field is expressed as the cross product of the gradients of two Euler potentials and the bounce-averaged particle drifts are calculated in the Euler potential coordinates. A dipolarization event is modeled by collapsing a tail-like magnetosphere to a dipole-like configuration. Our model is able to simulate the sudden enhancements in the ring current ion fluxes and the corresponding ionospheric precipitation during the substorm expansion.

  18. Magnetic field dependence of plasma relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.; Joyce, G.; Turner, L.

    1974-01-01

    A previously derived Fokker-Planck collision integral for an electron plasma in a dc magnetic field is examined in the limit in which the Debye length is greater than the thermal gyroradius, which is in turn greater than the mean distance of closest approach. It is demonstrated that the collision integral can be satisfactorily approximated by the classical Landau value (which ignores the presence of a dc magnetic field) if the following replacement is made: In the Coulomb logarithm, the Debye length is replaced by the gyroradius. This induces a fundamental logarithmic dependence on magnetic field in the relaxation times. Numerical comparison of the asymptotic approximations with the previously derived exact results is made, and good agreement is found. The simplification this introduces into the description of collision processes in magnetized plasma is considerable.

  19. Mechanical propulsion from unsymmetrical magnetic induction fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schlicher, R.L.; Biggs, A.W.; Tedeschi, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    A method is reported for generating mechanical spacecraft propulsion from unsymmetrical magnetic induction fields. It is based on an unsymmetrical three-dimensional loop antenna structure driven by a repetitively-pulsed high-current power supply. Antenna geometry is optimized for generating propulsive thrust rather than radiating electromagnetic energy. Part of this antenna consists of flat electrical conductors, which form a partially-closed quasi-cylindrical volume around a center conductor. Magnetic flux concentrates at the closed end of the quasicylindrical volume thereby creating a magnetic field flux density gradient along a single axis collinear to the Center Conductor. This magnetic field density gradient imbalances the magneto-mechanical forces that result from the interactions of the internal magnetic induction field with the current in the conductors of the antenna structure, in accordance with Lorentz`s Force Law. Also, there are electrically isolated prismatic conductor surfaces attached to the inside surface of the flat conductors which form the closed end of the quasi-cylindrical volume. Mechanical pressures occur on these conductor prisms because of the changing internal magnetic field and are a consequence of Faraday`s Induction Law and Lenz`s Law. Input current rise time and wave shape are crucial to maximizing spacecraft propulsive thrust.

  20. Magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn and the characteristics of their magnetospheres, formed by interaction with the solar wind, are discussed. The origins of both magnetic fields are associated with a dynamo process deep in the planetary interior. The Jovian magnetosphere is analogous to that of a pulsar magnetosphere: a massive central body with a rapid rotation and an associated intense magnetic field. Its most distinctive feature is its magnetodisk of concentrated plasma and particle flux, and reduced magnetic field intensity. The magnetopause near the subsolar point has been observed at radial distances ranging over 50 to 100 Jovian radii, implying a relatively compressible obstacle to solar wind flow. The composition of an embedded current sheet within the magnetic tail is believed to be influenced by volcanic eruptions and emissions from Io. Spectral troughs of the Jovian radiation belts have been interpreted as possible ring particles. The Saturnian magnetosphere appears to be more like the earth in its topology. It is mainly characterized by a dipole axis parallel to the rotational axis of the planet and a magnetic field intensity much less than expected.

  1. Neutron matter under strong magnetic fields: A comparison of models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, R.; Bauer, E.; Vidaña, I.

    2014-03-01

    The equation of state of neutron matter is affected by the presence of a magnetic field due to the intrinsic magnetic moment of the neutron. Here we study the equilibrium configuration of this system for a wide range of densities, temperatures, and magnetic fields. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the isothermal compressibility and the magnetic susceptibility. Our calculation is performed using both microscopic and phenomenological approaches of the neutron matter equation of state, namely the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) approach using the Argonne V18 nucleon-nucleon potential supplemented with the Urbana IX three-nucleon force, the effective Skyrme model in a Hartree-Fock description, and the quantum hadrodynamic formulation with a mean-field approximation. All these approaches predict a change from completely spin polarized to partially polarized matter that leads to a continuous equation of state. The compressibility and the magnetic susceptibility show characteristic behaviors which reflect that fact. Thermal effects tend to smear out the sharpness found for these quantities at T =0. In most cases a thermal increase of ?T =10 MeV is enough to hide the signals of the change of polarization. The set of densities and magnetic field intensities for which the system changes it spin polarization is different for each model. However, we found that under the conditions examined in this work there is an overall agreement between the three theoretical descriptions.

  2. Accuracy Improvement in Magnetic Field Modeling for an Axisymmetric Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Gurieva, Yana L.; Il,in, Valery P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the accuracy and calculation speed for the magnetic field computation in an axisymmetric electromagnet. Different numerical techniques, based on an adaptive nonuniform grid, high order finite difference approximations, and semi-analitical calculation of boundary conditions are considered. These techniques are being applied to the modeling of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket. For high-accuracy calculations, a fourth-order scheme offers dramatic advantages over a second order scheme. For complex physical configurations of interest in plasma propulsion, a second-order scheme with nonuniform mesh gives the best results. Also, the relative advantages of various methods are described when the speed of computation is an important consideration.

  3. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    SciTech Connect

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  4. Poloidal magnetic fields in superconducting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, K. T.; Wasserman, I.

    2013-06-01

    We develop the formalism for computing the magnetic field within an axisymmetric neutron star with a strong type II superconductor core surrounded by a normal conductor. The formalism takes full account of the constraints imposed by hydrostatic equilibrium with a barotropic equation of state. A characteristic of this problem is that the currents and fields need to be determined simultaneously and self-consistently. Within the core, the strong type II limit B ? H allows us to compute the shapes of individual field lines. We specialize to purely poloidal magnetic fields that are perpendicular to the equator, and develop the `most dipolar case' in which field lines are vertical at the outer radius of the core, which leads to a magnetic field at the stellar surface that is as close to a dipole as possible. We demonstrate that although field lines from the core may only penetrate a short distance into the normal shell, boundary conditions at the inner radius of the normal shell control the field strength on the surface. Remarkably, we find that for a Newtonian N = 1 polytrope, the surface dipole field strength is Bsurf ? Hb?b/3, where Hb is the magnetic field strength at the outer boundary of the type II core and ?bR is the thickness of the normal shell. For reasonable models, Hb ? 1014 G and ?b ? 0.1 so the surface field strength is Bsurf ? 3 × 1012 G, comparable to the field strengths of many radio pulsars. In general, Hb and ?b are both determined by the equation of state of nuclear matter and by the mass of the neutron star, but Bsurf ˜ 1012 G is probably a robust result for the `most dipolar' case. We speculate on how the wide range of neutron star surface fields might arise in situations with less restrictions on the internal field configuration. We show that quadrupolar distortions are ˜-10-9(Hb/1014 G)2 and arise primarily in the normal shell for B ? Hb.

  5. Determining Magnetic Field Close to Air-Bearing Surface by Projection Electron-Beam Tomography and Fourier Extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinada, Hiroyuki; Midoh, Yoshihiro; Shimakura, Tomokazu; Nakamae, Koji

    The magnetic field of a recording head is measured by projection electron-beam tomography with a resolution of about ten nanometers, and the magnetic field closer to the sample surface than the measurement plane is estimated by numerical calculation. The magnetic field at 20 nm calculated from the field measured at 50 nm adequately agrees with the directly measured field at 20 nm. The combination of projection electron-beam tomography and this calculation method make it possible to determine the magnetic field close to a head (air-bearing) surface.

  6. Theoretical analysis of magnetic field interactions with aortic blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kinouchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1996-04-01

    The flow of blood in the presence of a magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the major arteries of the central circulatory system. Under certain simplifying conditions, such as the assumption that the length of major arteries (e.g., the aorta) is infinite and that the vessel walls are not electrically conductive, the distribution of induced voltages and currents within these blood vessels can be calculated with reasonable precision. However, the propagation of magnetically induced voltages and currents from the aorta into neighboring tissue structures such as the sinuatrial node of the heart has not been previously determined by any experimental or theoretical technique. In the analysis presented in this paper, a solution of the complete Navier-Stokes equation was obtained by the finite element technique for blood flow through the ascending and descending aortic vessels in the presence of a uniform static magnetic field. Spatial distributions of the magnetically induced voltage and current were obtained for the aortic vessel and surrounding tissues under the assumption that the wall of the aorta is electrically conductive. Results are presented for the calculated values of magnetically induced voltages and current densities in the aorta and surrounding tissue structures, including the sinuatrial node, and for their field-strength dependence. In addition, an analysis is presented of magnetohydrodynamic interactions that lead to a small reduction of blood volume flow at high field levels above approximately 10 tesla (T). Quantitative results are presented on the offsetting effects of oppositely directed blood flows in the ascending and descending aortic segments, and a quantitative estimate is made of the effects of assuming an infinite vs. a finite length of the aortic vessel in calculating the magnetically induced voltage and current density distribution in tissue.

  7. UNDERSTANDING THE GEOMETRY OF ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2010-08-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique for probing the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13(RM/1 rad m{sup -2}){sup 1/4}(B/1 G){sup 1/2} MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the 'super-adiabatic regime' in which the rotation measure (RM) is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing RMs at high frequencies with those in this new regime provides direct information about the geometry of the magnetic field along the line of sight. Furthermore, the frequency defining the transition to this new regime, {nu}{sub SA}, depends directly upon the local electron density and magnetic field strength where the magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight, allowing the unambiguous distinction between Faraday rotation within and in front of the emission region. Typical values of {nu}{sub SA} range from 10 kHz (below the ionospheric cutoff, but above the heliospheric cutoff) to 10 GHz, depending upon the details of the Faraday rotating environment. In particular, for resolved active galactic nuclei, including the black holes at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M81, {nu}{sub SA} ranges from roughly 10 MHz to 10 GHz, and thus can be probed via existing and up-coming ground-based radio observatories.

  8. Lightning Magnetic Field Measurements around Langmuir Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Aulich, G. D.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    In the absence of artificial conductors, underground lightning transients are produced by diffusion of the horizontal surface magnetic field of a return stroke vertically downward into the conducting earth. The changing magnetic flux produces an orthogonal horizontal electric field, generating a dispersive, lossy transverse electromagnetic wave that penetrates a hundred meters or more into the ground according to the skin depth of the medium. In turn, the electric field produces currents that flow toward or away from the channel to ground depending on the stroke polarity. The underground transients can produce large radial horizontal potential gradients depending on the distance from the discharge and depth below the surface. In this study we focus on the surface excitation field. The goal of the work is to compare measurements of surface magnetic field waveforms B(t) at different distances from natural lightning discharges with simple and detailed models of the return stroke fields. In addition to providing input to the diffusion mechanism, the results should aid in further understanding return stroke field generation processes. The observational data are to be obtained using orthogonal sets of straightened Rogowski coils to measure magnetic field waveforms in N-S and E-W directions. The waveforms are sampled at 500 kS/s over 1.024 second time intervals and recorded directly onto secure digital cards. The instrument operates off of battery power for several days or weeks at a time in remote, unattended locations and measures magnetic field strengths of up to several tens of amperes/meter. The observations are being made in conjunction with collocated slow electric field change measurements and under good 3-D lightning mapping array (LMA) and fast electric field change coverage.

  9. Measuring exposed magnetic fields of welders in working time.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Ojima, Jun; Sekino, Masaki; Hojo, Minoru; Saito, Hiroyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of the occupational electromagnetic field exposure of welders is of great importance, especially in shielded-arc welding, which uses relatively high electric currents of up to several hundred amperes. In the present study, we measured the magnetic field exposure level of welders in the course of working. A 3-axis Hall magnetometer was attached to a subject's wrist in order to place the sensor probe at the closest position to the magnetic source (a cable from the current source). Data was acquired every 5 s from the beginning of the work time. The maximum exposed field was 0.35-3.35 mT (Mean ± SD: 1.55 ± 0.93 mT, N=17) and the average value per day was 0.04-0.12 mT (Mean ± SD: 0.07 ± 0.02 mT, N=17). We also conducted a finite element method-based analysis of human hand tissue for the electromagnetic field dosimetry. In addition, the magnetic field associated with grinders, an air hammer, and a drill using electromagnetic anchorage were measured; however, the magnetic fields were much lower than those generated in the welding process. These results agreed well with the results of the electromagnetic field dosimetry (1.49 mT at the wrist position), and the calculated eddy current (4.28 mA/m(2)) was much lower than the well-known guideline thresholds for electrical nerve or muscular stimulation. PMID:21670555

  10. Magnetic field imaging with NV ensembles

    E-print Network

    L. M. Pham; D. Le Sage; P. L. Stanwix; T. K. Yeung; D. Glenn; A. Trifonov; P. Cappellaro; P. R. Hemmer; M. D. Lukin; H. Park; A. Yacoby; R. L. Walsworth

    2012-07-13

    We demonstrate a method of imaging spatially varying magnetic fields using a thin layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers at the surface of a diamond chip. Fluorescence emitted by the two-dimensional NV ensemble is detected by a CCD array, from which a vector magnetic field pattern is reconstructed. As a demonstration, AC current is passed through wires placed on the diamond chip surface, and the resulting AC magnetic field patterns are imaged using an echo-based technique with sub-micron resolution over a 140 \\mu m x 140 \\mu m field of view, giving single-pixel sensitivity ~100 nT/\\sqrt{Hz}. We discuss ongoing efforts to further improve sensitivity and potential bioimaging applications such as real-time imaging of activity in functional, cultured networks of neurons.

  11. Measurements of Photospheric and Chromospheric Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Lagg, Andreas; Harvey, Jack; Gosain, Sanjay; Centeno, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The Sun is replete with magnetic fields, with sunspots, pores and plage regions being their most prominent representatives on the solar surface. But even far away from these active regions, magnetic fields are ubiquitous. To a large extent, their importance for the thermodynamics in the solar photosphere is determined by the total magnetic flux. Whereas in low-flux quiet Sun regions, magnetic structures are shuffled around by the motion of granules, the high-flux areas like sunspots or pores effectively suppress convection, leading to a temperature decrease of up to 3000 K. The importance of magnetic fields to the conditions in higher atmospheric layers, the chromosphere and corona, is indisputable. Magnetic fields in both active and quiet regions are the main coupling agent between the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and are therefore not only involved in the structuring of these layers, but also for the transport of energy from the solar surface through the corona to the interplanetary space. Conseque...

  12. ECE 390 Electric & Magnetic Fields Catalog Description: Static and quasi-static electric and magnetic fields.

    E-print Network

    ECE 390 ­ Electric & Magnetic Fields Catalog Description: Static and quasi-static electric), A. Jander (secondary) Course Content: · Introduction, review of vector analysis · Static electric fields in free space: Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, and electric potential, electric dipole · Static

  13. Magnetic field structure in Monoceros R2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T. H.; Novak, G.; Xie, T.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out polarimetric observations to investigate the geometry of the magnetic field in the giant molecular cloud Monoceros R2. This study is based upon deep R-band charge coupled device (CCD) polarimetry, covering a total area of 0.5 deg(exp 2) of the giant molecular cloud. The data were calibrated using a new technique that relies on obtaining broad-band photometry of stars simultaneously with polarimetric photometry of the Mon R2 fields, thus providing an accurate means of measuring the electric vectors of starlight which is polarized by the fore-ground dust grains aligned by the magnetic field in the Mon R2 GMC. In this work, (1) we were able to continuously trace magnetic field lines from the largest scales in Mon R2 to the detailed structure of the field in the dense core, as determined from infrared polarimetry; and (2) we have found that the ambient field is apparently modified by a large-scale structure in the Mon R2 cloud. The mean angle of polarization for the complete sample we measured is 158 deg, which is roughly coincident with the local Galactic magnetic field (155 deg). The dispersion in the angle of polarization is 33 deg, similar to that found in the Orion GMC. The dispersion in angle of polarization for stars located along the western side of the three CCD fields is 22 deg. The CCD fields are bisected by a dense ridge of gas defining the boundary of an expanding gas shell that recent observational results at millimeter wavelengths now reveal dominates the Mon R2 GMC. Our results suggest th at the expanding shell has distorted the magnetic field lines extending from the core to the northern gas structure comprising Mon R2.

  14. Structures and magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B magnets studied by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Ke, Liqin; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-06-01

    The structures and magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B alloys near the composition of Co5Zr with B at. % ?6% were studied using adaptive genetic algorithm and first-principles calculations. The energy and magnetic moment contour maps as a function of chemical composition were constructed for the Co-Zr-B magnet alloys through extensive structure searches and calculations. We found that Co-Zr-B system exhibits the same structure motif as the "Co11Zr2" polymorphs, and such motif plays a key role in achieving strong magnetic anisotropy. Boron atoms were found to be able to substitute cobalt atoms or occupy the "interruption" sites. First-principles calculations showed that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies of the boron-doped alloys are close to that of the high-temperature rhombohedral Co5Zr phase and larger than that of the low-temperature Co5.25Zr phase. Our calculations provide useful guidelines for further experimental optimization of the magnetic performances of these alloys.

  15. Structures and magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B magnets studied by first-principles calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Xin; Ke, Liqin; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-06-23

    The structures and magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B alloys near the composition of Co5Zr with B at. % ?6% were studied using adaptive genetic algorithm and first-principles calculations. The energy and magnetic moment contour maps as a function of chemical composition were constructed for the Co-Zr-B magnet alloys through extensive structure searches and calculations. We found that Co-Zr-B system exhibits the same structure motif as the “Co11Zr2”polymorphs, and such motif plays a key role in achieving strong magnetic anisotropy. Boronatoms were found to be able to substitute cobalt atoms or occupy the “interruption” sites. First-principles calculations showed that the magnetocrystalline anisotropymore »energies of the boron-doped alloys are close to that of the high-temperature rhombohedral Co5Zr phase and larger than that of the low-temperature Co5.25Zr phase. As a result, our calculations provide useful guidelines for further experimental optimization of the magnetic performances of these alloys.« less

  16. Structures and magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B magnets studied by first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Ke, Liqin; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-06-23

    The structures and magnetic properties of Co-Zr-B alloys near the composition of Co5Zr with B at. % ?6% were studied using adaptive genetic algorithm and first-principles calculations. The energy and magnetic moment contour maps as a function of chemical composition were constructed for the Co-Zr-B magnet alloys through extensive structure searches and calculations. We found that Co-Zr-B system exhibits the same structure motif as the “Co11Zr2”polymorphs, and such motif plays a key role in achieving strong magnetic anisotropy. Boronatoms were found to be able to substitute cobalt atoms or occupy the “interruption” sites. First-principles calculations showed that the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energies of the boron-doped alloys are close to that of the high-temperature rhombohedral Co5Zr phase and larger than that of the low-temperature Co5.25Zr phase. As a result, our calculations provide useful guidelines for further experimental optimization of the magnetic performances of these alloys.

  17. Probing correlations of early magnetic fields using ?-distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Ganc, Jonathan; Sloth, Martin S. E-mail: sloth@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2014-08-01

    The damping of a non-uniform magnetic field between the redshifts of about 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} injects energy into the photon-baryon plasma and causes the CMB to deviate from a perfect blackbody spectrum, producing a so-called ?-distortion. We can calculate the correlation (? T) of this distortion with the temperature anisotropy T of the CMB to search for a correlation ( B{sup 2}?) between the magnetic field B and the curvature perturbation ?; knowing the ( B{sup 2}?) correlation would help us distinguish between different models of magnetogenesis. Since the perturbations which produce the ?-distortion will be much smaller scale than the relevant density perturbations, the observation of this correlation is sensitive to the squeezed limit of ( B{sup 2}?), which is naturally parameterized by b{sub NL} (a parameter defined analogously to f{sub NL}). We find that a PIXIE-like CMB experiments has a signal to noise S/N? 1.0 × b{sub NL} ( B-tilde {sub ?}/10nG){sup 2}, where B-tilde {sub ?} is the magnetic field's strength on ?-distortion scales normalized to today's redshift; thus, a 10 nG field would be detectable with b{sub NL}=O(1). However, if the field is of inflationary origin, we generically expect it to be accompanied by a curvature bispectrum (?{sup 3}) induced by the magnetic field. For sufficiently small magnetic fields, the signal ( B{sup 2} ?) will dominate, but for B-tilde {sub ?}?> 1 nG, one would have to consider the specifics of the inflationary magnetogenesis model. We also discuss the potential post-magnetogenesis sources of a ( B{sup 2}?) correlation and explain why there will be no contribution from the evolution of the magnetic field in response to the curvature perturbation.

  18. Permanent Magnet Spiral Motor for Magnetic Gradient Energy Utilization: Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    The Spiral Magnetic Motor, which can accelerate a magnetized rotor through 90% of its cycle with only permanent magnets, was an energy milestone for the 20th century patents by Kure Tekkosho in the 1970's. However, the Japanese company used old ferrite magnets which are relatively weak and an electrically-powered coil to jump start every cycle, which defeated the primary benefit of the permanent magnet motor design. The principle of applying an inhomogeneous, anisotropic magnetic field gradient force Fz = ? cos ? dB/dz, with permanent magnets is well-known in physics, e.g., Stern-Gerlach experiment, which exploits the interaction of a magnetic moment with the aligned electron spins of magnetic domains. In this case, it is applied to dB/d? in polar coordinates, where the force F? depends equally on the magnetic moment, the cosine of the angle between the magnetic moment and the field gradient. The radial magnetic field increases in strength (in the attractive mode) or decreases in strength (in the repulsive mode) as the rotor turns through one complete cycle. An electromagnetic pulsed switching has been historically used to help the rotor traverse the gap (detent) between the end of the magnetic stator arc and the beginning (Kure Tekko, 1980). However, alternative magnetic pulse and switching designs have been developed, as well as strategic eddy current creation. This work focuses on the switching mechanism, novel magnetic pulse methods and advantageous angular momentum improvements. For example, a collaborative effort has begun with Toshiyuki Ueno (University of Tokyo) who has invented an extremely low power, combination magnetostrictive-piezoelectric (MS-PZT) device for generating low frequency magnetic fields and consumes "zero power" for static magnetic field production (Ueno, 2004 and 2007a). Utilizing a pickup coil such as an ultra-miniature millihenry inductor with a piezoelectric actuator or simply Wiegand wire geometry, it is shown that the necessary power for magnetic field switching device can be achieved in order to deflect the rotor magnet in transit. The Wiegand effect itself (bistable FeCoV wire called "Vicalloy") invented by John Wiegand (Switchable Magnetic Device, US Patent ?4,247,601), utilizing Barkhausen jumps of magnetic domains, is also applied for a similar achievement (Dilatush, 1977). Conventional approaches for spiral magnetic gradient force production have not been adequate for magnetostatic motors to perform useful work. It is proposed that integrating a magnetic force control device with a spiral stator inhomogeneous axial magnetic field motor is a viable approach to add a sufficient nonlinear boundary shift to apply the angular momentum and potential energy gained in 315 degrees of the motor cycle.

  19. Electric/magnetic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Schill, Jr., Robert A. (Henderson, NV); Popek, Marc [Las Vegas, NV

    2009-01-27

    A UNLV novel electric/magnetic dot sensor includes a loop of conductor having two ends to the loop, a first end and a second end; the first end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a first conductor within a first sheath; the second end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a second conductor within a second sheath; and the first sheath and the second sheath positioned adjacent each other. The UNLV novel sensor can be made by removing outer layers in a segment of coaxial cable, leaving a continuous link of essentially uncovered conductor between two coaxial cable legs.

  20. Behavior of a Single Langmuir Probe in a Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pytlinski, J. T.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to demonstrate the influence of a magnetic field on the behavior of a single Langmuir probe. The experiment introduces the student to magnetically supported plasma and particle behavior in a magnetic field. (GA)

  1. The Magnetic Field in Tapia's Globule 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, B.-G.; Carretti, Ettore; Bhat, Ramesh; Robishaw, Timothy; Crutcher, Richard; Vaillancourt, John

    2014-04-01

    We propose to measure the magnetic field in the Southern Coalsack using the Zeeman effect in OH at 1665 and 1667 MHz. This is motivated by (1) the measurement of a large magnetic field (B~90 uG) in the Coalsack region from optical and near infrared polarimetry and (2) a very low magnetic field (B~1 uG) measured ~30' from the cloud edge using pulsar Faraday rotation measurements. While the derived field strength in the cloud is significantly larger than usually seen in the interstellar medium, the existence of an X-ray emitting envelope around the cloud that contains significant amounts of O VI ions puts the magnetic pressure at approximate equipartition with the thermal pressure of such gas. A chain of observational results indicate that the Coalsack might be a unique, nearby example of externally triggered star formation. This chain starts with the passage of the Upper Centaurus-Lupus super bubble over the cloud, eventually causing triggered star formation. Probing the high magnetic field strength and providing accurate constraints for the interpretation of the observations of the cloud is therefore of great importance for testing this hypothesis.

  2. Dissipation function in a magnetic field (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, V. L.

    2015-07-01

    The dissipation function is introduced to describe the behavior of the system of harmonic oscillations interacting with the environment (thermostat). This is a quadratic function of generalized velocities, which determines the rate of dissipation of the mechanical energy in the system. It was assumed earlier (Landau, Lifshitz) that the dissipation function can be introduced only in the absence of magnetic field. In the present review based on the author's studies, it has been shown how the dissipation function can be introduced in the presence of a magnetic field B. In a magnetic field, both dissipative and nondissipative responses arise as a response to perturbation and are expressed in terms of kinetic coefficients. The matrix of nondissipative coefficients can be obtained to determine an additional term formally including it into the equations of motion, which still satisfy the energy conservation law. Then, the dissipative part of the matrix can be considered in exactly the same way as without magnetic field, i.e., it defines the dissipation loss. As examples, the propagation and absorption of ultrasound in a metal or a semiconductor in a magnetic field have been considered using two methods: (i) the method based on the phenomenological theory using the equations of the theory of elasticity and (ii) the method based on the microscopic approach by analyzing and solving the kinetic equation. Both examples are used to illustrate the approach with the dissipation function.

  3. Reducing blood viscosity with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Huang, K.

    2011-07-01

    Blood viscosity is a major factor in heart disease. When blood viscosity increases, it damages blood vessels and increases the risk of heart attacks. Currently, the only method of treatment is to take drugs such as aspirin, which has, however, several unwanted side effects. Here we report our finding that blood viscosity can be reduced with magnetic fields of 1 T or above in the blood flow direction. One magnetic field pulse of 1.3 T lasting ˜1 min can reduce the blood viscosity by 20%-30%. After the exposure, in the absence of magnetic field, the blood viscosity slowly moves up, but takes a couple of hours to return to the original value. The process is repeatable. Reapplying the magnetic field reduces the blood viscosity again. By selecting the magnetic field strength and duration, we can keep the blood viscosity within the normal range. In addition, such viscosity reduction does not affect the red blood cells’ normal function. This technology has much potential for physical therapy.

  4. Holographic Gauge Theory with Maxwell Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2010-03-13

    We first apply the transformation of mixing azimuthal with wrapped coordinate to the 11D M-theory with a stack N M5-branes to find the spacetime of a stack of N D4-branes with magnetic field in 10D IIA string theory, after the Kaluza-Klein reduction. In the near-horizon limit the background becomes the Melvin magnetic field deformed $AdS_6 \\times S^4$. Although the solution represents the D-branes under the Melvin RR one-form we use a simple observation to see that it also describes the solution of D-branes under the Maxwell magnetic field. As the magnetic field we consider is the part of the background itself we have presented an alternative to previous literature, because our method does not require the assumption of negligible back reaction. Next, we use the found solution to investigate the meson property through D4/D8 system (Sakai-Sugimoto model) and compare it with those studied by other authors. Finally, we present a detailed analysis about the Wilson loop therein and results show that the external Maxwell magnetic field will enhance the quark-antiquark potential.

  5. Cosmic Magnetic Fields: Observations and Prospects

    E-print Network

    Beck, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation at radio frequencies of 0.2-10 GHz are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of cosmic magnetic fields. The observational results are reviewed for spiral, barred and flocculent galaxies, the Milky Way, halos and relics of galaxy clusters, and for the intergalactic medium. Polarization observations with the forthcoming large radio telescopes will open a new era in the observation of cosmic magnetic fields and will help to understand their origin. At low frequencies, LOFAR (10-250 MHz) will allow us to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Polarization at higher frequencies (1-10 GHz), as observed with the EVLA, ASKAP, MeerKAT, APERTIF and the SKA, will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of nearby galaxies in unprecedented detail. Surveys of Faraday rotation measures of pulsars will map the Milky Way's magnetic field with high precision. All-sky sur...

  6. Reionization constraints on primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kanhaiya L.; Choudhury, T. Roy; Sethi, Shiv K.; Ferrara, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    We study the impact of the extra density fluctuations induced by primordial magnetic fields on the reionization history in the redshift range: 6 < z < 10. We perform a comprehensive Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) physical analysis allowing the variation of parameters related to primordial magnetic fields (strength, B0, and power-spectrum index n_{B}), reionization and ? cold dark matter cosmological model. We find that magnetic field strengths in the range: B0 ? 0.05-0.3 nG (for nearly scale-free power spectra) can significantly alter the reionization history in the above redshift range and can relieve the tension between the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and quasar absorption spectra data. Our analysis puts upper limits on the magnetic field strength B0 < 0.358, 0.120 and 0.059 nG (95 per cent c.l.) for n_{B} = -2.95, -2.9 and -2.85, respectively. These represent the strongest magnetic field constraints among those available from other cosmological observables.

  7. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor,Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. Wire degradation has resulted in aircraft fatalities and critical space launches being delayed. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power is wirelessly provided to the sensing element by using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency, resistance and amplitude has been developed and is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be near the acquisition hardware. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed. Examples of magnetic field response sensors and the respective measurement characterizations are presented. Implementation of this method on an aerospace system is discussed.

  8. Refocusing properties of periodic magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankiewicz, N.

    1976-01-01

    The use of depressed collectors for the efficient collection of spent beams from linear-beam microwave tubes depends on a refocusing procedure in which the space charge forces and transverse velocity components are reduced. The refocusing properties are evaluated of permanent magnet configurations whose axial fields are approximated by constant plateaus or linearly varying fields. The results provide design criteria and show that the refocusing properties can be determined from the plateau fields alone.

  9. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this paper, we present a series of simple activities adapted from the Matter & Interactions textbook for doing just this. Interestingly, these simple measurements are comparable to predictions made by the Bohr model of the atom. Although antiquated, Bohr's atom can lead the way to a deeper analysis of the atomic properties of magnets. Although originally developed for an introductory calculus-based course, these activities can easily be adapted for use in an algebra-based class or even at the high school level.

  10. Mechanism of magnetic field effect in cryptochrome

    E-print Network

    Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2011-01-01

    Creatures as varied as mammals, fish, insects, reptiles, and migratory birds have an intriguing `sixth' sense that allows them to distinguish north from south by using the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field. Yet despite decades of study, the physical basis of this magnetic sense remains elusive. A likely mechanism is furnished by magnetically sensitive radical pair reactions occurring in the retina, the light-sensitive part of the eyes. A photoreceptor, cryptochrome, has been suggested to endow birds with magnetoreceptive abilities as the protein has been shown to exhibit the biophysical properties required for an animal magnetoreceptor to operate properly. Here, we propose a concrete light-driven reaction cycle in cryptochrome that lets a magnetic field influence the signaling state of the photoreceptor. The reaction cycle ties together transient absorption and electron-spin-resonance observations with known facts on avian magnetoreception. Our analysis establishes the feasibility of cryptochrome to act as a g...

  11. Calculation of the induced currents and forces for a hybrid magnetic levitation system

    SciTech Connect

    Albertz, D.; Dappen, S.; Henneberger, G.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents the calculation of the induced currents and forces for a 3D non-linear eddy current field problem with ferromagnetic moving conductors. The {rvec A}, V-{rvec A} formulation is used in combination with four different gauging methods to stabilize the solution process. To consider non-rectangular shapes of geometries tetrahedral elements were employed. The computation procedure is applied to a hybrid magnetic levitation system of a contactless and frictionless conveyance system.

  12. High magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact technology

    DOEpatents

    Wilgen, John (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gail (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Jaramillo, Roger (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for high magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact treatment of conductive materials in a high magnetic field. A method includes applying a high magnetic field to at least a portion of a conductive material; and applying an inductive magnetic field to at least a fraction of the conductive material to induce a surface current within the fraction of the conductive material, the surface current generating a substantially bi-directional force that defines a vibration. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, the fraction of the conductive material is located within the portion of the conductive material and ohmic heating from the surface current is ohmically decoupled from the vibration. An apparatus includes a high magnetic field coil defining an applied high magnetic field; an inductive magnetic field coil coupled to the high magnetic field coil, the inductive magnetic field coil defining an applied inductive magnetic field; and a processing zone located within both the applied high magnetic field and the applied inductive magnetic field. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, and ohmic heating of a conductive material located in the processing zone is ohmically decoupled from a vibration of the conductive material.

  13. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  14. Effect of magnetic field in malaria diagnosis using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan; Yuen, Clement

    2011-07-01

    The current gold standard method of Malaria diagnosis relies on the blood smears examination. The method is laborintensive, time consuming and requires the expertise for data interpretation. In contrast, Raman scattering from a metabolic byproduct of the malaria parasite (Hemozoin) shows the possibility of rapid and objective diagnosis of malaria. However, hemozoin concentration is usually extremely low especially at the early stage of malaria infection, rendering weak Raman signal. In this work, we propose the sensitive detection of enriched ?-hematin, whose spectroscopic properties are equivalent to hemozoin, based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) by using magnetic nanoparticles. A few orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal of ?-hematin can be achieved using magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the effect of magnetic field on SERS enhancement is investigated. Our result demonstrates the potential of SERS using magnetic nanoparticles in the effective detection of hemozoin for malaria diagnosis.

  15. Magnetic Field Effects on Plasma Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, F.; Shebalin, J.; Girimaji, S.; Staack, D.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we will discuss our numerical studies of plasma jets and loops, of basic interest for plasma propulsion and plasma astrophysics. Space plasma propulsion systems require strong guiding magnetic fields known as magnetic nozzles to control plasma flow and produce thrust. Propulsion methods currently being developed that require magnetic nozzles include the VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) [1] and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Magnetic nozzles are functionally similar to de Laval nozzles, but are inherently more complex due to electromagnetic field interactions. The two crucial physical phenomenon are thrust production and plasma detachment. Thrust production encompasses the energy conversion within the nozzle and momentum transfer to a spacecraft. Plasma detachment through magnetic reconnection addresses the problem of the fluid separating efficiently from the magnetic field lines to produce maximum thrust. Plasma jets similar to those of VASIMR will be studied with particular interest in dual jet configurations, which begin as a plasma loops between two nozzles. This research strives to fulfill a need for computational study of these systems and should culminate with a greater understanding of the crucial physics of magnetic nozzles with dual jet plasma thrusters, as well as astrophysics problems such as magnetic reconnection and dynamics of coronal loops.[2] To study this problem a novel, hybrid kinetic theory and single fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) solver known as the Magneto-Gas Kinetic Method is used.[3] The solver is comprised of a "hydrodynamic" portion based on the Gas Kinetic Method and a "magnetic" portion that accounts for the electromagnetic behaviour of the fluid through source terms based on the resistive MHD equations. This method is being further developed to include additional physics such as the Hall effect. Here, we will discuss the current level of code development, as well as numerical simulation results

  16. Hydrogen molecules and chains in a superstrong magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Dong; Salpeter, Edwin E.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1992-01-01

    The electronic structures of hydrogen polymolecules H(n) (n = 2,3,4,...) is studied in a superstrong magnetic field (B greater than about 10 exp 12 G) typically found on the surface of a neutron star. Simple analytical scaling relations for several limiting cases (e.g., large n, high B field) are derived. The binding energies of H(n) molecules are numerically calculated for various magnetic-field strengths. For a given magnetic-field strength, the binding energy per atom in the H(n) molecules is found to approach a constant value as n increases. For typical field strengths of interest, energy saturation is essentially achieved once n exceeds 3 to 4. Also considered is the structure of negative H ions in a high magnetic field. For B about 10 exp 12 G, the dissociation energy of an atom in a hydrogen chain and the ionization potential of H(-) are smaller than the ionization potential of neutral atomic hydrogen.

  17. Lunar magnetic permeability, magnetic fields, and electrical conductivity temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    In the time period 1969-1972 a total of five magnetometers were deployed on the lunar surface during four Apollo missions. Data from these instruments, along with simultaneous measurements from other experiments on the moon and in lunar orbit, were used to study properties of the lunar interior and the lunar environment. The principal scientific results from analyses of the magnetic field data are discussed. The results are presented in the following main categories: (1) lunar electrical conductivity, temperature, and structure; (2) lunar magnetic permeability, iron abundance, and core size limits; (3) the local remnant magnetic fields, their interaction with the solar wind, and a thermoelectric generator model for their origin. Relevant publications and presented papers are listed.

  18. Whistler Modes with Wave Magnetic Fields Exceeding the Ambient Field

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.; Strohmaier, K.D.

    2006-03-10

    Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background.

  19. Whistler modes with wave magnetic fields exceeding the ambient field.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, R L; Urrutia, J M; Strohmaier, K D

    2006-03-10

    Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background. PMID:16606272

  20. Stability of a Toroidal Magnetic Field Under Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, J. P.; Reisenegger, A.

    2006-06-01

    In order to understand a possible decay modes of a neutron star magnetic field, we used electron-magnetohydrodynamics equations to calculate the evolution of a specific configuration in a solid sphere. Assuming a high conductivity, we found that the evolution of a purely toroidal field can be written in terms of the dissipationaless Burger equation, which has a family of stationary solutions. Introducing a small perturbation in the stationary toroidal field, we found that the poloidal component of the perturbation grows with time. Therefore, a toroidal magnetic field is unstable to poloidal perturbations under Hall effect. This instability under Hall effect was found numerically in the works of Urpin and Shalybkov and Reinhardt and Geppert.

  1. Molecular processes and turbulent magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. I.

    2008-08-01

    Coherent scattering in the solar atmosphere leads to the formation of the linearly polarized solar spectrum, just like Rayleigh scattering leads to the polarization of the blue sky. One of the most prominent features of the linearly polarized solar spectrum is the CN violet system as it is also in the unpolarized spectrum. This thesis is devoted to the modeling and interpretation of this system in both spectra and developing it into a very sensitive tool for studying the magnetic fields and the temperature structure of the solar atmosphere. The understanding of the solar magnetic field structure is very important as it is connected with and even controls most of the solar activity phenomena. Zeeman effect diagnostics allows to measure strong directed magnetic fields which only cover about 1% of the solar atmosphere. The remaining part is occupied by weak entangled magnetic fields with mixed polarity, which might significantly contribute to the overall solar magnetic energy. These fields are invisible to the Zeeman effect due to signal cancellation. Therefore the discovery of the linearly polarized solar spectrum opened a new epoch in solar physics. The polarization due to the scattering processes is modified by weak entangled magnetic fields via the Hanle effect and thus, provides us with a unique possibility to access and study such "hidden" magnetic fields. Molecular lines are very useful for probing magnetic fields as, due to their strong temperature sensitivity, different molecules sample different, narrow layers of the solar atmosphere. Therefore the extension of the atomic Hanle effect to molecular lines can provide the 3D structure of the solar turbulent magnetic field. Moreover, due to the broad range of magnetic sensitivities within narrow spectral regions molecular lines can be used for employing the differential Hanle effect technique, which allows dramatically reduced model dependence of the obtained magnetic field. This thesis consists of two main parts which reflect the two consecutive steps in the modeling of the polarized solar spectrum. First, the physical properties of the molecular scattering process have to be understood. For the CN violet system, it implies taking into account the Paschen-Back effect on the fine structure (which results in a change of intensities and line positions) and interference effects between the fine structure components itself. Both effects influence the Hanle effect and lead to the consequences which are analyzed in detail in the first part of this thesis. Then, to connect the coherent scattering and physical properties of the solar plasma with the emerged solar radiation, which is measured by our detectors, radiative transfer theory has to be applied. The presence of the scattering processes implies the non-equilibrium nature of the problem. Its self-consistent solution is especially complicated for molecular bands as they usually consist of a huge number of transitions which couple the numerous vibrational-rotational molecular levels. This, for example, makes the two-level approximation, often used in atomic calculations unsuitable. Moreover, there is a strong lack of information about the molecular collision rates so they basically enter the calculations as additional free parameter. In the second part of the thesis we present two radiative transfer models with different degrees of complexity and applicability. These models allow us to successfully fit the observations of the CN violet system in both polarized and unpolarized spectra and provide us with a magnetic field estimation. We discuss in detail the model-dependence of our results and general problems of the 1D solar spectrum modeling. The enormous potential of the linearly polarized solar spectrum makes it one of the main tools for studying solar magnetic fields, which becomes very urgent nowadays, as they can affect the Earth's climate and, hence, our life.

  2. Formation of magnetic anomalies antipodal to lunar impact basins: Two-dimensional model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, L.L.; Huang, Z. )

    1991-06-10

    The production of large-scale magnetic fields and associated crustal magnetization in lunar basin-forming impacts is investigated theoretically. Two-dimensional numerical models of the partially ionized vapor cloud produced in such impacts show that the low-density periphery of the cloud expands thermally around the Moon and converges near the antipode in a time of the order of 400 to 500 s for silicate impactor velocities of 15 to 20 km/s. Fields external to the impact plasma cloud are produced by the magnetohydrodynamic interaction of the cloud with ambient magnetic fields and plasmas. For the most typical case in which the Moon is immersed in the solar wind plasma and its embedded magnetic field, an MHD shock wave forms upstream of the cloud periphery separating the shocked solar wind from the free-stream solar wind. For impacts occurring on the downstream (antisunward) hemisphere, convergence of the impact plasma cloud and associated MHD shock waves occurs on the upstream side and results in a large antipodal field amplification. For impacts occurring on the upstream (sunward) hemisphere, some antipodal field amplification is still expected due to the finite electrical conductivity of the lunar interior (requiring an induced external magnetic field) and the likely presence of some residual plasma in the wake of the impact plasma cloud. During the period of compressed antipodal field amplification, seismic compressional waves from the impact converge at the antipode resulting in transient shock pressures that have been calculated to be as large as 2 GPa (20 kbar).

  3. Magnetic fields in early-type stars

    E-print Network

    Grunhut, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    For several decades we have been cognizant of the presence of magnetic fields in early-type stars, but our understanding of their magnetic properties has recently (over the last decade) expanded due to the new generation of high-resolution spectropolarimeters (ESPaDOnS at CFHT, Narval at TBL, HARPSpol at ESO). The most detailed surface magnetic field maps of intermediate-mass stars have been obtained through Doppler imaging techniques, allowing us to probe the small-scale structure of these stars. Thanks to the effort of large programmes (e.g. the MiMeS project), we have, for the first time, addressed key issues regarding our understanding of the magnetic properties of massive (M > 8 M_sun) stars, whose magnetic fields were only first detected about fifteen years ago. In this proceedings article we review the spectropolarimetric observations and statistics derived in recent years that have formed our general understanding of stellar magnetism in early-type stars. We also discuss how these observations have fu...

  4. Mechanical Response of Elastomers to Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, B. C.; Jolly, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    Elastomeric materials represent an important class of engineering materials, which are widely used to make components of structures, machinery, and devices for vibration and noise control. Elastomeric material possessing conductive or magnetic properties have been widely used in applications such as conductive and magnetic tapes, sensors, flexible permanent magnets, etc. Our interest in these materials has focussed on understanding and controlling the magnitude and directionality of their response to applied magnetic fields. The effect of magnetic fields on the mechanical properties of these materials has not been the subject of many published studies. Our interest and expertise in controllable fluids have given us the foundation to make a transition to controllable elastomers. Controllable elastomers are materials that exhibit a change in mechanical properties upon application of an external stimuli, in this case a magnetic field. Controllable elastomers promise to have more functionality than conventional elastomers and therefore could share the broad industrial application base with conventional elastomers. As such, these materials represent an attractive class of smart materials, and may well be a link that brings the applications of modern control technologies, intelligent structures and smart materials to a very broad industrial area. This presentation will cover our research work in the area of controllable elastomers at the Thomas Lord Research Center. More specifically, the presentation will discuss the control of mechanical properties and mathematical modeling of the new materials prepared in our laboratories along with experiments to achieve adaptive vibration control using the new materials.

  5. A Simple Demonstration of a General rule for the Variation of Magnetic Field with Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, K.

    2009-05-01

    Most science students have some basic knowledge about magnets: magnetic poles attract or repel, depending on their polarity; the shorter the distance to the magnet, the greater the magnetic force. However, the specific magnetic force-distance relationship seems to confuse students. Many students appear to believe, mistakenly based on analogy to the electrostatic field or to gravity, that the force between magnets follows the familiar inverse-square law. It is difficult to teach them that the direction and magnitude of a magnetic field varies in quite a different manner from other interacting forces. I propose an educational demonstration illustrating the variation in magnitude of a magnetic field with distance, allowing students to grasp the idea of magnetic poles and dipoles. The method uses an ordinary geologic compass, a small circular magnet, and a bar magnet about 60 cm long. The small magnet is similar to those commonly used on household bulletin boards or refrigerator doors. The long bar magnet is a steel bar magnetized by a long solenoid coil with the application of a small current. The experiment is unique in that it is designed to permit students to infer a general law from their observations and requires no special instruments. The principle of this experiment is based on electromagnetism but is more readily understood, as it uses only ratios of measured properties. Some logarithmic and trigonometric calculations, easily computed with a pocket calculator, are required. No special calculations requiring a computer are necessary.

  6. Topology of magnetic fields from MDI data: Background field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazeva, I. S.; Makarenko, N. G.; Karimova, L. M.

    2010-08-01

    A quantitative description of the geometry and topology of the magnetic field of the Sun is given in terms of Minkowski functionals: the Euler characteristic and the perimeter of excursion sets for specified levels. Methods of mathematical morphology are applied to background fragments of magnetograms for the entire solar disk. The results obtained show that the topological characteristics of the background field are stable in time and correspond to log-normal, intermittent random fields.

  7. Modeling Solar Magnetic Fields Using Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G.; Malanushenko, A. V.; DeRosa, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Previous research reconstructed a three-dimensional model of the magnetic field of an active region on the Sun from using solar coronal loops as guides for modeling(Malanushenko et al., ApJ,2009, 707:1044). In this study, we test the consistency of such reconstructions with data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) by applying the aformentioned method to additional active regions with varying amounts of solar activity. To create an initial model of a magnetic field surrounding an active region, we first manually trace the coronal loops on the coronal images in the following wavelengths: 171Å, 193Å, 211Å, 94Å, 131Å, and 335Å. The manually traced loops are then used as a guide for a computer reconstruction of the individual three-dimensional field lines with differing heights and degrees of local twist. The reconstructed field lines are then adjusted by a partially automated algorithm, so that the constructed field line would correspond to a coronal loop on the Sun. These fitted loops serve as a skeleton to create a model of the magnetic field of the active region. We expect that our modeling can be used in future works to predict future solar events. Implications of this ability include being able to prepare a response for a solar event before it happens.

  8. Creation of neutral fermions with anomalous magnetic moment from vacuum by inhomogeneous magnetic field

    E-print Network

    S. P. Gavrilov; D. M. Gitman

    2012-11-15

    Until now a consistent description (based on QFT) of neutral particle creation (due to their magnetic moments) in strong inhomogeneous magnetic fields was unknown. To provide such a description is a part of the present article. In the framework of the developed approach, we demonstrate that in a specific cases, the problem can be technically reduced to the problem of charge particle creation by an electric field given by a nonlinear scalar potential. We analyze once again the latter problem, taking into account existing approaches and formulating for the first time its solution from the view point of QFT. As a final result, we calculate neutral particle creation form the vacuum by a linearly growing magnetic field.

  9. Three-dimensional photogrammetric measurement of magnetic field lines in the WEGA stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Drewelow, Peter; Braeuer, Torsten; Otte, Matthias; Wagner, Friedrich; Werner, Andreas

    2009-12-15

    The magnetic confinement of plasmas in fusion experiments can significantly degrade due to perturbations of the magnetic field. A precise analysis of the magnetic field in a stellarator-type experiment utilizes electrons as test particles following the magnetic field line. The usual fluorescent detector for this electron beam limits the provided information to two-dimensional cut views at certain toroidal positions. However, the technique described in this article allows measuring the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field by means of close-range photogrammetry. After testing and optimizing the main diagnostic components, measurements of the magnetic field lines were accomplished with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The results agree with numeric calculations, qualifying this technique as an additional tool to investigate magnetic field configurations in a stellarator. For a possible future application, ways are indicated on how to reduce experimental error sources.

  10. Human melatonin during continuous magnetic field exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.; Cook, M.R.; Riffle, D.W.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the third in a series of double-blind, laboratory-based studies that were aimed at determining the effects of nocturnal exposure to power frequency magnetic fields on blood levels of melatonin in human volunteers. The two earlier studies evaluated effects on melatonin of intermittent exposure to 60 Hz circularly polarized magnetic fields at 10 and 200 mG. No overall effects on melatonin levels were found. In the present study, men were exposed continuously rather than intermittently through the night to the same 200 mG magnetic field condition that was used previously; again, no overall effects on melatonin levels were found. The authors conclude that the intermittent and continuous exposure conditions used in the laboratory to date are not effective in altering nocturnal blood levels of melatonin in human volunteers.

  11. The symmetry properties of planetary magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raedler, Karl-Heinz; Ness, Norman F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of the geometrical structures of the magnetic fields of earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, starting from the traditional multipolar representations of these fields. For earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, the centered dipole, quadrupole, and octupole contributions are included, while at Uranus only the dipole and quadrupole contributions are considered. It is found that there are a number of common features of the magnetic fields of earth and Jupiter. Compared to earth and Jupiter, the Saturnian field exhibits not only a high degree of symmetry about the rotation axis but also a high degree of antisymmetry about the equatorial plane. The Uranian field shows strong deviations from both such symmetries. Nevertheless, there remain features common to all four planets.

  12. Plasma Equilibrium in a Magnetic Field with Stochastic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Krommes and Allan H. Reiman

    2009-04-23

    The nature of plasma equilibrium in a magnetic field with stochastic regions is examined. It is shown that the magnetic differential equation that determines the equilibrium Pfirsch-Schluter currents can be cast in a form similar to various nonlinear equations for a turbulent plasma, allowing application of the mathematical methods of statistical turbulence theory. An analytically tractable model, previously studied in the context of resonance-broadening theory, is applied with particular attention paid to the periodicity constraints required in toroidal configurations. It is shown that even a very weak radial diffusion of the magnetic field lines can have a significant effect on the equilibrium in the neighborhood of the rational surfaces, strongly modifying the near-resonant Pfirsch-Schluter currents. Implications for the numerical calculation of 3D equilibria are discussed

  13. A magnetically field-controllable phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Alireza; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2014-04-01

    Phononic crystals are periodic structures consist of different materials in an elastic medium designed to interact with elastic waves. These crystals have practical applications, such as, frequency filters, beam splitters, sound or vibration protectors, acoustic lasers, acoustic mirrors and elastic waveguides. In this study, the wave propagation in a tunable phononic crystal is investigated. The magnetically controllable phononic crystal consists of a soft magnetorheological elastic medium undergoing large deformations upon the application of a magnetic field. Finite deformations and induced magnetic fields influence wave propagation characteristics in the periodic structure. The soft matrix is modeled as a hyperelastic elastomer to take into account the material nonlinearity. The integrated effects of material properties, transformation of the geometry of the unit cell, and the induced magnetic field, are used to tune the band structure of the periodic structure. Both analytical and finite element methods are employed to evaluate the dispersion diagrams considering Bloch boundary conditions. Results show that the applied magnetic field significantly affect the width and the position of band-gaps.

  14. Self-Consistent-Field Calculation on Lithium Hydride for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Frank; Harriss, Donald K.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a self-consistent-field-linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital calculation on the valence electrons of lithium hydride using the method of Roothaan. This description is intended for undergraduate physics students.

  15. The symmetry properties of planetary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Raedler, K.H. ); Ness, N.F. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper provides a comparative study of the geometrical structures of the magnetic fields of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, starting from the traditional multipolar representations of these fields. For Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn the centered dipole, quadrupole, and octupole contributions are included, while at Uranus, only the dipole and quadrupole contributoins are considered. The magnetic fields are analyzed by decomposing them into those parts which have simple symmetry properties with respect to the rotation axis and the equatorial plane. It is found that there are a number of common features of the magnetic fields of Earth and Jupiter. Compared to Earth and Jupiter, the Saturnian field exhibits not only a high degree of symmetry about the rotation axis, by now rather well known, but also a high degree of antisymmetry about the equatorial plane. The Uranian field shows strong deviations from both such symmetries. Nevertheless, there remain features common to all four planets. The implications of these results for dynamo models are discussed. With a vgiew to Cowling's theorem the symmetry of the fields is investigated with respect to not only the rotation axis but also to other axes intersecting the plaentary center. Surprisingly, the high degree of asymmetry of the Uranian field that is observed with respect to the rotation axis reduces considerably to being compare to that for Earth or Jupiter when the appropriate axis is employed.

  16. Hamiltonian description of closed configurations of the vacuum magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovoroda, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Methods of obtaining and using the Hamiltonians of closed vacuum magnetic configurations of fusion research systems are reviewed. Various approaches to calculate the flux functions determining the Hamiltonian are discussed. It is shown that the Hamiltonian description allows one not only to reproduce all traditional results, but also to study the behavior of magnetic field lines by using the theory of dynamic systems. The potentialities of the Hamiltonian formalism and its close relation to traditional methods are demonstrated using a large number of classical examples adopted from the fundamental works by A.I. Morozov, L.S. Solov'ev, and V.D. Shafranov.

  17. Quasi-equilibrium electron density along a magnetic field line

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Hann-Shin; Wirz, Richard

    2012-11-26

    A methodology is developed to determine the density of high-energy electrons along a magnetic field line for a low-{beta} plasma. This method avoids the expense and statistical noise of traditional particle tracking techniques commonly used for high-energy electrons in bombardment plasma generators. By preserving the magnetic mirror and assuming a mixing timescale, typically the elastic collision frequency with neutrals, a quasi-equilibrium electron distribution can be calculated. Following the transient decay, the analysis shows that both the normalized density and the reduction fraction due to collision converge to a single quasi-equilibrium solution.

  18. On the magnetotransport of 3D systems in quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    The resistivity components of 3D electron gas placed in quantizing magnetic field are calculated taking into account the correction caused by combined action of the Peltier and Seebeck thermoelectric effects. The longitudinal, transverse and the Hall magnetoresistivities exhibit familiar 1/B-period oscillations being universal functions of magnetic field and temperature.

  19. PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL OF RECONNECTING CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    E-print Network

    Isliker, Heinz

    PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL OF RECONNECTING CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS PETER J in final form 18 October 2005) Abstract. Particle acceleration in large-scale turbulent coronal magnetic fields is considered. Using test particle calculations, it is shown that both cellular automata and three

  20. Generation of Local Magnetic Field by Nano Electro-Magnets Hyung Kwon KIM1;2

    E-print Network

    Hwang, Sung Woo

    Generation of Local Magnetic Field by Nano Electro-Magnets Hyung Kwon KIM1;2 , Su Heon HONG1 , Bo; published April 27, 2004) Fabrication and characterization of nano electro-magnets are reported. The nano and current level of the electro-magnet. [DOI: 10.1143/JJAP.43.2054] KEYWORDS: magnetic field, electro-magnet

  1. Magnetic fields of spherical compact stars in a braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmedov, B. J.; Fattoyev, F. J.

    2008-08-15

    We study the stellar magnetic field configuration in dependence on brane tension and present solutions of Maxwell equations in the external background space-time of a magnetized spherical star in a Randall-Sundrum II type braneworld. The star is modeled as a sphere consisting of perfect highly magnetized fluid with infinite conductivity and a frozen-in magnetic field. With respect to solutions for magnetic fields found in the Schwarzschild space-time, brane tension introduces enhancing corrections to the exterior magnetic field which could be relevant for the magnetic fields of magnetized compact objects as pulsars and magnetars and may provide observational evidence for the brane tension.

  2. Complex Plasmas in Strong Magnetic Field Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Konopka, U.; Schwabe, M.; Knapek, C.; Kretschmer, M.; Morfill, G.E.

    2005-10-31

    To complete our picture of general complex plasmas, experiments under the influence of high magnetic fields have been carried out in a radio frequency (rf) discharge with and without embedded micro-particles. The influence of the strong magnetic field on the plasma with respect to its homogeneity as well as on the isotropy of the particle interaction was studied. We observed a filamentation of the plasma at low pressures and low powers even in the absence of particles. The plasma filaments moved around -- traced by embedded particles -- and suddenly changed to a crystalline like arrangement.

  3. Broadband antenna systems for lightning magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Noggle, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Broadband magnetic antenna systems suitable for recording submicrosecond field changes are described, and typical data from distant lightning are presented. Two types of systems are described, one with a high-impedance antenna loop connected to the integrator by a twisted pair of coaxial cables and another with the antenna loop and twisted signal loops formed from a single piece of coaxial cable. Data for correlated magnetic and electric field waveforms from lightning at a distance of 50 to 100 km are presented and are shown to be almost identical.

  4. Measurements of magnetic fields in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deglinnocenti, Egidio Landi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be measured, in solar prominences, by means of two different basic mechanisms that are responsible for the introduction (or the reduction) of a given amount of polarization in spectral lines: these are the Zeeman effect and the Hanle effect. Through the splitting of the magnetic components of a spectral line, the Zeeman effect is capable of introducing a certain amount of circular polarization across the line profile. The Hanle effect consist of a modification of the linear polarization that is induced in spectral lines by the anisotropic illumination of the prominence plasma by the photospheric radiation field. These two effects are briefly discussed.

  5. Helical magnetic fields via baryon asymmetry

    E-print Network

    Eduard F. Piratova; Edilson A. Reyes; Héctor J. Hortúa

    2014-09-03

    There is strong observational evidence for the presence of large-scale magnetic fields MF in galaxies and clusters, with strength $\\sim \\mu$G and coherence lenght on the order of Kpc. However its origin remains as an outstanding problem. One of the possible explanations is that they have been generated in the early universe. Recently, it has been proposed that helical primordial magnetic fields PMFs, could be generated during the EW or QCD phase transitions, parity-violating processes and predicted by GUT or string theory. Here we concentrate on the study of two mechanisms to generate PMFs, the first one is the $\

  6. Quantum pumping in graphene with a perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Rakesh P.; Blaauboer, M.

    2010-12-01

    We consider quantum pumping of Dirac fermions in a monolayer of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field in the central pumping region. The two external pump parameters are electrical voltages applied to the graphene sheet on either side of the pumping region. We analyze this pump within scattering matrix formalism and calculate both pumped charge and spin currents. The predicted charge currents are of the order of 1000 nA, which is readily observable using current technology.

  7. A field test of recursive calculation of crop evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous methods to calculate the evapotranspiration (ET) rate from field crops have been proposed, but few have convincingly demonstrated to be usefully accurate. The direct measurement of ET requires weighable lysimeters. However, the use of a surface energy balance to calculate ET requires a corr...

  8. The effects of intense laser field and applied electric and magnetic fields on optical properties of an asymmetric quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, R. L.; Ungan, F.; Kasapoglu, E.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Duque, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the theoretical study of the effects of non-resonant intense laser field and electric and magnetic fields on the optical properties (the linear and third-order nonlinear refractive index and absorption coefficients) in an asymmetric quantum well. The electric field and intense laser field are applied along the growth direction of the asymmetric quantum well and the magnetic field is oriented perpendicularly. To calculate the energy and the wave functions of the electron in the asymmetric quantum well, the effective mass approximation and the method of envelope wave function are used. The asymmetric quantum well is constructed by using different aluminium concentrations in both right and left barriers. The confinement in the quantum well is changed drastically by either the effect of electric and magnetic fields or by the application of intense laser field. The optical properties are calculated using the compact density matrix approach. The results show that the effect of the intense laser field competes with the effects of the electric and magnetic fields. Consequently, peak position shifts to lower photon energies due to the effect of the intense laser field and it shifts to higher photon energies by the effects of electric and magnetic fields. In general, it is found that the concentration of aluminum, electric and magnetic fields and intense laser field are external agents that modify the optical responses in the asymmetric quantum well.

  9. The high field superferric magnet Design and test of a new dipole magnet for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, John C.; Hinterberger, Henry; Russell Huson, F.; Mackay, William W.; Mann, Thomas L.; McIntyre, Peter M.; Phillips, Gerald C.; Pissanetzky, Sergio; Rocha, Richard; Schmidt, William M.; Shotzman, Garry; Wenzel, William A.; Fen Xie, Wan; Zeigler, John C.

    1988-07-01

    The Texas Accelerator Center has successfully tested a 6 T superferric dipole magnet of a design appropriate for future hadron colliders. The magnet surpassed the design field (90% of the short sample limit) on its first quench without training. The measured field quality is in excellent agreement with design calculations and meets collider requirements. The magnetic field design was developed at Rice University and is the subject of a Master's thesis. The features of the design include simple construction, efficient use of superconductor, and adequate containment of magnetic forces. A straightforward extension of the design to an 8 T dipole is under development. The high-field superferric magnet constitutes a significant improvement in magnet performance and cost for future accelerators.

  10. Magnetic fields of HgMn stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; González, J. F.; Ilyin, I.; Korhonen, H.; Schöller, M.; Savanov, I.; Arlt, R.; Castelli, F.; Lo Curto, G.; Briquet, M.; Dall, T. H.

    2012-11-01

    Context. The frequent presence of weak magnetic fields on the surface of spotted late-B stars with HgMn peculiarity in binary systems has been controversial during the two last decades. Recent studies of magnetic fields in these stars using the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) technique have failed to detect magnetic fields, indicating an upper limit on the longitudinal field between 8 and 15 G. In these LSD studies, assumptions were made that all spectral lines are identical in shape and can be described by a scaled mean profile. Aims: We re-analyse the available spectropolarimetric material by applying the moment technique on spectral lines of inhomogeneously distributed elements separately. Furthermore, we present new determinations of the mean longitudinal magnetic field for the HgMn star HD 65949 and the hotter analog of HgMn stars, the PGa star HD 19400, using FORS 2 installed at the VLT. We also give new measurements of the eclipsing system AR Aur with a primary star of HgMn peculiarity, which were obtained with the SOFIN spectropolarimeter installed at the Nordic Optical Telescope. Methods: We downloaded from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) archive the publically available HARPS spectra for eight HgMn stars and one normal and one superficially normal B-type star obtained in 2010. Out of this sample, three HgMn stars belong to spectroscopic double-lined systems. The application of the moment technique to the HARPS and SOFIN spectra allowed us to study the presence of the longitudinal magnetic field, the crossover effect, and quadratic magnetic fields. Results for the HgMn star HD 65949 and the PGa star HD 19400 are based on a linear regression analysis of low-resolution spectra obtained with FORS 2 in spectropolarimetric mode. Results: Our measurements of the magnetic field with the moment technique using spectral lines of several elements separately reveal the presence of a weak longitudinal magnetic field, a quadratic magnetic field, and the crossover effect on the surface of several HgMn stars as well as normal and superficially normal B-type stars. Furthermore, our analysis suggests the existence of intriguing correlations between the strength of the magnetic field, abundance anomalies, and binary properties. The results are discussed in the context of possible mechanisms responsible for the development of the element patches and complex magnetic fields on the surface of late B-type stars. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO programmes 076.D-0169(A), 076.D-0172(A), 084.D-0338(A), 085.D-0296(A), 085.D-0296(B), 087.D-0049(A), 088.D-0284(A)), SOFIN observations at the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, and observations obtained with the CORALIE Echelle Spectrograph on the 1.2 m Euler Swiss telescope on La Silla, Chile.Tables 2-7, 9, 10 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M. S.; Terradas, J.; Ballester, J. L.

    2014-04-20

    Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities may play a relevant role in many astrophysical problems. In this work the effect of magnetic shear on the growth rate of the MRT instability is investigated. The eigenmodes of an interface and a slab model under the presence of gravity are analytically calculated assuming that the orientation of the magnetic field changes in the equilibrium, i.e., there is magnetic shear. We solve the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations in the incompressible regime. We find that the growth rate is bounded under the presence of magnetic shear. We have derived simple analytical expressions for the maximum growth rate, corresponding to the most unstable mode of the system. These expressions provide the explicit dependence of the growth rate on the various equilibrium parameters. For small angles the growth time is linearly proportional to the shear angle, and in this regime the single interface problem and the slab problem tend to the same result. On the contrary, in the limit of large angles and for the interface problem the growth time is essentially independent of the shear angle. In this regime we have also been able to calculate an approximate expression for the growth time for the slab configuration. Magnetic shear can have a strong effect on the growth rates of the instability. As an application of the results found in this paper we have indirectly determined the shear angle in solar prominence threads using their lifetimes and the estimation of the Alfvén speed of the structure.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Joo Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-09

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a ?/2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5??T static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  13. Dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Deissler, Robert J. Wu, Yong; Martens, Michael A.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) the relaxation time of the magnetization in response to externally applied magnetic fields is determined by the Brownian and Néel relaxation mechanisms. Here the authors investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the magnetic field strength and the implications for MPI and MPS. Methods: The Fokker–Planck equation with Brownian relaxation and the Fokker–Planck equation with Néel relaxation are solved numerically for a time-varying externally applied magnetic field, including a step-function, a sinusoidally varying, and a linearly ramped magnetic field. For magnetic fields that are applied as a step function, an eigenvalue approach is used to directly calculate both the Brownian and Néel relaxation times for a range of magnetic field strengths. For Néel relaxation, the eigenvalue calculations are compared to Brown's high-barrier approximation formula. Results: The relaxation times due to the Brownian or Néel mechanisms depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. In particular, the Néel relaxation time is sensitive to the magnetic field strength, and varies by many orders of magnitude for nanoparticle properties and magnetic field strengths relevant for MPI and MPS. Therefore, the well-known zero-field relaxation times underestimate the actual relaxation times and, in particular, can underestimate the Néel relaxation time by many orders of magnitude. When only Néel relaxation is present—if the particles are embedded in a solid for instance—the authors found that there can be a strong magnetization response to a sinusoidal driving field, even if the period is much less than the zero-field relaxation time. For a ferrofluid in which both Brownian and Néel relaxation are present, only one relaxation mechanism may dominate depending on the magnetic field strength, the driving frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the applied magnetic field. Conclusions: A simple treatment of Néel relaxation using the common zero-field relaxation time overestimates the relaxation time of the magnetization in situations relevant for MPI and MPS. For sinusoidally driven (or ramped) systems, whether or not a particular relaxation mechanism dominates or is even relevant depends on the magnetic field strength, the frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the applied magnetic field.

  14. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ?0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup ?3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 ?G. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  15. Magnetic field exposure of commercial airline pilots.

    PubMed

    Hood; Nicholas; Butler; Lackland; Hoel; Mohr

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: Airline pilots are exposed to magnetic fields generated by the aircraft's electrical and electronic systems. The purpose of this study was to directly measure the flight deck magnetic fields to which commercial airline pilots are exposed when flying on different aircraft types over a 75-hour flight-duty month.METHODS: Magentic field measurements were taken using personal dosimeters capable of measuring magnetic fields in the 40-800 Hz frequency range. Dosimeters were carried by either the Captain or the First Officer on Boeing 737/200, Boeing 747/400, Boeing 767/300ER, and Airbus 320 aircraft. The data were analyzed by aircraft type, with statistics based on block hours. Block hours begin when the aircraft departs the gate prior to take off and end when the aircraft returns to the gate after landing.RESULTS: Approximately 1008 block hours were recorded at a sampling rate of 3 seconds. Total block time exposure to the pilots ranged from a harmonic geometric mean of 6.7 milliGauss (mG) for the Boeing 767/300ER to 12.7 mG for the Boeing 737/200.CONCLUSIONS: Measured flight deck magnetic field levels were substantially above the 0.8 to 1 mG level typically found in the home or office and suggest the need for further study to evaluate potential health effects of long-term exposure. PMID:11018425

  16. Finite Element Modeling for Megagauss Magnetic Field Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, David

    2005-10-01

    Applying external magnetic fields with MegaGauss strength is needed for hot plasma confinement and stabilization. We investigate the possibility of generating ultra-high magnetic fields with the fast z-pinch generator ``Zebra'' for experiments at the NTF. Zebra can produce a load a current of 1 MA in 100 ns. To design appropriate loads we use FemlabootnotetextFemlab 3 -- multi-physics, finite-element modeling program by Comsol AB, 2004 and ScreamerootnotetextScreamer -- A Pulsed Power Design Tool developed at SNL by M. L. Kiefer, K. L. Fugelso, K. W. Struve, and M. M. Widner. to simulate the magnetic field. Screamer predicts the load current using a detailed model of Zebra and helps optimize the operation. Using the information from Screamer, Femlab is able to calculate the magnetic field, heating, and stress on the conductor. All these effects must be taken into consideration to determine the integrity of the coil until maximum field is reached. The presentation will include simulation results for single- and multi-turn coils, as well as quasi-force-free inductors.

  17. Unusual Magnetic Fields of Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, W. J.

    2015-06-01

    Voyager 2 discovered the unusual non-dipolar and non-axisymmetric magnetic fields of the Ice Giants Uranus and Neptune (U/N) in the 1980's. The cause of those unique fields has been a major scientific question ever since. The answer lies in physical properties of fluids that generate planetary magnetic fields by dynamo action: convecting, electrically conducting fluids at high pressures P and temperatures T. Properties of fluids at planetary P/Ts are measured under adiabatic shock compression and quasi-isentropic multiple-shock compression up to a few 100 GPa and several 1000 K. Dynamic-compression and Voyager 2 data measured over three decades indicate (i) There is little ``Ice'' in the Ice Giants. (ii) Magnetic fields of U/N are made by metallic fluid H close to outer planetary radii. (iii) Thus, it is reasonable to observe non-dipolar non-axisymmetric fields. (iv) Those fields are probably caused by decoupling of rotational motion of U/N from convective motions in their dynamos, unlike Earth with strong coupling between those motions and a dipolar field. The full paper on this work is published.

  18. Biomaterials and Magnetic fields for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstanty

    2003-01-01

    The field of biomaterials has emerged as an important topic in the purview of NASA s new vision of research activities in the Microgravity Research Division. Although this area has an extensive track record in the medical field as borne out by the routine use of polymeric sutures, implant devices, and prosthetics, novel applications such as tissue engineering, artificial heart valves and controlled drug delivery are beginning to be developed. Besides the medical field, biomaterials and bio-inspired technologies are finding use in a host of emerging interdisciplinary fields such as self-healing and self-assembling structures, biosensors, fuel systems etc. The field of magnetic fluid technology has several potential applications in medicine. One of the emerging fields is the area of controlled drug delivery, which has seen its evolution from the basic oral delivery system to pulmonary to transdermal to direct inoculations. In cancer treatment by chemotherapy for example, targeted and controlled drug delivery has received vast scrutiny and substantial research and development effort, due to the high potency of the drugs involved and the resulting requirement to keep the exposure of the drugs to surrounding healthy tissue to a minimum. The use of magnetic particles in conjunction with a static magnetic field allows smart targeting and retention of the particles at a desired site within the body with the material transport provided by blood perfusion. Once so located, the therapeutical aspect (radiation, chemotherapy, hyperthermia, etc.) of the treatment, now highly localized, can be implemented.

  19. Electromagnetic field distribution calculation in solenoidal inductively coupled plasma using finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W. P.; Liu, Y.; Long, Q.; Chen, D. H.; Chen, Y. M.

    2008-10-15

    The electromagnetic field (both E and B fields) is calculated for a solenoidal inductively coupled plasma (ICP) discharge. The model is based on two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, and the finite difference method is used for solving Maxwell equations in both the radial and axial directions. Through one-turn coil measurements, assuming that the electrical conductivity has a constant value in each cross section of the discharge tube, the calculated E and B fields rise sharply near the tube wall. The nonuniform radial distributions imply that the skin effect plays a significant role in the energy balance of the stable ICP. Damped distributions in the axial direction show that the magnetic flux gradually dissipates into the surrounding space. A finite difference calculation allows prediction of the electrical conductivity and plasma permeability, and the induction coil voltage and plasma current can be calculated, which are verified for correctness.

  20. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A sensor for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  1. Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1980-02-26

    A sensor is described for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device that comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

  2. Extreme Geoelectric Fields Induced By Magnetic Storm Sudden Impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. J.; Rigler, E. J.; Swidinsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    Large magnetic storms, as quantified by the Dst index, can produce geoelectric fields that are hazardous for the operation of electric power grids. The great storm of March 1989, for example, had the highest -Dst value of the 20th century. During the main phase of this storm, rapid magnetic variation induced geoelectric fields in the Earth's lithosphere that caused the complete collapse of the Canadian Hydro-Québec electric-power grid. In this study, we focus specifically on how sudden impulses in geomagnetic activity, those that occur during large storms, can induce geoelectric fields. These impulses can be seen during storm main phases, but they are most usually recognized as storm sudden commencements corresponding to the arrival, at Earth, of coronal mass ejections. We use a newly developed algorithm for estimating induced geoelectric fields from magnetic field variation recorded at ground-based observatories. We train the algorithm on 1-sec geomagnetic and geoelectric field data collected at Japanese observatories during the October 2003 Halloween storm. We then postdict geoelectric fields that would have been realized (but not directly measured at 1-sec resolution) in Japan during the 1989 Québec storm and during another intense storm that occurred in March 1991. The later storm is noteworthy, not because of its intense main phase, but because it commenced with a sudden impulse of enormous magnitude. For the first half minute of the 1991 storm, induced geoelectric fields far exceeded those realized during the 1989 storm. Recognizing the potential hazard, we also analyze a scenario geomagnetic time series of an extreme event sudden commencement, and we calculate the geoelectric fields that this scenario event might plausibly induce. Results show that substantial geoelectric field induction, possibly hazardous for electric power grids, can occur briefly but very abruptly as soon as a magnetic storm commences.

  3. Terrestrial magnetic field effects on large photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonora, E.; KM3NeT Consortium

    2013-10-01

    The effects of the Earth's magnetic field on the performance of large PMTs for a cubic-kilometer-scale neutrino telescope has been studied. Measurements were performed for three Hamamatsu PMTs: two 8? R5912 types; one with a standard and the other with a super bialkali photocathode, and a 10? R7081 type with a standard bialkali photocathode. The main characteristics of the PMTs, such as detection efficiency, transit time, transit time spread, gain, peak-to-valley ratio, charge resolution and fractions of spurious pulses were measured while varying the PMT orientations with respect to the Earth's magnetic field. The measurements were performed both with and without a mu-metal cage magnetic shielding. For the 8? PMTs the impact of the magnetic field was found to be smaller than for the 10? PMT. The magnetic shielding strongly reduced the orientation-dependent variations measured for the 10? PMT and even improved the performance. Although less pronounced, improvements were also measured for the 8? PMTs.

  4. ANCHORING MAGNETIC FIELD IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Huabai; Goodman, Alyssa; Darren Dowell, C.; Hildebrand, Roger; Novak, Giles

    2009-10-20

    One of the key problems in star formation research is to determine the role of magnetic fields. Starting from the atomic intercloud medium which has density n {sub H} approx 1 cm{sup -3}, gas must accumulate from a volume several hundred pc across in order to form a typical molecular cloud. Star formation usually occurs in cloud cores, which have linear sizes below 1 pc and densities n {sub H2} > 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}. With current technologies, it is hard to probe magnetic fields at scales lying between the accumulation length and the size of cloud cores, a range corresponds to many levels of turbulent eddy cascade, and many orders of magnitude of density amplification. For field directions detected from the two extremes, however, we show here that a significant correlation is found. Comparing this result with molecular cloud simulations, only the sub-Alfvenic cases result in field orientations consistent with our observations.

  5. The Galactic magnetic field and its lensing of ultrahigh energy and Galactic cosmic rays

    E-print Network

    Farrar, Glennys R

    2015-01-01

    It has long been recognized that magnetic fields play an important role in many astrophysical environments, yet the strength and structure of magnetic fields beyond our solar system have been at best only qualitatively constrained. The Galactic magnetic field in particular is crucial for modeling the transport of Galactic CRs, for calculating the background to dark matter and CMB-cosmology studies, and for determining the sources of UHECRs. This report gives a brief overview of recent major advances in our understanding of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) and its lensing of Galactic and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

  6. Stress field at a sliding frictional contact: Experiments and calculations

    E-print Network

    Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar

    Stress field at a sliding frictional contact: Experiments and calculations J. Scheibert Ã,1 , A and tangential stress fields at the base of a rough elastomer film in contact with a smooth glass cylinder in steady sliding. This geometry allows for a direct comparison between the stress profiles measured along

  7. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4/sup 0/K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs.

  8. Pulsed-field magnetometry for rock magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-12-01

    An improved method is proposed for measuring dynamic magnetizations of bulk volcanic rock samples induced by a pulsed-field of 0.7 T and a duration of 10 ms. The transient magnetization is measured by a sensing system that consists of a pair of inductive differential coils, an analog preamplifier and integrator, and a high-speed digital storage scope. The system was calibrated using a paramagnetic salt (Gd2O3) and was tested to different kinds of volcanic rocks with their magnetic properties well-documented previously. The results were comparable with those measured by a quasi-static method using a vibrating sample magnetometer, although there were small discrepancies in hysteresis parameters suggesting the time-dependence of the magnetic properties. The proposed system provides not only the magnetization over the short interval of a pulse but also the rapid (~3 ms) exponential decay after a pulse. The decay time constant was different among the samples under study, indicating the variations of their magnetic relaxation time. Although the present system is not sensitive enough to characterize varieties of natural samples including sediments, it has the potential as a versatile and convenient tool for rock magnetism.

  9. The complex magnetic field of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of the characteristics of the magnetic field of the planet Jupiter is presented. The data were obtained during the flight of Pioneer 11 space probe, using a high field triaxial fluxgate magnetometer. The data are analyzed in terms of traditional Schmitt normalized spherical harmonic expansion fitted to the observations in a least squares sense. Tables of data and graphs are provided to summarize the findings.

  10. Magnetic field influence on paramecium motility

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.F.; Rosen, A.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The influence of a moderately intense static magnetic field on movement patterns of free swimming Paramecium was studied. When exposed to fields of 0.126 T, these ciliated protozoa exhibited significant reduction in velocity as well as a disorganization of movement pattern. It is suggested that these findings may be explained on the basis of alteration in function of ion specific channels within the cell membrane.

  11. Lattice calculation of the magnetic moments of {delta} and {omega}{sup -} baryons with dynamical clover fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Orginos, K.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2009-03-01

    We calculate the magnetic dipole moment of the {delta}(1232) and {omega}{sup -} baryons with 2+1 flavors of clover fermions on anisotropic lattices using a background magnetic field. This is the first dynamical calculation of these magnetic moments using a background field technique. The calculation for {omega}{sup -} is done at the physical strange quark mass, with the result in units of the physical nuclear magneton {mu}{sub {omega}{sup -}}=-1.93{+-}0.08{+-}0.12 (where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic) compared to the experimental number: -2.02{+-}0.05. The {delta} has been studied at three unphysical quark masses, corresponding to pion mass m{sub {pi}}=366, 438, and 548 MeV. The pion mass dependence is compared with the behavior obtained from chiral effective field theory.

  12. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOEpatents

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  13. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOEpatents

    Kohn, Gabriel (Omer, IL); Hicho, George (Derwood, MD); Swartzendruber, Lydon (New Carrollton, MD)

    1997-01-01

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  14. Error analysis regarding the calculation of nonlinear force-free field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Zhang, H. Q.; Su, J. T.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic field extrapolation is an alternative method to study chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields. In this paper, two semi-analytical solutions of force-free fields (Low and Lou in Astrophys. J. 352:343, 1990) have been used to study the errors of nonlinear force-free (NLFF) fields based on force-free factor ?. Three NLFF fields are extrapolated by approximate vertical integration (AVI) Song et al. (Astrophys. J. 649:1084, 2006), boundary integral equation (BIE) Yan and Sakurai (Sol. Phys. 195:89, 2000) and optimization (Opt.) Wiegelmann (Sol. Phys. 219:87, 2004) methods. Compared with the first semi-analytical field, it is found that the mean values of absolute relative standard deviations (RSD) of ? along field lines are about 0.96-1.19, 0.63-1.07 and 0.43-0.72 for AVI, BIE and Opt. fields, respectively. While for the second semi-analytical field, they are about 0.80-1.02, 0.67-1.34 and 0.33-0.55 for AVI, BIE and Opt. fields, respectively. As for the analytical field, the calculation error of <| RSD|> is about 0.1˜0.2. It is also found that RSD does not apparently depend on the length of field line. These provide the basic estimation on the deviation of extrapolated field obtained by proposed methods from the real force-free field.

  15. Laboratory Measurements of Astrophysical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. D.; Miniati, F.; Edwards, M.; Mithen, J.; Bell, A. R.; Constantin, C.; Everson, E.; Schaeffer, D.; Niemann, C.; Ravasio, A.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Gregory, C.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ryutov, D.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gregori, G.

    2010-11-01

    It has been proposed that high Mach number collisionless shocks propagating in an initially unmagnetized plasma play a major role in the magnetization of large scale structures in the Universe. A detailed study of the experimental configuration necessary to scale such environments down to laboratory dimensions will be presented. We will show initial results from preliminary experiments conducted at the Phoenix laser (UCLA) and the LULI laser (Ecole Polytechnique) where collisionless shocks are generated by the expansion of exploding foils driven by energetic laser beams. The time evolution of the magnetic field is probed with induction coils placed at 10 cm from the laser focus. We will discuss various mechanisms of magnetic field generation and compare them with the experimental results.

  16. Magnetic Field Fluctuations in Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Papen, M.; Saur, J.; Alexandrova, O.

    2012-12-01

    In the framework of turbulence, we analyze the statistical properties of magnetic field fluctuations measured by the Cassini spacecraft inside the Kronian magnetosphere. We focus on low-latitude passes, where Cassini is near the magnetic equator. In the power spectral densities of the fluctuations in frequency space measured in spacecraft frame we identify two power-law spectral ranges seperated by a spectral break around ion gyro-frequency. The mean spectral indices in the frequency range 0.05-1 Hz are ˜ 2.5 for the fluctuations perpendicular and parallel to the local mean magnetic field. The power-law spectral range below the spectral break is more variable and less pronounced, which may be due to nonconstant energy input on the corresponding scales. An increasing flatness with frequency indicates the build-up of intermittency.

  17. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salsbury Jr., Freddie

    1999-02-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules.

  18. Effects of the Non-Radial Magnetic Field on Measuring Magnetic Helicity Transport across the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Zhang, M.

    2015-05-01

    It is generally believed that the evolution of magnetic helicity has a close relationship with solar activity. Before the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), earlier studies had mostly used Michelson Doppler Imager/SOHO line of sight (LOS) magnetograms and assumed that magnetic fields are radial when calculating the magnetic helicity injection rate from photospheric magnetograms. However, this assumption is not necessarily true. Here we use the vector magnetograms and LOS magnetograms, both taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on SDO, to estimate the effects of the non-radial magnetic field on measuring the magnetic helicity injection rate. We find that: (1) the effect of the non-radial magnetic field on estimating tangential velocity is relatively small; (2) when estimating the magnetic helicity injection rate, the effect of the non-radial magnetic field is strong when active regions are observed near the limb and is relatively weak when active regions are close to disk center; and (3) the effect of the non-radial magnetic field becomes minor if the amount of accumulated magnetic helicity is the only concern.

  19. Magnetic Field based Heading Estimation for Pedestrian Navigation Environments

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    referenced to true North with the help of magnetic field models like International Geomagnetic Reference environments are seldom encountered and additional artificial magnetic fields are present causing magneticMagnetic Field based Heading Estimation for Pedestrian Navigation Environments Muhammad Haris Afzal

  20. In situ magnetic field observations of the AMPTE artificial comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehr, H.; Kloecker, N.; Southwood, D. J.; Dunlop, M. W.; Mier-Jedrzejowicz, W. A. C.; Rijnbeek, R. P.; Six, M.; Haeusler, B.; Acuna, M.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetometers aboard the IRM and UKS spacecraft monitored the magnetic field during the AMPTE artificial comet experiment of Dec. 27, 1984. Rapid photoionization of the released barium vapor resulted in the formation of a magnetic cavity, shielded from the ambient magnetic field.The presence of this highly conductive obstacle caused draping and compression of the solar wind magnetic field.