Sample records for magnetic field probe

  1. Probing Magnetic Fields With SNRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothes, Roland

    2015-03-01

    As supernova remnants (SNRs) expand, their shock waves freeze in and compress magnetic field lines they encounter; consequently we can use SNRs as magnifying glasses for interstellar magnetic fields. A simple model is used to derive polarization and rotation measure (RM) signatures of SNRs. This model is exploited to gain knowledge about the large-scale magnetic field in the Milky Way. Three examples are given which indicate a magnetic anomaly, an azimuthal large-scale magnetic field towards the anti-centre, and a chimney that releases magnetic energy from the plane into the halo.

  2. Behavior of a Single Langmuir Probe in a Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pytlinski, J. T.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to demonstrate the influence of a magnetic field on the behavior of a single Langmuir probe. The experiment introduces the student to magnetically supported plasma and particle behavior in a magnetic field. (GA)

  3. Magnetic field measurements using the orthogonal transient internal probe

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnet, M.A.; Galambos, J.P.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The transient internal probe (TIP) diagnostic is designed to measure the internal magnetic field profile of hot plasmas. A small magneto-optic probe is illuminated from the front with 514.5 nm laser light while being fired through the plasma at velocities in excess of 2 km/s. Magnetic field profiles are obtained by measuring the Faraday rotated laser light reflected from the probe. First generation TIP probes have the ability to measure only the axial component of the magnetic field. The orthogonal TIP probe, however, has the capability of measuring fields which are perpendicular to the direction of probe travel. Orthogonal measurement capability can provide a full radial scan of the poloidal field profiles and will serve as a technology base for future multi-dimensional TIP probes. Magnetic field resolution is 20 G, spatial resolution is 5 mm, and the system frequency response is 10 MHz. Measurements using the orthogonal TIP probe will be presented.

  4. Scattering effects of electric and magnetic field probes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Norgard; Ronald M. Sega; Michael Harrison; Anthony Pesta; Mike Seifert

    1989-01-01

    Many electromagnetic measurements of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) interactions with electronic systems use B-dot and D-dot probes. The effect of the measurement probe on the field distribution being measured is considered. An infrared measurement technique is used to determine the field distributions with and without the presence of electric- or magnetic-field probes. Two-dimensional thermogram images of the scattered field patterns are

  5. Ultralow magnetic fields and Gravity Probe B gyroscope readout

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Mester; J. M. Lockhart; B. Muhlfelder; D. O. Murray; M. A. Taber

    2000-01-01

    We describe the generation of an ultralow magnetic field of < 10?11 Tesla in the flight dewar of the Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission. The field was achieved using expanded-superconducting-shield techniques and is maintained with the aid of a magnetic materials control program. A high performance magnetic shield system is required for the proper function of gyroscope readout. The readout

  6. Development of transient internal probe (TIP) magnetic field diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T.

    1994-12-31

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is designed to permit measurement of internal magnetic fields, in hot, high density plasmas. The concept consists of accelerating a probe to high velocities (2.2 Km/s) in order to minimize probe exposure time to plasma. Faraday rotation within the probe is used to measure the local magnetic field. An Argon laser illuminates the probe consisting of a Faraday-rotator material with a retro-reflector that returns the incident light to the detection system. Performance results of the light gas gun and optical detection system will be shown. To date, the gas gun has been extensively tested consistently achieving velocities between 2 and 3 km/s. The probe and detection scheme have been tested by dropping the probe through a static magnetic field. Magnetic field resolution of 20 gauss and spatial resolution of 5 mm has been achieved. System frequency response is 10Mhz. Work is currently being conducted to integrate the diagnostic system with laboratory plasma experiments. Specifically a gas interfaced system has been developed to prevent helium muzzle gas from entering the plasma chamber with the probe. Additionally the probe must be separated from the sabot which protects the probe during acceleration in the gas gun. Data will be presented showing the results of various separation techniques.

  7. Gravitational Lens Systems to probe Extragalactic Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Narasimha, D

    2008-01-01

    The Faraday rotation measurements of multiply-imaged gravitational lens systems can be effectively used to probe the existence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields in lensing galaxies and galaxy clusters. The available sample of lens systems appears to suggest the presence of a coherent large-scale magnetic field in giant elliptical galaxies somewhat similar to the spiral galaxies.

  8. Ultralow Magnetic Fields and Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Readout

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Mester; J. M. Lockhart; B. Muhlfelder; D. O. Murray; M. A. Taber

    2000-01-01

    We describe the generation of an ultralow magnetic field of < 10-11Tesla in the flight dewar of the Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission. The field was achieved using expanded-superconducting-shield techniques and is maintained with the aid of a magnetic materials control program. A high performance magnetic shield system is required for the proper function of gyroscope readout. The readout system

  9. Magnetic force microscopy measurements in external magnetic fields-comparison between coated probes and an iron filled carbon nanotube probe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Wolny; T. Mühl; U. Weissker; A. Leonhardt; U. Wolff; D. Givord; B. Büchner

    2010-01-01

    We performed magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements in external magnetic fields parallel to the sample plane to qualitatively study their effect on the magnetization of different kinds of MFM probes. As a test structure we used an array of rectangular ferromagnetic thin film elements aligned with the external magnetic field direction. MFM images were taken while the field was increased

  10. A Global Probe of Cosmic Magnetic Fields to High Redshifts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. P. Kronberg; M. L. Bernet; F. Miniati; S. J. Lilly; M. B. Short; D. M. Higdon

    2007-01-01

    Faraday rotation (RM) probes of magnetic fields in the universe are sensitive\\u000ato cosmological and evolutionary effects as $z$ increases beyond $\\\\sim $1\\u000abecause of the scalings of electron density and magnetic fields, and the growth\\u000ain the number of expected intersections with galaxy-scale intervenors,\\u000a$d$N\\/$dz$. In this new global analysis of an unprecedented large sample of RM's\\u000aof high

  11. Characterization of magnetic force microscopy probe tip remagnetization for measurements in external in-plane magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, Tanja; Engel, Dieter; Ehresmann, Arno [Institute of Physics and Centre for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, 34132 Kassel (Germany); Krug, Ingo [DSM IRAMIS SPCSI, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Hoeink, Volker; Schmalhorst, Jan; Reiss, Guenter [Department of Physics, Thin Films and Nanostructures, Bielefeld University, P.O. Box 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    A quantitative analysis of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) images taken in external in-plane magnetic fields is difficult because of the influence of the magnetic field on the magnetization state of the magnetic probe tip. We prepared calibration samples by ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning with a topographically flat magnetic pattern magnetically stable in a certain external magnetic field range for a quantitative characterization of the MFM probe tip magnetization in point-dipole approximation.

  12. Detection of High-Frequency Magnetic Fields by a GMI Probe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenji Tan; Takashi Komakine; Kiyoshi Yamakawa; Yoshiki Kayano; Hiroshi Inoue; Masahiro Yamaguchi

    2006-01-01

    A giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) probe was fabricated in order to detect high-frequency magnetic fields. Magnetic near field measurements were carried out using the probe. A microstrip line driven by a current whose frequency was changed from 500 Hz to 1 GHz was used as a signal source in the measurements. The probe could clearly detect the characteristics of the field

  13. Modified pulsar current analysis: probing magnetic field evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshev, A. P.; Popov, S. B.

    2014-10-01

    We use a modified pulsar current analysis to study magnetic field decay in radio pulsars. In our approach, we analyse the flow not along the spin period axis as has been performed in previous studies, but study the flow along the direction of growing characteristic age, ? =P/(2dot{P}). We perform extensive tests of the method and find that in most of the cases it is able to uncover non-negligible magnetic field decay (more than a few tens of per cent during the studied range of ages) in normal radio pulsars for realistic initial properties of neutron stars. However, precise determination of the magnetic field decay time-scale is not possible at present. The estimated time-scale may differ by a factor of few for different sets of initial distributions of neutron star parameters. In addition, some combinations of initial distributions and/or selection effects can also mimic enhanced field decay. We apply our method to the observed sample of radio pulsars at distances <10 kpc in the range of characteristic ages 8 × 104 < ? < 106 yr where, according to our study, selection effects are minimized. By analysing pulsars in the Parkes Multibeam and Swinburne surveys, we find that, in this range, the field decays roughly by a factor of 2. With an exponential fit, this corresponds to the decay time-scale ˜4 × 105 yr. With larger statistics and better knowledge of the initial distribution of spin periods and magnetic field strength, this method can be a powerful tool to probe magnetic field decay in neutron stars.

  14. Probing Extragalactic Magnetic Fields and their Role in Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizani, N.

    2013-09-01

    VLA total intensity and polarization observations at L-, C and X-band have been taken to study the environment of powerful radio galaxies in terms of depolarization and external magnetic field. We have found a strong Laing-Garrington depolarization asymmetry between the two sides of the radio emission, which could be explained using the relativistic beaming model as a simple geometric effect. We have fitted a 'cooling flow model' to the X-ray surface brightness profile and a two-power law model to the Faraday dispersion ƒ-profile obtained from the radio data. We found that the extragalactic magnetic field is decreasing with radius with a central value of 3 <= B(ÏG) <= 9. We also probe their role in the acceleration of Cosmic Rays.

  15. The cage elasticity and under-field structure of concentrated magnetic colloids probed by small angle

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    The cage elasticity and under-field structure of concentrated magnetic colloids probed by small. Perzynski*a In the present study we probe the bulk modulus and the structure of concentrated magnetic fluids-eld structure of these magnetic colloids is mandatory. They are dipolar uids based on monodomain magnetic

  16. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Velas, K. M. [William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Box 352250, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)] [William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Box 352250, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States); Milroy, R. D. [Plasma Science and Innovation-Center, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Box 352250, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Innovation-Center, William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Box 352250, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure B{sub r}, B{sub ?}, and B{sub z} at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10?kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.

  17. Divisionally analytical reconstruction of the magnetic field around an electromagnetic velocity probe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. Fu; L. Hu; J. Zou; H. Y. Yang; X. D. Ruan; C. Y. Wang

    2009-01-01

    Determination of the magnetic field around an electromagnetic velocity probe is a key work for the dry calibration of the probe. In the paper, a novel divisionally analytical reconstruction approach to determine the magnetic field is introduced. It is especially suitable to be used in the dry calibration due to following advantages: no numerous measurements needed, unnecessary to know the

  18. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.; Turchi, Peter J.; Burton, Rodney L.; Messer, Sarah; Lovberg, Ralph H.; Hallock, Ashley K.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are often employed to perform field measurements in electric propulsion applications where there are time-varying fields. Magnetic field probes provide the means to measure these magnetic fields and can even be used to measure the plasma current density indirectly through the application of Ampere's law. Measurements of this type can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. Results of the development of a standard for B-dot probe measurements are presented, condensing the available literature on the subject into an accessible set of rules, guidelines, and techniques to standardize the performance and presentation of future measurements.

  19. Faraday Shadows as Probes of Galaxy Magnetic Fields at 0.3 < z < 2

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Harvey-Smith; Bryan Gaensler; Phil Kronberg

    2008-01-01

    Observations of the strength and morphology of magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are of fundamental astrophysical interest, not least because they allow us to test the models describing how magnetic fields are generated and maintained in galaxies. Faraday rotation mapping of polarized background radio sources provides a unique probe of intervening spiral galaxies, allowing both the determination of the magnetic

  20. Probing electric field control of magnetism using ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziyao; Trassin, Morgan; Gao, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Diana; Ashraf, Khalid; Nan, Tianxiang; Yang, Xi; Bowden, S R; Pierce, D T; Stiles, M D; Unguris, J; Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Salahuddin, S; Ramesh, R; Sun, Nian X

    2015-01-01

    Exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 thin-film heterostructures show great promise for power-efficient electric field-induced 180° magnetization switching. However, the coupling mechanism and precise qualification of the exchange coupling in CoFe/BiFeO3 heterostructures have been elusive. Here we show direct evidence for electric field control of the magnetic state in exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 through electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and nanoscale spatially resolved magnetic imaging. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis images reveal the coupling of the magnetization in the CoFe layer to the canted moment in the BiFeO3 layer. Electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance measurements quantify the exchange coupling strength and reveal that the CoFe magnetization is directly and reversibly modulated by the applied electric field through a ~180° switching of the canted moment in BiFeO3. This constitutes an important step towards robust repeatable and non-volatile voltage-induced 180° magnetization switching in thin-film multiferroic heterostructures and tunable RF/microwave devices. PMID:25631924

  1. Probing electric field control of magnetism using ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ziyao; Trassin, Morgan; Gao, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Diana; Ashraf, Khalid; Nan, Tianxiang; Yang, Xi; Bowden, S. R.; Pierce, D. T.; Stiles, M. D.; Unguris, J.; Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Salahuddin, S.; Ramesh, R.; Sun, Nian X.

    2015-01-01

    Exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 thin-film heterostructures show great promise for power-efficient electric field-induced 180° magnetization switching. However, the coupling mechanism and precise qualification of the exchange coupling in CoFe/BiFeO3 heterostructures have been elusive. Here we show direct evidence for electric field control of the magnetic state in exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 through electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and nanoscale spatially resolved magnetic imaging. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis images reveal the coupling of the magnetization in the CoFe layer to the canted moment in the BiFeO3 layer. Electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance measurements quantify the exchange coupling strength and reveal that the CoFe magnetization is directly and reversibly modulated by the applied electric field through a ~180° switching of the canted moment in BiFeO3. This constitutes an important step towards robust repeatable and non-volatile voltage-induced 180° magnetization switching in thin-film multiferroic heterostructures and tunable RF/microwave devices.

  2. Probing correlations of early magnetic fields using ?-distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganc, Jonathan; Sloth, Martin S.

    2014-08-01

    The damping of a non-uniform magnetic field between the redshifts of about 104 and 106 injects energy into the photon-baryon plasma and causes the CMB to deviate from a perfect blackbody spectrum, producing a so-called ?-distortion. We can calculate the correlation langle? Trangle of this distortion with the temperature anisotropy T of the CMB to search for a correlation langle B2?rangle between the magnetic field B and the curvature perturbation ? knowing the langle B2?rangle correlation would help us distinguish between different models of magnetogenesis. Since the perturbations which produce the ?-distortion will be much smaller scale than the relevant density perturbations, the observation of this correlation is sensitive to the squeezed limit of langle B2?rangle, which is naturally parameterized by bNL (a parameter defined analogously to fNL). We find that a PIXIE-like CMB experiments has a signal to noise S/N? 1.0 × bNL (tilde B?/10nG)2, where tilde B? is the magnetic field's strength on ?-distortion scales normalized to today's redshift; thus, a 10 nG field would be detectable with bNL=Script O(1). However, if the field is of inflationary origin, we generically expect it to be accompanied by a curvature bispectrum langle?3rangle induced by the magnetic field. For sufficiently small magnetic fields, the signal langle B2 ?rangle will dominate, but for tilde B?gtrsim 1 nG, one would have to consider the specifics of the inflationary magnetogenesis model. We also discuss the potential post-magnetogenesis sources of a langle B2?rangle correlation and explain why there will be no contribution from the evolution of the magnetic field in response to the curvature perturbation.

  3. Probing Mars Crustal Magnetic Field and Ionosphere with the MGS Electron Reflectometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Reme, H.; Cloutier, P. A.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    2002-01-01

    MGS Electron Reflectometer data are used to probe the shape and variability of Mars ionosphere and to identify weak crustal magnetic fields within the Hellas basin. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Magnetic field-dependent photoluminescence linewidths as a probe of disorder length scales in quantum wells

    E-print Network

    Moshchalkov, Victor V.

    Magnetic field-dependent photoluminescence linewidths as a probe of disorder length scales 2007 Photoluminescence from highly disordered GaAs quantum wells is studied in magnetic fields up to 50 T. The monotonic decrease of the photoluminescence linewidth with increasing quantum well thickness

  5. Miniature-probe measurements of electric fields induced by 60 Hz magnetic fields in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields interact with an animal by inducing internal electric fields, which represent the internal dose from an external exposure. In this study, an electric field probe of approximately 2 mm resolution was used to measure fields induced in rate carcasses by a 60 Hz magnetic field at 1 mT. With the rat lying on its side, the probe was inserted through a small hole in the body wall, and scanned at 5 mm increments from the side with frontal and axial exposure (field horizontal) and from the front with lateral exposure (field vertical). The induced electric field declined from a maximum at the entrance to the abdomen and crossed zero to negative (180{degree} phase shift) values within the body as expected. In general, the magnitudes of the measurements inside the abdomen were less than expected from whole-body calculations that used homogeneous-ellipsoidal models of a rate in the three orientations. The low measurements did not appear to be explained by perpendicular field components, by conductivity differences between the tissue and the probe path, or by air in the lungs. The low measurements probably result from inhomogeneities in actual rats that include conductivity differences between tissues and biological membranes. For example, an alternative model considered the abdominal cavity to be electrically isolated from the body by the diaphragm and the peritoneum and calculations from this model were in better agreement with the measurements inside the abdomen (than were the whole-body calculations). Therefore, inhomogeneities in conductivity and biomembranes such as the peritoneum should be considered in order to fully understand ELF-induced field dosimetry.

  6. Magnification bias as a novel probe for primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, S.; Fedeli, C.; Moscardini, L.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate magnetic fields generated in the early Universe. These fields are important candidates at explaining the origin of astrophysical magnetism observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters, whose genesis is still by and large unclear. Compared to the standard inflationary power spectrum, intermediate to small scales would experience further substantial matter clustering, were a cosmological magnetic field present prior to recombination. As a consequence, the bias and redshift distribution of galaxies would also be modified. Hitherto, primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) have been tested and constrained with a number of cosmological observables, e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation, galaxy clustering and, more recently, weak gravitational lensing. Here, we explore the constraining potential of the density fluctuation bias induced by gravitational lensing magnification onto the galaxy-galaxy angular power spectrum. Such an effect is known as magnification bias. Compared to the usual galaxy clustering approach, magnification bias helps in lifting the pathological degeneracy present amongst power spectrum normalisation and galaxy bias. This is because magnification bias cross-correlates galaxy number density fluctuations of nearby objects with weak lensing distortions of high-redshift sources. Thus, it takes advantage of the gravitational deflection of light, which is insensitive to galaxy bias but powerful in constraining the density fluctuation amplitude. To scrutinise the potentiality of this method, we adopt a deep and wide-field spectroscopic galaxy survey. We show that magnification bias does contain important information on primordial magnetism, which will be useful in combination with galaxy clustering and shear. We find we shall be able to rule out at 95.4% CL amplitudes of PMFs larger than 5 × 10-4 nG for values of the PMF power spectral index nB ~ 0.

  7. Probing correlations of early magnetic fields using mu-distortion

    E-print Network

    Jonathan Ganc; Martin S. Sloth

    2014-08-06

    The damping of a non-uniform magnetic field between the redshifts of about $10^4$ and $10^6$ injects energy into the photon-baryon plasma and causes the CMB to deviate from a perfect blackbody spectrum, producing a so-called $\\mu$-distortion. We can calculate the correlation $\\langle\\mu T\\rangle$ of this distortion with the temperature anisotropy $T$ of the CMB to search for a correlation $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$ between the magnetic field $B$ and the curvature perturbation $\\zeta$; knowing the $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$ correlation would help us distinguish between different models of magnetogenesis. Since the perturbations which produce the $\\mu$-distortion will be much smaller scale than the relevant density perturbations, the observation of this correlation is sensitive to the squeezed limit of $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$, which is naturally parameterized by $b_{\\text{NL}}$ (a parameter defined analogously to $f_{\\text{NL}}$). We find that a PIXIE-like CMB experiments has a signal to noise $S/N\\approx 1.0 \\times b_{\\text{NL}} (\\tilde B_\\mu/10\\text{ nG})^2$, where $\\tilde B_\\mu$ is the magnetic field's strength on $\\mu$-distortion scales normalized to today's redshift; thus, a 10 nG field would be detectable with $b_{\\text{NL}}=\\mathcal{O}(1)$. However, if the field is of inflationary origin, we generically expect it to be accompanied by a curvature bispectrum $\\langle\\zeta^3\\rangle$ induced by the magnetic field. For sufficiently small magnetic fields, the signal $\\langle B^2 \\zeta\\rangle$ will dominate, but for $\\tilde B_\\mu\\gtrsim 1$ nG, one would have to consider the specifics of the inflationary magnetogenesis model. We also discuss the potential post-magnetogenesis sources of a $\\langle B^2\\zeta\\rangle$ correlation and explain why there will be no contribution from the evolution of the magnetic field in response to the curvature perturbation.

  8. Inductive probe to measure the Earth’s magnetic field: a short note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2014-09-01

    This experiment provides ‘hands-on’ experience of Faraday’s law. By flipping a coil of wire (the probe) in a horizontal or vertical plane the two components of the Earth’s magnetic field are determined. The signal from the probe is recorded by a Picoscope ADC100.

  9. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are useful for performing measurements in electric space thrusters and various plasma accelerator applications where a time-varying magnetic field is present. Magnetic field probes have proven to be a mainstay in diagnosing plasma thrusters where changes occur rapidly with respect to time, providing the means to measure the magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents and even an indirect measure of the plasma current density through the application of Ampère's law. Examples of applications where this measurement technique has been employed include pulsed plasma thrusters and quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. The Electric Propulsion Technical Committee (EPTC) of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was asked to assemble a Committee on Standards (CoS) for Electric Propulsion Testing. The assembled CoS was tasked with developing Standards and Recommended Practices for various diagnostic techniques used in the evaluation of plasma thrusters. These include measurements that can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. This paper presents a summary of the standard, describing the preferred methods for fabrication, calibration, and usage of inductive magnetic field probes for use in diagnosing plasma thrusters. Inductive magnetic field probes (also called B-dot probes throughout this document) are commonly used in electric propulsion (EP) research and testing to measure unsteady magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents. The B-dot probe is relatively simple in construction, and requires minimal cost, making it a low-cost technique that is readily accessible to most researchers. While relatively simple, the design of a B-dot probe is not trivial and there are many opportunities for errors in probe construction, calibration, and usage, and in the post-processing of data that is produced by the probe. There are typically several ways in which each of these steps can be approached, and different applications may require more or less vigorous attention to various issues.

  10. Small, high frequency probe for internal magnetic field measurements in high temperature plasmas

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    . T. Slougha) and K. E. Miller University of Washington, Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory, 14700 NE-diam magnet wire. The two axis probe measured axial and azimuthal FRC magnetic fields as small as a few gauss Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1316752 I. INTRODUCTION In previous experiments on high temperature 50

  11. Fabrication and use of a nanoscale Hall probe for measurements of the magnetic field induced by MFM tips.

    PubMed

    Matveev, Victor N; Levashov, Vladimir I; Volkov, Vladimir T; Kononenko, Oleg V; Chernyh, Anatoly V; Knjazev, Maxim A; Tulin, Vyacheslav A

    2008-11-26

    Extraordinary Hall effect probes with 160 nm × 160 nm working area were fabricated using photo- and electron-beam lithographic procedures with the aim of direct measurements of MFM cantilever tip magnetic properties. The magnetic field sensitivity of the probes was 35 ? T(-1). Magnetic induction of the MFM cantilever tips coated by Co and SmCo films was measured with the probes. It was shown that the resolution of the probes was of the order of 10 nm. PMID:21836273

  12. Probing Mars' crustal magnetic field and ionosphere with the MGS Electron Reflectometer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Lin; C. Mazelle; H. Rème; P. A. Cloutier; J. E. P. Connerney; M. H. Acuña; N. F. Ness

    2001-01-01

    The Electron Reflectometer (ER) on board Mars Global Surveyor measures the energy and angular distributions of solar wind electrons and ionospheric photoelectrons. These data can be used in conjunction with magnetometer data to probe Mars' crustal magnetic field and to study Mars' ionosphere and solar wind interaction. During aerobraking, ionospheric measurements were obtained in the northern hemisphere at high solar

  13. Internal magnetic field measurements on the Helicity Injected Tokamak (HIT) using the Transient Internal Probe (TIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) is a novel diagnostic designed to measure internal magnetic fields in hot plasmas. The diagnostic involves shooting a magneto-optic probe through the plasma at high velocities (greater than 2 km/s) using a two stage light gas gun. Local fields are obtained by illuminating the probe with an argon ion laser and measuring the amount of Faraday rotation in the laser light reflected from the moving probe. Currently, internal magnetic profile measurements are being conducted on the Helicity Injected tokamak (HIT). HIT is a low aspect ratio (A = 1.5) tokamak designed to investigate steady state current drive using coaxial helicity injection. Operating parameters are T{sub e} {approx} 100, n{sub e} {approx} 5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and I{sub p} = 250 kA. Internal magnetic field profile data will be presented. The TIP diagnostic has a spatial resolution of 1 cm and 20 gauss magnetic field resolution. System frequency response is 10 MHz.

  14. Primary processing of magnetic field data aboard a space probe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Lenners; H. J. Linthe

    1987-01-01

    The real-time processing of magnetometric data on a space probe is examined. The design and components of the three-component vector magnetometer used in this study are discussed. The on-board computer used to digitize the three signal components consists of: a processor; memory; and input, control, calibration, time, output, and interrupt ports. The functions of these components and the tasks of

  15. Determination of the EEDF by Langmuir probe diagnostics in a plasma excited at ECR above a multipolar magnetic field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Lagarde; Y. Arnal; A. Lacoste; J. Pelletier

    2001-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms of plasma production above multipolar magnetic fields via electron cyclotron resonance, the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of an argon plasma in the magnetic field of a planar magnetron-like structure is determined by using optical emission spectroscopy and a cylindrical Langmuir probe. After a brief recall of the validity conditions for probe measurements

  16. Rotating field eddy current probe for characterization of cracking in non-magnetic tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Capobianco, T.E. [Lockheed Martin, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-07-01

    A rotating field eddy current probe was built and tested for use in small diameter, non-magnetic tubing. The rotating field probe is a driver/pickup style with two orthogonally wound drive coils and a pancake pickup coil. The driver coils are excited by two sine waves 90{degree} out of phase with each other. The physical arrangement of the drive coils and the 90{degree} phase shift of the excitation waveforms creates a field which rotates in the test piece under the drive coils. Preliminary tests on electrical discharge machined (EDM) notches show that phased based estimates of notch depth are possible. Probes currently used for detection of cracks in tubing produce responses that have proven unreliable for estimating defect depths. This recently developed version of the rotating field eddy current probe produces a bipolar response in the presence of a crack or a notch. Typically, the phase angle of a bipolar eddy current response is easily identified and measured and is used extensively for estimating depths of volumetric defects. Data are shown relating the phase angle of the rotating field probe`s bipolar response to the depth of circumferential EDM notches.

  17. Magnetically driven filament probe

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, A.; Herrmann, A.; Rohde, V.; Maraschek, M.; Mueller, H. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    A radially movable probe has been developed for studies of filamentary transport in ASDEX Upgrade during edge localized modes (ELMs) by means of Langmuir tips and magnetic pickup coils. The probe is permanently installed at the low field side in the ASDEX Upgrade vacuum vessel and is not subject to limitations in probe size, as, for example, probes on a shared manipulator are. The probe is moved by a magnetic drive, which allows for easy installation in the vessel, and has moderate machine requirements, as it will only require an electric feedthrough and an external power supply. The drive gives a linear motion with a radial range of 5 cm within 50 ms, where range and velocity can be largely scaled according to experimental requirements. The probe has been installed in the outer midplane of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel, where ELM filaments are expected to have their maximum amplitude. Filaments are coherent substructures within an ELM, carrying a fraction of the ELM released energy towards the wall. The new probe allows to measure the structure of these filaments, in particular, parameters such as filament rotation (by time delay measurements) and size (by peak width analysis). Activating the drive moves the probe from a safe position behind the limiter to a position in front of the limiters, i.e., exposes the Langmuir pins to the scrape-off layer plasma.

  18. PROBING THE LARGE-SCALE TOPOLOGY OF THE HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD USING JOVIAN ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, M. J.; Horbury, T. S. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Arge, C. N. [Air Force Research Laboratory/Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, NM 87117 (United States)

    2010-05-10

    Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a point source of near-relativistic electrons within the heliosphere. In this study, three solar cycles of Jovian electron data in near-Earth space are examined. Jovian electron intensity is found to peak for an ideal Parker spiral connection, but with considerable spread about this point. Assuming the peak in Jovian electron counts indicates the best magnetic connection to Jupiter, we find a clear trend for fast and slow solar wind to be over- and under-wound with respect to the ideal Parker spiral, respectively. This is shown to be well explained in terms of solar wind stream interactions. Thus, modulation of Jovian electrons by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) may primarily be the result of changing magnetic connection, rather than CIRs acting as barriers to cross-field diffusion. By using Jovian electrons to remote sensing magnetic connectivity with Jupiter's magnetosphere, we suggest that they provide a means to validate solar wind models between 1 and 5 AU, even when suitable in situ solar wind observations are not available. Furthermore, using Jovian electron observations as probes of heliospheric magnetic topology could provide insight into heliospheric magnetic field braiding and turbulence, as well as any systematic under-winding of the heliospheric magnetic field relative to the Parker spiral from footpoint motion of the magnetic field.

  19. Lobe crossing events observed by the Van Allen Probes as tests of magnetic field line mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, P.; MacDonald, E.; Grande, M.; Glocer, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we examine a series of lobe crossing events witnessed by the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft between 0200 and 0515 on November 14th 2012. The events occurred on the flank between 0400 and 0635 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE. During the events Dst was less than 100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = - 15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). Other observations at geosynchronous orbit also show lobe crossings at dawn and dusk flanks. These events provide a chance to examine the magnetic field topology in detail and compare it with models. We will show that the spacecraft were in locations with access to the open field lines by comparison to the CRCM + BATS-RUS models as well as comparing spacecraft encounters with the lobe to the predicted magnetic field topology.

  20. Measurement of azimuthal magnetic fields in a Z-pinch gas discharge using the faraday rotation of a probe beam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Illingworth

    1977-01-01

    The Faraday rotation of the plane of polarisation of a probe beam by azimuthal magnetic fields in the presence of beam deflection caused by refractive index gradients is discussed for a plasma carrying an axial current. A method for calculation of the magnetic field profile from experimental data is described. Btheta can be found by Abel inversion if the electron

  1. Probing the innermost regions of AGN jets and their magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jose L.; Lobanov, Andrei

    How relativistic jets are launched and collimated, and what are the sites and mechanisms for the high-energy (X and gamma-rays) emission are probably some of the most important questions related to AGN jet physics. The space VLBI program RadioAstron provides the first full-polarization observations of AGN jets on baselines longer than one Earth diameter, yielding the highest angular resolution measurements of magnetic field properties in the vicinity of the central black hole to date. First results from our RadioAstron Key Science Project (KSP) “Probing the innermost regions of AGN jets and their magnetic fields” will be presented. Polarimetric and Faraday rotation synthesis analysis of the RadioAstron KSP data allow us to construct 3D maps of the magnetic field structure and strength of the innermost jet regions, through which we intend to obtain a better understanding of the role played by the magnetic field in the jet formation and the high-energy emission mechanisms in AGN jets.

  2. Three dimensional imaging of helicon wave fields via magnetic induction probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Michael P.

    The majority of data presented in this work is for a helicon plasma discharge driven at 13.56 MHz, 500 Watts input power, 900 Gauss applied magnetic field, 10 mTorr neutral Argon gas, and cylindrical plasma of 5 cm diameter approximately 50 cm long. High frequency magnetic induction probes were developed to measure helicon wave propagation using a new technique for frequency calibration through an impedance analyzer; up to 100 MHz. This work demonstrates magnetic field measurements in high frequency plasma are greatly simplified through this new frequency characterization method. Line-lengths and transmission-cable-types are readily identified as diagnostic limiting factors. The magnetic probe design enables the first 3-dimensional imaging of plasma waves through detailed radial and axial measurements. Strong agreement is obtained between the measured br, btheta, and bz radial profiles with the numerical solutions of helicon waves when a non-uniform radial density profile is considered. The axial helicon wavelength predicted by the non-uniform radial density theory also agrees with the measured wavelength when the full three dimensional wave is accurately analyzed. In some cases, the differences between the three dimensional wavelength and the numerically solved values are less than 35%. This is in contrast to the two dimensional wavelengths which can differ from the numerical values by greater than 100%. We show a complete visual representation of helicon waves through 3-d imaging which provides significantly more accurate analysis of the helicon wavelength. This work also observed a density peak downstream from the antenna/source through axial density measurements with a RF compensated Langmuir probe (calibrated against a 90 GHz microwave interferometer). Here, the downstream density peak is explained in terms of a global energy balance modeled by an axially decaying electron temperature peaked at the source; Te ? 3 - 7 eV. This model does not require an assumption of a RF plasma or additional heating by helicon wave absorption; rather the model demonstrates excellent agreement with the measured axial density profiles when radial losses are assumed to be less than 10%, which is reasonably attributed to the axially applied static magnetic field. The new diagnostic methods developed in this work (both probe characterization and analysis of measured data) provide fundamental insight into laboratory helicon plasma. The methods and results derived here will supplement and aid the design of future helicon plasma sources.

  3. Magnetic field and quadruple Langmuir probe measurements in the plume of the plasmoid thruster experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelfgen, Syri Jo

    The development of high specific impulse rocket engines is essential for fast and efficient space travel. The plasmoid thruster, a novel propulsion concept with the potential for producing a high specific impulse, was investigated in light of this need. This pulsed inductive rocket utilizes the Lorentz force to accelerate plasmoids and produce thrust. The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) was designed to experimentally evaluate the thruster concept. PTX operates by producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and ejecting them at high velocity. Measurements of the plasmoid magnetic fields, electron temperature (Te), electron number density (n e) and Mach number (M) were taken in the PTX plume with a B? probe array and a quadruple Langmuir probe. The measurements were used for calculating exit velocity and Isp. High-speed photographs were also obtained for capturing images of the plasmoids and estimating their velocity. The magnetic field data showed behavior characteristic of plasmoids, such as the occurrence of the maximum axial magnetic field on axis and magnetic field reversal. The quadruple Langmuir probe data revealed several factors that influence thruster operation, including propellant choice, supply pressure and propellant injection timing (tpuff). For Ar propellant at supply pressures of 14--34 psig and tpuff = 2200 mus, Te ranged from 2--7 eV, ne ranged from 1.5 x 1020 m-3 to 3.5 x 1020 m-3, and M ranged from 3.3--3.8 in PTX. For H2 propellant, T e ranged from 15--27 eV, ne ranged from 0.8 x 1020 m-3 to 1.5 x 1020 m-3, and M ranged from 1.4--2.6, for supply pressures of 9--38 psig and tpuff = 1200--2400 mus. Analysis of the plume measurements yielded high thruster exit velocities, indicating that the plasmoid thruster can produce a high Isp. Velocities of 24 km/s, 35 km/s and 46 km/s were calculated for supply pressures of 38 psig, 24 psig and 9 psig of H2 propellant, respectively. These exit velocities deliver Isp values of 2,400 s, 3,500 s and 4,600 s respectively for the unoptimized plasmoid thruster.

  4. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  5. Probing the Solar Magnetic Field With a Sun-Grazing Comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Cooper; Linker, J. A.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.; Schrijver, C. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.

    2013-07-01

    Observations of comets occupy a rich history within Solar and Heliospheric science. Cometary plasma tails probe the solar wind in the inner solar system 0.5-3 AU) and their observations led to its discovery more than half a century ago. Fast forwarding to today, recent observations of sun-grazing comets within the solar corona have opened up a whole new avenue to study the Sun with these striking celestial bodies. Here we present our recent study of the perihelion passage of comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy), which came within 140Mm of the solar surface. Imaged from multiple perspectives by SDO/AIA and the STEREO/EUVI, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations of Lovejoy's tail showed substantial changes in direction, intensity, magnitude, and persistence. To understand this unique signature, we combine a state-of-the-art magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the solar corona and a prescription for the motion of emitting cometary tail ions in an embedded plasma. We show how the observed tail motions reveal the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the solar corona, and demonstrate how they constrain field and plasma properties in a region where the coronal plasma is normally not easily observed in EUV. We will also discuss our results in context of the upcoming perihelion passage of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), expected by many to be a spectacular probe of the near-sun environment. Work supported by NASA and NSF.

  6. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2013-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the angular anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thereby inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that current Fermi data already seem to prefer nonnegligible IGMF values. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  7. Using the morphology and magnetic fields of tailed radio galaxies as environmental probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Dehghan, S.; Pratley, L.

    2015-03-01

    Bent-tailed (BT) radio sources have long been known to trace over densities in the Universe up to z ~ 1 and there is increasing evidence this association persists out to redshifts of 2. The morphology of the jets in BT galaxies is primarily a function of the environment that they have resided in and so BTs provide invaluable clues as to their local conditions. Thus, not only can samples of BT galaxies be used as signposts of large-scale structure, but are also valuable for obtaining a statistical measurement of properties of the intra-cluster medium including the presence of cluster accretion shocks & winds, and as historical anemometers, preserving the dynamical history of their surroundings in their jets. We discuss the use of BTs to unveil large-scale structure and provide an example in which a BT was used to unlock the dynamical history of its host cluster. In addition to their use as density and dynamical indicators, BTs are useful probes of the magnetic field on their environment on scales which are inaccessible to other methods. Here we discuss a novel way in which a particular sub-class of BTs, the so-called `corkscrew' galaxies might further elucidate the coherence lengths of the magnetic fields in their vicinity. Given that BTs are estimated to make up a large population in next generation surveys we posit that the use of jets in this way could provide a unique source of environmental information for clusters and groups up to z = 2.

  8. Inverse Depolarization: A Potential Probe of Internal Faraday Rotation and Helical Magnetic Fields in Extragalactic Radio Jets

    E-print Network

    Homan, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations that show increasing fractional linear polarization with increasing wavelength in a small number of optically thin jet features, i.e. "inverse depolarization", we present a physical model that can explain this effect and may provide a new and complementary probe of the low energy particle population and possible helical magnetic fields in extragalactic radio jets. In our model, structural inhomogeneities in the jet magnetic field create cancellation of polarization along the line of sight. Internal Faraday rotation, which increases like wavelength squared, acts to align the polarization from the far and near sides of the jet, leading to increased polarization at longer wavelengths. Structural inhomogeneities of the right type are naturally produced in helical magnetic fields and will also appear in randomly tangled magnetic fields. We explore both alternatives and find that, for random fields, the length scale for tangling cannot be too small a fraction of the jet diameter and...

  9. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Probing Magnetic Fields by Positrons and Late-time IR Line Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P.

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of ? and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 ?m, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M Ch) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 109 G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a ?-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 ?m can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M Ch mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central 56Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M Ch. Good time coverage is required to separate the effects of optical depth, the size and morphology of B, and the aspect angle of the observer. The spectra require a resolution of about 500 km s-1 and a signal-to-noise ratio of about 20%. Two other strong near-IR spectral features at about 1.5 and 1.8 ?m are used to demonstrate the importance of line blending, which may invalidate a kinematic interpretation of emission lines. Flat-topped line profiles between 300 and 400 days have been observed and reported in the literature. They lend support for M Ch mass explosions in at least some cases and require magnetic fields equal to or in excess of 106 G. We briefly discuss the effects of the size and morphology of B on light curves, as well as limitations. We argue that line profiles are a more direct measurement of B than light curves because they measure both the distribution of 56Ni and the redistribution of the energy input by positrons rather than the total energy input. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms for the formation of high B-fields and the limitations of our analysis.

  10. Probing of field-induced structures and tunable rheological properties of surfactant capped magnetically polarizable nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Felicia, Leona J; Philip, John

    2013-01-01

    Oil-based nanofluid containing surfactant-capped magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized by a simple coprecipitation approach, and their magnetorheological properties are studied for different magnetic field strengths and volume fractions. We observe a distinct "plateau-like region" in the shear thinning viscosity curve, under an external magnetic field, possibly due to a peculiar alignment of the chains with respect to the field direction where the structure is stable against fragmentation. The observed plateau regime is reminiscent to that of kinetically arrested gel networks. Interestingly, such a plateau regime has been observed only above certain critical magnetic field when the dipolar interaction strength is much greater than the thermal energy where the aggregation becomes a nonequilibrium transport-limited process. The good collapse of specific viscosity data against Mason number for different magnetic field strengths onto a single curve suggests the dominance of hydrodynamic and magnetic forces on thermal force above a certain magnetic field strength. The observed increase in both static and dynamic yield stresses under the magnetic field confirms the formation of columnar structures that hinder the flow behavior. The hysteresis observed in the magnetic sweep experiments shows the inability of the chains to relax within the measurement time. The dynamic measurements confirm that the field-induced structures impart elastic behavior to the dispersion, which is found to increase with magnetic field and saturates at higher field strengths. PMID:23210900

  11. Elasticity of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals Probed by Director Reorientation in a Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    Elasticity of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals Probed by Director Reorientation in a Magnetic, and bend K3 elastic constants for the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal sunset yellow formed through=K3 and K1=K2 increase, which is attributed to elongation of self-assembled lyotropic chromonic

  12. Wave Science with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Acuna, M. H.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rpwlamd, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2008-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields of waves which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts. We discuss of the key scientific goals of the EMFISIS investigation with particular attention to the wave physics of the radiation belts.

  13. Fisher analysis on wide-band polarimetry for probing the intergalactic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Keitaro; Akahori, Takuya; Kumazaki, Kohei; Ryu, Dongsu

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the capability of current radio telescopes for probing Faraday rotation measure (RM) due to the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in the large-scale structure of the universe, which is expected to be of order O (1) rad m-2. We consider polarization observations of a compact radio source such as quasars behind a diffuse source such as the Galaxy, and calculate Stokes parameters Q and U assuming a simple model of the Faraday dispersion functions with Gaussian shape. Then, we perform the Fisher analysis to estimate the expected errors in the model parameters from QU-fitting of polarization intensity, accounting for the sensitivities and frequency bands of Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder, Low Frequency Array, and the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope. Finally, we examine the conditions on the source intensities which are required to detect the IGMF. Our analysis indicates that the QU-fitting is promising for forthcoming wideband polarimetry to explore RM due to the IGMF in filaments of galaxies.

  14. Determination of self generated magnetic field and the plasma density using Cotton Mouton polarimetry with two color probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    Self generated magnetic fields (SGMF) in laser produced plasmas are conventionally determined by measuring the Faraday rotation angle of a linearly polarized laser probe beam passing through the plasma along with the interferogram for obtaining plasma density. In this paper, we propose a new method to obtain the plasma density and the SGMF distribution from two simultaneous measurements of Cotton Mouton polarimetry of two linearly polarized probe beams of different colors that pass through plasma in a direction normal to the planar target. It is shown that this technique allows us to determine the distribution of SGMF and the plasma density without doing interferometry of laser produced plasmas.

  15. Magnetic field effects on spectrally resolved lifetime of on-line oxygen monitoring using magneto-optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermut, O.; Gallant, P.; Le Bouch, N.; Leclair, S.; Noiseux, I.; Vernon, M.; Morin, J.-F.; Diamond, K.; Patterson, M. S.; Samkoe, K.; Pogue, B.

    2009-02-01

    Multimodal agents that serve as both probes for contrast and light-activated effectors of cellular processes in diseased tissue were developed. These agents were introduced into multicellular tumor spheroids (3D tissue models) and in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of a chicken embryo. The luminescence decay was examined using a novel technique involving a spectrally-resolved fluorescence lifetime apparatus integrated with a weak electromagnet. A spectrallyresolved lifetime setup was used to identify magneto-optic species sensitive to magnetic field effects and distinguish from background emissions. We demonstrate that the applied magnetic fields can alter reaction rates and product distribution of some dyes detected by time- and spectrally-resolved luminescence changes. We will discuss the use of exogenous magneto-optical probes taken up in tumors to both induce phototoxicity, a process that is governed by complex and dynamically evolving mechanisms involving reactive oxygen species, and monitor treatment progress. The magnetic field enhancement, measured over a range of weak fields (0-300 mT) is correlated to oxygenation and may be used to monitor dynamic changes occurring due to oxygen consumption over the course of photodynamic therapy. Such online measurements provide the possibility to derive real-time information about response to treatment via monitoring magnetic field enhancement/suppression of the time-resolved, spectrally-resolved luminescence of the probe at the site of the treatment directly. Magnetic perturbation of lifetime can serve as a status reporter, providing optical feedback of oxygen-mediated treatments in situ and allowing for real-time adjustment of a phototherapy treatment plan.

  16. Single ion as a shot-noise-limited magnetic-field-gradient probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, A.; Poschinger, U.; Ziesel, F.; Hettrich, M.; Wiens, A.; Welzel, J.; Schmidt-Kaler, F. [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, DE-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    It is expected that ion-trap quantum computing can be made scalable through protocols that make use of transport of ion qubits between subregions within the ion trap. In this scenario, any magnetic field inhomogeneity the ion experiences during the transport may lead to dephasing and loss of fidelity. Here we demonstrate how to measure, and compensate for, magnetic field gradients inside a segmented ion trap, by transporting a single ion over variable distances. We attain a relative magnetic field sensitivity of {Delta}B/B{sub 0{approx}}5x10{sup -7} over a test distance of 140 {mu}m, which can be extended to the mm range, still with sub-{mu}m resolution. A fast experimental sequence is presented, facilitating its use as a magnetic-field-gradient calibration routine, and it is demonstrated that the main limitation is the quantum shot noise.

  17. Planck intermediate results. XXXV. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds

    E-print Network

    Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Arzoumanian, D; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bock, J J; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Guillet, V; Harrison, D L; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Netterfield, C B; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    Within ten nearby (d magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, $N_H$. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analyzed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool Histogram of Relative Orientations. Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing $N_H$ from preferentially parallel or no preferred orientation to preferentially perpendicular. In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfv\\'enic or sub-Alfv\\'enic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck. We compare the deduced magnetic field strength w...

  18. Faraday rotation limits on a primordial magnetic field from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year data

    SciTech Connect

    Kahniashvili, Tina [Department of Physics and McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C6 (Canada); National Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia Chavchavadze State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Maravin, Yurii [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Kosowsky, Arthur [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    A primordial magnetic field in the early universe will cause Faraday rotation of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background generated via Compton scattering at the surface of last scattering. This rotation induces a nonzero parity-odd (B-mode) polarization component. The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data puts an upper limit on the magnitude of the B-polarization power spectrum; assuming that the B-polarization signal is totally due to the Faraday rotation effect, the upper limits on the comoving amplitude of a primordial stochastic magnetic field range from 6x10{sup -8} to 2x10{sup -6} G on a comoving length scale of 1 Mpc, depending on the power spectrum of the magnetic field.

  19. Faraday rotation limits on a primordial magnetic field from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Maravin, Yurii; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2009-07-01

    A primordial magnetic field in the early universe will cause Faraday rotation of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background generated via Compton scattering at the surface of last scattering. This rotation induces a nonzero parity-odd (B-mode) polarization component. The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data puts an upper limit on the magnitude of the B-polarization power spectrum; assuming that the B-polarization signal is totally due to the Faraday rotation effect, the upper limits on the comoving amplitude of a primordial stochastic magnetic field range from 6×10-8 to 2×10-6G on a comoving length scale of 1 Mpc, depending on the power spectrum of the magnetic field.

  20. INVERSE DEPOLARIZATION: A POTENTIAL PROBE OF INTERNAL FARADAY ROTATION AND HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS IN EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, D. C., E-mail: homand@denison.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Denison University, Granville, OH 43023 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    Motivated by recent observations that show increasing fractional linear polarization with increasing wavelength in a small number of optically thin jet features, i.e., 'inverse depolarization', we present a physical model that can explain this effect and may provide a new and complementary probe of the low-energy particle population and possible helical magnetic fields in extragalactic radio jets. In our model, structural inhomogeneities in the jet magnetic field create cancellation of polarization along the line of sight. Internal Faraday rotation, which increases like wavelength squared, acts to align the polarization from the far and near sides of the jet, leading to increased polarization at longer wavelengths. Structural inhomogeneities of the right type are naturally produced in helical magnetic fields and will also appear in randomly tangled magnetic fields. We explore both alternatives and find that, for random fields, the length scale for tangling cannot be too small a fraction of the jet diameter and still be consistent with the relatively high levels of fractional polarization observed in these features. We also find that helical magnetic fields naturally produce transverse structure for inverse depolarization which may be observable even in partially resolved jets.

  1. Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students visualize the magnetic field of a strong permanent magnet using a compass. The lesson begins with an analogy to the effect of the Earth's magnetic field on a compass. Students see the connection that the compass simply responds to the Earth's magnetic field since it is the closest, strongest field, and thus the compass responds to the field of the permanent magnets, allowing them the ability to map the field of that magnet in the activity. This information will be important in designing a solution to the grand challenge in activity 4 of the unit.

  2. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. The instruments are integrated through a Central Data Processor Unit (CDPU) which provides for flexible instrument operations in both burst and survey telemetry modes that can be optimized to address the specific physics of the many radiation belt processes. The EMFISIS multi-institution team comprises a group of knowledgeable space physics investigators, both experimental and theoretical with the requisite capability, desire, and experience to accomplish the goals of the RBSP mission to further space weather capability. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts.

  3. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W.; Acuna, M.; Torbert, R.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Bounds, S.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2006-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field dynamics and time scales are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to MHz frequencies. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. The instruments are integrated through a Central Data Processor Unit (CDPU) which provides for flexible instrument operations in both burst and survey telemetry modes that can be optimized to address the specific physics of the many radiation belt processes. The EMFISIS multi-institution team comprises a group of knowledgeable space physics investigators, both experimental and theoretical, with the requisite capability, desire, and experience to accomplish the goals of the RBSP mission to further our nation's space weather capability. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts.

  4. Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Schöller, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we give a brief introduction into the use of the Zeeman effect in astronomy and the general detection of magnetic fields in stars, concentrating on the use of FORS2 for longitudinal magnetic field measurements.

  5. Recent Results From The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    2014-05-01

    The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics which are well-measured by the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft launched in 2012. An overview of recent results from the mission focusing on waves and wave-particle interactions measured by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is presented. We show examples of automated density determination and plasmapause identification as derived from the upper hybrid resonance; low frequency ULF pulsations; EMIC waves with electrostatic harmonics and their occurrence statistics; and whistler mode waves including upper and lower band chorus as well as plasmaspheric hiss and its relation to energetic particles.

  6. A novel technique for measurement of self-generated magnetic fields and the plasma density in laser produced plasmas from the Faraday rotation using two color probes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Joshi; P. A. Naik; S. Barnwal; Y. B. S. R. Prasad; P. D. Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic information about the self-generated magnetic fields (SGMF) generated in laser produced plasmas is normally obtained by measuring the Faraday rotation angle (FRA) of a linearly polarized laser probe beam passing through the plasma. Simultaneous recording of the corresponding interferogram is required to get the density information necessary for estimating the magnetic field. The problem with this method is that

  7. Hall probe measurements of the poloidal magnetic field in Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, B. A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Knowlton, S. F.; Hartwell, G. J., E-mail: hartwell@physics.auburn.edu; Hanson, J. D.; Maurer, D. A. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    A linear array of 16 Hall effect sensors has been developed to directly measure the poloidal magnetic field inside the boundary of a non-axisymmetric hybrid torsatron/tokamak plasma. The array consists of miniature gallium arsenide Hall sensor elements mounted 8 mm apart on a narrow, rotatable printed circuit board inserted into a re-entrant stainless steel tube sheathed in boron nitride. The sensors are calibrated on the bench and in situ to provide accurate local measurements of the magnetic field to aid in reconstructing the equilibrium plasma current density profiles in fully three-dimensional plasmas. Calibrations show that the sensor sensitivities agree with the nominal manufacturers specifications of 1.46?V/T. Poloidal fields measured with the Hall sensor array are found to be within 5% of poloidal fields modeled with a Biot-Savart code.

  8. Initial Results From The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; MacDowall, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Bounds, S. R.; Smith, C. W.; Connerney, J. E.; Santolik, O.; Thorne, R. M.; Jordanova, V. K.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2013-05-01

    The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics from large-scale ring current ion and magnetic field dynamics to microscopic kinetic interactions of whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these kinds of radiation belt interactions, NASA implemented the two-satellite Van Allen Probes mission. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer (MSC). These wave measurements include AC electric and magnetic fields from 10Hz to 400 kHz. We show examples of plasmapause identification and variation determined by the upper hybrid resonance, low frequency ULF pulsations, and whistler mode waves including upper and lower band chorus. These data are compared with particle measuements to show relationships between wave activity and particle energization.

  9. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; MacDowall, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Bounds, S. R.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Smith, C. W.; Connerney, J. E.; Santolik, O.; Thorne, R. M.; Jordanova, V. K.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics from large-scale ring current ion and magnetic field dynamics to microscopic kinetic interactions of whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these kinds of radiation belt interactions, NASA implemented the two-satellite Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer (MSC). These wave measurements include AC electric and magnetic fields from 10Hz to 400 kHz. Examples of key wave science such as the plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic equatorial noise, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and chorus are presented along with overall instrument capability and data availability.

  10. Initial Results From The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    2013-04-01

    The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics from large-scale ring current ion and magnetic field dynamics to microscopic kinetic interactions of whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these kinds of radiation belt interactions, NASA implemented the two-satellite Van Allen Probes mission. As part of the mission, the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer (MSC). These wave measurements include AC electric and magnetic fields from 10Hz to 400 kHz. We show examples of plasmapause identification and variation determined by the upper hybrid resonance, low frequency ULF pulsations, and whistler mode waves including upper and lower band chorus. These data are compared with particle measuements to show relationships between wave activity and particle energization.

  11. Eddy currents from moving point sources of magnetic field in the Gravity Probe B experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Silbergleit; M. G. Keiser

    1998-01-01

    Two boundary-value problems in plane geometry, modeling the field and current distribution produced by moving sources of magnetic\\u000a field (fluxons) in surrounding normal metals, are solved analytically. In the first case a fluxon moves with a constant velocity\\u000a in a superconducting plane separated by a vacuum gap from a half space filled with a metal having a low electrical conductivity.

  12. A magneto-optic imaging probe for continuous magnetic field profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

    1992-10-01

    Magnetic field profiles are measured continuously in space and time using Faraday rotation in magneto-optic glass. A line focused laser beam which undergoes Faraday rotation within the glass element is imaged in one dimension through a polarizer and onto a streak camera. The system is described and used to characterize an exploding diamagnetic plasma cavity.

  13. Faraday caustics: Singularities in the Faraday spectrum and their utility as probes of magnetic field properties

    E-print Network

    Bell, M R; Enßlin, T A

    2011-01-01

    We describe singularities in the distribution of polarized intensity as a function of Faraday depth (i.e. the Faraday spectrum) that arise due to line of sight (LOS) magnetic field reversals. We call these features Faraday caustics due to their similarity to optical caustics. They appear sharply spiked in the Faraday spectrum with a tail that extends to one side. The direction in which the tail extends depends on the way in which the LOS magnetic field reversal occurs (either changing from oncoming to retreating or vice versa). We describe how surfaces of Faraday caustics relate to boundaries between regions where the LOS magnetic field has opposite polarity. Examples from simulations of the polarized synchrotron emission from the Milky Way are provided. We derive the probability or luminosity distribution of Faraday caustics produced in a Gaussian magnetic field distribution as a function of their strength, F, and find that for strong Faraday caustics P(F) ~ F^(-3). If fully resolved, this distribution is al...

  14. Terahertz probes of magnetic field induced spin reorientation in YFeO3 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xian; Jiang, Junjie; Jin, Zuanming; Wang, Dongyang; Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Ma, Guohong

    2015-03-01

    Using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, we demonstrate the spin reorientation of a canted antiferromagnetic YFeO3 single crystal, by evaluating the temperature and magnetic field dependence of resonant frequency and amplitude for the quasi-ferromagnetic (FM) and quasi-antiferromagnetic modes (AFM), a deeper insight into the dynamics of spin reorientation in rare-earth orthoferrites is established. Due to the absence of 4f-electrons in Y ion, the spin reorientation of Fe sublattices can only be induced by the applied magnetic field, rather than temperature. In agreement with the theoretical predication, the frequency of FM mode decreases with magnetic field. In addition, an obvious step of spin reorientation phase transition occurs with a relatively large applied magnetic field of 4 T. By comparison with the family members of RFeO3 (R = Y3+ or rare-earth ions), our results suggest that the chosen of R would tailor the dynamical rotation properties of Fe ions, leading to the designable spin switching in the orthoferrite antiferromagnetic systems.

  15. THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. BAILEY

    1963-01-01

    A new analysis of magnetic and concurrent plasma data collected from the ; space probes Pionecr 5, Explorer 10, and Mariner 2 yields a new model of the ; interplanetary magnetic field. It is hypothesized that the observed ; interplanetary field F\\/sub i\\/ is due to motion of the magnetometer relative to a ; negatively charged rotating sun from which

  16. A biased probe analysis of potential well formation in an electron only, low beta Polywell magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Matthew; Khachan, Joe [Department of Plasma Physics, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)] [Department of Plasma Physics, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-05-15

    Orbital limited motion theory has been applied to two biased probes in a low beta Polywell. The cases studied include electron injection, magnetic field scaling, Polywell bias scaling, and radial position profiles. Langmuir's original orbital limited motion results for a monoenergetic electron beam are shown to be in excellent agreement for electron injection into the Polywell. A distribution function is proposed for the electron plasma characteristics in the centre of the magnetic null and confirmed with experimental results. A translational stage was used to measure the radial plasma potential profile. In other experiments, two probes were used to simultaneously measure the profiles in both the null and a position halfway along a corner cusp. The results confirm a radial potential well created by electron trapping in the device. In addition, we present preliminary results of the potential well scaling with the magnetic field, Polywell bias voltage, and the injected beam current. The electron population was found to maintain non-equilibrium in all cases studied.

  17. A biased probe analysis of potential well formation in an electron only, low beta Polywell magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Matthew; Khachan, Joe

    2013-05-01

    Orbital limited motion theory has been applied to two biased probes in a low beta Polywell. The cases studied include electron injection, magnetic field scaling, Polywell bias scaling, and radial position profiles. Langmuir's original orbital limited motion results for a monoenergetic electron beam are shown to be in excellent agreement for electron injection into the Polywell. A distribution function is proposed for the electron plasma characteristics in the centre of the magnetic null and confirmed with experimental results. A translational stage was used to measure the radial plasma potential profile. In other experiments, two probes were used to simultaneously measure the profiles in both the null and a position halfway along a corner cusp. The results confirm a radial potential well created by electron trapping in the device. In addition, we present preliminary results of the potential well scaling with the magnetic field, Polywell bias voltage, and the injected beam current. The electron population was found to maintain non-equilibrium in all cases studied.

  18. Faraday caustics. Singularities in the Faraday spectrum and their utility as probes of magnetic field properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Bell; H. Junklewitz; T. A. Enßlin

    2011-01-01

    We describe singularities in the distribution of polarized intensity as a function of Faraday depth (i.e. the Faraday spectrum) caused by line-of-sight (LOS) magnetic field reversals. We call these features Faraday caustics because of their similarity to optical caustics. They appear as sharply peaked and asymmetric profiles in the Faraday spectrum, that have a tail that extends to one side.

  19. ANISOTROPY AS A PROBE OF THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY PROPAGATION AND HALO MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xue, Liang, E-mail: zhangyi@mail.ihep.ac.cn [School of Physics, Shandong University, Ji'nan 250100 (China)

    2012-05-01

    The anisotropy of cosmic rays (CRs) in the solar vicinity is generally attributed to CR streaming due to the discrete distribution of CR sources or local magnetic field modulation. Recently, the two-dimensional large-scale CR anisotropy has been measured by many experiments in the TeV-PeV energy range in both hemispheres. The tail-in excess along the tangential direction of the local spiral arm and the loss cone deficit pointing to the north Galactic pole direction agree with what have been obtained in tens to hundreds of GeV. The persistence of the two large-scale anisotropy structures in such a wide energy range suggests that the anisotropy might be due to global streaming of the Galactic CRs (GCRs). This work tries to extend the observed CR anisotropy picture from the solar system to the whole galaxy. In such a case, we can find a new interesting signature, a loop of GCR streaming, of the GCR propagation. We further calculate the overall GCR streaming induced magnetic field, and find a qualitative consistency with the observed structure of the halo magnetic field.

  20. SQUID readout and ultra-low magnetic fields for Gravity Probe-B (GP-B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, James M.

    1986-01-01

    The superconducting readout system to be used for resolving 0.001 arcsec changes in the gyroscope spin direction in the Relativity Gyroscope (GP-B) experiment is described. This system couples the London magnetic moment flux of the spinning gyro to a low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector. Resolution limits and noise performance of the detection system are discussed, and improvements obtained and expected with advanced SQUIDs are presented. Also described is the novel use of superconducting magnetic shielding techniques to obtain a 250 dB attenuation of the earth's magnetic field at the location of the gyroscopes. In this approach, expanded superconducting foil shields are coupled with fixed cylindrical superconducting shields and special geometric considerations to obtain the extremely high attenuation factor required. With these shielding techniques, it appears that the 0.5-Gauss earth field (which appears to the gyroscopes as an ac field at the satellite roll rate) can be reduced to the 10 to the -13th G level required by the experiment. Recent results concerning improvements in the performance of the superconducting foil techniques obtained with the use of a new computer-controlled cooling system are presented.

  1. Probing the Magnetic Fields in the Environment of Mg II Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Sinclaire; Williams, Anna; Wilcots, Eric M.; Gould Zweibel, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    We present a rotation measure survey of radio luminous QSOs with known Mg II absorption line systems, the purpose of which is to measure the characteristics of magnetics fields in and around galaxies at intermediate redshift. A sample of 38 high Galactic latitude QSOs have been selected as our primary targets. Each QSO has a single absorption line system between a redshift of 0.38<0.65 and we have excellent photometry on the galaxies associated with each absorber. In addition we identify a statistically significant sample of QSOs without intervening Mg II absorbers as a control sample. We use the control sample to correct for both the Galactic foreground and the Faraday rotation internal to the background QSOs. With these data we plan to derive the mean strength of the coherent field in the intermediate redshift galaxies and correlate variations in the observed RM with galaxy color, Mg II equivalent width, and impact parameter. At this time, we present preliminary total intensity images and RMs of the target objects in our sample. Additionally, observed radio jets in a portion of the sample provide an interesting comparison between the RMs of the disks of the galaxies versus those measured in the jets. The ultimate goal for this study is to provide robust constraints on models of the origin and evolution of the global magnetic fields in galaxies like the Milky Way. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  2. Triaxial Probe Magnetic Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shultz, Kimberly; Whittlesey, Albert; Narvaez, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The Triaxial Magnetic Moment Analysis software uses measured magnetic field test data to compute dipole and quadrupole moment information from a hardware element. It is used to support JPL projects needing magnetic control and an understanding of the spacecraft-generated magnetic fields. Evaluation of the magnetic moment of an object consists of three steps: acquisition, conditioning, and analysis. This version of existing software was extensively rewritten for easier data acquisition, data analysis, and report presentation, including immediate feedback to the test operator during data acquisition. While prior JPL computer codes provided the same data content, this program has a better graphic display including original data overlaid with reconstructed results to show goodness of fit accuracy and better appearance of the report graphic page. Data are acquired using three magnetometers and two rotations of the device under test. A clean acquisition user interface presents required numeric data and graphic summaries, and the analysis module yields the best fit (least squares) for the magnetic dipole and/or quadrupole moment of a device. The acquisition module allows the user to record multiple data sets, selecting the best data to analyze, and is repeated three times for each of the z-axial and y-axial rotations. In this update, the y-axial rotation starting position has been changed to an option, allowing either the x- or z-axis to point towards the magnetometer. The code has been rewritten to use three simultaneous axes of magnetic data (three probes), now using two "rotations" of the device under test rather than the previous three rotations, thus reducing handling activities on the device under test. The present version of the software gathers data in one-degree increments, which permits much better accuracy of the fit ted data than the coarser data acquisition of the prior software. The data-conditioning module provides a clean data set for the analysis module. For multiple measurements at a given degree, the first measurement is used. For omitted measurements, the missing field is estimated by linear interpolation between the two nearest measurements. The analysis module was rewritten for the dual rotation, triaxial probe measurement process and now has better moment estimation accuracy, based on the finer one degree of data acquisition resolution. The magnetic moments thus computed are used as an input to summarize the total spacecraft field.

  3. PROBING THE SHALLOW CONVECTION ZONE: RISING MOTION OF SUBSURFACE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, Shin; Yokoyama, Takaaki [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ilonidis, Stathis [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi, E-mail: toriumi@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-06-10

    In this Letter, we present a seismological detection of a rising motion of magnetic flux in the shallow convection zone of the Sun, and show estimates of the emerging speed and its decelerating nature. In order to evaluate the speed of subsurface flux that creates an active region, we apply six Fourier filters to the Doppler data of NOAA AR 10488, observed with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager, to detect the reduction of acoustic power at six different depths from -15 to -2 Mm. All the filtered acoustic powers show reductions, up to 2 hr before the magnetic flux first appears at the visible surface. The start times of these reductions show a rising trend with a gradual deceleration. The obtained velocity is first several km s{sup -1} in a depth range of 15-10 Mm, then {approx}1.5 km s{sup -1} at 10-5 Mm, and finally {approx}0.5 km s{sup -1} at 5-2 Mm. If we assume that the power reduction is actually caused by the magnetic field, the velocity of the order of 1 km s{sup -1} is well in accordance with previous observations and numerical studies. Moreover, the gradual deceleration strongly supports the theoretical model that the emerging flux slows down in the uppermost convection zone before it expands into the atmosphere to build an active region.

  4. Recurrent Cosmic-ray Variations as a Probe of the Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, R. A.; Engelbrecht, E. E.

    2006-12-01

    A linear relationship between the observed 26-day recurrent cosmic-ray intensity variations and the global latitudinal gradient was first reported by Zhang (1997, ApJ, 488), who made extensive use of Ulysses data. This relationship is seen for all species considered and at all latitudes covered by the spacecraft. Burger and Hitge (2004, ApJL, 617) used a three-dimensional steady-state numerical modulation model and showed that a Fisk-type (Fisk 1996, JGR, 101) heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) can in principle explain these observations, at least at high latitudes. In this progress report we use a refinement of the Fisk-Parker hybrid HMF model of Burger and Hitge (2004) by Kruger (2006, MSc dissertation, NWU University) (see also Kruger, Burger and Hitge 2005, AGU Fall meeting abstracts SH23B-0341) to study these 26-day recurrent variations in more detail with the same modulation code. In Kruger's model the HMF is Parker-like at the highest latitudes, becomes Fisk- like at intermediate latitudes, and becomes Parker-like again in the region swept out by the wavy current sheet. By using an almost continuous range of latitudinal gradients for both solar magnetic polarity cycles and for both protons and electrons - in contrast to the limited number of values used by Burger and Hitge (2004) - the structure of the graphs of amplitude of the recurrent cosmic-ray intensity variations as function of global latitudinal gradient can be studied in detail. This was performed in a 100 AU model heliosphere for solar minimum conditions with the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet at 10 degrees. In all cases drift effects are included. We find that these curves for amplitude vs. latitudinal gradient are similar for protons and for electrons. By switching the sign of the modeled amplitudes when the latitudinal gradient becomes negative, the existence of a single relationship between the two quantities can be studied for the whole range of modeled latitudinal gradients. This study shows that a single second-order fit gives better results than a first-order fit for the whole range of latitudinal gradients (and consequently for both species and both solar magnetic polarities) and that there is a difference in the amplitudes for high- and for low rigidities, even if the latitudinal gradient is the same. This difference is a minimum at latitudes where the Fisk-type field is expected to dominate. In the ecliptic at 1 AU, we find that at high rigidity, the amplitude of the recurrent variations is larger for protons during A > 0 polarity epochs than for A < 0 epochs. This is in agreement with observational results of Richardson, Cane and Wibberenz (1999, JGR, 104). For the case of a Parker field, the modeled amplitudes have about the same magnitude for both polarity epochs. Note that what we discus here are preliminary results, and while they clearly suggest the existence of a Fisk-type HMF, the role of the diffusion tensor (and the associated turbulence quantities) has yet to be determined.

  5. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  6. Stray field nuclear magnetic resonance of soil water: development of a new, large probe and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Kinchesh, P; Samoilenko, A A; Preston, A R; Randall, E W

    2002-01-01

    Development, characterization, and preliminary results of a recent technique capable of local measurements of pore-size distribution by a spatially resolved low resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique are described. Potential environmental uses include studying the change in pore-size distribution caused by surface compaction, which influences surface runoff, and obtaining information on the physical state of non-aqueous compounds in porous materials, which should aid the selection of appropriate soil remediation methods. Stray field (STRAFI) imaging is an NMR technique that allows distortion-free imaging of materials with short NMR relaxation times. The sample is placed in the strong axial fringe field gradient of a superconducting NMR magnet. We report on a new, unique, large 5-cm-diameter STRAFI probe, and its use for three preliminary test cases: water in ceramics of known pore size, paraffin wax and oil in sandstone rock, and water in soil at different matric potentials. The imaging is confined to one dimension with a spatial resolution of the order of 100 microm for protons. The optimum position for imaging occurs at 2.62 T and a gradient of 12.1 T/m. Water relaxation decay curves can be measured at any position in the 8-cm-long sample. These curves are decomposed into a series of terms each corresponding to a different pore size. Preliminary results show continuum fits to decay curves for a soil drained to three different matric potentials. Such information will be useful for interpreting water retention curves and will lead to understanding of the behavior of fluids in the vadose zone. PMID:11931439

  7. A new probe of magnetic fields during high-mass star formation: Zeeman splitting of 6.7 GHz methanol masers

    E-print Network

    W. H. T. Vlemmings

    2008-04-07

    Context: The role of magnetic fields during high-mass star formation is a matter of fierce debate, yet only a few direct probes of magnetic field strengths are available. Aims: The magnetic field is detected in a number of massive star-forming regions through polarization observations of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. Although these masers are the most abundant of the maser species occurring during high-mass star formation, most magnetic field measurements in the high-density gas currently come from OH and H2 O maser observations. Methods: The 100-m Effelsberg telescope was used to measure the Zeeman splitting of 6.7 GHz methanol masers for the first time. The observations were performed on a sample of 24 bright northern maser sources. Results: Significant Zeeman splitting is detected in 17 of the sources with an average magnitude of 0.56 m/s . Using the current best estimate of the 6.7 GHz methanol maser Zeeman splitting coefficient and a geometrical correction, this corresponds to an absolute magnetic field strength of 23 mG in the methanol maser region. Conclusions: The magnetic field is dynamically important in the dense maser regions. No clear relation is found with the available OH maser magnetic field measurements. The general sense of direction of the magnetic field is consistent with other Galactic magnetic field measurements, although a few of the masers display a change of direction between different maser features. Due to the abundance of methanol masers, measuring their Zeeman splitting provides the opportunity to construct a comprehensive sample of magnetic fields in high-mass star-forming regions.

  8. Singlet and triplet states of trions in ZuSe-based quantum wells probed by magnetic fields to 50 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Astakhov, G. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Crooker, S. A. (Scott A.); Barrick, T. (Todd); Dzyubenko, A. B.; Sander, Thomas; Kochereshko, V. P.; Ossau, W.; Faschinger, W.; Waag, A.

    2002-01-01

    Singlet and triplet states of positively (X{sup +}) and negatively (X{sup -}) charged excitons in ZnSe-based quantum wells have been studied by means of photoluminescence in pulsed magnetic fields up to 50 T. The binding energy of the X{sup -} singlet state shows a monotonic increase with magnetic field with a tendency to saturation, while that of the X{sup +} slightly decreases. The triplet X{sup +} and X{sup -} states, being unbound at zero magnetic field, noticeably increase their binding energy in high magnetic fields. The experimental evidence for the interaction between the triplet and singlet states of lTions leading to their anticrossing in magnetic fields has been found.

  9. Elasticity of Lyotropic Chromonic Liquid Crystals Probed by Director Reorientation in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuang; Nastishin, Yu. A.; Omelchenko, M. M.; Tortora, L.; Nazarenko, V. G.; Boiko, O. P.; Ostapenko, T.; Hu, T.; Almasan, C. C.; Sprunt, S. N.; Gleeson, J. T.; Lavrentovich, O. D.

    2012-07-01

    Using a magnetic Frederiks transition technique, we measure the temperature and concentration dependences of splay K1, twist K2, and bend K3 elastic constants for the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal sunset yellow formed through noncovalent reversible aggregation of organic molecules in water. K1 and K3 are comparable to each other and are an order of magnitude higher than K2. At higher concentrations and lower temperatures, K1 and the ratios K1/K3 and K1/K2 increase, which is attributed to elongation of self-assembled lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal aggregates, a feature not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals formed by covalently bound units of a fixed length.

  10. Elasticity of lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals probed by director reorientation in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang; Nastishin, Yu A; Omelchenko, M M; Tortora, L; Nazarenko, V G; Boiko, O P; Ostapenko, T; Hu, T; Almasan, C C; Sprunt, S N; Gleeson, J T; Lavrentovich, O D

    2012-07-20

    Using a magnetic Frederiks transition technique, we measure the temperature and concentration dependences of splay K1, twist K2, and bend K3 elastic constants for the lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal sunset yellow formed through noncovalent reversible aggregation of organic molecules in water. K1 and K3 are comparable to each other and are an order of magnitude higher than K2. At higher concentrations and lower temperatures, K1 and the ratios K1/K3 and K1/K2 increase, which is attributed to elongation of self-assembled lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal aggregates, a feature not found in conventional thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals formed by covalently bound units of a fixed length. PMID:22861899

  11. Proton probing measurement of electric and magnetic fields generated by ns and ps laser-matter interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Romagnani; M. Borghesi; C. A. Cecchetti; S. Kar; P. Antici; P. Audebert; S. Bandhoupadjay; F. Ceccherini; T. Cowan; J. Fuchs; M. Galimberti; L. A. Gizzi; T. Grismayer; R. Heathcote; R. Jung; T. V. Liseykina; A. Macchi; P. Mora; D. Neely; M. Notley; J. Osterholtz; G. PRETZLER; A. SCHIAVI; G. SCHURTZ; T. TONCIAN; P. A. WILSON; O. WILLI

    2008-01-01

    The use of laser-accelerated protons as a particle probe for the detection of electric fields in plasmas has led in recent years to a wealth of novel information regarding the ultrafast plasma dynamics following high intensity laser-matter interactions. The high spatial quality and short duration of these beams have been essential to this purpose. We will discuss some of the

  12. Magnetically modulated fluorescent probes in turbid media

    E-print Network

    Yang,; Chen, Hongyu; Anker, Jeffrey N

    2010-01-01

    Magnetically modulated optical nanoprobes (MagMOONs) were used to detect and distinguish probe fluorescence from autofluorescent backgrounds in turbid media. MagMOONs are micro/nano-sized particles with magnetically controlled orientation and orientation-dependent fluorescence. These probes blink when they rotate in response to rotating external magnetic fields. This blinking signal can be separated from backgrounds enabling spectrochemical sensing in media with strong autofluorescence. We explore the effect of scattering on MagMOON fluorescence. Turbid media reduce the modulated MagMOON signal due to a combination of attenuation of fluorescence signal and reduction in contrast between "On" and "Off" states. The blinking MagMOON fluorescence spectrum can be detected in turbid non-dairy creamer solution with extinction 2.0, and through 9 mm of chicken breast tissue, suggesting that whole mouse imaging is feasible by using this strategy.

  13. Constraint on the primordial vector mode and its magnetic field generation from seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2012-02-01

    It is often stated that the cosmological vector mode has only a decaying mode and gives negligible effects on cosmological observations. The vector mode, however, has a growing mode if there exists anisotropic stress in energy distributions in the universe. In this paper, we consider a primordial vector mode sustained by free-streaming neutrinos and its associated magnetic field generation. First, we put an observational constraint on the amount of the vector mode from the 7-year WMAP data. The constraint is found as rv?-(r)/(40)+0.012, where rv and r are the amounts of vector and tensor perturbation amplitudes with respect to the scalar one, respectively. Second, we calculate the spectrum of magnetic fields inevitably created from the primordial vector mode, given the constraint on rv. It is found that the maximum amount of magnetic fields generated from the vector mode is given by B?10-22G((rv)/(0.012))1/2((k)/(0.002))(nv+1)/2, with nv being a spectral index of the vector mode. We find a nontrivial cancellation of the magnetic field generation in the radiation-dominated era, which creates a characteristic cutoff in the magnetic field spectrum around k?1.0Mpc-1.

  14. Probe measurements in the REPUTE-1 reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Toyama, H.; Yamagishi, K.; Shinohara, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Miyamoto, K. (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan))

    1991-10-01

    A four-channel triple-probe and magnetic-probe array, a complex probe which consists of three types of probes and two eight-channel magnetic-probe (poloidal and toroidal) arrays, has been installed in the revised field pinch University of Tokyo experiment (REPUTE-1) reversed field pinch (RFP) device. Mean and fluctuation parts of plasma parameters, including the three components of magnetic fields, three components of electric fields, electron density, electron temperature, and space potential, are measured in 0.5{ital a}{approx lt}{ital r}{le}{ital a} region. The triple-probe method and the electric field measurement are described in detail, and effects due to the fast electrons, etc., are discussed. Some experimental examples obtained in the REPUTE-1 RFP plasma are given, and the detailed results will be published elsewhere.

  15. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-12-31

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  16. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  17. Research of optical electric field probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wan; Li, Bin; Chen, Jingyao; Wang, Jifeng; Lu, Guizhen

    2012-10-01

    As an important modern measurement equipment of the electromagnetic field, electric field probe can measure the industrial, scientific and medical aspects of the leakage field. In the Electro Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) experiment, it can also check the high-frequency-sensitive parts of the devices and the parasitic radiations due to the mechanical movement. Especially in the field of Electromagnetic Compatibility, electric field probe is one of the most important test equipment. This paper introduces a type of optical electric field probe. In the system, a kind of antenna, which could provide a response nearly isotropic for all polarizations of the incident field, is used for receiving the signal of the electric field. The high-frequency signal received by the antenna then is detected by Schottky barrier diode detector. This low-frequency or Direct Current (DC) signal can be modulated to the band of light by the Electro-Absorption-Distributed Feed Back (EA-DFB) modulator, thus the probe can provide a wild band responds. Through the optical fiber, the optical signal is sent to the photoelectric detector. Based on the optical power value, the field intensity can be calculated. In this system, compared with traditional transmission line, optical fiber can minimize the electromagnetic interference and transmission-line attenuation. In addition to this, the system also has high test sensitivity and wide measurement bandwidth. Furthermore, the whole system has a simple structure and low manufacturing cost.

  18. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  19. A new method of measuring the poloidal magnetic and radial electric fields in a tokamak using a laser-accelerated ion-beam trace probe

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. Y.; Chen, Y. H.; Lin, C.; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J., E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn [State Key Labaratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, L. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, M. [Center for Fusion Science of Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Both the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) and radial electric field (E{sub r}) are significant in magnetic confinement devices. In this paper, a new method was proposed to diagnose both B{sub p} and E{sub r} at the same time, which was named Laser-accelerated Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP). This method based on the laser-accelerated ion beam, which has three properties: large energy spread, short pulse lengths, and multiple charge states. LITP can provide the 1D profiles, or 2D images of both B{sub p} and E{sub r}. In this paper, we present the basic principle and some preliminary theoretical results.

  20. Molecules as magnetic probes of starspots

    E-print Network

    Afram, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    Stellar dynamo processes can be explored by measuring the magnetic field. This is usually obtained using the atomic and molecular Zeeman effect in spectral lines. While the atomic Zeeman effect can only access warmer regions, the use of molecular lines is of advantage for studying cool objects. The molecules MgH, TiO, CaH, and FeH are suited to probe stellar magnetic fields, each one for a different range of spectral types, by considering the signal that is obtained from modeling various spectral types. We have analyzed the usefulness of different molecules (MgH, TiO, CaH, and FeH) as diagnostic tools for studying stellar magnetism on active G-K-M dwarfs. We investigate the temperature range in which the selected molecules can serve as indicators for magnetic fields on highly active cool stars and present synthetic Stokes profiles for the modeled spectral type. We modeled a star with a spot size of 10% of the stellar disk and a spot comprising either only longitudinal or only transverse magnetic fields and es...

  1. Magnetic fields in astrophysics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ia. B. Zeldovich; A. A. Ruzmaikin; D. D. Sokolov

    1983-01-01

    The evidence of cosmic magnetism is examined, taking into account the Zeeman effect, beats in atomic transitions, the Hanle effect, Faraday rotation, gyro-lines, and the strength and scale of magnetic fields in astrophysics. The origin of magnetic fields is considered along with dynamos, the conditions for magnetic field generation, the topology of flows, magnetic fields in stationary flows, kinematic turbulent

  2. OH MASER SOURCES IN W49N: PROBING MAGNETIC FIELD AND DIFFERENTIAL ANISOTROPIC SCATTERING WITH ZEEMAN PAIRS USING THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Avinash A. [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Mendoza-Torres, J. E., E-mail: desh@rri.res.in, E-mail: mgoss@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: mend@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Optica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico)

    2013-09-20

    Our analysis of a Very Long Baseline Array 12 hr synthesis observation of the OH masers in the well-known star-forming region W49N has yielded valuable data that enable us to probe distributions of magnetic fields in both the maser columns and the intervening interstellar medium (ISM). The data, consisting of detailed high angular resolution images (with beam width ?20 mas) of several dozen OH maser sources, or spots, at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz, reveal anisotropic scatter broadening with typical sizes of a few tens of milliarcseconds and axial ratios between 1.5 and 3. Such anisotropies have been reported previously by Desai et al. and have been interpreted as being induced by the local magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. However, we find (1) apparent angular sizes of, on average, a factor of about 2.5 less than those reported by Desai et al., indicating significantly less scattering than inferred previously, and (2) a significant deviation in the average orientation of the scatter-broadened images (by ?10°) from that implied by the magnetic field in the Galactic plane. More intriguingly, for a few Zeeman pairs in our set, significant differences (up to 6?) are apparent in the scatter-broadened images for the two hands of circular polarization, even when the apparent velocity separation is less than 0.1 km s{sup –1}. This may possibly be the first example of a Faraday rotation contribution to the diffractive effects in the ISM. Using the Zeeman pairs, we also study the distribution of the magnetic field in the W49N complex, finding no significant trend in the spatial structure function. In this paper, we present the details of our observations and analysis leading to these findings, discuss implications of our results for the intervening anisotropic magneto-ionic medium, and suggest possible implications for the structure of magnetic fields within this star-forming region.

  3. OH Maser Sources in W49N: Probing Magnetic Field and Differential Anisotropic Scattering with Zeeman Pairs Using the Very Long Baseline Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Avinash A.; Goss, W. M.; Mendoza-Torres, J. E.

    2013-09-01

    Our analysis of a Very Long Baseline Array 12 hr synthesis observation of the OH masers in the well-known star-forming region W49N has yielded valuable data that enable us to probe distributions of magnetic fields in both the maser columns and the intervening interstellar medium (ISM). The data, consisting of detailed high angular resolution images (with beam width ~20 mas) of several dozen OH maser sources, or spots, at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz, reveal anisotropic scatter broadening with typical sizes of a few tens of milliarcseconds and axial ratios between 1.5 and 3. Such anisotropies have been reported previously by Desai et al. and have been interpreted as being induced by the local magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. However, we find (1) apparent angular sizes of, on average, a factor of about 2.5 less than those reported by Desai et al., indicating significantly less scattering than inferred previously, and (2) a significant deviation in the average orientation of the scatter-broadened images (by ~10°) from that implied by the magnetic field in the Galactic plane. More intriguingly, for a few Zeeman pairs in our set, significant differences (up to 6?) are apparent in the scatter-broadened images for the two hands of circular polarization, even when the apparent velocity separation is less than 0.1 km s-1. This may possibly be the first example of a Faraday rotation contribution to the diffractive effects in the ISM. Using the Zeeman pairs, we also study the distribution of the magnetic field in the W49N complex, finding no significant trend in the spatial structure function. In this paper, we present the details of our observations and analysis leading to these findings, discuss implications of our results for the intervening anisotropic magneto-ionic medium, and suggest possible implications for the structure of magnetic fields within this star-forming region.

  4. Exploring Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners explore the magnetic field of a bar magnet as an introduction to understanding Earth's magnetic field. First, learners explore and play with magnets and compasses. Then, learners trace the field lines of the magnet using the compass on a large piece of paper. This activity will also demonstrate why prominences are always "loops."

  5. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothesis passes the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale range. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length-scale 1/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy-overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small-scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magnetogeostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order 120 years is pseudo-scale-invariant. Magnetic spectra of other planets may differ; however, if a transition to non-conducting fluid hydrogen in Jupiter acts as a barrier to vertical flow, as well as current, then the shape of the jovi-magnetic spectrum could be remarkably Earth-like.

  6. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynmcal hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothes pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at lentgh-scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core- mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order l20 years is pseudo-scale-invarient. Magnetic spectra of other planets may differ; however, if a transition to non-conductmg fluid hydrogen in Jupiter acts as barrier to vertical flow, as well as current, then the shape of the jovi-magnetic spectrum could be remarkably Earth-like.

  7. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    E-print Network

    Walker, Mitchell

    Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe MFFP to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance

  8. Exploring Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about magnetic fields. Using iron filings, learners will observe magnets in various arrangements to investigate the magnetic field lines of force. This information is then related to magnetic loops on the Sun's surface and the magnetic field of the Earth. This is the second activity in the Exploring the Earth's Magnetic Field: An IMAGE Satellite Guide to the Magnetosphere educators guide.

  9. Probing the local strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic nanocomposites by magnetic field-assisted piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Caruntu, Gabriel; Yourdkhani, Amin; Vopsaroiu, Marian; Srinivasan, Gopalan

    2012-05-21

    The magnetoelectric effect that occurs in multiferroic materials is fully described by the magnetoelectric coupling coefficient induced either electrically or magnetically. This is rather well understood in bulk multiferroics, but it is not known whether the magnetoelectric coupling properties are retained at nanometre length scales in nanostructured multiferroics. The main challenges are related to measurement difficulties of the coupling at nanoscale, as well as the fabrication of suitable nano-multiferroic samples. Addressing these issues is an important prerequisite for the implementation of multiferroics in future nanoscale devices and sensors. In this paper we report on the local measurement of the magnetoelectric coefficient in bilayered ceramic nanocomposites from the variation in the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of the electrostrictive layer in the presence of a magnetic field. The experimental data were analyzed using a theoretical relationship linking the piezoelectric coefficient to the magneto-electric coupling coefficient. Our results confirm the presence of a measurable magnetoelectric coupling in bilayered nanocomposites constructed by a perovskite as the electrostrictive phase and two different ferrites (cubic spinel and hexagonal) as the magnetic phases. The reported experimental values as well as our theoretical approach are both in good agreement with previously published data for bulk and nanostructure magnetoelectric multiferroics. PMID:22522318

  10. Exploring Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students investigate the presence of magnetic fields around magnets, the sun and the earth. They will explore magnetic field lines, understand that magnetic lines of force show the strength and direction of magnetic fields, determine how field lines interact between attracting and repelling magnetic poles, and discover that the earth and sun have magnetic properties. They will also discover that magnetic force is invisible and that a "field of force" is a region or space in which one object can attract or repel another.

  11. Magnetic Fields Matter

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    This lesson introduces students to the effects of magnetic fields in matter addressing permanent magnets, diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, and magnetization. First students must compare the magnetic field of a solenoid to the magnetic field of a permanent magnet. Students then learn the response of diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic material to a magnetic field. Now aware of the mechanism causing a solid to respond to a field, students learn how to measure the response by looking at the net magnetic moment per unit volume of the material.

  12. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes; Operational Modes and Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C.; Crawford, D.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; MacDowall, R. J.; Connerney, J. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Needell, J.; Smith, C. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation on board the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer (MSC). These wave measurements include AC electric and magnetic fields from 10Hz to 400 kHz. AC Electric field signals are provided, on board, by the Electric Field and Waves Suite (EFW). All the instrument components are controlled by a Central Data Processing Unit (CDPU), which provides versatility in capturing data in a variety of modes. The system is designed to provide a standard cadence of survey products through the entire orbit, and burst data capture of higher cadenced data at opportune times in the orbit. A description and examples of all the operational modes are presented. Descriptions of the data products and how to access them is also presented. Data from the suite is located at a central Science Operation Center (SOC) maintained at the University of Iowa. EMFISIS data are organized to be easily viewed utilizing the freeware data visualization tool, Autoplot.

  13. Probing states with macroscopic circulations in magnetic photonic crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S T Chui; Z F Lin

    2007-01-01

    We predict that when light is reflected off a magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) there is a grazing component that is parallel to the surface; the magnitude of this component can be changed by an external field. The direction of this parallel component is reversed as the direction of the magnetization is reversed. This provides a way to probe states with

  14. Probing states with macroscopic circulations in magnetic photonic crystals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siu Tat Chui; Zhifang Lin

    2008-01-01

    We predict that when light is reflected off a magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) there is a grazing component that is parallel to the surface; the magnitude of this component can be changed by an external field. The direction of this parallel component is reversed (dotted line) as the direction of the magnetization is reversed. This provides a way to probe

  15. Electric field probes for cellular phone dosimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Howard I. Bassen

    1997-01-01

    Miniature implantable electric field probes (E-field Probes) enable the measurements of microwave electric fields induced in biological subjects by relatively low level exposures. Using these instruments, the rate of energy deposition (Specific Absorption Rate or SAR) can be determined throughout models or actual bodies of laboratory animals and humans exposed to emissions from cellular phones and other radiators. E-field probes

  16. Contributions of the electronic spin and orbital current to the CoCl{sub 4}{sup 2-} magnetic field probed in polarised neutron diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cassam-Chenaie, Patrick [Laboratoire J. A. Dieudonne, UMR 6621 du CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France); Jayatilaka, Dylan [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2012-08-14

    Polarised neutron diffraction experiments conducted at 4.2 K on Cs{sub 3}CoCl{sub 5} crystals have been analysed by using a four-dimensional model Hilbert space made of ab initio n-electron wave functions of the CoCl{sub 4}{sup 2-} molecular ion. Two spin-orbit mixing coefficients and several configuration interaction coefficients have been optimized by fitting calculated magnetic structure factors to experimental ones, to obtain the best ensemble density operator that is representable in the model space. A goodness of fit, {chi}{sup 2}, less then 1 has been obtained for the first time for the two experimental data sets available. In the present article, the optimized density operators are used to calculate the magnetic field densities that are the genuine observables probed in neutron diffraction experiments. Density maps of such observables are presented for the first time and numerical details are provided. The respective contributions of spin density and orbital current to the magnetic field density are analyzed.

  17. Molecules as magnetic probes of starspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afram, N.; Berdyugina, S. V.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Stellar dynamo processes can be explored by measuring the magnetic field. This is usually obtained using the atomic and molecular Zeeman effect in spectral lines. While the atomic Zeeman effect can only access warmer regions, the use of molecular lines is of advantage for studying cool objects. The molecules MgH, TiO, CaH, and FeH are suited to probe stellar magnetic fields, each one for a different range of spectral types, by considering the signal that is obtained from modeling various spectral types. Aims: We have analyzed the usefulness of different molecules (MgH, TiO, CaH, and FeH) as diagnostic tools for studying stellar magnetism on active G-K-M dwarfs. We investigate the temperature range in which the selected molecules can serve as indicators for magnetic fields on highly active cool stars and present synthetic Stokes profiles for the modeled spectral type. Methods: We modeled a star with a spot size of 10% of the stellar disk and a spot comprising either only longitudinal or only transverse magnetic fields and estimated the strengths of the polarization Stokes V and Q signals for the molecules MgH, TiO, CaH, and FeH. We combined various photosphere and spot models according to realistic scenarios. Results: In G dwarfs, the molecules MgH and FeH show overall the strongest Stokes V and Q signals from the starspot, whereas FeH has a stronger Stokes V signal in all G dwarfs with a spot temperature of 3800 K. In K dwarfs, CaH signals are generally stronger, and the TiO signature is most prominent in M dwarfs. Conclusions: Modeling synthetic polarization signals from starspots for a range of G-K-M dwarfs leads to differences in the prominence of various molecular signatures in different wavelength regions, which helps to efficiently select targets and exposure times for observations.

  18. Visualizing Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

    In this activity, students take the age old concept of etch-a-sketch a step further. Using iron filings, students begin visualizing magnetic field lines. To do so, students use a compass to read the direction of the magnet's magnetic field. Then, students observe the behavior of iron filings near that magnet as they rotate the filings about the magnet. Finally, students study the behavior of iron filings suspended in mineral oil which displays the magnetic field in three dimensions.

  19. What are Magnetic Fields?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about magnetic fields. Using iron filings, learners will observe magnets in various arrangements to investigate the magnetic field lines of force. This information is then related to magnetic loops on the Sun's surface and the magnetic field of the Earth. This is the second activity in the Magnetic Math booklet; this booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website.

  20. Magnetic fields of galaxies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aleksandr A. Ruzmaikin; Dmitrii D. Sokolov; Anvar M. Shukurov

    1988-01-01

    The current state of the understanding of the magnetic fields of galaxies is reviewed. A simple model of the turbulent dynamo is developed which explains the main observational features of the global magnetic fields of spiral galaxies. The generation of small-scale chaotic magnetic fields in the interstellar medium is also examined. Attention is also given to the role of magnetic

  1. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  2. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  3. Probing electric and magnetic vacuum fluctuations with quantum dots

    E-print Network

    Petru Tighineanu; Mads Lykke Andersen; Anders Søndberg Sørensen; Søren Stobbe; Peter Lodahl

    2014-04-04

    The electromagnetic-vacuum-field fluctuations are intimately linked to the process of spontaneous emission of light. Atomic emitters cannot probe electric- and magnetic-field fluctuations simultaneously because electric and magnetic transitions correspond to different selection rules. In this paper we show that semiconductor quantum dots are fundamentally different and are capable of mediating electric-dipole, magnetic-dipole, and electric-quadrupole transitions on a single electronic resonance. As a consequence, quantum dots can probe electric and magnetic fields simultaneously and can thus be applied for sensing the electromagnetic environment of complex photonic nanostructures. Our study opens the prospect of interfacing quantum dots with optical metamaterials for tailoring the electric and magnetic light-matter interaction at the single-emitter level.

  4. Probing Electric and Magnetic Vacuum Fluctuations with Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighineanu, P.; Andersen, M. L.; Sørensen, A. S.; Stobbe, S.; Lodahl, P.

    2014-07-01

    The electromagnetic-vacuum-field fluctuations are intimately linked to the process of spontaneous emission of light. Atomic emitters cannot probe electric- and magnetic-field fluctuations simultaneously because electric and magnetic transitions correspond to different selection rules. In this Letter we show that semiconductor quantum dots are fundamentally different and are capable of mediating electric-dipole, magnetic-dipole, and electric-quadrupole transitions on a single electronic resonance. As a consequence, quantum dots can probe electric and magnetic fields simultaneously and can thus be applied for sensing the electromagnetic environment of complex photonic nanostructures. Our study opens the prospect of interfacing quantum dots with optical metamaterials for tailoring the electric and magnetic light-matter interaction at the single-emitter level.

  5. Probing the magnetic topologies of magnetic clouds by means of solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) have been used as probes of magnetic cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to the interiors of many clouds indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun and hence are not plasmoids. The small modulation of galactic cosmic rays associated with clouds also suggests that the magnetic fields of clouds are not closed.

  6. Mapping Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about bar magnets and their invisible magnetic fields. Learners will experiment with magnets and a compass to detect and draw magnetic fields. This is Activity 1 of a larger resource, entitled Exploring the Sun. The NASA spacecraft missions represented by this material include SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, and SDO.

  7. An emerging population of BL Lacs with extreme properties: towards a class of EBL and cosmic magnetic field probes?

    E-print Network

    Bonnoli, Giacomo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Sbarrato, Tullia

    2015-01-01

    High energy observations of extreme BL Lac objects, such as 1ES 0229+200 or 1ES 0347-121, recently focused interest both for blazar and jet physics and for the implication on the extragalactic background light and intergalactic magnetic field estimate. However, the number of these extreme highly peaked BL Lac objects (EHBL) is still rather small. Aiming at increase their number, we selected a group of EHBL candidates starting from the BL Lac sample of Plotkin et al. (2011), considering those undetected (or only barely detected) by the Large Area Telescope onboard Fermi and characterized by a high X-ray vs. radio flux ratio. We assembled the multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution of the resulting 9 sources, profiting of publicly available archival observations performed by the Swift, Galex and Fermi satellites, confirming their nature. Through a simple one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model we estimate the expected VHE flux, finding that in the majority of cases it is within the reach of present genera...

  8. Probing Intergalactic Magnetic Fields in the GLAST Era through Pair Echo Emission from TeV Blazars

    E-print Network

    Kohta Murase; Keitaro Takahashi; Susumu Inoue; Kiyomoto Ichiki; Shigehiro Nagataki

    2008-09-04

    More than a dozen blazars are known to be emitters of multi-TeV gamma rays, often with strong and rapid flaring activity. By interacting with photons of the cosmic microwave and infrared backgrounds, these gamma rays inevitably produce electron-positron pairs, which in turn radiate secondary inverse Compton gamma rays in the GeV-TeV range with a characteristic time delay that depends on the properties of the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF). For sufficiently weak IGMF, such "pair echo" emission may be detectable by the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), providing valuable information on the IGMF. We perform detailed calculations of the time-dependent spectra of pair echos from flaring TeV blazars such as Mrk 501 and PKS 2155-304, taking proper account of the echo geometry and other crucial effects. In some cases, the presence of a weak but non-zero IGMF may enhance the detectability of echos. We discuss the quantitative constraints that can be imposed on the IGMF from GLAST observations, including the case of non-detections.

  9. The Declining Magnetic Field

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about the declining strength of Earth's magnetic field. Learners will review a graph of magnetic field intensity and calculate the amount by which the field has changed its intensity in the last century, the rate of change of its intensity, and when the field should decrease to zero strength at the current rate of change. Learners will also use evidence from relevant sources to create a conjecture on the effects on Earth of a vanished magnetic field. Access to information sources about Earth's magnetic field strength is needed for this activity. This is Activity 7 in the Exploring Magnetism on Earth teachers guide.

  10. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Evaluation of a Magnetically-Filtered Faraday Probe for

    E-print Network

    Walker, Mitchell

    of a magnetically-filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, boxed Faraday probe (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operated

  11. Probes for investigating the effect of magnetic field, field orientation, temperature and strain on the critical current density of anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes in a split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunwong, P.; Higgins, J. S.; Hampshire, D. P.

    2014-06-01

    We present the designs of probes for making critical current density (Jc) measurements on anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes as a function of field, field orientation, temperature and strain in our 40 mm bore, split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet. Emphasis is placed on the design of three components: the vapour-cooled current leads, the variable temperature enclosure, and the springboard-shaped bending beam sample holder. The vapour-cooled brass critical-current leads used superconducting tapes and in operation ran hot with a duty cycle (D) of ˜0.2. This work provides formulae for optimising cryogenic consumption and calculating cryogenic boil-off, associated with current leads used to make Jc measurements, made by uniformly ramping the current up to a maximum current (Imax) and then reducing the current very quickly to zero. They include consideration of the effects of duty cycle, static helium boil-off from the magnet and Dewar (b'), and the maximum safe temperature for the critical-current leads (Tmax). Our optimized critical-current leads have a boil-off that is about 30% less than leads optimized for magnet operation at the same maximum current. Numerical calculations show that the optimum cross-sectional area (A) for each current lead can be parameterized by LI_{max} /A = [1.46D^{ - 0.18} L^{0.4} (T_{max } - 300)^{0.25D^{ - 0.09} } + 750(b^' /I_{max })D^{10^{ - 3} I_{max } - 2.87b^' }] × 10^6 A m^{ - 1} where L is the current lead's length and the current lead is operated in liquid helium. An optimum A of 132 mm2 is obtained when Imax = 1000 A, Tmax = 400 K, D = 0.2, b' = 0.3 l h-1 and L = 1.0 m. The optimized helium consumption was found to be 0.7 l h-1. When the static boil-off is small, optimized leads have a boil-off that can be roughly parameterized by: b/Imax ? (1.35 × 10-3)D0.41 l h-1 A-1. A split-current-lead design is employed to minimize the rotation of the probes during the high current measurements in our high-field horizontal magnet. The variable-temperature system is based on the use of an inverted insulating cup that operates above 4.2 K in liquid helium and above 77.4 K in liquid nitrogen, with a stability of ±80 mK to ±150 mK. Uniaxial strains of -1.4% to 1.0% can be applied to the sample, with a total uncertainty of better than ±0.02%, using a modified bending beam apparatus which includes a copper beryllium springboard-shaped sample holder.

  12. Probes for investigating the effect of magnetic field, field orientation, temperature and strain on the critical current density of anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes in a split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet.

    PubMed

    Sunwong, P; Higgins, J S; Hampshire, D P

    2014-06-01

    We present the designs of probes for making critical current density (Jc) measurements on anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes as a function of field, field orientation, temperature and strain in our 40 mm bore, split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet. Emphasis is placed on the design of three components: the vapour-cooled current leads, the variable temperature enclosure, and the springboard-shaped bending beam sample holder. The vapour-cooled brass critical-current leads used superconducting tapes and in operation ran hot with a duty cycle (D) of ~0.2. This work provides formulae for optimising cryogenic consumption and calculating cryogenic boil-off, associated with current leads used to make J(c) measurements, made by uniformly ramping the current up to a maximum current (I(max)) and then reducing the current very quickly to zero. They include consideration of the effects of duty cycle, static helium boil-off from the magnet and Dewar (b'), and the maximum safe temperature for the critical-current leads (T(max)). Our optimized critical-current leads have a boil-off that is about 30% less than leads optimized for magnet operation at the same maximum current. Numerical calculations show that the optimum cross-sectional area (A) for each current lead can be parameterized by LI(max)/A = [1.46D(-0.18)L(0.4)(T(max) - 300)(0.25D(-0.09)) + 750(b'/I(max))D(10(-3)I(max)-2.87b') × 10? A m?¹ where L is the current lead's length and the current lead is operated in liquid helium. An optimum A of 132 mm(2) is obtained when I(max) = 1000 A, T(max) = 400 K, D = 0.2, b' = 0.3 l?h(-1) and L = 1.0 m. The optimized helium consumption was found to be 0.7 l?h(-1). When the static boil-off is small, optimized leads have a boil-off that can be roughly parameterized by: b/I(max)? ? (1.35 × 10(-3))D(0.41) l?h(?1)?A(-1). A split-current-lead design is employed to minimize the rotation of the probes during the high current measurements in our high-field horizontal magnet. The variable-temperature system is based on the use of an inverted insulating cup that operates above 4.2 K in liquid helium and above 77.4 K in liquid nitrogen, with a stability of ±80 mK to ±150 mK. Uniaxial strains of -1.4% to 1.0% can be applied to the sample, with a total uncertainty of better than ±0.02%, using a modified bending beam apparatus which includes a copper beryllium springboard-shaped sample holder. PMID:24985856

  13. Probes for investigating the effect of magnetic field, field orientation, temperature and strain on the critical current density of anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes in a split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwong, P.; Higgins, J. S.; Hampshire, D. P. [Superconductivity Group, Centre for Materials Physics, Department of Physics, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    We present the designs of probes for making critical current density (J{sub c}) measurements on anisotropic high-temperature superconducting tapes as a function of field, field orientation, temperature and strain in our 40 mm bore, split-pair 15 T horizontal magnet. Emphasis is placed on the design of three components: the vapour-cooled current leads, the variable temperature enclosure, and the springboard-shaped bending beam sample holder. The vapour-cooled brass critical-current leads used superconducting tapes and in operation ran hot with a duty cycle (D) of ?0.2. This work provides formulae for optimising cryogenic consumption and calculating cryogenic boil-off, associated with current leads used to make J{sub c} measurements, made by uniformly ramping the current up to a maximum current (I{sub max}) and then reducing the current very quickly to zero. They include consideration of the effects of duty cycle, static helium boil-off from the magnet and Dewar (b{sup ?}), and the maximum safe temperature for the critical-current leads (T{sub max}). Our optimized critical-current leads have a boil-off that is about 30% less than leads optimized for magnet operation at the same maximum current. Numerical calculations show that the optimum cross-sectional area (A) for each current lead can be parameterized by LI{sub max}/A=[1.46D{sup ?0.18}L{sup 0.4}(T{sub max}?300){sup 0.25D{sup ?{sup 0{sup .{sup 0{sup 9}}}}}}+750(b{sup ?}/I{sub max})D{sup 10{sup ?{sup 3I{sub m}{sub a}{sub x}?2.87b{sup ?}}}}]× 10{sup 6}A m{sup ?1} where L is the current lead's length and the current lead is operated in liquid helium. An optimum A of 132 mm{sup 2} is obtained when I{sub max} = 1000 A, T{sub max} = 400 K, D = 0.2, b{sup ?} = 0.3 l?h{sup ?1} and L = 1.0 m. The optimized helium consumption was found to be 0.7 l?h{sup ?1}. When the static boil-off is small, optimized leads have a boil-off that can be roughly parameterized by: b/I{sub max?} ? (1.35 × 10{sup ?3})D{sup 0.41} l?h{sup ?1}?A{sup ?1}. A split-current-lead design is employed to minimize the rotation of the probes during the high current measurements in our high-field horizontal magnet. The variable-temperature system is based on the use of an inverted insulating cup that operates above 4.2 K in liquid helium and above 77.4 K in liquid nitrogen, with a stability of ±80 mK to ±150 mK. Uniaxial strains of ?1.4% to 1.0% can be applied to the sample, with a total uncertainty of better than ±0.02%, using a modified bending beam apparatus which includes a copper beryllium springboard-shaped sample holder.

  14. Spin-lattice coupling in uranium dioxide probed by magnetostriction measurements at high magnetic fields (P08358-E001-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    K. Gofryk; M. Jaime

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions Our preliminary magnetostriction measurements have already shown a strong interplay of lattice dynamic and magnetism in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states, and give unambiguous evidence of strong spin- phonon coupling in uranium dioxide. Further studies are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in magnetic and paramagnetic states and details of the spin-phonon coupling.

  15. Exploring Magnetic Fields in Your Environment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson about measuring magnetic field directions of Earth and in the environment. First, learners go outside, far away from buildings, power lines, or anything electrical or metal, and use compasses to identify magnetic North. Next, they use the compasses to probe whether there are any sources of magnetic fields in the local environment, including around electronic equipment such as a CD player and speakers. This is the first lesson in the second session of the Exploring Magnetism teacher guide.

  16. The Magnetic Field

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jeffrey Barker

    This demonstration of the magnetic field lines of Earth uses a bar magnet, iron filings, and a compass. The site explains how to measure the magnetic field of the Earth by measuring the direction a compass points from various points on the surface. There is also an explanation of why the north magnetic pole on Earth is actually, by definition, the south pole of a magnet.

  17. Drawing Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students use a compass and a permanent magnet to trace the magnetic field lines produced by the magnet. By positioning the compass in enough spots around the magnet, the overall magnet field will be evident from the collection of arrows representing the direction of the compass needle. In activities 3 and 4 of this unit, students will use this information to design a way to solve the grand challenge of separating metal for a recycling company.

  18. Electricity and Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    VU Bioengineering RET Program,

    The grand challenge for this legacy cycle unit is for students to design a way to help a recycler separate aluminum from steel scrap metal. In previous lessons, they have looked at how magnetism might be utilized. In this lesson, students think about how they might use magnets and how they might confront the problem of turning the magnetic field off. Through the accompanying activity students explore the nature of an electrically induced magnetic field and its applicability to the needed magnet.

  19. Magnetic fields at Neptune

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. F. Ness; M. H. Acuna; L. F. Burlaga; J. E. P. Connerney; R. P. Lepping; F. M. Neubauer

    1989-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10⁻⁵ gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a

  20. Appendix E: Software MEASURING CONSTANT MAGNETIC FIELD

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    , and the Guide Box, shown below. The Guide Box will give you directions and tasks to perform. It will also tell "degree" will make a plot of magnetic field strength as a function of angle (B vs. ). Click "OK" when you. This process is called "zeroing the Hall probe" in the Guide Box. Place the magnetic field sensor wand

  1. Manipulation of molecular structures with magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marius Iosif Boamfa

    2003-01-01

    The present thesis deals with the use of magnetic fields as a handle to manipulate matter at a molecular level and as a tool to probe molecular properties or inter molecular interactions. The work consists of in situ optical studies of (polymer) liquid crystals and molecular aggregates in high magnetic fields up to 20T, together with a description of the

  2. Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet

    E-print Network

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet produces a magnetic field, B Set up a B field two ways: Moving electrically charged particles Current in a wire Intrinsic magnetic field Basic) Opposite magnetic poles attract like magnetic poles repel #12;Like the electric field lines

  3. Quantitative magnetic force microscopy on permalloy dots using an iron filled carbon nanotube probe.

    PubMed

    Wolny, F; Obukhov, Y; Mühl, T; Weissker, U; Philippi, S; Leonhardt, A; Banerjee, P; Reed, A; Xiang, G; Adur, R; Lee, I; Hauser, A J; Yang, F Y; Pelekhov, D V; Büchner, B; Hammel, P C

    2011-07-01

    An iron filled carbon nanotube (FeCNT), a 10-40 nm ferromagnetic nanowire enclosed in a protective carbon tube, is an attractive candidate for a magnetic force microscopy (MFM) probe as it provides a mechanically and chemically robust, nanoscale probe. We demonstrate the probe's capabilities with images of the magnetic field gradients close to the surface of a Py dot in both the multi-domain and vortex states. We show the FeCNT probe is accurately described by a single magnetic monopole located at its tip. Its effective magnetic charge is determined by the diameter of the iron wire and its saturation magnetization 4?M(s) ? 2.2 × 10(4)G. A magnetic monopole probe is advantageous as it enables quantitative measurements of the magnetic field gradient close to the sample surface. The lateral resolution is defined by the diameter of the iron wire and the probe-sample separation. PMID:21864777

  4. The Square Kilometre Array: A new probe of cosmic magnetism

    E-print Network

    Bryan M. Gaensler

    2006-03-02

    Magnetic fields are a fundamental part of many astrophysical phenomena, but the evolution, structure and origin of magnetic fields are still unresolved problems in physics and astrophysics. When and how were the first fields generated? Are present-day magnetic fields the result of standard dynamo action, or do they represent rapid or recent field amplification through other processes? What role do magnetic fields play in turbulence, cosmic ray acceleration and structure formation? I explain how the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a next-generation radio telescope, can deliver stunning new data-sets that will address these currently unanswered issues. The foundation for these experiments will be an all-sky survey of rotation measures, in which Faraday rotation toward >10^7 background sources will provide a dense grid for probing magnetism in the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, and in distant galaxies, clusters and protogalaxies. Using these data, we can map out the evolution of magnetized structures from redshifts z > 3 to the present, can distinguish between different origins for seed magnetic fields in galaxies, and can develop a detailed model of the magnetic field geometry of the intergalactic medium and of the overall Universe. In addition, the SKA will certainly discover new magnetic phenomena beyond what we can currently predict or imagine.

  5. Magnetic Field Problem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    The above animations represent two typical bar magnets each with a North and South pole. The arrows represent the direction of the magnetic field. The color of the arrows represents the magnitude of the field with magnitude increasing as the color changes from blue to green to red to black. You may drag either magnet and double-click anywhere inside the animation to add a magnetic field line, and mouse-down to read the magnitude of the magnetic field at that point.

  6. Magnetic microwire probes for the magnetic rod interfacial stress rheometer.

    PubMed

    Tajuelo, J; Pastor, J M; Martínez-Pedrero, F; Vázquez, M; Ortega, F; Rubio, R G; Rubio, M A

    2015-02-01

    The magnetic needle interfacial shear rheometer is a valuable tool for the study of the mechanical properties of thin fluid films or monolayers. However, it is difficult to differentiate the interfacial and subphase contributions to the drag on the needle. In principle, the problem can be addressed by decreasing the needle diameter, which decreases the bulk contribution while the interfacial contribution remains essentially the same. Here we show the results obtained when using a new type of needle, that of magnetic microwires with diameter approximately 10 times thinner than for commercial needles. We show that the lower inertia of the microwires calls for a new calibration procedure. We propose such a new calibration procedure based on the flow field solution around the needle introduced in refs 1 and 2. By measuring thin silicone oil films with well-controlled interfacial viscosities as well as eicosanol (C20) and pentadecanoic acid (PDA, C15) Langmuir monolayers, we show that the new calibration method works well for standard needles as well as for the microwire probes. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the force terms contributing to the force on the needle helps to ascertain whether the measurements obtained are reliable for given surface shear viscosity values. We also show that the microwire probes have at least a 10-fold-lower resolution limit, allowing one to measure interfacial viscosities as low as 10(-7) N·m/s. PMID:25495270

  7. Mapping Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is a lesson about the magnetic field of a bar magnet. The lesson begins with an introductory discussion with learners about magnetism to draw out any misconceptions that may be in their minds. Then, learners freely experiment with bar magnets and various materials, such as paper clips, rulers, copper or aluminum wire, and pencils, to discover that magnets attract metals containing iron, nickel, and/or cobalt but not most other materials. Next, learners experiment with using a magnetic compass to discover how it is affected by the magnet and then draw the magnetic field lines of the magnet by putting dots at the location of the compass arrow. This is the first lesson in the first session of the Exploring Magnetism teacher guide.

  8. The Jupiter Gravity and Magnetics Mission: Probing Jupiter's Internal Structure and Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. R. Spilker; E. J. Smith; N. Murphy

    1996-01-01

    The Jupiter Gravity and Magnetics Mission would use gravity field measurements from Radio Science Celestial Mechanics (CM) experiments, magnetic field measurements by a Scalar\\/Vector Helium Magnetometer, and Radio Science Atmospheric Occultations to probe Jupiter's interior and tropospheric structure and interior processes. In addition to probing Jupiter's interior structure, the CM investigation is sensitive to the tropospheric zone-belt structure's penetration depth,

  9. Probing states with macroscopic circulations in magnetic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, S. T.; Lin, Z. F.

    2007-10-01

    We predict that when light is reflected off a magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) there is a grazing component that is parallel to the surface; the magnitude of this component can be changed by an external field. The direction of this parallel component is reversed as the direction of the magnetization is reversed. This provides a way to probe states with macroscopic circulations inside the MPC.

  10. Probing states with macroscopic circulations in magnetic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tat Chui, Siu; Lin, Zhifang

    2008-03-01

    We predict that when light is reflected off a magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) there is a grazing component that is parallel to the surface; the magnitude of this component can be changed by an external field. The direction of this parallel component is reversed (dotted line) as the direction of the magnetization is reversed. This provides a way to probe states with macroscopic circulations inside the MPC.

  11. Probing states with macroscopic circulations in magnetic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Chui, S T; Lin, Z F

    2007-10-10

    We predict that when light is reflected off a magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) there is a grazing component that is parallel to the surface; the magnitude of this component can be changed by an external field. The direction of this parallel component is reversed as the direction of the magnetization is reversed. This provides a way to probe states with macroscopic circulations inside the MPC. PMID:22049131

  12. Mapping Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about magnetism. Using bar magnets, classroom materials, and a compass, learners will explore how bar magnets interact with one another and with other materials, use a compass to find the direction north, and use various materials to make magnetic field lines visible around a bar magnet. This is an activity in a larger poster resource, entitled The Sun Like It's Never Been Seen Before: In 3D.

  13. The Magnetic Field

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Windows to the Universe

    1997-12-03

    This webpage is part of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Windows to the Universe program. It describes the nature and configuration of magnetic fields, which are the result of moving electric charges, including how they cause magnetic objects to orient themselves along the direction of the magnetic force points, which are illustrated as lines. Magnetic field lines by convention point outwards at the north magnetic pole and inward at the south magnetic pole. The site features text, scientific illustrations and an animation. Text and vocabulary are selectable for the beginning, intermediate, or advanced reader.

  14. Internal field probing of translating FRCs

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.T.; Chrien, R.E.; Milroy, R.D.

    1984-11-01

    Magnetic field probes have been employed to study the internal field structure of Field-Reversed Configurations (FRCs) translating past the probes in the FRX-C/T device. Internal closed flux surfaces can be studied in this manner with minimal perturbation because of the rapid transit of the plasma (translation velocity v/sub z/ approx. 10 cm/..mu..s). Data have been taken using a 5-mtorr-D/sub 2/ gas-puff mode of operation in the FRC source coil which yields an initial plasma density of approx. 1 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/ and x/sub s/ approx. 0.40. FRCs translate from the approx. 25 cm radius source coil into a 20 cm radius metal translation vessel. Of many translation conditions studied, the condition considered here is translation into a weak guide field resulting in expansion of the FRC to conditions of density approx. 3 x 10/sup 14/ and x/sub s/ approx. 0.7. The expected reversed B/sub z/ structure is observed. Evidence of island structure is also observed. Fluctuating levels of B/sub THETA/ are observed with amplitudes less than or equal to B/sub 0//3 and values of flux approx. 4 x the poloidal flux. Values of ..beta.. on the separatrix of ..beta../sub s/ approx. = 0.3 (indexed to the external field) are implied from the field measurements. This decrease of ..beta../sub s/ with increased x/sub s/ is expected, and desirable for improved plasma confinement.

  15. Magnetic Field Distribution of Permanent Magnet Magnetized by Static Magnetic Field Generated by HTS Bulk Magnet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuo Oka; Nobutaka Kawasaki; Satoshi Fukui; Jun Ogawa; Takao Sato; Toshihisa Terasawa; Yoshitaka Itoh; Ryohei Yabuno

    2012-01-01

    Demagnetized rare earth magnets (Nd-Fe-B) can be fully magnetized by scanning them in the intense static fields over 3 T of a HTS bulk magnet which was cooled to the temperature range lower than 77K with use of cryo-coolers and activated by the field of 5 T. We precisely examined the magnetic field distributions of magnetized permanent magnets. The magnetic

  16. Spectra of magnetic fields injected during baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Yifung [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Vachaspati, Tanmay [CERCA, Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7079 (United States); Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Helical magnetic fields are injected into the cosmic medium during cosmological baryogenesis and can potentially provide a useful probe of the early universe. We construct a model to study the injection process during a first order phase transition and to determine the power spectra of the injected magnetic field. By Monte Carlo simulations we evaluate the Fourier space symmetric and helical power spectra of the magnetic field at the time the phase transition completes. The spectra are peaked at the scale given by the inverse size of bubbles at percolation and with a comparable width. These injected magnetic fields set the initial conditions for further cosmological magneto-hydrodynamical evolution.

  17. Photodetachment in magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Larson; R. Stoneman

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of the photodetachment cross section, near threshold, for atomic negative ioris in a magnetic field is described and illustrated with data on photodetachment of electrons from negative sulfur ions. The effect of the final state interaction is discussed and the photodetachment of atomic negative ions in a magnetic field is compared to photoionization of neutral atoms in a

  18. Magnetic field line Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-01

    The magnetic field line Hamiltonian and the associated canonical form for the magnetic field are important concepts both for understanding toroidal plasma physics and for practical calculations. A number of important properties of the canonical or Hamiltonian representation are derived and their importance is explained.

  19. Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino; Dal Pino

    2006-01-01

    Most of the visible matter in the Universe is in a plasma state, or more specifically is composed of ionized or partially ionized gas permeated by magnetic fields. Thanks to recent advances on the theory and detection of cosmic magnetic fields there has been a worldwide growing interest in the study of their role on the formation of astrophysical sources

  20. Thermodynamics of the Magnetic-Field-Induced \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Chandler Riggs

    2010-01-01

    High magnetic fields are used to kill superconductivity and probe what happens to system when it cannot reach the ideal ground state, i.e. what is the normal-state ground state? Early work in High-Tc, where the application of magnetic field destroyed the zero resistance state and recovered a resistivity value that connected continuously with the zero field curve, lead people to

  1. Cosmological magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Roy Maartens

    2000-07-24

    Magnetic fields are observed not only in stars, but in galaxies, clusters, and even high redshift Lyman-alpha systems. In principle, these fields could play an important role in structure formation and also affect the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). The study of cosmological magnetic fields aims not only to quantify these effects on large-scale structure and the CMB, but also to answer one of the outstanding puzzles of modern cosmology: when and how do magnetic fields originate? They are either primordial, i.e. created before the onset of structure formation, or they are generated during the process of structure formation itself.

  2. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mendez, J.

    This web page, authored and curated by David P. Stern, provides information and a graphical exercise for students regarding the interaction between magnetic field lines and a plasma. The activity involves tracing a typical interplanetary magnetic field line, dragged out of a location on the Sun by the radial flow of the solar wind. This illustrates the way magnetic field lines are "frozen to the plasma" and the wrapping of field lines due to the rotation of the sun. This is part of the work "The Exploration of the Earth's Magnetosphere". A Spanish translation is available.

  3. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The magnetic field of the Earth is contained in a region called the magnetosphere. The magnetosphere prevents most of the particles from the sun, carried in solar wind, from hitting the Earth. This site, produced by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), uses text, scientific illustrations,and remote imagery to explain the occurrence and nature of planetary magnetic fields and magnetospheres, how these fields interact with the solar wind to produce phenomena like auroras, and how magnetic fields of the earth and other planets can be detected and measured by satellite-borne magnetometers.

  4. Investigation on Electric Field Excitation type MWR Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazaki, Emi

    2011-11-01

    A plane-type microwave resonator (MWR) probe has been developed for electron density monitoring with less disturbance to the plasma. In a conventional case, the resonator was excited by MW magnetic field where the complex connection of the frequency-swept MW source was necessary. In this study, an electric-field-excited resonator was investigated to simplify the probe structure, and this excitation configuration was applied to a multi-resonance MWR probe for measurements of electron density and electron temperature. The probe has two slot resonators of 34 mm and 39 mm in length which are formed in a 0.1-mm-thick 28 mm square plane conductor. To excite the two resonators, only one MW-applied small rod conductor was used for one of the resonators. FDTD simulation revealed that even in such an excitation configuration, both the resonators were excited at different two frequencies of 1.88 GHz and 1.68 GHz similarly to the conventional magnetic field excitation. The resonance frequencies almost coincided with calculated ones under an assumption that the slot length is equal to a quarter wavelength of electromagnetic wave propagating the slot. These results suggested the electric field excitation enabling simple probe structure is useful for the multi-resonance MWR probe.

  5. Magnetic Probe Construction using Thick-film Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Sakakibara, S.; Kubota, Y.; and Yamada, H.

    2001-02-02

    Thick-film technology has been successfully adapted for the design and fabrication of magnetic probes of a new type suitable for use in the simultaneous ultra-high vacuum and high-temperature environment of a nuclear fusion device. The maximum usable temperature is expected to be around 900 degrees C. This new probe has a specific sensitivity (coupling area per unit volume) an order of magnitude higher than a conventional coil. The new probe in one implementation is capable of simultaneously measuring magnetic field in three orthogonal directions about a single spatial point and in two frequency ranges. Low-frequency coils have a measured coupling area of 296-323 cm squared and a frequency response of about 300 kHz. High-frequency coils have a design coupling area of 12-15 cm squared.

  6. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua L. Rovey; Mitchell L. R. Walker; Alec D. Gallimore; Peter Y. Peterson

    2006-01-01

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude

  7. Sources of Magnetic Field Magnetic Phenomena

    E-print Network

    Tobar, Michael

    push on currents Moving charges can make and feel magnetic forces. We don't understand how permanent will consider the last piece of the puzzle in electromagnetic - changing magnetic fields can make induction. 15Lecture 9 Sources of Magnetic Field 1 Magnetic Phenomena 1. Magnets can push on each other (and

  8. Longitudinal Field Modes Probed by Single Molecules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Novotny; M. R. Beversluis; K. S. Youngworth; T. G. Brown

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate that a strong longitudinal, nonpropagating field is generated at the focus of a radially polarized beam mode. This field is localized in space and its energy density exceeds the energy density of the transverse field by more than a factor of 2. Single molecules with fixed absorption dipole moments are used to probe the longitudinal field. Vice versa,

  9. Mapping Magnetic Field Lines

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about electromagnetism. Learners will use a compass to map the magnetic field lines surrounding a coil of wire that is connected to a battery. This activity requires a large coil or spool of wire, a source of electricity such as 3 D-cell batteries or an AC to DC power adapter, alligator-clipped wire, and magnetic compasses. This is the third lesson in the second session of the Exploring Magnetism teachers guide.

  10. The First Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Ryu, Dongsu; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Tsagas, Christos G.; Treumann, Rudolf A.

    2012-05-01

    We review current ideas on the origin of galactic and extragalactic magnetic fields. We begin by summarizing observations of magnetic fields at cosmological redshifts and on cosmological scales. These observations translate into constraints on the strength and scale magnetic fields must have during the early stages of galaxy formation in order to seed the galactic dynamo. We examine mechanisms for the generation of magnetic fields that operate prior during inflation and during subsequent phase transitions such as electroweak symmetry breaking and the quark-hadron phase transition. The implications of strong primordial magnetic fields for the reionization epoch as well as the first generation of stars are discussed in detail. The exotic, early-Universe mechanisms are contrasted with astrophysical processes that generate fields after recombination. For example, a Biermann-type battery can operate in a proto-galaxy during the early stages of structure formation. Moreover, magnetic fields in either an early generation of stars or active galactic nuclei can be dispersed into the intergalactic medium.

  11. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  12. Mapping the magnetic field vector in a fountain clock

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsvolf, Marina; Marmet, Louis [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We show how the mapping of the magnetic field vector components can be achieved in a fountain clock by measuring the Larmor transition frequency in atoms that are used as a spatial probe. We control two vector components of the magnetic field and apply audio frequency magnetic pulses to localize and measure the field vector through Zeeman spectroscopy.

  13. A tunable radio-frequency magnetic probe.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Yuan, G Y; Huo, W G; Ding, Z F

    2010-05-01

    A tunable center-tapped transformer is proposed to increase the output of a rf magnetic probe and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The tuning is implemented by a variable capacitor connected parallel with the primary winding of the tunable center-tapped transformer. Undesirable common-to-differential conversion is reduced by installing a compensating capacitor. In addition, a planar Faraday shield is installed between the windings of the transformer to further suppress the electrostatic coupling. It is found that tuning the variable capacitor can result in a resonance in the output voltage of the rf magnetic probe. The largest output voltage, achieved with the tunable magnetic probe under the optimal condition, is higher than that with a conventional one by an order of magnitude. Effects of the compensating capacitance on the common-mode output voltage are studied and discussed. Influences of parameters such as cable length, the coupling coefficient, and the step-up ratio of the transformer on the output voltage are also presented. Analytical derivations and numerical calculations based on the equivalent circuit are performed to elucidate the characteristics of the differential mode. PMID:20515162

  14. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael H.; Martin, Adam; Hawk, Clark W.; Fimognan, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and ejecting them at high velocity. A plasmoid is a plasma with an imbedded closed magnetic field structure. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids have been measured with of an array of magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes were constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes are wound on a square G10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x l0(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is the cross-sectional area. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven by a high-voltage pulser to measure NA, and by a signal generator to determine the probe's frequency response. The plasmoid electron number density n(sub e) electron temperature T(sub e), and velocity ratio v/c(sub m), (where v is the bulk plasma flow velocity and c(sub m), is the ion thermal speed) have also been measured with a quadruple Langmuir probe. The Langmuir probe tips are 10 mm long, 20-mil diameter stainless steel wire, housed in a 6-inch long 4-bore aluminum rod. Measurements on PTX with argon and hydrogen from the magnetic field probes and quadruple Langmuir probe will be presented in this paper.

  15. Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Scott C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-16

    A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

  16. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  17. Planar near-field to far-field transformation using an array of dipole probes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Petre; Tapan K. Sarkar

    1994-01-01

    A method is presented for computing far-field antenna patterns from measured near-field data measured by an array of planar dipole probes. The method utilizes the near-field data to determine some equivalent magnetic current sources over a fictitious planar surface which encompasses the antenna. These currents are then used to find the far fields. The near-field measurement is carried out by

  18. Magnetic Field Problem: Current

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    A cross section of a circular wire loop carrying an unknown current is shown above. The arrows represent the direction of the magnetic field. The color of the arrows represents the magnitude of the field with magnitude increasing as the color changes from blue to green to red to black. You can double-click in the animation to add magnetic field lines, click-drag the center of the loop to reposition it, and click-drag the top or bottom of the loop to change its size.

  19. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  20. Probes for High Field Solid-state NMR of Lossy Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Christopher V.; Wu, Chin H.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    In solid-state NMR exphydrated samples biopolymers are susceptible to radio-frequency heating and have a significant impact on probe tuning frequency and performance parameters such as sensitivity. These considerations are increasingly important as magnetic field strengths increase with improved magnet technology. Recent developments in the design, construction, and performance of probes for solid-state NMR experiments on stationary lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are reviewed. PMID:20435493

  1. Magnetic fields at Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, Norman F.; Acuna, Mario H.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Connerney, John E. P.; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1989-01-01

    The Voyager 2 magnetic field experiment discovered a complex and powerful magnetic field in Neptune, as well as an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar. The auroral zones are probably located far from the rotation poles, and may possess complex geometry. The Neptune rings and all its known moons are imbedded deep within the magnetosphere (except for Nereid, which is outside when it lies sunward of the planet); the radiation belts have a complex structure due to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune, as well as losses associated with the significant changes in the diurnally varying magnetosphere configuration.

  2. The Sun and Magnetic Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity about magnetic fields and their relation to the Sun, learners will simulate sunspots by using iron filings to show magnetic fields around a bar or cow magnet, and draw the magnetic field surrounding two dipole magnets, both in parallel and perpendicular alignments. Finally, learners examine images of sunspots to relate their magnetic field drawings and observations to what is seen on the Sun.

  3. Graphene Magnetic Field Sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone Pisana; Patrick M. Braganca; Ernesto E. Marinero; Bruce A. Gurney

    2010-01-01

    Graphene extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices have been fabricated and characterized in varying magnetic fields at room temperature. The atomic thickness, high carrier mobility and high current carrying capabilities of graphene are ideally suited for the detection of nanoscale sized magnetic domains. The device sensitivity can reach 10 mV\\/Oe, larger than state of the art InAs 2DEG devices of comparable size

  4. Magnetic probing of the solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic field patterns in the region beneath the solar photosphere is determined. An approximate method for downward extrapolation of line of sight magnetic field measurements taken at the solar photosphere was developed. It utilizes the mean field theory of electromagnetism in a form thought to be appropriate for the solar convection zone. A way to test that theory is proposed. The straightforward application of the lowest order theory with the complete model fit to these data does not indicate the existence of any reasonable depth at which flux conservation is achieved.

  5. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  6. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000000 (0000) Printed November 30, 2009 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) Probing magnetic fields in volume

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Andr´e, 69561 Saint Genis Laval Cedex, France. 3 Service d'Astrophysique, IRFU, CEA-CNRS, L'orme des) in the case of a constant magnetic field, has been further studied in semi-analytically for given functional success- fully achieved by Vogt & En�lin (2005) in the case of the Fara- day rotation of the polarized

  7. Magnetic Field and Life

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson where learners explore magnetic forces, fields, and the relationship between electricity. Learners will use this information to infer how the Earth generates a protective magnetic field. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson seven in the Astro-Venture Geology Training Unit that were developed to increase students' awareness of and interest in astrobiology and the many career opportunities that utilize science, math and technology skills. The lessons are designed for educators to use with with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

  8. Multiwavelength Magnetic Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, T. R.

    2015-03-01

    We model the large-scale Galactic magnetic fields, including a spiral arm compression to generate anisotropic turbulence, by comparing polarized synchrotron and thermal dust emission. Preliminary results show that in the outer Galaxy, the dust emission comes from regions where the fields are more ordered than average while the situation is reversed in the inner Galaxy. We will attempt in subsequent work to present a more complete picture of what the comparison of these observables tells us about the distribution of the components of the magnetized ISM and about the physics of spiral arm shocks and turbulence.

  9. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields, their strength and structure in intergalactic space, their first occurrence in young galaxies, and their dynamical importance for galaxy evolution remain widely unknown. Radio synchrotron emission, its polarization and its Faraday rotation are powerful tools to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized radio synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 ?G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 ?G). Such fields are dynamically important; they can affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. Polarized radio emission traces ordered fields which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, generated from isotropic turbulent fields by compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields of 10-15 ?G strength are generally found in interarm regions and follow the orientation of adjacent gas spiral arms. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered (anisotropic turbulent) fields are also observed at the inner edges of the spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions of starburst galaxies. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are an excellent tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium. Irregular galaxies host isotropic turbulent fields often of similar strength as in spiral galaxies, but only weak ordered fields. Faraday rotation measures (RM) of the diffuse polarized radio emission from the disks of several galaxies reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by a mean-field ? -? dynamo. So far no indications were found in external galaxies of large-scale field reversals, like the one in the Milky Way. Ordered magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies out to large distances from the plane, with X-shaped patterns. In the outflow cone above a starburst region of NGC 253, RM data indicate a helical magnetic field.

  10. Design of a dual sensor probe array for internal field measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus.

    PubMed

    Jeong-hun, Yang; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; An, YoungHwa; Jung, Bong Ki; Jo, Jong Gab; Hwang, Y S

    2012-10-01

    A dual sensor probe array is designed and constructed for internal magnetic field measurement at Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) at the Seoul National University. Simultaneous use of Hall sensors and chip inductors allows cross-calibration among the measurements and compensation for each other's weaknesses while their small sizes are expected to cause only mild plasma perturbations. Calibration of the dual sensor probe array, using a Helmholtz coil, shows good sensitivity for the magnetic field measurement of the VEST. Prior to Ohmic start-up, the magnetic field structure inside the vacuum chamber is measured by using the calibrated probe array. The dual sensor probe array is expected to be useful in analyzing the temporal magnetic field structure change during the magnetic reconnection and in reconstruction of the current profile during the discharge of the VEST device. PMID:23126895

  11. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  12. Magnetic domain imaging using orthogonal fluxgate probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Y.; Sasada, I.

    2002-05-01

    This article presents an application of a miniature orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer to magnetic domain imaging of coated grain-oriented silicon steels. The method is based on a common technique which maps stray magnetic fields emerging from the surface of the silicon steel. An orthogonal fluxgate made of a thin amorphous wire core is bent in a J-shape so that it may work as a gradiometer, in which the longer leg of the J-shaped wire core is made sensitive to stray magnetic fields whereas the shorter one is effectively located at a distance from them. Experiments were carried out with a thin Co-based amorphous wire used as a wire core and a highly grain oriented silicon steel as a sample on which the domain refinement by laser irradiation is made. Well-defined stripe domains with some spike domains, and grain boundaries were clearly imaged with this method without any assisting magnetic field to enhance stray magnetic fields.

  13. Probing latitudinal variations of the solar magnetic field in cycles 21-23 by Parker's Two-Layer Dynamo Model with meridional circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, E.; Zharkova, V.; Zharkov, S.

    2013-11-01

    Principle component analysis (PCA) of the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) measured from Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) magnetograms revealed the following principal components (PCs) in latitudes: two main symmetric components, which are the same for all cycles 21-23, and three pairs of asymmetric components, which are unique for each cycle. These SBMF variations are assumed to be those of poloidal magnetic field travelling slightly off-phase from pole to pole while crossing the equator. They are assumed to be caused by a joint action of dipole and quadruple magnetic sources in the Sun. In the current paper, we make the first attempt to interpret these latitudinal variations in the surface magnetic field with Parker's two-layer dynamo model. The latitudinal distributions of such waves are simulated for cycles 21-23 by the modified Parker's dynamo model taking into account both ? and ? effects operating simultaneously in the two (upper and lower) layers of the solar convective zone (SCZ) and having opposite directions of meridional circulation. The simulations are carried out for both dipole and quadruple magnetic sources with the dynamo parameters specifically selected to provide the curves fitting closely the PCs derived from SBMF variations in cycles 21-23. The simulations are optimised for matching the positions of maximums in latitude, the number of equator crossings and the phase difference between the two dynamo waves operating in the two layers. The dominant pair of PCs present in each cycle is found to be fully asymmetric with respect to the magnetic poles and produced by a magnetic dipole. This pair is found to account for the two main dynamo waves operating between the two magnetic poles. There are also three further pairs of waves unique to each cycle and associated with multiple magnetic sources in the Sun. For the odd cycle 21 the simulated poloidal field fits the observed PCs, only if they are produced by magnetic sources with a quadruple symmetry in both layers, while for the even cycle 22 the fit to the observed PCs is achieved only in the case of quadruple magnetic sources in the upper layer and dipole sources in the inner layer. For the other odd cycle 23 the fit to observation is obtained for the quadruple magnetic sources in the inner layer and the dipole sources in the upper layer. The magnitudes of dynamo numbers D defining the conditions (depth and latitude) of a magnetic flux formation and the numbers N of zeros (equator crossings by the waves) are found to increase and the meridional circulation speed to decrease with a cycle number increase (D = -700, N = 3 for cycle 21 and D = -104, N = 9 for cycle 23). The phase delays between the waves in each unique pairs are also found to increase with the cycle number from ~9° in cycle 21 to ~13° in cycle 23.

  14. Initial Results of the SSPX Transient Internal Probe System for Measuring Toroidal Field Profiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. Holcomb; T. R. Jarboe; A. T. Mattick; D. N. Hill; H. S. McLean; R. D. Wood; V. Cellamare

    2000-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) is using a field profile diagnostic called the Transient Internal Probe (TIP). TIP consists of a verdet-glass bullet that is used to measure the magnetic field by Faraday rotation. This probe is shot through the spheromak by a light gas gun at speeds near 2 km\\/s.

  15. Magnetic measurements of peripheral nerve function using a neuromagnetic current probe.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Ranjith S

    2010-02-01

    The progress made during the last three decades in mathematical modeling and technology development for the recording of magnetic fields associated with cellular current flow in biological tissues has provided a means of examining action currents more accurately than that of using traditional electrical recordings. It is well known to the biomedical research community that the room-temperature miniature toroidal pickup coil called the neuromagnetic current probe can be employed to measure biologically generated magnetic fields in nerve and muscle fibers. In contrast to the magnetic resonance imaging technique, which relies on the interaction between an externally applied magnetic field and the magnetic properties of individual atomic nuclei, this device, along with its room-temperature, low-noise amplifier, can detect currents in the nano-Ampere range. The recorded magnetic signals using neuromagnetic current probes are relatively insensitive to muscle movement since these probes are not directly connected to the tissue, and distortions of the recorded data due to changes in the electrochemical interface between the probes and the tissue are minimal. Contrary to the methods used in electric recordings, these probes can be employed to measure action currents of tissues while they are lying in their own natural settings or in saline baths, thereby reducing the risk associated with elevating and drying the tissue in the air during experiments. This review primarily describes the investigations performed on peripheral nerves using the neuromagnetic current probe. Since there are relatively few publications on these topics, a comprehensive review of the field is given. First, magnetic field measurements of isolated nerve axons and muscle fibers are described. One of the important applications of the neuromagnetic current probe to the intraoperative assessment of damaged and reconstructed nerve bundles is summarized. The magnetic signals of crushed nerve axons and the determination of the conduction velocity distribution of nerve bundles are also reviewed. Finally, the capabilities and limitations of the probe and the magnetic recordings are discussed. PMID:20404030

  16. Magnetic fields at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Lepping, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    The conclusions drawn regarding the structure, behavior and composition of the Uranian magnetic field and magnetosphere as revealed by Voyager 2 data are summarized. The planet had a bipolar magnetotail and a bow shock wave which was observed 23.7 Uranus radii (UR) upstream and a magnetopause at 18.0 UR. The magnetic field observed can be represented by a dipole offset from the planet by 0.3 UR. The field vector and the planetary angular momentum vector formed a 60 deg angle, permitting Uranus to be categorized as an oblique rotator, with auroral zones occurring far from the rotation axis polar zones. The surface magnetic field was estimated to lie between 0.1-1.1 gauss. Both the field and the magnetotail rotated around the planet-sun line in a period of about 17.29 hr. Since the ring system is embedded within the magnetosphere, it is expected that the rings are significant absorbers of radiation belt particles.

  17. UNDERSTANDING THE GEOMETRY OF ASTROPHYSICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Blandford, Roger D., E-mail: aeb@cita.utoronto.c [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94309 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Faraday rotation measurements have provided an invaluable technique for probing the properties of astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Unfortunately, typical observations provide information only about the density-weighted average of the magnetic field component parallel to the line of sight. As a result, the magnetic field geometry along the line of sight, and in many cases even the location of the rotating material, is poorly constrained. Frequently, interpretations of Faraday rotation observations are dependent upon underlying models of the magnetic field being probed (e.g., uniform, turbulent, equipartition). However, we show that at sufficiently low frequencies, specifically below roughly 13(RM/1 rad m{sup -2}){sup 1/4}(B/1 G){sup 1/2} MHz, the character of Faraday rotation changes, entering what we term the 'super-adiabatic regime' in which the rotation measure (RM) is proportional to the integrated absolute value of the line-of-sight component of the field. As a consequence, comparing RMs at high frequencies with those in this new regime provides direct information about the geometry of the magnetic field along the line of sight. Furthermore, the frequency defining the transition to this new regime, {nu}{sub SA}, depends directly upon the local electron density and magnetic field strength where the magnetic field is perpendicular to the line of sight, allowing the unambiguous distinction between Faraday rotation within and in front of the emission region. Typical values of {nu}{sub SA} range from 10 kHz (below the ionospheric cutoff, but above the heliospheric cutoff) to 10 GHz, depending upon the details of the Faraday rotating environment. In particular, for resolved active galactic nuclei, including the black holes at the center of the Milky Way (Sgr A*) and M81, {nu}{sub SA} ranges from roughly 10 MHz to 10 GHz, and thus can be probed via existing and up-coming ground-based radio observatories.

  18. Internal Magnetic Field Measurements on the FIX Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Martin; T. Kawada; S. Okada; S. Goto

    1999-01-01

    FIX (FRC Injection Experiment) is a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) used for translation, confinement, and NBI experiments. A Faraday effect probe is being developed for internal magnetic field measurements on FIX. The Faraday effect: in the presence of a magnetic field, a Faraday rotator material will rotate the polarization of light by an angle theta = VBL, where V is

  19. Internal Magnetic Field Measurements on the FIX-FRC Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam Martin; Shigefumi Okada; Seiichi Goto

    1998-01-01

    FIX (FRC Injection Experiment) is a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) used for translation, confinement and NBI experiments. A Faraday effect probe has been developed for internal magnetic field measurements on FIX. The Faraday effect: in the presence of a magnetic field, a Faraday rotator will rotate the polarization of light by an angle theta = VBl, where B is the

  20. Evolution of Stellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Stellar magnetic fields can reliably be characterized by several magnetic activity indicators, such as X-ray or radio luminosity. Physical processes leading to such emission provide important information on dynamic processes in stellar atmospheres and magnetic structuring.

  1. Antenna Near-Field Probe Station Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz J. (Inventor); Lee, Richard Q. (Inventor); Darby, William G. (Inventor); Barr, Philip J. (Inventor); Lambert, Kevin M (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized antenna system is characterized non-destructively through the use of a scanner that measures its near-field radiated power performance. When taking measurements, the scanner can be moved linearly along the x, y and z axis, as well as rotationally relative to the antenna. The data obtained from the characterization are processed to determine the far-field properties of the system and to optimize the system. Each antenna is excited using a probe station system while a scanning probe scans the space above the antenna to measure the near field signals. Upon completion of the scan, the near-field patterns are transformed into far-field patterns. Along with taking data, this system also allows for extensive graphing and analysis of both the near-field and far-field data. The details of the probe station as well as the procedures for setting up a test, conducting a test, and analyzing the resulting data are also described.

  2. Magnetic Fields and Forces in Permanent Magnet Levitated Bearings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin D. Bachovchin; James F. Hoburg; Richard F. Post

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic fields and magnetic forces from magnetic bearings made of circular Halbach permanent-magnet arrays are computed and analyzed. The magnetic fields are calculated using superposition of fields due to patches of magnetization charge at surfaces where the magnetization is discontinuous. The magnetic force from the magnetic bearing is computed using superposition of forces on each patch of magnetization charge. The

  3. Heat Capacity Measurements in Pulsed Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jaime, M.; Movshovich, R.; Sarrao, J.L.; Kim, J.; Stewart, G.; Beyermann, W.P.; Canfield, P.C.

    1998-10-23

    The new NHMFL 60T quasi-continuous magnet produces a flat-top field for a period of 100 ms at 60 Tesla, and for longer time at lower fields, e.g. 0.5 s at 45 Tesla. We have developed for the first time the capability to measure heat capacity at very high magnetic fields in the NHMFL 60T quasi-continuous magnet at LANL, using a probe built out of various plastic materials. The field plateau allows us to utilize a heat-pulse method to obtain heat capacity data. Proof-of-principle heat capacity experiments were performed on a variety of correlated electron systems. Both magnet performance characteristics and physical properties of various materials studied hold out a promise of wide application of this new tool.

  4. Magnetic Field of the Earth

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Merritt

    2005-10-18

    Students can learn about how the magnetic field of the earth is similar to magnets. Go to the following link: Magnetic Field of the Earth 1. What makes the earth like a magnet? 2. How do we measure magnetism? Be sure to check out the fun games and activities on this web site too!! Now click on the following link and listen to a 2 minute presentation about magnetism: Pulse Planet Next go to ...

  5. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  6. CRRES electric field\\/Langmuir probe instrument

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Wygant; P. R. Harvey; D. Pankow; F. S. Mozer; N. Maynard; H. Singer; M. Smiddy; W. Sullivan; P. Anderson

    1992-01-01

    The CRRES spacecraft's electric field\\/Langmuir probe instruments, which consist of a main electronics package on the body of the spacecraft and two pairs of orthogonal sensors with a 100-m separation on the spin-plane of the spacecraft, measures the quasi-static 2D electric field in this spin plane at 32 samples\\/sec. Sensitivity is 0.1 mV\\/m, over a dynamic range of 1000 mV\\/m.

  7. High sensitivity piezomagnetic force microscopy for quantitative probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Ma, Feiyue; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Yuanming; Proksch, Roger; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-07-01

    Accurate scanning probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale is essential for developing and characterizing magnetic nanostructures, yet quantitative analysis is difficult using the state of the art magnetic force microscopy, and has limited spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this communication, we develop a novel piezomagnetic force microscopy (PmFM) technique, with the imaging principle based on the detection of magnetostrictive response excited by an external magnetic field. In combination with the dual AC resonance tracking (DART) technique, the contact stiffness and energy dissipation of the samples can be simultaneously mapped along with the PmFM phase and amplitude, enabling quantitative probing of magnetic materials and structures at the nanoscale with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PmFM has been applied to probe magnetic soft discs and cobalt ferrite thin films, demonstrating it as a powerful tool for a wide range of magnetic materials. PMID:23720016

  8. Spin Polarized Electron Probes and Magnetic Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Mills

    2003-10-15

    OAK B188 This report summarizes progress to date in our theoretical research program, for the period from July 1, 2002 to November 1, 2003. In addition, our research priorities for the coming year are set forth. The reporting period has been a most exciting and significant one. For the past several years, one of our principal thrust areas has been development of the theory of spin dynamics in magnetic nanostructures with emphasis on the use of spin polarized electrons as probes of short wavelength spin dynamics in such entities. Our program stimulated the first experiment which detected large wave vector spin waves in ultrathin films in 1999 through spin polarized electron loss spectroscopy (SPEELS); the publication which announced this discovery was a joint publication between a group in Halle (Germany) with our theory effort. The continued collaboration has led to the design and implementation of the new SPEELS spectrometer and we now have in hand the first detailed measurements of spin wave dispersion in an ultrathin film. A second such spectrometer is now operational in the laboratory of Prof. H. Hopster, at UC Irvine. We are thus entering a most exciting new era in the spectroscopy of spin excitations in magnetic nanostructures. During the reporting period, we have completed very important new analyses which predict key aspects of the spectra which will be uncovered by these new instruments, and the calculations continue to be developed and to expand our understanding. In addition, we have initiated a new series of theoretical studies directed toward spin dynamics of single magnetic adatoms on metal surfaces, with STM based studies of this area n mind. In the near future, these studies will continue, and we will expand our effort into new areas of spin dynamics in magnetic nanostructures.

  9. Magnetic Field Evolution During Neutron Star Recycling

    E-print Network

    Andrew Cumming

    2004-04-27

    I describe work on two aspects of magnetic field evolution relevant for the "recycling" scenario for making millisecond radio pulsars. First, many of the theoretical ideas for bringing about accretion-induced field decay rely on dissipation of currents in the neutron star crust. I discuss field evolution in the crust due to the Hall effect, and outline when it dominates Ohmic decay. This emphasises the importance of understanding the impurity level in the crust. Second, I briefly discuss the progress that has been made in understanding the magnetic fields of neutron stars currently accreting matter in low mass X-ray binaries. In particular, thermonuclear X-ray bursts offer a promising probe of the magnetic field of these neutron stars.

  10. The WIND magnetic field investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Lepping; M. H. Ac?na; L. F. Burlaga; W. M. Farrell; J. A. Slavin; K. H. Schatten; F. Mariani; N. F. Ness; F. M. Neubauer; Y. C. Whang; J. B. Byrnes; R. S. Kennon; P. V. Panetta; J. Scheifele; E. M. Worley

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment on WIND will provide data for studies of a broad range of scales of structures and fluctuation characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field throughout the mission, and, where appropriate, relate them to the statics and dynamics of the magnetosphere. The basic instrument of the Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) is a boom-mounted dual triaxial fluxgate magnetometer and

  11. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  12. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  13. Magnetic Field Problem: Current and Magnets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    The above animations represent two typical bar magnets each with a North and South pole. The arrows represent the direction of the magnetic field. A wire is placed between the magnets and a current that comes out of the page can be turned on.

  14. The Galactic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R.

    2012-12-01

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength ?20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  15. THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

  16. The Martian magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the Martian magnetic field measurements and the criticisms made of them. The measurements of the Mars 2, 3, and 5 spacecraft were interpreted by Dolginov et al. (1976, 1978) to be consistent with an intrinsic planetary magnetic moment of 2.5 times 10 to the 22nd power gauss cu cm, basing this result on the apparent size of the obstacle responsible for deflecting the solar wind and an apparent encounter of the spacecraft with the planetary field. It is shown that if the dependence of the Martian magnetic moment on the rotation rate was linear, the estimate of the moment would be far larger than reported by Dolginov et al. An upper limit of 250 km is calculated for the dynamo radius using the similarity law, compared with 500 km obtained by Dolginov et al. It is concluded that the possible strength of a Martian dynamo is below expectations, and it is likely that the Mars dynamo is not presently operative.

  17. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  18. Utility of a baffle probe for measurements in a magnetized plasma^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Vladimir; Finnegan, Sean; Koepke, Mark; Reynolds, Eric

    2003-10-01

    A probe for measurements of space potential and its oscillations in magnetized plasmas is tested. The probe consists of a tungsten wire tip, situated perpendicular to the magnetic field, and is partially shielded by ceramic baffles. The probe works under the condition that electron Larmor radius is much smaller than the probe radius, and the ion Larmor radius is comparable to or larger than the probe radius. By rotating the baffle configuration around the probe tip, the ratio between electron and ion probe current can be adjusted. The probe uses the same principle as Katsumata probe, but has the advantage of convenient controllability of the ratio between electron and ion current. Experiments have been conducted in a fully ionized, barium plasma in the WVUniversity Q-machine. By rotating of the probe it is possible to make electron and ion contributions to the floating probe's collected current comparable within a fraction of T_e/e of the dc space potential. Measurements of ac probe potentials allow us to distinguish income of oscillations from space potentials and electron temperature fluctuations. ^*This research supported by NSF

  19. Magnetic field programming in quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen Williams, P.; Carpino, Francesca; Moore, Lee R.; Zborowski, Maciej

    Magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF) is a technique for the separation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. It is explained that the analysis of polydisperse samples requires a programmed decay of field and field gradient during sample elution. A procedure for achieving reproducible field decay with asymptotic approach to zero field using a quadrupole electromagnet is described. An example of an analysis of a polydisperse sample under programmed field decay is given.

  20. Modeling and Measurements by Hall probes of Magnetic Structures of Undulators HU256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A.; Briquez, F.; Chubar, O.; Dael, A.; Churkin, I.; Ilyin, I.; Roux, G.; Steshov, A.; Valleau, M.; Vobly, P.

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic calculations of the individual dipoles and dipoles in "undulator environment" were executed by means of Mermaid 3D Code and these results were confirmed by magnetic measurements of the individual dipoles and the assembled undulators. The magnetic parameters of all dipoles were estimated on basis of the mechanical measurement of the dipole characteristics (pole gap, yoke width, coil position) and the main dependences obtained from magnetic calculations and measurements. These parameters were used for optimal placing of the dipoles in undulators (sorting). The special Hall probe system was designed and manufactured for magnetic measurements of the undulators. It allowed us to observe the inner structure of the magnetic fields. At a magnetic field measurement accuracy of ± 15 ?T the accuracy of the 1st integral calculated on the basis of the measured magnetic fields is ˜ 50 ?Tm. All three undulators were magnetically measured at BINP and are being re-measured at Soleil after transportation.

  1. Modeling and Measurements by Hall probes of Magnetic Structures of Undulators HU256

    SciTech Connect

    Batrakov, A.; Churkin, I.; Ilyin, I.; Steshov, A.; Vobly, P. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lavrenteva 11, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Briquez, F.; Chubar, O.; Dael, A.; Roux, G.; Valleau, M. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48-F91192, GIF-sur-YVETTE Cedex (France)

    2007-01-19

    The magnetic calculations of the individual dipoles and dipoles in 'undulator environment' were executed by means of Mermaid 3D Code and these results were confirmed by magnetic measurements of the individual dipoles and the assembled undulators. The magnetic parameters of all dipoles were estimated on basis of the mechanical measurement of the dipole characteristics (pole gap, yoke width, coil position) and the main dependences obtained from magnetic calculations and measurements. These parameters were used for optimal placing of the dipoles in undulators (sorting). The special Hall probe system was designed and manufactured for magnetic measurements of the undulators. It allowed us to observe the inner structure of the magnetic fields. At a magnetic field measurement accuracy of {+-} 15 {mu}T the accuracy of the 1st integral calculated on the basis of the measured magnetic fields is {approx} 50 {mu}Tm. All three undulators were magnetically measured at BINP and are being re-measured at Soleil after transportation.

  2. Scattering by magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Yafaev

    2005-01-01

    Consider the scattering amplitude $s(\\\\omega,\\\\omega^\\\\prime;\\\\lambda)$,\\u000a$\\\\omega,\\\\omega^\\\\prime\\\\in{\\\\Bbb S}^{d-1}$, $\\\\lambda > 0$, corresponding to an\\u000aarbitrary short-range magnetic field $B(x)$, $x\\\\in{\\\\Bbb R}^d$. This is a smooth\\u000afunction of $\\\\omega$ and $\\\\omega^\\\\prime$ away from the diagonal\\u000a$\\\\omega=\\\\omega^\\\\prime$ but it may be singular on the diagonal. If $d=2$, then\\u000athe singular part of the scattering amplitude (for example, in the transversal\\u000agauge) is a

  3. Evidence for the Reversal of Magnetic Field Polarity in Coronal Streamers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Faraday rotation observations are unique amongst radio occultation measurements in that they respond to magnetic field in addition to electron density, making it possible to probe the coronal magnetic field.

  4. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  5. Field measurement for large quadrupole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaro, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Cavallaro, M.; Foti, A.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Winfield, J. S.

    2008-06-01

    The results of the field measurement of the large quadrupole magnet of the MAGNEX spectrometer are presented and analyzed in the view of the possible application of modern techniques of ray reconstruction. The experimental data are checked against the symmetry conditions expected for the magnet. The observed deviations are related both to imperfections on the magnet manufacturing and to the not ideal positioning of the measurement device. In particular a quantitative estimation of the experimental error in the alignment of the probe with respect to the magnet is achieved. The measured field is also compared with the results from three-dimensional finite elements calculation. The obtained discrepancies between the measured and calculated field are too large for a direct application of the latter to ray-reconstruction methods. Nevertheless, these calculations are reliably used to study the impact of the observed inaccuracies in the probe alignment on the overall precision of field reconstruction and to set quantitative constraints on the field interpolation algorithms.

  6. The Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Mathew J.; Forsyth, Robert J.

    2013-11-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) is the extension of the coronal magnetic field carried out into the solar system by the solar wind. It is the means by which the Sun interacts with planetary magnetospheres and channels charged particles propagating through the heliosphere. As the HMF remains rooted at the solar photosphere as the Sun rotates, the large-scale HMF traces out an Archimedean spiral. This pattern is distorted by the interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams, as well as the interplanetary manifestations of transient solar eruptions called coronal mass ejections. On the smaller scale, the HMF exhibits an array of waves, discontinuities, and turbulence, which give hints to the solar wind formation process. This review aims to summarise observations and theory of the small- and large-scale structure of the HMF. Solar-cycle and cycle-to-cycle evolution of the HMF is discussed in terms of recent spacecraft observations and pre-spaceage proxies for the HMF in geomagnetic and galactic cosmic ray records.

  7. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  8. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Fimognari, Peter; Hawk, Clark W.; Lee, Mike; Martin, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and subsequently ejecting them at high velocity. An overview of PTX is described in a companion paper. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids will be measured with of an array of inductive magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes (for a total of twelve probes) have been constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven alternately by a high-voltage pulser or a signal generator. The probes are wound on a G-10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x 10(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is cross-sectional area. The frequency response of the probes was measured over the range from 1 kHz to 10 MHZ. The electron number density n(sub e), electron temperature T(sub e) and velocity v will be determined from measurements taken with a quadruple Langmuir probe, situated in the exhaust chamber. Three of the four probes on the quadruple probe sample the current-voltage characteristic, and from this yield measurements of T(sub e) and n(sub e). The fourth probe provides a measurement of plasma flow velocity. A 6-inch long alumina rod, hollowed with four holes to house the probe wires, is being used to construct the quadruple probe. A variety of propellants will be used, including hydrogen, nitrogen and argon. From the measurements of the plasmoid mass, density, temperature, and velocity, the basic propulsion characteristics of PTX will be evaluated.

  9. Using Coordinated Observations in Polarised White Light and Faraday Rotation to Probe the Spatial Position and Magnetic Field of an Interplanetary Sheath

    E-print Network

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Owens, Mathew J; Harrison, Richard A; Davis, Chris J; Liu, Ying D

    2013-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White-light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons, and therefore depend on both the viewing geometry and the electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component $B_\\parallel$, and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modelling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesise the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depen...

  10. Using Coordinated Observations in Polarized White Light and Faraday Rotation to Probe the Spatial Position and Magnetic Field of an Interplanetary Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ming; Davies, Jackie A.; Feng, Xueshang; Owens, Mathew J.; Harrison, Richard A.; Davis, Chris J.; Liu, Ying D.

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B ? and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression Ivpropr -3. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r sheath and the mass of plasma at that position M sheath can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B ?sheath at r sheath can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  11. USING COORDINATED OBSERVATIONS IN POLARIZED WHITE LIGHT AND FARADAY ROTATION TO PROBE THE SPATIAL POSITION AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF AN INTERPLANETARY SHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Davies, Jackie A.; Harrison, Richard A. [Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) Space, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Owens, Mathew J.; Davis, Chris J., E-mail: mxiong@spacweather.ac.cn [Reading University, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub ?} and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression I?r {sup –3}. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r{sub sheath} and the mass of plasma at that position M{sub sheath} can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B{sub ?sheath} at r{sub sheath} can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  12. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  13. INTRINSIC BISPECTRA OF COSMIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Iain A., E-mail: i.a.brown@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-06-01

    Forthcoming data sets from the Planck experiment and others are in a position to probe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) non-Gaussianity with higher accuracy than has yet been possible, and potentially open a new window into the physics of the very early universe. However, a signal need not necessarily be inflationary in origin, and possible contaminants should be examined in detail. One such is provided by early universe magnetic fields, which can be produced by a variety of models including during an inflationary phase, at phase transitions, or seeded by cosmic defects. Should such fields have been extant in the early universe, they would provide a natural source of CMB non-Gaussianity. Knowledge of the CMB angular bispectrum requires the complete Fourier-space (or 'intrinsic') bispectrum. In this paper, I consider in detail the intrinsic bispectra of an early-universe magnetic field for a range of power-law magnetic spectra.

  14. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  15. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  16. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Hubrig; M. Scholler; M. Briquet; M. A. Pogodin; R. V. Yudin; J. F. Gonzalez; T. Morel; P. De; R. Ignace; G. Mathys; G. J. Peters

    2007-01-01

    Although indirect evidence for the presence of magnetic fields in high-mass stars is regularly reported in the literature, the detection of these fields remains an extremely challenging observational problem. We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  17. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    E-print Network

    S. Hubrig

    2007-03-09

    Although indirect evidence for the presence of magnetic fields in high-mass stars is regularly reported in the literature, the detection of these fields remains an extremely challenging observational problem. We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  18. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  19. The Galileo magnetic field investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. G. Kivelson; K. K. Khurana; J. D. Means; C. T. Russell; R. C. Snare

    1992-01-01

    The Galileo Orbiter carries a complement of fields and particles instruments designed to provide data needed to shed light on the structure and dynamical variations of the Jovian magnetosphere. Many questions remain regarding the temporal and spatial properties of the magnetospheric magnetic field, how the magnetic field maintains corotation of the embedded plasma and the circumstances under which corotation breaks

  20. The origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2015-01-01

    The universe is magnetized on all scales probed so far. On the largest scales, galaxies and galaxy clusters host magnetic fields at the micro Gauss level coherent on scales up to ten kpc. Recent observational evidence suggests that even the intergalactic medium in voids could host a weak $\\sim 10^{-16}$ Gauss magnetic field, coherent on Mpc scales. An intriguing possibility is that these observed magnetic fields are a relic from the early universe, albeit one which has been subsequently amplified and maintained by a dynamo in collapsed objects. We review here the origin, evolution and signatures of primordial magnetic fields. After a brief summary of magnetohydrodynamics in the expanding universe, we turn to magnetic field generation during inflation and other phase transitions. We trace the linear and nonlinear evolution of the generated primordial fields through the radiation era, including viscous effects. Sensitive observational signatures of primordial magnetic fields on the cosmic microwave background, ...

  1. Mercury's magnetic field and interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Ness, N. F.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic-field data collected on Mercury by the Mariner-10 spacecraft present substantial evidence for an intrinsic global magnetic field. However, studies of Mercury's thermal evolution show that it is most likely that the inner core region of Mercury solidified or froze early in the planet's history. Thus, the explanation of Mercury's magnetic field in the framework of the traditional planetary dynamo is less than certain.

  2. Ferrofilm in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, Randy; Beckham, J. Regan

    2012-10-01

    A vertically draining thin ferrofilm under the influence of gravity and a nonuniform magnetic field is considered. It is observed experimentally that the presence of the magnetic field greatly alters the drainage of the film. A mathematical model is developed to describe the behavior. Experiments are conducted for multiple magnetic field configurations. The model is solved for two different sets of boundary conditions and results are compared to experiments. It is shown that the magnetic field structure, the concentration of magnetite in the solution, and the boundary conditions all have noticeable affects on the evolution of the thinning film. Good qualitative agreement between the model and the experiments is observed.

  3. Venus Deep Nightside Magnetic Fields Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, M. N.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.; Zhang, T.

    2011-12-01

    We reexamined the near-Venus deep nightside magnetic fields observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter(PVO) over two decades ago. This analysis was in part inspired by recent discussions of the possibilities of identifying a weak planetary dynamo or remanent magnetic field, and in part by the availability of numerical simulations of weak field plasma interactions using the BATS-R-US MHD code. The data were first scrutinized for statistically significant regions of radial field in the near-midnight low altitude wake from the prime mission periapsis of ~150km up to about 450 km. Radial field 'maps' were constructed for a range of altitudes in both solar wind interaction and planetary geographical coordinate systems. The results suggested the presence of weak radial fields above ~250km that show a persistent North-South sign bias. This behavior is not seen at the lowest altitudes probed, and is present regardless of the interplanetary magnetic field sector. The MHD simulations provided basic pictures of what might be expected for a hypothetical planet with a weak but still detectable dipole field that is comparable to the solar wind interaction-related draped interplanetary field. These show similar tendencies, illustrating that models are essential to the interpretation of potential weak intrinsic field signatures at planets such as Venus. Further modeling specific to Venus is needed to make further progress.

  4. THE OUTER MAGNETIC FIELD OF L183

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Dan P., E-mail: clemens@bu.edu [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-03-20

    The L183 (= L134N) dark molecular cloud has been probed using deep near-infrared imaging polarimetry of stars to beyond 14 mag in H band (1.6 {mu}m), using the Mimir instrument on the 1.83 m Perkins Telescope. Nearly 400 arcmin{sup 2} were surveyed, including the dense core in L183, as seen in WISE Band 3 (12 {mu}m) extinction, and the near surroundings, revealing 35 stars with either detected polarizations or significant upper limits. Stars with detected polarizations are reddened if closer than 8 arcmin (0.25 pc at the 110 pc cloud distance) and unreddened beyond. The polarimetric sample probes as close to the core as 3 arcmin (0.1 pc), where A{sub V} {approx} 14 mag. Compared to the relatively unextincted surrounding stars, the reddened stars show no increase in polarization with extinction, suggesting that all of the polarization is induced in the outer layers of the cloud. This 0.25 pc radius envelope magnetic field does show a strong interaction with the L183 dark cloud. The envelope field is also virtually perpendicular, on the plane of the sky, to the field seen at 850 {mu}m, though more closely aligned with the rotation axis of the dense gas core. The physical size scale at which the envelope and the core magnetic fields either decouple from each other or strongly modify their directions must be inside the 0.1 pc region probed here.

  5. Quantitative imaging of stray fields and magnetization distributions in hard magnetic element arrays

    E-print Network

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    of interaction between the probe and the sample, the different magnetic imaging methods usually either map circu- lar dichroism XMCD 9,10 is able to probe bulk magnetiza- tion. In contrast, different of the Faraday ef- fect. The MOIF sensors can be calibrated with known exter- nal stray fields to achieve

  6. Evolution of pulsar magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Flowers; M. A. Ruderman

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical considerations of neutron star matter and magnetic fields suggest a picture of the evolution of pulsar dipole moments. At birth the spin axis and magnetic dipole are argued to be roughly aligned. Subsequently the magnetic dipole greatly diminishes in strength and changes its direction until it ultimately makes a large angle with the spin axis. This view is supported

  7. Theory of fossil magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudorov, Alexander E.; Khaibrakhmanov, Sergey A.

    2015-02-01

    Theory of fossil magnetic field is based on the observations, analytical estimations and numerical simulations of magnetic flux evolution during star formation in the magnetized cores of molecular clouds. Basic goals, main features of the theory and manifestations of MHD effects in young stellar objects are discussed.

  8. Travelling wave approach for high field magnetic resonance imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ibrahim A. Elabyad; A. Omar; T. Herrmann; J. Mallow; J. Bernarding

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the travelling-wave approach for high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presented. The travelling wave probes excite the fields in the longitudinal direction of the bore, so that the effects of the attenuation constant due to high permittivity and lossy tissue need to be calculated. In addition, the travelling wave modes should affect the B1+ field

  9. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  10. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)??G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)??GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  11. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  12. High frequency umbilical magnetic probe array for SSX wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werth, A. M.; Gray, T.; Brown, M. R.

    2012-10-01

    The Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) wind tunnel consists of a high velocity plume of magnetized plasma injected into a copper flux conserver with dimensions L = 1 m and R = 0.08 m (aspect ratio 10:1). The plasma spheromaks in this wind tunnel typically have densities on the order of 1 - 5 x10^15 cm-3 and flow speeds of 50 km/s. In the past, fluctuations and turbulence in the SSX plasma wind tunnel during magnetic reconnection have been examined by means of two high resolution (16 position at 0.46 cm spacing) radial magnetic probes. Results from the radial probes show high frequency magnetic fluctuations at the site of reconnection. Four more probes have been design to help detect magnetic fluctuations and reconnection activity along the axial direction of the wind tunnel. The four new probes have 8 positions at 0.95 cm spacing and have a flexible bellow in vacuum and a quartz jacket. The bellows act as an umbilical giving the probe excellent flexibility and versatility. The flexibility allows the probe to be bent so it lies along the axis of the flux conserver.

  13. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)] [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Garbini, Joseph L. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 ?m diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  14. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-01

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 ?m diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  15. Miniaturized endoscopic probe for optical coherence tomography with a tiny magnet driving device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ziwei; Wu, Jigang

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes an endoscopic probe for optical coherence tomography (OCT) applying on side-imaging of internal organs. The probe consists of single-mode fiber, a gradient-index (GRIN) lens, and a mirror of cylindrical wedge shape attaching to a magnetized metal piece by epoxy with a short steel wire. For OCT scanning, we use magnetic field generated by a larger magnet externally to drive the rotation of the magnetized metal. Compare with other probes, our probe design has two distinct advantages: 1) The exit beam will be unobstructed during 360 degree circumference scanning because there are no connecting wires in the scanning part. 2) In principle, the probe can be made very tiny because of the simple structure consisting only the single-mode fiber, GRIN lens, reflection mirror and the magnetized metal piece. The OCT system has axial resolution of 14µm and SNR of 98.6 dB. The probe prototype we made has an outer diameter of 1.4 mm.

  16. The magnetic field of Mercury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Southwood

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic field of Mercury was measured on two fly-bys of the planet by the Mariner 10 space-craft. The presence of a field at Mercury is interesting for what it implies for both the internal and external sources of field. The internal field of the planet is almost certainly generated by an internal dynamo although there remain many puzzles as

  17. The magnetic field of Mercury

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Southwood

    1997-01-01

    The magnetic field of Mercury was measured on two fly-bys of the planet by the Mariner 10 spacecraft. The presence of a field at Mercury is interesting for what it implies for both the internal and external sources of field. The internal field of the planet is almost certainly generated by an internal dynamo although there remain many puzzles as

  18. Low-Cost Miniature Probes used in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cylinder, D.; Terry, S.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Whitney, J.

    2002-11-01

    The need for low-cost and low perturbing diagnostic probes in the MRX experiment has led to the development of miniature probes. Attention has been paid to material selection, using off-the-shelf products, and especially to perfecting the techniques involved in building tiny and delicate instruments. These design and fabrication principles have been applied to the construction of the ninety and sixty channel 2D magnetic field mapping probes, electrostatic probes with distal end in probe noise reduction amplifiers, Mach probes for plasma flow velocity, and a streamlined version of an Ion Dynamics Spectroscopic Probe (IDSP) device used in MRX. Motivated by a theory on a possible mechanism for fast reconnection, construction is underway of a probe array to measure magnetic structures on the order of the electron skin depth (a few millimeters). Millimeter scale induction coils are being fabricated for a sixty-coil probe array. The coils are 160 turns of 46-gauge wire with a diameter of 0.97 millimeters. They are designed for a frequency response of up to 100MHz. Detailed descriptions and sample results will be presented.

  19. Catheter based magnetic resonance compatible perfusion probe

    E-print Network

    Toretta, Cara Lynne

    2007-01-01

    Neurosurgeons are using a thermal based technique to quantify brain perfusion. The thermal diffusion probe (TDP) technology measures perfusion in a relatively small volume of brain tissue. The neurosurgeon chooses the ...

  20. Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-04-15

    Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

  1. Time-Dependent Meson Melting in External Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    M. Ali-Akbari; F. Charmchi; A. Davody; H. Ebrahim; L. Shahkarami

    2015-03-15

    The dynamics of a probe D7-brane in an asymptotically AdS-Vaidya background has been investigated in the presence of an external magnetic field. Holographically, this is dual to the dynamical meson melting in the N = 2 super Yang-Milles theory. If the final temperature of the system is large enough, the probe D7-brane will dynamically cross the horizon (black hole embedding). By turning on the external magnetic field and raising it sufficiently, the final embedding of the corresponding D7-brane changes to Minkowski embedding. In the field theory side, this means that the mesons which melt due to the raise in the temperature, will form bound states again by applying an external magnetic field. We will also show that the evolution of the system to its final equilibrium state is postponed due to the presence of the magnetic field.

  2. Time-Dependent Meson Melting in External Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    Ali-Akbari, M; Davody, A; Ebrahim, H; Shahkarami, L

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of a probe D7-brane in an asymptotically AdS-Vaidya background has been investigated in the presence of an external magnetic field. Holographically, this is dual to the dynamical meson melting in the N = 2 super Yang-Milles theory. If the final temperature of the system is large enough, the probe D7-brane will dynamically cross the horizon (black hole embedding). By turning on the external magnetic field and raising it sufficiently, the final embedding of the corresponding D7-brane changes to Minkowski embedding. In the field theory side, this means that the mesons which melt due to the raise in the temperature, will form bound states again by applying an external magnetic field. We will also show that the evolution of the system to its final equilibrium state is postponed due to the presence of the magnetic field.

  3. Pattern Formation in a Complex Plasma in High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schwabe, M.; Konopka, U.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Morfill, G. E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-05-27

    Low-pressure room-temperature neon, argon, krypton, and air plasmas were studied in magnetic fields up to flux densities of 2.3 T. Filaments appeared parallel to the magnetic field lines, and patterns such as spirals and concentric circles formed in the perpendicular direction. We link these effects to the magnetization of the ions. We also used a layer of embedded microparticles as probes in the plasma. Their motion changed dramatically from a collective rotation of the whole ensemble in moderate magnetic fields to a rotation in several small vortices centered at the filaments.

  4. High magnetic fields in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Laurence J.; Parkin, Don E.; Crow, Jack E.; Schneider-Muntau, Hans J.; Sullivan, Neil S.

    During the past thirty years research using high magnetic fields has technically evolved in the manner, but not the magnitude, of the so-called big science areas of particle physics, plasma physics, neutron scattering, synchrotron light scattering, and astronomy. Starting from the laboratories of individual researchers it moved to a few larger universities, then to centralized national facilities with research and maintenance staffs, and, finally, to joint international ventures to build unique facilities, as illustrated by the subject of this conference. To better understand the nature of this type of research and its societal justification it is helpful to compare it, in general terms, with the aforementioned big-science fields. High magnetic field research differs from particle physics, plasma physics, and astronomy in three respects: (1) it is generic research that cuts across a wide range of scientific disciplines in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and engineering; (2) it studies materials and processes that are relevant for a variety of technological applications and it gives insight into biological processes; (3) it has produced, at least, comparably significant results with incomparably smaller resources. Unlike neutron and synchrotron light scattering, which probe matter, high magnetic fields change the thermodynamic state of matter. This change of state is fundamental and independent of other state variables, such as pressure and temperature. After the magnetic field is applied, various techniques are then used to study the new state.

  5. Preprocessing Magnetic Fields with Chromospheric Longitudinal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Kusano, K.

    2012-06-01

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  6. PREPROCESSING MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH CHROMOSPHERIC LONGITUDINAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Kusano, K., E-mail: tyamamot@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Yokohama, Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan)

    2012-06-20

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  7. Design for a multifrequency high magnetic field superconducting quantum interference device-detected quantitative electron paramagnetic resonance probe: Spin-lattice relaxation of cupric sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4.5H2O)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brant Cage; Stephen Russek

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a spectrometer for the quantitative determination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at high magnetic fields and frequencies. It uses a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) for measuring the magnetic moment as a function of the applied magnetic field and microwave frequency. We used powdered 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl to demonstrate resolution of g-tensor anisotropy to 1 mT in a magnetic

  8. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  9. The magnetic field of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.

    1992-01-01

    A model is given of the planetary magnetic field of Neptune based on a spherical harmonic analysis of the observations obtained by the Voyager 2. Generalized inverse techniques are used to partially solve a severely underdetermined inverse problem, and the resulting model is nonunique since the observations are limited in spatial distribution. Dipole, quadrupole, and octupole coefficients are estimated independently of other terms, and the parameters are shown to be well constrained by the measurement data. The large-scale features of the magnetic field including dipole tilt, offset, and harmonic content are found to characterize a magnetic field that is similar to that of Uranus. The traits of Neptune's magnetic field are theorized to relate to the 'ice' interior of the planet, and the dynamo-field generation reflects this poorly conducting planet.

  10. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, Christian T. [CERN, PH-TH Division, CH-1211, Genève 23 (Switzerland); Hollenstein, Lukas; Jain, Rajeev Kumar [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genève, 24, Quai Ernest Ansermet, CH-1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Urban, Federico R., E-mail: cbyrnes@cern.ch, E-mail: lukas.hollenstein@unige.ch, E-mail: rajeev.jain@unige.ch, E-mail: urban@phas.ubc.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of O(10{sup ?15} Gauss) today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  11. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    E-print Network

    Christian T. Byrnes; Lukas Hollenstein; Rajeev Kumar Jain; Federico R. Urban

    2012-03-06

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of order 10^{-15} Gauss today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  12. Schrödinger operators with magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Avron; I. W. Herbst; B. Simon

    1981-01-01

    We prove a large number of results about atoms in constant magnetic field including (i) Asymptotic formula for the ground state energy of Hydrogen in large field, (ii) Proof that the ground state of Hydrogen in an arbitrary constant field hasLz = 0 and of the monotonicity of the binding energy as a function ofB, (iii) Borel summability of Zeeman

  13. Investigating Magnetic Force Fields

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Daryl ("Tish") Monjeau, Bancroft Elementary School, Minneapolis, MN

    2012-03-18

    In this classroom activity, the students will investigate the magnetic pull of a bar magnet at varying distances with the use of paper clips. Students will hypothesize, conduct the experiment, collect the data, and draw conclusions that support their data. Each student will record the experiment and their findings in their science journals. As a class, students will compare each groups' data and their interpretation of the results.

  14. Reconnection of stressed magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassam, A. B.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that magnetized plasma configurations under magnetic stress relax irreversibly to the state of minimum stress at a rate that is essentially Alfvenic provided a magnetic null is present. The relaxation is effected by the reconnection at the field null and proceeds at a rate proportional to the absolute value of ln(eta) exp-1, where eta is the resistivity. An analytic calculation in the linear regime is presented.

  15. Preface: Cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in observations and modeling have opened new perspectives for the understanding of fundamental dynamical processes of cosmic magnetism, and associated magnetic activity on the Sun, stars and galaxies. The goal of the Special Issue is to discuss the progress in solar physics and astrophysics, similarities and differences in phenomenology and physics of magnetic phenomena on the Sun and other stars. Space observatories, ground-based telescopes, and new observational methods have provided tremendous amount of data that need to be analyzed and understood. The solar observations discovered multi-scale organization of solar activity, dramatically changing current paradigms of solar variability. On the other side, stellar observations discovered new regimes of dynamics and magnetism that are different from the corresponding solar phenomena, but described by the same physics. Stars represent an astrophysical laboratory for studying the dynamical, magnetic and radiation processes across a broad range of stellar masses and ages. These studies allow us to look at the origin and evolution of our Sun, whereas detailed investigations of the solar magnetism give us a fundamental basis for interpretation and understanding of unresolved stellar data.

  16. Holographic non-Fermi liquid in a background magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Pallab; He Jianyang; Mukherjee, Anindya; Shieh, Hsien-Hang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    We study the effects of a nonzero magnetic field on a class of 2+1 dimensional non-Fermi liquids, recently found in [Hong Liu, John McGreevy, and David Vegh, arXiv:0903.2477.] by considering properties of a Fermionic probe in an extremal AdS{sup 4} black hole background. Introducing a similar fermionic probe in a dyonic AdS{sup 4} black hole geometry, we find that the effect of a magnetic field could be incorporated in a rescaling of the probe fermion's charge. From this simple fact, we observe interesting effects like gradual disappearance of the Fermi surface and quasiparticle peaks at large magnetic fields and changes in other properties of the system. We also find Landau level like structures and oscillatory phenomena similar to the de-Haas-van Alphen effect.

  17. Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

  18. The polar heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Kota, J.

    1989-01-01

    It is suggested that the polar heliospheric magnetic field, at large heliocentric distances, may deviate considerably from the generally accepted Archimedean spiral. Instead, it is suggested that the large-scale field near the poles may be dominated by randomly-oriented transverse magnetic fields with magnitude much larger than the average spiral. The average vector field is still the spiral, but the average magnitude may be much larger. In addition, the field direction is transverse to the radial direction most of the time instead of being nearly radial. This magnetic-field structure has important consequences for the transport of cosmic rays. Preliminary model calculations suggest changes in the radial gradient of galactic cosmic rays which may improve agreement with observations.

  19. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  20. Ion beam probing of electrostatic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persson, H.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of a cylindrically symmetric, time-independent electrostatic potential V in a magnetic field B with the same symmetry by measurements of the deflection of a primary beam of ions is analyzed and substantiated by examples. Special attention is given to the requirements on canonical angular momentum and total energy set by an arbitrary, nonmonotone V, to scaling laws obtained by normalization, and to the analogy with ionospheric sounding. The inversion procedure with the Abel analysis of an equivalent problem with a one-dimensional fictitious potential is used in a numerical experiment with application to the NASA Lewis Modified Penning Discharge. The determination of V from a study of secondary beams of ions with increased charge produced by hot plasma electrons is also analyzed, both from a general point of view and with application to the NASA Lewis SUMMA experiment. Simple formulas and geometrical constructions are given for the minimum energy necessary to reach the axis, the whole plasma, and any point in the magnetic field. The common, simplifying assumption that V is a small perturbation is critically and constructively analyzed; an iteration scheme for successively correcting the orbits and points of ionization for the electrostatic potential is suggested.

  1. Si nanowire probe with Nd–Fe–B magnet for attonewton-scale force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yong-Jun; Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we have developed a 210?nm-wide and 32?µm-long silicon nanowire probe with a silicon mirror using a silicon-on-insulator wafer in order to improve sensitivity of force detection for magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). Additionally, a Nd–Fe–B magnet has been integrated at the end of the nanowire. The fabricated nanowire probe shows a resonance frequency of 11.256?kHz and a factor of 12?800 after annealing at 800?°C for 2?h in forming gas. The probe exhibits attonewton sensitivity, and the measurement of force mapping based on electron spin resonance is demonstrated for 3D imaging of radicals. The detected force and magnetic field gradient are approximately 82?aN and ~70.1?G??m?1 at room temperature. The radical density is calculated as 4.6? × ?1018?spins?cm?3.

  2. Magnetic field in holographic superconductor with dark matter sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakonieczny, ?ukasz; Rogatko, Marek; Wysokinski, Karol I.

    2015-02-01

    Based on the analytical technique the effect of the static magnetic field on the s-wave holographic superconductor with dark matter sector of U (1 )-gauge field type coupled to the Maxwell field has been examined. In the probe limit, we obtained the mean value of the condensation operator. The nature of the condensate in an external magnetic field as well as the behavior of the critical field close to the transition temperature has been revealed. The obtained upturn of the critical field curves as a function of temperature, both in four and five spacetime dimensions, is a fingerprint of the strong coupling approach.

  3. Magnetic field in holographic superconductor with dark matter sector

    E-print Network

    Nakonieczny, L; Wysokinski, K I

    2015-01-01

    Based on the analytical technique the effect of the static magnetic field on the s-wave holographic superconductor with dark matter sector of U(1)-gauge field type coupled to the Maxwell field has been examined. In the probe limit, we obtained the mean value of the condensation operator. The nature of the condensate in an external magnetic field as well as the behaviour of the critical field close to the transition temperature has been revealed. The obtained upturn of the critical field curves as a function of temperature, both in four and five spacetime dimensions, is a fingerprint of the strong coupling approach.

  4. The ACE Magnetic Fields Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. W. Smith; J. L'Heureux; N. F. Ness; M. H. Acuña; L. F. Burlaga; J. Scheifele

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment on ACE provides continuous measurements of the local magnetic field in the interplanetary medium.\\u000a These measurements are essential in the interpretation of simultaneous ACE observations of energetic and thermal particles\\u000a distributions. The experiment consists of a pair of twin, boom- mounted, triaxial fluxgate sensors which are located 165 inches\\u000a (=4.19 m) from the center of the

  5. Magnetic resonance in an elliptic magnetic field

    E-print Network

    E. A. Ivanchenko

    2004-04-20

    The behaviour of a particle with a spin 1/2 and a dipole magnetic moment in a time-varying magnetic field in the form $(h_0 cn(\\omega t,k), h_0 sn(\\omega t,k), H_0 dn(\\omega t,k))$, where $\\omega$ is the driving field frequency, $t$ is the time, $h_0$ and $H_0$ are the field amplitudes, $cn$, $sn$, $dn$ are Jacobi elliptic functions, $ k$ is the modulus of the elliptic functions has been considered. The variation parameter $k$ from zero to 1 gives rise to a wide set of functions from trigonometric shapes to exponential pulse shapes modulating the field. The problem was reduced to the solution of general Heun' equation. The exact solution of the wave function was found at resonance for any $ k$. It has been shown that the transition probability in this case does not depend on $k$. The present study may be useful for analysis interference experiments, improving magnetic spectrometers and the field of quantum computing.

  6. A magnetically driven reciprocating probe for tokamak scrape-off layer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, J. P.; Pascal, J.-Y.

    2011-12-01

    A new in situ reciprocating probe system has been developed to provide scrape-off layer measurements in the Tore Supra tokamak. The probe motion is provided by the rotation of an energized coil in the tokamak magnetic field. Simple analytic approximations to the exact numerical model were used to identify the important parameters that govern the dynamics of the system, and optimize the coil geometry, the electrical circuit, and the stiffness of the retaining spring. The linear speed of the probe is directly proportional to the current induced by the coil's rotation; its integral gives the coil position, providing a means to implement real-time feedback control of the probe motion. Two probes were recently mounted on a movable outboard antenna protection limiter in Tore Supra and provided automatic measurements during the 2011 experimental campaign.

  7. A magnetically driven reciprocating probe for tokamak scrape-off layer measurements.

    PubMed

    Gunn, J P; Pascal, J-Y

    2011-12-01

    A new in situ reciprocating probe system has been developed to provide scrape-off layer measurements in the Tore Supra tokamak. The probe motion is provided by the rotation of an energized coil in the tokamak magnetic field. Simple analytic approximations to the exact numerical model were used to identify the important parameters that govern the dynamics of the system, and optimize the coil geometry, the electrical circuit, and the stiffness of the retaining spring. The linear speed of the probe is directly proportional to the current induced by the coil's rotation; its integral gives the coil position, providing a means to implement real-time feedback control of the probe motion. Two probes were recently mounted on a movable outboard antenna protection limiter in Tore Supra and provided automatic measurements during the 2011 experimental campaign. PMID:22225216

  8. Probing Ganymede's Magnetosphere with Field Line Resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volwerk, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; McPherron, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the spectrum of field line resonances identified in data acquired by the Galileo spacecraft within Ganymede's magnetosphere on a relatively low latitude pass. We infer properties of the plasma distribution and its transport from the observed spectrum. The harmonic structure in the spectrum of the magnetometer data agrees very well with the frequencies predicted for resonances of a dipole field. The spectrum implies a density of 2 amu per cubic centimeter near the equator on closed field lines of Ganymede's magnetic field inside of 2 RG (Ganymede radii). This density is significantly reduced relative to the local density of the Jovian plasma sheet near Ganymede (less than or equal to 8 electrons per cubic centimeter, or approximately equal to 100 amu per cubic centimeter for an average ion mass per charge of 20 amu and average charge of 1.5 electron charges). A shadowing effect of Ganymede for the flow of particles injected at a reconnection layer on the side of the moon downstream relative to the direction of torus plasma flow accounts for the marked density depletion. Implications for conducting paths near Ganymede's surface are considered.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Based on Earth's Magnetic Field

    E-print Network

    StepiÂ?nik, Janez

    magnetic field can be partly compensated by the receiving coil design and shielding of electromagnetic pick magnetic fields. Common sources of static magnetic fields are super conducting coils, electromagnets, and permanent magnets. The induced magnetization, and thus the signal, is proportional to the magnitude

  10. An analysis and optimization of elliptical RF probes used in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Lawrence K.; Crozier, Stuart; Doddrell, David M.

    1996-09-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging of the entire body, it is often desirable to use an elliptical RF probe, rather than a circular one. As an ellipse more closely conforms to the anatomical cross section of the human thorax and head, better filling factors and therefore improved signal-to-noise ratios may be achieved by the use of elliptical RF coils. The probe is usually of bird-cage type, but the rungs are of finite width due to the high-frequency signals involved. This paper presents a method for computing the magnetic fields produced inside elliptical probes, and the current distributions on the rungs. A slotted shield is assumed to surround the probe, and its influence on field homogeneity is studied. In particular, the currents in a 16-runged unshielded elliptical coil of practical interest were determined optimally in one case, using simulated annealing to optimize the homogeneity of the magnetic field within the probe. The effects of a segmented shield of both elliptical and circular cross section on this coil are discussed, and the results are confirmed by experiment.

  11. The magnetic field of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager 2 observations obtained during the Neptune encounter are used to develop a spherical harmonic model of the planetary magnetic field of Neptune. The model yields a dipole of magnitude 0.14 G R(N) exp 3, tilted by 47 deg toward 72 deg west longitude. Neptune's quadrupole is equal to or exceeding in magnitude the surface dipole field; the octupole is also very large, although less well constrained. The characteristics of the Neptune's magnetic field are illustrated using contour maps of the field on the planet's surface.

  12. The magnetic field of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Mariner 10 spacecraft encountered Mercury three times in 1974-1975. The first and third encounters provided detailed observations of a well-developed detached bow shock wave which results from the interaction of the solar wind. The planet possesses a global magnetic field and a modest magnetosphere, which deflects the solar wind. The field is approximately dipolar, with orientation in the same sense as earth, tilted 12 deg from the rotation axis. The magnetic moment corresponds to an undistorted equatorial field intensity of 350 gammas, approximately 1% of earth's. The field, while unequivocally intrinsic to the planet, may be due to remanent magnetization acquired from an extinct dynamo or a primordial magnetic field or due to a presently active dynamo. The latter possibility appears more plausible at present. In any case, the existence of the magnetic field provides very strong evidence of a mature differentiated planetary interior with a large core (core radius about 0.7 Mercury radius) and a record of the history of planetary formation in the magnetization of the crustal rocks.

  13. Chiral transition with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Hernández, Luis Alberto; Mizher, Ana Júlia; Rojas, Juan Cristóbal; Villavicencio, Cristián

    2014-06-01

    We study the nature of the chiral transition for an effective theory with spontaneous breaking of symmetry, where charged bosons and fermions are subject to the effects of a constant external magnetic field. The problem is studied in terms of the relative intensity of the magnetic field with respect to the mass and the temperature. When the former is the smallest of the scales, we present a suitable method to obtain magnetic and thermal corrections up to ring order at high temperature. By these means, we solve the problem of the instability in the boson sector for these theories, where the squared masses—taken as functions of the order parameter—can vanish and even become negative. The solution is found by considering the screening properties of the plasma, encoded in the resummation of the ring diagrams at high temperature. We also study the case where the magnetic field is the intermediate of the three scales and explore the nature of the chiral transition as we vary the field strength, the coupling constants, and the number of fermions. We show that the critical temperature for the restoration of chiral symmetry monotonically increases from small to intermediate values of the magnetic field and that this temperature is always above the critical temperature for the case when the magnetic field is absent.

  14. Near-field optical magnetometry and magnetic imaging of nanomagnets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naser Qureshi; Aaron R. Hawkins; Holger Schmidt

    2005-01-01

    We present an all-optical approach to detecting magnetization reversal events in submicron ferromagnetic structures that is non-perturbative and compatible with ultrafast optical techniques. We demonstrate experimentally that structures much smaller than the wavelength of light can be probed using both near-field and far-field laser techniques combined with a cavity Kerr enhancement technique and two different polarimetry methods. Controlled magnetization reversal

  15. Analysis of the Distribution of Magnetic Fluid inside Tumors by a Giant Magnetoresistance Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kurnicki, Adam; Yamada, Sotoshi; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42°C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe. PMID:24312280

  16. A Review of Maser Polarization and Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    W. H. T. Vlemmings

    2007-05-07

    Through polarization observations masers are unique probes of the magnetic field in a variety of different astronomical objects, with the different maser species tracing different physical conditions. In recent years maser polarization observations have provided insights in the magnetic field strength and morphology in, among others, the envelopes around evolved stars, Planetary Nebulae (PNe), massive star forming regions and supernova remnants. More recently, maser observations have even been used to determine the magnetic field in megamaser galaxies. This review will present an overview of maser polarization observations and magnetic field determinations of the last several years and discuss the implications of the magnetic field measurements for several important fields of study, such as aspherical PNe creation and massive star formation.

  17. Wideband scalable probe for Spherical Near-Field Antenna measurements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oleksiy S. Kim; Sergey Pivnenko; Olav Breinbjerg

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a design of an open-boundary quad-ridged horn to be used as a wideband scalable dual-linearly polarized probe for spherical near-field antenna measurements. With a new higher-order probe correction technique developed at the Technical University of Denmark, the probe will enable high-accuracy wideband antenna measurements at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility at frequencies down to 400

  18. Dynamic nuclear polarization at high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Joo, Chan-Gyu; Mak–Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a method that permits NMR signal intensities of solids and liquids to be enhanced significantly, and is therefore potentially an important tool in structural and mechanistic studies of biologically relevant molecules. During a DNP experiment, the large polarization of an exogeneous or endogeneous unpaired electron is transferred to the nuclei of interest (I) by microwave (?w) irradiation of the sample. The maximum theoretical enhancement achievable is given by the gyromagnetic ratios (?e/?l), being ?660 for protons. In the early 1950s, the DNP phenomenon was demonstrated experimentally, and intensively investigated in the following four decades, primarily at low magnetic fields. This review focuses on recent developments in the field of DNP with a special emphasis on work done at high magnetic fields (?5 T), the regime where contemporary NMR experiments are performed. After a brief historical survey, we present a review of the classical continuous wave (cw) DNP mechanisms—the Overhauser effect, the solid effect, the cross effect, and thermal mixing. A special section is devoted to the theory of coherent polarization transfer mechanisms, since they are potentially more efficient at high fields than classical polarization schemes. The implementation of DNP at high magnetic fields has required the development and improvement of new and existing instrumentation. Therefore, we also review some recent developments in ?w and probe technology, followed by an overview of DNP applications in biological solids and liquids. Finally, we outline some possible areas for future developments. PMID:18266416

  19. CHAPTER 3. STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS 1 Structure of Magnetic

    E-print Network

    Callen, James D.

    CHAPTER 3. STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS 1 Chapter 3 Structure of Magnetic Fields Many of the most in Fig. 3.1, the generic structure of the magnetic field can be open (a­c and f) or closed (d,e). In open). The magnetic field structure in closed configurations (d,e) is toroidal in character or topology. That is, its

  20. Damping of cosmic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jedamzik, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Katalinic, V.; Olinto, A.V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    We examine the evolution of magnetic fields in an expanding fluid composed of matter and radiation with particular interest in the evolution of cosmic magnetic fields. We derive the propagation velocities and damping rates for relativistic and non-relativistic fast and slow magnetosonic and Alfv{acute e}n waves in the presence of viscous and heat conducting processes. The analysis covers all magnetohydrodynamics modes in the radiation diffusion and the free-streaming regimes. When our results are applied to the evolution of magnetic fields in the early universe, we find that cosmic magnetic fields are damped from prior to the epoch of neutrino decoupling up to recombination. Similar to the case of sound waves propagating in a demagnetized plasma, fast magnetosonic waves are damped by radiation diffusion on all scales smaller than the radiation diffusion length. The characteristic damping scales are the horizon scale at neutrino decoupling (M{sub {nu}}{approx}10{sup {minus}4}M{sub {circle_dot}} in baryons) and the Silk mass at recombination (M{sub {gamma}}{approx}10{sup 13}M{sub {circle_dot}} in baryons). In contrast, the oscillations of slow magnetosonic and Alfv{acute e}n waves get overdamped in the radiation diffusion regime, resulting in frozen-in magnetic field perturbations. Further damping of these perturbations is possible only if before recombination the wave enters a regime in which radiation free-streams on the scale of the perturbation. The maximum damping scale of slow magnetosonic and Alfv{acute e}n modes is always smaller than or equal to the damping scale of fast magnetosonic waves, and depends on the magnetic field strength and its direction relative to the wave vector. Our findings have multifold implications for cosmology. The dissipation of magnetic field energy into heat during the epoch of neutrino decoupling ensures that most magnetic field configurations generated in the very early universe satisfy big bang nucleosynthesis constraints. Further dissipation before recombination constrains models in which primordial magnetic fields give rise to galactic magnetic fields or density perturbations. Finally, the survival of Alfv{acute e}n and slow magnetosonic modes on scales well below the Silk mass may be of significance for the formation of structure on small scales. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields. Independent information on the internal magnetic field of neutron stars will come from future gravitational wave detections. Coherent searches for the Crab pulsar with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) have already constrained its gravitational wave luminosity to be ?2 % of the observed spin-down luminosity, thus placing a limit of ?1016 G on the internal field. Indirect spin-down limits inferred from recycled pulsars also yield interesting gravitational-wave-related constraints. Thus we may be at the dawn of a new era of exciting discoveries in compact star magnetism driven by the opening of a new, non-electromagnetic observational window. We also review recent advances in the theory and computation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence as it applies to stellar magnetism and dynamo theory. These advances offer insight into the action of stellar dynamos as well as processes which control the diffusive magnetic flux transport in stars.

  2. Cosmic Structure of Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Peter L. Biermann; Hyesung Kang; Joerg P. Rachen; Dongsu Ryu

    1997-09-25

    The simulations of the formation of cosmological structure allows to determine the spatial inhomogeneity of cosmic magnetic fields. Such simulations, however, do not give an absolute number for the strength of the magnetic field due to insufficient spatial resolution. Combining these simulations with observations of the Rotation Measure to distant radio sources allows then to deduce upper limits for the strength of the magnetic field. These upper limits are of order 0.2 - 2 muG along the filaments and sheets of the galaxy distribution. In one case, the sheet outside the Coma cluster, there is a definitive estimate of the strength of the magnetic field consistent with this range. Such estimates are almost three orders of magnitude higher than hitherto assumed usually. High energy cosmic ray particles can be either focussed or strongly scattered in such magnetic filaments and sheets, depending on the initial transverse momentum. The cosmological background in radio and X-ray wavelengths will have contributions from these intergalactic filaments and sheets, should the magnetic fields really be as high as 0.2 - 2 muG.

  3. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yang; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz1/2, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  4. The magnetic field of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.

    1987-01-01

    Aspherical harmonic model of the planetary magnetic field of Uranus is obtained from the Voyager 2 encounter observations using generalized inverse techniques which allow partial solutions to complex (underdetermined) problems. The Goddard Space Flight Center 'Q3' model is characterized by a large dipole tilt (58.6 deg) relative to the rotation axis, a dipole moment of 0.228 G R(Uranus radii cubed) and an unusually large quadrupole moment. Characteristics of this complex model magnetic field are illustrated using contour maps of the field on the planet's surface and discussed in the context of possible dynamo generation in the relatively poorly conducting 'ice' mantle.

  5. Helical Magnetic Fields from Sphaleron Decay and Baryogenesis

    E-print Network

    Craig J. Copi; Francesc Ferrer; Tanmay Vachaspati; Ana Achucarro

    2008-02-20

    Many models of baryogenesis rely on anomalous particle physics processes to give baryon number violation. By numerically evolving the electroweak equations on a lattice, we show that baryogenesis in these models creates helical cosmic magnetic fields. After a transitory period, electroweak dynamics is found to conserve the Chern-Simons number and the total electromagnetic helicity. We argue that baryogenesis could lead to magnetic fields of nano-Gauss strength today on astrophysical length scales. In addition to being astrophysically relevant, such helical magnetic fields can provide an independent probe of baryogenesis and CP violation in particle physics.

  6. Helical magnetic fields from sphaleron decay and baryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Copi, Craig J; Ferrer, Francesc; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Achúcarro, Ana

    2008-10-24

    Many models of baryogenesis rely on anomalous particle physics processes to give baryon number violation. By numerically evolving the electroweak equations on a lattice, we show that baryogenesis in these models creates helical cosmic magnetic fields, though the helicity created is smaller than earlier analytical estimates. After a transitory period, electroweak dynamics is found to conserve the Chern-Simons number and the total electromagnetic helicity. We argue that baryogenesis could lead to magnetic fields of nano-Gauss strength today on astrophysical length scales. In addition to being astrophysically relevant, such helical magnetic fields can provide an independent probe of baryogenesis and CP violation in particle physics. PMID:18999736

  7. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS. R.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation.

  8. Magnetic Fields in Molecular Clouds

    E-print Network

    Tyler L. Bourke; Alyssa A. Goodman

    2004-01-14

    Magnetic fields are believed to play an important role in the evolution of molecular clouds, from their large scale structure to dense cores, protostellar envelopes, and protoplanetary disks. How important is unclear, and whether magnetic fields are the dominant force driving star formation at any scale is also unclear. In this review we examine the observational data which address these questions, with particular emphasis on high angular resolution observations. Unfortunately the data do not clarify the situation. It is clear that the fields are important, but to what degree we don't yet know. Observations to date have been limited by the sensitivity of available telescopes and instrumentation. In the future ALMA and the SKA in particular should provide great advances in observational studies of magnetic fields, and we discuss which observations are most desirable when they become available.

  9. Modeling Earth's magnetic field variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardinski, I.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of the Earth's magnetic field taken at the Earth's surface and at satellite altitude have been combined to construct models of the geomagnetic field and its variation. Lesur et al. (2010) developed a kinematic reconstruction of core field changes that satisfied the frozen-flux constraint. By constraining the field evolution to be entirely due to advection of the magnetic field at the core surface it maintained the spatial complexity of the field morphology imposed by a satellite field model backward in time [Wardinski & Lesur,2012]. In this study we attempt a kinematic construction of future variation in Earth's magnetic field variation. Our approach, first seeks to identify typical time scales of the magnetic field and core surface flows present in decadal and millennial field and flow models. Therefore, the individual spherical harmonic coefficients are treated by methods of time series analysis. The second step employs stochastic modelling of the temporal variability of such spherical harmonic coefficients that represent the field and core surface flow. Difficulties arise due to the non-stationary behavior of the field and core surface flow. However, the broad behavior may consist of some homogeneity, which could be captured by a generalized stochastic model that calls for the d'th difference of the time series to be stationary (ARIMA-Model), or by detrending the coefficient time series. By computing stochastic models, we obtain two sets of field-forecasts, the first set is obtained from stochastic models of the Gauss coefficients. Here, first results suggest that secular variation on time scales shorter than 5 years behaves rather randomly and cannot be described sufficiently well by stochastic models. The second set is derived from forward modeling the secular variation using the diffusion-less induction equation (kinematic construction). This approach has not provide consistent results.

  10. UHECR propagation in the Galactic Magnetic Field Serguei Vorobiov, Mustafa Hussain, and Darko Veberic

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    to the halo [3], [4]. The observed Faraday rotation measures (RM) allow to probe the Galactic magnetic field fields in the Milky Way and other galaxies are investigated by means of measurements of the Faraday

  11. LABORATORY V MAGNETIC FIELDS AND FORCES

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    's technology. Magnets are used today to image parts of the body, to explore the mysteries of the human brain to combine magnets to change the magnetic field at any point. You must determine the map of the magnetic

  12. X-Ray Detected Magnetic Resonance: A Unique Probe of the Precession Dynamics of Orbital Magnetization Components

    PubMed Central

    Goulon, Jo?e; Rogalev, Andrei; Goujon, Gérard; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Ben Youssef, Jamal; Gros, Claude; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Guilard, Roger

    2011-01-01

    X-ray Detected Magnetic Resonance (XDMR) is a novel spectroscopy in which X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) is used to probe the resonant precession of local magnetization components in a strong microwave pump field. We review the conceptual bases of XDMR and recast them in the general framework of the linear and nonlinear theories of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Emphasis is laid on the information content of XDMR spectra which offer a unique opportunity to disentangle the precession dynamics of spin and orbital magnetization components at given absorbing sites. For the sake of illustration, we focus on selected examples in which marked differences were found between FMR and XDMR spectra simultaneously recorded on ferrimagnetically ordered iron garnets. With pumping capabilities extended up to sub-THz frequencies, high-field XDMR should allow us to probe the precession of orbital magnetization components in paramagnetic organometallic complexes with large zero-field splitting. Even more challenging, we suggest that XDMR spectra might be recorded on selected antiferromagnetic crystals for which orbital magnetism is most often ignored in the absence of any supporting experimental evidence. PMID:22272105

  13. Detecting solar axions using Earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Huber, Patrick

    2006-10-01

    We show that solar axion conversion to photons in the Earth's magnetosphere can produce an x-ray flux, with average energy omega approximately 4 keV, which is measurable on the dark side of the Earth. The smallness of the Earth's magnetic field is compensated by a large magnetized volume. For axion masses m(a) less, similar10(-4) eV, a low-Earth-orbit x-ray detector with an effective area of 10(4) cm(2), pointed at the solar core, can probe the photon-axion coupling down to 10(-11) GeV-1, in 1 yr. Thus, the sensitivity of this new approach will be an order of magnitude beyond current laboratory limits. PMID:17155238

  14. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing hallways with different kinds of pillars, doors and elevators. All in all, this dissertation contributes the following: 1) provides a framework for understanding the presence of ambient magnetic fields indoors and utilizing them to solve the indoor localization problem; 2) develops an application that is independent of the user and the smart phones and 3) requires no other infrastructure since it is deployed on a device that encapsulates the sensing, computing and inferring functionalities, thereby making it a novel contribution to the mobile and pervasive computing domain.

  15. Black holes and magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    J. Bicak; V. Karas; T. Ledvinka

    2007-04-09

    Stationary axisymmetric magnetic fields are expelled from outer horizons of black holes as they become extremal. Extreme black holes exhibit Meissner effect also within exact Einstein--Maxwell theory and in string theories in higher dimensions. Since maximally rotating black holes are expected to be astrophysically most important, the expulsion of the magnetic flux from their horizons represents a potential threat to an electromagnetic mechanism launching the jets at the account of black-hole rotation.

  16. Wall scanning probe for high-field side plasma measurements on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Smick, Noah; LaBombard, Brian [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    A new, high-field side scanning probe has been added to Alcator C-Mod's complement of edge diagnostics. The wall scanning probe is designed to provide all the benefits of a linear plunge, multielectrode scanning probe while working from the confined space of the inner tokamak wall. The drive mechanism is an embedded coil which produces a torque with the ambient toroidal magnetic field when energized, thus allowing the probe to plunge to different preprogramed depths at different times during a plasma discharge. The probe tip is designed for easy replacement and is presently configured to operate as a modified, high heat-flux ''Gundestrup-type'' probe with four tungsten electrodes. The probe has demonstrated the ability to obtain cross-field profiles for electron temperature, density, floating potential, and plasma flow information (parallel and perpendicular to B) up to a depth of a few millimiters inside the last-closed flux surface in standard C-Mod discharges. The tungsten-tipped probe has proved very robust and shows little or no damage though it routinely handles surface heat fluxes on the order of 100 MW/m{sup 2} at peak insertion.

  17. Internal toroidal field measurements on the helicity injected tokamak using the transient internal probe

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.P.; Bohnet, M.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mattick, A.T. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the local toroidal magnetic field have been achieved on the helicity injected tokamak (HIT) using the transient internal probe (TIP). HIT is a low aspect (a=1.5, R=0.35 m) ratio tokamak designed to study steady state current drive. The TIP diagnostic involves accelerating a small diamond clad magneto-optic probe through the plasma at high velocities ({approximately}2 km/s) using a light gas gun. The local field is obtained by illuminating the probe with a laser and measuring the amount of Faraday rotation in the reflected beam. Measurements were conducted using unclad magneto-optic probes directed along a chord tangent to the toroidal field. Plasma conditions were typically n{sub e}{approximately}7{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e}{approximately}40{endash}80 eV. Measurement uncertainty is less than 2{percent}. No changes in plasma parameters were observed during the first 200 ms ({approximately}40 cm) of probe travel in the plasma. A temporary dip in plasma current, probably due to ablation of the retroreflecting material on the probe, is observed as the probe exits the plasma. Density is unaffected by the presence of the probe in the plasma. No long term deleterious effects to tokamak performance were observed as the TIP diagnostic was found to be quite compatible with the tokamak. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, J A; Herrera, E; Guillamón, I; Azpeitia, J; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Cuenca, M; Higuera, J A; Díaz, N; Pazos, M; García-Hernandez, M; Buendía, A; Vieira, S; Suderow, H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor ?-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert. PMID:25638089

  19. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; Cuenca, M.; Higuera, J. A.; Díaz, N.; Pazos, M.; García-Hernandez, M.; Buendía, A.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor ?-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  20. Observations of Mercury's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by Mariner 10 during the third and final encounter with the planet Mercury on 16 March 1975 were studied. A well developed bow shock and modest magnetosphere, previously observed at first encounter on 29 March 1974, were again observed. In addition, a much stronger magnetic field near closest approach, 400 gamma versus 98 gamma, was observed at an altitude of 327 km and approximately 70 deg north Mercurian latitude. Spherical harmonic analysis of the data provide an estimate of the centered planetary magnetic dipole of 4.7 x 10 to the 22nd power Gauss/cu cm with the axis tilted 12 deg to the rotation axis and in the same sense as Earth's. The interplanetary field was sufficiently different between first and third encounters that in addition to the very large field magnitude observed, it argues strongly against a complex induction process generating the observed planetary field. While a possibility exists that Mercury possesses a remanent field due to magnetization early in its formation, a present day active dynamo seems to be a more likely candidate for its origin.

  1. The Magnetic Field Geometry in M82 and Cen A

    E-print Network

    Terry Jay Jones

    2000-09-07

    Imaging polarimetry at 1.65 and 2.2 $\\mu $m is presented for the classic starburst galaxy M82 and the advanced merger system Cen A. Polarimetry at near IR wavelengths allows the magnetic field geometry in galaxies to be probed much deeper into dusty regions than optical polarimetry. In M82, the magnetic field throughout the nucleus has a polar geometry, presumably due to the massive vertical flow that is a result of the intense star formation there. Fully two thirds of the line of sight dust through to the center of M82 contains a vertical magnetic field. In Cen A, the prominent dust lane shows a normal planar field geometry. There is no indication of significant disturbance in the field geometry in the dust lane and the polarization strength is near normal for the amount of extinction. Either the magnetic field geometry was well maintained during the merger, or it reestablished itself very easily.

  2. Magnetic field tomography, helical magnetic fields and Faraday depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horellou, C.; Fletcher, A.

    2014-07-01

    Wide-band radio polarization observations offer the possibility to recover information about the magnetic fields in synchrotron sources, such as details of their three-dimensional configuration, that has previously been inaccessible. The key physical process involved is the Faraday rotation of the polarized emission in the source (and elsewhere along the wave's propagation path to the observer). In order to proceed, reliable methods are required for inverting the signals observed in wavelength space into useful data in Faraday space, with robust estimates of their uncertainty. In this paper, we examine how variations of the intrinsic angle of polarized emission ?0 with the Faraday depth ? within a source affect the observable quantities. Using simple models for the Faraday dispersion F(?) and ?0(?), along with the current and planned properties of the main radio interferometers, we demonstrate how degeneracies among the parameters describing the magneto-ionic medium can be minimized by combining observations in different wavebands. We also discuss how depolarization by Faraday dispersion due to a random component of the magnetic field attenuates the variations in the spectral energy distribution of the polarization and shifts its peak towards shorter wavelengths. This additional effect reduces the prospect of recovering the characteristics of the magnetic field helicity in magneto-ionic media dominated by the turbulent component of the magnetic field.

  3. Magnetic Fields of the Earth and Sun

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity that compares the magnetic field of the Earth to the complex magnetic field of the Sun. Using images of the Earth and Sun that have magnets attached in appropriate orientations, learners will use a handheld magnetic field detector to observe the magnetic field of the Earth and compare it to that of the Sun, especially in sunspot areas. For each group of students, this activity requires use of a handheld magnetic field detector, such as a Magnaprobe or a similar device, a bar magnet, and ten small disc magnets.

  4. Magnetic Forces and Field Line Density

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about depicting the relative strength of magnetic fields using field line density. Learners will use the magnetic field line drawing of six magnetic poles created in a previous activity and identify the areas of strong, weak, and medium magnetic intensity using the density of magnetic field lines. This is the fifth activity in the Magnetic Math booklet; this booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website. How to Draw Magnetic Fields - II in the Magnetic Math booklet must be completed prior to this activity.

  5. Origin of astrophysical magnetic fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, George B.

    The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields observed in stars and galaxies is the ?-? dynamo, in which a feedback loop involving differential rotation and helical turbulence leads to exponential amplification of a large-scale field. Recently this model has been criticized on the grounds that the Lorentz forces associated with the buildup of small-scale fields by the turbulence prevents the turbulent diffusion of magnetic field that is an essential part of the model. The author discusses the consequences for cosmology if dynamo theory is wrong, and reviews recent criticisms from a new perspective. They suggest new calculations that can help to decide whether the theory is right or wrong.

  6. A 7 T Pulsed Magnetic Field Generator for Magnetized Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guangyue; Liang, Yihan; Song, Falun; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Yulin; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A pulsed magnetic field generator was developed to study the effect of a magnetic field on the evolution of a laser-generated plasma. A 40 kV pulsed power system delivered a fast (~230 ns), 55 kA current pulse into a single-turn coil surrounding the laser target, using a capacitor bank of 200 nF, a laser-triggered switch and a low-impedance strip transmission line. A one-dimensional uniform 7 T pulsed magnetic field was created using a Helmholtz coil pair with a 6 mm diameter. The pulsed magnetic field was controlled to take effect synchronously with a nanosecond heating laser beam, a femtosecond probing laser beam and an optical Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) detector. The preliminary experiments demonstrate bifurcation and focusing of plasma expansion in a transverse magnetic field.

  7. EXPLORER 10 MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Heppner; N. F. Ness; C. S. Scearce; T. L. Skillman

    1963-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements made by means of Explorer 10 over geocentric ; distances of 1.8 to 42.6R\\/sub e\\/ on March 25experiment on the same satellite are ; referenced in interpretations. The close-in data are consistent with the ; existence of a very weak ring current below 3R\\/sub e\\/ along the trajectory, but ; alternative explanations for the field deviations are

  8. COLLIMATION OF COSMIC RAYS BY THE INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. G. McCracken; N. F. Ness

    1966-01-01

    a portion of the cosmic-ray and magnetic data observed during one of these flare events and lo demonstrate specific particle guidance properties of the interplanetary magnetic field. The data were obtained at a time when the spacecraft was 2.8 X 106 km from earth and at a sun-earth probe angle of 90 ø east of the sun and arc, therefore,

  9. Quantum Probe and Design for a Chemical Compass with Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianming

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic fields as weak as Earth’s may affect the outcome of certain photochemical reactions that go through a radical pair intermediate. When the reaction environment is anisotropic, this phenomenon can form the basis of a chemical compass and has been proposed as a mechanism for animal magnetoreception. Here, we demonstrate how to optimize the design of a chemical compass with a much better directional sensitivity simply by a gradient field, e.g., from a magnetic nanostructure. We propose an experimental test of these predictions, and suggest design principles for a hybrid metallic-organic chemical compass. In addition to the practical interest in designing a biomimetic weak magnetic field sensor, our result shows that gradient fields can serve as powerful tools to probe spin correlations in radical pair reactions.

  10. Effects of magnetic fields on iron electrodeposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Matsushima; T. Nohira; I. Mogi; Y. Ito

    2004-01-01

    The effects of magnetic fields (of 0–5 T magnetic flux density) on iron electrodeposition were investigated in terms of current efficiency, morphology and crystal orientation. The AFM images showed that the shape of iron grains was angular in no magnetic field and roundish in magnetic fields. The occurrence of preferred orientation parallel to the substrate plane was influenced by an

  11. How to Draw Magnetic Fields - I

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about depicting magnetic fields. Learners will observe two provided drawings of magnetic field line patterns for bar magnets in simple orientations of like and unlike polarities and carefully draw the field lines for both orientations. This is the third activity in the Magnetic Math booklet; this booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website.

  12. Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2000-01-01

    An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

  13. Jupiter's magnetic field and magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Among the planets of the solar system, Jupiter is unique in connection with its size and its large magnetic moment, second only to the sun's. The Jovian magnetic field was first detected indirectly by radio astronomers who postulated its existence to explain observations of nonthermal radio emissions from Jupiter at decimetric and decametric wavelengths. Since the early radio astronomical studies of the Jovian magnetosphere, four spacecraft have flown by the planet at close distances and have provided in situ information about the geometry of the magnetic field and its strength. The Jovian magnetosphere is described in terms of three principal regions. The inner magnetosphere is the region where the magnetic field created by sources internal to the planet dominates. The region in which the equatorial currents flow is denoted as the middle magnetosphere. In the outer magnetosphere, the field has a large southward component and exhibits large temporal and/or spatial variations in magnitude and direction in response to changes in solar wind pressure.

  14. Crystal field and magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

  15. Testing a sheath-compensated Langmuir probe in geometrically and magnetically expanding plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Higashiyama, Hiroki; Takaki, Koichi; Ando, Akira

    2015-01-01

    A sheath expansion around the Langmuir probe is known to give a significantly overestimated plasma density. Here, the sheath expansion effect suggested by Sheridan [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3084 (2000)] is successfully incorporated with no cumbersome analysis of the current–voltage (I–V) characteristics of the planar probe by measuring local plasma potential, floating potential, and ion saturation current. The probe consists of an emissive probe and two planar Langmuir probes, and is tested in low-pressure geometrically and magnetically expanding plasmas. The electron temperature estimated from the difference between the local plasma and floating potentials in the geometrically expanding plasma is in good agreement with that obtained from a classical analysis of the I–V characteristics. The plasma density computed with taking into account the sheath expansion effect shows significantly lower values than that obtained from the classical density estimation. The measurements in the magnetically expanding plasma successfully reproduce both the presence of the high-temperature population of electrons near the last field lines intersecting the radial wall at the open source exit and the presence of cold electrons outside the last field lines. The presently proposed method will lead to easy access to the two- and/or three-dimensional diagnoses of the low-pressure plasma structures.

  16. A high-field superferric NMR magnet.

    PubMed

    Huson, F R; Bryan, R N; MacKay, W W; Herrick, R C; Colvin, J; Ford, J J; Pissanetzky, S; Plishker, G A; Rocha, R; Schmidt, W

    1993-01-01

    Strong, extensive magnetic fringe fields are a significant problem with magnetic resonance imaging magnets. This is particularly acute with 4-T, whole-body research magnets. To date this problem has been addressed by restricting an extensive zone around the unshielded magnet or by placing external unsaturated iron shielding around the magnet. This paper describes a solution to this problem which uses superconducting coils closely integrated with fully saturated iron elements. A 4-T, 30-cm-bore prototype, based on this design principle, was built and tested. The 5 G fringe field is contained within 1 meter of the magnet bore along the z axis. Homogeneity of the raw magnetic field is 10 ppm over 30% of the magnet's diameter after passive shimming. Compared with an unshielded magnet, 20% less superconductor is required to generate the magnetic field. Images and spectra are presented to demonstrate the magnet's viability for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. PMID:8419740

  17. Magnetic fields in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The observed properties of solar magnetic fields are reviewed, with particular reference to the complexities imposed on the field by motions of the highly conducting gas. Turbulent interactions between gas and field lead to heating or cooling of the gas according to whether the field energy density is less or greater than the maximum kinetic energy density in the convection zone. The field strength above which cooling sets in is 700 gauss. A weak solar dipole field may be primeval, but dynamo action is also important in generating new flux. The dynamo is probably not confined to the convection zone, but extends throughout most of the volume of the sun. Planetary tides appear to play a role in driving the dynamo.

  18. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At ?6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  19. Slotless Permanent-Magnet Machines: General Analytical Magnetic Field Calculation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre-Daniel Pfister; Yves Perriard

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a general analytical model for predicting the magnetic field of slotless permanent-magnet machines. The model takes into account the effect of eddy currents in conductive regions and notably in conductive permanent magnets without neglecting their remanent field. The modeling of this effect is important for the design of very high speed slotless permanent-magnet machines, as the power

  20. Measuring Magnetic Fields Near and Far with the SKA via the Zeeman Effect

    E-print Network

    Robishaw, Timothy; Surcis, Gabriele; Vlemmings, Wouter; Richards, A M S; Etoka, Sandra; Bourke, Tyler; Fish, Vincent; Gray, Malcolm; Imai, Hiroshi; Kramer, Busaba; McBride, James; Momjian, Emmanuel; Sarma, Anuj; Zijlstra, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of Zeeman splitting in spectral lines---both in emission and absorption---can provide direct estimates of the magnetic field strength and direction in atomic and molecular clouds, both in our own Milky Way and in external galaxies. This method will probe the magnetic field in the warm and cold neutral components of the interstellar medium, providing a complement to the extensive SKA Faraday studies planning to probe the field in the ionized components.

  1. Magnetic field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws of electromagnetism. According to a rule of the left hand: if the magnetic field in a kernel is directed to drawing, electric current are directed to an axis of rotation of the Earth, - a action of force clockwise (to West). Definition of the force causing drift a kernel according to the law of Ampere F = IBlsin. Powerful force 3,5 × 1012 Nyton, what makes drift of the central part of a kernel of the Earth on 0,2 the longitude in year to West, and also it is engine of the mechanism of movement of slabs together with continents. Movement of a core of the Earth carry out around of a terrestrial axis one circulation in the western direction in 2000 of years. Linear speed of rotation of a kernel concerning a mantle on border the mantle a kernel: V = × 3,471 × 10 = 3,818 × 10 m/s = 33 m/day = 12 km/years. Considering greater viscosity of a mantle, the powerful energy at rotation of a kernel seize a mantle and lithospheric slabs and makes their collisions as a result of which there are earthquakes and volcano. Continents Northern and Southern America every year separate from the Europe and Africa on several centimeters. Atlantic ocean as a result of movement of these slabs with such speed was formed for 200 million years, that in comparison with the age of the Earth - several billions years, not so long time. Drift of a kernel in the western direction is a principal cause of delay of speed of rotation of the Earth. Flow of radial electric currents allot according to the law of Joule - Lenz, the quantity of warmth : Q = I2Rt = IUt, of thermal energy 6,92 × 1017 calories/year. This defines heating of a kernel and the Earth as a whole. In the valley of the median-Atlantic ridge having numerous volcanos, the lava flow constantly thus warm up waters of Atlantic ocean. It is a fact the warm current Gulf Stream. Thawing of a permafrost and ices of Arctic ocean, of glaciers of Greenland and Antarctica is acknowledgement: the warmth of earth defines character of thawing of glaciers and a permafrost. This is a global warming. The version of the author: the period

  2. Advances in high field magnetism at Osaka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, M.

    1989-03-01

    Recent advances in high field magnetism mainly done in the High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Osaka University, are reviewed. Various magnetic and electronic properties are induced in high fields; it is emphasized that the newly developed incommensurate mean field model is effective in understanding complex phase diagrams such as in CeSb, CeBi and PrCo 2Si 2.

  3. Field induced anisotropic cooperativity in a magnetic colloidal glass

    E-print Network

    E Wandersman; Y Chushkin; E Dubois; V Dupuis; A Robert; R Perzynski

    2015-02-03

    The translational dynamics in a repulsive colloidal glass-former is probed by time-resolved X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy. In this dense dispersion of charge-stabilized and magnetic nanoparticles, the interaction potential can be tuned, from quasi-isotropic to anisotropic by applying an external magnetic field. Structural and dynamical anisotropies are reported on interparticle lengthscales associated with highly anisotropic cooperativity, almost two orders of magnitude larger in the field direction than in the perpendicular direction and in zero field.

  4. Characterization of the electronic properties of magnetic and semiconductor devices using scanning probe techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Maria Schaadt

    2003-01-01

    In the first part of this dissertation, scanning probe techniques are used in the study of localized charge deposition and subsequent transport in Co nanoclusters embedded in a SiO2 matrix are presented, and the application of this material in a hybrid magneto-electronic device for magnetic field sensing is described. Co nanoclusters are charged by applying a bias voltage pulse between

  5. LABORATORY V MAGNETIC FIELDS AND FORCES

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    's technology. Magnets are used today to image parts of the body, to explore the mysteries of the human brain to combine magnets to change the magnetic field at any point. You decide to determine the form

  6. Quantitative estimates of magnetic field reconnection properties from electric and magnetic field measurements

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Quantitative estimates of magnetic field reconnection properties from electric and magnetic field there are positive electric field components tangential to the magnetopause and a magnetic field component normal to it. Because these three components are the smallest of the six electric and magnetic fields

  7. Explaining Mercury's peculiar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Johannes; Cao, Hao; Heyner, Daniel; Dietrich, Wieland; Christensen, Ulrich R.

    2014-05-01

    MESSENGER magnetometer data revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is not only particularly weak but also has a peculiar geometry. The MESSENGER team finds that the location of the magnetic equator always lies significantly north of the geographic equator, is largely independent of the distance to the planet, and also varies only weakly with longitude. The field is best described by an axial dipole that is offset to the north by about 20% of the planetary radius. In terms of classical Gauss coefficients, this translates into a low axial dipole component of g10= -190 nT but a relatively large axial quadrupole contribution that amounts to roughly 40% of this value. The axial octupole is also sizable while higher harmonic contributions are much weaker. Very remarkable is also the fact that the equatorial dipole contribution is very small, consistent with a dipole tilt below 0.8 degree, and this is also true for the other non-axisymmetic field contributions. We analyze several numerical dynamos concerning their capability of explaining Mercury's magnetic field. Classical schemes geared to model the geomagnetic field typically show a much weaker quadrupole component and thus a smaller offset. The onset only becomes larger when the dynamo operates in the multipolar regime at higher Rayleigh numbers. However, since the more complex dynamics generally promotes all higher multipole contributions the location of the magnetic equator varies strongly with longitude and distance to the planet. The situation improves when introducing a stably stratified outer layer in the dynamo region, representing either a rigid FeS layer or a sub-adiabatic core-mantle boundary heat flux. This layer filters out the higher harmonic contributions and the field not only becomes sufficiently weak but also assumes a Mercury like offset geometry during a few percent of the simulation time. To increase the likelihood for the offset configuration, the north-south symmetry must be permanently broken and we explore two scenarios. Increasing the heat flux through the northern hemisphere of the core-mantle boundary is an obvious choice but is not supported by current models for Mercury's mantle. We find that a combination of internal rather than bottom driving and an increased heat flux through the equatorial region of the core-mantle boundary also promotes the required symmetry breaking and results in very Mercury like fields. The reason is that the imposed heat flux pattern, though being equatorially symmetric, lowers the critical Rayleigh number for the onset of equatorially anti-symmetric convection modes. In both scenarios, a stably stratified layer or a feedback coupling to the magnetospheric field is required for lowering the field strength to Mercury-like values.

  8. PLANT GROWTH UNDER STATIC MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCEê

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. RÃCUCIU; D. CREANGÃ; I. HORGA

    2008-01-01

    Already germinated seeds of Zea mays were cultivated in the presence of static magnetic field in order to observe several biochemical changes and stimulation effect on plantlets growth. Magnetic treatment involved the application of five different values of magnetic induction of static magnetic field, ranging between 50 mT and 250 mT, during 14 days. In order to investigate the biochemical

  9. Using Faraday Rotation Gradients to probe Magnetic Tower Models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehreen Mahmud; Denise C. Gabuzda

    2009-01-01

    Parsec-scale multi-wavelength VLBA polarization observations can be used to study the magnetic-field structures of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) based on Faraday Rotation (FR) gradients. A number of transverse FR gradients have been found, and interpreted as corresponding to helical magnetic fields wrapped around the jets; the gradients reflect the systematic change in the line-of-sight component of a toroidal or helical

  10. Field errors in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.Q.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of this workshop is a discussion of the techniques for tracking particles through arbitrary accelerator field configurations to look for dynamical effects that are suggested by various theoretical models but are not amenable to detailed analysis. A major motivation for this type of study is that many of our accelerator projects are based on the use of superconducting magnets which have field imperfections that are larger and of a more complex nature than those of conventional magnets. Questions such as resonances, uncorrectable closed orbit effects, coupling between planes, and diffusion mechanisms all assume new importance. Since, simultaneously, we are trying to do sophisticated beam manipulations such as stacking, high current accelerator, long life storage, and low loss extraction, we clearly need efficient and accurate tracking programs to proceed with confidence.

  11. Simultaneous near field imaging of electric and magnetic field in photonic crystal nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignolini, Silvia; Intonti, Francesca; Riboli, Francesco; Wiersma, Diederik Sybolt; Balet, Laurent; Li, Lianhe H.; Francardi, Marco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Fiore, Andrea; Gurioli, Massimo

    2012-06-01

    The insertion of a metal-coated tip on the surface of a photonic crystal microcavity is used for simultaneous near field imaging of electric and magnetic fields in photonic crystal nanocavities, via the radiative emission of embedded semiconductor quantum dots (QD). The photoluminescence intensity map directly gives the electric field distribution, to which the electric dipole of the QD is coupled. The magnetic field generates, via Faraday's law, a circular current in the apex of the metallized probe that can be schematized as a ring. The resulting magnetic perturbation of the photonic modes induces a blue shift, which can be used to map the magnetic field, within a single near-field scan.

  12. Dynamics of positive probes in underdense, strongly magnetized, E×B drifting plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Cooke, David L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Electron trapping, electron heating, space-charge wings, wake eddies, and current collection by a positive probe in E×B drifting plasma were studied in three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. In these simulations, electrons and ions were magnetized with respect to the probe and the plasma was underdense (?{sub pe}probe was created with background electric and magnetic fields. Four distinct regions developed in the presences of the positive probe: a quasi-trapped electron region, an electron-depletion wing, an ion-rich wing, and a wake region. We report on the observations of strong electron heating mechanisms, space-charge wings, ion cyclotron charge-density eddies in the wake, electron acceleration due to a magnetic presheath, and the current-voltage relationship.

  13. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  14. Plasma stability in a dipole magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Simakov, Andrei N., 1974-

    2001-01-01

    The MHD and kinetic stability of an axially symmetric plasma, confined by a poloidal magnetic field with closed lines, is considered. In such a system the stabilizing effects of plasma compression and magnetic field ...

  15. A new approach for highly accurate, remote temperature probing using magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Liu, Wenzhong; Kong, Li; Morais, Paulo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report on a new approach for remote temperature probing that provides accuracy as good as 0.017°C (0.0055% accuracy) by measuring the magnetisation curve of magnetic nanoparticles. We included here the theoretical model construction and the inverse calculation method, and explored the impact caused by the temperature dependence of the saturation magnetisation and the applied magnetic field range. The reported results are of great significance in the establishment of safer protocols for the hyperthermia therapy and for the thermal assisted drug delivery technology. Likewise, our approach potentially impacts basic science as it provides a robust thermodynamic tool for noninvasive investigation of cell metabolism. PMID:25315470

  16. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh 208 016 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  17. Minireview: Biological effects of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Mustarelli, P. (Lab. NMR, Pavia (Italy)); Caprotti, M. (Fondazione Clinica del Lavoro, Pavia (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    The literature about the biological effects of magnetic fields is reviewed. The authors begin by discussing the weak and/or time variable fields, responsible for subtle changes in the circadian rhythms of superior animals, which are believed to be induced by same sort of resonant mechanism. The safety issues related with the strong magnetic fields and gradients generated by clinical NMR magnets are then considered. The last portion summarizes the debate about the biological effects of strong and uniform magnetic fields.

  18. High RF Magnetic Field Near-Field Microwave Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Tamin; Mircea, Dragos I.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2010-03-01

    Near-field microwave microscopes have been developed to quantitatively image RF and microwave properties of a variety of materials on deep sub-wavelength scales [1]. Microscopes that develop high-RF magnetic fields on short length scales are useful for examining the fundamental electrodynamic properties of superconductors [2]. We are creating a new class of near-field microwave microscopes that develop RF fields on the scale of 1 Tesla on sub-micron length scales. These microscopes will be employed to investigate defects that limit the RF properties of bulk Nb materials used in accelerator cavities, and the nonlinear Meissner effect in novel superconductors. Work funded by the US Department of Energy. [1] S. M. Anlage, V. V. Talanov, A. R. Schwartz, ``Principles of Near-Field Microwave Microscopy,'' in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Electrical and Electromechanical Phenomena at the Nanoscale, Volume 1, edited by S. V. Kalinin and A. Gruverman (Springer-Verlag, New York, 2007), pp. 215-253. [2] D. I. Mircea, H. Xu, S. M. Anlage, ``Phase-sensitive Harmonic Measurements of Microwave Nonlinearities in Cuprate Thin Films,'' Phys. Rev. B 80, 144505 (2009).

  19. Lightning-Driven Electric and Magnetic Fields Measured in the Stratosphere: Implications for Sprites

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    Lightning-Driven Electric and Magnetic Fields Measured in the Stratosphere: Implications made from microform." Signature Date #12;#12;University of Washington Abstract Lightning impedance, dou- ble Langmuir probe instrument is designed specifically for measuring these large lightning

  20. A multichannel magnetic probe system for analysing magnetic fluctuations in helical axis plasmas.

    PubMed

    Haskey, S R; Blackwell, B D; Seiwald, B; Hole, M J; Pretty, D G; Howard, J; Wach, J

    2013-09-01

    The need to understand the structure of magnetic fluctuations in H-1NF heliac [S. Hamberger et al., Fusion Technol. 17, 123 (1990)] plasmas has motivated the installation of a sixteen former, tri-axis helical magnetic probe Mirnov array (HMA). The new array complements two existing poloidal Mirnov arrays by providing polarisation information, higher frequency response, and improved toroidal resolution. The helical placement is ideal for helical axis plasmas because it positions the array as close as possible to the plasma in regions of varying degrees of favourable curvature in the magnetohydrodynamic sense, but almost constant magnetic angle. This makes phase variation with probe position near linear, greatly simplifying the analysis of the data. Several of the issues involved in the design, installation, data analysis, and calibration of this unique array are presented including probe coil design, frequency response measurements, mode number identification, orientation calculations, and mapping probe coil positions to magnetic coordinates. Details of specially designed digitally programmable pre-amplifiers, which allow gains and filters to be changed as part of the data acquisition initialisation sequence and stored with the probe signals, are also presented. The low shear heliac geometry [R. Jiménez-Gómez et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 033001 (2011)], flexibility of the H-1NF heliac, and wealth of information provided by the HMA create a unique opportunity for detailed study of Alfvén eigenmodes, which could be a serious issue for future fusion reactors. PMID:24089823

  1. A multichannel magnetic probe system for analysing magnetic fluctuations in helical axis plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haskey, S. R.; Blackwell, B. D.; Seiwald, B.; Hole, M. J.; Pretty, D. G.; Howard, J.; Wach, J. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)] [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    The need to understand the structure of magnetic fluctuations in H-1NF heliac [S. Hamberger et al., Fusion Technol. 17, 123 (1990)] plasmas has motivated the installation of a sixteen former, tri-axis helical magnetic probe Mirnov array (HMA). The new array complements two existing poloidal Mirnov arrays by providing polarisation information, higher frequency response, and improved toroidal resolution. The helical placement is ideal for helical axis plasmas because it positions the array as close as possible to the plasma in regions of varying degrees of favourable curvature in the magnetohydrodynamic sense, but almost constant magnetic angle. This makes phase variation with probe position near linear, greatly simplifying the analysis of the data. Several of the issues involved in the design, installation, data analysis, and calibration of this unique array are presented including probe coil design, frequency response measurements, mode number identification, orientation calculations, and mapping probe coil positions to magnetic coordinates. Details of specially designed digitally programmable pre-amplifiers, which allow gains and filters to be changed as part of the data acquisition initialisation sequence and stored with the probe signals, are also presented. The low shear heliac geometry [R. Jiménez-Gómez et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 033001 (2011)], flexibility of the H-1NF heliac, and wealth of information provided by the HMA create a unique opportunity for detailed study of Alfvén eigenmodes, which could be a serious issue for future fusion reactors.

  2. Study of local magnetic fields and magnetic ordering in fluid and solid matrices containing magnetite nanoparticles using TEMPOL stable radical

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander L. Kovarski; Olga N. Sorokina

    2007-01-01

    The stable nitroxide radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxy-piperidin-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) has been applied as a sensor to study magnetite nanoparticles both in water suspension and in dried gelatin films. g-values and line widths of ESR spectra of the probe were found to be sensitive to the local magnetic fields of magnetic nanoparticles. Calculated on the basis of the sensor ESR spectra, local magnetic fields

  3. Magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Xiuqing Huang

    2008-12-10

    We investigate the factuality of the hypothetical magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field. It is shown from many aspects that the concept of the massive magnetic monopoles clearly is physically untrue. We argue that the static magnetic field of a bar magnet, in fact, is the static electric field of the periodically quasi-one-dimensional electric-dipole superlattice, which can be well established in some transition metals with the localized d-electron. This research may shed light on the perfect unification of magnetic and electrical phenomena.

  4. Anisotropy of magnetic emulsions induced by magnetic and electric fields

    E-print Network

    Yury I. Dikansky; Alexander N. Tyatyushkin; Arthur R. Zakinyan

    2011-09-10

    The anisotropy of magnetic emulsions induced by simultaneously acting electric and magnetic fields is theoretically and experimentally investigated. Due to the anisotropy, the electric conductivity and magnetic permeability of a magnetic emulsion are no longer scalar coefficients, but are tensors. The electric conductivity and magnetic permeability tensors of sufficiently diluted emulsions in sufficiently weak electric and magnetic fields are found as functions of the electric and magnetic intensity vectors. The theoretically predicted induced anisotropy was verified experimentally. The experimental data are analyzed and compared with theoretical predictions. The results of the analysis and comparison are discussed.

  5. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Doran D; Alexson, Dimitri A; Garbini, Joseph L

    2013-09-01

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 ?m diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner. PMID:24089869

  6. Microwave Measurements of Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2006-08-01

    Magnetic field measurements of the solar corona using microwave observation are reviewed. The solar corona is filled with highly ionised plasma and magnetic field. Moving charged particles interact with magnetic field due to Lorentz force. This results in gyration motion perpendicular to the magnetic field and free motion along the magnetic field. Circularly polarized electro-magnetic waves interact with gyrating electrons efficiently and the interaction depends on the sense of circular polarization (right-handed or left-handed). This is the reason why we can measure magnetic field strength through microwave observations. This process does not require complicated quantum physics but the classical treatment is enough. Hence the inversion of measured values to magnetic field strength is simpler than in the case of optical and infrared measurements. There are several methods to measure magnetic field strength through microwave observations. We can divide them into two categories: one is based on emission mechanisms and the other is based on wave propagation. In the case of emission mechanisms, thermal f-f emission, thermal gyro-resonance emission and non-thermal gyro-synchrotron emission can be used to measure magnetic field strength. In the case of wave propagation, polarization reversal due to propagation through quasi-transverse magnetic field region can be used. Examples of distribution of magnetic field strength in the solar corona measured by Nobeyama Radioheliograph will be presented.

  7. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y. [Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); QSS Inc., NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States)

    2006-01-15

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10{sup -4} Pa Xe (3.3x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) to 1.1x10{sup -3} Pa Xe (8.4x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures.

  8. Harmonic undulator radiations with constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevakhan, Hussain; Mishra, G.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic undulators has been analysed in the presence of constant magnetic field along the direction of main undulator field. The spectrum modifications in harmonic undulator radiations and intensity degradation as a function of constant magnetic field magnitude at fundamental and third harmonics have been evaluated with a numerical integration method and generalised Bessel function. The role of harmonic field to overcome the intensity reduction due to constant magnetic field and energy spread in electron beam has also been demonstrated.

  9. How to Draw Magnetic Fields - II

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about depicting magnetic polarity. Learners will observe several provided drawings of magnetic field line patterns for bar magnets in simple orientations of like and unlike polarities and carefully draw the field lines and depict the polarities for several orientations, including an arrangement of six magnetic poles. This is the fourth activity in the Magnetic Math booklet; this booklet can be found on the Space Math@NASA website.

  10. Design and validation of the ball-pen probe for measurements in a low-temperature magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousselin, G.; Cavalier, J.; Pautex, J. F.; Heuraux, S.; Lemoine, N.; Bonhomme, G.

    2013-01-01

    Ball-pen probes have been used in fusion devices for direct measurements of the plasma potential. Their application in low-temperature magnetized plasma devices is still subject to studies. In this context, a ball-pen probe has been recently implemented on the linear plasma device Mirabelle. Produced by a thermionic discharge, the plasma is characterized by a low electron temperature and a low density. Plasma confinement is provided by an axial magnetic field that goes up to 100 mT. The principle of the ball-pen probe is to adjust the saturation current ratio to 1 by reducing the electron current contribution. In that case, the floating potential of the probe is close to the plasma potential. A thorough study of the ball-pen probe operation is performed for different designs of the probe over a large set of plasma conditions. Comparisons between ball-pen, Langmuir, and emissive probes are conducted in the same plasma conditions. The ball-pen probe is successfully measuring the plasma potential in these specific plasma conditions only if an adapted electronics and an adapted probe size to the plasma characteristic lengths (?D, ?ce) are used.

  11. Design and validation of the ball-pen probe for measurements in a low-temperature magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bousselin, G.; Cavalier, J.; Pautex, J. F.; Heuraux, S.; Lemoine, N.; Bonhomme, G. [IJL, Universite de Lorraine, CNRS (UMR 7198), BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2013-01-15

    Ball-pen probes have been used in fusion devices for direct measurements of the plasma potential. Their application in low-temperature magnetized plasma devices is still subject to studies. In this context, a ball-pen probe has been recently implemented on the linear plasma device Mirabelle. Produced by a thermionic discharge, the plasma is characterized by a low electron temperature and a low density. Plasma confinement is provided by an axial magnetic field that goes up to 100 mT. The principle of the ball-pen probe is to adjust the saturation current ratio to 1 by reducing the electron current contribution. In that case, the floating potential of the probe is close to the plasma potential. A thorough study of the ball-pen probe operation is performed for different designs of the probe over a large set of plasma conditions. Comparisons between ball-pen, Langmuir, and emissive probes are conducted in the same plasma conditions. The ball-pen probe is successfully measuring the plasma potential in these specific plasma conditions only if an adapted electronics and an adapted probe size to the plasma characteristic lengths ({lambda}{sub D}, {rho}{sub ce}) are used.

  12. Design and validation of the ball-pen probe for measurements in a low-temperature magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Bousselin, G; Cavalier, J; Pautex, J F; Heuraux, S; Lemoine, N; Bonhomme, G

    2013-01-01

    Ball-pen probes have been used in fusion devices for direct measurements of the plasma potential. Their application in low-temperature magnetized plasma devices is still subject to studies. In this context, a ball-pen probe has been recently implemented on the linear plasma device Mirabelle. Produced by a thermionic discharge, the plasma is characterized by a low electron temperature and a low density. Plasma confinement is provided by an axial magnetic field that goes up to 100 mT. The principle of the ball-pen probe is to adjust the saturation current ratio to 1 by reducing the electron current contribution. In that case, the floating potential of the probe is close to the plasma potential. A thorough study of the ball-pen probe operation is performed for different designs of the probe over a large set of plasma conditions. Comparisons between ball-pen, Langmuir, and emissive probes are conducted in the same plasma conditions. The ball-pen probe is successfully measuring the plasma potential in these specific plasma conditions only if an adapted electronics and an adapted probe size to the plasma characteristic lengths (?(D), ?(ce)) are used. PMID:23387648

  13. Interplanetary magnetic field data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    An interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) data set is presented that is uniform with respect to inclusion of cislunar IMF data only, and which has as complete time coverage as presently possible over a full solar cycle. Macroscale phenomena in the interplanetary medium (sector structure, heliolatitude variations, solar cycle variations, etc.) and other phenomena (e.g., ground level cosmic-ray events) for which knowledge of the IMF with hourly resolution is necessary, are discussed. Listings and plots of cislunar hourly averaged IMP parameters over the period November 27, 1963, to May 17, 1974, are presented along with discussion of the mutual consistency of the IMF data used herein. The magnetic tape from which the plots and listings were generated, which is available from the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), is also discussed.

  14. Magnetic field driven domain-wall propagation in magnetic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.R. [Physics Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China); Yan, P. [Physics Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: yanpeng@ust.hk; Lu, J.; He, C. [Physics Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China)

    2009-08-15

    The mechanism of magnetic field induced magnetic domain-wall (DW) propagation in a nanowire is revealed: A static DW cannot exist in a homogeneous magnetic nanowire when an external magnetic field is applied. Thus, a DW must vary with time under a static magnetic field. A moving DW must dissipate energy due to the Gilbert damping. As a result, the wire has to release its Zeeman energy through the DW propagation along the field direction. The DW propagation speed is proportional to the energy dissipation rate that is determined by the DW structure. The negative differential mobility in the intermediate field is due to the transition from high energy dissipation at low field to low energy dissipation at high field. For the field larger than the so-called Walker breakdown field, DW plane precesses around the wire, leading to the propagation speed oscillation.

  15. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Frank C. (Plano, TX); Spencer, John E. (Plano, TX)

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  16. Magnetic fluid flow phenomena in DC and rotating magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Rhodes, Scott E. (Scott Edward), 1981-

    2004-01-01

    An investigation of magnetic fluid experiments and analysis is presented in three parts: a study of magnetic field induced torques in magnetorheological fluids, a characterization and quantitative measurement of properties ...

  17. Behavior of the magnetic structures of the magnetic fluid film under tilted magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. C Yang; I. J Jang; H. E Horng; J. M Wu; Y. C Chiou; Chin-Yih Hong

    1999-01-01

    The patterns of the magnetic structure of the magnetic fluid thin film under tilted magnetic fields were taken to investigate the behavior of magnetic structures. The tilted angle ? is the angle between the direction of applied magnetic field and the normal line of the film. In our previous work, a nearly perfect ordered hexagonal structure in magnetic fluid thin

  18. Behavior of the magnetic structures of the magnetic fluid film under tilted magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. C. Yang; I. J. Jang; H. E. Horng; J. M. Wu; Y. C. Chiou; Chin-Yih Hong

    1999-01-01

    The patterns of the magnetic structure of the magnetic fluid thin film under tilted magnetic fields were taken to investigate the behavior of magnetic structures. The tilted angle theta is the angle between the direction of applied magnetic field and the normal line of the film. In our previous work, a nearly perfect ordered hexagonal structure in magnetic fluid thin

  19. Quantitative model of the magnetospheric magnetic field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. P. Olson; K. A. Pfitzer

    1974-01-01

    Quantitative representations of the magnetic fields associated with the magnetopause currents and the distributed currents (tail and quiet time ring currents) have been developed. These fields are used together with a dipole representation of the main field of the earth to model the total vector magnetospheric magnetic field. The model is based on quiet time data averaged over all 'tilt

  20. Near-Field Magnetic Dipole Moment Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Patrick K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the data analysis technique used for magnetic testing at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Excellent results have been obtained using this technique to convert a spacecraft s measured magnetic field data into its respective magnetic dipole moment model. The model is most accurate with the earth s geomagnetic field cancelled in a spherical region bounded by the measurement magnetometers with a minimum radius large enough to enclose the magnetic source. Considerably enhanced spacecraft magnetic testing is offered by using this technique in conjunction with a computer-controlled magnetic field measurement system. Such a system, with real-time magnetic field display capabilities, has been incorporated into other existing magnetic measurement facilities and is also used at remote locations where transport to a magnetics test facility is impractical.

  1. Magnetic field observations in Comet Halley's coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Styashkin, V. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-05-01

    During the encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer (MISCHA) aboard the Vega 1 spacecraft observed an increased level of magnetic field turbulence, resulting from an upstream bow wave. Both Vega spacecraft measured a peak field strength of 70-80 nT and observed draping of magnetic field lines around the cometary obstacle. An unexpected rotation of the magnetic field vector was observed, which may reflect either penetration of magnetic field lines into a diffuse layer related to the contact surface separating the solar-wind and cometary plasma, or the persistence of pre-existing interplanetary field structures.

  2. Full 180° Magnetization Reversal with Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J. M.; Ma, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals.

  3. Full 180° magnetization reversal with electric fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, J J; Hu, J M; Ma, J; Zhang, J X; Chen, L Q; Nan, C W

    2014-01-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals. PMID:25512070

  4. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  5. Full 180° Magnetization Reversal with Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J. M.; Ma, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving 180° magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180° magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90° magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180° magnetization reversals. PMID:25512070

  6. A field-sweep/field-lock system for superconducting magnets--Application to high-field EPR.

    PubMed

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G

    2006-12-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of +/-0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10(-5) T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR. PMID:17027306

  7. Probing of field-induced structures and their dynamics in ferrofluids using oscillatory rheology.

    PubMed

    Felicia, Leona J; Philip, John

    2014-10-21

    We probe field-induced structures and their dynamics in ferrofluids using oscillatory rheology. The magnetic field dependence of the relaxation time and crossover modulus showed two distinct regions, indicating the different microstructures in those regions. The observed relaxation at various magnetic field strengths indicates that side chains are attached to the pinned single-sphere-width chains between the rheometer plates. Our results suggest that the ferrofluid under a magnetic field exhibits a soft solidlike behavior whose relaxation is governed by the imposed strain rate and the magnetic field. Using the scaling factors obtained from the frequency and modulus at the crossover point in the oscillatory rheological measurements, the constant strain-rate frequency sweep data is superimposed onto a single master curve. The frequency scaling factor increases with the strain rate as a power law with an exponent close to unity, whereas the amplitude scaling factor is almost strain-rate-independent at high magnetic field strengths. These findings are useful for a better understanding of field-induced ordering of nanoparticles in fluids and their optimization for practical applications. PMID:25268053

  8. Magnetic field calculation and measurement of active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa

    2006-11-01

    Magnetic Bearings are typical devices in which electric energy and mechanical energy convert mutually. Magnetic Field indicates the relationship between 2 of the most important parameters in a magnetic bearing - current and force. This paper presents calculation and measurement of the magnetic field distribution of a self-designed magnetic bearing. Firstly, the static Maxwell's equations of the magnetic bearing are presented and a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is found to solve the equations and get post-process results by means of ANSYS software. Secondly, to confirm the calculation results a Lakeshore460 3-channel Gaussmeter is used to measure the magnetic flux density of the magnetic bearing in X, Y, Z directions accurately. According to the measurement data the author constructs a 3D magnetic field distribution digital model by means of MATLAB software. Thirdly, the calculation results and the measurement data are compared and analyzed; the comparing result indicates that the calculation results are consistent with the measurement data in allowable dimension variation, which means that the FEA calculation method of the magnetic bearing has high precision. Finally, it is concluded that the magnetic field calculation and measurement can accurately reflect the real magnetic distribution in the magnetic bearing and the result can guide the design and analysis of the magnetic bearing effectively.

  9. Diluted magnetic semiconductors: Novel properties in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. R.

    1990-06-01

    Diluted magnetic semiconductors, II-VI and IV-VI compounds in which the cation is partially replaced by a magnetic ion such as Mn or a rare earth, combine interesting semiconducting and magnetic properties. At zero applied field, the materials behave like normal semiconductors or semimetals with energy gaps that can be varied with the composition of the magnetic ion. In the presence of an applied field, however, novel properties are observed. These include large field-induced splittings of energy levels, leading to strong Faraday rotations and the possibility of energy-gap tuning by magnetic field, field and temperature-dependent g-factors, large negative magnetoresistance followed at higher fields by a slowly varying positive magnetoresistance, and large paramagnetism with coupling of the magnetic ions by superexchange. Not only can these properties be observed in bulk crystal, but also they suggest promising physics and applications in artificially structured materials.

  10. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK

    SciTech Connect

    Khotkevych, V. V.; Bending, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, BA2 7AY Bath (United Kingdom); Milosevic, M. V. [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, BA2 7AY Bath (United Kingdom); Department Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgelaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2008-12-15

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial {sup 3}He-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6x6x7 mm{sup 3} space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields {>=}10 mG/Hz{sup 1/2}. The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature.

  11. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK.

    PubMed

    Khotkevych, V V; Milosevi?, M V; Bending, S J

    2008-12-01

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial (3)He-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6x6x7 mm(3) space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields >or=10 mG/Hz(1/2). The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature. PMID:19123570

  12. Using Faraday Rotation Gradients to probe Magnetic Tower Models

    E-print Network

    Mahmud, Mehreen

    2009-01-01

    Parsec-scale multi-wavelength VLBA polarization observations can be used to study the magnetic-field structures of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) based on Faraday Rotation (FR) gradients. A number of transverse FR gradients have been found, and interpreted as corresponding to helical magnetic fields wrapped around the jets; the gradients reflect the systematic change in the line-of-sight component of a toroidal or helical magnetic field across the jet (e.g Gabuzda, Murray & Cronin 2004). Our observations of a sample of BL Lac objects at six wavelengths near 2, 4 and 6 cm have also revealed a previously undetected phenomena: these transverse gradients sometimes change their direction with distance from the core. We have observed this behaviour in at least five sources, which display gradients in their VLBI core region opposite to those in the jet. We suggest that this may be linked to magnetic tower models. In magnetic tower models, the field lines go outward with the jet and return and close in the accretio...

  13. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  14. Exploring Magnetic Fields with a Compass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunk, Brandon; Beichner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A compass is an excellent classroom tool for the exploration of magnetic fields. Any student can tell you that a compass is used to determine which direction is north, but when paired with some basic trigonometry, the compass can be used to actually measure the strength of the magnetic field due to a nearby magnet or current-carrying wire. In this…

  15. Analysis of magnetic field levels at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, Christos G.

    1994-01-01

    The scope of this work is to evaluate the magnetic field levels of distribution systems and other equipment at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Magnetic fields levels in several operational areas and various facilities are investigated. Three dimensional mappings and contour are provided along with the measured data. Furthermore, the portion of magnetic fields generated by the 60 Hz fundamental frequency and the portion generated by harmonics are examined. Finally, possible mitigation techniques for attenuating fields from electric panels are discussed.

  16. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1994-01-01

    The research efforts funded by the Uranus Data Analysis Program (UDAP) grant to the Bartol Research Institute (BRI) involved the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. Upstream wave studies are motivated as a study of the physics of collisionless shocks. Collisionless shocks in plasmas are capable of 'reflecting' a fraction of the incoming thermal particle distribution and directing the resulting energetic particle motion back into the upstream region. Once within the upstream region, the backward streaming energetic particles convey information of the approaching shock to the supersonic flow. This particle population is responsible for the generation of upstream magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations known as 'upstream waves', for slowing the incoming wind prior to the formation of the shock ramp, and for heating of the upstream plasma. The waves produced at Uranus not only differed in several regards from the observations at other planetary bow shocks, but also gave new information regarding the nature of the reflected particle populations which were largely unmeasurable by the particle instruments. Four distinct magnetic field wave types were observed upstream of the Uranian bow shock: low-frequency Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves excited by energetic protons originating at or behind the bow shock; whistler wave bursts driven by gyrating ion distributions within the shock ramp; and two whistler wave types simultaneously observed upstream of the flanks of the shock and argued to arise from resonance with energetic electrons. In addition, observations of energetic particle distributions by the LECP experiment, thermal particle populations observed by the PLS experiment, and electron plasma oscillations recorded by the PWS experiment proved instrumental to this study and are included to some degree in the papers and presentations supported by this grant.

  17. Toroidal Field Generation and Magnetic Field Relaxation in a Conical Theta Pinch Generated Configuration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wira, Kurnia

    Two different cone angles, 10^ circ and 18^circ, were used in this experiment to investigate the effect of the cone angle on the toroidal field generation and magnetic field structure evolution. The configuration was generated in the pinch and then translated into a 15 cm (diameter) x 70 cm (length) stainless steel flux conserver. The hydrogen fill gas was puffed from the small end of the cone resulting in a pressure of approximately 15 mT at the middle of the pinch. The peak line-averaged electron density of the plasmoid was 1-3 times 10^{15} cm^ {-3} and its temperature was ~5 eV. The magnetic field structure of the configuration was measured by four 3 dimensional internal magnetic probes. Probes were placed at the same axial location on a given discharge. One of the probes was kept at the machine axis and the other probes formed a concentric circle around the axis. The measured magnetic field components were interpolated using a cubic-spline with a periodic end condition scheme along the circumference of each concentric circle formed by the probes. The magnetic helicity and energy of the configuration were calculated by algorithms which are independent of the chosen axis and the coordinate system. The magnetic fluxes were calculated after the configuration axis was located. Within the range of the examined cone angle, theta <=q 24 ^circ, the averaged toroidal field generation was measured to vary quadratically with the cone angle of the pinch (data for 24^ circ and 1.7^circ were obtained from other experiments). Therefore, a spheromak -like configuration could be generated directly by a Conical Theta Pinch (e.g. 18^circ pinch) if the poloidal and the generated toroidal field had an appropriate distribution. Various experimental evidence, e.g. the time history of the magnetic helicity and energy decay, and the flux conversion indicate that the relaxation of the configuration has occurred in agreement with the Taylor hypothesis. The relaxation parameter, the ratio of the magnetic energy to magnetic helicity, time history indicates that the relaxation behaves like a turbulent relaxation process. For cone angles smaller than 2^circ the relaxation process would not be observed since the relaxation time is longer than the configuration life time. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  18. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  19. Abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)3(3+) … TPrA(•)] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet ? singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)3(3+) … TPrA(•)] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  20. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet ? singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature. PMID:25772580

  1. Unique topological characterization of braided magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A. R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hornig, G. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15

    We introduce a topological flux function to quantify the topology of magnetic braids: non-zero, line-tied magnetic fields whose field lines all connect between two boundaries. This scalar function is an ideal invariant defined on a cross-section of the magnetic field, and measures the average poloidal magnetic flux around any given field line, or the average pairwise crossing number between a given field line and all others. Moreover, its integral over the cross-section yields the relative magnetic helicity. Using the fact that the flux function is also an action in the Hamiltonian formulation of the field line equations, we prove that it uniquely characterizes the field line mapping and hence the magnetic topology.

  2. Atom probe field ion microscopy of high resistivity materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sibrandij, S.J.; Larson, D.J.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-02-01

    Over the last 30 years the atom probe has proved to be a powerful tool for studying nanometer-sized compositional fluctuations in a wide range of metallic alloys but has had only limited applications to semiconductors and ceramics. One of the primary reasons for this difference is the higher resistivity of semiconducting and ceramic specimens. Because of this high resistivity, the high voltage field evaporation pulse is attenuated before it reaches the apex of the specimen thereby making the pulse ineffective for field evaporation. Experiments have demonstrated that both variants of the voltage-pulsed atom probe (i.e., those instruments in which the field evaporation pulse is applied directly to the specimen and those in which the negative pulse is applied to a counter electrode in front of the specimen) are equally affected. In this overview, the limits of applicability of the voltage-pulsed atom probe to high resistivity materials are examined. In this study, a wide range of materials have been examined to determine whether field ion microscopy and voltage-pulsed field evaporation can be achieved and the results are summarized in the report. Field ion microscopy including dc field evaporation was possible for all materials except bulk ceramic insulators and glasses. Field ion microscopy requires some conductivity both to achieve a high electric field at the apex of the specimen, and also to support the field ion current. In contrast, voltage-pulsed field evaporation requires transmission of the pulse to the apex of the specimen. All metallic alloys including high resistance alloys and metallic glasses were successfully field evaporated with a voltage pulse. Specimens that were produced from bulk material of several conducting ceramics including MoSi, TiB and TiC were also successfully field evaporated with a voltage pulse.

  3. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, Martin S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies.

  4. Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Lubell, M.S.

    1994-10-25

    A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies. 2 figs.

  5. RFID-based flexible low-cost EM field probe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Capdevila; R. Serrano; A. Aguasca; S. Blanch; J. Romeu; L. Jofre

    2008-01-01

    The capability of the RFID tags as a low cost flexible device to measure the EM complex field distribution has been presented and some preliminary results presented. The devices do not need any kind of electrical connexion giving them a high versatility to act as a remote EM probing device under different conditions of positioning and accessibility. Sensitivity and dynamic

  6. Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

  7. Holographic description of the Schwinger effect in electric and magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Yoshiki Sato; Kentaroh Yoshida

    2013-05-17

    We consider a generalization of the holographic Schwinger effect proposed by Semenoff and Zarembo to the case with constant electric and magnetic fields. There are two ways to turn on magnetic fields, i) the probe D3-brane picture and ii) the string world-sheet picture. In the former picture, magnetic fields both perpendicular and parallel to the electric field are activated by a Lorentz transformation and a spatial rotation. In the latter one, the classical solutions of the string world-sheet corresponding to circular Wilson loops are generalized to contain two additional parameters encoding the presence of magnetic fields.

  8. Probing the electromagnetic field distribution within a metallic nanodisk.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Rodríguez, David; Ferreiro-Vila, Elías; Prieto, Patricia; Anguita, José; González, María U; García-Martín, José M; Cebollada, Alfonso; García-Martín, Antonio; Armelles, Gaspar

    2011-12-01

    A Co nanolayer is used as a local probe to evaluate the vertical inhomogeneous distribution of the electromagnetic (EM) field within a resonant metallic nanodisk. Taking advantage of the direct relation between the magneto-optical activity and the electromagnetic field intensity in the Co layer, it is shown that the nonuniform EM distribution within the nanodisk under plasmon resonant conditions has maximum values close to the upper and lower flat faces, and a minimum value in the middle. PMID:21972067

  9. Dirac oscillator in an external magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Bhabani Prasad Mandal; Shweta Verma

    2009-12-19

    We show that 2+1 dimensional Dirac oscillators in an external magnetic field is mapped onto the same with reduced angular frequency in absence of magnetic field. This can be used to study the atomic transitions in a radiation field. Relativistic Landau levels are constructed explicitly. Several interesting features of this system are discussed.

  10. Representation of magnetic fields in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    Several methods by which a magnetic field in space can be represented are reviewed with particular attention to problems of the observed geomagnetic field. Time dependence is assumed to be negligible, and five main classes of representation are described by vector potential, scalar potential, orthogonal vectors, Euler potentials, and expanded magnetic field.

  11. Ohm's law for mean magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Boozer

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic fields associated with plasmas frequently exhibit small amplitude MHD fluctuations. It is useful to have equations for the magnetic field averaged over these fluctuations, the so-called mean field equations. Under very general assumptions it is shown that the effect of MHD fluctuations on a force-free plasma can be represented by one parameter in Ohm's law, which is effectively

  12. Magnetic Field Structure in Molecular Clouds by Polarization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Su, B. H.; Eswaraiah, C.; Pandey, A. K.; Wang, C. W.; Lai, S. P.; Tamura, M.; Sato, S.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a program to delineate magnetic field structure inside molecular clouds by optical and infrared polarization observations. An ordered magnetic field inside a dense cloud may efficiently align the spinning dust grains to cause a detectable level of optical and near-infrared polarization of otherwise unpolarized background starlight due to dichroic extinction. The near-infrared polarization data were taken by SIRPOL mounted on IRSF in SAAO. Here we present the SIRPOL results in RCW 57, for which the magnetic field is oriented along the cloud filaments, and in Carina Nebula, for which no intrinsic polarization is detected in the turbulent environment. We further describe TRIPOL, a compact and efficient polarimer to acquire polarized images simultaneously at g', r', and i' bands, which is recently developed at Nagoya University for adaption to small-aperture telescopes. We show how optical observations probe the translucent outer parts of a cloud, and when combining with infrared observations probing the dense parts, and with millimeter and submillimeter observations to sutdy the central embedded protostar, if there is one, would yield the magnetic field structure on different length scales in the star-formation process.

  13. Exploring High-Latitude Electric Field Variability With the Auroral Spatial Structures Probe Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, D.; Stromberg, E.; Neilsen, T. L.; Weston, C.; Byers, B.; Frazier, C. A.; Nelson, W.; Perkins, C.; Miller, J.; Swenson, C.; Fish, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe (ASSP) is a NASA sounding rocket mission to be launched in the late January 2014 time frame that, will be used to study both the spatial and temporal small scale variation of the electric and magnetic fields during active aurora and just before the onset of an auroral sub-storm. This will be accomplished through the use of a constellation of small payloads that separate relative to each other throughout a sounding rocket flight. The multiple baseline observations of the electric and magnetic fields will be used to observe variability of both the E-field and the Poynting flux. These observations will be placed in the context of available data, including winds, large scale E-fields, and proxy conductivity (airglow images) observations. In this way we will address the main scientific objective of this mission which is: What are the contributions of small spatial scale and rapid temporal scale fluctuations of electric fields relative to the larger-scale electrodynamic processes? The high altitude rocket will be launched along the magnetic field line and carry six sub-payloads to be ejected from the main payload at high velocity. The sub-payloads will be deployed both along the flight path and perpendicular to the flight path so that both spatial features and temporal-spatial ambiguities can be explored. The low-mass sub-payloads that, for a fixed ejection impulse will achieve at least a 50 km separation by the end of the flight are key to the observational success. Each sub-payload will carry a crossed pair of double-probe sensors to measure in-situ electric fields, a three axis magnetometer, a Langmuir probe and a GPS receiver. In this poster we review the ASSP science and mission, and preliminary design.

  14. The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe: Exploring Small-Scale High-Latitude Electric Field Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, D.; Weston, C.; Nelson, W.; Stromberg, E. M.; Byers, B.; Frazier, C.; Swenson, A.; Miller, J.; Carrick, B.; Neilsen, T. L.; Hidalgo, J. M.; Cox, W.; Evans, T.; Vangeison, V.; Perkins, C.; Fish, C. S.; Swenson, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe (ASSP) is a NASA sounding rocket mission to be launched in the late January 2014 time frame that will be used to study both the spatial and temporal small scale variation of the electric and magnetic fields during active aurora and just before the onset of an auroral sub-storm. This will be accomplished through the use of a constellation of small payloads that separate relative to each other throughout a sounding rocket flight. The multiple baseline observations of the electric and magnetic fields will be used to observe variability of both the E-field and the Poynting flux. These observations will be placed in the context of available data, including winds, large scale E-fields, and proxy conductivity (airglow image) observations. In this way we will address the main scientific objective of this mission which is: What are the contributions of small spatial scale and rapid temporal scale fluctuations of electric fields relative to the larger-scale electrodynamic processes? The high altitude rocket will be launched along the magnetic field line and carry six sub-payloads to be ejected from the main payload at high velocity. The sub-payloads will be deployed both along the flight path and perpendicular to the flight path so that both spatial features and temporal-spatial ambiguities can be explored. The low-mass sub-payloads will achieve at least a 35 km separation by the end of the flight and are key to observational success. Each sub-payload will carry a crossed pair of double-probe sensors to measure in-situ electric fields, a three axis magnetometer, a Langmuir probe and a GPS receiver. In this poster we review the ASSP science, mission, and design, and present instrument calibration and testing results.

  15. Magnetic field sensor for isotropically sensing an incident magnetic field in a sensor plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pant, Bharat B. (Inventor); Wan, Hong (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor that isotropically senses an incident magnetic field. This is preferably accomplished by providing a magnetic field sensor device that has one or more circular shaped magnetoresistive sensor elements for sensing the incident magnetic field. The magnetoresistive material used is preferably isotropic, and may be a CMR material or some form of a GMR material. Because the sensor elements are circular in shape, shape anisotropy is eliminated. Thus, the resulting magnetic field sensor device provides an output that is relatively independent of the direction of the incident magnetic field in the sensor plane.

  16. MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS B. Fornberg,2

    E-print Network

    Fornberg, Bengt

    MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS N. Flyer,1 B Axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields external to a unit sphere are studied as solutions to boundary value total azimuthal flux with a power-law distribution over the poloidal field. Particular attention is paid

  17. Magnetization measurements reveal the local shear stiffness of hydrogels probed by ferromagnetic nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, P.; Tschöpe, A.; Birringer, R.

    2014-12-01

    The local mechanical coupling of ferromagnetic nanorods in hydrogels was characterized by magnetization measurements. Nickel nanorods were synthesized by the AAO-template method and embedded in gelatine hydrogels with mechanically soft or hard matrix properties determined by the gelatine weight fraction. By applying a homogeneous magnetic field during gelation the nanorods were aligned along the field resulting in uniaxially textured ferrogels. The magnetization curves of the soft ferrogel exhibited not only important similarities but also characteristic differences as compared to the hard ferrogel. The hystereses measured in a field parallel to the texture axis were almost identical for both samples indicating effective coupling of the nanorods with the polymer network. By contrast, measurements in a magnetic field perpendicular to the texture axis revealed a much higher initial susceptibility of the soft as compared to the hard ferrogel. This difference was attributed to the additional rotation of the nanorods allowed by the reduced shear modulus in the soft ferrogel matrix. Two methods for data analysis were presented which enabled us to determine the shear modulus of the gelatine matrix which was interpreted as a local rather than macroscopic quantity in consideration of the nanoscale of the probe particles.

  18. Magnetic field waves at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lepping, Ronald P.; Mish, William H.; Wong, Hung K.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed research efforts funded by the UDAP grant to the BRI involve the study of magnetic field waves associated with the Uranian bow shock. This is a collaborative venture bringing together investigators at the BRI, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). In addition, other collaborations have been formed with investigators granted UDAP funds for similar studies and with investigators affiliated with other Voyager experiments. These investigations and the corresponding collaborations are included in the report. The proposed effort as originally conceived included an examination of waves downstream from the shock within the magnetosheath. However, the observations of unexpected complexity and diversity within the upstream region have necessitated that we confine our efforts to those observations recorded upstream of the bow shock on the inbound and outbound legs of the encounter by the Voyager 2 spacecraft.

  19. Magnetic shielding of an inhomogeneous magnetic field source by a bulk superconducting tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, K.; Fagnard, J.-F.; Wéra, L.; Vanderheyden, B.; Vanderbemden, P.

    2015-03-01

    Bulk type-II irreversible superconductors can act as excellent passive magnetic shields, with a strong attenuation of low frequency magnetic fields. Up to now, the performances of superconducting magnetic shields have mainly been studied in a homogenous magnetic field, considering only immunity problems, i.e. when the field is applied outside the tube and the inner field should ideally be zero. In this paper, we aim to investigate experimentally and numerically the magnetic response of a high-Tc bulk superconducting hollow cylinder at 77 K in an emission problem, i.e. when subjected to the non-uniform magnetic field generated by a source coil placed inside the tube. A bespoke 3D mapping system coupled with a three-axis Hall probe is used to measure the magnetic flux density distribution outside the superconducting magnetic shield. A finite element model is developed to understand how the magnetic field penetrates into the superconductor and how the induced superconducting shielding currents flow inside the shield in the case where the emitting coil is placed coaxially inside the tube. The finite element modelling is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Results show that a concentration of the magnetic flux lines occurs between the emitting coil and the superconducting screen. This effect is observed both with the modelling and the experiment. In the case of a long tube, we show that the main features of the field penetration in the superconducting walls can be reproduced with a simple analytical 1D model. This model is used to estimate the maximum flux density of the emitting coil that can be shielded by the superconductor.

  20. ICPP: Scale size of of magnetic turbulence as probed with 30 MeV runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaspers, Roger

    2000-10-01

    This paper reviews results concerning generation, confinement and transport of runaway electrons in the energy range 20-30 MeV in the TEXTOR tokamak. For future fusion reactors, it is of major importance to know the processes of runaway generation and runaway loss after disruptions, because of the potential damage to first wall components. Second, since the runaway electrons are effectively collisionless, their confinement is determined by the magnetic field turbulence. In this way the runaway transport provides a unique opportunity to probe turbulence in the core of a thermonuclear plasma. Runaway electrons above 20 MeV emit synchrotron radiation in the (near) infrared, which can easily be detected by thermographic cameras. This technique is developed and exploited at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak and has resulted in some spectacular results. These include: the experimental evidence of the secondary (`knock-on') runaway generation; the discovery of the runaway snake; the observation of disruption generated runaways; the probing of magnetic turbulence in the core of the plasma in Ohmic and additionally heated plasmas. The paper reviews these results with special emphasis on the subject of probing magnetic turbulence in the core of the plasma. Measurements in the TEXTOR-94 tokamak show that after switching on Neutral Beam Injection, the runaway population decays. The decay only starts with a significant delay, which decreases with increasing NBI heating power. This delay provides direct evidence of the energy dependence of runaway confinement, which is expected if magnetic modes govern the loss of runaway electrons. These observations allow to estimate the mode width ? of the magnetic perturbations:? smaller than 0.5 cm in Ohmic discharges, increasing to ?=3D 4.4 cm for 0.6 MW NBI power.

  1. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  2. Numerical analysis of magnetic field in superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamaru, Y. (Kanazawa Inst. of Technology, 7-1 Ohgigaoka, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921 (JP)); Amemiya, Y. (Chiba Inst. of Tech., Narashino (Japan))

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than the other systems of electric energy storage because of larger stored energy and higher efficiency. The other systems are the battery, the flywheel, the pumped-storage power station. Some models of solenoid type SMES are designed in U.S.A. and Japan. But a high magnetic field happens by the large scale SMES in the living environment, and makes the erroneous operations of the computer display, the pacemaker of the heart and the electronic equipments. We study some fit designs of magnetic shielding of the solenoidal type SMES for reduction of the magnetic field in living environment. When some superconducting shielding coils are over the main storage coil, magnetic field reduces remarkably than the case of non shielding coil. The calculated results of the magnetic field are obtained y the finite element method.

  3. Flow Transitions in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    1996-01-01

    Critical Rayleigh numbers have been measured in a liquid metal cylinder of finite height in the presence of a rotating magnetic field. Several different stability regimes were observed, which were determined by the values of the Rayleigh and Hartmann numbers. For weak rotating magnetic fields and small Rayleigh numbers, the experimental observations can be explained by the existence of a single non-axisymmetric meridional roll rotating around the cylinder, driven by the azimuthal component of the magnetic field. The measured dependence of rotational velocity on magnetic field strength is consistent with the existence of laminar flow in this regime.

  4. Magnetic Fields in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, Marijke

    This chapter presents a review of observational studies to determine the magnetic field in the Milky Way, both in the disk and in the halo, focused on recent developments and on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar medium. I discuss some terminology which is confusingly or inconsistently used and try to summarize current status of our knowledge on magnetic field configurations and strengths in the Milky Way. Although many open questions still exist, more and more conclusions can be drawn on the large-scale and small-scale components of the Galactic magnetic field. The chapter is concluded with a brief outlook to observational projects in the near future.

  5. Magnetic fields in anisotropic relativistic stars

    E-print Network

    Vladimir Folomeev; Vladimir Dzhunushaliev

    2015-02-28

    Relativistic, spherically symmetric configurations consisting of a gravitating magnetized anisotropic fluid are studied. For such configurations, we obtain static equilibrium solutions with an axisymmetric, poloidal magnetic field produced by toroidal electric currents. The presence of such a field results in small deviations of the shape of the configuration from spherical symmetry. This in turn leads to the modification of an equation for the current and correspondingly to changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field for the systems supported by the anisotropic fluid, in contrast to the case of an isotropic fluid, where such deviations do not affect the magnetic field.

  6. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  7. Magnetic fields in anisotropic relativistic stars

    E-print Network

    Folomeev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Relativistic, spherically symmetric configurations consisting of a gravitating magnetized anisotropic fluid are studied. For such configurations, we obtain static equilibrium solutions with an axisymmetric, poloidal magnetic field produced by toroidal electric currents. The presence of such a field results in small deviations of the shape of the configuration from spherical symmetry. This in turn leads to the modification of an equation for the current and correspondingly to changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field for the systems supported by the anisotropic fluid, in contrast to the case of an isotropic fluid, where such deviations do not affect the magnetic field.

  8. Magnetic field screening effect in electroweak model

    E-print Network

    A. S. Bakry; D. G. Pak; P. M. Zhang; L. P. Zou

    2014-10-03

    It is shown that in the Weinberg-Salam model a magnetic field screening effect for static magnetic solutions takes place. The origin of this phenomenon can be traced to the mutual cancellation of Abelian magnetic fields created by the SU(2) gauge fields and Higgs boson. The effect implies monopole charge screening in the finite energy system of monopoles and antimonopoles. We consider another manifestation of the screening effect which leads to an essential energy decrease of magnetic solutions. Applying a variational method we have found a magnetic field configuration with a topological azimuthal magnetic flux which minimizes the energy functional and possesses a total energy of order 1 TeV. We suppose that a corresponding magnetic bound state exists in the electroweak theory and can be detected by experiment.

  9. Generation of the magnetic field in jets

    E-print Network

    V. Urpin

    2006-05-22

    We consider dynamo action under the combined influence of turbulence and large-scale shear in sheared jets. Shear can stretch turbulent magnetic field lines in such a way that even turbulent motions showing mirror symmetry become suitable for generation of a large-scale magnetic field. We derive the integral induction equation governing the behaviour of the mean field in jets. The main result is that sheared jets may generate a large-scale magnetic field if shear is sufficiently strong. The generated mean field is mainly concentrated in a magnetic sheath surrounding the central region of a jet, and it exhibits sign reversals in the direction of the jet axis. Typically, the magnetic field in a sheath is dominated by the component along the jet that can reach equipartition with the kinetic energy of particles, The field in the central region of jets has a more disordered structure.

  10. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  11. SIMULATING MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kotarba, H.; Karl, S. J.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Lesch, H. [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Dolag, K.; Stasyszyn, F. A., E-mail: kotarba@usm.lmu.d [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2010-06-20

    We present self-consistent high-resolution simulations of NGC 4038/4039 (the 'Antennae galaxies') including star formation, supernova feedback, and magnetic fields performed with the N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code GADGET, in which magnetohydrodynamics are followed with the SPH method. We vary the initial magnetic field in the progenitor disks from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -4} G. At the time of the best match with the central region of the Antennae system, the magnetic field has been amplified by compression and shear flows to an equilibrium field value of {approx}10 {mu}G, independent of the initial seed field. These simulations are a proof of the principle that galaxy mergers are efficient drivers for the cosmic evolution of magnetic fields. We present a detailed analysis of the magnetic field structure in the central overlap region. Simulated radio and polarization maps are in good morphological and quantitative agreement with the observations. In particular, the two cores with the highest synchrotron intensity and ridges of regular magnetic fields between the cores and at the root of the southern tidal arm develop naturally in our simulations. This indicates that the simulations are capable of realistically following the evolution of the magnetic fields in a highly nonlinear environment. We also discuss the relevance of the amplification effect for present-day magnetic fields in the context of hierarchical structure formation.

  12. The AGN origin of cluster magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao

    The origin of magnetic fields in galaxy clusters is one of the most fascinating but challenging problems in astrophysics. In this dissertation, the possibility of an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) origin of cluster magnetic fields is studied through state of the art simulations of magnetic field evolution in large scale structure formation using a newly developed cosmological Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code -- EnzoMHD. After presenting a complete but concise description and verification of the code, we discuss the creation of magnetic fields through the Biermann Battery effect during first star formation and galaxy cluster formation. We find that magnetic fields are produced as predicted by theory in both cases. For the first star formation, we obtain a lower limit of (~ 10 -9 G) for magnetic fields when the first generation stars form. On the other hand, we find that the magnetic energy is amplified 4 orders of magnitude within ~ 10 Gyr during cluster formation. We then study magnetic field injection from AGN into the Intra- Cluster Medium (ICM) and their impact on the ICM. We reproduce the X-ray cavities as well as weak shocks seen in observations in the simulation, and further confirm the idea that AGN outburst must contain lots of magnetic energy (up to 10 61 ergs) and the magnetic fields play an important part in the formation of jet/lobe system. We present high resolution simulations of cluster formation with magnetic fields injected from high redshift AGN. We find that these local magnetic fields are spread quickly throughout the whole cluster by cluster mergers. The ICM is in a turbulent state with a Kolmogorov-like power spectrum. Magnetic fields are amplified to and maintained at the observational level of a few mG by bulk flows at large scale and the ICM turbulence at small scale. The total magnetic energy increases about 25 times to ~ 1.2 × 10^61 ergs at the present time. We conclude that magnetic fields from AGN at high redshift may provide sufficient initial magnetic fields to magnetize the whole cluster.

  13. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T., E-mail: shikama@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaoka, H. [Faculty of Engineering, Undergraduate School of Engineering Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30?eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  14. Detecting ultra-low magnetic fields with common magnetic minerals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Kletetschka; P. J. Wasilewski; T. Kohout; E. Herrero-Bervera; M. D. Fuller

    2004-01-01

    Growing volume of extraterrestrial material is being used to analyze magnetic paleo-intensities. They are important for estimation of paleo-fields that once existed in extraterrestrial environment. The extraterrestrial field can be several orders of magnitudes weaker than a terrestrial field. The data demonstrating that the TRM linear acquisition is valid for such low fields are virtually not existent. We tested the

  15. Model of Dipole Field Variations in the LEP Bending Magnets

    E-print Network

    Bravin, Enrico; Drees, A; Mugnai, G

    1998-01-01

    The determination of the Z mass at LEP requires a knowledge of the relative beam energy in the order of 10 ppm, therefore it is essential to understand the dipole field variations to the same level of accuracy. In LEP the bending magnet field shows a relative increase of the order of 100 ppm over 10 hours, which was found to be caused by leakage currents from railways flowing along the vacuum cham ber and temperature variations. A LEP dipole test bench was set up for systematic investigations. Field variations were monitored with NMR probes while the cooling water temperature of both coil and vacuum chamber was kept under control. The results lead to a parametrisation of the magnetic field variation as a function of the vacuum chamber current and temperature.

  16. Heavy ion beam probe operation in time varying equilibria of improved confinement reversed field pinch discharges.

    PubMed

    Demers, D R; Chen, X; Schoch, P M; Fimognari, P J

    2010-10-01

    Operation of a heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) on a reversed field pinch is unique from other toroidal applications because the magnetic field is more temporal and largely produced by plasma current. Improved confinement, produced through the transient application of a poloidal electric field which leads to a reduction of dynamo activity, exhibits gradual changes in equilibrium plasma quantities. A consequence of this is sweeping of the HIBP trajectories by the dynamic magnetic field, resulting in motion of the sample volume. In addition, the plasma potential evolves with the magnetic equilibrium. Measurement of the potential as a function of time is thus a combination of temporal changes of the equilibrium and motion of the sample volume. A frequent additional complication is a nonideal balance of ion current on the detectors resulting from changes in the beam trajectory (magnetic field) and energy (plasma potential). This necessitates use of data selection criteria. Nevertheless, the HIBP on the Madison Symmetric Torus has acquired measurements as a function of time throughout improved confinement. A technique developed to infer the potential in the improved confinement reversed field pinch from HIBP data in light of the time varying plasma equilibrium will be discussed. PMID:21033974

  17. Polarized Radiation Observables for Probing the Magnetism of the Outer Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2014-10-01

    The basic idea of optical pumping, for which Alfred Kastler received the 1966 Nobel Prize in Physics, is that the absorption and scattering of anisotropic radiation can produce population imbalances and quantum coherence among the magnetic substates of atomic levels. The degree of this radiatively-induced atomic level polarization, which is very sensitive to the presence of magnetic fields, can be determined by observing the polarization of the scattered or transmitted spectral line radiation. The most important point for solar physics is that the outer solar atmosphere is an optically pumped vapor and that the polarization of the emergent spectral line radiation can be exploited to obtain quantitative information on the strength and/or geometry of magnetic fields within the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. Here we review some recent investigations of the polarization produced by optical pumping in selected IR, FUV, and EUV spectral lines, showing that their magnetic sensitivity is suitable for probing the magnetism of the outer solar atmosphere.

  18. Quark antiscreening at strong magnetic field and inverse magnetic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, E. J.; de la Incera, V.; Wen, X. J.

    2015-03-01

    The dependence of the QCD coupling constant with a strong magnetic field and the implications for the critical temperature of the chiral phase transition are investigated. It is found that the coupling constant becomes anisotropic in a strong magnetic field and that the quarks, confined by the field to the lowest Landau level where they pair with antiquarks, produce an antiscreening effect. These results lead to inverse magnetic catalysis, providing a natural explanation for the behavior of the critical temperature in the strong-field region.

  19. Preliminary Results of Performance Measurements on a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic configurations. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying a higher thrust efficiency. Preliminary thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 100-250 W. The thrust levels over this power range were 3.5-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 14-19% and 875- 1425 s, respectively. The magnetic field in the thruster was lower for the thrust measurements than the plasma probe measurements due to heating and weakening of the permanent magnets, reducing the maximum field strength from 2 kG to roughly 750-800 G. The discharge current levels observed during thrust stand testing were anomalously high compared to those levels measured in previous experiments with this thruster.

  20. Measuring exposed magnetic fields of welders in working time.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Ojima, Jun; Sekino, Masaki; Hojo, Minoru; Saito, Hiroyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of the occupational electromagnetic field exposure of welders is of great importance, especially in shielded-arc welding, which uses relatively high electric currents of up to several hundred amperes. In the present study, we measured the magnetic field exposure level of welders in the course of working. A 3-axis Hall magnetometer was attached to a subject's wrist in order to place the sensor probe at the closest position to the magnetic source (a cable from the current source). Data was acquired every 5 s from the beginning of the work time. The maximum exposed field was 0.35-3.35 mT (Mean ± SD: 1.55 ± 0.93 mT, N=17) and the average value per day was 0.04-0.12 mT (Mean ± SD: 0.07 ± 0.02 mT, N=17). We also conducted a finite element method-based analysis of human hand tissue for the electromagnetic field dosimetry. In addition, the magnetic field associated with grinders, an air hammer, and a drill using electromagnetic anchorage were measured; however, the magnetic fields were much lower than those generated in the welding process. These results agreed well with the results of the electromagnetic field dosimetry (1.49 mT at the wrist position), and the calculated eddy current (4.28 mA/m(2)) was much lower than the well-known guideline thresholds for electrical nerve or muscular stimulation. PMID:21670555

  1. The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

  2. Magnetic Braiding and Parallel Electric Fields

    E-print Network

    A. L. Wilmot-Smith; G. Hornig; D. I. Pontin

    2008-10-08

    The braiding of the solar coronal magnetic field via photospheric motions - with subsequent relaxation and magnetic reconnection -- is one of the most widely debated ideas of solar physics. We readdress the theory in the light of developments in three-dimensional magnetic reconnection theory. It is known that the integrated parallel electric field along field lines is the key quantity determining the rate of reconnection, in contrast with the two-dimensional case where the electric field itself is the important quantity. We demonstrate that this difference becomes crucial for sufficiently complex magnetic field structures. A numerical method is used to relax a braided magnetic field to an ideal force-free equilibrium; that equilibrium is found to be smooth, with only large- scale current structures. However, the equilibrium is shown to have a highly filamentary integrated parallel current structure with extremely short length- scales. An analytical model is developed to show that, in a coronal situation, the length scales associated with the integrated parallel current structures will rapidly decrease with increasing complexity, or degree of braiding, of the magnetic field. Analysis shows the decrease in these length scales will, for any finite resistivity, eventually become inconsistent with the stability of a force- free field. Thus the inevitable consequence of the magnetic braiding process is shown to be a loss of equilibrium of the coronal field, probably via magnetic reconnection events.

  3. Magnetic Field Seeding through Supernova Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Daegene; Wise, John

    2015-01-01

    Stellar feedback occurring at small-scales can significantly impact the evolution of galaxies at much larger scales. For example, an appropriate feedback mechanism, including thermal and radiative components, can help regulate star formation, particularly in low-mass galaxies. While feedback models are generally prevalent in numerical simulations, the magnetic component is often neglected. However, measurements of galaxies indicate the presence of fields with a strength on the order of µG. Previous studies have demonstrated the formation of these fields through the amplification of a primordial magnetic field. Here, we describe a self-consistent prescription where magnetic fields are injected in supernova injections, calibrated by observations of magnetic fields in supernova remnants. These fields will then become seeds that evolve by way of mixing and turbulence to result in galactic-scale magnetic fields. As a proof of concept, we apply this method to model the supernova of a single Population III star and trace the evolution of the injected magnetic field. Future studies will apply this prescription to study not only the effects of magnetic fields on galaxy formation and evolution, but also the growth of the magnetized bubbles that form in the IGM.

  4. Investigation of the arcjet plume near field using electrostatic probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The near field plum of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster was investigated using electrostatic probes of various geometries. The electron number densities and temperatures were determined in a simulated hydrazine plume at axial distances between 3 cm (1.2 in) and 15 cm (5.9 in) and radial distances extending to 10 cm (3.9 in) off centerline. Values of electron number densities obtained using cylindrical and spherical probes of different geometries agreed very well. The electron density on centerline followed a source flow approximation for axial distances as near as 3 cm (1.2 in) from the nozzle exit plane. The model agreed well with previously obtained data in the far field. The effects of propellant mass flow rate and input power level were also studied. Cylindrical probes were used to obtain ion streamlines by changing the probe orientation with respect to the flow. The effects of electrical configuration on the plasma characteristics of the plume were also investigated by using a segmented anode/nozzle thruster. The results showed that the electrical configuration in the nozzle affected the distribution of electrons in the plume.

  5. Investigation of the Arcjet near Field Plume Using Electrostatic Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The near field plume of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster was investigated using electrostatic probes of various geometries. The electron number densities and temperatures were determined in a simulated hydrazine plume at axial distances between 3 cm (1.2 in.) and 15 cm (5.9 in.) and radial distances extending to 10 cm (3.9 in.) off centerline. Values of electron number densities obtained using cylindrical and spherical probes of different geometries agreed very well. The electron density on centerline followed a source flow approximation for axial distances as near as 3 cm (1.2 in.) from the nozzle exit plane. The model agreed well with previously obtained data in the far field. The effects of propellant mass flow rate and input power level were also studied. Cylindrical probes were used to obtain ion streamlines by changing the probe orientation with respect to the flow. The effects of electrical configuration on the plasma characteristics of the plume were also investigated by using a segmented anode/nozzle thruster. The results showed that the electrical configuration in the nozzle affected the distribution of electrons in the plume.

  6. Graphene Nanoribbon in Sharply Localized Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Abdulaziz D. Alhaidari; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

    2013-03-20

    We study the effect of a sharply localized magnetic field on the electron transport in a strip (ribbon) of graphene sheet, which allows to give results for the transmission and reflection probability through magnetic barriers. The magnetic field is taken as a single and double delta type localized functions, which are treated later as the zero width limit of gaussian fields. For both field configurations, we evaluate analytically and numerically their transmission and reflection coefficients. The possibility of spacial confinement due to the inhomogeneous field configuration is also investigated.

  7. The unusual solar minimum: magnetic fields in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Andre

    Solar cycle 23 has concluded with a minimum activity interval that was significantly longer than all recent cycles for which relatively comprehensive observations are available. In addition to a lack of sunspots, the sun's polar magnetic fields were significantly weaker than measured previously. The solar wind momentum flux was much reduced (by about 40 percent), and the magnetic flux density measured in the heliosphere also decreased by about a third with respect to the previous solar minimum. In this paper, primarily Ulysses magnetic field observations from the two solar minima, in 1996 and 2005-2008 are compared and related to the magnetic field structure in the corona, as diagnosed by the coronal temperatures indicated by the obser-vation of solar wind ion charge state distributions. Comparison is also made with equivalent observations near 1 AU. The weaker polar fields have led to a larger latitudinal excursion of the coronal neutral line, and therefore to the persistence of a more pronounced excursion of the Heliospheric Current Sheet. In the heliosphere, there was also a reduced absolute level of power in the magnetic fluctuations, although the weakness of the magnetic field led to comparable levels of relative magnetic fluctuation power. There was also even less evidence of any latitudi-nal asymmetry in the heliospheric magnetic field than during the previous minimum. Although the minimum appears to be over and solar cycle 24 has started with still a relatively small sunspot count, heliospheric observation during the unusual minimum can be used to probe the robustness of cosmic ray propagation and modulation models.

  8. Bashful ballerina unveiled: Multipole analysis of the coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, I.; Mursula, K.

    2012-12-01

    Heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is the continuum of the coronal magnetic equator, dividing the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) into two sectors (polarities). Because of its wavy structure, the HCS is often called the ballerina skirt. Several studies have proven that the HCS is southward shifted during about three years in the solar declining phase. This persistent phenomenon, called the bashful ballerina, has been verified by geomagnetic indices since 1930s, by OMNI data base since 1960s, by the WSO PFSS model since mid-1970s and by the Ulysses probe measurements during the fast latitude scans in 1994-1995 and 2007. We study here the Wilcox Solar Observatory measurements of the photospheric magnetic field and the PFSS extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field. We show that the quadrupole moment of the photospheric magnetic field, which is important for the HCS asymmetry (bashful ballerina), mainly arises from the difference between northern and southern polar field strengths. According to the WSO data the minimum time quadrupole is mainly due to the difference between the highest northern and southern latitude bins. Related studies imply that the southward shift of the HCS is related to the delayed development of southern coronal holes. We also discuss the suggested connection of the HCS asymmetry to sunspot hemispheric asymmetry.

  9. Interferometric methods for mapping static electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Giulio; Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2014-02-01

    The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensity Equation. Among these approaches, image-plane off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope has acquired a prominent role thanks to its quantitative capabilities and broad range of applicability. After a brief overview of the main ideas and methods behind field mapping, we focus on theoretical models that form the basis of the quantitative interpretation of electron holographic data. We review the application of electron holography to a variety of samples (including electric fields associated with p-n junctions in semiconductors, quantized magnetic flux in superconductors and magnetization topographies in nanoparticles and other magnetic materials) and electron-optical geometries (including multiple biprism, amplitude and mixed-type set-ups). We conclude by highlighting the emerging perspectives of (i) three-dimensional field mapping using electron holographic tomography and (ii) the model-independent determination of the locations and magnitudes of field sources (electric charges and magnetic dipoles) directly from electron holographic data.

  10. The gravitomagnetic field of a sphere, Gravity Probe B and the LAGEOS satellites

    E-print Network

    Jacob Biemond

    2012-01-14

    The gravitomagnetic field generated by a rotating sphere is usually calculated from the ideal dipole model. However, for a sphere with a homogeneous mass density, this model is not generally valid. Trying to obtain a more accurate value of the gravitomagnetic field inside and outside the sphere, series expansions for this field are presented in this paper. The calculated polar gravitomagnetic field of the sphere and that from the ideal dipole model appear to coincide, but the field in the vicinity of the sphere may deviate. The deduced field within the sphere strongly deviates from the ideal dipole result. As an illustration, the gravitomagnetic precession rate (or frame-dragging effect) of a gyroscope moving in the gravitomagnetic field from a large rotating sphere is calculated. For the Gravity Probe B experiment the result may coincide with the prediction from the ideal dipole model and in fair agreement with observations. In addition, the obtained Lense-Thirring precession rate for the LAGEOS satellites probably coincides with the standard prediction. For both experiments alternative predictions are calculated, when the gravitomagnetic field and the magnetic field from moving charge are equivalent. Theoretical and observational indications for such an equivalence are summarized. The obtained series expansions for the gravitomagnetic field of a sphere can also be applied to the calculation of the magnetic field, generated by a rotating sphere with a homogeneous charge density. Results for this case are also discussed.

  11. Coronal magnetic fields produced by photospheric shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Yang, W.-H.

    1987-01-01

    The magneto-frictional method is used for computing force free fields to examine the evolution of the magnetic field of a line dipole, when there is relative shearing motion between the two polarities. It found that the energy of the sheared field can be arbitrarily large compared with the potential field. It is also found that it is possible to fit the magnetic energy, as a function of shear, by a simple functional form.

  12. Control of magnetism by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field.

  13. Control of magnetism by electric fields.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field. PMID:25740132

  14. Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L.; Orlov, Alexei P.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A.; Breslavskaya, Natalia N.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the rate of DNA synthesis catalysed by polymerases ? with isotopic ions 24Mg2+, 25Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ in the catalytic sites were detected. No difference in enzymatic activity was found between polymerases ? carrying 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions with spinless, non-magnetic nuclei 24Mg and 26Mg. However, 25Mg2+ ions with magnetic nucleus 25Mg were shown to suppress enzymatic activity by two to three times with respect to the enzymatic activity of polymerases ? with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions. Such an isotopic dependence directly indicates that in the DNA synthesis magnetic mass-independent isotope effect functions. Similar effect is exhibited by polymerases ? with Zn2+ ions carrying magnetic 67Zn and non-magnetic 64Zn nuclei, respectively. A new, ion–radical mechanism of the DNA synthesis is suggested to explain these effects. Magnetic field dependence of the magnesium-catalysed DNA synthesis is in a perfect agreement with the proposed ion–radical mechanism. It is pointed out that the magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects may be used for medicinal purposes (trans-cranial magnetic treatment of cognitive deceases, cell proliferation, control of the cancer cells, etc). PMID:23851636

  15. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  16. Protein crystals orientation in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Astier, J P; Veesler, S; Boistelle, R

    1998-07-01

    Nucleation and crystal growth of hen egg-white lysozyme, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase were carried out in the presence of a magnetic field of 1.25 T produced by small permanent magnets. Crystals were oriented in the magnetic field, except when heterogeneous nucleation occurred. The orientation of protein crystals in the presence of a magnetic field can be attributed to the anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of proteins resulting from the large anisotropy of the alpha-helices due to the axial alignment of the peptide bonds. PMID:9761881

  17. Neutron spin polarization in strong magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    H. Wen; L. S. Kisslinger; Walter Greiner; G. Mao

    2006-01-09

    The effects of strong magnetic fields on the inner crust of neutron stars are investigated after taking into account the anomalous magnetic moments of nucleons. Energy spectra and wave functions for protons and neutrons in a uniform magnetic field are provided. The particle spin polarizations and the yields of protons and neutrons are calculated in a free Fermi gas model. Obvious spin polarization occurs when $B\\geq10^{14}$G for protons and $B\\geq10^{17}$G for neutrons, respectively. It is shown that the neutron spin polarization depends solely on the magnetic field strength.

  18. High concentration ferronematics in low magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    T. Tóth-Katona; P. Salamon; N. Éber; N. Tomašovi?ová; Z. Mitróová; P. Kop?anský

    2014-09-05

    We investigated experimentally the magneto-optical and dielectric properties of magnetic-nanoparticle-doped nematic liquid crystals (ferronematics). Our studies focus on the effect of the very small orienting bias magnetic field $B_{bias}$, and that of the nematic director pretilt at the boundary surfaces in our systems sensitive to low magnetic fields. Based on the results we assert that $B_{bias}$ is not necessarily required for a detectable response to low magnetic fields, and that the initial pretilt, as well as the aggregation of the nanoparticles play an important (though not yet explored enough) role.

  19. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (?) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low ? and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers' turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  20. Alignment of magnetic uniaxial particles in a magnetic field: Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovnia, O. A.; Popov, A. G.; Sobolev, A. N.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2014-09-01

    The numerical investigations of the process of alignment of magnetically uniaxial Nd-Fe-B powders in an applied magnetic field were carried out using the discrete element method (DEM). It is shown that magnetic alignment of ensemble of spherical particles provides extremely high degree of alignment, which is achieved in low magnetic fields. A model of formation of anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles is suggested. The influence of the shape anisotropy and friction coefficient on the alignment degree was analyzed. The increase in the friction coefficient leads to a decrease in the alignment degree; the simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental dependences. It is shown that in magnetic fields higher than 5 T, the calculated field dependences of the alignment degree quantitatively render the experimental data. The increase of about 6% in the alignment degree in the experiments with addition of internal lubricant can be explained by the decrease of 14% in friction coefficient.

  1. Two-axis magnetic field sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jander, Albrecht (Inventor); Nordman, Catherine A. (Inventor); Qian, Zhenghong (Inventor); Smith, Carl H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A ferromagnetic thin-film based magnetic field sensor with first and second sensitive direction sensing structures each having a nonmagnetic intermediate layer with two major surfaces on opposite sides thereof having a magnetization reference layer on one and an anisotropic ferromagnetic material sensing layer on the other having a length in a selected length direction and a smaller width perpendicular thereto and parallel to the relatively fixed magnetization direction. The relatively fixed magnetization direction of said magnetization reference layer in each is oriented in substantially parallel to the substrate but substantially perpendicular to that of the other. An annealing process is used to form the desired magnetization directions.

  2. Astrophysical magnetic fields and nonlinear dynamo theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Axel Brandenburg; Kandaswamy Subramanian

    2005-01-01

    The current understanding of astrophysical magnetic fields is reviewed, focusing on their generation and maintenance by turbulence. In the astrophysical context this generation is usually explained by a self-excited dynamo, which involves flows that can amplify a weak ‘seed’ magnetic field exponentially fast. Particular emphasis is placed on the nonlinear saturation of the dynamo. Analytic and numerical results are discussed

  3. Space Quantization in a Gyrating Magnetic Field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. I. Rabi

    1937-01-01

    The nonadiabatic transitions which a system with angular momentum J makes in a magnetic field which is rotating about an axis inclined with respect to the field are calculated. It is shown that the effects depend on the sign of the magnetic moment of the system. We therefore have an absolute method for measuring the sign and magnitude of the

  4. Magnetic fields, branes, and noncommutative geometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniela Bigatti; Leonard Susskind

    2000-01-01

    We construct a simple physical model of a particle moving on the infinite noncommutative 2-plane. The model consists of a pair of opposite charges moving in a strong magnetic field. In addition, the charges are connected by a spring. In the limit of large magnetic field, the charges are frozen into the lowest Landau levels. Interactions of such particles include

  5. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Eric Priest

    E-print Network

    Priest, Eric

    CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Eric Priest Mathematics Institute, St Andrews University the structure of the magnetic field (in the pho­ tosphere, chromosphere and corona) and the dynamics, so that a corona lay above spherical shells of tran­ sition region, chromosphere and photosphere

  6. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Eric Priest

    E-print Network

    Priest, Eric

    CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS Eric Priest Mathematics Institute, St Andrews University the structure of the magnetic field (in the pho- tosphere, chromosphere and corona) and the dynamics, so that a corona lay above spherical shells of tran- sition region, chromosphere and photosphere

  7. Statistical analysis of magnetic-field spectra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian Wang; Hong Guo

    1998-01-01

    We have calculated and statistically analyzed the magnetic-field spectrum (the B spectrum) at fixed electron Fermi energy for two quantum dot systems with classically chaotic shape. This problem arises naturally in transport measurements where the incoming electron has a fixed energy while one tunes the magnetic field to obtain resonance conductance patterns. The B spectrum, defined as the collection of

  8. On the origins of galactic magnetic fields

    E-print Network

    A. Borzou; H. R. Sepangi; R. Yousefi; A. H. Ziaie

    2009-11-18

    We present a five dimensional unified theory of gravity and electromagnetism which leads to modified Maxwell equations, suggesting a new origin for galactic magnetic fields. It is shown that a region with nonzero scalar curvature would amplify the magnetic fields under certain conditions.

  9. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  10. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple…

  11. Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, Roman O. (Mountain View, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis.

  12. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.

    2014-04-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. Here I discuss how magnetic helicity has come to help us understand the saturation of and sustenance of large scale dynamos, the need for either local or global helicity fluxes to avoid dynamo quenching, and the associated observational consequences. I also discuss how magnetic helicity acts as a hindrance to turbulent diffusion of large scale fields, and thus a helper for fossil remnant large scale field origin models in some contexts. I briefly discuss the connection between large scale fields and accretion disk theory as well. The goal here is to provide a conceptual primer to help the reader efficiently penetrate the literature.

  13. Comparison of adjustable permanent magnetic field sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørk, R.; Bahl, C. R. H.; Smith, A.; Pryds, N.

    2010-11-01

    A permanent magnet assembly in which the flux density can be altered by a mechanical operation is often significantly smaller than comparable electromagnets and also requires no electrical power to operate. In this paper five permanent magnet designs in which the magnetic flux density can be altered are analyzed using numerical simulations, and compared based on the generated magnetic flux density in a sample volume and the amount of magnet material used. The designs are the concentric Halbach cylinder, the two half Halbach cylinders, the two linear Halbach arrays and the four and six rod mangle. The concentric Halbach cylinder design is found to be the best performing design, i.e. the design that provides the most magnetic flux density using the least amount of magnet material. A concentric Halbach cylinder has been constructed and the magnetic flux density, the homogeneity and the direction of the magnetic field are measured and compared with numerical simulation and a good agrement is found.

  14. Chaotic magnetic fields: Particle motion and energization

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Brahmananda [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Ram, Abhay K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Li, Gang [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Li, Xiaocan [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-02-11

    Magnetic field line equations correspond to a Hamiltonian dynamical system, so the features of a Hamiltonian systems can easily be adopted for discussing some essential features of magnetic field lines. The integrability of the magnetic field line equations are discussed by various authors and it can be shown that these equations are, in general, not integrable. We demonstrate several examples of realistic chaotic magnetic fields, produced by asymmetric current configurations. Particular examples of chaotic force-free field and non force-free fields are shown. We have studied, for the first time, the motion of a charged particle in chaotic magnetic fields. It is found that the motion of a charged particle in a chaotic magnetic field is not necessarily chaotic. We also showed that charged particles moving in a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field are energized. Such energization processes could play a dominant role in particle energization in several astrophysical environments including solar corona, solar flares and cosmic ray propagation in space.

  15. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    E-print Network

    Viganò, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

    2015-01-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  16. Strong laser fields as a probe for fundamental physics

    E-print Network

    Holger Gies

    2008-12-03

    Upcoming high-intensity laser systems will be able to probe the quantum-induced nonlinear regime of electrodynamics. So far unobserved QED phenomena such as the discovery of a nonlinear response of the quantum vacuum to macroscopic electromagnetic fields can become accessible. In addition, such laser systems provide for a flexible tool for investigating fundamental physics. Primary goals consist in verifying so far unobserved QED phenomena. Moreover, strong-field experiments can search for new light but weakly interacting degrees of freedom and are thus complementary to accelerator-driven experiments. I review recent developments in this field, focusing on photon experiments in strong electromagnetic fields. The interaction of particle-physics candidates with photons and external fields can be parameterized by low-energy effective actions and typically predict characteristic optical signatures. I perform first estimates of the accessible new-physics parameter space of high-intensity laser facilities such as POLARIS and ELI.

  17. Fast torsional waves and strong magnetic field within the Earth's core

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Gillet; Dominique Jault; Elisabeth Canet; Alexandre Fournier

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic field inside the Earth's fluid and electrically conducting outer core cannot be directly probed. The root-mean-squared (r.m.s.) intensity for the resolved part of the radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary is 0.3mT, but further assumptions are needed to infer the strength of the field inside the core. Recent diagnostics obtained from numerical geodynamo models indicate that the

  18. Real-time magnetic nanothermometry: The use of magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles assessed under low frequency triangle-wave magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Liu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Ling; Yang, Ming; Morais, Paulo Cesar

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we propose and demonstrate the usefulness of employing time-varying magnetization of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) based sample, induced by low frequency (f = 25 Hz) triangular-wave magnetic field, to achieve the approach of real-time recording of magnetization curve, which allows precise and noninvasive temperature probing with real-time performance. Moreover, the present report introduces the design and performed the test of a detection system for accurate and real-time recording of the magnetization curve of MNP-based samples. We found that by employing the magnetization curve of a magnetic fluid sample containing magnetite nanoparticles of about 30 nm in diameter the accuracy of the temperature probing is about 0.32 K (0.1% relative accuracy), with response time of 1 s. Furthermore, an increase in response time from 1 to 8 s improves the accuracy of temperature probing from 0.32 to 0.20 K. Finally, we envisage that breakthroughs in clinical hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery and basic cell research can be accomplished while using the approach reported in this study.

  19. Real-time magnetic nanothermometry: the use of magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles assessed under low frequency triangle-wave magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Liu, Wenzhong; Jiang, Ling; Yang, Ming; Morais, Paulo Cesar

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we propose and demonstrate the usefulness of employing time-varying magnetization of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) based sample, induced by low frequency (f = 25 Hz) triangular-wave magnetic field, to achieve the approach of real-time recording of magnetization curve, which allows precise and noninvasive temperature probing with real-time performance. Moreover, the present report introduces the design and performed the test of a detection system for accurate and real-time recording of the magnetization curve of MNP-based samples. We found that by employing the magnetization curve of a magnetic fluid sample containing magnetite nanoparticles of about 30 nm in diameter the accuracy of the temperature probing is about 0.32 K (0.1% relative accuracy), with response time of 1 s. Furthermore, an increase in response time from 1 to 8 s improves the accuracy of temperature probing from 0.32 to 0.20 K. Finally, we envisage that breakthroughs in clinical hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery and basic cell research can be accomplished while using the approach reported in this study. PMID:25273762

  20. Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Piccinelli, Gabriella [Centro Tecnológico, FES Aragón, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Rancho Seco S/N, Bosques de Aragón, Nezahualcóyotl, Estado de México 57130 (Mexico)] [Centro Tecnológico, FES Aragón, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Rancho Seco S/N, Bosques de Aragón, Nezahualcóyotl, Estado de México 57130 (Mexico); Sánchez, Ángel [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, México Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico)] [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, México Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico)

    2013-07-23

    We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales which rises de possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger's proper time method.

  1. A Large Volume Double Channel 1H-X RF Probe for Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance at 0.0475 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Wilkens, Ken; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we describe a large volume 340 mL 1H-X magnetic resonance (MR) probe for studies of hyperpolarized compounds at 0.0475 T. 1H/13C and 1H/15N probe configurations are demonstrated with the potential for extension to 1H/129Xe. The primary applications of this probe are preparation and quality assurance of 13C and 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using PASADENA (parahydrogen and synthesis allow dramatically enhanced nuclear alignment) and other parahydrogen-based methods of hyperpolarization. The probe is efficient and permits 62 ?s 13C excitation pulses at 5.3 Watts, making it suitable for portable operation. The sensitivity and detection limits of this probe, tuned to 13C, are compared with a commercial radio frequency (RF) coil operating at 4.7 T. We demonstrate that low field MR of hyperpolarized contrast agents could be as sensitive as conventional high field detection and outline potential improvements and optimization of the probe design for preclinical in vivo MRI. PASADENA application of this low-power probe is exemplified with 13C hyperpolarized 2-hydroxyethyl propionate-1-13C,2,3,3-d3. PMID:22706029

  2. A simple, small and low cost permanent magnet design to produce homogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Manz, B; Benecke, M; Volke, F

    2008-05-01

    A new portable, pocket-size NMR probe based on a novel permanent magnet arrangement is presented. It is based on a Halbach-type magnet design which mimics the field of a spherical dipole by using cylindrical bar and ring magnets. The magnet system is made up of only three individual magnets, and most field calculations and optimisations can be performed analytically. A prototype system has been built using a set of small, off the shelf commercially available permanent magnets. Proton linewidths of 50 ppm FWHM could be achieved at a field strength of 1T. Calculations show that with custom-sized permanent magnets, linewidths of less than 1 ppm can be achieved over sample volumes of up to 1 mm3, which would in theory enable chemical shift resolved proton spectroscopy on mass-limited samples. But even with the achieved linewidth of 50 ppm, this can be a useful portable sensor for small amounts of liquid samples with restricted molecular mobility, like gels, polymers or high viscosity liquids. PMID:18314366

  3. A simple, small and low cost permanent magnet design to produce homogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manz, B.; Benecke, M.; Volke, F.

    2008-05-01

    A new portable, pocket-size NMR probe based on a novel permanent magnet arrangement is presented. It is based on a Halbach-type magnet design which mimics the field of a spherical dipole by using cylindrical bar and ring magnets. The magnet system is made up of only three individual magnets, and most field calculations and optimisations can be performed analytically. A prototype system has been built using a set of small, off the shelf commercially available permanent magnets. Proton linewidths of 50 ppm FWHM could be achieved at a field strength of 1 T. Calculations show that with custom-sized permanent magnets, linewidths of less than 1 ppm can be achieved over sample volumes of up to 1 mm 3, which would in theory enable chemical shift resolved proton spectroscopy on mass-limited samples. But even with the achieved linewidth of 50 ppm, this can be a useful portable sensor for small amounts of liquid samples with restricted molecular mobility, like gels, polymers or high viscosity liquids.

  4. The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Goetz, K.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.; Bale, S. D.; Ludlam, M.; Turin, P.; Harvey, P. R.; Hochmann, R.; Harps, K.; Dalton, G.; McCauley, J.; Rachelson, W.; Gordon, D.; Donakowski, B.; Shultz, C.; Smith, C.; Diaz-Aguado, M.; Fischer, J.; Heavner, S.; Berg, P.; Malsapina, D. M.; Bolton, M. K.; Hudson, M.; Strangeway, R. J.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Albert, J.; Foster, J. C.; Chaston, C. C.; Mann, I.; Donovan, E.; Cully, C. M.; Cattell, C. A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Kersten, K.; Brenneman, A.; Tao, J. B.

    2013-11-01

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency electric fields and waves associated with the major mechanisms responsible for the acceleration of energetic charged particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. For this measurement, the instrument uses two pairs of spherical double probe sensors at the ends of orthogonal centripetally deployed booms in the spin plane with tip-to-tip separations of 100 meters. The third component of the electric field is measured by two spherical sensors separated by ˜15 m, deployed at the ends of two stacer booms oppositely directed along the spin axis of the spacecraft. The instrument provides a continuous stream of measurements over the entire orbit of the low frequency electric field vector at 32 samples/s in a survey mode. This survey mode also includes measurements of spacecraft potential to provide information on thermal electron plasma variations and structure. Survey mode spectral information allows the continuous evaluation of the peak value and spectral power in electric, magnetic and density fluctuations from several Hz to 6.5 kHz. On-board cross-spectral data allows the calculation of field-aligned wave Poynting flux along the magnetic field. For higher frequency waveform information, two different programmable burst memories are used with nominal sampling rates of 512 samples/s and 16 k samples/s. The EFW burst modes provide targeted measurements over brief time intervals of 3-d electric fields, 3-d wave magnetic fields (from the EMFISIS magnetic search coil sensors), and spacecraft potential. In the burst modes all six sensor-spacecraft potential measurements are telemetered enabling interferometric timing of small-scale plasma structures. In the first burst mode, the instrument stores all or a substantial fraction of the high frequency measurements in a 32 gigabyte burst memory. The sub-intervals to be downloaded are uplinked by ground command after inspection of instrument survey data and other information available on the ground. The second burst mode involves autonomous storing and playback of data controlled by flight software algorithms, which assess the "highest quality" events on the basis of instrument measurements and information from other instruments available on orbit. The EFW instrument provides 3-d wave electric field signals with a frequency response up to 400 kHz to the EMFISIS instrument for analysis and telemetry (Kletzing et al. Space Sci. Rev. 2013).

  5. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOEpatents

    Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

    1999-05-18

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

  6. Near-field scanning optical microscopy with an active probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Qiaoqiang; Song, Guofeng; Yang, Guohua; Xu, Yun; Gao, Jianxia; Li, Yuzhang; Cao, Qing; Chen, Lianghui; Lu, Haiwei; Chen, Zhonghao; Zeng, Wei; Yan, Rongjin

    2006-03-01

    A near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) system employing a very-small-aperture laser (VSAL) as an active probe is reported in this Letter. The VSAL in our experiment has an aperture size of 300nm×300nm and a near-field spot size of about 600nm. The resolution of the NSOM system with the VSAL can reach about 600nm, and even 400nm. Considering the high output power of the VSAL, such a NSOM system is a potentially useful tool for nanodetection, data storage, nanolithography, and nanobiology.

  7. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOEpatents

    Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Kaushik, Sumanth (Cambridge, MA)

    1999-01-01

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations.

  8. Ohm's law for mean magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1984-11-01

    Spatially complicated magnetic fields are frequently treated as the sum of a large, slowly varying, mean field and a small, rapidly varying, field. The primary effect of the small field is to modify the Ohm's law of the mean field. A set of plausible assumptions leads to a form of the mean field Ohm's law which is fundamentally different from the conventional alpha effect of dynamo theory.

  9. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985. PMID:23787954

  10. Dynamic Magnetic Field Applications for Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Grugel, Richard N.; Motakef, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic fields, variable in time and space, can be used to control convection in electrically conducting melts. Flow induced by these fields has been found to be beneficial for crystal growth applications. It allows increased crystal growth rates, and improves homogeneity and quality. Particularly beneficial is the natural convection damping capability of alternating magnetic fields. One well-known example is the rotating magnetic field (RMF) configuration. RMF induces liquid motion consisting of a swirling basic flow and a meridional secondary flow. In addition to crystal growth applications, RMF can also be used for mixing non-homogeneous melts in continuous metal castings. These applied aspects have stimulated increasing research on RMF-induced fluid dynamics. A novel type of magnetic field configuration consisting of an axisymmetric magnetostatic wave, designated the traveling magnetic field (TMF), has been recently proposed. It induces a basic flow in the form of a single vortex. TMF may find use in crystal growth techniques such as the vertical Bridgman (VB), float zone (FZ), and the traveling heater method. In this review, both methods, RMF and TMF are presented. Our recent theoretical and experimental results include such topics as localized TMF, natural convection dumping using TMF in a vertical Bridgman configuration, the traveling heater method, and the Lorentz force induced by TMF as a function of frequency. Experimentally, alloy mixing results, with and without applied TMF, will be presented. Finally, advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, will be discussed.

  11. Protein detection with magnetic nanoparticles in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckhoff, Jan; Lak, Aidin; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    A detection scheme based on magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) dynamics in a rotating magnetic field for a quantitative and easy-to-perform detection of proteins is illustrated. For the measurements, a fluxgate-based setup was applied, which measures the MNP dynamics, while a rotating magnetic field is generated. The MNPs exhibit single iron oxide cores of 25 nm and 40 nm diameter, respectively, as well as a protein G functionalized shell. IgG antibodies were utilized as binding target molecules for the physical proof-of-concept. The measurement results were fitted with a theoretical model describing the magnetization dynamics in a rotating magnetic field. The established detection scheme allows quantitative determination of proteins even at a concentration lower than of the particles. The observed differences between the two MNP types are discussed on the basis of logistic functions.

  12. External-field-free magnetic biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanpeng; Wang, Yi; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping, E-mail: jpwang@umn.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    In this paper, we report a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) detection scheme without the presence of any external magnetic field. The proposed magnetic sensor uses a patterned groove structure within the sensor so that no external magnetic field is needed to magnetize the MNPs. An example is given based on a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing device with a spin valve structure. For this structure, the detection of MNPs located inside the groove and near the free layer is demonstrated under no external magnetic field. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to calculate the signal to noise level of this detection scheme. A maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 18.6?dB from one iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle with 8?nm radius is achieved. As proof of concept, this external-field-free GMR sensor with groove structure of 200?nm?×?200?nm is fabricated using a photo and an electron beam integrated lithography process. Using this sensor, the feasibility demonstration of the detection SNR of 9.3?dB is achieved for 30??l magnetic nanoparticles suspension (30?nm iron oxide particles, 1?mg/ml). This proposed external-field-free sensor structure is not limited to GMR devices and could be applicable to other magnetic biosensing devices.

  13. Theory of magnetic superconductors in an external magnetic field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narayan C. Das

    1984-01-01

    The theory of Abrikosov and Gor'kov has been extended to study superconducting systems containing a lattice of magnetic ions. Differential equations have been set up for the Green's-function matrices which describe a magnetic superconductor in the presence of local-spin--conduction-electron exchange and external magnetic field. The self-consistent gap equation for the system has been formulated in terms of normal-state Green's functions.

  14. Theory of magnetic superconductors in an external magnetic field

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narayan C. Das

    1984-01-01

    The theory of Abrikosov and Gor'kov has been extended to study superconducting systems containing a lattice of magnetic ions. Differential equations have been set up for the Green's-function matrices which describe a magnetic superconductor in the presence of local-spin-conduction-electron exchange and external magnetic field. The self-consistent gap equation for the system has been formulated in terms of normal-state Green's functions.

  15. Compact low field magnetic resonance imaging magnet: Design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciandrone, M.; Placidi, G.; Testa, L.; Sotgiu, A.

    2000-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed with a very large instrument that allows the patient to be inserted into a region of uniform magnetic field. The field is generated either by an electromagnet (resistive or superconductive) or by a permanent magnet. Electromagnets are designed as air cored solenoids of cylindrical symmetry, with an inner bore of 80-100 cm in diameter. In clinical analysis of peripheral regions of the body (legs, arms, foot, knee, etc.) it would be better to adopt much less expensive magnets leaving the most expensive instruments to applications that require the insertion of the patient in the magnet (head, thorax, abdomen, etc.). These "dedicated" apparati could be smaller and based on resistive magnets that are manufactured and operated at very low cost, particularly if they utilize an iron yoke to reduce power requirements. In order to obtain good field uniformity without the use of a set of shimming coils, we propose both particular construction of a dedicated magnet, using four independently controlled pairs of coils, and an optimization-based strategy for computing, a posteriori, the optimal current values. The optimization phase could be viewed as a low-cost shimming procedure for obtaining the desired magnetic field configuration. Some experimental measurements, confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach (construction and optimization), have also been reported. In particular, it has been shown that the adoption of the proposed optimization based strategy has allowed the achievement of good uniformity of the magnetic field in about one fourth of the magnet length and about one half of its bore. On the basis of the good experimental results, the dedicated magnet can be used for MRI of peripheral regions of the body and for animal experimentation at very low cost.

  16. Colour superconductivity in a strong magnetic field

    E-print Network

    Efrain J. Ferrer; Vivian de la Incera; Cristina Manuel

    2005-11-30

    We explore the effects of an applied strong external magnetic field in a three flavour massless colour superconductor. The long-range component of the B field that penetrates the superconductor enhances some quark condensates, leading to a different condensation pattern. The external field also reduces the flavour symmetries in the system, and thus it changes drastically the corresponding low energy physics. Our considerations are relevant for the study of highly magnetized compact stars.

  17. Ohm's law for mean magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1986-05-01

    The magnetic fields associated with plasmas frequently exhibit small amplitude MHD fluctuations. It is useful to have equations for the magnetic field averaged over these fluctuations, the so-called mean field equations. Under very general assumptions it is shown that the effect of MHD fluctuations on a force-free plasma can be represented by one parameter in Ohm's law, which is effectively the coefficient of electric current viscosity.

  18. Ohm's law for mean magnetic fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. H. Boozer

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic fields associated with plasmas frequently exhibit small-amplitude MHD fluctuations. It is useful to have equations for the magnetic field averaged over these fluctuations, the so-called mean field equations. Under very general assumptions, it is shown that the effect of MHD fluctuations on a force-free plasma can be represented by one parameter in Ohm's law, which is effectively the

  19. Magnetic field corrections to solar oscillation frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B.; Campbell, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that the frequencies of both the solar p- and g-modes of oscillation are modified by a magnetic field. In particular, the decrease in p-mode frequencies is attributed to a magnetic field within the solar interior evolving over the solar cycle. Field strengths at the base of the convection zone of at least 500,000 G are required.

  20. Magnetic field homogeneity perturbations in finite Halbach dipole magnets.

    PubMed

    Turek, Krzysztof; Liszkowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Halbach hollow cylinder dipole magnets of a low or relatively low aspect ratio attract considerable attention due to their applications, among others, in compact NMR and MRI systems for investigating small objects. However, a complete mathematical framework for the analysis of magnetic fields in these magnets has been developed only for their infinitely long precursors. In such a case the analysis is reduced to two-dimensions (2D). The paper details the analysis of the 3D magnetic field in the Halbach dipole cylinders of a finite length. The analysis is based on three equations in which the components of the magnetic flux density Bx, By and Bz are expanded to infinite power series of the radial coordinate r. The zeroth term in the series corresponds to a homogeneous magnetic field Bc, which is perturbed by the higher order terms due to a finite magnet length. This set of equations is supplemented with an equation for the field profile B(z) along the magnet axis, presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the geometrical factors in the coefficients of particular powers of r, defined by intricate integrals are the coefficients of the Taylor expansion of the homogeneity profile (B(z)-Bc)/Bc. As a consequence, the components of B can be easily calculated with an arbitrary accuracy. In order to describe perturbations of the field due to segmentation, two additional equations are borrowed from the 2D theory. It is shown that the 2D approach to the perturbations generated by the segmentation can be applied to the 3D Halbach structures unless r is not too close to the inner radius of the cylinder ri. The mathematical framework presented in the paper was verified with great precision by computations of B by a highly accurate integration of the magnetostatic Coulomb law and utilized to analyze the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the magnet with the accuracy better than 1 ppm. PMID:24316186