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Sample records for magnetic flux noise

  1. Magnetic flux noise in copper oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic flux noise and flux creep in thin films and single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x}, Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, and TlCa{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The noise power spectrum generally scales as 1/f (f is frequency) from 1 Hz to 1 kHz, increases with temperature, and decreases in higher-quality films. It is proportional to the magnetic field B in which the sample is cooled, at least in the range 0.1 mT < B < 3 mT. A model of thermally activated vortex motion is developed which explains the dependence of the noise on frequency, temperature, current, and applied magnetic field. The pinning potential is idealized as an ensemble of double wells, each with a different activation energy separating the two states. From the noise measurements, this model yields the distribution of pinning energies in the samples, the vortex hopping distance, the number density of mobile vortices, and the restoring force on a vortex at a typical pinning site. The distribution of pinning energies in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} shows a broad peak below 0.1 eV. The small ambient magnetic field, and the detection of noise even in the absence of a driving force, insure that the measured pinning energies are characteristic of isolated vortices near thermal equilibrium. The observed vortex density in fields much less than 0.1 mT is too large to be explained by the ambient field, suggesting a mechanism intrinsic to the sample which produces trapped vortices.

  2. Can magnetic noise from Kondo traps explain high frequency flux noise in superconducting qubits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias da Silva, Luis; de Sousa, Rogerio

    2015-03-01

    In solid state devices, charge and magnetic noise have common microscopic origin. Both occur due to the presence of Kondo traps nearby metallic wires. We use numerical renormalization group calculations to show that, despite their common origin, charge and magnetic noise have opposing behavior controlled by completely different energy scales. While magnetic noise follows an universal scaling with the Kondo temperature, charge noise remains well described by non-interacting theory even when the trap is deep into the Kondo regime. We show how these results may explain the high frequency (f= 1-10 GHz) Ohmic flux noise observed in SQUIDs and superconducting qubits. LGDS acknowledges support from Brazilian agencies FAPESP (2013/50220-7), CNPq (307107/2013-2) and PRP-USP NAP-QNano. RdS acknowledges support from the Canadian program NSERC-Discovery and a FAPESP-UVic exchange award.

  3. Measurement of the Magnetic Flux Noise Spectrum in Superconducting Xmon Transmon Quantum Bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaro, Ben; Sank, D.; Kelly, J.; Chen, Z.; Campbell, B.; Dunsworth, A.; O'Malley, P.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Barends, R.; Chen, Y.; Fowler, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Migrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Roushan, P.; White, T.; Martinis, J. M.

    Dephasing induced by magnetic flux noise limits the performance of modern superconducting quantum processors. We measure the flux noise power spectrum in planar, frequency-tunable, Xmon transmon quantum bits (qubits), with several SQUID loop geometries. We extend the Ramsey Tomography Oscilloscope (RTO) technique by rapid sampling up to 1 MHz, without state reset, to measure the flux noise power spectrum between 10-2 and 105 Hz. The RTO measurements are combined with idle gate randomized benchmarking and Ramsey decay to give a more complete picture of dephasing in SQUID-based devices.

  4. Development of a low noise induction magnetic sensor using magnetic flux negative feedback in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, X G; Shang, X L; Lin, J

    2016-05-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic system can implement great depth detection. As for the electromagnetic system, the receiver utilized an air coil sensor, and the matching mode of the sensor employed the resistance matching method. By using the resistance matching method, the vibration of the coil in the time domain can be effectively controlled. However, the noise of the sensor, especially the noise at the resonance frequency, will be increased as well. In this paper, a novel design of a low noise induction coil sensor is proposed, and the experimental data and noise characteristics are provided. The sensor is designed based on the principle that the amplified voltage will be converted to current under the influence of the feedback resistance of the coil. The feedback loop around the induction coil exerts a magnetic field and sends the negative feedback signal to the sensor. The paper analyses the influence of the closed magnetic feedback loop on both the bandwidth and the noise of the sensor. The signal-to-noise ratio is improved dramatically. PMID:27250444

  5. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  6. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  7. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe. PMID:27320418

  8. Flux noise due to magnetic impurities in superconducting circuits: Optimal spin texture and role of phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Rogério

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and other superconducting circuits are limited by intrinsic flux noise with spectral density 1 /fα with α < 1 whose origin is believed to be due to spin impurities. We present a theory of flux noise in the presence of phase transitions and arbitrary spin textures in the impurity spin system. At higher temperatures we find that the spin-spin correlation length scale (describing, e.g., the average size of ferromagnetic spin clusters) greatly impacts the scaling of flux noise with wire geometry. At lower temperatures we find that flux noise is quite sensitive to the particular spin texture realized by the spin system ground state. Remarkably, we show that flux-noise is exactly equal to zero when the spins form a poloidal texture. Flux noise is nonzero for other spin textures, but gets reduced in the presence of correlated ferromagnetic fluctuations between the top and bottom wire surfaces, where the flux vectors are antiparallel. This demonstrates the idea of engineering spin textures and/or intersurface correlation as a method to reduce flux noise in superconducting circuits. This research was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (RGPIN/342982-2010, EGP/429649-2012) through its Discovery and Engage programs.

  9. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  10. Rejection of seamless pipe noise in magnetic flux leakage data obtained from gas pipeline inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Udpa, Satish; Udpa, Lalita; Lord, William

    2000-05-01

    Natural gas is traditionally transmitted from production facilities to customer locations through a vast pipeline network. A major segment of this network employs seamless pipes. This is especially true for smaller diameter transmission and distribution lines. Manufacturing process associated with the production of seamless pipes contribute to a helical variation in the pipe along the axis. The deformation introduces an artifact in the data obtained from MFL inspection of these pipelines. This seamless pipe noise is usually correlated with signals generated by defects and other elements (joints, tees, etc.) in pipelines, and can therefore, mask their indications in MFL data. This warrants the need for methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in MFL data from seamless pipes. This paper presents a technique for detecting signals in MFL data from seamless pipes. The approach processes the data in various steps. First, a wavelet based denoising technique is applied to reduce the noise due to instrumentation and other sources. An adaptive filtering approach is then applied to reject seamless noise in the data. Since the inspection of pipelines typically generates vast amounts of data, it is imperative that the algorithm be computationally efficient. The processing method has to be robust in that it should be data independent. The approach described in this paper meet these criteria. Results from application of the approach to data from field tests are presented.

  11. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, R.B.; Antiochos, S.K.; Norton, D.

    1997-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of {ital orthogonal} magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can {open_quotes}tunnel{close_quotes} through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch {gt}1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, {ge}2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and {open_quotes}pass{close_quotes} through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Magnetic flux tube tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Antiochos, S. K.; Norton, D.

    1997-08-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of orthogonal magnetic flux tubes. The simulations were carried out using a parallelized spectral algorithm for compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the flux tubes can ``tunnel'' through each other, a behavior not previously seen in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic flux tube interactions. Two conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch >>1, and the Lundquist number must be somewhat large, >=2880. An examination of magnetic field lines suggests that tunneling is due to a double-reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections, and ``pass'' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  13. Suppression of 1/f Flux Noise in Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Freeland, John; Yu, Clare; Wu, Ruqian; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Pappas, David; McDermott, Robert

    Low frequency 1/f magnetic flux noise is a dominant contributor to dephasing in superconducting quantum circuits. It is believed that the noise is due to a high density of unpaired magnetic defect states at the surface of the superconducting thin films. We have performed X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments that point to adsorbed molecular oxygen as the dominant source of magnetism in these films. By improving the vacuum environment of our superconducting devices, we have achieved a significant reduction in surface magnetic susceptibility and 1/f flux noise power spectral density. These results open the door to realization of superconducting qubits with improved dephasing times. State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

  14. Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Hu, Jun; Han, Sungho; Yu, Clare C; Wu, R Q

    2015-08-14

    A major obstacle to using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as qubits is flux noise. We propose that the heretofore mysterious spins producing flux noise could be O_{2} molecules adsorbed on the surface. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an O_{2} molecule adsorbed on an α-alumina surface has a magnetic moment of ~1.8 μ_{B}. The spin is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the O-O bond, the barrier to spin rotations is about 10 mK. Monte Carlo simulations of ferromagnetically coupled, anisotropic XY spins on a square lattice find 1/f magnetization noise, consistent with flux noise in Al SQUIDs. PMID:26317742

  15. Flux Compression Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In pulsed fusion propulsion schemes in which the fusion energy creates a radially expanding plasma, a magnetic nozzle is required to redirect the radially diverging flow of the expanding fusion plasma into a rearward axial flow, thereby producing a forward axial impulse to the vehicle. In a highly electrically conducting plasma, the presence of a magnetic field B in the plasma creates a pressure B(exp 2)/2(mu) in the plasma, the magnetic pressure. A gradient in the magnetic pressure can be used to decelerate the plasma traveling in the direction of increasing magnetic field, or to accelerate a plasma from rest in the direction of decreasing magnetic pressure. In principle, ignoring dissipative processes, it is possible to design magnetic configurations to produce an 'elastic' deflection of a plasma beam. In particular, it is conceivable that, by an appropriate arrangement of a set of coils, a good approximation to a parabolic 'magnetic mirror' may be formed, such that a beam of charged particles emanating from the focal point of the parabolic mirror would be reflected by the mirror to travel axially away from the mirror. The degree to which this may be accomplished depends on the degree of control one has over the flux surface of the magnetic field, which changes as a result of its interaction with a moving plasma.

  16. Plasmoids as magnetic flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Moldwin, M.B.; Hughes, W.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Observational constraints on the magnetic topology and orientation of plasmoids is examined using a magnetic field model. The authors develop a magnetic flux rope model to examine whether principal axis analysis (PAA) of magnetometer signatures from a single satellite pass is sufficient to determine the magnetic topology of plasmoids and if plasmoid observations are best explained by the flux rope, closed loop, or large-amplitude wave picture. Satellite data are simulated by extracting the magnetic field along a path through the model of a magnetic flux rope. They then examine the results using PAA. They find that the principal axis directions (and therefore the interpretation of structure orientation) is highly dependent on several parameters including the satellite trajectory through the structure. Because of this they conclude that PAA of magnetometer data from a single satellite pass is insufficient to differentiate between magnetic closed loop and flux rope models. They also compare the model results to ISEE 3 magnetometer data of plasmoid events in various coordinate frames including principal axis and geocentric solar magnetospheric. They find that previously identified plasmoid events that have been explained as closed loop structures can also be modeled as flux ropes. They also searched the literature for previously reported flux rope and closed loop plasmoid events to examine if these structures had any similarities and/or differences. The results of the modeling efforts and examination of both flux rope and plasmoid events lead them to favor the flux rope model of plasmoid formation, as it is better able to unify the observations of various magnetic structures observed by ISEE 3.

  17. Simulations of Magnetic Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert; Nordlund, Aake

    Magnetic flux emerges from the solar surface on a wide range of scales. We review recent simulations of both large and small scale flux emergence. In our own simulations, we represent the magnetic flux produced by the global dynamo as uniform, untwisted, horizontal field advected into the simulation domain by supergranule scale inflows at the bottom. Our computational domain extends from the temperature minimum (half a megameter above the visible surface) to 20 Mm below the surface, which is 10% of the depth of the convection zone, but contains 2/3 of its scale heights. We investigate how magnetic flux rises through the upper solar convection zone and emerges through the surface. Convective up-flows and magnetic buoyancy bring field toward the surface. Convective down-flows pin down field and prevent its rise. Most of the field gets pumped downward by the convection, but some field rises to the surface. The convective motions both confine the flux concentrations (without the need for twist) and shred them. This process creates a hierarchy of magnetic loops with smaller loops riding "piggy-back", in a serpentine pattern, on larger loops. As a result, magnetic flux emerges in a mixed polarity, "pepper and salt" pattern. The small loops appear as horizontal field over granules with their vertical legs in the bounding intergranular lanes. The fields are quickly swept into the intergranular lanes. As the larger, parent, flux concentrations reach the surface with their legs rooted in the the downflow boundaries of the underlying, supergranule-scale, convective cells near the bottom of the simulation domain, the surface field counter-streams into separate, opposite polarity concentrations, creating pores and spots. The subsurface magnetic field lines of the pores and spots formed by the magneto-convection (without being imposed as an initial condition) are braided, some tightly, some loosely and they connect in complicated ways to the surrounding field at large depths

  18. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  19. Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules as a Possible Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chuntai; Wang, Hui; Hu, Jun; Yu, Clare; Wu, Ruqian

    2015-03-01

    One of the dominant source of flux noise in SQUIDs is flux noise which has been attributed to mysterious fluctuating magnetic spins on the surface. We propose that the spins producing flux noise could be adsorbed O2 molecules that have a magnetic moment of about 2 μB. Using density functional calculations, we studied O2 molecules adsorbed on a sapphire surface. We find that the barrier for spin rotation is small enough to allow almost free spin reorientation due to thermal excitations at low temperatures. Monte Carlo simulations of a 2D XY spin model yields 1 / f noise where f is frequency. This work was supported by 1000 Talent Program of China through Fudan University. Work at UCI was supported by DOE-BES (Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER46237) and the Army Research Office (Grant No. W911NF-10-1-0494).

  20. Chaos in Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; DeHaas, T.; Van Compernolle, B.; Vincena, S.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic Flux Ropes Immersed in a uniform magnetoplasma are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and rotate about a central axis. They are kink unstable and smash into one another as they move. Each collision results in magnetic field line generation and the generation of a quasi-seperatrix layer. Three dimensional magnetic field lines are computed by conditionally averaging the data using correlation techniques. When the currents associated with the ropes are large,this is possible for only a number of rotation cycles as the field line motion becomes chaotic. The permutation entropy1 can be calculated from the the time series of the magnetic field data (this is also done with flows) and used to calculate the positions of the data on a Jensen Shannon complexity map2. The power spectra of much of the magnetic and flow data is exponential and Lorentzian structures in the time domain are embedded in them. The location of data on this map indicates if the magnetic fields are stochastic, or fall into regions of minimal or maximal complexity. The complexity is a function of space and time. The complexity map, and analysis will be explained in the course of the talk. Other types of chaotic dynamical models such as the Lorentz or Gissinger process also fall on the map and can give a clue to the nature of the flux rope turbulence. The ropes fall in the region of the C-H plane where chaotic systems lie. 1 C. Bandt, B. Pompe, Phys. Rev. Lett., 88,174102 (2007) 2 O. Russo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 99, 154102 (2007), J. Maggs, G.Morales, “Permutation Entropy analysis of temperature fluctuations from a basic electron heat transport experiment”,submitted PPCF (2013)

  1. Chaos in magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Van Compernolle, Bart; DeHaas, Tim; Vincena, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic flux ropes immersed in a uniform magnetoplasma are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and rotate about a central axis. They are kink unstable and smash into one another as they move. Each collision results in magnetic field line reconnection and the generation of a quasi-separatrix layer. Three-dimensional magnetic field lines are computed by conditionally averaging the data using correlation techniques. Conditional averaging is possible for only a number of rotation cycles as the field line motion becomes chaotic. The permutation entropy can be calculated from the time series of the magnetic field data (this is also done with flows) and is used to calculate the positions of the data on a Jensen-Shannon complexity map. The location of data on this map indicates if the magnetic fields are stochastic, or fall into regions of minimal or maximal complexity. The complexity is a function of space and time. The Lyapunov and Hurst exponents are calculated and the complexity and permutation entropy of the flows and field components are shown throughout the volume.

  2. Annihilation of Quantum Magnetic Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.

    After introducing the concepts associated with the Aharonov and Bohm effect and with the existence of a quantum of magnetic flux (QMF), we briefly discuss the Ginzburg-Landau theory that explains its origin and fundamental consequences. Also relevant observations of QMFs obtained in the laboratory using superconducting systems (vortices) are mentioned. Next, we describe processes related with the interaction of QMFs with opposite directions in terms of the gauge field geometry related to the vector potential. Then, we discuss the use of a Lagrangian density for a scalar field theory involving radiation in order to describe the annihilation of QMFs, claimed to be responsible for the emission of photons with energies corresponding to that of the annihilated magnetic fields. Finally, a possible application of these concepts to the observed variable dynamics of neutron stars is briefly mentioned.

  3. Measurement of Integrated Low Frequency Flux Noise in Superconducting Flux/Phase Qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Bo; Qiu Wei; Han Siyuan

    2008-11-07

    We measured the integrated low frequency flux noise ({approx}1 m{phi}{sub 0}) of an rf SQUID as a flux qubit by fitting the resonant peaks from photon assistant tunneling (PAT). The energy relaxation time Tl between the ground and first excited states in the same potential well, measured directly in time domain, is 3 ns. From these results we identified low frequency flux noise as the dominant source of decoherence. In addition, we found that the measured values of integrated flux noise in three qubits of various sizes differ more than an order of magnitude.

  4. A time-varying magnetic flux concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibret, B.; Premaratne, M.; Lewis, P. M.; Thomson, R.; Fitzgerald, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    It is known that diverse technological applications require the use of focused magnetic fields. This has driven the quest for controlling the magnetic field. Recently, the principles in transformation optics and metamaterials have allowed the realization of practical static magnetic flux concentrators. Extending such progress, here, we propose a time-varying magnetic flux concentrator cylindrical shell that uses electric conductors and ferromagnetic materials to guide magnetic flux to its center. Its performance is discussed based on finite-element simulation results. Our proposed design has potential applications in magnetic sensors, medical devices, wireless power transfer, and near-field wireless communications.

  5. Cross correlation of thermal flux noise in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashkenazy, V.D.; Jung, G. |; Shapiro, B.Y. |

    1996-10-01

    Cross correlation in the magnetic flux noise due to thermally activated movements of pancake vortices in strongly anisotropic layered superconductors has been investigated theoretically. It has been shown that there exists a crossover frequency, inversely proportional to the sample thickness, below which vortices behave as rigid rods and their ends move coherently on the opposite sides of the sample. At low frequencies, the cross-correlation spectrum is identical to the spectrum measured at each side of the sample. The cross-correlation spectrum demonstrates two regimes of behavior, separated by a characteristic frequency which depends on the geometry of the flux measuring loop. At high frequencies above the crossover frequency, the excitations of the elastic lattice modes lead to exponentially vanishing oscillations of the cross-correlation spectra. Pancake movements became incoherent and the correlation function decays, accompanied by the oscillations. The oscillations are most pronounced for the separation between pickup loops smaller than the sample thickness. In a typical experimental configuration with pickup loops located on the sample surface, the oscillations constitute only small perturbations to the dominating powerlike decay of the correlation function. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Parity-time symmetry under magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We study a parity-time-(PT -) symmetric ring lattice, with one pair of balanced gain and loss located at opposite positions. The system remains PT -symmetric when threaded by a magnetic flux; however, the PT symmetry is sensitive to the magnetic flux in the presence of a large balanced gain and loss, or in a large system. We find a threshold gain or loss above which any nontrivial magnetic flux breaks the PT symmetry. We obtain the maximally tolerable magnetic flux for the exact PT -symmetric phase, which is approximately linearly dependent on a weak gain or loss.

  7. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  8. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  9. How the Saturnian Magnetosphere Conserves Magnetic Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R. L.; Wei, H.; Russell, C. T.; Arridge, C. S.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn are driven by the centrifugal force of near co-rotating water group ions released at a rate of hundreds of kilograms per second by Saturn's moon Enceladus. The plasma is accelerated up to co-rotation speed by the magnetospheric magnetic field coupled to the Saturnian ionosphere. The plasma is lost ultimately through the process of magnetic reconnection in the tail. Conservation of magnetic flux requires that plasma-depleted, "empty" flux tubes return magnetic flux to the inner magnetosphere. After completion of the initial inrush of the reconnected and largely emptied flux tubes inward of the reconnection point, the flux tubes face the outflowing plasma and must move inward against the flow. Observations of such flux tubes have been identified in the eight years of Cassini magnetometer data. The occurrence of these tubes is observed at all local times indicating slow inward transport of the tubes relative to the co-rotation speed. Depleted flux tubes observed in the equatorial region appear as an enhancement in the magnitude of the magnetic field, whereas the same flux tubes observed at higher latitudes appear as decreased field strength. The difference in appearance of the low latitude and the high latitude tubes is due to the plasma environment just outside the tube. Warm low-density plasma fills the inside of the flux tube at all latitudes. This flux tube thus will expand in the less dense regions away from the magnetic equator and will be observed as a decrease in the magnitude of the magnetic field from the background. These flux tubes near the equator, where the plasma density outside of the flux tube is much greater, will be observed as an enhancement in the magnitude of the magnetic field. Cassini magnetometer and CAPS data are examined to understand the properties of these flux tubes and their radial and latitudinal evolution throughout the Saturnian magnetospheric environment.

  10. Regulation of the interplanetary magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study we use a recently developed technique for measuring the 2-D magnetic flux in the ecliptic plane to examine (1) the long term variation of the magnetic flux in interplanetary space and (2) the apparent rate at which coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may be opening new flux from the Sun. Since there is a substantial variation ({approximately}50%) of the flux in the ecliptic plane over the solar cycle, we conclude that there must be some means whereby new flux can be opened from the Sun and previously open magnetic flux can be closed off. We briefly describe recently discovered coronal disconnections events which could serve to close off previously open magnetic flux. CMEs appear to retain at least partial magnetic connection to the Sun and hence open new flux, while disconnections appear to be likely signatures of the process that returns closed flux to the Sun; the combination of these processes could regulate the amount of open magnetic flux in interplanetary space. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The paper considers steady siphon flows in isolated thin magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas, with plasma beta greater than or equal to 1, appropriate for conditions in the solar photosphere. The cross-sectional area of the flux tube varies along the tube in response to pressure changes induced by the siphon flow. Consideration is also given to steady isothermal siphon flows in arched magnetic flux tubes in a stratified atmosphere. Applications of the results to intense magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere and to the photospheric Evershed flow in a sunspot penumbra are addressed.

  12. Magnetic flux amplification by Lenz lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmaker, J.; Pirota, K. R.; Teixeira, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Tailoring magnetic flux distribution is highly desirable in a wide range of applications such as magnetic sensors and biomedicine. In this paper we study the manipulation of induced currents in passive devices in order to engineer the distribution of magnetic flux intensity in a given region. We propose two different approaches, one based on especially designed wire loops (Lenz law) and the other based on solid conductive pieces (eddy currents). The gain of such devices is mainly determined by geometry giving perspective of high amplification. We consistently modeled, simulated, and executed the proposed devices. Doubled magnetic flux intensity is demonstrated experimentally for a moderate aspect ratio.

  13. Implicit Flux Feedback Control for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Frederick Joseph

    Design and implementation of a dynamic system that includes magnetic bearings is dependent on knowledge of the relationship between the command input to the magnetic actuator and the force that the bearing actually applies to the rotor (or other structure) being controlled. Traditional designs relate the bearing coil current to the developed bearing force; unfortunately, the current-to-force relationship is not invariant to magnetic hysteresis, magnetic saturation, eddy current effects, or changes in the bearing air gap length. To overcome these limitations, an approach known as implicit flux feedback is explored. Since the gap force in a magnetic circuit is directly related to the flux in that gap, measuring the gap flux and employing it as a feedback state results in a bearing with an improved command -to-force relation which is less subject to the error sources mentioned above. Confirmation of the flux-to-force relationship is accomplished via experiments on a test apparatus specifically designed to allow simultaneous force and flux measurements on a single-axis magnetic bearing (using both laminated and solid magnetic components). Successful implementation of the flux feedback algorithm simplifies the control system design of magnetic bearing systems by providing a more accurate, well characterized actuator model, and, by overcoming such effects as hysteresis, saturation, eddy currents and gap dependence, this approach provides magnetic bearings which exhibit significantly improved dynamic performance.

  14. Magnetic Flux Cancellation and Formation of Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Kim, Mun Song; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Kyong Chol

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic flux cancellation appears to be closely related to various kinds of solar activities such as flares, microflares/surges/jets, X-ray bright points, erupting mini-filaments, transition region explosive events, filament formation, filament activation and eruption, and coronal mass ejections. It is commonly believed that magnetic reconnections in the low atmosphere are responsible for canceling magnetic features, and magnetic fragments are observed to originate as bipoles. According to the Sweet-Parker type reconnection model, the inflow speed closely corresponds to the converging speed of each pole in a canceling magnetic feature and the rate of flux cancellation must be explained by the observed converging speed. As distinct from the corona, the efficiency of photospheric magnetic reconnection may be due to the small Cowling conductivity, instead of the Spitzer, of weakly ionized and magnetized plasma in the low atmosphere of the sun. Using the VAL-C atmospheric model and Cowling conductivity, we have computed the parameters describing Sweet-Parker type reconnecting current sheets in the plasma of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, and particularly for the phenomena of magnetic flux cancellation and dark filament formation which occurred on July 2, 1994 we have estimated the rate of flux cancellation, the inflow speed(the converging speed) and the upward mass flux to compare with the observation. The results show that when taking account of the Cowling conductivity in the low atmosphere, large flux cancellation rates(>1019Mxhr-1) in solar active regions are better explained than by the Spitzer conductivity-considered reconnection model. Particularly for the flux cancellation event on July 2, 1994, the inflow speed(0.26kms-1)is almost similar to the converging speed(0.22kms-1)and the upward mass flux(3.3X1012gs-1) in the model is sufficient for the large dark filament formation in a time of several hours through magnetic flux cancellation process.

  15. Magnetic bearing. [for supplying magnetic fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A magnetic bearing is described which includes a pair of coaxial, toroidal, and permanent magnets having axially directed poles. Like poles of the permanent magnets are adjacent to each other, whereby the permanent magnets have a tendency to be urged apart along the common axis. An electromagnet is wound coaxially with the permanent magnets in such a manner that the poles are axially directed. Between the poles of each permanent magnet there is a low magnetic reluctance circuit including two series air gaps. Between the poles of the electromagnet a low reluctance path including only one air gap of each of the low magnetic reluctance circuits is provided. The low reluctance path for the electromagnet includes a ring axially translatable relative to the permanent magnets. The ring forms opposite faces of the air gaps in the magnetic circuits for each permanent magnet.

  16. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  17. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  18. Flux Emergence in a Magnetized Convection Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-07-01

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as Bvpropρα, with α <~ 1. An increase of radial velocity, density, and current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux influences the system's global polarity

  19. FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-07-20

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}< 1. An increase of radial velocity, density, and current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux

  20. Analysis of Vibration and Acoustic Noise in Permanent Magnet Motors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sangmoon

    The drive motor is a frequent source of vibration and acoustic noise in many precision spindle motors. One of the electromagnetic sources of vibration in permanent magnet motors is the torque ripple, consisting of the reluctance torque and electromagnetic torque fluctuation. This type of vibration is becoming more serious with the advent of new high-grade magnets with increased flux density. Acoustic noise of electromagnetic origin is difficult to predict and its exact mechanism is unclear. The mechanism of noise generation should be revealed to design a quieter motor which is the modern customer's demand. For motor operation at low speeds and loads, torque ripple due to the reluctance torque is often a source of vibration and control difficulty. The reluctance torque in a motor was calculated from the flux density by a finite element method and the Maxwell stress method. Effects of design parameters, such as stator slot width, permanent slot width, airgap length and magnetization direction, were investigated. Magnet pole shaping, by gradually decreasing the magnet thickness toward edges, yields a sinusoidal shape of the reluctance torque with reduced harmonics, thus reducing the vibration. This dissertation also presents two motor design techniques: stator tooth notching and rotor pole skewing with magnet pole shaping, and the effect of each method on the output torque. The analysis shows that the reluctance torque can be nearly eliminated by the suggested designs, with minimal sacrifice of the output torque. In permanent magnet DC motors, the most popular design type is the trapezoidal back electro-motive force (BEMF), for switched DC controllers. It is demonstrated that the output torque profile of one phase energized is qualitatively equivalent to the BEMF profile for motors with reduced reluctance torque. It implies that design of BEMF profile is possible by magnetic modeling of a motor, without expensive and time-consuming experiments for different designs

  1. Vector Magnetic Field in Emerging Flux Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Pariat, E.

    A crucial phase in magnetic flux emergence is the rise of magnetic flux tubes through the solar photosphere, which represents a severe transition between the very different environments of the solar interior and corona. Multi-wavelength observations with Flare Genesis, TRACE, SoHO, and more recently with the vector magnetographs at THEMIS and Hida (DST) led to the following conclusions. The fragmented magnetic field in the emergence region - with dipped field lines or bald patches - is directly related with Ellerman bombs, arch filament systems, and overlying coronal loops. Measurements of vector magnetic fields have given evidence that undulating "serpentine" fields are present while magnetic flux tubes cross the photosphere. See the sketch below, and for more detail see Pariat et al. (2004, 2007); Watanabe et al. (2008):

  2. Magnetic refrigeration using flux compression in superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U. E.; Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using flux compression in high-temperature superconductors to produce the large time-varying magnetic fields required in a field cycled magnetic refrigerator operating between 20 K and 4 K is presently investigated. This paper describes the refrigerator concept and lists limitations and advantages in comparison with conventional refrigeration techniques. The maximum fields obtainable by flux compression in high-temperature supercoductor materials, as presently prepared, are too low to serve in such a refrigerator. However, reports exist of critical current values that are near usable levels for flux pumps in refrigerator applications.

  3. Sensor noise in low-level flux-gate magnetometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scouten, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The noise mechanism in a well-designed magnetometer is shown to be due to small-scale magnetic moments which are probably small volumes of the core material that are not oriented by the drive field. Design developments include the sense coil radius and the development of a drive waveform which yields considerably improved performance over the commonly used sine wave drive.

  4. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  5. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  6. Flux-Feedback Magnetic-Suspension Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1990-01-01

    Flux-feedback magnetic-suspension actuator provides magnetic suspension and control forces having linear transfer characteristics between force command and force output over large range of gaps. Hall-effect devices used as sensors for electronic feedback circuit controlling currents flowing in electromagnetic windings to maintain flux linking suspended element at substantially constant value independent of changes in length of gap. Technique provides effective method for maintenance of constant flux density in gap and simpler than previous methods. Applications include magnetic actuators for control of shapes and figures of antennas and of precise segmented reflectors, magnetic suspensions in devices for storage of angular momentum and/or kinetic energy, and systems for control, pointing, and isolation of instruments.

  7. Magnetic Flux Quantization of the Landau Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhua; Li, Kang; Long, Shuming; Yuan, Yi

    2014-08-01

    Landau problem has a very important application in modern physics, in which two-dimensional electron gas system and quantum Hall effect are outstanding. In this paper, first we review the solution of the Pauli equation, then using the single electron wave function, we calculate moving area expectations of the ideal 2-dimensional electron gas system and the per unit area's degeneracy of the electron gas system. As a result, how to calculate the magnetic flux of the electron gas system is given. It shows that the magnetic flux of 2-dimensional electron gas system in magnetic field is quantized, and magnetic flux quantization results from the quantization of the moving area expectations of electron gas system.

  8. Magnetic topology of emerging flux regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, Etienne

    Coronal magnetic fields structure and governs the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. These magnetic fields are often complex, composed of multiples domains of magnetic-field-lines connectivity. The topology of the magnetic field allows a synthetic description of these complex magnetic field by highlighting the structural elements that are important for the dynamic and the activity of the corona. Topology identifies the key elements where magnetic reconnection will preferentially occurs, and allows to explain and predict the evolution of the coronal plasma. However the topological elements - such as null points, separatrices, separators - do not appear out of thin air. Along with energy, and helicity, the magnetic topology of an active region is build up as the consequence of flux emergence. Some topological elements, such as bald-patches, are even fully part of the mechanism of flux emergence mechanism and drive the evolution and the structuration of the coronal magnetic field as it crosses the lower layer of the solar atmosphere. In the present talk I will therefore review our current understanding of the formation of active region in terms of magnetic topology. I will speak on how the topological structures which are key to solar activity are formed. Meanwhile I'll also discus the topological properties of emerging active region and how topology influences the very process of flux emergence.

  9. Ising-Glauber Spin Cluster Model for Temperature-Dependent Magnetization Noise in SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Amrit

    2014-11-01

    Clusters of interacting two-level-systems, likely due to Farbe+(F+) centers at the metal-insulator interface, are shown to self-consistently lead to 1 /fα magnetization noise [with α (T )≲1 ] in SQUIDs. Model calculations, based on a new method of obtaining correlation functions, explains various puzzling experimental features. It is shown why the inductance noise is inherently temperature dependent while the flux noise is not, despite the same underlying microscopics. Magnetic ordering in these systems, established by three-point correlation functions, explains the observed flux- inductance-noise cross correlations. Since long-range ferromagnetic interactions are shown to lead to a more weakly temperature dependent flux noise when compared to short-range interactions, the time reversal symmetry of the clusters is also not likely broken by the same mechanism which mediates surface ferromagnetism in nanoparticles and thin films of the same insulator materials.

  10. Tuning magnetic nanostructures and flux concentrators for magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaolu; Liu, Yen-Fu; Ewing, Dan; Ruder, Carmen K.; De Rego, Paul J.; Edelstein, A. S.; Liou, Sy-Hwang

    2015-09-01

    The methods for the optimization of the magnetoresistive (MR) sensors are to reduce sources of noises, to increase the signal, and to understand the involved fundamental limitations. The high-performance MR sensors result from important magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) properties, such as tunneling magnetoresistance ratio (TMR), coercivity (Hc), exchange coupling field (He), domain structures, and noise properties as well as the external magnetic flux concentrators. All these parameters are sensitively controlled by the magnetic nanostructures, which can be tuned by varying junction free layer nanostructures, geometry, and magnetic annealing process etc. In this paper, we discuss some of efforts that an optimized magnetic sensor with a sensitivity as high as 5,146 %/mT. This sensitivity is currently the highest among all MR-type sensors that have been reported. The estimated noise of our magnetoresistive sensor is 47 pT/Hz1/2 at 1 Hz. This magnetoresistance sensor dissipates only 100 μW of power while operating under an applied voltage of 1 V at room temperature.

  11. Crossed Flux Tubes Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Zachary; Bellan, Paul

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics of arched, plasma-filled flux tubes have been studied in experiments at Caltech. These flux tubes expand, undergo kink instabilities, magnetically reconnect, and are subject to magnetohydrodynamic forces. An upgraded experiment will arrange for two of these flux tubes to cross over each other. It is expected then that the flux tubes will undergo magnetic reconnection at the crossover point, forming one long flux tube and one short flux tube. This reconnection should also result in a half-twist in the flux tubes at the crossover point, which will propagate along each tube as Alfv'en waves. The control circuitry requires two independent floating high energy capacitor power supplies to power the plasma loops, which will be put in series when the plasma loops reconnect. Coordinating these two power supplies requires the building of new systems for controlling plasma generation. Unlike with previous designs, all timing functions are contained on a single printed circuit board, allowing the design to be easily replicated for use with each independent capacitor involved. The control circuit sequencing has been tested successfully in generating a single flux tube. The plasma gun is currently under construction, with its installation pending completion of prior experiments.

  12. Study Of Dc Modulation Noise In Magnetic Recording Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses dc modulation noise in thin-film magnetic medium on magnetic recording disk. Presents study of statistical and spectral characteristics of noise and describes study of dependence of noise upon applied magnetic field, thickness of magnetic layer, and roughness of surface of layer. DC modulation noise attributed to nucleation of isolated regions of reversal of magnetization in recording medium, and to growth and coalescence of regions with increasing reverse applied magnetic field. Inhomogeneities in magnetic recording media, not roughnesses of surfaces, are dominant sources of noise.

  13. Magnetic Flux Leakage: a Benchmark Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etcheverry, J. I.; Sánchez, G. A.; Bonadeo, N.

    2011-06-01

    The magnetic flux leaked by artificial notches machined by EDM is measured for two different rectangular steel plates. The measurements were performed for different field intensities, different liftoffs, and both sides, simultaneously recording the three components of the magnetic field. Attention was paid to the accurate measurement of the liftoff, and to make the magnetic history of the material as predictable as possible. This was achieved by measuring for decreasing magnetic excitations, starting from saturation. The descending branch of the major loop is measured and reported, to allow for a detailed comparison against numerical experiments.

  14. Magnetic flux reconstruction methods for shaped tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Chi-Wa

    1993-12-01

    The use of a variational method permits the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to be solved by reducing the problem of solving the 2D non-linear partial differential equation to the problem of minimizing a function of several variables. This high speed algorithm approximately solves the GS equation given a parameterization of the plasma boundary and the current profile (p` and FF` functions). The author treats the current profile parameters as unknowns. The goal is to reconstruct the internal magnetic flux surfaces of a tokamak plasma and the toroidal current density profile from the external magnetic measurements. This is a classic problem of inverse equilibrium determination. The current profile parameters can be evaluated by several different matching procedures. Matching of magnetic flux and field at the probe locations using the Biot-Savart law and magnetic Green`s function provides a robust method of magnetic reconstruction. The matching of poloidal magnetic field on the plasma surface provides a unique method of identifying the plasma current profile. However, the power of this method is greatly compromised by the experimental errors of the magnetic signals. The Casing Principle provides a very fast way to evaluate the plasma contribution to the magnetic signals. It has the potential of being a fast matching method. The performance of this method is hindered by the accuracy of the poloidal magnetic field computed from the equilibrium solver. A flux reconstruction package has been implemented which integrates a vacuum field solver using a filament model for the plasma, a multi-layer perception neural network as an interface, and the volume integration of plasma current density using Green`s functions as a matching method for the current profile parameters. The flux reconstruction package is applied to compare with the ASEQ and EFIT data. The results are promising.

  15. Magnetic Flux Tube Interchange at the Heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florinski, V.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic field measured by Voyager 1 prior to its heliocliff encounter on 2012.65 showed an unexpectedly complex transition from the primarily azimuthal inner-heliosheath field to the draped interstellar field tilted by some 20° to the nominal azimuthal direction. Most prominent were two regions of enhanced magnetic field strength depleted in energetic charged particles of heliospheric origin. These regions were interpreted as magnetic flux tubes connected to the outer heliosheath that provided a path for the particles to escape. Despite large increases in strength, the field’s direction did not change appreciably at the boundaries of these flux tubes. Rather, the field’s direction changed gradually over several months prior to the heliocliff crossing. It is shown theoretically that the heliopause, as a pressure equilibrium layer, can become unstable to interchange of magnetic fields between the inner and the outer heliosheaths. The curvature of magnetic field lines and the anti-sunward gradient in plasma kinetic pressure provide conditions favorable for an interchange. Magnetic shear between the heliosheath and the interstellar fields reduces the growth rates, but does not fully stabilize the heliopause against perturbations propagating in the latitudinal direction. The instability could create a transition layer permeated by magnetic flux tubes, oriented parallel to each other and alternately connected to the heliosheath or the interstellar regions.

  16. The dynamics of magnetic flux rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, E. E.; Fisher, G. H.; Patten, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in the presence of turbulent convection is examined using results of numerical simulations of closed magnetic flux tubes embedded in a steady 'ABC' flow field, which approximate some of the important characteristics of a turbulent convecting flow field. Three different evolutionary scenarios were found: expansion to a steady deformed ring; collapse to a compact fat flux ring, separated from the expansion type of behavior by a critical length scale; and, occasionally, evolution toward an advecting, oscillatory state. The work suggests that small-scale flows will not have a strong effect on large-scale, strong fields.

  17. The separation velocity of emerging magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Wang, Haimin

    1987-01-01

    The separation velocities and magnetic fluxes of 24 emerging bipoles on the sun are measured in order to provide data on the emerging mechanism. Velocities are shown to range from about 0.2-1 km/s, bipole fluxes to range over more than two orders of magnitude, and the mean field strength and the sizes to range over one order of magnitude. No correlation is noted between measured separation velocities and either the flux or the mean field strength of the bipole. Predicted separation velocities are found be about one order of magnitude greater than measured values.

  18. Magnetic Flux Cancellation in Ellerman Bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, A.; Mathioudakis, M.; Doyle, J. G.; Scullion, E.; Nelson, C. J.; Henriques, V.; Ray, T.

    2016-06-01

    Ellerman Bombs (EBs) are often found to be co-spatial with bipolar photospheric magnetic fields. We use Hα imaging spectroscopy along with Fe i 6302.5 Å spectropolarimetry from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope (SST), combined with data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory, to study EBs and the evolution of the local magnetic fields at EB locations. EBs are found via an EB detection and tracking algorithm. Using NICOLE inversions of the spectropolarimetric data, we find that, on average, (3.43 ± 0.49) × 1024 erg of stored magnetic energy disappears from the bipolar region during EB burning. The inversions also show flux cancellation rates of 1014–1015 Mx s‑1 and temperature enhancements of 200 K at the detection footpoints. We investigate the near-simultaneous flaring of EBs due to co-temporal flux emergence from a sunspot, which shows a decrease in transverse velocity when interacting with an existing, stationary area of opposite polarity magnetic flux, resulting in the formation of the EBs. We also show that these EBs can be fueled further by additional, faster moving, negative magnetic flux regions.

  19. Returning magnetic flux in sunspot penumbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Cobo, B.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We study the presence of reversed polarity magnetic flux in sunspot penumbra. Methods: We applied a new regularized method to deconvolve spectropolarimetric data observed with the spectropolarimeter SP onboard Hinode. The new regularization is based on a principal component decomposition of the Stokes profiles. The resulting Stokes profiles were inverted to infer the magnetic field vector using SIR. Results: We find, for the first time, reversed polarity fields at the border of many bright penumbral filaments in the whole penumbra.

  20. Magnetic field line lengths inside interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang; Qiu, Jiong; Krucker, Sam

    2015-07-01

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model to reveal the close relation between the field line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in situ Wind spacecraft measurements. We show that the field line twist distributions within interplanetary flux ropes are inconsistent with the Lundquist model. In particular, we utilize the unique measurements of magnetic field line lengths within selected ICME events as provided by Kahler et al. () based on energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU and the associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft. These direct measurements are compared with our model calculations to help assess the flux rope interpretation of the embedded magnetic structures. By using the different flux rope models, we show that the in situ direct measurements of field line lengths are consistent with a flux rope structure with spiral field lines of constant and low twist, largely different from that of the Lundquist model, especially for relatively large-scale flux ropes.

  1. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorecka, Agnieszka; Gremaud, Benoit; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  2. Geometrical Effects in Noise Spectra of Superconducting Flux Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andre; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Martinis, John

    We present theoretical study of geometrical effects related to spin diffusion in superconducting flux qubits. We adopt a model of a long superconducting wire surrounded by a thin oxide layer with spins distributed uniformly over cross-sectional area of the oxide layer. Using a continuous transformation from a round cylinder to a flat wire strip, we demonstrate that the noise spectral density tends to a power law S (ω) ~(ω / Γ) - s with s 3 / 4 , approaching s = 3 / 4 for very thin wires. The ω-s dependence is valid in a broad frequency range above ωΓ stretching up to four orders of magnitude in units of characteristic diffusion decay rate Γ ~ 1 -102 Hz. The effect is highly sensitive to a cross-sectional aspect ratio of a thin wire thus revealing its geometrical origin. We substantiate our findings by detailed comparison with available experimental data and conclude that 3 / 4 power law distinguishes spin diffusion flux noise from generic `` 1 / f '' family. Supported by the AFRL Information Directorate under Grant F4HBKC4162G001.

  3. Magnetic flux concentrations in a polytropic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, I. R.; Brandenburg, A.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Strongly stratified hydromagnetic turbulence has recently been identified as a candidate for explaining the spontaneous formation of magnetic flux concentrations by the negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI). Much of this work has been done for isothermal layers, in which the density scale height is constant throughout. Aims: We now want to know whether earlier conclusions regarding the size of magnetic structures and their growth rates carry over to the case of polytropic layers, in which the scale height decreases sharply as one approaches the surface. Methods: To allow for a continuous transition from isothermal to polytropic layers, we employ a generalization of the exponential function known as the q-exponential. This implies that the top of the polytropic layer shifts with changing polytropic index such that the scale height is always the same at some reference height. We used both mean-field simulations (MFS) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced stratified turbulence to determine the resulting flux concentrations in polytropic layers. Cases of both horizontal and vertical applied magnetic fields were considered. Results: Magnetic structures begin to form at a depth where the magnetic field strength is a small fraction of the local equipartition field strength with respect to the turbulent kinetic energy. Unlike the isothermal case where stronger fields can give rise to magnetic flux concentrations at larger depths, in the polytropic case the growth rate of NEMPI decreases for structures deeper down. Moreover, the structures that form higher up have a smaller horizontal scale of about four times their local depth. For vertical fields, magnetic structures of super-equipartition strengths are formed, because such fields survive downward advection that causes NEMPI with horizontal magnetic fields to reach premature nonlinear saturation by what is called the "potato-sack" effect. The horizontal cross-section of such

  4. SYNOPTIC MAPPING OF CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, C. L.; Harvey, J. W.; Pietarila, A. E-mail: jharvey@nso.edu

    2013-03-10

    We used daily full-disk Ca II 854.2 nm magnetograms from the Synoptic Optical Long Term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility to study the chromospheric magnetic field from 2006 April through 2009 November. We determined and corrected previously unidentified zero offsets in the SOLIS magnetograms. By tracking the disk passages of stable unipolar regions, the measured net flux densities were found to systematically decrease from the disk center to the limb by a factor of about two. This decrease was modeled using a thin flux tube model with a difference in signal formation height between the center and limb sides. Comparison of photospheric and chromospheric observations shows that their differences are largely due to horizontal spreading of magnetic flux with increasing height. The north polar magnetic field decreased nearly linearly with time during our study period while the south polar field was nearly constant. We used the annual change in the viewing angle of the polar regions to estimate the radial and meridional components of the polar fields and found that the south polar fields were tilted away from the pole. Synoptic maps of the chromospheric radial flux density distribution were used as boundary conditions for extrapolation of the field from the chromosphere into the corona. A comparison of modeled and observed coronal hole boundaries and coronal streamer positions showed better agreement when using the chromospheric rather than the photospheric synoptic maps.

  5. Magnetic merging in colliding flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.; Rhoads, James E.

    1995-01-01

    We develop an analytical theory of reconnection between colliding, twisted magnetic flux tubes. Our analysis is restricted to direct collisions between parallel tubes and is based on the collision dynamics worked out by Bogdan (1984). We show that there is a range of collision velocities for which neutral point reconnection of the Parker-Sweet type can occur, and a smaller range for which reconnection leads to coalescence. Mean velocities within the solar convection zone are probably significantly greater than the upper limit for coalescence. This suggests that the majority of flux tube collisions do not result in merging, unless the frictional coupling of the tubes to the background flow is extremely strong.

  6. Interplanetary magnetic flux - Measurement and balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for determining the approximate amount of magnetic flux in various solar wind structures in the ecliptic (and solar rotation) plane is developed using single-spacecraft measurements in interplanetary space and making certain simplifying assumptions. The method removes the effect of solar wind velocity variations and can be applied to specific, limited-extent solar wind structures as well as to long-term variations. Over the 18-month interval studied, the ecliptic plane flux of coronal mass ejections was determined to be about 4 times greater than that of HFDs.

  7. Magnetic Flux Compression Experiments Using Plasma Armatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic flux compression reaction chambers offer considerable promise for controlling the plasma flow associated with various micronuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power schemes, primarily because they avoid thermalization with wall structures and permit multicycle operation modes. The major physical effects of concern are the diffusion of magnetic flux into the rapidly expanding plasma cloud and the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the plasma surface, both of which can severely degrade reactor efficiency and lead to plasma-wall impact. A physical parameter of critical importance to these underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes is the magnetic Reynolds number (R(sub m), the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Efficient flux compression requires R(sub m) less than 1, and a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is essential to the reliable design and operation of practical reactors. As a means of improving this understanding, a simplified laboratory experiment has been constructed in which the plasma jet ejected from an ablative pulse plasma gun is used to investigate plasma armature interaction with magnetic fields. As a prelude to intensive study, exploratory experiments were carried out to quantify the magnetic Reynolds number characteristics of the plasma jet source. Jet velocity was deduced from time-of-flight measurements using optical probes, and electrical conductivity was measured using an inductive probing technique. Using air at 27-inHg vacuum, measured velocities approached 4.5 km/s and measured conductivities were in the range of 30 to 40 kS/m.

  8. MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; Decker, R. B.; Drake, J. F.; Ness, N. F.; Opher, M. E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net E-mail: drake@umd.edu E-mail: mopher@bu.edu

    2013-01-01

    Voyager 1(V1) and Voyager 2(V2) have observed heliosheath plasma since 2005 December and 2007 August, respectively. The observed speed profiles are very different at the two spacecrafts. Speeds at V1 decreased to zero in 2010 while the average speed at V2 is a constant 150 km s{sup -1} with the direction rotating tailward. The magnetic flux is expected to be constant in these heliosheath flows. We show that the flux is constant at V2 but decreases by an order of magnitude at V1, even after accounting for divergence of the flows and changes in the solar field. If reconnection were responsible for this decrease, the magnetic field would lose 70% of its free energy to reconnection and the energy density released would be 0.6 eV cm{sup -3}.

  9. Magnetic Flux Conservation in the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; Decker, R. B.; Drake, J. F.; Ness, N. F.; Opher, M.

    2013-01-01

    Voyager 1(V1) and Voyager 2(V2) have observed heliosheath plasma since 2005 December and 2007 August, respectively. The observed speed profiles are very different at the two spacecrafts. Speeds at V1 decreased to zero in 2010 while the average speed at V2 is a constant 150 km s-1 with the direction rotating tailward. The magnetic flux is expected to be constant in these heliosheath flows. We show that the flux is constant at V2 but decreases by an order of magnitude at V1, even after accounting for divergence of the flows and changes in the solar field. If reconnection were responsible for this decrease, the magnetic field would lose 70% of its free energy to reconnection and the energy density released would be 0.6 eV cm-3.

  10. Magnetic-Flux-Compensated Voltage Divider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mata, Carlos T.

    2005-01-01

    A magnetic-flux-compensated voltage-divider circuit has been proposed for use in measuring the true potential across a component that is exposed to large, rapidly varying electric currents like those produced by lightning strikes. An example of such a component is a lightning arrester, which is typically exposed to currents of the order of tens of kiloamperes, having rise times of the order of hundreds of nanoseconds. Traditional voltage-divider circuits are not designed for magnetic-flux-compensation: They contain uncompensated loops having areas large enough that the transient magnetic fluxes associated with large transient currents induce spurious voltages large enough to distort voltage-divider outputs significantly. A drawing of the proposed circuit was not available at the time of receipt of information for this article. What is known from a summary textual description is that the proposed circuit would contain a total of four voltage dividers: There would be two mixed dividers in parallel with each other and with the component of interest (e.g., a lightning arrester), plus two mixed dividers in parallel with each other and in series with the component of interest in the same plane. The electrical and geometric configuration would provide compensation for induced voltages, including those attributable to asymmetry in the volumetric density of the lightning or other transient current, canceling out the spurious voltages and measuring the true voltage across the component.

  11. Magnetic flux concentrations from turbulent stratified convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Brandenburg, A.; Kleeorin, N.; Käpylä, M. J.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The formation of magnetic flux concentrations within the solar convection zone leading to sunspot formation is unexplained. Aims: We study the self-organization of initially uniform sub-equipartition magnetic fields by highly stratified turbulent convection. Methods: We perform simulations of magnetoconvection in Cartesian domains representing the uppermost 8.5-24 Mm of the solar convection zone with the horizontal size of the domain varying between 34 and 96 Mm. The density contrast in the 24 Mm deep models is more than 3 × 103 or eight density scale heights, corresponding to a little over 12 pressure scale heights. We impose either a vertical or a horizontal uniform magnetic field in a convection-driven turbulent flow in set-ups where no small-scale dynamos are present. In the most highly stratified cases we employ the reduced sound speed method to relax the time step constraint arising from the high sound speed in the deep layers. We model radiation via the diffusion approximation and neglect detailed radiative transfer in order to concentrate on purely magnetohydrodynamic effects. Results: We find that super-equipartition magnetic flux concentrations are formed near the surface in cases with moderate and high density stratification, corresponding to domain depths of 12.5 and 24 Mm. The size of the concentrations increases as the box size increases and the largest structures (20 Mm horizontally near the surface) are obtained in the models that are 24 Mm deep. The field strength in the concentrations is in the range of 3-5 kG, almost independent of the magnitude of the imposed field. The amplitude of the concentrations grows approximately linearly in time. The effective magnetic pressure measured in the simulations is positive near the surface and negative in the bulk of the convection zone. Its derivative with respect to the mean magnetic field, however, is positive in most of the domain, which is unfavourable for the operation of the negative

  12. Slip Running Reconnection in Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W. N.; Van Compernolle, B.; Vincena, S. T.; De Hass, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are due to helical currents and form a dense carpet of arches on the surface of the sun. Occasionally one tears loose as a coronal mass ejection and its rope structure can be detected by satellites close to the earth. Current sheets can tear into filaments and these are nothing other than flux ropes. Ropes are not static, they exert mutual ěc{J}×ěc{B} forces causing them to twist about each other and eventually merge. Kink instabilities cause them to violently smash into each other and reconnect at the point of contact. We report on experiments on two adjacent ropes done in the large plasma device (LAPD) at UCLA ( ne ˜ 1012, Te ˜ 6 eV, B0z=330G, Brope}\\cong{10G,trep=1 Hz). The currents and magnetic fields form exotic shapes with no ignorable direction and no magnetic nulls. Volumetric space-time data (70,600 spatial locations) show multiple reconnection sites with time-dependent locations. The concept of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL), a tool to understand and visualize 3D magnetic field lines reconnection without null points is introduced. Three-dimensional measurements of the QSL derived from magnetic field data are presented. Within the QSL field lines that start close to one another rapidly diverge as they pass through one or more reconnection regions. The motion of magnetic field lines are traced as reconnection proceeds and they are observed to slip through the regions of space where the QSL is largest. As the interaction proceeds we double the current in the ropes. This accompanied by intense heating as observed in uv light and plasma flows measured by Mach probes. The interaction of the ropes is clearly seen by vislaulizng magnetic field data , as well as in images from a fast framing camera. Work supported by the Dept. of Energy and The National Science Foundation, done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA.Magnetic Field lines (measured) of three flux ropes and the plasma currents associated with them

  13. SEED BANKS FOR MAGNETIC FLUX COMPRESSION GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, E S

    2008-05-14

    In recent years the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been conducting experiments that require pulsed high currents to be delivered into inductive loads. The loads fall into two categories (1) pulsed high field magnets and (2) the input stage of Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG). Three capacitor banks of increasing energy storage and controls sophistication have been designed and constructed to drive these loads. One bank was developed for the magnet driving application (20kV {approx} 30kJ maximum stored energy.) Two banks where constructed as MFCG seed banks (12kV {approx} 43kJ and 26kV {approx} 450kJ). This paper will describe the design of each bank including switching, controls, circuit protection and safety.

  14. Linear magnetic motor/generator. [to generate electric energy using magnetic flux for spacecraft power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A linear magnetic motor/generator is disclosed which uses magnetic flux to provide mechanical motion or electrical energy. The linear magnetic motor/generator includes an axially movable actuator mechanism. A permament magnet mechanism defines a first magnetic flux path which passes through a first end portion of the actuator mechanism. Another permament magnet mechanism defines a second magnetic flux path which passes through a second end portion of the actuator mechanism. A drive coil defines a third magnetic flux path passing through a third central portion of the actuator mechanism. A drive coil selectively adds magnetic flux to and subtracts magnetic flux from magnetic flux flowing in the first and second magnetic flux path.

  15. Nonlinear oscillations of coalescing magnetic flux ropes.

    PubMed

    Kolotkov, Dmitrii Y; Nakariakov, Valery M; Rowlands, George

    2016-05-01

    An analytical model of highly nonlinear oscillations occurring during a coalescence of two magnetic flux ropes, based upon two-fluid hydrodynamics, is developed. The model accounts for the effect of electric charge separation, and describes perpendicular oscillations of the current sheet formed by the coalescence. The oscillation period is determined by the current sheet thickness, the plasma parameter β, and the oscillation amplitude. The oscillation periods are typically greater or about the ion plasma oscillation period. In the nonlinear regime, the oscillations of the ion and electron concentrations have a shape of a narrow symmetric spikes. PMID:27300993

  16. A review on equivalent magnetic noise of magnetoelectric laminate sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. J.; Gao, J. Q.; Li, M. H.; Shen, Y.; Hasanyan, D.; Li, J. F.; Viehland, D.

    2014-01-01

    Since the turn of the millennium, multi-phase magnetoelectric (ME) composites have been subject to attention and development, and giant ME effects have been found in laminate composites of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive layers. From an application perspective, the practical usefulness of a magnetic sensor is determined not only by the output signal of the sensor in response to an incident magnetic field, but also by the equivalent magnetic noise generated in the absence of such an incident field. Here, a short review of developments in equivalent magnetic noise reduction for ME sensors is presented. This review focuses on internal noise, the analysis of the noise contributions and a summary of noise reduction strategies. Furthermore, external vibration noise is also discussed. The review concludes with an outlook on future possibilities and scientific challenges in the field of ME magnetic sensors. PMID:24421380

  17. Permanent-magnet switched-flux machine

    DOEpatents

    Trzynadlowski, Andrzej M.; Qin, Ling

    2010-01-12

    A permanent-magnet switched-flux (PMSF) device has a ferromagnetic outer stator mounted to a shaft about a central axis extending axially through the PMSF device. Pluralities of top and bottom stator poles are respectively mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly in first and second transverse planes extending from first and second sections of the central axis adjacent to an inner surface of the ferromagnetic outer stator. A ferromagnetic inner rotor is coupled to the shaft and has i) a rotor core having a core axis co-axial with the central axis; and ii) first and second discs having respective outer edges with first and second pluralities of permanent magnets (PMs) mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly from the rotor core axis in the first and second transverse planes. The first and second pluralities of PMs each include PMs of alternating polarity.

  18. Permanent-magnet switched-flux machine

    DOEpatents

    Trzynadlowski, Andrzej M.; Qin, Ling

    2011-06-14

    A permanent-magnet switched-flux (PMSF) device has an outer rotor mounted to a shaft about a central axis extending axially through the PMSF device. First and second pluralities of permanent-magnets (PMs) are respectively mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly in first and second transverse planes extending from first and second sections of the central axis adjacent to an inner surface of the outer rotor. An inner stator is coupled to the shaft and has i) a stator core having a core axis co-axial with the central axis; and ii) first and second pluralities of stator poles mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly from the stator core axis in the first and second transverse planes. The first and second pluralities of PMs each include PMs of alternating polarity.

  19. Permanent-magnet switched-flux machine

    DOEpatents

    Trzynadlowski, Andrzej M.; Qin, Ling

    2012-02-21

    A permanent-magnet switched-flux (PMSF) device has an outer rotor mounted to a shaft about a central axis extending axially through the PMSF device. First and second pluralities of permanent-magnets (PMs) are respectively mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly in first and second transverse planes extending from first and second sections of the central axis adjacent to an inner surface of the outer rotor. An inner stator is coupled to the shaft and has i) a stator core having a core axis co-axial with the central axis; and ii) first and second pluralities of stator poles mounted in first and second circles, radially outwardly from the stator core axis in the first and second transverse planes. The first and second pluralities of PMs each include PMs of alternating polarity.

  20. Harmonic Fluxes and Electromagnetic Forces of Concentric Winding Brushless Permanent Magnet Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Fuminori; Takemasa, Ryo; Matsushita, Makoto; Nishizawa, Takashi; Noda, Shinichi

    Brushless permanent magnet motors have been widely used in home applications and industrial fields. These days, high efficiency and low noise motors are demanded from the view point of environment. Electromagnetic noise and iron loss of the motor are produced by the harmonic fluxes and electromagnetic forces. However, order and space pattern of these have not been discussed in detail. In this paper, fluxes, electromagnetic forces and magneto-motive forces of brushless permanent magnet motors with concentric winding were analyzed analytically, experimentally and numerically. Time harmonic fluxes and time electromagnetic forces in the air gap were measured by search coils on the inner surface of the stator teeth and analyzed by FEM. Space pattern of time harmonic fluxes and time electromagnetic forces were worked out with experiments and FEM. Magneto motive forces due to concentric winding were analyzed with equations and checked by FEM.

  1. Downward Catastrophe of Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, Yuming; Hu, Youqiu; Liu, Rui

    2016-07-01

    2.5-dimensional time-dependent ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models in Cartesian coordinates were used in previous studies to seek MHD equilibria involving a magnetic flux rope embedded in a bipolar, partially open background field. As demonstrated by these studies, the equilibrium solutions of the system are separated into two branches: the flux rope sticks to the photosphere for solutions at the lower branch but is suspended in the corona for those at the upper branch. Moreover, a solution originally at the lower branch jumps to the upper, as the related control parameter increases and reaches a critical value, and the associated jump is here referred to as an upward catastrophe. The present paper advances these studies in three aspects. First, the magnetic field is changed to be force-free; the system still experiences an upward catastrophe with an increase in each control parameter. Second, under the force-free approximation, there also exists a downward catastrophe, characterized by the jump of a solution from the upper branch to the lower. Both catastrophes are irreversible processes connecting the two branches of equilibrium solutions so as to form a cycle. Finally, the magnetic energy in the numerical domain is calculated. It is found that there exists a magnetic energy release for both catastrophes. The Ampère's force, which vanishes everywhere for force-free fields, appears only during the catastrophes and does positive work, which serves as a major mechanism for the energy release. The implications of the downward catastrophe and its relevance to solar activities are briefly discussed.

  2. Automatic magnetic flux measurement of micro plastic-magnetic rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingdong; Lin, Mingxing; Song, Aiwei

    2015-07-01

    Micro plastic-magnetic rotors of various sizes and shapes are widely used in industry, their magnetic flux measurement is one of the most important links in the production process, and therefore some technologies should be adopted to improve the measurement precision and efficiency. In this paper, the automatic measurement principle of micro plastic-magnetic rotors is proposed and the integration time constant and the integrator drift’s suppression and compensation in the measurement circuit are analyzed. Two other factors influencing the measurement precision are also analyzed, including the relative angles between the rotor magnetic poles and the measurement coil, and the starting point of the rotors in the coil where the measurement begins. An instrument is designed to measure the magnetic flux of the rotors. Measurement results show that the measurement error is within  ±1%, which meets the basic requirements in industry application, and the measurement efficiency is increased by 10 times, which can cut down labor cost and management cost when compared with manual measurement.

  3. NONLINEAR THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOCONVECTION AROUND MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Botha, G. J. J.; Rucklidge, A. M.; Hurlburt, N. E. E-mail: A.M.Rucklidge@leeds.ac.uk

    2011-04-20

    Magnetic flux in the solar photosphere forms concentrations from small scales, such as flux elements, to large scales, such as sunspots. This paper presents a study of the decay process of large magnetic flux tubes, such as sunspots, on a supergranular scale. Three-dimensional nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations are performed in a cylindrical domain, initialized with axisymmetric solutions that consist of a well-defined central flux tube and an annular convection cell surrounding it. As the nonlinear convection evolves, the annular cell breaks up into many cells in the azimuthal direction, allowing magnetic flux to slip between cells away from the central flux tube (turbulent erosion). This lowers magnetic pressure in the central tube, and convection grows inside the tube, possibly becoming strong enough to push the tube apart. A remnant of the central flux tube persists with nonsymmetric perturbations caused by the convection surrounding it. Secondary flux concentrations form between convection cells away from the central tube. Tube decay is dependent on the convection around the tube. Convection cells forming inside the tube as time-dependent outflows will remove magnetic flux. (This is most pronounced for small tubes.) Flux is added to the tube when flux caught in the surrounding convection is pushed toward it. The tube persists when convection inside the tube is sufficiently suppressed by the remaining magnetic field. All examples of persistent tubes have the same effective magnetic field strength, consistent with the observation that pores and sunspot umbrae all have roughly the same magnetic field strength.

  4. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  5. Noise-cancelling quadrature magnetic position, speed and direction sensor

    DOEpatents

    Preston, Mark A.; King, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    An array of three magnetic sensors in a single package is employed with a single bias magnet for sensing shaft position, speed and direction of a motor in a high magnetic noise environment. Two of the three magnetic sensors are situated in an anti-phase relationship (i.e., 180.degree. out-of-phase) with respect to the relationship between the other of the two sensors and magnetically salient target, and the third magnetic sensor is situated between the anti-phase sensors. The result is quadrature sensing with noise immunity for accurate relative position, speed and direction measurements.

  6. Magnetic flux concentration and zonal flows in magnetorotational instability turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2014-11-20

    Accretion disks are likely threaded by external vertical magnetic flux, which enhances the level of turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Using shearing-box simulations, we find that such external magnetic flux also strongly enhances the amplitude of banded radial density variations known as zonal flows. Moreover, we report that vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated toward low-density regions of the zonal flow. Mean vertical magnetic field can be more than doubled in low-density regions, and reduced to nearly zero in high-density regions in some cases. In ideal MHD, the scale on which magnetic flux concentrates can reach a few disk scale heights. In the non-ideal MHD regime with strong ambipolar diffusion, magnetic flux is concentrated into thin axisymmetric shells at some enhanced level, whose size is typically less than half a scale height. We show that magnetic flux concentration is closely related to the fact that the turbulent diffusivity of the MRI turbulence is anisotropic. In addition to a conventional Ohmic-like turbulent resistivity, we find that there is a correlation between the vertical velocity and horizontal magnetic field fluctuations that produces a mean electric field that acts to anti-diffuse the vertical magnetic flux. The anisotropic turbulent diffusivity has analogies to the Hall effect, and may have important implications for magnetic flux transport in accretion disks. The physical origin of magnetic flux concentration may be related to the development of channel flows followed by magnetic reconnection, which acts to decrease the mass-to-flux ratio in localized regions. The association of enhanced zonal flows with magnetic flux concentration may lead to global pressure bumps in protoplanetary disks that helps trap dust particles and facilitates planet formation.

  7. Magnetic Flux Concentration and Zonal Flows in Magnetorotational Instability Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2014-11-01

    Accretion disks are likely threaded by external vertical magnetic flux, which enhances the level of turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Using shearing-box simulations, we find that such external magnetic flux also strongly enhances the amplitude of banded radial density variations known as zonal flows. Moreover, we report that vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated toward low-density regions of the zonal flow. Mean vertical magnetic field can be more than doubled in low-density regions, and reduced to nearly zero in high-density regions in some cases. In ideal MHD, the scale on which magnetic flux concentrates can reach a few disk scale heights. In the non-ideal MHD regime with strong ambipolar diffusion, magnetic flux is concentrated into thin axisymmetric shells at some enhanced level, whose size is typically less than half a scale height. We show that magnetic flux concentration is closely related to the fact that the turbulent diffusivity of the MRI turbulence is anisotropic. In addition to a conventional Ohmic-like turbulent resistivity, we find that there is a correlation between the vertical velocity and horizontal magnetic field fluctuations that produces a mean electric field that acts to anti-diffuse the vertical magnetic flux. The anisotropic turbulent diffusivity has analogies to the Hall effect, and may have important implications for magnetic flux transport in accretion disks. The physical origin of magnetic flux concentration may be related to the development of channel flows followed by magnetic reconnection, which acts to decrease the mass-to-flux ratio in localized regions. The association of enhanced zonal flows with magnetic flux concentration may lead to global pressure bumps in protoplanetary disks that helps trap dust particles and facilitates planet formation.

  8. Noise analysis in fast magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) based on spoiled multi gradient echo (SPMGE) pulse sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In Oh, Tong; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Ji Eun; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; In Kwon, Oh; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a promising non-invasive method to visualize a static cross-sectional conductivity and/or current density image by injecting low frequency currents. MREIT measures one component of the magnetic flux density caused by the injected current using a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. For practical in vivo implementations of MREIT, especially for soft biological tissues where the MR signal rapidly decays, it is crucial to develop a technique for optimizing the magnetic flux density signal by the injected current while maintaining spatial-resolution and contrast. We design an MREIT pulse sequence by applying a spoiled multi-gradient-echo pulse sequence (SPMGE) to the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE), which fully injects the current at the end of the read-out gradient. The applied ICNE-SPMGE pulse sequence maximizes the duration of injected current almost up to a repetition time by measuring multiple magnetic flux density data. We analyze the noise level of measured magnetic flux density with respect to the pulse width of injection current and T_{2}^{*} relaxation time. In due consideration of the ICNE-SPMGE pulse sequence, using a reference information of T_{2}^{*} values in a local region of interest by a short pre-scan data, we predict the noise level of magnetic flux density to be measured for arbitrary repetition time TR. Results from phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the noise level of magnetic flux density for an appropriate TR = 40 ms using a reference scan for TR = 75 ms. The predicted noise level was compared with the noise level of directly measured magnetic flux density data.

  9. Transport of magnetic flux in Saturn’s inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher T.; Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.; Jia, Y. D.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of the Saturnian magnetosphere, which rotates rapidly with an internal plasma source provided by Enceladus, qualitatively resembles those of the jovian magnetosphere powered by Io. The newly added plasma is accelerated to the corotation speed and moves outward together with the magnetic flux. In the near tail region, reconnection cuts the magnetic flux, reconnects it into plasma-depleted inward moving flux tubes and outward moving massive plasmoids. The buoyant empty tubes then convect inward against the outward flow to conserve the total magnetic flux established by the internal dynamo. In both jovian and saturnian magnetospheres, flux tubes with enhanced field strength relative to their surroundings are detected in the equatorial region. Recent observations show that there are flux tubes with reduced field strength off the equator in the saturnian magnetosphere. To understand the formation mechanism of both types of flux tubes, we have surveyed all the available 1-sec magnetic field data from Cassini. The systematic statistical study confirms the different latitudinal distributions of the two types of flux tubes. In addition, enhanced-field flux tubes are closer to the planet while reduced-field flux tubes can be detected at larger distances; both types of flux tubes become indistinguishable from the background magnetic flux inside an L-value of about 4; the local time distribution of both types of flux tubes are similar and they contain about the same amount of magnetic flux. Therefore, the two types of flux tubes are the same phenomena with different manifestations in different plasma environments. When the surrounding plasma density is high (near the equator and closer to the plasma source region), the flux tubes are compressed and have enhanced field strength inside; while in the low-plasma density region (off the equator and further from the plasma source region), the flux tubes expand and have reduced field strength inside.

  10. Drive Mechanisms of Erupting Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, J.; Chen, J.; Santoro, R.

    2000-08-01

    The dynamics of magnetic flux ropes near the Sun and in interplanetary space are studied using a magnetohydrodynamic model of erupting magnetic flux ropes. In this model, the magnetic structure of a coronal mass ejection (CME) corresponds to a flux rope with footpoints that remain anchored below the photosphere. The model flux rope eruption can be driven by a rapid increase in poloidal flux (flux injection), a quasi-static increase in poloidal flux (photospheric footpoint twisting), a rapid release of stored magnetic energy (magnetic energy release), or a rapid increase in the amount of hot plasma within the flux rope (hot plasma injection). Model results are compared with Large-Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph data (from the CME of 1997 April 13) and with interplanetary magnetic cloud data over the range 0.4-5 AU. Of these mechanisms, only flux injection and magnetic energy release reproduce key features of the data both near the Sun and in the interplanetary medium and only flux injection obtains a detailed match to the near-Sun dynamics.

  11. Multiplicative noise effects on electroconvection in controlling additive noise by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We report multiplicative noise-induced threshold shift of electroconvection (EC) in the presence of a magnetic field H . Controlling the thermal fluctuation (i.e., additive noise) of the rodlike molecules of nematic liquid crystals by H , the EC threshold is examined at various noise levels [characterized by their intensity and cutoff frequency (fc) ]. For a sufficiently strong H (i.e., ignorable additive noise), a modified noise sensitivity characterizing the shift problem is in good agreement with experimental results for colored as well as white noise (fc→∞ ) ; until now, there was a large deviation for (sufficiently) colored noises. The present study shows that H provides us with ideal conditions for studying the corresponding Carr-Helfrich theory considering pure multiplicative noise.

  12. Multiplicative noise effects on electroconvection in controlling additive noise by a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    We report multiplicative noise-induced threshold shift of electroconvection (EC) in the presence of a magnetic field H. Controlling the thermal fluctuation (i.e., additive noise) of the rodlike molecules of nematic liquid crystals by H, the EC threshold is examined at various noise levels [characterized by their intensity and cutoff frequency (f(c))]. For a sufficiently strong H (i.e., ignorable additive noise), a modified noise sensitivity characterizing the shift problem is in good agreement with experimental results for colored as well as white noise (f(c)→∞); until now, there was a large deviation for (sufficiently) colored noises. The present study shows that H provides us with ideal conditions for studying the corresponding Carr-Helfrich theory considering pure multiplicative noise. PMID:26764708

  13. Thermal magnetic field noise: electron optics and decoherence.

    PubMed

    Uhlemann, Stephan; Müller, Heiko; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max

    2015-04-01

    Thermal magnetic field noise from magnetic and non-magnetic conductive parts close to the electron beam recently has been identified as a reason for decoherence in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Here, we report about new experimental results from measurements for a layered structure of magnetic and non-magnetic materials. For a simplified version of this setup and other situations we derive semi-analytical models in order to predict the strength, bandwidth and spatial correlation of the noise fields. The results of the simulations are finally compared to previous and new experimental data in a quantitative manner. PMID:25499019

  14. A magnetic bearing control approach using flux feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1989-01-01

    A magnetic bearing control approach using flux feedback is described and test results for a laboratory model magnetic bearing actuator are presented. Test results were obtained using a magnetic bearing test fixture, which is also described. The magnetic bearing actuator consists of elements similar to those used in a laboratory test model Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD).

  15. Complexity and diffusion of magnetic flux surfaces in anisotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Ruffolo, D.; Oughton, S.

    2014-04-10

    The complexity of magnetic flux surfaces is investigated analytically and numerically in static homogeneous magnetic turbulence. Magnetic surfaces are computed to large distances in magnetic fields derived from a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. The question addressed is whether one can define magnetic surfaces over large distances when turbulence is present. Using a flux surface spectral analysis, we show that magnetic surfaces become complex at small scales, experiencing an exponential thinning that is quantified here. The computation of a flux surface is of either exponential or nondeterministic polynomial complexity, which has the conceptual implication that global identification of magnetic flux surfaces and flux exchange, e.g., in magnetic reconnection, can be intractable in three dimensions. The coarse-grained large-scale magnetic flux experiences diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established explicitly through multiple scale analysis. The Kubo number controls both large and small scale limits. These results have consequences for interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Transport of magnetic flux and mass in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Russell, C. T.; Jia, Y. D.; Wei, H. Y.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-04-01

    It is well accepted that cold plasma sourced by Enceladus is ultimately lost to the solar wind, while the magnetic flux convecting outward with the plasma must return to the inner magnetosphere. However, whether the interchange or reconnection, or a combination of the two processes is the dominant mechanism in returning the magnetic flux is still under debate. Initial Cassini observations have shown that the magnetic flux returns in the form of flux tubes in the inner magnetosphere. Here we investigate those events with 10 year Cassini magnetometer data and confirm that their magnetic signatures are determined by the background plasma environments: inside (outside) the plasma disk, the returning magnetic field is enhanced (depressed) in strength. The distribution, temporal variation, shape, and transportation rate of the flux tubes are also characterized. The flux tubes break into smaller ones as they convect in. The shape of their cross section is closer to circular than fingerlike as produced in the simulations based on the interchange mechanism. In addition, no sudden changes in any flux tube properties can be found at the "boundary" which has been claimed to separate the reconnection and interchange-dominant regions. On the other hand, reasonable cold plasma loss rate and outflow velocity can be obtained if the transport rate of the magnetic flux matches the reconnection rate, which supports reconnection alone as the dominant mechanism in unloading the cold plasma from the inner magnetosphere and returning the magnetic flux from the tail.

  17. PROTOSTELLAR ACCRETION FLOWS DESTABILIZED BY MAGNETIC FLUX REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Li Zhiyun; Zhao Bo

    2012-09-20

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  18. Protostellar Accretion Flows Destabilized by Magnetic Flux Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Li, Zhi-Yun; Shang, Hsien; Zhao, Bo

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  19. Spin noise and magnetic screening of impurities in a BCS superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Dall, Matthias; da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias; de Sousa, Rogério

    The coupling of a localized impurity to a BCS superconductor (SC) leads to the formation of impurity Cooper-pairs via the proximity effect, generating two bound states within the SC energy gap, the so-called Yu-Rusinov-Shiba (YSR) states. They are similar to the Andreev Bound States that originate from Andreev reflection, e.g. when the impurity is hosted in a Josephson junction, and are known to produce sharp sub-gap resonances in charge noise [de Sousa et al., PRB 2009], providing a natural explanation for the observation of microresonators in superconducting devices [Simmonds et al., PRL 2004]. Here we present a theory for the spin noise generated by magnetic impurities in a SC, and discuss the impact of the Shiba states on models of flux noise in superconducting qubits. We use a combination of analytical methods and the numerical renormalization group technique to calculate the spin noise of an Anderson impurity in a SC, unveiling the competition between the proximity effect and Kondo correlations. Both mechanisms produce magnetic screening and a corresponding reduction in spin noise, giving rise to new insights on the kinds of impurities that are responsible for the observed 1 /fα flux noise in superconducting circuits. This research is supported by NSERC CRD/478366-2015.

  20. On-line noise monitoring at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mullens, J.A.; Thie, J.A.; Campbell, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    An automated noise surveillance and diagnostics system (ANSDS) is being demonstrated at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Three low-level, in-vessel fission chambers (LLFMs), three ex-vessel compensated ion chambers (CICs), and two accelerometers on the mechanism of one advanced absorber (ADVAB) control rod were monitored with an automated noise surveillance and diagnostic system (ANSDS) in late 1983.

  1. Unresolved Magnetic Flux Removal Process in the Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Masahito; Chye Low, Boon; Lites, Bruce

    The mutual loss of magnetic flux due to the apparent collision of opposite-polarity magnetic elements is called "magnetic flux cancellation" as a descriptive term. The flux cancellation is essential to understand the dissipation of magnetic flux from the solar surface. An Ω-loop submerging below the surface or a U-loop rising through the photosphere is the usual idea to explain the magnetic flux cancellation. Magnetic reconnection may be crucial for the forma-tion of these loops, especially for the submerging -loop. In fact, chromospheric and coronal activities are often observed at the cancellation sites. We investigate the evolution of 5 cancel-lation events of the opposite-polarity magnetic elements at granular scales by using accurate spectropolarimetric measurements with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. We find that the horizontal magnetic field, which is expected in both submerging Ω-loop model and emerging U-loop model, does not appear between the canceling magnetic elements in 4 of the 5 events. The approaching magnetic elements in these events are more concentrated rather than gradually diffused, and they have nearly vertical fields even while they are in contact each other. We thus imply that the actual flux cancellation is highly time dependent event near the solar surface at scales less than a pixel of Hinode/SOT (about 200 km). At the polarity inversion line formed by the canceling magnetic elements, highly asymmetric Stokes-V profiles are observed. We confirm that such asymmetric profile can be made by the sum of the profiles at the opposite-polarity magnetic elements next to the polarity inversion line. This means that the approaching bipolar flux tubes still keep their nature within the pixel where they come in contact with each other, and thus supports the unresolved flux removal process within the pixel at the polarity inversion line.

  2. Flux Transport and the Sun's Global Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The Sun s global magnetic field is produced and evolved through the emergence of magnetic flux in active regions and its transport across the solar surface by the axisymmetric differential rotation and meridional flow and the non-axisymmetric convective flows of granulation, supergranulation, and giant cell convection. Maps of the global magnetic field serve as the inner boundary condition for space weather. The photospheric magnetic field and its evolution determine the coronal and solar wind structures through which CMEs must propagate and in which solar energetic particles are accelerated and propagate. Producing magnetic maps which best represent the actual field configuration at any instant requires knowing the magnetic field over the observed hemisphere as well as knowing the flows that transport flux. From our Earth-based vantage point we only observe the front-side hemisphere and each pole is observable for only six months of the year at best. Models for the surface magnetic flux transport can be used to provide updates to the magnetic field configuration in those unseen regions. In this presentation I will describe successes and failures of surface flux transport and present new observations on the structure, the solar cycle variability, and the evolution of the flows involved in magnetic flux transport. I find that supergranules play the dominant role due to their strong flow velocities and long lifetimes. Flux is transported by differential rotation and meridional flow only to the extent that the supergranules participate in those two flows.

  3. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. II - Adiabatic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesinos, Benjamin; Thomas, John H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper extends the study of steady siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas to the case of adiabatic flows. The basic equations governing steady adiabatic siphon flows in a thin, isolated magnetic flux tube are summarized, and qualitative features of adiabatic flows in elevated, arched flux tubes are discussed. The equations are then cast in nondimensional form and the results of numerical computations of adiabatic siphon flows in arched flux tubes are presented along with comparisons between isothermal and adiabatic flows. The effects of making the interior of the flux tube hotter or colder than the surrounding atmosphere at the upstream footpoint of the arch is considered. In this case, is it found that the adiabatic flows are qualitatively similar to the isothermal flows, with adiabatic cooling producing quantitative differences. Critical flows can produce a bulge point in the rising part of the arch and a concentration of magnetic flux above the bulge point.

  4. Charge and Spin Noise in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovskiy, Alexander; Swiebodzinski, Jacek; Kamenev, Alex; Dunn, Thomas; Pfannkuche, Daniela

    Manipulation of magnetization by electric current lies in the mainstream of the rapidly developing field of spintronics. The electric current influences the magnetization through the spin-torque effect. Entering a magnet, spin-polarized current exerts a torque on the magnetization, which aligns the magnetization parallel or antiparallel to the spin polarization of the current. The spin-torque effect can be used for fast magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) that consist of two magnetic layers separated by a tunnel barrier. Moreover, applying external magnetic field and passing electric current simultaneously, one can induce a wide variety of nonequilibrium dynamical regimes, ranging from hysteretic switching between two static orientations of magnetization to steady nonequilibrium magnetization precession. Theoretical description of nonlinear nonequilibrium magnetization dynamics is given by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. In this approach, the magnetization is treated on a classical level, resulting in a deterministic dynamics, which can exhibit crossover from periodic to chaotic orbits. In presence of spin-polarized current, there are nonequilibrium fluctuations of magnetization - the spin shot noise - that distort the classical dynamics of magnetization. Those fluctuations originate from the discrete nature of spin and, in this respect, they are similar to the well-known shot noise in the charge transport that stems from the discreteness of charge.

  5. Controlling the flux dynamics in superconductors by nanostructured magnetic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapra, Andrey

    In this thesis we investigate theoretically how the critical current jc of nano-engineered mesoscopic superconducting film can be improved and how one can control the dynamics of the magnetic flux, e.g., the transition from flux-pinned to flux-flow regime, using arrays of magnetic nanostructures. In particularly we investigate: (1) Vortex transport phenomena in superconductors with deposited ferromagnetic structures on top, and the influence of the sample geometry on the critical parameters and on the vortex configurations. Changing geometry of the magnetic bars and magnetization of the bars will affect the critical current jc of the superconducting film. Such nanostructured ferromagnets strongly alter the vortex structure in its neighborhood. The influence of geometry, position and magnetization of the ferromagnet (single bar or regular lattice of the bars) on the critical parameters of the superconductor is investigated. (2) Effect of flux confinement in narrow superconducting channels with zigzag-shaped banks: the flux motion is confined in the transverse (perpendicular) direction of a diamond-cell-shape channel. The matching effect for the magnetic flux is found in the system relevantless of boundary condition. We discuss the dynamics of vortices in the samples and vortex pattern formation in the channel. We show how the inclusion of higher-Tc superconductor into the sample can lead to enhanced properties of the system. By adding an external driving force, we study the vortex dynamics. The different dynamic regimes are discussed. They allowed an effective control of magnetic flux in superconductors.

  6. Flux Leakage Measurements for Defect Characterization Using a High Precision 3-AXIAL Gmr Magnetic Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelkner, M.; Blome, M.; Reimund, V.; Thomas, H.-M.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2011-06-01

    High-precision magnetic field sensors are of increasing interest in non destructive testing (NDT). In particular GMR-sensors (giant magneto resistance) are qualified because of their high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio and high spatial resolution. With a GMR-gradiometer and a 3D-GMR-magnetometer we performed magnetic flux leakage measurements of artificial cracks and cracks of a depth of ≤50 μm still could be dissolved with a sufficient high signal-to-noise ratio. A semi-analytic magnetic dipole model that allows realistic GMR sensor characteristics to be incorporated is used for swiftly predicting magnetic stray fields. The reliable reconstruction based on measurements of artificial rectangular-shaped defects is demonstrated.

  7. Vortex Avalanches and Magnetic Flux Fragmentation in Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, Igor; Gurevich, Alex; Vinokur, Valerii

    2001-08-06

    We report the results of numerical simulations of nonisothermal dendritic flux penetration in type-II superconductors. We propose a generic mechanism of dynamic branching of a propagating hot spot of a flux flow/normal state triggered by a local heat pulse. The branching occurs when the flux hot spot reflects from inhomogeneities or the boundary on which magnetization currents either vanish, or change direction. The hot spot then undergoes a cascade of successive splittings, giving rise to a dissipative dendritic-type flux structure. This dynamic state eventually cools down, turning into a frozen multifilamentary pattern of magnetization currents.

  8. Forecasting the Solar photospheric magnetic field using solar flux transport model and local ensemble Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate forecasting the solar photospheric magnetic field distribution play an important role in the estimates of the inner boundary conditions of the coronal and solar wind model. Forecasting solar photospheric magnetic field using the solar flux transport (SFT) model can achieve an acceptable match to the actual field. The observations from ground-based or spacecraft instruments can be assimilated to update the modeled flux. The local ensemble Kalman filtering (LEnKF) method is utilized to improve forecasts and characterize their uncertainty by propagating the SFT model with different model parameters forward in time to control the evolution of the solar photospheric magnetic field. Optimal assimilation of measured data into the ensemble produces an improvement in the fit of the forecast to the actual field. Our approach offers a method to improve operational forecasting of the solar photospheric magnetic field. The LEnKF method also allows sensitivity analysis of the SFT model to noise and uncertainty within the physical representation.

  9. Forecasting the solar photospheric magnetic field using solar flux transport model and local ensemble Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Du, Aimin; Feng, Xueshang

    2015-04-01

    Accurate forecasting the solar photospheric magnetic field distribution play an important role in the estimates of the inner boundary conditions of the coronal and solar wind model. Forecasting solar photospheric magnetic field using the solar flux transport (SFT) model can achieve an acceptable match to the actual field. The observations from ground-based or spacecraft instruments can be assimilated to update the modeled flux. The local ensemble Kalman filtering (LEnKF) method is utilized to improve forecasts and characterize their uncertainty by propagating the SFT model with different model parameters forward in time to control the evolution of the solar photospheric magnetic field. Optimal assimilation of measured data into the ensemble produces an improvement in the fit of the forecast to the actual field. Our approach offers a method to improve operational forecasting of the solar photospheric magnetic field. The LEnKF method also allows sensitivity analysis of the SFT model to noise and uncertainty within the physical representation.

  10. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-02-20

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  11. Adaptive noise cancelling of multichannel magnetic resonance sounding signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgaard, E.; Auken, E.; Larsen, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive noise cancelling of multichannel magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) signals is investigated. An analysis of the noise sources affecting MRS signals show that the applicability of adaptive noise cancelling is primarily limited to cancel powerline harmonics. The problems of handling spikes in MRS signals are discussed and an efficient algorithm for spike detection is presented. The optimum parameters for multichannel adaptive noise cancelling are identified through simulations with synthetic signals added to noise-only recordings from an MRS instrument. We discuss the design and the efficiency of different stacking methods. The results from multichannel adaptive noise cancelling are compared to time-domain multichannel Wiener filtering. Our results show that within the experimental uncertainty the two methods give identical results.

  12. Magnetic flux circulation in the rotationally-driven giant magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delamere, P. A.; Otto, A.; Ma, X.; Bagenal, F.; Wilson, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The giant planet magnetodiscs are shaped by the radial transport of plasma originating in the inner magnetosphere. Along with plasma transport, magnetic flux transport is a key aspect of the stretched magnetic field configuration of the magnetodisc. While net mass transport is outward (ultimately lost to the solar wind), magnetic flux conservation requires a balanced two-way transport process involving magnetic reconnection. A key property of flux transport is the azimuthal bend forward or bend back of the magnetic field. The bend back configuration is an expected property of the magnetodisc with net mass outflow, but the bend forward configuration can be achieved with the rapid inward motion of mostly empty flux tubes following thin current sheet reconnection. We present a comprehensive analysis of current sheet crossings in Saturn's magnetosphere using Cassini MAG data from 2004 to 2012 in an attempt to quantify the circulation of magnetic flux, emphasizing local time dependence. We find that the bend forward cases are limited mostly to the post-noon sector, indicating that much of the reconnection returning flux to the inner magnetosphere occurs in the subsolar and dusk sector. We also find a complex and patchy network of reconnection sites, supporting the idea that plasma can be lost on small-scales through a ``drizzle''-like process rather than a single extended X-line as originally envisioned for the Vasyliunas cycle. Auroral implications for the observed flux circulation and comparisons with Jupiter will also be presented.

  13. A novel high temperature superconducting magnetic flux pump for MRI magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhiming; Yan, Guo; Wu, Chunli; Ding, Shufang; Chen, Chuan

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a kind of minitype magnetic flux pump made of high temperature superconductor. This kind of novel high temperature superconducting (HTS) flux pump has not any mechanical revolving parts or thermal switches. The excitation current of copper coils in magnetic pole system is controlled by a singlechip. The structure design and operational principle have been described. The operating performance of the new model magnetic flux pump has been preliminarily tested. The experiments show that the maximum pumping current is approximately 200 A for Bi2223 flux pump and 80 A for MgB 2 flux pump operating at 20 K. By comparison, it is discovered that the operating temperature range is wider, the ripple is smaller and the pumping frequency is higher in Bi2223 flux pump than those in MgB 2 flux pump. These results indicate that the newly developed Bi2223 magnetic flux pump may efficiently compensate the magnetic field decay in HTS magnet and make the magnet operate in persistent current mode, this point is significant to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) magnets. This new flux pump is under construction presently. It is expected that the Bi2223 flux pump would be applied to the superconducting MRI magnets by further optimizing structure and improving working process.

  14. Control of noise in magnetic multilayers by spin torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebei, Adnan

    2012-02-01

    In this work we show that the stability of magnetic nanostructures can be enhanced by time-dependent spin momentum transfer. Building reliable magnetic devices at smaller scales need to address the issue of thermal noise. Using two commonly studied magnetic systems with multiple stable states at zero temperature as examples, we show that periodic spin torques can enhance the stability of the system and hence suppress the noise due to interwell transitions. In the case of weak periodic spin torques, stochastic resonance which is usually associated with ac magnetic fields is also manifested for non-conservative torques. In more complex systems with a relatively low energy barrier, it is shown that high frequency spin torques can inhibit interwell transitions and in effect suppress the telegraph noise due to the switching between neigboring states.

  15. Magnetic flux studies in horizontally cooled elliptical superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Martinello, M. Checchin, M.; Grassellino, A. Crawford, A. C.; Melnychuk, O.; Romanenko, A.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2015-07-28

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooldown procedures for elliptical superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities showed that when the cavity beam axis is placed parallel to the helium cooling flow and sufficiently large thermal gradients are achieved, all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper, we investigate flux trapping for the case of resonators positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is more representative of how SRF cavities are cooled in accelerators and for different directions of the applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. We show that different field components have a different impact on the surface resistance, and several parameters have to be considered to fully understand the flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concentration of flux lines at the cavity top leading to temperature rise at the cavity equator is presented.

  16. Acoustic emission from magnetic flux tubes in the solar network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeesh, G.; Hasan, S. S.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the excitation of waves in the magnetic network of the Sun due to footpoint motions of a magnetic flux tube. We consider motions that typically mimic granular buffeting and vortex flows and implement them as driving motions at the base of the flux tube. The driving motions generates various MHD modes within the flux tube and acoustic waves in the ambient medium. The response of the upper atmosphere to the underlying photospheric motion and the role of the flux tube in channeling the waves is investigated. We compute the acoustic energy flux in the various wave modes across different boundary layers defined by the plasma and magnetic field parameters and examine the observational implications for chromospheric and coronal heating.

  17. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms.

  18. Evolution of the magnetic helicity flux during the formation and eruption of flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, P.; Zuccarello, F. P.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-10-20

    We describe the evolution and the magnetic helicity flux for two active regions (ARs) since their appearance on the solar disk: NOAA 11318 and NOAA 11675. Both ARs hosted the formation and destabilization of magnetic flux ropes. In the former AR, the formation of the flux rope culminated in a flare of C2.3 GOES class and a coronal mass ejection (CME) observed by Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment. In the latter AR, the region hosting the flux rope was involved in several flares, but only a partial eruption with signatures of a minor plasma outflow was observed. We found a different behavior in the accumulation of the magnetic helicity flux in the corona, depending on the magnetic configuration and on the location of the flux ropes in the ARs. Our results suggest that the complexity and strength of the photospheric magnetic field is only a partial indicator of the real likelihood of an AR producing the eruption of a flux rope and a subsequent CME.

  19. Signal photon flux and background noise in a coupling electromagnetic detecting system for high-frequency gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangyu; Yang, Nan; Fang, Zhenyun; Baker, Robert M. L., Jr.; Stephenson, Gary V.; Wen, Hao

    2009-09-01

    A coupling system among Gaussian-type microwave photon flux, a static magnetic field, and fractal membranes (or other equivalent microwave lenses) can be used to detect high-frequency gravitational waves (HFGWs) in the microwave band. We study the signal photon flux, background photon flux, and the requisite minimal accumulation time of the signal in the coupling system. Unlike the pure inverse Gertsenshtein effect (G effect) caused by the HFGWs in the gigahertz band, the electromagnetic (EM) detecting scheme proposed by China and the U.S. HFGW groups is based on the composite effect of the synchroresonance effect and the inverse G effect. The key parameter in the scheme is the first-order perturbative photon flux (PPF) and not the second-order PPF; the distinguishable signal is the transverse first-order PPF and not the longitudinal PPF; the photon flux focused by the fractal membranes or other equivalent microwave lenses is not only the transverse first-order PPF but the total transverse photon flux, and these photon fluxes have different signal-to-noise ratios at the different receiving surfaces. Theoretical analysis and numerical estimation show that the requisite minimal accumulation time of the signal at the special receiving surfaces and in the background noise fluctuation would be ˜103-105 seconds for the typical laboratory condition and parameters of hrms˜10-26-10-30/Hz at 5 GHz with bandwidth ˜1Hz. In addition, we review the inverse G effect in the EM detection of the HFGWs, and it is shown that the EM detecting scheme based only on the pure inverse G effect in the laboratory condition would not be useful to detect HFGWs in the microwave band.

  20. Kink Wave Propagation in Thin Isothermal Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I. P.; Nagorny, I. G.; Nippolainen, E.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the propagation of kink waves in thin and isothermal expanding flux tubes in cylindrical geometry. By using the method of radial expansion for fluctuating variables we obtained a new kink wave equation. We show that including the radial component of the tube magnetic field leads to cutoff-free propagation of kink waves along thin flux tubes.

  1. Optimization of multiply acquired magnetic flux density Bz using ICNE-Multiecho train in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyun Soo; In Kwon, Oh

    2010-05-01

    The aim of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to visualize the electrical properties, conductivity or current density of an object by injection of current. Recently, the prolonged data acquisition time when using the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method has been advantageous for measurement of magnetic flux density data, Bz, for MREIT in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the ICNE method results in undesirable side artifacts, such as blurring, chemical shift and phase artifacts, due to the long data acquisition under an inhomogeneous static field. In this paper, we apply the ICNE method to a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) multi-echo train pulse sequence in order to provide the multiple k-space lines during a single RF pulse period. We analyze the SNR of the measured multiple Bz data using the proposed ICNE-Multiecho MR pulse sequence. By determining a weighting factor for Bz data in each of the echoes, an optimized inversion formula for the magnetic flux density data is proposed for the ICNE-Multiecho MR sequence. Using the ICNE-Multiecho method, the quality of the measured magnetic flux density is considerably increased by the injection of a long current through the echo train length and by optimization of the voxel-by-voxel noise level of the Bz value. Agarose-gel phantom experiments have demonstrated fewer artifacts and a better SNR using the ICNE-Multiecho method. Experimenting with the brain of an anesthetized dog, we collected valuable echoes by taking into account the noise level of each of the echoes and determined Bz data by determining optimized weighting factors for the multiply acquired magnetic flux density data.

  2. Spatial Transport of Magnetic Flux Surfaces in Strongly Anisotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Oughton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic flux surfaces afford familiar descriptions of spatial structure, dynamics, and connectivity of magnetic fields, with particular relevance in contexts such as solar coronal flux tubes, magnetic field connectivity in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, as well as in laboratory plasmas and dynamo problems [1-4]. Typical models assume that field-lines are orderly, and flux tubes remain identifiable over macroscopic distances; however, a previous study has shown that flux tubes shred in the presence of fluctuations, typically losing identity after several correlation scales [5]. Here, the structure of magnetic flux surfaces is numerically investigated in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model of homogeneous turbulence. Short and long-wavelength behavior is studied statistically by propagating magnetic surfaces along the mean field. At small scales magnetic surfaces become complex, experiencing an exponential thinning. At large scales, instead, the magnetic flux undergoes a diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established by means of a multiple scale analysis. Both large and small scales limits are controlled by the Kubo number. These results have consequences for understanding and interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in plasmas [6]. [1] E. N. Parker, Cosmical Magnetic Fields (Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1979). [2] J. R. Jokipii and E. N. Parker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 44 (1968). [3] R. Bruno et al., Planet. Space Sci. 49, 1201 (2001). [4] M. N. Rosenbluth et al., Nuclear Fusion 6, 297 (1966). [5] W. H. Matthaeus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2136 (1995). [6] S. Servidio et al., submitted (2013).

  3. Longitudinal variations of the magnetic flux in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dósa, Melinda; Erdős, Géza

    2015-04-01

    The heliospheric magnetic flux is determined from the radial component of the magnetic field vector measured onboard interplanetary space probes. Earlier Ulysses research has shown remarkable independence of the flux from heliographic latitude. Here we investigate whether any longitudinal variation exist in the 50 year long OMNI magnetic data set. When determining the heliographic longitude of the plasma source, correction was applied for the solar wind travel time. Significant recurrent enhancements of the magnetic flux was observed during the declining phase of the solar cycles. These flux enhancements are associated with co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs), lasting several years. The recurrence period equals the equatorial rotation period of the Sun. The same, long lasting recurring features can be observed in the deviation angle of the solar wind velocity vector from the radial direction. However, the deviation angle is small, in the order of few degrees, which cannot account for the observed flux increases. An increase of the magnetic field is clearly caused by the plasma compression associated to CIRs, however the increase of the radial component is not obvious. It is suggested that the origin of that increase is caused by the compression of the plasma in the direction perpendicular to the Parker field line rather than the radial direction. The longitudinal variation of the magnetic flux during the declining phase of the solar cycle has impact on the modulation of cosmic rays as well as on the frequency and intensity of space weather events.

  4. Drive Mechanisms of Erupting Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, J.; Chen, J.; Santoro, R.

    1999-05-01

    The dynamics of magnetic flux ropes near the sun and in interplanetary space are studied using a modified version of the flux rope model of Chen and Garren [1]. In this model, a coronal mass ejection (CME) corresponds to a flux rope with foot points that remain anchored in the photosphere. The model flux rope eruption can be driven by a rapid increase in poloidal flux (flux injection), a gradual increase in poloidal flux (photospheric foot-point twisting), an unstable release of stored magnetic energy (storage-release), or a rapid increase in the volume of hot plasma within the flux rope(mass injection). Model results are compared with LASCO data (from the CME of 13 April 1997) and with interplanetary magnetic cloud data over the range 0.5 to 4.0 AU. Of these mechanisms, only flux injection is found to reproduce the key features of the data both near the sun and in the interplanetary medium. [1] Chen, J., and Garren, D. A. 1993, Goephys. Res. Lett., 20, 2319 *Work supported by ONR.

  5. Sudden flux change studies in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Feher, S.; Bordini, B.; Carcagno, R.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    As part of the High Field Magnet Program at Fermilab many magnets have been tested which utilize multi strand Rutherford type cable made of state-of-the art Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. During these magnet tests we observed sudden flux changes by monitoring coil voltages and the magnetic field close to the magnets. These flux changes might be linked to magnet instabilities. The voltage spike signals were correlated with quench antenna signals, a strong indication that these are magnet phenomena. With a new high resolution voltage spike detection system, we were able to observe the detailed structure of the spikes. Two fundamentally different signal shapes were distinguished, most likely generated by different mechanisms.

  6. Shot noise in magnetic field modulated graphene superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattari, Farhad

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the shot noise properties in a monolayer graphene superlattice modulated by N parallel ferromagnets deposited on a dielectric layer. It is found that for the antiparallel magnetization configuration or when magnetic field is zero the new Dirac-like point appears in graphene superlattice. The transport is almost forbidden at this new Dirac-like point, and the Fano factor reaches its maximum value 1/3. In the parallel magnetization configuration as the number of magnetic barriers increases, the shot noise increases. In this case, the transmission can be blocked by the magnetic-electric barrier and the Fano factor approaches 1, which is dramatically distinguishable from that in antiparallel alignment. The results may be helpful to control the electron transport in graphene-based electronic devices.

  7. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-02-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new - magnetometric - potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates.

  8. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new – magnetometric – potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates. PMID:26882994

  9. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Ryzhov, Ivan I; Kozlov, Gleb G; Smirnov, Dmitrii S; Glazov, Mikhail M; Efimov, Yurii P; Eliseev, Sergei A; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A; Petrov, Vladimir V; Kavokin, Kirill V; Kavokin, Alexey V; Zapasskii, Valerii S

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new - magnetometric - potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This "optical field" is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates. PMID:26882994

  10. Amplitude and phase noise of magnetic tunnel junction oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinsat, M.; Gusakova, D.; Sierra, J. F.; Michel, J. P.; Houssameddine, D.; Delaet, B.; Cyrille, M.-C.; Ebels, U.; Dieny, B.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.; Katine, J. A.; Mauri, D.; Zeltser, A.; Prigent, M.; Nallatamby, J.-C.; Sommet, R.

    2010-11-01

    The microwave emission linewidth of spin transfer torque nano-oscillators is closely related to their phase and amplitude noise that can be extracted from the magnetoresistive voltage signal V(t ) using single shot time domain techniques. Here we report on phase and amplitude noise studies for MgO based magnetic tunnel junction oscillators. The analysis of the power spectral densities allows one to separate the linear and nonlinear contributions to the phase noise, the nonlinear contribution being due to the coupling between phase and amplitude. The coupling strength as well as the amplitude relaxation rate can be directly extracted.

  11. The equilibrium structure of thin magnetic flux tubes. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.; Bodo, G.

    1985-01-01

    A model atmosphere within a thin magnetic flux tube that is embedded in an arbitrarily stratified medium is presently constructed by solving the radiative transfer equation in the two-stream approximation for gray opacity, under the assumption that the magnetic field is sufficiently strong to warrant the neglect of both thermal conduction and convective diffusion; energy inside the flux tube therefore being transported solely by radiation. The structure of the internal atmosphere is determined on the basis of the hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium conditions of the tube embedded in an external atmosphere. The gas temperature along the axis of the tube is computed, and the geometry of the flux tube is determined on the basis of magnetic flux conservation and total pressure equilibrium.

  12. Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis of residual stress and carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. M.; Stevens, K. J.; Kaiser, A. B.

    2001-04-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis is an effective non-destructive testing technique for determining both residual stress and carburization, with potential for improving the accuracy of remaining-life estimates of critical components in operational plant such as that used in thermal power stations and the petrochemical industry. We have measured Barkhausen noise in magnetic Durehete 1055 samples under stress and in carburized ethylene pyrolysis tubes. The Barkhausen power as a function of applied field is modeled using Sablik's function for Barkhausen power as a function of irreversible differential permeability (μirr); the Jiles-Atherton model of hysteresis is used to determine μirr as a function of applied field.

  13. SIGNATURES OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AT BOUNDARIES OF INTERPLANETARY SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Hui; Yao Shuo; Zong Qiugang; Qi Yu; He Jiansen

    2010-09-01

    The interaction between interplanetary small-scale magnetic flux ropes and the magnetic field in the ambient solar wind is an important topic in the understanding of the evolution of magnetic structures in the heliosphere. Through a survey of 125 previously reported small flux ropes from 1995 to 2005, we find that 44 of them reveal clear signatures of Alfvenic fluctuations and thus classify them as Alfven wave trains rather than flux ropes. Signatures of magnetic reconnection, generally including a plasma jet of {approx}30 km s{sup -1} within a magnetic field rotational region, are clearly present at boundaries of about 42% of the flux ropes and 14% of the wave trains. The reconnection exhausts are often observed to show a local increase in the proton temperature, density, and plasma beta. About 66% of the reconnection events at flux rope boundaries are associated with a magnetic field shear angle larger than 90{sup 0} and 73% of them reveal a decrease of 20% or more in the magnetic field magnitude, suggesting a dominance of anti-parallel reconnection at flux rope boundaries. The occurrence rate of magnetic reconnection at flux rope boundaries through the years 1995-2005 is also investigated and we find that it is relatively low around the solar maximum and much higher when approaching solar minima. The average magnetic field depression and shear angle for reconnection events at flux rope boundaries also reveal a similar trend from 1995 to 2005. Our results demonstrate for the first time that boundaries of a substantial fraction of small-scale flux ropes have properties similar to those of magnetic clouds, in the sense that both of them exhibit signatures of magnetic reconnection. The observed reconnection signatures could be related either to the formation of small flux ropes or to the interaction between flux ropes and the interplanetary magnetic fields.

  14. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. 3: The equilibrium path of the flux tube arch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinis, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    The arched equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a plane-stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere is calculated for cases in which the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The large scale mechanical equilibrium of the flux tube involves a balance among the magnetic buoyancy force, the net magnetic tension force due to the curvature of the flux tube axis, and the inertial (centrifugal) force due to the siphon flow along curved streamlines. The ends of the flux tube are assumed to be pinned down by some other external force. Both isothermal and adiabatic siphon flows are considered for flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere. For the isothermal case, in the absence of a siphon flow the equilibrium path reduces to the static arch calculated by Parker (1975, 1979). The presence of a siphon flow causes the flux tube arch to bend more sharply, so that magnetic tension can overcome the additional straightening effect of the inertial force, and reduces the maximum width of the arch. The curvature of the arch increases as the siphon flow speed increases. For a critical siphon flow, with supercritical flow in the downstream leg, the arch is asymmetric, with greater curvature in the downstream leg of the arch. Adiabatic flow have qualitatively similar effects, except that adiabatic cooling reduces the buoyancy of the flux tube and thus leads to significantly wider arches. In some cases the cooling is strong enough to create negative buoyancy along sections of the flux tube, requiring upward curvature of the flux tube path along these sections and sometimes leading to unusual equilibrium paths of periodic, sinusoidal form.

  15. Detecting magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with polarized x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Claudia; Audehm, Patrick; Gräfe, Joachim; Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Schmidt, Mathias; Treiber, Sebastian; Bechtel, Michael; Goering, Eberhard; Schütz, Gisela; Albrecht, Joachim

    2014-09-01

    The magnetic flux distribution arising from a high-Tc superconductor is detected and visualized using polarized x rays. Therefore, we introduce a sensor layer, namely, an amorphous, soft-magnetic Co40Fe40B20 cover layer, providing a large x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Temperature-dependent XMCD spectroscopy on the magnetic layer has been performed. Exploiting the temperature dependence of the critical current density of the superconductor we find a quantitative correlation between the XMCD signal and the in-plane stray field of the superconductor. Magneto-optical Kerr effect experiments on the sensor layer can simulate the stray field of the superconductor and hence verify the correlation. We show that the XMCD contrast in the sensor layer corresponds to the in-plane magnetic flux distribution of the superconductor and can hence be used to image magnetic structures in superconductors.

  16. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the heating of the quiet corona by measuring the increase of coronal luminosity with the amount of magnetic flux in the underlying network at solar minimum when there were no active regions on the face of the Sun. The coronal luminosity is measured from Fe IX/X-Fe XII pairs of coronal images from SOHO/EIT. The network magnetic flux content is measured from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. We find that the luminosity of the corona in our quiet regions increases roughly in proportion to the square root of the magnetic flux content of the network and roughly in proportion to the length of the perimeter of the network magnetic flux clumps. From (1) this result, (2) other observations of many fine-scale explosive events at the edges of network flux clumps, and (3) a demonstration that it is energetically feasible for the heating of the corona in quiet regions to be driven by explosions of granule-sized sheared-core magnetic bipoles embedded in the edges of network flux clumps, we infer that in quiet regions that are not influenced by active regions the corona is mainly heated by such magnetic activity in the edges of the network flux clumps. Our observational results together with our feasibility analysis allow us to predict that (1) at the edges of the network flux clumps there are many transient sheared-core bipoles of the size and lifetime of granules and having transverse field strengths > 100 G, (2) 30 of these bipoles are present per supergranule, and (3) most spicules are produced by explosions of these bipoles. This work was supported by NASA's Office of Space Science through its Solar and Heliospheric Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program and its Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program.

  17. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets. PMID:23252846

  18. The Solar Internetwork. I. Contribution to the Network Magnetic Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gošić, M.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Katsukawa, Y.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic network (NE) observed on the solar surface harbors a sizable fraction of the total quiet Sun flux. However, its origin and maintenance are not well known. Here we investigate the contribution of internetwork (IN) magnetic fields to the NE flux. IN fields permeate the interior of supergranular cells and show large emergence rates. We use long-duration sequences of magnetograms acquired by Hinode and an automatic feature tracking algorithm to follow the evolution of NE and IN flux elements. We find that 14% of the quiet Sun (QS) flux is in the form of IN fields with little temporal variations. IN elements interact with NE patches and modify the flux budget of the NE either by adding flux (through merging processes) or by removing it (through cancellation events). Mergings appear to be dominant, so the net flux contribution of the IN is positive. The observed rate of flux transfer to the NE is 1.5 × 1024 Mx day-1 over the entire solar surface. Thus, the IN supplies as much flux as is present in the NE in only 9-13 hr. Taking into account that not all the transferred flux is incorporated into the NE, we find that the IN would be able to replace the entire NE flux in approximately 18-24 hr. This renders the IN the most important contributor to the NE, challenging the view that ephemeral regions are the main source of flux in the QS. About 40% of the total IN flux eventually ends up in the NE.

  19. Local magnetization unit for GMR array based magnetic flux leakage inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelkner, M.; Neubauer, A.; Reimund, V.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2012-05-01

    GMR sensors are increasingly used for magnetic surface inspection due to their high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. In case of simple planar or cylindrical shaped components, the GMR-based inspection procedure can be automated easily. We present GMR measurements of real fatigue cracks. In addition, we present a probe design using a local magnetization unit and commercially available GMR sensors. The design was carried out by means of finite-element method (FEM) simulations. Using the local probe we measured bearings containing artificial reference cracks of different depths and orientations. Cracks with a depth of 40 μm could be resolved with a signal-to-noise ratio better than 6. A further reduction of the measuring time can be obtained using a sensor array. For this purpose we present a study of the optimized size of the sensing GMR-layers for a NDE-adapted sensor array. The geometric sensor parameters were investigated through simulations of the magnetic flux leakage of surface cracks using an analytic model.

  20. Re-direction of dc magnetic flux in magnetically isotropic multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarkhanyan, Roland H.; Niarchos, Dimitris G.

    2016-07-01

    Analytical design of a periodic composite structure allowing re-direction (bending) of dc magnetic flux with respect to applied external field is presented using methods of transformation optics. The composite structure is made of micrometer scale alternating layers of two different homogeneous and magnetically isotropic materials. Dependence of the magnetic flux bending angle on geometrical orientation of the layers as well as on the magnetic permeability ratio is examined. Such structures can find use in various devices based on the control and manipulations of the magnetic flux.

  1. Magnetic Flux Density in the Heliosphere through Several Solar Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdős, G.; Balogh, A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, BR , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of BR to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average lang|BR |rang is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  2. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Erdős, G.; Balogh, A.

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  3. Measurements of EUV coronal holes and open magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, C.; Qiu, J.; Leamon, R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-03-10

    Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the footprints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images obtained by SOHO/EIT, SDO/AIA, and STEREO/EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5% and 17% of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between (2-5)× 10{sup 22} Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements is similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5%-10% of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measured much enhanced open magnetic flux in the range of (2-4)× 10{sup 22} Mx, which is about twice the flux measured by EIT, and matches with the PFSS calculated open flux, with discrepancies in the location and strength of coronal holes. A detailed comparison between the three measurements (by EIT, AIA-EUVI, and PFSS) indicates that coronal holes in low latitudes contribute significantly to the total open magnetic flux. These low-latitude coronal holes are not well measured with either the He I 10830 line in previous studies, or EIT EUV images; neither are they well captured by the static PFSS model. The enhanced observations from AIA/EUVI allow a more accurate measure of these low-latitude coronal holes and their contribution to open magnetic flux.

  4. Magnetic field characters of returning flux tubes in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hairong; Russell, Christopher; Jia, Yingdong; Wei, Hanying

    2016-04-01

    Deep in the Saturnian magnetosphere, water-group neutrals are ionized after being released from the plume of Enceladus at 4 RS. This forms a plasma disk from 2.5 to 8 RS around Saturn and the typical source rate is 12~250 kg/s. Such plasma addition must be shed to the solar wind ultimately to maintain the plasma density in the magnetosphere in long term average. In this plasma transfer process, the magnetic flux also convects outward. To conserve the total magnetic flux imposed on the magnetosphere by the planet's internal dynamo, the magnetic flux has to return to the inner magnetosphere. Flux tubes are found to be the major form of such return. Determining such flux tubes is essential in understanding the breathing of Saturn magnetosphere. We investigated 10 years of Cassini magnetometer data to identify over six hundred flux-returning events between 4 and 18 in L. Statistical properties are presented, to constrain the origin, transport and evolution of these flux tubes.

  5. Buoyant Magnetic Flux Ropes and Convection: Evolution Prior to Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2003-10-01

    We have performed detailed numerical 3-d simulations of the interaction of buoyantly ascending twisted magnetic flux ropes and solar-like stratified convection (with surface cells similar to solar supergranules in size). Results are presented for three different cases -- corresponding to different amounts of initial field line twist -- that represents fundamentally different types of instabilities: the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which case the flux rope disrupts and network patches are formed at surface cell boundaries; the kink instability that has been proposed as a mechanism for forming tightly packed δ-type spots; a stable flux rope where neither of the former instabilities arise, and the behavior of which is similar to classical text book flux tubes, except from a flux-loss due to the advective action of the convective flows. The simulations thus support the idea that the magnetic flux observed at the surface in bipolar regions are smaller, ceteris paribus, than that of the dynamo generated flux ropes near the bottom of the convection zone. Please note that this material is also available as an online htmladdnormallink{web-talk}{http://www.astro.su.se/ dorch/talks/01_CS12/}

  6. Spin-dependent shot noise in magnetic graphene superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattari, Farhad

    2015-10-01

    We study the spin-dependent shot noise properties in magnetic graphene superlattice with Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI). The magnetic field generated by N parallel ferromagnets (FM) deposited on a dielectric layer. We consider two types of magnetic profiles: the FM stripes with magnetization parallel (P) or antiparallel (AP) perpendicular to the graphene. It is found that the shot noise of a spin state can be efficiently controlled by the number of barrier, RSOI strength and magnetic field. In the first case the Fano factor shows a peak with value approximately F = 1/3 for the both spin-up and spin-down electrons at new Dirac-like point. The position of the new Dirac point is robust against the magnetic field and RSOI. In the second case the Fano factor increases by increasing the number of barriers, and plateau of the Fano factor is formed. The results indicate that there is a strong relationship between spin-dependent shot noise and the magnitude of the spin polarization.

  7. Superpoissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cascales, Juan Pedro; Martinez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G.; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Szczepański, Tomasz; Dugaev, Vitalii K.; Barnaś, Józef

    2014-12-08

    Organic molecules have recently revolutionized ways to create new spintronic devices. Despite intense studies, the statistics of tunneling electrons through organic barriers remains unclear. Here, we investigate conductance and shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) barriers a few nm thick. For junctions in the electron tunneling regime, with magnetoresistance ratios between 10% and 40%, we observe superpoissonian shot noise. The Fano factor exceeds in 1.5–2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. We explain our main findings in terms of a model which includes tunneling through a two level (or multilevel) system, originated from interfacial bonds of the PTCDA molecules. Our results suggest that interfaces play an important role in the control of shot noise when electrons tunnel through organic barriers.

  8. Superpoissonian shot noise in organic magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cascales, Juan Pedro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Martinez, Isidoro; Lin, Minn-Tsong; Szczepański, Tomasz; Dugaev, Vitalii K.; Barnaś, Józef; Aliev, Farkhad G.

    2014-12-01

    Organic molecules have recently revolutionized ways to create new spintronic devices. Despite intense studies, the statistics of tunneling electrons through organic barriers remains unclear. Here, we investigate conductance and shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions with 3,4,9,10-perylene-teracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) barriers a few nm thick. For junctions in the electron tunneling regime, with magnetoresistance ratios between 10% and 40%, we observe superpoissonian shot noise. The Fano factor exceeds in 1.5-2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. We explain our main findings in terms of a model which includes tunneling through a two level (or multilevel) system, originated from interfacial bonds of the PTCDA molecules. Our results suggest that interfaces play an important role in the control of shot noise when electrons tunnel through organic barriers.

  9. Evaluation of surface decarburization depth by magnetic Barkhausen noise technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakov, O.; Perevertov, O.; Tomáš, I.; Skrbek, B.

    2011-06-01

    Industrially unfavorable process of steel surface decarburization was induced by annealing in air. Two methods of after-anneal surface treatment were used: an acid pickling and a sand blasting. The obtained decarburized layers were examined by optical microscope, wave dispersive spectrometer, and surface X-ray diffraction method. Magnetic Barkhausen noise technique was tested for applicability of non-destructive characterization of the decarburized layer depth. A newly introduced parameter, Barkhausen noise coercivity, was proposed for practical use due to its sensitivity to decarburization and stability to measurement conditions. Other magnetic parameters, e.g. number of Barkhausen noise counts, were found to be sensitive to the compressive residual stress caused by the sand blasting.

  10. Magneto-Acoustic Waves in Compressible Magnetically Twisted Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, Robert; Fedun, Viktor

    2010-05-01

    The oscillatory modes of a magnetically twisted compressible flux tube embedded in a compressible magnetic environment are investigated in cylindrical geometry. Solutions to the governing equations to linear wave perturbations are derived in terms of Whittaker’s functions. A general dispersion equation is obtained in terms of Kummer’s functions for the approximation of weak and uniform internal twist, which is a good initial working model for flux tubes in solar applications. The sausage, kink and fluting modes are examined by means of the derived exact dispersion equation. The solutions of this general dispersion equation are found numerically under plasma conditions representative of the solar photosphere and corona. Solutions for the phase speed of the allowed eigenmodes are obtained for a range of wavenumbers and varying magnetic twist. Our results generalise previous classical and widely applied studies of MHD waves and oscillations in magnetic loops without a magnetic twist. Potential applications to solar magneto-seismology are discussed.

  11. Influence of noise on a magnetically sensitive atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desavage, Sara A.; Srinivasan, Arvind; Davis, Jon P.; Zimmermann, Matthias; Efremov, Maxim; Rasel, Ernst; Schleich, Wolfgang; Welch, George R.; Mimih, Jihane; Narducci, Frank A.

    2016-05-01

    The inherent sensitivity of atom interferometer sensors has been well established and much progress has been made in the development of atom interferometer gravimeters, gravity gradiometers and gyroscopes e.g.. These interferometers use the ``clock'' transition which is magnetically insensitive. When considering interferometers with magnetically sensitive transitions operating in unshielded environments additional noise sources must be considered. The frequency content of the noise from these sources can vary dramatically, depending on the environment. In this talk, we will discuss these various noise sources and their impact on the performance of magnetically sensitive interferometers. Specifically, we identify three ways by which noise can be introduced into the system and their effect: fluctuating detuning, leading to a randomness of the interference pattern; fluctuating Rabi frequency, leading to pulse errors; non-uniformity of the magnetic field across the atom cloud, which can, under certain circumstances lead to a complete washing out of the interference pattern. Implications for our current experiments will be discussed. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research.

  12. Magnetic clouds, helicity conservation, and intrinsic scale flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Rust, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    An intrinsic-scale flux-rope model for interplanetary magnetic clouds, incorporating conservation of magnetic helicity, flux and mass is found to adequately explain clouds' average thermodynamic and magnetic properties. In spite their continuous expansion as they balloon into interplanetary space, magnetic clouds maintain high temperatures. This is shown to be due to magnetic energy dissipation. The temperature of an expanding cloud is shown to pass through a maximum above its starting temperature if the initial plasma beta in the cloud is less than 2/3. Excess magnetic pressure inside the cloud is not an important driver of the expansion as it is almost balanced by the tension in the helical field lines. It is conservation of magnetic helicity and flux that requires that clouds expand radially as they move away from the Sun. Comparison with published data shows good agreement between measured cloud properties and theory. Parameters determined from theoretical fits to the data, when extended back to the Sun, are consistent with the origin of interplanetary magnetic clouds in solar filament eruptions. A possible extension of the heating mechanism discussed here to heating of the solar corona is discussed.

  13. Localization of Metal-Induced Gap States at the Metal-Insulator Interface: Origin of Flux Noise in SQUIDs and Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sangkook; Lee, Dung-Hai; Louie, Steven G.; Clarke, John

    2010-03-01

    The origin of magnetic flux noise in dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) with a power spectrum scaling as 1/f (f is frequency) has been a puzzle for over 25 years. This noise limits both the low frequency performance of SQUIDs and the decoherence time of flux-sensitive superconducting qubits, making scaling-up for quantum computing problematic. Recent calculations and experiments indicate that the noise is generated by electrons that randomly reverse their spin directions. Their areal density of ˜ 5 x 10^17 m-2 is relatively insensitive to the nature of the superconductor and substrate. Here, we propose that the local magnetic moments originate in metal-induced gap states (MIGSs) localized by potential disorder at the metal-insulator interface. MIGSs are particularly sensitive to such disorder, so that the localized states have a Coulomb repulsion sufficiently large to make them singly occupied. Our calculations demonstrate that a modest level of disorder generates the required areal density of localized moments. This result suggests that magnetic flux noise could be reduced by fabricating superconductor-insulator interfaces with less disorder. Support: NSF DMR07-05941, US DOE De-AC02-05CH11231, Samsung Foundation, Teragrid, NERSC.

  14. Controlling the motion of magnetic flux quanta.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B Y; Marchesoni, F; Nori, Franco

    2004-05-01

    We study the transport of vortices in superconductors with triangular arrays of boomerang- or V-shaped asymmetric pinning wells, when applying an alternating electrical current. The asymmetry of the pinning landscape induces a very efficient "diode" effect, that allows the sculpting at will of the magnetic field profile inside the sample. We present the first quantitative study of magnetic "lensing" of fluxons inside superconductors. Our proposed vortex lens provides a near threefold increase of the vortex density at its "focus" regions. The main numerical features have been derived analytically. PMID:15169477

  15. Casimir interactions between magnetic flux tubes in a dense lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Dan; Heyl, Jeremy S.

    2015-03-01

    We use the worldline numerics technique to study a cylindrically symmetric model of magnetic flux tubes in a dense lattice and the nonlocal Casimir forces acting between regions of magnetic flux. Within a superconductor the magnetic field is constrained within magnetic flux tubes and if the background magnetic field is on the order the quantum critical field strength, Bk=m/2 e =4.4 ×1013 Gauss, the magnetic field is likely to vary rapidly on the scales where QED effects are important. In this paper, we construct a cylindrically symmetric toy model of a flux tube lattice in which the nonlocal influence of QED on neighboring flux tubes is taken into account. We compute the effective action densities using the worldline numerics technique. The numerics predict a greater effective energy density in the region of the flux tube, but a smaller energy density in the regions between the flux tubes compared to a locally constant-field approximation. We also compute the interaction energy between a flux tube and its neighbors as the lattice spacing is reduced from infinity. Because our flux tubes exhibit compact support, this energy is entirely nonlocal and predicted to be zero in local approximations such as the derivative expansion. This Casimir-Polder energy can take positive or negative values depending on the distance between the flux tubes, and it may cause the flux tubes in neutron stars to form bunches. In addition to the above results we also discuss two important subtleties of determining the statistical uncertainties within the worldline numerics technique. Firstly, the distributions generated by the worldline ensembles are highly non-Gaussian, and so the standard error in the mean is not a good measure of the statistical uncertainty. Secondly, because the same ensemble of worldlines is used to compute the Wilson loops at different values of T and xcm, the uncertainties associated with each computed value of the integrand are strongly correlated. We recommend a

  16. The Evolution of Open Magnetic Flux Driven by Photospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field is of paramount importance in solar and heliospheric physics. Two profoundly different views of the coronal magnetic field have emerged. In quasi-steady models, the predominant source of open magnetic field is in coronal holes. In contrast, in the interchange model, the open magnetic flux is conserved, and the coronal magnetic field can only respond to the photospheric evolution via interchange reconnection. In this view the open magnetic flux diffuses through the closed, streamer belt fields, and substantial open flux is present in the streamer belt during solar minimum. However, Antiochos and co-workers, in the form of a conjecture, argued that truly isolated open flux cannot exist in a configuration with one heliospheric current sheet (HCS) - it will connect via narrow corridors to the polar coronal hole of the same polarity. This contradicts the requirements of the interchange model. We have performed an MHD simulation of the solar corona up to 20R solar to test both the interchange model and the Antiochos conjecture. We use a synoptic map for Carrington Rotation 1913 as the boundary condition for the model, with two small bipoles introduced into the region where a positive polarity extended coronal hole forms. We introduce flows at the photospheric boundary surface to see if open flux associated with the bipoles can be moved into the closed-field region. Interchange reconnection does occur in response to these motions. However, we find that the open magnetic flux cannot be simply injected into closed-field regions - the flux eventually closes down and disconnected flux is created. Flux either opens or closes, as required, to maintain topologically distinct open and closed field regions, with no indiscriminate mixing of the two. The early evolution conforms to the Antiochos conjecture in that a narrow corridor of open flux connects the portion of the coronal hole that is nearly detached by one of the bipoles. In the later evolution, a

  17. A generalized flux function for three-dimensional magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.

    2011-10-15

    The definition and measurement of magnetic reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic fields with multiple reconnection sites is a challenging problem, particularly in fields lacking null points. We propose a generalization of the familiar two-dimensional concept of a magnetic flux function to the case of a three-dimensional field connecting two planar boundaries. In this initial analysis, we require the normal magnetic field to have the same distribution on both boundaries. Using hyperbolic fixed points of the field line mapping, and their global stable and unstable manifolds, we define a unique flux partition of the magnetic field. This partition is more complicated than the corresponding (well-known) construction in a two-dimensional field, owing to the possibility of heteroclinic points and chaotic magnetic regions. Nevertheless, we show how the partition reconnection rate is readily measured with the generalized flux function. We relate our partition reconnection rate to the common definition of three-dimensional reconnection in terms of integrated parallel electric field. An analytical example demonstrates the theory and shows how the flux partition responds to an isolated reconnection event.

  18. Signal-to-noise issues in measuring nitrous oxide fluxes by the eddy covariance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicholas; Levy, Peter; Langford, Ben; Skiba, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Recently-developed fast-response gas analysers capable of measuring atmospheric N2O with high precision (< 50 ppt) at a rate of 10 Hz are becoming more widely available. These instruments are capable of measuring N2O fluxes using the eddy covariance method, with significantly less effort and uncertainty than previous instruments have allowed. However, there are still many issues to overcome in order to obtain accurate and reliable flux data. The signal-to-noise ratio of N2O measured using these instruments is still two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of CO2. The low signal-to-noise ratio can lead to systematic uncertainties, in the eddy covariance method, the most significant being in the calculation of the time lag between gas analyser and anemometer by maximisation of covariance (Langford et al., 2015). When signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low, as it is with many N2O measurements, the maximisation of covariance method can systematically overestimate fluxes. However, if constant time lags are assumed, then fluxes will be underestimated. This presents a major issue for N2O eddy covariance measurements. In this presentation we will focus on the signal to noise ratio for an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL). Eddy covariance flux measurements from multiple agricultural sites across the UK were investigated for potential uncertainties. Our presentation highlights some of these uncertainties when analysing eddy covariance data and offers suggestions as to how these issues may be minimised. Langford, B., Acton, W., Ammann, C., Valach, A. and Nemitz, E.: Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection, Atmos Meas Tech, 8(10), 4197-4213, doi:10.5194/amt-8-4197-2015, 2015.

  19. Magnetic flux cancellation and Doppler shifts in flaring active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtseva, Olga; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    Flux cancellation plays an important role in some theories of solar eruptions. The mechanism of flux cancellation is suggested by many models to be a necessary condition of flare initiation as a part of slow reconnection processes in the lower atmosphere. In our earlier work we analyzed flux cancellation events during major flares using GONG line-of-sight magnetograms. In this work we use vector magnetic field data from SDO/HMI for better interpretation of the longitudinal field changes. We also compute Doppler velocity shifts at the cancellation sites in attempt to distinguish between the three physical processes that could stand behind flux removal from the photosphere: submergence of U-shaped loops, emergence of Ω-shaped loops and magnetic reconnection.

  20. The magnetotail and substorms. [magnetic flux transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The tail plays a very active and important role in substorms. Magmetic flux eroded from the dayside magnetosphere is stored here. As more and more flux is transported to the magnetotail and stored, the boundary flares more, the field strength in the tail increases, and the currents strengthen and move closer to the earth. Further, the plasma sheet thins and the magnetic flux crossing the neutral sheet lessens. The experimental evidence for these processes is discussed and a phenomenological or qualitative model of the substorm sequence is presented. In this model, the flux transport is driven by the merging of the magnetospheric and interplanetary magnetic fields. During the growth phase of substorms the merging rate on the dayside magnetosphere exceeds the reconnection rate in the neutral sheet.

  1. Modeled ground magnetic signatures of flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchenry, Mark A.; Clauer, C. Robert

    1987-01-01

    The magnetic field on the ground due to a small (not greater than 200 km scale size) localized field-aligned current (FAC) system interacting with the ionosphere is calculated in terms of an integral over the ionospheric distribution of FAC. Two different candidate current systems for flux transfer events (FTEs) are considered: (1) a system which has current flowing down the center of a cylindrical flux tube with a return current uniformly distributed along the outside edge; and (2) a system which has upward current on one half of the perimeter of a cylindrical flux tube with downward current on the opposite half. The peak magnetic field on the ground is found to differ by a factor of 2 between the two systems, and the magnetic perturbations are in different directions depending on the observer's position.

  2. Equilibrium model of thin magnetic flux tubes. [solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of a physically realizable domain in which approximations that lead to a self consistent solution for flux tube stratification in the solar atmosphere, without ad hoc hypotheses, is proved. The transfer equation is solved assuming that no energy transport other than radiative is present. Convective motions inside the tube are assumed to be suppressed by magnetic forces. Only one parameter, the plasma beta at tau = 0, must be specified, and this can be estimated from observations of spatially resolved flux tubes.

  3. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  4. Theory and Application of Magnetic Flux Leakage Pipeline Detection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Rui; Cai, Maolin; Jia, Guanwei

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) detection is one of the most popular methods of pipeline inspection. It is a nondestructive testing technique which uses magnetic sensitive sensors to detect the magnetic leakage field of defects on both the internal and external surfaces of pipelines. This paper introduces the main principles, measurement and processing of MFL data. As the key point of a quantitative analysis of MFL detection, the identification of the leakage magnetic signal is also discussed. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of different identification methods are analyzed. Then the paper briefly introduces the expert systems used. At the end of this paper, future developments in pipeline MFL detection are predicted. PMID:26690435

  5. Theory and Application of Magnetic Flux Leakage Pipeline Detection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Rui; Cai, Maolin; Jia, Guanwei

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) detection is one of the most popular methods of pipeline inspection. It is a nondestructive testing technique which uses magnetic sensitive sensors to detect the magnetic leakage field of defects on both the internal and external surfaces of pipelines. This paper introduces the main principles, measurement and processing of MFL data. As the key point of a quantitative analysis of MFL detection, the identification of the leakage magnetic signal is also discussed. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of different identification methods are analyzed. Then the paper briefly introduces the expert systems used. At the end of this paper, future developments in pipeline MFL detection are predicted. PMID:26690435

  6. Do the Legs of Magnetic Clouds Contain Twisted Flux-rope Magnetic Fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The time of flight of energetic particles, however, suggests shorter magnetic field line lengths than such a continuous twisted flux rope would produce. In this study, two simple models are compared with observed flux rope axis orientations of 196 MCs to show that the flux rope structure is confined to the MC leading edge. The MC “legs,” which magnetically connect the flux rope to the Sun, are not recognizable as MCs and thus are unlikely to contain twisted flux rope fields. Spacecraft encounters with these non-flux rope legs may provide an explanation for the frequent observation of non-MC ICMEs.

  7. Determining the axis orientation of cylindrical magnetic flux rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zhaojin; Wan, Weixing; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Tielong; Lui, Anthony; Wang, Yuming; Dunlop, malcolm; Zhang, Yongcun; Zong, Qiugang

    2013-04-01

    We develop a new simple method for inferring the orientation of a magnetic flux rope, which is assumed to be a time-independent cylindrically symmetric structure via the direct single-point analysis of magnetic field structure. The model tests demonstrate that, for the cylindrical flux rope regardless of whether it is force-free or not, the method can consistently yield the axis orientation of the flux rope with higher accuracy and stability than the minimum variance analysis of the magnetic field and the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique. Moreover, the radial distance to the axis center and the current density can also be estimated consistently. Application to two actual flux transfer events observed by the four satellites of the Cluster mission demonstrates that the method is more appropriate to be used for the inner part of flux rope, which might be closer to the cylindrical structure, showing good agreement with the results obtained from the optimal Grad-Shafranov reconstruction and the least squares technique of Faraday's law, but fails to produce such agreement for the outer satellite that grazes the flux rope. Therefore, the method must be used with caution.

  8. Properties of magnetic helicity flux in turbulent dynamos

    SciTech Connect

    Vishniac, Ethan T.; Shapovalov, Dmitry E-mail: dmsh@jhu.edu

    2014-01-10

    We study the flux of small-scale magnetic helicity in simulations of driven statistically homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a periodic box with an imposed large-scale shear. The simulations show that in the regime of strong dynamo action the eddy-scale magnetic helicity flux has only two significant terms: advective motion driven by the large-scale velocity field and the Vishniac-Cho (VC) flux which moves helicity across the magnetic field lines. The contribution of all the other terms is negligible. The VC flux is highly correlated with the large-scale electromotive force and is responsible for large-scale dynamo action, while the advective term is not. The VC flux is driven by the anisotropy of the turbulence. We derive analytical expressions for it in terms of the small-scale velocity or magnetic field. These expressions are used to predict the existence and strength of dynamo action for different turbulent anisotropies and tested against the results of the simulations.

  9. Chromospheric and Coronal Wave Generation in a Magnetic Flux Sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Steiner, Oskar; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris; Wedemeyer, Sven; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-08-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmospheric layers from the upper convection zone to the lower corona, we investigate the self-consistent excitation of slow magneto-acoustic body waves (slow modes) in a magnetic flux concentration. We find that the convective downdrafts in the close surroundings of a two-dimensional flux slab “pump” the plasma inside it in the downward direction. This action produces a downflow inside the flux slab, which encompasses ever higher layers, causing an upwardly propagating rarefaction wave. The slow mode, excited by the adiabatic compression of the downflow near the optical surface, travels along the magnetic field in the upward direction at the tube speed. It develops into a shock wave at chromospheric heights, where it dissipates, lifts the transition region, and produces an offspring in the form of a compressive wave that propagates further into the corona. In the wake of downflows and propagating shock waves, the atmosphere inside the flux slab in the chromosphere and higher tends to oscillate with a period of ν ≈ 4 mHz. We conclude that this process of “magnetic pumping” is a most plausible mechanism for the direct generation of longitudinal chromospheric and coronal compressive waves within magnetic flux concentrations, and it may provide an important heat source in the chromosphere. It may also be responsible for certain types of dynamic fibrils.

  10. Visualising Plasma Flow in Current-carrying Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    Laboratory experiments at Caltech [1], designed to study the formation and dynamics of spheromaks, solar prominences [2] and astrophysical jets, have motivated a theory for plasma flow within current-carrying magnetic flux tubes [3]. The spheromak and jet plasmas studied are formed by the merging of several plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes. These flux tubes ingest gas puffed in by pulsed gas valves and have current driven along a bias field. The apparatus is now being modified to permit injection of two different gas species into the same flux tube from different ports, corresponding to opposite footpoints of the flux tube. The new gas delivery system allows for simultaneous injection of various combinations of gas species (H, D, He, N, Ne, Ar, Kr) through various gas nozzle locations (inner or outer gun electrodes, left hand side or right hand side series). During the discharge, the multi-species plasmas are to be imaged with high speed, single- and multiple-frame, intensified CCD cameras and will be differentiated by narrow band optical filters. Other diagnostics include a magnetic probe array, soft x-ray diodes and an optical multichannel analyser to monitor the magnetic field evolution, particle velocities and energies. [1] S. C. Hsu and P. M. Bellan, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 334, 257-261 (2000). [2] J. F. Hansen and P. M. Bellan, Astrophys. J., 563, L183-L186, (2001). [3] P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas, 10, 1999-2008 (2003).

  11. Three-dimensional prominence-hosting magnetic configurations: Creating a helical magnetic flux rope

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Guo, Y.

    2014-01-10

    The magnetic configuration hosting prominences and their surrounding coronal structure is a key research topic in solar physics. Recent theoretical and observational studies strongly suggest that a helical magnetic flux rope is an essential ingredient to fulfill most of the theoretical and observational requirements for hosting prominences. To understand flux rope formation details and obtain magnetic configurations suitable for future prominence formation studies, we here report on three-dimensional isothermal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including finite gas pressure and gravity. Starting from a magnetohydrostatic corona with a linear force-free bipolar magnetic field, we follow its evolution when introducing vortex flows around the main polarities and converging flows toward the polarity inversion line near the bottom of the corona. The converging flows bring the feet of different loops together at the polarity inversion line, where magnetic reconnection and flux cancellation happen. Inflow and outflow signatures of the magnetic reconnection process are identified, and thereby the newly formed helical loops wind around preexisting ones so that a complete flux rope grows and ascends. When a macroscopic flux rope is formed, we switch off the driving flows and find that the system relaxes to a stable state containing a helical magnetic flux rope embedded in an overlying arcade structure. A major part of the formed flux rope is threaded by dipped field lines that can stably support prominence matter, while the total mass of the flux rope is in the order of 4-5× 10{sup 14} g.

  12. Simulations of emerging magnetic flux. I. The formation of stable coronal flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Török, Tibor

    2013-12-01

    We present results from three-dimensional visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a convection zone magnetic flux tube into a solar atmosphere containing a pre-existing dipole coronal field, which is orientated to minimize reconnection with the emerging field. We observe that the emergence process is capable of producing a coronal flux rope by the transfer of twist from the convection zone, as found in previous simulations. We find that this flux rope is stable, with no evidence of a fast rise, and that its ultimate height in the corona is determined by the strength of the pre-existing dipole field. We also find that although the electric currents in the initial convection zone flux tube are almost perfectly neutralized, the resultant coronal flux rope carries a significant net current. These results suggest that flux tube emergence is capable of creating non-current-neutralized stable flux ropes in the corona, tethered by overlying potential fields, a magnetic configuration that is believed to be the source of coronal mass ejections.

  13. Explosive instability and erupting flux tubes in a magnetized plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, S. C.; Cowley, B.; Henneberg, S. A.; Wilson, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    The eruption of multiple flux tubes in a magnetized plasma is proposed as a mechanism for explosive release of energy in plasmas. A significant fraction of the linearly stable isolated flux tubes are shown to be metastable in a box model magnetized atmosphere in which ends of the field lines are embedded in conducting walls. The energy released by destabilizing such field lines can be a large proportion of the gravitational energy stored in the system. This energy can be released in a fast dynamical time. PMID:26339193

  14. Sausage Mode Propagation in a Thick Magnetic Flux Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardi, A.; Ballai, I.; Marcu, A.; Orza, B.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the propagation of slow magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) sausage waves in a thick expanding magnetic flux tube in the context of the quiescent (VAL-C) solar atmosphere. The propagation of these waves is found to be described by the Klein-Gordon equation. Using the governing MHD equations and the VAL-C atmosphere model we study the variation of the cut-off frequency along and across the magnetic tube guiding the waves. Due to the radial variation of the cut-off frequency the flux tubes act as low frequency filters for the waves.

  15. Correlated low-frequency electric and magnetic noise along the auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Huff, R. L.; Menietti, J. D.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 1 measurements of intense low-frequency electric and magnetic noise observed at low altitudes over the auroral zone are described. The intensity of both the electric and magnetic fields decreases rapidly with increasing frequency. Most of the energy is at frequencies below the O(+) cyclotron frequency, and some evidence is found for a cutoff or change in spectral slope near that frequency. The magnetic to electric field ratio decreases rapidly with increasing radial distance and also decreases with increasing frequency. The polarization of the electric field in a plane perpendicular to the earth's magnetic field is essentially random. The transverse electric and magnetic fields are closely correlated, with the average Poynting flux directed toward the earth. The total electromagnetic power flow associated with the noise is substantial. Two general models are discussed to interpret these observations, one based on static electric and magnetic fields imbedded in the ionosphere and the other based on Alfven waves propagating along the auroral field lines.

  16. Noise spectroscopy of magnetic tunnel junctions with organic barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Farkhad; Cascales, Juan Pedro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the details of spin and charge transport through organic barriers remains one of the main challenges in organic spintronics. Here we present low frequency noise studies in magnetic tunnel junctions with thin (2-5nm) organic PTCDA barriers in the tunnelling regime, investigated at temperatures of under 1K up to 300K. Shot noise measurements show a superpoissonian contribution at low biases giving rise to a Fano factor of around 1.5-2. We tentatively link the enhanced shot noise with electron bunching induced by inelastic interaction with collective low frequency vibration modes of the molecules. On the other hand, the bias dependence of 1/f noise studied up to 350mV reveals reproducible anomalies which could be linked with excitations induced by inelastic tunnelling, due to individual vibrational modes of higher frequency of the PTCDA molecules. The dependence of the shot and 1/f noise with the magnetic alignment of the electrodes will also be discussed Supported by UAM-Santander and MAT2012-32743 grants.

  17. Space Weather in Magnetic Observatory Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S. A.; Truong, F.

    2012-12-01

    Space weather impacts human activity by degrading satellite operation or disrupting electrical power grids. By exploiting small differences in the time stamp between magnetometer pairs to facilitate data filtering, we find that ground-based magnetic observatories are well suited to measure space weather phenomena, and in particular, high frequency fluctuations known as pulsations. Several of the world's consortium of INTERMAGNET observatories are used in the analyses. They show that pulsation amplitudes attain a maximum near local noon over diurnal periods. Long-term trends in pulsation amplitude correlate well with the solar cycle, with the greatest effect occurring during the waning part of the cycle when the derivative of the number of sunspots attains a maximum rate of decrease. Seasonal variability and total amplitude of the diurnal expression of pulsations depends on latitude. Our study highlights the utility of ground-based observatories to understand solar phenomena and suggests how INTERMAGNET data and protocol could be better tuned to monitor space weather.

  18. A flux-coupled ac/dc magnetizing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Liu, H.; Kent, A. D.

    2013-06-01

    We report on an instrument for applying ac and dc magnetic fields by capturing the flux from a rotating permanent magnet and projecting it between two adjustable pole pieces. This can be an alternative to standard electromagnets for experiments with small samples or in probe stations in which an applied magnetic field is needed locally, with advantages that include a compact form-factor, very low power requirements and dissipation as well as fast field sweep rates. This flux capture instrument (FLUXCAP) can produce fields from -400 to +400 mT, with field resolution less than 1 mT. It generates static magnetic fields as well as ramped fields, with ramping rates as high as 10 T/s. We demonstrate the use of this apparatus for studying the magnetotransport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a nanoscale device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance.

  19. Spin-torque shot noise in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Chudnovskiy, A L; Swiebodzinski, J; Kamenev, A

    2008-08-01

    A spin polarized current may transfer angular momentum to a ferromagnet, resulting in a spin-torque phenomenon. At the same time the shot noise, associated with the current, leads to a nonequilibrium stochastic force acting on the ferromagnet. We derive a stochastic version of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for a magnetization of a "free" ferromagnetic layer in contact with a "fixed" ferromagnet. We solve the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and show that the nonequilibrium noise yields to a nonmonotonic dependence of the precession spectrum linewidth on the current. PMID:18764485

  20. Magnetic flux generation and transport in cool stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Işık, E.; Schmitt, D.; Schüssler, M.

    2011-04-01

    Context. The Sun and other cool stars harbouring outer convection zones manifest magnetic activity in their atmospheres. The connection between this activity and the properties of a deep-seated dynamo generating the magnetic flux is not well understood. Aims: By employing physical models, we study the spatial and temporal characteristics of the observable surface field for various stellar parameters. Methods: We combine models for magnetic flux generation, buoyancy instability, and transport, which encompass the entire convection zone. The model components are: (i) a thin-layer αΩ dynamo at the base of the convection zone; (ii) buoyancy instabilities and the rise of flux tubes through the convection zone in 3D, which provides a physically consistent determination of emergence latitudes and tilt angles; and (iii) horizontal flux transport at the surface. Results: For solar-type stars and rotation periods longer than about 10 days, the latitudinal dynamo waves generated by the deep-seated αΩ dynamo are faithfully reflected by the surface distribution of magnetic flux. For rotation periods of the order of two days, however, Coriolis acceleration of rising flux loops leads to surface flux emergence at much higher latitudes than the dynamo waves at the bottom of the convection zone reach. A similar result is found for a K0V star with a rotation period of two days. In the case of a rapidly rotating K1 subgiant, overlapping dynamo waves lead to noisy activity cycles and mixed-polarity fields at high latitudes. Conclusions: The combined model reproduces the basic observed features of the solar cycle. The differences between the latitude distributions of the magnetic field at the bottom of the convection zone and the emerging surface flux grow with increasing rotation rate and convection zone depth, becoming quite substantial for rapidly rotating dwarfs and subgiants. The dynamical evolution of buoyantly rising magnetic flux should be considered as an essential

  1. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previously, from analysis of SOHO coronal images in combination with Kitt Peak magnetograms, we found that the quiet corona is the sum of two components: the large-scale corona and the coronal network. The large-scale corona consists of all coronal-temperature (T approximately 10(exp 6) K) structures larger than supergranules (greater than approximately 30,000 kilometers). The coronal network (1) consists of all coronal-temperature structures smaller than supergranules, (2) is rooted in and loosely traces the photospheric magnetic network, (3) has its brightest features seated on polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network magnetic flux, and (4) produces only about 5% of the total coronal emission in quiet regions. The heating of the coronal network is apparently magnetic in origin. Here, from analysis of EIT coronal images of quiet regions in combination with magnetograms of the same quiet regions from SOHO/MDI and from Kitt Peak, we examine the other 95% of the quiet corona and its relation to the underlying magnetic network. We find: (1) Dividing the large-scale corona into its bright and dim halves divides the area into bright "continents" and dark "oceans" having spans of 2-4 supergranules. (2) These patterns are also present in the photospheric magnetograms: the network is stronger under the bright half and weaker under the dim half. (3) The radiation from the large-scale corona increases roughly as the cube root of the magnetic flux content of the underlying magnetic network. In contrast, the coronal radiation from an active region increases roughly linearly with the magnetic flux content of the active region. We assume, as is widely held, that nearly all of the large-scale corona is magnetically rooted in the network. Our results suggest that either the coronal heating in quiet regions has a large non-magnetic component, or, if the heating is predominantly produced via the magnetic field, the mechanism is significantly different than in active

  2. Predicting ICME Magnetic Fields with a Numerical Flux Rope Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I.

    2014-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a dramatic manifestation of solar activity that release vast amounts of plasma into the heliosphere, and have many effects on the interplanetary medium and on planetary atmospheres, and are the major driver of space weather. CMEs occur with the formation and expulsion of large-scale flux ropes from the solar corona, which are routinely observed in interplanetary space. Simulating and predicting the structure and dynamics of these ICME magnetic fields is essential to the progress of heliospheric science and space weather prediction. We combine observations made by different observing techniques of CME events to develop a numerical model capable of predicting the magnetic field of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMES). Photospheric magnetic field measurements from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI are used to specify a coronal magnetic flux rope that drives the CMEs. We examine halo CMEs events that produced clearly observed magnetic clouds at Earth and present our model predictions of these events with an emphasis placed on the z component of the magnetic field. Comparison of the MHD model predictions with coronagraph observations and in-situ data allow us to robustly determine the parameters that define the initial state of the driving flux rope, thus providing a predictive model.

  3. Identification of different processes in magnetization dynamics of API steels using magnetic Barkhausen noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Benítez, J. A.; Espina-Hernández, J. H.; Le Man, Tu; Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a method to identify processes in magnetization dynamics using the angular dependence of the magnetic Barkhausen noise. The analysis reveals that three different processes of the magnetization dynamics could be identified using the angular dependence of the magnetic Barkhausen noise energy. The first process is the reversed domain nucleation which is related to the magneto-crystalline energy of the material, and the second and third ones are associated with 180° and 90° domain walls motions, respectively. Additionally, two transition regions were identified and they are located between the regions associated with the aforementioned processes. The causes involving these processes are analyzed and a method for establishing their location in the Barkhausen noise signal with respect to the applied magnetic field intensity is proposed.

  4. The origin of noise and magnetic hysteresis in crystalline permalloy ring-core fluxgate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narod, B. B.

    2014-06-01

    6-81.3 Mo permalloy, developed in the 1960s for use in high performance ring-core fluxgate sensors, remains the state-of-the-art for permalloy-cored fluxgate magnetometers. The magnetic properties of 6-81.3, namely magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropies and saturation induction are all optimum in the Fe-Ni-Mo system. In such polycrystalline permalloy fluxgate sensors a single phenomenon may cause both fluxgate noise and magnetic hysteresis, explain Barkhausen jumps, remanence and coercivity, and avoid domain denucleation. The phenomenon, domain wall reconnection, is presented as part of a theoretical model. In the unmagnetized state a coarse-grain high-quality permalloy foil ideally forms stripe domains, which present at the free surface as parallel, uniformly spaced domain walls that cross the entire thickness of the foil. Leakage flux "in" and "out" of alternating domains is a requirement of the random orientation, grain-by-grain, of magnetic easy axes' angles with respect to the foil free surface. Its magnetostatic energy together with domain wall energy determines an energy budget to be minimized. Throughout the magnetization cycle the free surface domain pattern remains essentially unchanged, due to the magnetostatic energy cost such a change would elicit. Thus domain walls are "pinned" to free surfaces. Driven to saturation, domain walls first bulge then reconnect via Barkhausen jumps to form a new domain configuration this author has called "channel domains", that are attached to free surfaces. The approach to saturation now continues as reversible channel domain compression. Driving the permalloy deeper into saturation compresses the channel domains to arbitrarily small thickness, but will not cause them to denucleate. Returning from saturation the channel domain structure will survive through zero H, thus explaining remanence. The Barkhausen jumps being irreversible exothermic events are sources of fluxgate noise, powered by the energy

  5. The origin of noise and magnetic hysteresis in crystalline permalloy ring-core fluxgate sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narod, B. B.

    2014-09-01

    Developed in the 1960s for use in high-performance ring-core fluxgate sensors, 6-81.3 Mo permalloy remains the state of the art for permalloy-cored fluxgate magnetometers. The magnetic properties of 6-81.3, namely magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropies and saturation induction, are all optimum in the Fe-Ni-Mo system. In such polycrystalline permalloy fluxgate sensors, a single phenomenon may cause both fluxgate noise and magnetic hysteresis; explain Barkhausen jumps, remanence and coercivity; and avoid domain denucleation. This phenomenon, domain wall reconnection, is presented as part of a theoretical model. In the unmagnetized state a coarse-grain high-quality permalloy foil ideally forms stripe domains, which present at the free surface as parallel, uniformly spaced domain walls that cross the entire thickness of the foil. Leakage flux "in" and "out" of alternating domains is a requirement of the random orientation, grain by grain, of magnetic easy axes' angles with respect to the foil free surface. Its magnetostatic energy together with domain wall energy determines an energy budget to be minimized. Throughout the magnetization cycle the free-surface domain pattern remains essentially unchanged, due to the magnetostatic energy cost such a change would elicit. Thus domain walls are "pinned" to free surfaces. Driven to saturation, domain walls first bulge then reconnect via Barkhausen jumps to form a new domain configuration that I have called "channel domains", which are attached to free surfaces. The approach to saturation now continues as reversible channel domain compression. Driving the permalloy deeper into saturation compresses the channel domains to arbitrarily small thickness, but will not cause them to denucleate. Returning from saturation the channel domain structure will survive through zero H, thus explaining remanence. The Barkhausen jumps, being irreversible exothermic events, are sources of fluxgate noise powered by the energy

  6. Models for the probability densities of the turbulent plasma flux in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, A. S.; Fredriksen, Å; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    Observations of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas indicate that plasma losses can be due to coherent structures or bursts of plasma rather than a classical random walk or diffusion process. A model for synthetic data based on coherent plasma flux events is proposed, where all basic properties can be obtained analytically in terms of a few control parameters. One basic parameter in the present case is the density of burst events in a long time-record, together with parameters in a model of the individual pulse shapes and the statistical distribution of these parameters. The model and its extensions give the probability density of the plasma flux. An interesting property of the model is a prediction of a near-parabolic relation between skewness and kurtosis of the statistical flux distribution for a wide range of parameters. The model is generalized by allowing for an additive random noise component. When this noise dominates the signal we can find a transition to standard results for Gaussian random noise. Applications of the model are illustrated by data from the toroidal Blaamann plasma.

  7. The perpendicular electron energy flux driven by magnetic fluctuations in the edge of TEXT-U

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Prager, S.C.; Bengtson, R.D.; Wootton, A.J.

    1995-06-12

    A fast bolometer was used for direct measurements of parallel electron energy flux in the edge of TEXT-U. The fluctuating component of the parallel electron energy flux, combined with a measurement of magnetic fluctuations, provides an upper limit to the perpendicular electron flux. This magnetically driven energy flux cannot account for the observed energy flux.

  8. Frozen flux violation, electron demagnetization and magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Daughton, W.

    2015-10-15

    We argue that the analogue in collisionless plasma of the collisional diffusion region of magnetic reconnection is properly defined in terms of the demagnetization of the plasma electrons that enable “frozen flux” slippage to occur. This condition differs from the violation of the “frozen-in” condition, which only implies that two fluid effects are involved, rather than the necessary slippage of magnetic flux as viewed in the electron frame. Using 2D Particle In Cell (PIC) simulations, this approach properly finds the saddle point region of the flux function. Our demagnetization conditions are the dimensionless guiding center approximation expansion parameters for electrons which we show are observable and determined locally by the ratio of non-ideal electric to magnetic field strengths. Proxies for frozen flux slippage are developed that (a) are measurable on a single spacecraft, (b) are dimensionless with theoretically justified threshold values of significance, and (c) are shown in 2D simulations to recover distinctions theoretically possible with the (unmeasurable) flux function. A new potentially observable dimensionless frozen flux rate, Λ{sub Φ}, differentiates significant from anecdotal frozen flux slippage. A single spacecraft observable, ϒ, is shown with PIC simulations to be essentially proportional to the unobservable local Maxwell frozen flux rate. This relationship theoretically establishes electron demagnetization in 3D as the general cause of frozen flux slippage. In simple 2D cases with an isolated central diffusion region surrounded by separatrices, these diagnostics uniquely identify the traditional diffusion region (without confusing it with the two fluid “ion-diffusion” region) and clarify the role of the separatrices where frozen flux violations do occur but are not substantial. In the more complicated guide and asymmetric 2D cases, substantial flux slippage regions extend out along, but inside of, the preferred separatrices

  9. Flux noise resulting from vortex avalanches using a simple kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, G.; Stroud, D.

    1999-10-01

    We have carried out a model calculation of the flux noise produced by vortex avalanches in a type-II superconductor, using a simple kinetic model proposed by Bassler and Paczuski. Over a broad range of frequencies, we find that the flux noise S{sub {Phi}}({omega}) has a power-law dependence on frequency, S{sub {Phi}}({omega}){approximately}{omega}{sup {minus}s}, with s{approximately}1.4 in reasonable agreement with experiment. In addition, for small lattices, the calculated S{sub {Phi}}({omega}) has a high-frequency knee, which is seen in some experiments, and which is due to the finite lattice size. Deviations between calculation and experiment are attributed mostly to uncertainties in the measured critical current densities and pinning strengths of the experimental samples. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Magnetic flux annihilation and the development of magnetic field depletions in the sectored heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Opher, M.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of magnetic reconnection in the sectored heliosheath isexplored with the goal of identifying signatures that can be comparedwith Voyager observations. Simulations now include much more realisticinitial conditions, including unequal magnetic fluxes in adjacentsectors and very high β. Large numbers of small magnetic islandsform early but rapidly coalesce to sector-size structures. Thelate-time magnetic structure of the sector zone differs greatly fromthat obtained in earlier simulations. Bands of unreconnected azimuthalmagnetic flux thread through the simulation domain separating regionsof depleted magnetic field strength. The depletion regions have radialscale sizes somewhat greater than the initial sector width. Theboundaries of the magnetic depletions are sharp and reveal littlechange in the direction of B. The characteristic minima of thedepletions are one third of the initial magnetic field strength. Atlate time surviving magnetic islands are widely spaced and occur inpairs. Cuts across the domain in the radial direction reveal mostlyunipolar flux except when a cut crosses one of the remnant magneticislands. This unusual late time magnetic structure is generic resultof reconnection in a high β system. The magnetic depletionsexhibit many of the properties of ``proton boundary layers'' seen inthe Voyager 1 magnetic field data. The simulations suggest that significant flux loss should take place in the heliosheath, which is consistent with Voyager measurements. The long periods of unipolar fluxseen by Voyager 1 prior to crossing the heliopause likely results fromthe annihilation of the sectors rather than an exit from the sectorzone.

  11. An Emerging Magnetic Flux Catalog for SOHO/MDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Derek; Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeForest, Craig

    2016-05-01

    We present a catalog of emerging magnetic flux events covering the entirety of the 15-year-long SOHO/MDI 96-minute magnetogram dataset. Such a catalog has myriad uses in studies of the solar dynamo and solar cycle. Our catalog is designed to mimic as nearly as possible the Emerging Flux region catalog produced for SDO/HMI, allowing continuity across missions and solar cycles. We will present details of the algorithm for identifying emerging flux events, special considerations for MDI as opposed to HMI, detailed examples of some detected emerging flux regions, and a brief overview of statistics of the entire catalog. The catalog will be available for querying through the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase, as well as for direct downloading from Southwest Research Institute. This work has been supported by NASA Grant NNX14AJ67G through the Heliophysics Data Environment Enhancements program.

  12. Low-Noise YBa2Cu3O7 Nano-SQUIDs for Performing Magnetization-Reversal Measurements on Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, T.; Wölbing, R.; Reiche, C. F.; Müller, B.; Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Mühl, T.; Büchner, B.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.

    2015-04-01

    We fabricate YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) direct-current nano- superconducting quantum-interference devices (nano-SQUIDs) based on grain-boundary Josephson junctions by focused-ion-beam patterning. Characterization of electric transport and noise properties at 4.2 K in a magnetically shielded environment yields a very small inductance L of a few pH for an optimized device geometry. This, in turn, results in very low values of flux noise <50 n Φ0/Hz1 /2 in the thermal white-noise limit, which yields spin sensitivities of a few μB/Hz1 /2 (Φ0 is the magnetic flux quantum, and μB is the Bohr magneton). We observe frequency-dependent excess noise up to 7 MHz, which can be eliminated only partially by bias reversal readout. This behavior indicates the presence of fluctuators of unknown origin, possibly related to defect-induced spins in the SrTiO3 substrate. We demonstrate the potential of using YBCO nano-SQUIDs for the investigation of small spin systems, by placing a 39-nm-diameter Fe nanowire encapsulated in a carbon nanotube on top of a nonoptimized YBCO nano-SQUID and by measuring the magnetization reversal of the Fe nanowire via the change of magnetic flux coupled to the nano-SQUID. The measured flux signals upon magnetization reversal of the Fe nanowire are in very good agreement with estimated values, and the determined switching fields indicate magnetization reversal of the nanowire via curling mode.

  13. Materials for efficient high-flux magnetic bearing actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. E.; Trumper, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have demonstrated the capability for achieving positioning accuracies at the nanometer level in precision motion control stages. This makes possible the positioning of a wafer in six degrees of freedom with the precision necessary for photolithography. To control the position of an object at the nanometer level, a model of the magnetic bearing actuator force-current-airgap relationship must be accurately obtained. Additionally, to reduce thermal effects the design of the actuator should be optimized to achieve maximum power efficiency and flux density. Optimization of the actuator is accomplished by proper pole face sizing and utilizing a magnetic core material which can be magnetized to the highest flux density with low magnetic loss properties. This paper describes the construction of a magnetic bearing calibration fixture designed for experimental measurement of the actuator force characteristics. The results of a material study that review the force properties of nickel-steel, silicon-steel, and cobalt-vanadium-iron, as they apply to magnetic bearing applications are also presented.

  14. Multiresolution Analysis and Prediction of Solar Magnetic Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wik, Magnus

    Synoptic maps of the solar magnetic field provide an important visualization of the global transport and evolution of the large-scale magnetic flux. The solar dynamo picture is dependent on both the spatial and time resolution. It is therefore interesting to study the solar magnetic activity for many resolutions at the same time. A multi-resolution analysis gives us the possibility to study the synoptic solar magnetic fields for several resolutions at the same time. In this study we have first carried out a wavelet based multiresolution analysis (MRA) of the longitudinally averaged photospheric synoptic magnetograms. Magnetograms of Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO), Stanford and of Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) onboard SOHO of ESA/NASA were used. WSO data enabled a study of cycle 21,22 and 23 and MDI data a more detailed study of cycle 23. The result reveals a complex picture of the solar magnetic activity on different scales. For resolutions around 1-2 years and 6-7 years we observe strong transports of fluxes to the polar regions. Around 11 years we observe a very regular pattern which resembles a wave from the polar to the sunspot regions. We also see that a large range of latitudes vary in phase. A large asymmetry between solar northern and southern hemispheres is also seen. We have also developed a multilayer back propagation neural network for prediction of the solar magnetic flux. The inputs to the model are the polar and sunspot magnetic field in WSO longitudinally averaged solar magnetic fields.

  15. Physiological Noise Reduction Using Volumetric Functional Magnetic Resonance Inverse Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Witzel, Thomas; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Wang, Fu-Nien; Belliveau, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological noise arising from a variety of sources can significantly degrade the detection of task-related activity in BOLD-contrast fMRI experiments. If whole head spatial coverage is desired, effective suppression of oscillatory physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations is quite difficult without external monitoring, since traditional EPI acquisition methods cannot sample the signal rapidly enough to satisfy the Nyquist sampling theorem, leading to temporal aliasing of noise. Using a combination of high speed magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) and digital filtering, we demonstrate that it is possible to suppress cardiac and respiratory noise without auxiliary monitoring, while achieving whole head spatial coverage and reasonable spatial resolution. Our systematic study of the effects of different moving average (MA) digital filters demonstrates that a MA filter with a 2 s window can effectively reduce the variance in the hemodynamic baseline signal, thereby achieving 57-58% improvements in peak z-statistic values compared to unfiltered InI or spatially smoothed EPI data (FWHM =8.6 mm). In conclusion, the high temporal sampling rates achievable with InI permit significant reductions in physiological noise using standard temporal filtering techniques that result in significant improvements in hemodynamic response estimation. PMID:21954026

  16. Resolving Magnetic Flux Patches at the Surface of the Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    The geomagnetic field at a given epoch can be used to partition the surface of the liquid outer core into a finite number of contiguous regions in which the radial component of the magnetic flux density, B (sub r), is of one sign. These flux patches are instrumental in providing detail to surface fluid flows inferred from the changing geomagnetic field and in evaluating the validity of the frozen-flux approximation on which such inferences rely. Most of the flux patches in models of the modem field are small and enclose little flux compared to the total unsigned flux emanating from the core. To demonstrate that such patches are not required to explain the most spatially complete and accurate data presently available, those from the Magsat mission, I have constructed a smooth core field model that fits the Magsat data but does not possess small flux patches. I conclude that our present knowledge of the geomagnetic field does not allow us to resolve these features reliably at the core-mantle boundary; thus we possess less information about core flow than previously believed.

  17. Inference of physical phenomena from FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) noise analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thie, J.A.; Damiano, B.; Campbell, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    The source of features observed in noise spectra collected by an automated data collection system operated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) can be identified using a methodology based on careful data observation and intuition. When a large collection of data is available, as in this case, automatic pattern recognition and parameter storage and retrieval using a data base can be used to extract useful information. However, results can be limited to empirical signature comparison monitoring unless an effort is made to determine the noise sources. This paper describes the identification of several FFTF noise data phenomena and suggests how this understanding may lead to new or enhanced monitoring. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    Hysteresis loops and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in a single crystal α-iron containing a nonmagnetic particle were simulated based on the Laudau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The analyses of domain morphologies and hysteresis loops show that reversal magnetization process is control by nucleation of reversed domains at nonmagnetic particle when the particle size reaches a particle value. In such a situation, the value of nucleation field is determined by the size of nonmagnetic particles, and moreover, coercive field and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal are strongly affected by the nucleation field of reversed domains.

  19. Resonant Absorption of Axisymmetric Modes in Twisted Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagkiozis, I.; Goossens, M.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2016-06-01

    It has been shown recently that magnetic twist and axisymmetric MHD modes are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, and therefore the study of resonant absorption for these modes has become a pressing issue because it can have important consequences for heating magnetic flux tubes in the solar atmosphere and the observed damping. In this investigation, for the first time, we calculate the damping rate for axisymmetric MHD waves in weakly twisted magnetic flux tubes. Our aim is to investigate the impact of resonant damping of these modes for solar atmospheric conditions. This analytical study is based on an idealized configuration of a straight magnetic flux tube with a weak magnetic twist inside as well as outside the tube. By implementing the conservation laws derived by Sakurai et al. and the analytic solutions for weakly twisted flux tubes obtained recently by Giagkiozis et al. we derive a dispersion relation for resonantly damped axisymmetric modes in the spectrum of the Alfvén continuum. We also obtain an insightful analytical expression for the damping rate in the long wavelength limit. Furthermore, it is shown that both the longitudinal magnetic field and the density, which are allowed to vary continuously in the inhomogeneous layer, have a significant impact on the damping time. Given the conditions in the solar atmosphere, resonantly damped axisymmetric modes are highly likely to be ubiquitous and play an important role in energy dissipation. We also suggest that, given the character of these waves, it is likely that they have already been observed in the guise of Alfvén waves.

  20. C 4 fluxes from the sun as a star and the correlation with magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Linsky, J. L.; Bennett, J.; Brown, A.; Saar, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A total of 144 C 4 wavelength 1548 SMM-UVSP spectroheliograms of solar plages were analyzed, some of which are series of exposures of the same region on the same day. Also analyzed were C 4 wavelength 1551 rasters of plages and C 4 1548 rasters of the quiet sun. The sample contains data on 17 different plages, observed on 50 different days. The center-to-limb variations of the active regions show that the optical thickness effects in the C 4 wavelength 1548 line can be neglected in the conversion from intensity to flux density. As expected for the nearly optically thin situation, the C 4 1548 line is twice as bright as the C 4 wavelength 1551 line. The average C 4 wavelength 1548 flux density for a quiet is 2700 erg/cm/s and, with surprisingly little scatter, 18,000 erg/cm/s for plages. The intensity histograms of rasters obtained at disk centers can be separated into characteristic plage and quiet-sun contributions with variable relative filling factors. The disk-averaged flux density in the C 4 doublet and the disk-averaged magnitude of the magnetic flux density are related. The relationship between the C 4 and magnetic flux densities for spatially resolved data is inferred to be almost the same, with only an additional factor of order unity in the constant of proportionality.

  1. Origin of 1/f noise peaks of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} films in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, W.N.; Kim, D.H.; Park, J.H.

    1994-02-01

    The temperature and magnetic field dependence of 1/f noise has been measured in epitaxial YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} films. In a magnetic field, two noise peaks were observed as temperature decreases; one at higher temperature was found to match the thermal fluctuation of the sample resistance and the other near the foot of the transition was found to be magnetic-field dependent. The location of the latter was shifted toward low temperature and the peak height was decreased as a magnetic field increased. In a zero field only one peak from the resistance fluctuation was observed. We show that the field-dependent noises are due to flux motion interacting with the pinning potential. A classical model is used to explain the field-induced noise peaks. We interpret that the temperature dependences of the flux bundle size and the sample resistance are the reasons for the noise peaks, and a rough estimation of the temperature and field dependence of the flux bundle size is presented. Any possible relationship between the noise peaks and the flux-line-lattice phase transition is also discussed.

  2. Magnetic flux submergence in the photosphere: A target for DKIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Pillet, Valentin

    2016-05-01

    While magnetic flux emergence is ubiquitous on the Sun and relatively well observed, the opposite process, flux submergence, is elusive. In the absence of large-scale submergence processes, it has always been assumed that submergence occurs at granular or smaller scales. Models that explain flux rope and filament formation near neutral lines, specifically need small-scale submergence. The same is true for dynamo models that propose the repair of the large-scale toroidal tubes after they have emerged to the surface. However, the detection of field lines being pulled back down into the solar photosphere has escaped clear detection. In this work, I demonstrate that DKIST capabilities are uniquely tailored to observe and characterize small-scale flux submergence, if it indeed happens on the Sun. By searching for transverse fields at small scales and studying their Doppler shifts, an understanding of the nature of flux submergence can be achieved. Such studies are particularly relevant near magnetic neutral lines where filaments are formed though poorly understood processes.

  3. TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Vörös, Zoltán; Narita, Yasuhito; Bruno, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic flux tubes in the solar wind can be twisted as they are transported from the solar surface, where the tubes are twisted due to photospheric motions. It is suggested that the twisted magnetic tubes can be detected as the variation of total (thermal+magnetic) pressure during their passage through the observing satellite. We show that the total pressure of several observed twisted tubes resembles the theoretically expected profile. The twist of the isolated magnetic tube may explain the observed abrupt changes of magnetic field direction at tube walls. We have also found some evidence that the flux tube walls can be associated with local heating of the plasma and elevated proton and electron temperatures. For the tubes aligned with the Parker spiral, the twist angle can be estimated from the change of magnetic field direction. Stability analysis of twisted tubes shows that the critical twist angle of the tube with a homogeneous twist is 70°, but the angle can further decrease due to the motion of the tube with respect to the solar wind stream. The tubes with a stronger twist are unstable to the kink instability, therefore they probably cannot reach 1 AU.

  4. Injection of magnetic flux and helicity in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, E.

    2006-09-01

    This thesis is related to the mechanisms of emergence into the solar atmosphere, of two quantities playing key roles in solar activity: magnetic flux and magnetic helicity. Helicity, which is a topological measure of twist and shear, is believed to be a conserved quantity for solar conditions, in the frame of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A crucial phase in the emergence process of these quantities, which are generated and amplified in the solar interior, are their injection through the solar photosphere, the transition region between the solar interior and atmosphere. The first part of my work provided new answers to questions unsolved by the classical scenario of emergence. I have analyzed multi-wavelength observations (FGE, TRACE, SoHO, THEMIS) of an emerging active region. I demonstrated that magnetic flux tubes emerge with a flat undulated shape and that small scale magnetic reconnection events, are necessary to this emergence process. Then, using a 3D MHD numerical simulation, I studied the mechanism of magnetic reconnection and in particular the natural formation of current layers where regions of strong variations of magnetic connectivity, called quasi-separatrix layers, are present. Finally, I demonstrated that the classical definition of helicity flux density is biased and proposed a more accurate definition. I applied my new definition to observations of active regions and showed that the photospheric injection pattern of magnetic helicity is unipolar and homogenous. This study allows to link the generation of helicity in the solar atmosphere, its injection and its distribution in the solar corona and its ejection in the interplanetary medium.

  5. MHD waves on solar magnetic flux tubes - Tutorial review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the highly simplified models that have been developed for solar magnetic flux tubes, which are intense photospheric-level fields confined by external gas pressure but able to vary rapidly with height, are presently discussed with emphasis on the torsional Alfven mode's propagation, reflection, and non-WKB properties. The 'sausage' and 'kink' modes described by the thin flux-tube approximation are noted. Attention is also given to the surface waves and resonance absorption of X-ray-emitting loops, as well as to the results of recent work on the resonant instabilities that occur in the presence of bulk flows.

  6. Local flux intrusion in HTS annuli during pulsed field magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, V. S.; Krasnoperov, E. P.; Kartamyshev, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    During pulsed field magnetization of melt-grown HTS flux jumps can occur and the shielding current falls by 10-20 times. As the duration of pulse is shorter than the temperature relaxation time (<< 1 s), the circular current remains small during the field falling. The residual trapped field in the hole of the annulus has a direction opposite to that of the pulsed field. Small circular current and high critical current density are explained by the fact that flux moves through narrow regions of the annulus body. The angle of the sector with “soft flux” (i.e. a low Jc region) is estimated to be ∼ 7 deg.

  7. Variation of Magnetic Flux Ropes With Heliocentric Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Mulligan, T.; Anderson, B. J.

    As the magnetic flux ropes in interplanetary coronal mass ejections move away from the Sun, their thickness expands and the field strength drops. This radial variation has been measured statistically by Bothmer and Schwenn with Helios. On occasion spacecraft are sufficiently radially aligned during the passage of an ICME that this expansion can be determined for a single structure. Two such occasions occurred with ACE and NEAR on July 12-16, 2000 and August 13-15, 2000. In accord with the statistical results from Helios, we find that the axial field for the first rope (the Bastille Day event) decreased as R^-1.4 and the poloidal field as R^-1.2 and as R^-1.8 and R^- 1.3 for the second rope. The thickness of the ropes increased from 0.50 to 0.86 AU over a distance of 0.76 AU and from 0.34 to 0.58 AU over 0.72 AU respectively. These results confirm that even when in quasi force-free magnetic balance magnetic ropes expand with heliocentric distance. Such an evolution is a natural consequence of the motion of the flux tube if it is rooted to the Sun even if the twist and magnetic flux content of the tube remain constant since the poloidal field must decrease as the tube moves outward.

  8. Magnetic flux penetration into twisted multifilamentary coated superconductors subjected to ac transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki; Sato, Susumu; Ito, Takeshi

    2006-12-01

    ac losses in superconductors are generated by the magnetic flux and current penetration into them. To reveal the magnetic flux and current penetration processes in twisted multifilamentary coated superconductors in which the thin superconductor layer is subdivided into filaments and then twisted as a whole for ac loss reduction, a theoretical model for electromagnetic field analysis was developed based on the power law E-J (electric-field-current-density) characteristic for the superconductor and a thin strip approximation of the conductor. The developed theoretical model was implemented into a numerical code using the finite element method to calculate and visualize the current and magnetic flux distributions. The magnetization losses in twisted multifilamentary coated superconductors exposed to ac transverse magnetic fields were calculated from the temporal evolutions of the current distribution to demonstrate the effect of the twisted multifilamentary architecture on ac loss reduction.

  9. Noise-induced bifurcations in magnetization dynamics of uniaxial nanomagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, C. Perna, S.; Quercia, A.; Bertotti, G.; D'Aquino, M.; Mayergoyz, I. D.

    2015-05-07

    Stochastic magnetization dynamics in uniformly magnetized nanomagnets is considered. The system is assumed to have rotational symmetry as the anisotropy axis, the applied field, and the spin polarization are all aligned along an axis of symmetry. By appropriate integration of the Fokker-Planck equation associated to the problem, the stochastic differential equation governing the evolution of the angle between the magnetization orientation and the symmetry axis is derived. The drift terms present in this equation contain a noise-induced drift term, which, in combination with drift terms of deterministic origin, can be written as the derivative of an effective potential. Superparamagnetic-like transitions are studied in connections with the bifurcations of the effective potential as temperature and excitation conditions are varied.

  10. Magnetic Flux Conservation in the Heliosheath Including Solar Cycle Variations of Magnetic Field Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, A. T.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Tóth, G.

    2015-04-01

    In the heliosheath (HS), Voyager 2 has observed a flow with constant radial velocity and magnetic flux conservation. Voyager 1, however, has observed a decrease in the flow’s radial velocity and an order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux. We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variation of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic flux within the HS using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN and interplanetary scintillations data and implemented solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27 day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database. With the inclusion of the solar cycle time-dependent magnetic field intensity, the model matches the observed intensity of the magnetic field in the HS along both Voyager 1 and 2. This is a significant improvement from the same model without magnetic field solar cycle variations, which was over a factor of two larger. The model accurately predicts the radial velocity observed by Voyager 2; however, the model predicts a flow speed ˜100 km s-1 larger than that derived from LECP measurements at Voyager 1. In the model, magnetic flux is conserved along both Voyager trajectories, contrary to observations. This implies that the solar cycle variations in solar wind magnetic field observed at 1 AU does not cause the order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux observed in the Voyager 1 data.

  11. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Aerospace Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Robertson, Tony; Hawk, Clark W.; Turner, Matt; Koelfgen, Syri

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate system level performance and design issues associated with magnetic flux compression devices for aerospace power generation and propulsion. The proposed concept incorporates the principles of magnetic flux compression for direct conversion of nuclear/chemical detonation energy into electrical power. Specifically a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stator structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). The expanding plasma cloud is entirely confined by the compressed magnetic field at the expense of internal kinetic energy. Electrical power is inductively extracted, and the detonation products are collimated and expelled through a magnetic nozzle. The long-term development of this highly integrated generator/propulsion system opens up revolutionary NASA Mission scenarios for future interplanetary and interstellar spacecraft. The unique features of this concept with respect to future space travel opportunities are as follows: ability to implement high energy density chemical detonations or ICF microfusion bursts as the impulsive diamagnetic plasma source; high power density system characteristics constrain the size, weight, and cost of the vehicle architecture; provides inductive storage pulse power with a very short pulse rise time; multimegajoule energy bursts/terawatt power bursts; compact pulse power driver for low-impedance dense plasma devices; utilization of low cost HTSC material and casting technology to increase magnetic flux conservation and inductive energy storage; improvement in chemical/nuclear-to-electric energy conversion efficiency and the ability to generate significant levels of thrust with very high specific impulse; potential for developing a small, lightweight, low cost, self-excited integrated propulsion and power system suitable for space stations, planetary bases, and interplanetary and interstellar space travel

  12. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  13. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domainsmore » on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.« less

  14. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan

    2015-07-15

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  15. Solving the problem of magnetic flux transport during star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos de Lima, Reinaldo; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Guerrero, Gustavo; Leao, Marcia; Lazarian, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Fast magnetic reconnection is an omnipresent process in turbulent astrophysical flows. It allows the magnetic flux to diffuse through the gas even when the electrical conductivity is very high. Recently we have tested this diffusive mechanism (termed Reconnection Diffusion, RD) for solving two intriguing problems related to star formation: (i) the removal of magnetic flux from collapsing molecular clouds in order to explain the observed magnetic field intensities in protostars, and (ii) the formation of rotationally sustained protostellar disks in the presence of the magnetic fields, which tend to remove all the angular momentum. Using 3D MHD simulations we have demonstrated successfully the efficiency of the RD in both problems. More recently, we have also identified the conditions under which RD is able to produce supercritical cores from self-gravitating subcritical molecular cloud clumps. In this presentation we review the RD theory and the results of our numerical studies in different phases of star formation. We also derive the RD coefficient from the numerical simulations and compare with the theoretical predictions

  16. Quantifying the dynamic evolution of individual arched magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, E. V.; Bellan, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Highly dynamic arched ‘loops’ of plasma were created in the laboratory with a magnetized plasma gun. The magnetic structure of the loops was found to be consistent with that of an expanding flux tube subject to a kink instability. High-speed flows were found to transport plasma along the loop axis, from both footpoints toward the apex of the arched loop. Two complementary MHD models were used to explain the expansion and axial flows, both of which scale in proportion to a ‘toroidal Alfven speed’.

  17. Plasma observations and magnetic flux conservation in the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    Voyager 2 has observed the plasma in the heliosheath from 84 to 101 AU. This paper presents recent observations which show that the speed of the solar wind has been constant across the heliosheath but the flow direction is changing. The flow is now about 60 degrees from radial, mostly in the azimuthal direction. The density decreased in 2008 by a factor of two, but recovered in 2011; this change may be a solar cycle effect. The magnetic flux is conserved at V2 as expected, but at V1 it decreases significantly as the flow slows approaching the stagnation region. The decrease could be due to reconnection in this region removing magnetic flux.

  18. Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Previously, from analysis of SOHO/EIT coronal images in combination with Kitt Peak magnetograms (Falconer et al 1998, ApJ, 501, 386-396), we found that the quiet corona is the sum of two components: the e-scale corona and the coronal network. The large-scale corona consists of all coronal-temperature (T approx. 10(exp 6) K) structures larger than supergranules (>approx.30,000 km). The coronal network (1) consists of all coronal-temperature structures smaller than supergranules, (2) is rooted in and loosely traces the photospheric magnetic network, (3) has its brightest features seated on polarity dividing fines (neutral lines) in the network magnetic flux, and (4) produces only about 5% of the total coronal emission in quiet regions. The heating of the coronal network is apparently magnetic in origin. Here, from analysis of EIT coronal images of quiet regions in combination with magnetograms of the same quiet regions from SOHO/MDI and from Kitt Peak, we examine the other 95% of the quiet corona and its relation to the underlying magnetic network. We find: (1) Dividing the large-scale corona into its bright and dim halves divides the area into bright "continents" and dark "oceans" having spans of 2-4 supergranules. (2) These patterns are also present in the photospheric magnetograms: the network is stronger under the bright half and weaker under the dim half. (3) The radiation from the large-scale corona increases roughly as the cube root of the magnetic flux content of the underlying magnetic network. In contrast, Fisher et A (1998, ApJ, 508, 985-998) found that the coronal radiation from an active region increases roughly linearly with the magnetic flux content of the active region. We assume, as is widely held, that nearly all of the large-scale corona is magnetically rooted in the network. Our results, together with the result of Fisher et al (1999), suggest that either the coronal heating in quiet regions has a large non-magnetic component, or, if the heating

  19. Alternative magnetic flux leakage modalities for pipeline inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Katragadda, G.; Lord, W.; Sun, Y.S.; Udpa, S.; Udpa, L.

    1996-05-01

    Increasing quality consciousness is placing higher demands on the accuracy and reliability of inspection systems used in defect detection and characterization. Nondestructive testing techniques often rely on using multi-transducer approaches to obtain greater defect sensitivity. This paper investigates the possibility of taking advantage of alternative modalities associated with the standard magnetic flux leakage tool to obtain additional defect information, while still using a single excitation source.

  20. Magnetic and Electric Flux Quanta: the Pion Mass

    SciTech Connect

    P Cameron

    2011-12-31

    The angular momentum of the magnetic flux quantum is balanced by that of the associated supercurrent, such that in condensed matter the resultant angular momentum is zero. The notion of a flux quantum in free space is not so simple, needing both magnetic and electric flux quanta to propagate the stable dynamic structure of the photon. Considering these flux quanta at the scale where quantum field theory becomes essential, at the scale defined by the reduced Compton wavelength of the electron, exposes variants of a paradox that apparently has not been addressed in the literature. Leaving the paradox unresolved in this note, reasonable electromagnetic rationales are presented that permit to calculate the masses of the electron, muon, pion, and nucleon with remarkable accuracy. The calculated mass of the electron is correct at the nine significant digit limit of experimental accuracy, the muon at a part in one thousand, the pion at two parts in ten thousand, and the nucleon at seven parts in one hundred thousand. The accuracy of the pion and nucleon mass calculations reinforces the unconventional common notion that the strong force is electromagnetic in origin.

  1. Influence of High Harmonics of Magnetic Fields on Trapped Magnetic Fluxes in HTS Bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, K.; Miyagi, D.; Tsukamoto, O.

    Various kinds of HTS bulk motors are proposed and have been developed. Generally, those motors are driven by semiconductor inverters and currents fed to the armature windings contain high harmonics. Therefore, the bulks are exposed to high harmonics magnetic fields and AC losses are produced in the bulks. The AC losses deteriorate the efficiency of the motors and cause temperature rise of the bulks which decrease the trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulks. Usually, electro-magnetic shielding devices are inserted between the bulks and armature windings. However, the shielding devices degrade compactness of the motors. Therefore, it is important to have knowledge of the influence of the high harmonics magnetic fields on the AC losses and trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulk for optimum design of the shielding devices. In this work, the authors experimentally study the influence of high harmonics magnetic fields.

  2. Magnetic flux transport of decaying active regions and enhanced magnetic network. [of solar supergranulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Haimin; Zirin, Harold; Ai, Guoxiang

    1991-01-01

    Several series of coordinated observations on decaying active regions and enhanced magnetic network regions on the sun were carried out jointly at Big Bear Solar Observatory and at the Huairou Solar Observing Station of the Bejing Astronomical Observatory in China. The magnetic field evolution in several regions was followed closely for three to seven days. The magnetic flux transport from the remnants of decayed active regions was studied, along with the evolution and lifetime of the magnetic network which defines the boundaries of supergranules. The magnetic flux transport in an enhanced network region was studied in detail and found to be negative. Also briefly described are some properties of moving magnetic features around a sunspot. Results of all of the above studies are presented.

  3. Enhanced magnetic flux density mapping using coherent steady state equilibrium signal in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Lee, Mun Bae; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the z-component of magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) induced by transversally injected current, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) aims to visualize electrical property (current density and/or conductivity distribution) in a three-dimensional imaging object. For practical implementations of MREIT technique, it is critical to reduce injection of current pulse within safety requirements. With the goal of minimizing the noise level in measured Bz data, we propose a new method to enhance the measure Bz data using steady-state coherent gradient multi-echo (SSC-GME) MR pulse sequence combining with injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method in MREIT, where the ICNE technique injects current during a readout gradient to maximize the signal intensity of phase signal including Bz. The total phase offset in SSC-GME includes additional magnetic flux density due to the injected current, which is different from the phase signal for the conventional spoiled MR pulse sequence. We decompose the magnetization precession phase from the total phase offset including Bz and optimize Bz data using the steady-state equilibrium signal. Results from a real phantom experiment including different kinds of anomalies demonstrated that the proposed method enhanced Bz comparing to a conventional spoiled pulse sequence.

  4. Magnetic flux concentrations from dynamo-generated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, S.; Brandenburg, A.; Losada, I. R.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The mean-field theory of magnetized stellar convection gives rise to two distinct instabilities: the large-scale dynamo instability, operating in the bulk of the convection zone and a negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI) operating in the strongly stratified surface layers. The latter might be important in connection with magnetic spot formation. However, as follows from theoretical analysis, the growth rate of NEMPI is suppressed with increasing rotation rates. On the other hand, recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) have shown a subsequent increase in the growth rate. Aims: We examine quantitatively whether this increase in the growth rate of NEMPI can be explained by an α2 mean-field dynamo, and whether both NEMPI and the dynamo instability can operate at the same time. Methods: We use both DNS and mean-field simulations (MFS) to solve the underlying equations numerically either with or without an imposed horizontal field. We use the test-field method to compute relevant dynamo coefficients. Results: DNS show that magnetic flux concentrations are still possible up to rotation rates above which the large-scale dynamo effect produces mean magnetic fields. The resulting DNS growth rates are quantitatively reproduced with MFS. As expected for weak or vanishing rotation, the growth rate of NEMPI increases with increasing gravity, but there is a correction term for strong gravity and large turbulent magnetic diffusivity. Conclusions: Magnetic flux concentrations are still possible for rotation rates above which dynamo action takes over. For the solar rotation rate, the corresponding turbulent turnover time is about 5 h, with dynamo action commencing in the layers beneath.

  5. Nonlinear evolution of magnetic flux ropes. 2: Finite beta plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    In this second paper on the evolution of magnetic flux ropes we study the effects of gas pressure. We assume that the energy transport is described by a polytropic relationship and reduce the set of ideal MHD equations to a single, second-order, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation for the evolution function. For this conservative system we obtain a first integral of motion. To analyze the possible motions, we use a mechanical analogue -- a one-dimensional, nonlinear oscillator. We find that the effective potential for such an oscillator depends on two parameters: the polytropic index gamma and a dimensionless quantity kappa the latter being a function of the plasma beta, the strength of the azimuthal magnetic field relative to the axial field of the flux rope, and gamma. Through a study of this effective potential we classify all possible modes of evolution of the system. In the main body of the paper, we focus on magnetic flux ropes whose field and gas pressure increase steadily towards the symmetry axis. In this case, for gamma greater than 1 and all values of kappa, only oscillations are possible. For gamma less than 1, however, both oscillations and expansion are allowed. For gamma less than 1 and kappa below a critical value, the energy of the nonlinear oscillator determines whether the flux rope will oscillate or expand to infinity. For gamma less than 1 and kappa above critical, however, only expansion occurs. Thus by increasing kappa while keeping gamma fixed (less than 1), a phase transition occurs at kappa = kappa(sub critical) and the oscillatory mode disappears. We illustrate the above theoretical considerations by the example of a flux rope of constant field line twist evolving self-similarly. For this example, we present the full numerical MHD solution. In an appendix to the paper we catalogue all possible evolutions when (1) either the magnetic field or (2) the gas pressure decreases monotonically toward the axis. We find that in these cases

  6. A magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the formation of magnetic flux tubes at the earth's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1989-01-01

    Dayside magnetic reconnection was studied by using a three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. Two different mechanisms were found for the formation of magnetic flux tubes at the dayside magnetopause, which depend on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The dayside magnetic flux tubes occur only when the IMF has a southward component. A strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tube similar to magnetic flux ropes appears at the subsolar magnetopause when the IMF has a large B(y) component. When the B(y) component is small, twin flux tubes appear at the dayside magnetopause. Both types of magnetic flux tube are consistent with several observational features of flux transfer events and are generated by antiparallel magnetic reconnection.

  7. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  8. Anisotropy study of grain oriented steels with Magnetic Barkhausen Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, M. F.; Campos, M. A.; Landgraf, F. J. G.; Padovese, L. R.

    2011-07-01

    Grain oriented electrical steels present strong anisotropy, due to a {110} <001> texture (Goss), with [100] direction parallel to rolling direction (RD) and [110] direction parallel to transverse direction (TD). MBN (Magnetic Barkhausen Noise) were employed to measure magnetic properties in several angles towards RD using a 15° step. For 90° to the rolling direction (i.e., TD), the MBN signal changes, decreasing the MBNrms. It is found a connection between initial permeability and MBNrms. The lower initial permeability for the TD is related to a larger contribution of irreversible rotation in the hysteresis. The MBN procedure is non-destructive and provides rapid understanding of the anisotropy of the material, without the use of laborious methods like Epstein frame or toroidal coils.

  9. Application of the flux noise reducing filter for CO2 inverse modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, Shamil; Yaremchuk, Alexey

    2010-05-01

    Recent atmospheric remote sensing products from AIRS and GOSAT provide large volume of the observations but with larger errors and variance as compared to in-situ measurements, so efficient noise reduction techniques are required for inverse modeling of the surface fluxes. Inverse models of the atmospheric transport optimize regional or grid resolving surface CO2 fluxes to fit transport model simulation optimally to the observations. The optimization problem appears to be ill-posed so it is usually solved by applying regularization techniques. Most widely used regularization methods apply constraints on flux deviation from prior and/or from adjacent regions of same surface type (land-ocean, vegetation type), and from adjacent time periods. Convenient method for solving the problem of limited dimension is based on singular value decomposition (SVD) of the transport matrix, because it can decompose the solution space into a combination of the independent singular vectors. Introducing a simple constraint on fluxes limits amplitude of the corresponding singular vectors with larger reduction for smaller singular values. However this amplitude reduction is not sufficient in practice for inverse modeling of the regional CO2 fluxes, when we have large underconstrained regions in tropics. Alternatively other means of the amplitude reduction are also used, such as truncation, when all amplitudes below threshold singular value are set to zero. We apply a filter which is less abrupt is less abrupt compared to truncation but still suppressing strongly small singular value related vectors. Setting strength of a constraint is often done empirically. To decide a proper value of the cut-off singular value we suggest analyzing a dependence of the singular vector amplitude vs the singular value and set the cut-off value aiming at retaining most of useful information from observation. A graphical tool based on a plot of amplitude spectra is proposed. Advantage of the technique is

  10. Stochastic Flux-Freezing and Turbulent Magnetic Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, G. L.

    2010-12-01

    “Spontaneous stochasticity” of Lagrangian particle trajectories is a long-overlooked consequence of the explosive separation of particles undergoing turbulent Richardson diffusion. The effect implies a breakdown of Laplacian determinism for classical dynamics, with infinitely many (random) trajectories for the same initial particle position. We discuss the theoretical basis and empirical evidence for the phenomenon. Spontaneous stochasticity implies that magnetic field-lines cannot be ``frozen-in’’ to a turbulent MHD fluid (plasma or liquid metal) in the original sense of Alfvén, even at infinite conductivity if also the kinetic Reynolds number is large. We show that systems described by resistive nonlinear hydromagnetic equations (MHD, Hall MHD, etc.) satisfy a stochastic Alfvén Theorem and we use this result to argue that flux-conservation must remain stochastic at infinite Reynolds numbers. The predictions of standard flux-freezing are thus found to be wrong---by many orders of magnitude---in high-Reynolds-number MHD turbulence. Stochastic flux-freezing has fundamental consequences for many astrophysical problems, such as planetary and solar dynamos, star formation, solar flares, etc. As one example, we present numerical results on the kinematic, fluctuation dynamo in non-helical, incompressible turbulence at magnetic Prandtl number Pr=1, using a Lagrangian particle method with a hydrodynamic turbulence database at Re_λ=433. We find that Richardson diffusion and stochasticity of field-line motion play an essential role in magnetic energy growth. The Lagrangian mechanisms of small-scale dynamo are found to be very similar to those in the soluble Kazantsev model at Pr=0. We also discuss briefly the application of stochastic flux-freezing to the problem of fast magnetic reconnection. We use the phenomenological Goldreich-Sridhar 1995 theory to estimate the dispersion of particle-pairs in strong MHD turbulence with an imposed magnetic field. We then

  11. Magnetic Reconnection During Flux Conversion in a Driven Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E B; Kopriva, T A; Cohen, B I; Hill, D N; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Woodruff, S; Sovinec, C R

    2005-06-07

    During buildup of a spheromak by helicity injection, magnetic reconnection converts toroidal flux into poloidal flux. This physics is explored in the resistive magnetohydrodynamic code, NIMROD [C.R. Sovinec, A.H. Glasser, T.A. Gianakon, D.C. Barnes, R.A. Nebel, S.E. Kruger, D.D. Schnack, S.J. Plimpton, A. Tarditi, and M.S. Chu, J. Comp. Phys., 195, 355-386 (2004)], which reveals negative current sheets with {lambda} = {mu}{sub 0}j {center_dot} B/B{sup 2}reversed relative to the applied current. The simulated event duration is consistent with magnetic diffusion on the sheet thickness and is accompanied by cathode voltage spikes and poloidal field increases similar to those seen in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. All magnetic fieldlines are open during reconnection and their trajectories are very sensitive to their starting points, resulting in chaos. The current sheets are most intense inside the separatrix near the X-point of the mean-field spheromak, suggesting that the reconnection occurs near fieldlines which are closed in the azimuthal average.

  12. The effect of an interaction of magnetic flux and supergranulation on the decay of magnetic plages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrijver, C. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper studies how the properties of large-scale convection affect the decay of plages. The plage decay, caused by the random-walk dispersion of flux tubes, is suggested to be severely affected by differences between the mean size of cellular openings within and around plages. The smaller cell size within a plage largely explains the smaller diffusion coefficient within plages as compared to that of the surrounding regions. The semipermeability of the plage periphery, together with the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the flux-tube density, can explain the observed slow decay of plages (predicting a typical life time of about a month for a medium-sized plage), the existence of a well-defined plage periphery, and the observed characteristic mean magnetic flux density of about 100 G. One effect of the slowed decay of the plage by the semipermeability of the plage periphery is the increase of the fraction of the magnetic flux that can cancel with flux of the opposite polarity along the neutral line to as much as 80 percent as compared to at most 50 percent in the case of nonuniform diffusion. This may explain why only a small fraction of the magnetic flux is observed to escape from the plage into the surrounding network.

  13. Supergranular-scale magnetic flux emergence beneath an unstable filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Guerrero, A.; Saiz, E.; Cerrato, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Aims: Here we report evidence of a large solar filament eruption on 2013, September 29. This smooth eruption, which passed without any previous flare, formed after a two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection towards Earth. The coronal mass ejection generated a moderate geomagnetic storm on 2013, October 2 with very serious localized effects. The whole event passed unnoticed to flare-warning systems. Methods: We have conducted multi-wavelength analyses of the Solar Dynamics Observatory through Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. The AIA data on 304, 193, 211, and 94 Å sample the transition region and the corona, respectively, while HMI provides photospheric magnetograms, continuum, and linear polarization data, in addition to the fully inverted data provided by HMI. Results: This flux emergence happened very close to a filament barb that was very active in mass motion, as seen in 304 Å images. The observed flux emergence exhibited hectogauss values. The flux emergence extent appeared just beneath the filament, and the filament rose during the following hours. The emergence acquired a size of 33'' in ~12 h, about ~0.16 km s-1. The rate of signed magnetic flux is around 2 × 1017 Mx min-1 for each polarity. We have also studied the eruption speed, size, and dynamics. The mean velocity of the rising filament during the ~40 min previous to the flare is 115 ± 5 km s-1, and the subsequent acceleration in this period is 0.049 ± 0.001 km s-2. Conclusions: We have observed a supergranular-sized emergence close to a large filament in the boundary of the active region NOAA11850. Filament dynamics and magnetogram results suggest that the magnetic flux emergence takes place in the photospheric level below the filament. Reconnection occurs underneath the filament between the dipped lines that support the filament and the supergranular emergence. The very smooth ascent is probably caused by this emergence and torus instability

  14. System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2006-08-15

    A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

  15. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  16. Magnetic Reconnection Indicated in Jupiter's H3+ Auroral Flux Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Takehiko; Connerney, J. E.; Morioka, A.; Tokumaru, M.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-10-01

    Due to its complexity, the production mechanism of Jupiter's powerful aurora is to date not very well understood. Possible correlation with the solar wind has been one of such unsolved problems (Prange et al. 1993; Baron et al., 1996; Gurnet et al., 2002). We analyzed several sets of ground-based infrared data of Jupiter's H3+ aurora, acquired at NASA/IRTF atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii during 1998-2000 seasons. Night-to-night variations of total auroral flux are measured in images and are compared with the solar wind parameters at Jupiter's orbit. The solar wind parameters used in this study have been numerically inferred using a MHD tomography based on the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations (Hayashi et al., 2003).This method reconstructs the global structure of corotating solar wind assuming that such structure exists steadily during one Carrington rotation. Because of this assumption, transient changes of the solar wind can not be reproduced. As Jupiter's H3+ aurora is believed to reflect "time-averaged" magnetospheric activities, the solar wind parameters with 1-day time resolution is still a useful index. We evaluated the solar-wind dynamic pressure P and the reconnection voltage φ (Nichols et al., 2006) for the period of auroral observations. These two quantities are then converted to possible changes of magnetic flux density in Jupiter's magnetosphere. Neither of these two can explain the auroral flux vatiations solely. However, it is found that combining these two quantities (with slight adjustments) could better explain the increases/decreases of auroral flux. Amplitudes of the auroral flux variations, as well as uncertainties due to "extrapolation" of solar wind parameters to Jupiter's orbit will be discussed.

  17. Spectral features of background ULF noise during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotik, Dmitry; Ermakova, Elena; Ryabov, Alexander; Shchecoldin, Aexander

    The monitoring of tangential components of ULF noise below first Schumann resonance was permanently provided since 2003 up to now at mid-latitude station New Life (56N, 44,7E). The regular structure in ULF spectrograms named SRS -spectral resonance structure could be observed practically every night excepting years of solar activity maximum. The SRS appears in the ULF noise due existing the resonator for Alfven waves in the ionosphere at heights from the bottom up to 600 -1000 km [1]. It was noticed that during magnetically disturbed time the strong anti-correlation between the intensity of SRS events and K index from station on neighbor magnetic meridian [2]. For more detail investigation it was choused several magnetic storms. First one is storm witch has began at November 20, 2003 with maximum Kp=9 (strong), second -at March 19, 2006 with Kp=6+ (moderate) and the third -at November 25, 2008 with Kp=5 (weak). The spectra of magnetic component amplitude and polarization parameter were analyzed. The comparison with ionosond and magnetic field data as well as world TEC maps for mentioned storm periods were made. The dynamics of changing the properties of ULF spectra during the storms were explored. The general regularities of these changes were displayed. One of the prominent feathers appeared at the end of the strong and moderate storms looked like fish shoals. Perhaps this kind of ULF bursts is the same nature as well known pearls pulsation but displayed in broad frequency range 1-6 Hz. May be it could be classified as special spectral structure. The analysis of changing the properties of ULF spectra during the storms together with geo-physical data has shown that the main regularities in changes the SRS caused by changing of the ionospheric parameters above the observation point. But some of ULF spectral features are results of interaction waves and particles in the magnetosphere. 1. Belyaev P.P., Polyakov S.V., Ermakova E.N., Isaev S.V. Solar cycle variations in

  18. Decoupling suspension controller based on magnetic flux feedback.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output) state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module's antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced. PMID:23844415

  19. Decoupling Suspension Controller Based on Magnetic Flux Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output) state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module's antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced. PMID:23844415

  20. Tracking of magnetic flux concentrations over a five-day observation, and an insight into surface magnetic flux transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    The solar dynamo problem is the question of how the cyclic variation in the solar magnetic field is maintained. One of the important processes is the transport of magnetic flux by surface convection. To reveal this process, the dependence of the squared displacement of magnetic flux concentrations on the elapsed time is investigated in this paper via a feature-recognition technique and a continual five-day magnetogram. This represents the longest time scale over which a satellite observation has ever been performed for this problem. The dependence is found to follow a power law and differ significantly from that of diffusion transport. Furthermore, there is a change in the behavior at a spatial scale of 103.8 km. A super-diffusion behavior with an index of 1.4 is found at smaller scales, while changing to a sub-diffusion behavior with an index of 0.6 on larger ones. We interpret this difference in the transport regime as coming from the network-flow pattern.

  1. The distribution mechanism of noise fluxes between three oscillating modes of a free-running class-A laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilzadeh, E.; Jahanpanah, J.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we have extended the noise features of a class-A laser from the single-mode state with one oscillating freedom to the three-mode state with three oscillating freedoms. The laser noise is modeled by the cavity Langevin force in the absence of other two atomic population inversion and dipole moment Langevin forces. The Maxwell-Bloch equations of motion are thus solved in the presence of three cavity Langevin forces associated with the simultaneous oscillations of cavity central mode and its left and right adjacent modes. Therefore, the phase and amplitude fluctuations of electric field components that are oscillating at the three consecutive longitudinal modes have analytically been calculated in frequency domain. The results of our calculations indicate that the cavity Langevin force of each of three oscillating modes makes a direct contribution in producing the noise fluxes of other two oscillating modes. We have also determined the exact share of each oscillating mode in the total output intensity noise spectra of a three-mode laser. It is finally demonstrated that the input noise flux of laser pumping is distributed between the output noise fluxes of spontaneous and stimulated emission radiations of three oscillating modes according to the flux conservation law.

  2. Magnetic Field-line Twist and Length Distributions inside Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang; Qiu, Jiong; Krucker, Sam

    2015-04-01

    ​We report on the detailed and systematic study of field-line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method is utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model and the commonly known Lundquist (linear force-free) model to reveal the close relation between the field-line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in-situ spacecraft magnetic field and plasma measurements. In particular, we utilize energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU together with associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft to provide unique measurements of magnetic field-line lengths within selected ICME events. These direct measurements are compared with flux-rope model calculations to help assess the fidelity of different models and to provide diagnostics of internal structures. We show that our initial analysis of field-line twist indicates clear deviation from the Lundquist model, but better consistency with the Gold-Hoyle model. By using the different flux-rope models, we conclude that the in-situ direct measurements of field-line lengths are consistent with a flux-rope structure with spiral field lines of constant and low twist, largely different from that of the Lundquist model, especially for relatively large-scale flux ropes. We will also discuss the implications of our analysis of flux-rope structures on the origination and evolution processes in their corresponding solar source regions.

  3. Magnetic flux emergence, flares, and coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Schmieder, Brigitte; Cristiani, Germán; Demoulin, Pascal; Guo, Yang

    We study the violent events occurring in the cluster of two active regions (ARs), NOAA numbers 11121 and 11123, observed in November 2010 with instruments onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory and from Earth. Within one day the total magnetic flux increased by 70 per cent with the emergence of new groups of bipoles in AR 11123. These emergences led to a very complex magnetic configuration in which around ten solar flares, some of them accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), occurred. A magnetic-field topology somputation indicates the presence of null points, associated separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) where magnetic reconnection is prone to occur. Based on this analysis, we propose a scenario to explain the origin of a low-energy event preceding a filament eruption, which is accompanied by a two-ribbon flare and CME, and a consecutive confined flare in AR 11123. The results of our topology computation can also explain the locations of flare ribbons in two other events, one preceding and one following the ones just mentioned.

  4. C IV fluxes from the Sun as a star, and the correlation with magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Linsky, J. L.; Bennett, J.; Brown, A.; Saar, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    A total of 144 C IV wavelength 1548 Solar Maximum Mission (SMM)-UVSP spectroheliograms of solar plages were analyzed, some of which are series of exposures of the same region on the same day. Also analyzed were the C IV wavelength 1551 rasters of plages and C IV wavelength 1548 rasters of the quiet sun. The sample contained data on 17 different plages, observed on 50 different days. The center-to-limb variations of the active regions show that the optical thickness effects in the C IV wavelength 1548 line can be neglected in the conversion from intensity to flux density. As expected for the nearly optically thin situation, the C IV wavelength 1548 line is twice as bright as the C IV 1551 line. The average C IV wavelength 1548 flux density for a quiet region is 2700 ergs/cm/s and, with surprisingly little scatter, 18,000 erg/cm/s for plages. The intensity histograms of rasters obtained at disk center can be separated into characteristic plage and quiet sun contributions with variable relative filling factors. The relationship between the C IV and magnetic flux densities for spatially resolved data is inferred to be almost the same, with only an additional factor of order unity in the constant of proportionality.

  5. Exponentially localized Wannier functions in periodic zero flux magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nittis, G.; Lein, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, we investigate conditions which ensure the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis for a given periodic hamiltonian. We extend previous results [Panati, G., Ann. Henri Poincare 8, 995-1011 (2007), 10.1007/s00023-007-0326-8] to include periodic zero flux magnetic fields which is the setting also investigated by Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. The new notion of magnetic symmetry plays a crucial rôle; to a large class of symmetries for a non-magnetic system, one can associate "magnetic" symmetries of the related magnetic system. Observing that the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis is equivalent to the triviality of the so-called Bloch bundle, a rank m hermitian vector bundle over the Brillouin zone, we prove that magnetic time-reversal symmetry is sufficient to ensure the triviality of the Bloch bundle in spatial dimension d = 1, 2, 3. For d = 4, an exponentially localized Wannier basis exists provided that the trace per unit volume of a suitable function of the Fermi projection vanishes. For d > 4 and d ⩽ 2m (stable rank regime) only the exponential localization of a subset of Wannier functions is shown; this improves part of the analysis of Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. Finally, for d > 4 and d > 2m (unstable rank regime) we show that the mere analysis of Chern classes does not suffice in order to prove triviality and thus exponential localization.

  6. The continuum intensity as a function of magnetic field. II. Local magnetic flux and convective flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, P.; Solanki, S. K.; Borrero, J. M.

    2012-06-01

    Context. To deepen our understanding of the role of small-scale magnetic fields in active regions (ARs) and in the quiet Sun (QS) on the solar irradiance, it is fundamental to investigate the physical processes underlying their continuum brightness. Previous results showed that magnetic elements in the QS reach larger continuum intensities than in ARs at disk center, but left this difference unexplained. Aims: We use Hinode/SP disk center data to study the influence of the local amount of magnetic flux on the vigour of the convective flows and the continuum intensity contrasts. Methods: The apparent (i.e. averaged over a pixel) longitudinal field strength and line-of-sight (LOS) plasma velocity were retrieved by means of Milne-Eddington inversions (VFISV code). We analyzed a series of boxes taken over AR plages and the QS, to determine how the continuum intensity contrast of magnetic elements, the amplitude of the vertical flows and the box-averaged contrast were affected by the mean longitudinal field strength in the box (which scales with the total unsigned flux in the box). Results: Both the continuum brightness of the magnetic elements and the dispersion of the LOS velocities anti-correlate with the mean longitudinal field strength. This can be attributed to the "magnetic patches" (here defined as areas where the longitudinal field strength is above 100 G) carrying most of the flux in the boxes. There the velocity amplitude and the spatial scale of convection are reduced. Due to this hampered convective transport, these patches appear darker than their surroundings. Consequently, the average brightness of a box decreases as the the patches occupy a larger fraction of it and the amount of embedded flux thereby increases. Conclusions: Our results suggest that as the magnetic flux increases locally (e.g. from weak network to strong plage), the heating of the magnetic elements is reduced by the intermediate of a more suppressed convective energy transport within

  7. Magnetically coupled quantum-flux-latch with wide operation margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Naoki; Takeuchi, Naoki; Narama, Tatsuya; Ortlepp, Thomas; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-11-01

    We have been developing adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) circuits as an ultra-low-power superconductor logic for energy-efficient computing. In a previous study, we proposed and demonstrated a quantum-flux-latch (QFL), which is a compact and compatible latch for AQFP logic. The QFL is composed of an AQFP buffer gate and a storage loop, which are directly connected to each other. However, the operation margins were not sufficiently wide due to a trade-off between the operation margins of the storage loop and that of the buffer gate. In this present study, we propose a magnetically coupled QFL (MC-QFL), where the storage loop and the buffer gate are physically separated and magnetically coupled to each other to eliminate the trade-off in the operation margins. The simulation results showed that the critical parameter margin of the MC-QFL is twice as large as that of the previously designed QFL. For comparison, we fabricated and demonstrated both the previously designed QFL and the newly designed MC-QFL. The measurement results showed that the MC-QFL has wider operation margins compared with the previously designed QFL.

  8. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  9. Plasma Flows Observed in Magnetic Flux Concentrations and Sunspot Fine Structure Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, Thomas R.

    2004-04-01

    We present diffraction-limited observations of magnetic flux concentrations and penumbral and umbral fine structure within an active region observed at disk center. We recorded G-band images, magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and narrowband filtergrams, using the Universal Birefringent Filter (UBF) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). The National Solar Observatory (NSO) adaptive optics system at the DST was used to achieve diffraction-limited long-exposure imaging with a high signal-to-noise ratio. The main results can be summarized as follows: Strong and spatially narrow downflows are observed at the edge of magnetic structures, such as small flux concentrations (sometimes also referred to as flux tubes), pores, a light bridge, and the sunspot umbrae. For the particular sunspot observed, we find strong evidence for what appear to be vigorous, small-scale convection patterns in a light bridge. We observe extremely narrow (<0.2") channels or sheets of downflowing plasma. Flux concentrations as seen in intensity expand from a height close to where the continuum is formed to the height of formation for the G band. These observations indicate that the G band forms in the mid-photosphere. We are able to identify individual penumbral fibrils in our data and find a bright (hot) upflow and a more vertical field structure at the filament footpoint near the umbral boundary. The observations are consistent with a filament geometry in which the field and flow turn to a nearly horizontal, dark structure over a distance of about 0.2". In the deep photosphere we observe strong upflows of the order of 1 km s-1 in umbral dots. We compare our results with theoretical model predictions.

  10. Influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in API5L steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ortiz, P.; Pérez-Benítez, J. A.; Espina-Hernández, J. H.; Caleyo, F.; Mehboob, N.; Grössinger, R.; Hallen, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    This work studies the influence of the maximum applied magnetic field on the angular dependence of the energy of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal in three different API5L pipeline steels. The results show that the shape of the angular dependence of the Magnetic Barkhausen Noise energy changes with the increase of the amplitude of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon is a consequence of the presence of unlike magnetization processes at different magnitudes of the applied magnetic field. The outcomes reveal the importance of controlling the value of the maximum applied field as parameter for the improvement of the MBN angular dependence measurements.

  11. Rapid single-flux-quantum circuits for low noise mK operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intiso, Samuel; Pekola, Jukka; Savin, Alexander; Devyatov, Ygor; Kidiyarova-Shevchenko, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Rapid single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) technology has been proposed as control electronics for superconducting quantum bits because of the material and working temperature compatibility. In this work, we consider practical aspects of RSFQ circuit design for low noise low power operation. At the working temperature of 20 mK and operational frequency of 2 GHz, dissipated power per junction is reduced to 25 pW by using 6 µA critical current junctions available at the Hypres and VTT low Jc fabrication process. To limit phonon temperature to 30 mK, a maximum of 40 junctions can be placed on a 5 mm × 5 mm chip. Electron temperature in resistive shunts of Josephson junctions is minimized by use of cooling fins, giving minimum electron temperatures of about 150 mK for the Hypres process and 70 mK for the VTT process.

  12. Diffusion of Magnetic Field and Removal of Magnetic Flux from Clouds Via Turbulent Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Lima, R.; Lazarian, A.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Cho, J.

    2010-05-01

    The diffusion of astrophysical magnetic fields in conducting fluids in the presence of turbulence depends on whether magnetic fields can change their topology via reconnection in highly conducting media. Recent progress in understanding fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of turbulence reassures that the magnetic field behavior in computer simulations and turbulent astrophysical environments is similar, as far as magnetic reconnection is concerned. This makes it meaningful to perform MHD simulations of turbulent flows in order to understand the diffusion of magnetic field in astrophysical environments. Our studies of magnetic field diffusion in turbulent medium reveal interesting new phenomena. First of all, our three-dimensional MHD simulations initiated with anti-correlating magnetic field and gaseous density exhibit at later times a de-correlation of the magnetic field and density, which corresponds well to the observations of the interstellar media. While earlier studies stressed the role of either ambipolar diffusion or time-dependent turbulent fluctuations for de-correlating magnetic field and density, we get the effect of permanent de-correlation with one fluid code, i.e., without invoking ambipolar diffusion. In addition, in the presence of gravity and turbulence, our three-dimensional simulations show the decrease of the magnetic flux-to-mass ratio as the gaseous density at the center of the gravitational potential increases. We observe this effect both in the situations when we start with equilibrium distributions of gas and magnetic field and when we follow the evolution of collapsing dynamically unstable configurations. Thus, the process of turbulent magnetic field removal should be applicable both to quasi-static subcritical molecular clouds and cores and violently collapsing supercritical entities. The increase of the gravitational potential as well as the magnetization of the gas increases the segregation of the mass and magnetic flux in the

  13. Emergence of undulatory magnetic flux tubes by small scale reconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.

    2006-01-01

    With Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon borne observatory launched in Antarctica on January 2000, series of high spatial resolution vector magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and Hα filtergrams have been obtained in an emerging active region (AR 8844). Previous analyses of this data revealed the occurence of many short-lived and small-scale H α brightenings called 'Ellerman bombs' (EBs) within the AR. We performed an extrapolation of the field above the photosphere using the linear force-free field approximation. The analysis of the magnetic topology reveals a close connexion between the loci of EBs and the existence of "Bald patches" (BP) regions (BPs are regions where the vector magnetic field is tangential to the photosphere). Some of these EBs/BPs are magnetically connected by low-lying field lines, presenting a serpentine shape. This results leads us to conjecture that arch filament systems and active regions coronal loops do not result from the smooth emergence of large scale Ω-loops, but rather from the rise of flat undulatory flux tubes which get released from their photospheric anchorage by reconnection at BPs, which observational signature is Ellerman bombs.

  14. Investigation of the influence of magnetostriction and magnetic forces on transformer core noise and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phophongviwat, Teeraphon

    Transformer noise is of increasing environmental concern so continued efforts are being made by electrical steel and transformer producers to satisfy users by reducing the noise. Magnetostriction and magnetic forces are the main causes of transformer core noise and vibration. Understanding of the relationship from the core material to core structure and core vibration to core noise can help the design of low noise transformer cores. The most appropriate parameter for investigating the relationship between noise and vibration is sound pressure (in the unit of Pascals) in the frequency domain because it is not A-weighted. In this study, the side surfaces of transformer cores were found to emit higher noise than front and top surfaces at low magnetic induction. When the magnetic induction was increased, the effect of magnetic force increased and caused the front surfaces to emit higher noise. For three phase three limb transformer cores, the front surface of the middle limb generated higher noise than the outer limbs due to the effect of T-joint. However this does not translate higher noise level because of the phase difference of the vibration between the limbs. Due to this A-weighted sound power level of three phase, three limb transformer cores were shown to be lower than single phase transformer cores, although at the same cross sectional area and core window size the three phase cores has larger size.. A model, developed to separate the effects of magnetostriction and magnetic forces on transformer core vibration, showed that at low induction, magnetostriction is more significant than magnetic forces. The magnetic forces become more significant than magnetostriction when the induction is increased. Magnetostriction primarily depends on material and stress but magnetic forces principally depend on core building. Louder noise can be generated from a core built with low magnetostriction material than higher magnetostriction if the building tolerances are worse. The

  15. An investigation into the torque density capabilities of flux-focusing magnetic gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppalapati, Krishna Kiran

    Wind and many rotary based ocean energy conversion devices rely on a mechanical gearbox to increase their speed so as to match the requirements of the electromagnetic generator. However, mechanical gearboxes have a number of disadvantages such as the need for gear lubrication, no overload protection and the creation of acoustic noise. Frequently direct-drive generators are employed to overcome these issues, wherein the gearbox is removed and the shaft of the turbine is directly connected to the synchronous generator, either with an electrically excited or permanent magnet rotor. If the input speed to the generator is very low the torque must be very high in order to generate the necessary power. However, as the electrical loading of a synchronous generator is thermally limited, the size of the generator will become excessively large at high power levels. An alternative to these technologies is to consider replacing the mechanical gearbox with a magnetic gear. A magnetic gear can create speed change without any physical contact. It has inherent overload protection, and its non-contact operation offers the potential for high reliability. Despite significant progress, existing magnetic gear designs do not achieve torque densities that are competitive with mechanical gearboxes. This research has focused on designing a coaxial magnetic gear that can operate at a volumetric torque density that is comparable to a mechanical gearbox. A flux-focusing rotor topology also called spoke-type rotor magnet arrangement was adopted to improve the air-gap magnetic flux density which in turn improves the torque transferred between the rotors. Finite element analysis was utilized to conduct a parameter sweep analysis of the different geometric parameters of the magnetic gear. A sub-scale magnetic gear with a diameter of 110 mm and a scaled-up magnetic gear with a diameter of 228 mm was designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated. The torque and torque density of sub

  16. A new stator-flux orientation strategy for flux-switching permanent magnet motor based on current-hysteresis control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei; Cheng, Ming; Lu, Wei; Jia, Hongyun

    2009-04-01

    A stator-flux orientation strategy based on current hysteresis for the flux-switching permanent magnet (FSPM) motor is proposed, in which the stator-PM FSPM motor is considered as a conventional rotor-PM surface-mounted motor and an equivalent rotor-orientated dq-axes synchronous reference frame is built although there are actually no rotary magnetic motive force produced by the stator magnets in the FSPM motor. Based on the proposed model, a vector-control strategy with current hysteresis for the FSPM motor drive is investigated and implemented on a dSPACE-based platform, and both the simulated and experimental results validate the effectiveness. It should be emphasized that the proposed stator-flux orientation strategy can be applied to other stator-PM machines (including doubly salient and flux-reversal PM machines) and other control methods (including space-vector pulsed-width-modification and direct torque control).

  17. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. III - The equilibrium path of the flux-tube arch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinos, Benjamin

    1990-01-01

    It is shown how to calculate the equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere when the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The equilbrium path of a static thin flux tube in an infinite stratified atmosphere generally takes the form of a symmetric arch of finite width, with the flux tube becoming vertical at either end of the arch. A siphon flow within the flux tube increases the curvature of the arched equilibrium path in order that the net magnetic tension force can balance the inertial force of the flow, which tries to straighten the flux tube. Thus, a siphon flow reduces the width of the arched equilibrium path, with faster flows producing narrower arches. The effect of the siphon flow on the equilibrium path is generally greater for flux tubes of weaker magnetic field strength. Examples of the equilibrium are shown for both isothemal and adiabatic siphon flows in thin flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere.

  18. Downstream properties of magnetic flux transfer events. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the downstream evolution of the field line tubes known as 'flux transfer events' (FTEs), whose magnetic field and plasma properties are distinct from those of the nearby unmerged magnetosheath and magnetosphere field lines. After the FTE has moved 200 earth radii down the tail, its drained portion reaches 25 earth radii radially outward from the tail boundary. It is suggested that most multiple crossings of the tail boundary observed by spacecraft are encounters with tailward-moving FTEs, thereby explaining both the behavior of boundary normals during multiple crossings and how the sign of the IMF causes the observed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the thickness of the magnetotail boundary layer.

  19. Results of railgun experiments powered by magnetic flux compression generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Deadrick, F.J.; Scudder, J.K.; Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Peterson, D.R.

    1980-10-24

    Researchers from LLNL and LANSL initiated a joint railgun research and development program to explore the potential of electromagnetic railguns to accelerate projectiles to hypervelocities. The effort was intended to determine experimentally the limits of railgun operation, to verify calculations of railgun performance, and to establish a data base at megampere currents. The program has led to the selection of a particular magnetic flux compression generator (MFCG) design for a set of initial experiments and to the design of small- and large-square bore railguns to match the expected MFCG power profile. The bore sizes are 12.7 and 50 mm, respectively. The design of the railguns and the diagnostic and data reduction techniques, followed by the results of eight experiments with the two railgun types are presented.

  20. Results of railgun experiments powered by magnetic flux compression generators

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Deadrick, J.; Scudder, J.K.; Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Peterson, D.R.

    1981-03-16

    Researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory initiated a joint railgun research and development program to explore the potential of electromagnetic railguns to accelerate projectiles to hypervelocities. The effort was intended to (1) determine experimentally the limits of railgun operation; (2) verify calculations of railgun performance; and (3) establish a data base at megampere currents. The program has led to the selection of a particular magnetic flux compression generator (MFCG) design for a set of initial experiments and the design of small- and large-square-bore railguns to match the expected MFCG power profile. The bore sizes are 12.7 and 50 mm, respectively. In this paper, the design of the railguns and the diagnostic and data reduction techniques, followed by the results of eight experiments with the two railgun types, are presented.

  1. On the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction of toroidal magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We report briefly the technical approach of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction of toroidal magnetic flux ropes, and present a case study of a multi-spacecraft magnetic cloud event on 20 November 2007.

  2. Estimates of magnetic flux, and energy balance in the plasma sheet during substorm expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    1996-01-01

    The energy and magnetic flux budgets of the magnetotail plasma sheet during substorm expansion are investigated. The possible mechanisms that change the energy content of the closed field line region which contains all the major dissipation mechanisms of relevance during substorms, are considered. The compression of the plasma sheet mechanism and the diffusion mechanism are considered and excluded. It is concluded that the magnetic reconnection mechanism can accomplish the required transport. Data-based empirical magnetic field models are used to investigate the magnetic flux transport required to account for the observed magnetic field dipolarizations in the inner magnetosphere. It is found that the magnetic flux permeating the current sheet is typically insufficient to supply the required magnetic flux. It is concluded that no major substorm-type magnetospheric reconfiguration is possible in the absence of magnetic reconnection.

  3. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. IV - Critical flows with standing tube shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinos, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    Critical siphon flows in arched, isolated magnetic flux tubes are studied within the thin flux tube approximation, with a view toward applications to intense magnetic flux concentrations in the solar photosphere. The results of calculations of the strength and position of the standing tube shock in the supercritical downstream branch of a critical siphon flow are presented, as are calculations of the flow variables all along the flux tube and the equilibrium path of the flux tube in the surrounding atmosphere. It is suggested that arched magnetic flux tubes, with magnetic field strength increased by a siphon flow, may be associated with some of the intense, discrete magnetic elements observed in the solar photosphere.

  4. Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux tubes in almost helical plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L.C.

    2006-02-15

    Riemannian geometry of curves applied recently by Ricca [Fluid Dyn. Res 36, 319 (2005)] in the case of inflectional disequilibrium of twisted magnetic flux tubes is used here to compute the magnetic helicity force-free field case. Here the application of Lorentz force-free to the magnetic flux tube in tokamaks allows one to obtain an equation that generalizes the cylindrical tokamak equation by a term that contains the curvature of the magnetic flux tube. Another example of the use of the magnetic flux tube is done by taking the electron magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluid model (EMHD) of plasma physics that allows one to compute the velocity of the fluid in helical and almost helical flows in terms of the Frenet torsion of thin magnetic flux tubes. The cases of straight and curved twisted tubes are examined. Second-order effects on the Frenet torsion arise on the poloidal component of the magnetic field, while curvature effects appear in the toroidal component. The magnetic fields are computed in terms of the penetration depth used in superconductors. The ratio between poloidal and toroidal components of the magnetic field depends on the torsion and curvature of the magnetic flux tube. It is shown that the rotation of the almost helical plasma flow contributes to the twist of the magnetic flux tube through the total Frenet torsion along the tube.

  5. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Field Line Reconnection involving Magnetic Flux Ropes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W. N.; van Compernolle, B.; Lawrence, E.; Vincena, S. T.

    2010-12-01

    We report on two experiments in which three dimensional magnetic field line reconnection plays a role. Magnetic field line reconnection is a processes in which the magnetic field energy is converted to particle energy and heating accompanied by changes in the magnetic topology. In the first experiment two magnetic flux ropes are generated from initially adjacent pulsed current channels in a background magnetoplasma in the LAPD device at UCLA. The currents exert mutual jXB forces causing them to twist about each other and merge. The currents are not static but move towards or away from each other in time. In addition the currents are observed to filament after merging. Volumetric space-time data show multiple reconnection sites with time-dependent locations. The quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) is a narrow region between the flux ropes. Two field lines on either side of the QSL will have closely spaced foot-points at on end of the flux ropes, but a very different separation at the other end. Outside the QSL, neighboring field lines do not diverge. The QSL has been measured, for the first time in this experiment [1] and its three dimensional development will be shown in movies made from the data. A system involving the reconnection of three flux ropes will also be presented. Three flux ropes are generated by drawing currents through apertures in a carbon shield located in front of a 10 cm diameter cathode immersed in the background magnetoplasma. The currents are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and thrash about due to kink the kink instability. Multiple reconnection regions (which are three dimensional) and a complex QSL are observed. The magnetic helicity is evaluated from volumetric data in both cases and its rate of change is used to estimate the plasma resistivity. These measurements lead one to suspect that magnetic field line reconnection is not an independent topic, which can be studied in isolation, but part of the phenomena associated

  6. Emergence of undulatory magnetic flux tubes by small scale reconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.

    With Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon borne observatory launched in Antarctica on January 2000, series of high spatial resolution vector magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and Hα filtergrams have been obtained in an emerging active region (AR 8844). Previous analyses of this data revealed the occurence of many short-lived and small-scale Hα brightenings called 'Ellerman bombs' (EBs) within the AR. We performed an extrapolation of the field above the photosphere using the linear force-free field approximation. The analysis of the magnetic topology reveals a close connexion between the loci of EBs and the existence of ``Bald patches'' regions (BPs are regions where the vector magnetic field is tangential to the photosphere). Among 47 identified EBs, we found that 23 are co-spatial with a BP, while 19 are located at the footpoint of very flat separatrix field lines passing throught a distant BP. We reveal for the first time that some of these EBs/BPs are magneticaly connected by low-lying lines, presenting a 'sea-serpent' shape. This results leads us to conjecture that arch filament systems and active regions coronal loops do not result from the smooth emergence of large scale Ω loops, but rather from the rise of flat undulatory flux tubes which get released from their photospheric anchorage by reconnection at BPs, whose observational signature is Ellerman bombs.

  7. Anthropogenic electromagnetic noise disrupts magnetic compass orientation in a migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Engels, Svenja; Schneider, Nils-Lasse; Lefeldt, Nele; Hein, Christine Maira; Zapka, Manuela; Michalik, Andreas; Elbers, Dana; Kittel, Achim; Hore, P J; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2014-05-15

    Electromagnetic noise is emitted everywhere humans use electronic devices. For decades, it has been hotly debated whether man-made electric and magnetic fields affect biological processes, including human health. So far, no putative effect of anthropogenic electromagnetic noise at intensities below the guidelines adopted by the World Health Organization has withstood the test of independent replication under truly blinded experimental conditions. No effect has therefore been widely accepted as scientifically proven. Here we show that migratory birds are unable to use their magnetic compass in the presence of urban electromagnetic noise. When European robins, Erithacus rubecula, were exposed to the background electromagnetic noise present in unscreened wooden huts at the University of Oldenburg campus, they could not orient using their magnetic compass. Their magnetic orientation capabilities reappeared in electrically grounded, aluminium-screened huts, which attenuated electromagnetic noise in the frequency range from 50 kHz to 5 MHz by approximately two orders of magnitude. When the grounding was removed or when broadband electromagnetic noise was deliberately generated inside the screened and grounded huts, the birds again lost their magnetic orientation capabilities. The disruptive effect of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields is not confined to a narrow frequency band and birds tested far from sources of electromagnetic noise required no screening to orient with their magnetic compass. These fully double-blinded tests document a reproducible effect of anthropogenic electromagnetic noise on the behaviour of an intact vertebrate. PMID:24805233

  8. ENERGY INJECTION VIA FLUX EMERGENCE ON THE SUN DEPENDING ON THE GEOMETRIC SHAPE OF MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Magara, T.

    2011-04-20

    Flux emergence is a complicated process involving flow and magnetic field, which provides a way of injecting magnetic energy into the solar atmosphere. We show that energy injection via this complicated process is characterized by a physical quantity called the emergence velocity, which is determined by the spatial relationship between the flow velocity and magnetic field vectors. By using this quantity, we demonstrate that the geometric shape of magnetic field might play an important role in the energy injection via flux emergence.

  9. Testing a solar coronal magnetic field extrapolation code with the Titov-Démoulin magnetic flux rope model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao-Wei; Feng, Xue-Shang

    2016-01-01

    In the solar corona, the magnetic flux rope is believed to be a fundamental structure that accounts for magnetic free energy storage and solar eruptions. Up to the present, the extrapolation of the magnetic field from boundary data has been the primary way to obtain fully three-dimensional magnetic information about the corona. As a result, the ability to reliably recover the coronal magnetic flux rope is important for coronal field extrapolation. In this paper, our coronal field extrapolation code is examined with an analytical magnetic flux rope model proposed by Titov & Démoulin, which consists of a bipolar magnetic configuration holding a semi-circular line-tied flux rope in force-free equilibrium. By only using the vector field at the bottom boundary as input, we test our code with the model in a representative range of parameter space and find that the model field can be reconstructed with high accuracy. In particular, the magnetic topological interfaces formed between the flux rope and the surrounding arcade, i.e., the “hyperbolic flux tube” and “bald patch separatrix surface,” are also reliably reproduced. By this test, we demonstrate that our CESE-MHD-NLFFF code can be applied to recovering the magnetic flux rope in the solar corona as long as the vector magnetogram satisfies the force-free constraints.

  10. Magnetic reconnection in 3D magnetosphere models: magnetic separators and open flux production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glocer, A.; Dorelli, J.; Toth, G.; Komar, C. M.; Cassak, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are multiple competing definitions of magnetic reconnection in 3D (e.g., Hesse and Schindler [1988], Lau and Finn [1990], and Boozer [2002]). In this work we focus on separator reconnection. A magnetic separator can be understood as the 3D analogue of a 2D x line with a guide field, and is defined by the line corresponding to the intersection of the separatrix surfaces associated with the magnetic nulls. A separator in the magnetosphere represents the intersection of four distinct magnetic topologies: solar wind, closed, open connected to the northern hemisphere, and open connected to the southern hemisphere. The integral of the parallel electric field along the separator defines the rate of open flux production, and is one measure of the reconnection rate. We present three methods for locating magnetic separators and apply them to 3D resistive MHD simulations of the Earth's magnetosphere using the BATS-R-US code. The techniques for finding separators and determining the reconnection rate are insensitive to IMF clock angle and can in principle be applied to any magnetospheric model. The present work examines cases of high and low resistivity, for two clock angles. We also examine the separator during Flux Transfer Events (FTEs) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  11. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  12. Simulations of emerging magnetic flux. II. The formation of unstable coronal flux ropes and the initiation of coronal mass ejections

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-05-20

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (∼36 Mm above the surface). We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as 'magnetic breakout', are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  13. Enhancement of magnetic flux distribution in a DC superconducting electric motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, N. A.; Ewe, L. S.; Chin, K. M.

    2013-06-01

    Most motor designs require an air gap between the rotor and stator to enable the armature to rotate freely. The interaction of magnetic flux from rotor and stator within the air gap will provide the thrust for rotational motion. Thus, the understanding of magnetic flux in the vicinity of the air gap is very important to mathematically calculate the magnetic flux generated in the area. In this work, a finite element analysis was employed to study the behavior of the magnetic flux in view of designing a synchronous DC superconducting electric motor. The analysis provides an ideal magnetic flux distribution within the components of the motor. From the flux plot analysis, it indicates that flux losses are mainly in the forms of leakage and fringe effect. The analysis also shows that the flux density is high at the area around the air gap and the rotor. The high flux density will provide a high force area that enables the rotor to rotate. In contrast, the other parts of the motor body do not show high flux density indicating low distribution of flux. Consequently, a bench top model of a DC superconducting motor was developed where by motor with a 2-pole type winding was chosen. Each field coil was designed with a racetrack-shaped double pancake wound using DI-BSCCO Bi-2223 superconducting tapes. The performance and energy efficiency of the superconducting motor was superior when compared to the conventional motor with similar capacity.

  14. Magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional multiple open magnetic flux tubes in the stratified solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gent, F. A.; Erdélyi, R.; Fedun, V.

    2014-07-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modeled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background condition for numerical studies of energy transport mechanisms from the solar surface to the corona. We apply magnetic field strength, plasma density, pressure, and temperature distributions consistent with observational and theoretical estimates for the lower solar atmosphere. Although each flux tube is identical in construction apart from the location of the radial axis, combinations can be applied to generate a non-axisymmetric magnetic field with multiple non-uniform flux tubes. This is a considerable step forward in modeling the realistic magnetized three-dimensional equilibria of the solar atmosphere.

  15. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  16. RSFQ: Ultrafast Logic Based on Magnetic Flux Quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likharev, Konstantin

    2000-03-01

    I will review the progress and prospects of Rapid Single-Flux-Quantum (RSFQ) logic family, the newest generation of ultrafast superconductor digital circuits. Elementary cells of this family, based on overdamped Josephson junctions, store and process digital bits in the form of single quanta of magnetic flux, while intercell signaling is provided by picosecond pulses transferred along superconductor microstrip lines, with a speed approaching speed of light. RSFQ integrated circuits may provide the highest speed available in superconductor digital electronics: simple devices like digital frequency dividers have been demonstrated to operate at frequencies up to 770 GHz. Simultaneously, power consumption of RSFQ devices is extremely low (at helium temperatures, about 10-18 Joule per bit), allowing very compact chip packaging, and hence dramatic cuts in the interchip communication latency. Finally, the technology of fabrication of the niobium-based RSFQ circuits is considerably simpler than the standard silicon CMOS process. As a result of the recent work at Stony Brook, HYPRES and elsewhere, relatively complex RSFQ circuits (with thousands of Josephson junctions), including notably the world's fastest analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters and digital autocorrelators, have been designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. The main problem with the practical introduction of RSFQ circuits is the necessity of their deep refrigeration. Helium-range closed-cycle refrigerators are still costly and bulky, while HTS RSFQ circuits run into fabrication yield and layout problems. However, for several important applications (including A/D and D/A conversion, digital SQUIDs, RF voltage standards and calibrators, digital correlators, and possibly high-performance computing), the unparalleled performance of LTS RSFQ devices may overweigh the inconvenience of their helium cooling. I will describe the recent advances in these directions, with a special emphasis on the

  17. Pulsating Reconnection in the interaction of two magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Dehaas, Tim; Daughton, William; van Compernolle, Bart

    2015-11-01

    Two flux ropes (dia = 7 cm, ds = 3 cm, L = 10m, Irope = 300 A/rope) are generated by using a mask in front of a high emissivity cathode (n = 4X1012 cm3, Te-rope = 8.5 eV) in a background magnetoplasma (He, Boz = 330 G, n =1.0X1012cm3, Te = 4 eV) in the LAPD device at UCLA. The ropes are kink unstable (I >250 A) but not violently so. All three components of the magnetic field were measured with small (1 mm dia) 3-axis probes sensitive to ∂/B-> ∂ t and the plasma potential measured with an emissive probe. These were measured at 42,075 locations in the volume containing the ropes and 7000 time steps (δτ = .33 μs). The total electric field E-> = - ∇ ϕ -∂/A-> ∂ t and parallel resistivity as well as the Quasi Seperatrix layer (QSL) were derived from the data. The flux ropes periodically collide as they kink. Each time this happens a strong QSL (Q<400) forms and the resistivity jumps to over a hundred times the classical value at locations within the QSL and also on the gradient of the rope current. The reconnection rate is directly evaluated by integrating the electric field along field lines as well as the energy deposition J-> . E-> . The data indicate that there is more than one process causing the enhanced resistivity. The reconnection rate cannot be explained by conventional 2D theories. Work done at the BaPSF which is supported by NSF/DOE. project supported by DOE and a LANL research grant.

  18. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics of the emerging magnetic flux in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, R.; Tajima, T.; Shibata, K.; Kaisig, M.

    1993-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of an emerging magnetic flux tube or sheet in the solar atmosphere is studied through 3D MHD simulations. In the initial state, a horizontal magnetic flux sheet or tube is assumed to be embedded at the bottom of MHD two isothermal gas layers, which approximate the solar photosphere/chromosphere and the corona. The magnetic flux sheet or tube is unstable against the undular mode of the magnetic buoyancy instability. The magnetic loop rises due to the linear and then later nonlinear instabilities caused by the buoyancy enhanced by precipitating the gas along magnetic field lines. We find by 3D simulation that during the ascendance of loops the bundle of flux tubes or even the flux sheet develops into dense gas filaments pinched between magnetic loops. The interchange modes help produce a fine fiber flux structure perpendicular to the magnetic field direction in the linear stage, while the undular modes determine the overall buoyant loop structure. The expansion of such a bundle of magnetic loops follows the self-similar behavior observed in 2D cases studied earlier. Our study finds the threshold flux for arch filament system (AFS) formation to be about 0.3 x 10 exp 20 Mx.

  19. Structure of a Magnetic Flux Annihilation Layer Formed by the Collision of Supersonic, Magnetized Plasma Flows.

    PubMed

    Suttle, L G; Hare, J D; Lebedev, S V; Swadling, G F; Burdiak, G C; Ciardi, A; Chittenden, J P; Loureiro, N F; Niasse, N; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Wu, J; Yang, Q; Clayson, T; Frank, A; Robinson, T S; Smith, R A; Stuart, N

    2016-06-01

    We present experiments characterizing the detailed structure of a current layer, generated by the collision of two counterstreaming, supersonic and magnetized aluminum plasma flows. The antiparallel magnetic fields advected by the flows are found to be mutually annihilated inside the layer, giving rise to a bifurcated current structure-two narrow current sheets running along the outside surfaces of the layer. Measurements with Thomson scattering show a fast outflow of plasma along the layer and a high ion temperature (T_{i}∼Z[over ¯]T_{e}, with average ionization Z[over ¯]=7). Analysis of the spatially resolved plasma parameters indicates that the advection and subsequent annihilation of the inflowing magnetic flux determines the structure of the layer, while the ion heating could be due to the development of kinetic, current-driven instabilities. PMID:27314720

  20. Structure of a Magnetic Flux Annihilation Layer Formed by the Collision of Supersonic, Magnetized Plasma Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, L. G.; Hare, J. D.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Ciardi, A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Loureiro, N. F.; Niasse, N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Wu, J.; Yang, Q.; Clayson, T.; Frank, A.; Robinson, T. S.; Smith, R. A.; Stuart, N.

    2016-06-01

    We present experiments characterizing the detailed structure of a current layer, generated by the collision of two counterstreaming, supersonic and magnetized aluminum plasma flows. The antiparallel magnetic fields advected by the flows are found to be mutually annihilated inside the layer, giving rise to a bifurcated current structure—two narrow current sheets running along the outside surfaces of the layer. Measurements with Thomson scattering show a fast outflow of plasma along the layer and a high ion temperature (Ti˜Z ¯ Te , with average ionization Z ¯=7 ). Analysis of the spatially resolved plasma parameters indicates that the advection and subsequent annihilation of the inflowing magnetic flux determines the structure of the layer, while the ion heating could be due to the development of kinetic, current-driven instabilities.

  1. Vector magnetic properties of Fe-based amorphous sheets under alternating flux condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Todaka, T.; Enokizono, M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents measured vector magnetic properties of Fe-based amorphous sheets under alternating flux conditions in arbitrary direction. It is well known that amorphous material has usually isotropic magnetic property; however it is changeable by heat-treatment and shows complicated aspects. In this paper, the relationship between the magnetic flux density and field strength vector and iron loss under alternating flux conditions is measured by using a vector magnetic property measurement system. Moreover, the iron losses depending on the exciting frequency are discussed. The results show a weak anisotropy in plane and the frequency dependence of the iron losses shows different tendency in each direction.

  2. Thermal magnetic noise control in the ultra-high-density read head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y. K.; Han, G. C.; Liu, B.

    In order to reduce the resistance of tunnel magnetoresistive (TMR) read heads, a large stripe height sensor structure was proposed. The thermal magnetic noise, called as mag-noise, in this type of TMR heads was simulated by micromagnetic modeling using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) gyro-magnetic equation. It is found that for the same hard bias strength, both the sensitivity and the mag-noise of TMR heads increase as the sensor height increases. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is reduced at large stripe height. The large increase in the demagnetization field resulting from the stripe height increase causes the weakening of the effective bias field, thus increasing the mag-noise significantly. Low mag-noise and high SNR can be obtained by increasing the hard bias strength and reducing the spacer between the hard bias and the free layer. An extended hard bias structure has been proposed to further increase SNR of TMR heads.

  3. Spin-dependent shot noise in diluted magnetic semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures with a nonmagnetic barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Guo, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We investigate quantum size effect on the spin-dependent shot noise in the diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS)/semiconductor heterostructure with a nonmagnetic semiconductor (NMS) barrier in the presence of external magnetic and electric fields. The results demonstrate that the NMS barrier plays a quite different role from the DMS layer in the electron transport process. It is found that spin-down shot noise shows relatively regular oscillations as the width of DMS layer increases, while the spin-up shot noise deceases monotonically. However, as the width of NMS layer increases, the spin-down shot noise displays irregular oscillations at first and then decreases while the spin-up shot noise decreases at a quite different rate. The results indicate that the shot noise can be used as a sensitive probe in detecting material type and its size.

  4. Noise

    MedlinePlus

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  5. Three-dimensional Simulation of Magnetic Flux Dynamics and Temperature Rise in HTSC Bulk during Pulsed Field Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, H.; Naito, T.; Oyama, M.

    We have performed a three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation of the dynamical motion of the magnetic flux and the heat propagation in the superconducting bulk after applying a pulsed magnetic field. An inhomogeneous Jc distribution was supposed in the bulk; the Jc in the growth sector boundary (GSB) is four times higher than that in the growth sector region (GSR). For lower applied pulsed field, magnetic flux was penetrated and trapped in the GSR, and for higher applied pulsed field, the magnetic flux was trapped more preferentially in the GSB. These results of the simulation reproduce the experimental ones and are valuable for the understanding the flux dynamics in the bulk during pulsed field magnetization.

  6. Composite multi-qubit gates dynamically corrected against charge noise and magnetic field noise for singlet-triplet qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kestner, Jason; Barnes, Edwin; Wang, Xin; Bishop, Lev; Das Sarma, Sankar

    2013-03-01

    We use previously described single-qubit SUPCODE pulses on both intra-qubit and inter-qubit exchange couplings, integrated with existing strategies such as BB1, to theoretically construct a CNOT gate that is robust against both charge noise and magnetic field gradient fluctuations. We show how this allows scalable, high-fidelity implementation of arbitrary multi-qubit operations using singlet-triplet spin qubits in the presence of experimentally realistic noise. This work is supported by LPS-NSA-CMTC, IARPA-MQCO and CNAM.

  7. Magnetic Flux Concentrations in Stratified Turbulent Plasma Due to Negative Effective Magnetic Pressure Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, S.; Brandenburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    al. 2013). When the field is vertical, the resulting magnetic flux concentrations lead to the magnetic spots and can be of equipartition field strength. DNS, MFS, and implicit large eddy simulations (ILES) confirm that in a proper parameter regime, vertical imposed fields lead to the formation of circular magnetic spots (Brandenburg et al. 2014).

  8. Fine resolution soil water fluxes measured with a small Smart Field Lysimeter: The noise removal and further interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolezal, Frantisek; Bekere Mekonnen, Getu; Matula, Svatopluk; Mihalikova, Marketa; Fisak, Jaroslav; Teressa Chala, Ayele; Hrkalova, Marketa; Moreira Barradas, Joao Manuel

    2014-05-01

    A weighable Smart Field Lysimeter (30 cm diameter, 30 cm depth) with an adaptively regulated suction at its bottom was used to measure soil water fluxes at the surface and at the 30 cm depth of a short grass stand. No overland flow or accumulation of water at the surface were observed and there was no groundwater table within the soil profile. Appropriate distinction between the fluxes of different directions made it possible to separately estimate actual evapotranspiration (upward surface flux), precipitation and condensation (downward surface flux and dew on grass leaves), percolation (downward flux at 30 cm) and capillary rise (upward flux at 30 cm). The primary data were collected at 1 minute intervals but required digital filtering to remove the information noise. Various methods of filtering were tested, with a special regard to intensive rain events. The resulting data have a 10-minute resolution. The lysimeter is capable of self-recovery after a period of drought but the noise of percolation and capillary rise estimates is enhanced for some time during, before and after this period. In these situations, it is important that a porous matrix sensor measures the suction in parallel to the reference tensiometer. Both the precipitation and the actual evapotranspiration derived from the lysimeter data alone are in absolute values higher than the analogous quantities obtained with the help of the directly measured tipping bucket precipitation. These discrepancies are probably due to the rain gauge underestimating true precipitation, but partly also due to numerical noise, however smoothed. If the rain gauge data are used only to distinguish the periods of rain from the rainless periods, than the condensation of water in the soil and on the grass leaves can be estimated. The actual evapotranspiration measured by the lysimeter has a diurnal patterns depending on actual weather. The maximum occurs, on average, shortly after the noon. The percolation curves after rain

  9. Control of magnetic flux and eddy currents in magnetic films for on-chip radio frequency inductors: Role of the magnetic vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Gardner, Donald S.; Zhao, Shirong; Huang, Hai; Yu, Hongbin

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the role of the magnetic vias for magnetic flux and eddy current control is investigated using both simulations and experiments that used different patterning techniques and by altering the magnetic via width. Improved finger-shaped magnetic vias have been designed and integrated into on-chip radio frequency inductors improving the peak quality factor from 400 MHz to 800 MHz without sacrificing the inductance enhancement. The eddy currents and magnetic flux density in different areas of the magnetic vias are analyzed by 3D electromagnetic simulation. With optimized magnetic vias, the high frequency response of up to 2 GHz has been achieved.

  10. Mechanism of a high-Tc superconducting flux pump: Using alternating magnetic field to trigger flux flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jianzhao; Coombs, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    High-Tc Superconducting (HTS) magnets operating in persistent current mode suffer a current decay due to flux creep of superconductor and joint resistance. Flux pumps are able to inject direct current into superconducting circuit to compensate the current decay, without the thermal loss caused by current leads. In this work, we proposed a flux pumping mechanism for HTS coils, with an experimental verification and an analytical model. The basic principle we have used is that flux flow can be triggered when the superconductor carrying a direct current is subjected to a perpendicular AC magnetic field. Low frequency alternating current is induced in a loop of YBCO tape using an AC field. A portion of the tape which we refer to as the "bridge" shorts a superconducting coil. A high frequency AC field is applied perpendicular to the bridge tape when alternating current in the tape reaches one polarity. This triggers a net flux flow and results in a current increase in the coil. The proposed flux pump has clear physics and is easily controllable, which may make it promising in practical use.

  11. Cancellation technique of external noise inside a magnetically shielded room used for biomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandori, Akihiko; Miyashita, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Keiji

    2000-05-01

    First-order gradiometers inside a magnetically shielded room (MSR) were used to cancel magnetic-field noise. However, the magnetic field inside a MSR is distorted when the amount of external noise is large. This distortion is caused by the low-pass filter property of the MSR. Therefore, the time constants of the frequency-dependent attenuation of the MSR vary spatially and this variation must be taken into account. To investigate noise cancellation, we used a multichannel superconducting quantum interference device consisting of four gradiometers measuring a source signal and two gradiometers as a reference. To compensate for the different magnitudes of the gradiometer wave forms, which differed because of slight differences in their pickup-coil cancel rates, we calculated a fitting parameter. The noise-cancellation method consisted of two processes: reduction of ambient noise caused by the differences in the cancel rate of the gradiometers and a gradient magnetic field inside the MSR, and cancellation of wave-form distortion caused by the spatial variation of the time constants inside the MSR. This cancellation method provides additional attenuation of over 20-30 dB in addition to the balance (>46 dB) of a first-order gradiometer. However, the remaining noise, especially a spike (<2 pT) at the beginning of a large ambient noise step, could not be completely canceled. This noise was caused by the slight difference between the time constants at the reference sensor position and at the signal sensor position. Except for this noise spike, however, the noise cancellation enabled clear magnetocardiogram wave forms to be measured without being affected by strong external noise.

  12. Magnetic flux emergence in granular convection: radiative MHD simulations and observational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We study the emergence of magnetic flux from the near-surface layers of the solar convection zone into the photosphere. Methods: To model magnetic flux emergence, we carried out a set of numerical radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Our simulations take into account the effects of compressibility, energy exchange via radiative transfer, and partial ionization in the equation of state. All these physical ingredients are essential for a proper treatment of the problem. Furthermore, the inclusion of radiative transfer allows us to directly compare the simulation results with actual observations of emerging flux. Results: We find that the interaction between the magnetic flux tube and the external flow field has an important influence on the emergent morphology of the magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), the emergence process can also modify the local granulation pattern. The emergence of magnetic flux tubes with a flux of 1019 Mx disturbs the granulation and leads to the transient appearance of a dark lane, which is coincident with upflowing material. These results are consistent with observed properties of emerging magnetic flux. Movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Magnetic Field-line Twist in Interplanetary Flux Ropes and its Implications for Their Solar Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Qiu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Interplanetary flux ropes, embedded within interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), are often detected in-situ by spacecraft ACE, Wind, and STEREO. Both magnetic field and plasma measurements sampled along the spacecraft path across the ICME structure are available for quantitative analysis. We apply the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique to examine the configuration of the flux ropes and to derive relevant physical quantities, such as magnetic flux content, relative magnetic helicity, and the field-line twist. We select recent events during the rising phase of enhanced solar activity, and utilize additional imaging observations from STEREO and SDO spacecraft. Both detailed analyses of solar source region characteristics including flaring and magnetic reconnection sequence, and the corresponding flux rope structures will be presented. In particular, we examine the distribution of magnetic field-line twist in flux ropes on nested cylindrical iso-surfaces of the magnetic flux function. We compare the in-situ characterization of these flux-rope structures with their corresponding solar source region properties. We discuss the implications of such comparison for the origination of flux ropes on the Sun.

  14. A high-speed induction motor making use of the third harmonic of the magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goleman, Ryszard

    1994-05-01

    This paper indicates some possibilities of construction of high-speed induction motors taking advantage of the magnetic flux third harmonic due to a process of magnetization of nonlinear magnetic circuits. Configurations of magnetic frequency triplers, which can be used as basic stator structures and generate a distorted flux, are presented. The paper also describes an experimental high-speed induction motor supplied from a single-phase source via a magnetic frequency tripler that make possible to obtain a rotating field having a synchronous speed equal to 9000 rpm at a supply voltage angular frequency of 314 rd.

  15. MMS observations of small magnetic flux ropes in the near-tail (X > -11 Re)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Poh, G.; Le, G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Anderson, B. J.; Fischer, D.; Plaschke, F.; Bromund, K. R.; Leinweber, H. K.; Kepko, L.; Chutter, M.; Le Contel, O.; Torbert, R. B.; Nakamura, R.; Magnes, W.; Baumjohann, W.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the most important energy conversion process in the Earth's magnetotail. Flux ropes are helical magnetic structures created by multiple X-line reconnection in the tail current sheet in the presence of a guide field in the east - west direction. Many numerical simulations predict that the formation of small flux ropes, referred to as secondary islands, takes place as reconnection transitions from the slow Sweet-Parker mode to fast reconnection with inertial scale neutral points. High time resolution MMS magnetic and electric fields measurements are near ideal for the investigation of secondary island - type flux ropes carried Earthward from downstream reconnnection sites, as well as their interaction with the strong dipolar magnetic fields of the inner magnetosphere. We present and analyze initial MMS magnetic field measurements of small flux ropes in the near-tail during the commissioning phase while the spacecraft were in a "string-­of-­pearls" configuration.

  16. High noise suppression using magnetically isotropic (CoFe-AlN)/(AlN) multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijima, Hanae; Ohnuma, Shigehiro; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Shimada, Yutaka; Endo, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    Magnetically isotropic (CoFe-AlN)n/(AlN)n+1 multilayer films, in which the number of CoFe-AlN magnetic layers n ranged from 1 to 27, were prepared by radio frequency sputtering to achieve noise suppression at gigahertz frequencies. The soft CoFe-AlN magnetic layers consisted of nanometer-sized CoFe ferromagnetic grains embedded in an insulating AlN amorphous matrix, while the insulating AlN layers comprised AlN columnar crystals. All films showed a similar frequency dependence of permeability and ferromagnetic resonance of 1.7 GHz. Noise suppression was evaluated using a microstrip line as a noise source by determining the in-line conductive loss and the near-field intensity picked up by magnetic field detective probes. High noise suppression effects were observed in every direction in the film plane. Maximum noise suppression values amounted to 60% for the in-line conductive loss and -20 dB for the magnetic near-field intensity at around 1.7 GHz in the 27-layer film. These high-frequency noise suppression levels may be attributed to eddy current losses and ferromagnetic resonance.

  17. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Liang; Xiang, Li; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian; Li, D. L.; Yuan, Z. H.; Feng, J. F. Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the low frequency (LF) noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlO{sub x}/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlO{sub x}-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN) is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  18. Fermionic condensate in a conical space with a circular boundary and magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Bellucci, S.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.

    2011-04-15

    The fermionic condensate is investigated in a (2+1)-dimensional conical spacetime in the presence of a circular boundary and a magnetic flux. It is assumed that on the boundary the fermionic field obeys the MIT bag boundary condition. For irregular modes, we consider a special case of boundary conditions at the cone apex, when the MIT bag boundary condition is imposed at a finite radius, which is then taken to zero. The fermionic condensate is a periodic function of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. For both exterior and interior regions, the fermionic condensate is decomposed into boundary-free and boundary-induced parts. Two integral representations are given for the boundary-free part for arbitrary values of the opening angle of the cone and magnetic flux. At distances from the boundary larger than the Compton wavelength of the fermion particle, the condensate decays exponentially, with the decay rate depending on the opening angle of the cone. If the ratio of the magnetic flux to the flux quantum is not a half-integer number for a massless field the boundary-free part in the fermionic condensate vanishes, whereas the boundary-induced part is negative. For half-integer values of the ratio of the magnetic flux to the flux quantum, the irregular mode gives a nonzero contribution to the fermionic condensate in the boundary-free conical space.

  19. Sausage Instabilities on top of Kinking Lengthening Current-Carrying Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2015-11-01

    Observations indicate that the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in our cosmos and terrestrial experiments involve fast topological change beyond MHD reconnection. Recent experiments suggest that hierarchies of instabilities coupling disparate plasma scales could be responsible for this fast topological change by accessing two-fluid and kinetic scales. This study will explore the possibility of sausage instabilities developing on top of a kink instability in lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. Current driven flux tubes evolve over a wide range of aspect ratios k and current to magnetic flux ratios λ . An analytical stability criterion and numerical investigations, based on applying Newcomb's variational approach to idealized magnetic flux tubes with core and skin currents, indicate a dependence of the stability boundaries on current profiles and overlapping kink and sausage unstable regions in the k - λ trajectory of the flux tubes. A triple electrode planar plasma gun (Mochi.LabJet) is designed to generate flux tubes with discrete core and skin currents. Measurements from a fast-framing camera and a high resolution magnetic probe are being assembled into stability maps of the k - λ space of flux tubes. This work was sponsored in part by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  20. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated.

  1. Magnetic Flux Transport and the Long-term Evolution of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  2. Controlling the magnetic susceptibility in an artificial elliptical quantum ring by magnetic flux and external Rashba effect

    SciTech Connect

    Omidi, Mahboubeh Faizabadi, Edris

    2015-03-21

    Magnetic susceptibility is investigated in a man-made elliptical quantum ring in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interactions and the magnetic flux. It is shown that magnetic susceptibility as a function of magnetic flux changes between negative and positive signs periodically. The periodicity of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations depends on the geometry of the region where magnetic field is applied, the eccentricity, and number of sites in each chain ring (the elliptical ring is composed of chain rings). The magnetic susceptibility sign can be reversed by tuning the Rashba spin-orbit strength as well. Both the magnetic susceptibility strength and sign can be controlled via external spin-orbit interactions, which can be exploited in spintronics and nanoelectronics.

  3. Plasma signatures in large Martian magnetic flux ropes: MARSIS/ASPERA-3 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diéval, Catherine; Morgan, David; Duru, Firdevs; Gurnett, Donald

    2014-05-01

    Cylindrical structures of highly twisted magnetic field (flux ropes) have been observed at Mars, using measurements by the MAG-ER magnetometer-electron reflectometer onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and by the MARSIS radar sounder onboard Mars Express (MEX). Signatures of flux ropes are spikes of magnetic field strength and magnetic field rotations. Both small scale flux ropes (diameters of a few tens of km) and large scale flux ropes (diameters of around 100 km) have been found at Mars. We look at times of presumed flux ropes on the dayside of Mars, detected in the local magnetic field strength given by MARSIS. The signatures in MARSIS are magnetic field strength increases (peak strength reaches several tens to hundred nT) for several minutes (size of hundreds of km along the spacecraft track), found outside but near crustal magnetic field regions. Although we cannot determine the presence of a magnetic field rotation because of the lack of a magnetometer onboard MEX, we assume that these magnetic field increases are large flux ropes. There are indeed large flux ropes with similar characteristics which were established by the magnetometer data from MGS, and thought to form by stretching and reconnection of crustal magnetic field by the solar wind. On the other hand, MEX possesses in situ ion measurements, unlike MGS. We will use the ion and electron data from the ASPERA-3 particle instrument onboard MEX in order to characterize the plasma (ionospheric only or mixing with shocked plasma?) inside the flux ropes, which will give hints on their origin.

  4. Tracking the magnetic structure of flux ropes from eruption to in-situ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmerio, Erika; Kilpua, Emilia; Green, Lucie; James, Alexander; Pomoell, Jens; Valori, Gherardo

    2016-04-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are spectacular explosions from the Sun where huge amounts of plasma and magnetic flux are ejected into the heliosphere. CMEs are built at the Sun as a force-free (J ×B = 0) magnetic flux rope. It is well-established that CMEs are the main drivers of intense magnetic storms and various space weather effects at the Earth. One of the most significant problems for improving the long lead-time space weather predictions is that there is no method to directly measure the structure of CME magnetic fields, neither in the onset process nor during the subsequent propagation from the solar surface to the Earth. The magnetic properties of the CME flux rope (magnetic helicity sign, the flux rope tilt and the direction of the flux rope axial field) can be estimated based on the properties of the source active region and characteristics of the related structures, such as filament details, coronal EUV arcades and X-ray sigmoids. We present here a study of two CME flux ropes. We compare their magnetic structure using the synthesis of these indirect proxies based on multi-wavelength remote sensing observations with the structure detected in-situ near the orbit of the Earth.

  5. Asymmetric planar gradiometer for rejection of uniform ambient magnetic noise

    DOEpatents

    Dantsker, Eugene; Clarke, John

    2000-01-01

    An asymmetric planar gradiometer for use in making biomagnetic measurements. The gradiometer is formed from a magnetometer which is inductively-coupled to the smaller of two connected loops patterned in a superconducting film which form a flux transformer. The magnetometer is based on a SQUID formed from a high T.sub.c superconducting material. The flux transformer and magnetometer may be formed on separate substrates, allowing the baseline to be increased relative to presently available devices.

  6. Avalanche dynamics of magnetic flux in a two-dimensional discrete superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, S. L.; Nakin, A. V.; Savitskaya, N. E.

    2006-11-15

    The critical state of a two-dimensional discrete superconductor in an external magnetic field is studied. This state is found to be self-organized in the generalized sense, i.e., is a set of metastable states that transform to each other by means of avalanches. An avalanche is characterized by the penetration of a magnetic flux to the system. The sizes of the occurring avalanches, i.e., changes in the magnetic flux, exhibit the power-law distribution. It is also shown that the size of the avalanche occurring in the critical state and the external magnetic field causing its change are statistically independent quantities.

  7. BaBar technical design report: Chapter 9, Magnet coil and flux return

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, T.; The BaBar Collaboration

    1995-03-01

    The BaBar magnet is a thin, 1.5 T superconducting solenoid with a hexagonal flux return. This chapter discusses the physics requirements and performance goals for the magnet, describes key interfaces, and summarizes the projected magnet performance. It also presents the design of the superconducting solenoid, including magnetic design, cold mass design, quench protection and stability, cold mass cooling, cryostat design, and coil assembly and transportation. The cryogenic supply system and instrumentation are described briefly, and the flux return is described.

  8. Flux penetration in a ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayer utilizing perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Abal'Oshev, A.; Berkowski, M.; Konczykowski, M.; Cheng, X. M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2006-03-01

    The Hall sensor array is a useful tool for measuring local magnetic fields. An array of miniature Hall sensors has been used to study the flux penetration in a ferromagnetic/superconducting (F/S) bilayer consisting of Nb as the S layer and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the F layer, separated by an amorphous Si layer to avoid proximity effect. The F layer is first premagnetized to different magnetization reversal stages to obtain various magnetic domain patterns. The effect of these domain patterns on the flux behavior in the S layer is then studied at various temperatures in the superconducting state. We have observed that, in addition to the vortex pinning enhancement, some domain patterns strongly increase the first penetration field and induce large thermomagnetic instabilities (flux jumps), which are not detectable by magnetometry. We also discuss the profiles of the flux distribution across these F/S bilayers.

  9. Cluster electric current density measurements within a magnetic flux rope in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Gjerloev, J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Balogh, A.; Dunlop, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K.

    2003-01-01

    On August 22, 2001 all 4 Cluster spacecraft nearly simultaneously penetrated a magnetic flux rope in the tail. The flux rope encounter took place in the central plasma sheet, Beta(sub i) approx. 1-2, near the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow. The "time-of-flight" of the flux rope across the 4 spacecraft yielded V(sub x) approx. 700 km/s and a diameter of approx.1 R(sub e). The speed at which the flux rope moved over the spacecraft is in close agreement with the Cluster plasma measurements. The magnetic field profiles measured at each spacecraft were first modeled separately using the Lepping-Burlaga force-free flux rope model. The results indicated that the center of the flux rope passed northward (above) s/c 3, but southward (below) of s/c 1, 2 and 4. The peak electric currents along the central axis of the flux rope predicted by these single-s/c models were approx.15-19 nA/sq m. The 4-spacecraft Cluster magnetic field measurements provide a second means to determine the electric current density without any assumption regarding flux rope structure. The current profile determined using the curlometer technique was qualitatively similar to those determined by modeling the individual spacecraft magnetic field observations and yielded a peak current density of 17 nA/m2 near the central axis of the rope. However, the curlometer results also showed that the flux rope was not force-free with the component of the current density perpendicular to the magnetic field exceeding the parallel component over the forward half of the rope, perhaps due to the pressure gradients generated by the collision of the BBF with the inner magnetosphere. Hence, while the single-spacecraft models are very successful in fitting flux rope magnetic field and current variations, they do not provide a stringent test of the force-free condition.

  10. Twisted versus braided magnetic flux ropes in coronal geometry. II. Comparative behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: Sigmoidal structures in the solar corona are commonly associated with magnetic flux ropes whose magnetic field lines are twisted about a mutual axis. Their dynamical evolution is well studied, with sufficient twisting leading to large-scale rotation (writhing) and vertical expansion, possibly leading to ejection. Here, we investigate the behaviour of flux ropes whose field lines have more complex entangled/braided configurations. Our hypothesis is that this internal structure will inhibit the large-scale morphological changes. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the background field within which the rope is embedded. Methods: A technique for generating tubular magnetic fields with arbitrary axial geometry and internal structure, introduced in part I of this study, provides the initial conditions for resistive-MHD simulations. The tubular fields are embedded in a linear force-free background, and we consider various internal structures for the tubular field, including both twisted and braided topologies. These embedded flux ropes are then evolved using a 3D MHD code. Results: Firstly, in a background where twisted flux ropes evolve through the expected non-linear writhing and vertical expansion, we find that flux ropes with sufficiently braided/entangled interiors show no such large-scale changes. Secondly, embedding a twisted flux rope in a background field with a sigmoidal inversion line leads to eventual reversal of the large-scale rotation. Thirdly, in some cases a braided flux rope splits due to reconnection into two twisted flux ropes of opposing chirality - a phenomenon previously observed in cylindrical configurations. Conclusions: Sufficiently complex entanglement of the magnetic field lines within a flux rope can suppress large-scale morphological changes of its axis, with magnetic energy reduced instead through reconnection and expansion. The structure of the background magnetic field can significantly affect the changing morphology of a

  11. Direct control of air gap flux in permanent magnet machines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for field weakening in PM machines uses field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72) to produce flux in one or more stators (34, 49, 63, 64), including a flux which counters flux normally produced in air gaps between the stator(s) (34, 49, 63, 64) and the rotor (20, 21, 41, 61) which carries the PM poles. Several modes of operation are introduced depending on the magnitude and polarity of current in the field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72). The invention is particularly useful for, but not limited to, the electric vehicle drives and PM generators.

  12. Suppression of weak localization due to magnetic flux in few-channel ballistic microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhar, Z.; Weidenmueller, H.A.; Zuk, J.A. ); Lewenkopf, C.H. )

    1994-10-10

    Using a random-matrix model for the Hamiltonian of a ballistic microstructure, which is chaotic in the classical limit, maximizing the coupling to the external leads, and employing Landauer's formula and Efetov's supersymmetry technique, we derive an expression for the magnetic-flux dependence of weak localization. This expression describes the crossover from orthogonal to unitary symmetry, depends only on the number of channels and on the magnetic flux through the structure, and is expected to apply universally.

  13. An introduction to the propellant-driven magnetic flux compression generator

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.E.

    1995-12-01

    An introduction to the concept of a propellant-driven magnetic flux compression generator is presented, together with the theory of its operation. The principles of operation of the propellant flux compression generator combine generator principles, derived from lumped parameter circuit theory, and interior ballistic principles.

  14. Line-of-sight magnetic flux imbalances caused by electric currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Rabin, Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Several physical and observational effects contribute to the significant imbalances of magnetic flux that are often observed in active regions. We consider an effect not previously treated: the influence of electric currents in the photosphere. Electric currents can cause a line-of-sight flux imbalance because of the directionality of the magnetic field they produce. Currents associated with magnetic flux tubes produce larger imbalances than do smoothly-varying distributions of flux and current. We estimate the magnitude of this effect for current densities, total currents, and magnetic geometry consistent with observations. The expected imbalances lie approximately in the range 0-15%, depending on the character of the current-carying fields and the angle from which they are viewed. Observationally, current-induced flux imbalances could be indicated by a statistical dependence of the imbalance on angular distance from disk center. A general study of magnetic flux balance in active regions is needed to determine the relative importance of other- probably larger- effects such as dilute flux (too weak to measure or rendered invisible by radiative transfer effects), merging with weak background fields, and long-range connections between active regions.

  15. Defect profile estimation from magnetic flux leakage signal via efficient managing particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenhua; Xu, Jun; Wang, Ping; Tian, Guiyun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, efficient managing particle swarm optimization (EMPSO) for high dimension problem is proposed to estimate defect profile from magnetic flux leakage (MFL) signal. In the proposed EMPSO, in order to strengthen exchange of information among particles, particle pair model was built. For more efficient searching when facing different landscapes of problems, velocity updating scheme including three velocity updating models was also proposed. In addition, for more chances to search optimum solution out, automatic particle selection for re-initialization was implemented. The optimization results of six benchmark functions show EMPSO performs well when optimizing 100-D problems. The defect simulation results demonstrate that the inversing technique based on EMPSO outperforms the one based on self-learning particle swarm optimizer (SLPSO), and the estimated profiles are still close to the desired profiles with the presence of low noise in MFL signal. The results estimated from real MFL signal by EMPSO-based inversing technique also indicate that the algorithm is capable of providing an accurate solution of the defect profile with real signal. Both the simulation results and experiment results show the computing time of the EMPSO-based inversing technique is reduced by 20%-30% than that of the SLPSO-based inversing technique. PMID:24926693

  16. Changes in magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of carbon tool steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2010-03-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find the cracks which eventually grow to cause failures. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish, in the early stages of growth, the cracks which will grow fast and cause failure. We hypothesized that it may be possible to distinguish them by comparing changes in the magnetic flux density around the tips of those cracks that grew large enough to cause failure. In order to measure these changes in magnetic flux density, we developed a scanning Hall probe microscope and observed the fatigue cracks growing from artificial slits in carbon tool steels (JIS SKS93). We also compared the changes in magnetic flux density around crack tips which grew under different loads and found that there is a strong correlation between the magnetic flux density, crack growth and stress intensity factors. In order to understand this relation, we measured the changes in the magnetic flux density and residual tensile stress by using an X-ray system, and found that the magnetic flux density changes not only in the plastic deformation area but also in the area of elastic stress field with increased stress.

  17. Changes in magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of carbon tool steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Takashi; Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find the cracks which eventually grow to cause failures. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish, in the early stages of growth, the cracks which will grow fast and cause failure. We hypothesized that it may be possible to distinguish them by comparing changes in the magnetic flux density around the tips of those cracks that grew large enough to cause failure. In order to measure these changes in magnetic flux density, we developed a scanning Hall probe microscope and observed the fatigue cracks growing from artificial slits in carbon tool steels (JIS SKS93). We also compared the changes in magnetic flux density around crack tips which grew under different loads and found that there is a strong correlation between the magnetic flux density, crack growth and stress intensity factors. In order to understand this relation, we measured the changes in the magnetic flux density and residual tensile stress by using an X-ray system, and found that the magnetic flux density changes not only in the plastic deformation area but also in the area of elastic stress field with increased stress.

  18. Comparing a current-carrying circular wire with polygons of equal perimeter: magnetic field versus magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. P.; Silvestre, A. J.

    2005-09-01

    We compare the magnetic field at the centre and the self-magnetic flux through a current-carrying circular loop, with those obtained for current-carrying polygons with the same perimeter. As the magnetic field diverges at the position of the wires, we compare the self-fluxes utilizing several regularization procedures. The calculation is best performed utilizing the vector potential, thus highlighting its usefulness in practical applications. Our analysis answers some of the intuition challenges students face when they encounter a related simple textbook example. These results can be applied directly to the determination of mutual inductances in a variety of situations.

  19. Observation of an evolving magnetic flux rope before and during a solar eruption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin; Ding, Ming-de

    2012-01-01

    Explosive energy release is a common phenomenon occurring in magnetized plasma systems ranging from laboratories, Earth's magnetosphere, the solar corona and astrophysical environments. Its physical explanation is usually attributed to magnetic reconnection in a thin current sheet. Here we report the important role of magnetic flux rope structure, a volumetric current channel, in producing explosive events. The flux rope is observed as a hot channel before and during a solar eruption from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly telescope on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. It initially appears as a twisted and writhed sigmoidal structure with a temperature as high as 10 MK, and then transforms toward a semi-circular shape during a slow-rise phase, which is followed by fast acceleration and onset of a flare. The observations suggest that the instability of the magnetic flux rope triggers the eruption, thus making a major addition to the traditional magnetic-reconnection paradigm. PMID:22434190

  20. 22 year cycle in the imbalance of the photospheric magnetic fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernova, Elena; Baranov, Dmitrii; Tyasto, Marta

    The manifestation of the 22 year solar magnetic cycle in the imbalance of positive and negative photospheric magnetic fluxes is studied. For the analysis we use synoptic maps of the photospheric magnetic field of Kitt Peak Observatory (1976 - 2003) and John Wilcox Observatory in Stanford (1976 - 2012). We consider strong magnetic fields for the heliolatitudes in the interval from +40° to -40°. It is shown that the sign of the imbalance between positive and negative fluxes remains constant during 11 years from one inversion of the Sun’s global magnetic field to the next one and always coincides with the sign of the polar field in the Northern hemisphere. Thus, the imbalance between the magnetic fluxes of different polarities changes according to the 22 year cycle. The sign of the imbalance is determined both by the phase of the solar cycle (before or after the inversion) and by the parity of the solar cycle. The imbalance of positive and negative magnetic fluxes can be observed not only for the strong fields in the sunspot zone. The mean magnetic field of the Sun (Sun as a star), which is determined by the net flux of the background fields, changes according to the same pattern as the imbalance of the strong fields. The regular changes of the imbalance of the photospheric magnetic fields are reflected also in the parameters of heliosphere. We show the connection of the imbalance with the quadrupole component of the photospheric magnetic field and with the imbalance of the interplanetary magnetic field (the difference between the numbers of the days with positive and negative polarities of the interplanetary magnetic field near Earth).

  1. Magnetic buoyancy instabilities in the presence of magnetic flux pumping at the base of the solar convection zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Adrian J.; Silvers, Lara J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.; Weiss, Nigel O.

    2012-07-01

    We perform idealized numerical simulations of magnetic buoyancy instabilities in three dimensions, solving the equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics in a model of the solar tachocline. In particular, we study the effects of including a highly simplified model of magnetic flux pumping in an upper layer ('the convection zone') on magnetic buoyancy instabilities in a lower layer ('the upper parts of the radiative interior - including the tachocline'), to study these competing flux transport mechanisms at the base of the convection zone. The results of the inclusion of this effect in numerical simulations of the buoyancy instability of both a preconceived magnetic slab and a shear-generated magnetic layer are presented. In the former, we find that if we are in the regime that the downward pumping velocity is comparable with the Alfvén speed of the magnetic layer, magnetic flux pumping is able to hold back the bulk of the magnetic field, with only small pockets of strong field able to rise into the upper layer. In simulations in which the magnetic layer is generated by shear, we find that the shear velocity is not necessarily required to exceed that of the pumping (therefore the kinetic energy of the shear is not required to exceed that of the overlying convection) for strong localized pockets of magnetic field to be produced which can rise into the upper layer. This is because magnetic flux pumping acts to store the field below the interface, allowing it to be amplified both by the shear and by vortical fluid motions, until pockets of field can achieve sufficient strength to rise into the upper layer. In addition, we find that the interface between the two layers is a natural location for the production of strong vertical gradients in the magnetic field. If these gradients are sufficiently strong to allow the development of magnetic buoyancy instabilities, strong shear is not necessarily required to drive them (cf. previous work by Vasil & Brummell). We find

  2. Correlated magnetic noise in global networks of gravitational-wave detectors: Observations and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrane, E.; Christensen, N.; Schofield, R. M. S.

    2013-06-01

    One of the most ambitious goals of gravitational-wave astronomy is to observe the stochastic gravitational-wave background. Correlated noise in two or more detectors can introduce a systematic error, which limits the sensitivity of stochastic searches. We report on measurements of correlated magnetic noise from Schumann resonances at the widely separated LIGO and Virgo detectors. We investigate the effect of this noise on a global network of gravitational-wave detectors and derive a constraint on the allowable coupling of environmental magnetic fields to test mass motion in gravitational-wave detectors. We find that while correlated noise from global electromagnetic fields could be safely ignored for initial LIGO stochastic searches, it could severely impact Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, KAGRA, as well as third-generation detectors.

  3. Effect of various pulse wave forms for pulse-type magnetic flux pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhiming; Chen, Chuan; Wu, Yanqing; Zhen, Zhen

    2011-09-01

    The excitation current of magnetic pole windings in magnetic flux pump needs to be generated by a control system. In this paper, the control system of pulse-type high temperature superconducting magnetic flux pump is discussed in detail. The control system consists of a control circuit and a drive circuit. A direct current power supply is the unique power supply of the drive circuit. The control circuit is powered by a computer through a USB interface of the computer. The control circuit receives commands from the computer and controls the drive circuit to generate different pulse waves. Each pulse wave generates a unique pulse-type traveling magnetic field and will pump magnetic flux into the superconducting loop. Experiments have been performed to examine the pumping effect of different pulse waves on both MgB 2 and Bi-2223 superconducting loops using the proposed control system, and the best pulse wave has been found. The experimental results show that the magnetic flux pump can compensate current decay up to 32.5 A for MgB 2 loop and 129 A for Bi-2223 loop. It indicates that the control system of the pulse-type magnetic flux pump is effective and feasible.

  4. AN ANALYSIS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INVARIANTS OF MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS WITHIN INTERPLANETARY FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Telloni, D.; Perri, S.; Carbone, V.; Bruno, R.; D Amicis, R.

    2013-10-10

    A statistical analysis of magnetic flux ropes, identified by large-amplitude, smooth rotations of the magnetic field vector and a low level of both proton density and temperature, has been performed by computing the invariants of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, namely the magnetic helicity, the cross-helicity, and the total energy, via magnetic field and plasma fluctuations in the interplanetary medium. A technique based on the wavelet spectrograms of the MHD invariants allows the localization and characterization of those structures in both scales and time: it has been observed that flux ropes show, as expected, high magnetic helicity states (|σ{sub m}| in [0.6: 1]), but extremely variable cross-helicity states (|σ{sub c}| in [0: 0.8]), which, however, are not independent of the magnetic helicity content of the flux rope itself. The two normalized MHD invariants observed within the flux ropes tend indeed to distribute, neither trivially nor automatically, along the √(σ{sub m}{sup 2}+σ{sub c}{sup 2})=1 curve, thus suggesting that some constraint should exist between the magnetic and cross-helicity content of the structures. The analysis carried out has further showed that the flux rope properties are totally independent of their time duration and that they are detected either as a sort of interface between different portions of solar wind or as isolated structures embedded in the same stream.

  5. The perpendicular electron energy flux driven by magnetic fluctuations in the edge of the Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Bengtson, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Wootton, A.J. |

    1995-12-01

    A fast bolometer was used for direct measurements of parallel electron energy flux in the edge of the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT-U) [K. W. Gentle, Nucl. Technol. Fusion {bold 1}, 479 (1981)]. The fluctuating component of the parallel electron energy flux, combined with a measurement of magnetic fluctuations, provides an upper limit to the perpendicular electron flux. This magnetically driven energy flux cannot account for the observed energy flux. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. A moving hum filter to suppress rotor noise in high-resolution airborne magnetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Doll, W.E.; Miller, R.D.; Gamey, T.J.; Emond, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A unique filtering approach is developed to eliminate helicopter rotor noise. It is designed to suppress harmonic noise from a rotor that varies slightly in amplitude, phase, and frequency and that contaminates aero-magnetic data. The filter provides a powerful harmonic noise-suppression tool for data acquired with modern large-dynamic-range recording systems. This three-step approach - polynomial fitting, bandpass filtering, and rotor-noise synthesis - significantly reduces rotor noise without altering the spectra of signals of interest. Two steps before hum filtering - polynomial fitting and bandpass filtering - are critical to accurately model the weak rotor noise. During rotor-noise synthesis, amplitude, phase, and frequency are determined. Data are processed segment by segment so that there is no limit on the length of data. The segment length changes dynamically along a line based on modeling results. Modeling the rotor noise is stable and efficient. Real-world data examples demonstrate that this method can suppress rotor noise by more than 95% when implemented in an aeromagnetic data-processing flow. ?? 2005 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  8. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  9. Compact and lightweight VLF/LF magnetic antenna with femtotesla noise level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marusenkov, Andriy

    2016-04-01

    The measurements of the electromagnetic field in the frequency band 3-300 kHz are widely used for subsurface geophysical surveys, investigations of the various phenomena in the Earth-ionosphere cavity, in the ionosphere and in the magnetosphere, including those connected with seismic and lightning activity. The instrumental noise has to be as low as possible in order to reliably detect the weakest electromagnetic signals, which magnitude could be only a few femtoteslas. In order to decrease magnetic antenna noises the size and mass of the probe has to be increased. However, such approach could be hardly applied for development of mobile sensors. In this report the efforts to achieve the minimal possible noise level at the restricted weight and size of the magnetic antenna are presented. Applying the minimal mass criteria the noise level of the induction coil with a high permeability magnetic core, used as a probe, was optimized. The new pre-amplifier, based on the ultra low noise field effect transistor, was developed. The special attention was paid to the design of the electrostatic screen, which has to generate negligible magnetic noise. As a result, the 300 mm long, 25 mm diameter antenna has the noise level approximately 1 fT/sqrt(Hz) in the frequency band 50 - 200 kHz and <5 fT/sqrt(Hz) in the band 3 - 500 kHz. The mass of the antenna is equal to 0.27 kg for the weather protected version and 0.15 kg for the indoor version. The possibilities to achieve even lower noise level at the same size of the instrument will be also discussed.

  10. Control and readout of current-induced magnetic flux quantization in a superconducting transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, C.; Hackens, B.; Golubović, D. S.; Poli, S.; Faniel, S.; Magnus, W.; Schoenmaker, W.; Bayot, V.; Maes, H.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate a simple and robust method for inducing and detecting changes of magnetic flux quantization in the absence of an externally applied magnetic field. In our device, an isolated ring is interconnected with two access loops via permalloy cores, forming a superconducting transformer. By applying and tuning a direct current at the first access loop, the number of flux quanta trapped in the isolated ring is modified without the aid of an external field. The flux state of the isolated ring is simply detected by recording the evolution of the critical current of the second access loop.

  11. Electron heat flux dropouts in the solar wind - Evidence for interplanetary magnetic field reconnection?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Phillips, J. L.; Bame, S. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    An examination of ISEE-3 data from 1978 reveal 25 electron heat flux dropout events ranging in duration from 20 min to over 11 hours. The heat flux dropouts are found to occur in association with high plasma densities, low plasma velocities, low ion and electron temperatures, and low magnetic field magnitudes. It is suggested that the heat flux dropout intervals may indicate that the spacecraft is sampling plasma regimes which are magnetically disconnected from the sun and instead are connected to the outer heliosphere at both ends.

  12. MODELING THE SUN'S OPEN MAGNETIC FLUX AND THE HELIOSPHERIC CURRENT SHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Cameron, R.; Schmitt, D.; Schuessler, M.

    2010-01-20

    By coupling a solar surface flux transport model with an extrapolation of the heliospheric field, we simulate the evolution of the Sun's open magnetic flux and the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) based on observational data of sunspot groups since 1976. The results are consistent with measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field near Earth and with the tilt angle of the HCS as derived from extrapolation of the observed solar surface field. This opens the possibility for an improved reconstruction of the Sun's open flux and the HCS into the past on the basis of empirical sunspot data.

  13. Structure, Stability, and Evolution of Magnetic Flux Ropes from the Perspective of Magnetic Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Kliem, Bernhard; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of NOAA Active Region (AR) 11817 during 2013 August 10-12, when it developed a complex field configuration and produced four confined, followed by two eruptive, flares. These C-and-above flares are all associated with a magnetic flux rope (MFR) located along the major polarity inversion line, where shearing and converging photospheric flows are present. Aided by the nonlinear force-free field modeling, we identify the MFR through mapping magnetic connectivities and computing the twist number {{ T }}w for each individual field line. The MFR is moderately twisted (| {{ T }}w| \\lt 2) and has a well-defined boundary of high squashing factor Q. We found that the field line with the extremum | {{ T }}w| is a reliable proxy of the rope axis, and that the MFR's peak | {{ T }}w| temporarily increases within half an hour before each flare while it decreases after the flare peak for both confined and eruptive flares. This pre-flare increase in | {{ T }}w| has little effect on the AR's free magnetic energy or any other parameters derived for the whole region, due to its moderate amount and the MFR's relatively small volume, while its decrease after flares is clearly associated with the stepwise decrease in the whole region's free magnetic energy due to the flare. We suggest that {{ T }}w may serve as a useful parameter in forewarning the onset of eruption, and therefore, the consequent space weather effects. The helical kink instability is identified as the prime candidate onset mechanism for the considered flares.

  14. The application of wavelet shrinkage denoising to magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, James

    2014-02-18

    The application of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) as a non-destructive method of defect detection has proliferated throughout the manufacturing community. Instrument technology and measurement methodology have matured commensurately as applications have moved from the R and D labs to the fully automated manufacturing environment. These new applications present a new set of challenges including a bevy of error sources. A significant obstacle in many industrial applications is a decrease in signal to noise ratio due to (i) environmental EMI and (II) compromises in sensor design for the purposes of automation. The stochastic nature of MBN presents a challenge to any method of noise reduction. An application of wavelet shrinkage denoising is proposed as a method of decreasing extraneous noise in MBN measurements. The method is tested and yields marked improvement on measurements subject to EMI, grounding noise, and even measurements in ideal conditions.

  15. Magnetic flux penetration of an aluminum liner during working fluid compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.E.; Hussey, T.W.

    1994-12-31

    The Phillips Laboratory WFX program is a research effort to study the adiabatic compression of a hot hydrogen gas using an electromagnetically imploded solid liner. The potential uses for the megabar pressures obtained include antiproton-catalyzed microfission, magnetized target fusion, hypervelocity projectile acceleration, and equation of state studies. This numerical and analytic study explores the vaporization of an aluminum solid liner during its implosion under the influence of a 5.3 MJ capacitor discharge, and the subsequent magnetic flux penetration into the working fluid. If sufficient magnetic flux diffuses through the liner, then the working fluid is compressed by the magnetic flux rather than the liner. This is undesirable since compression by the magnetic flux will cause the onset of a shock wave within the working fluid. A study of the dynamics of the solid liner was performed with both 1-D and 2-D radiation MHD simulations, which included a careful treatment of the electrical conductivity near the phase transitions. A simple analytic model was developed for determining the effect of the flux penetration on the working fluid compression. The results of this model were used to predict the minimum working fluid density required in order to ignore the flux penetration.

  16. MAGNETAR GIANT FLARES-FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS IN MULTIPOLAR MAGNETOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Cong

    2012-09-20

    We address a primary question regarding the physical mechanism that triggers the energy release and initiates the onset of eruptions in the magnetar magnetosphere. Self-consistent stationary, axisymmetric models of the magnetosphere are constructed based on force-free magnetic field configurations that contain a helically twisted force-free flux rope. Depending on the surface magnetic field polarity, there exist two kinds of magnetic field configurations, inverse and normal. For these two kinds of configurations, variations of the flux rope equilibrium height in response to gradual surface physical processes, such as flux injections and crust motions, are carefully examined. We find that equilibrium curves contain two branches: one represents a stable equilibrium branch, and the other an unstable equilibrium branch. As a result, the evolution of the system shows a catastrophic behavior: when the magnetar surface magnetic field evolves slowly, the height of the flux rope would gradually reach a critical value beyond which stable equilibriums can no longer be maintained. Subsequently, the flux rope would lose equilibrium and the gradual quasi-static evolution of the magnetosphere will be replaced by a fast dynamical evolution. In addition to flux injections, the relative motion of active regions would give rise to the catastrophic behavior and lead to magnetic eruptions as well. We propose that a gradual process could lead to a sudden release of magnetosphere energy on a very short dynamical timescale, without being initiated by a sudden fracture in the crust of the magnetar. Some implications of our model are also discussed.

  17. A Magnetic Flux Leakage and Magnetostrictive Guided Wave Hybrid Transducer for Detecting Bridge Cables

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiang; Wu, Xinjun; Cheng, Cheng; Ben, Anran

    2012-01-01

    Condition assessment of cables has gained considerable attention for the bridge safety. A magnetic flux leakage and magnetostrictive guided wave hybrid transducer is provided to inspect bridge cables. The similarities and differences between the two methods are investigated. The hybrid transducer for bridge cables consists of an aluminum framework, climbing modules, embedded magnetizers and a ribbon coil. The static axial magnetic field provided by the magnetizers meets the needs of the magnetic flux leakage testing and the magnetostrictive guided wave testing. The magnetizers also provide the attraction for the climbing modules. In the magnetic flux leakage testing for the free length of cable, the coil induces the axial leakage magnetic field. In the magnetostrictive guided wave testing for the anchorage zone, the coil provides a pulse high power variational magnetic field for generating guided waves; the coil induces the magnetic field variation for receiving guided waves. The experimental results show that the transducer with the corresponding inspection system could be applied to detect the broken wires in the free length and in the anchorage zone of bridge cables. PMID:22368483

  18. Magnetic field enhancement of generation-recombination and shot noise in organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Djidjou, T. K.; Basel, Tek; Rogachev, A.; Chen, Ying; Shinar, J.

    2015-03-21

    We have studied the effect of magnetic field on noise in series of 2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene-based organic light emitting diodes with dominant hole injection, dominant electron injection, and balanced electron and hole injection. The noise spectra of the balanced devices revealed the generation-recombination (g-r) noise term, which we associated with bimolecular electron-hole recombination. The presence of the g-r noise term is correlated with the strong organic magnetoresistance (up to 25%) observed in the balanced devices. The noise spectra also have the shot noise contribution with the Fano factor 0.25–0.4. We found that time constant of the g-r term decreases and the magnitude of shot noise increases when magnetic field is applied. This behavior can be consistently explained within the polaron-polaron model of organic magnetoresistance. We have not found any evidence that the magnetoresistance in studied devices is affected by traps.

  19. Magnetic field enhancement of generation-recombination and shot noise in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djidjou, T. K.; Chen, Ying; Basel, Tek; Shinar, J.; Rogachev, A.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the effect of magnetic field on noise in series of 2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene-based organic light emitting diodes with dominant hole injection, dominant electron injection, and balanced electron and hole injection. The noise spectra of the balanced devices revealed the generation-recombination (g-r) noise term, which we associated with bimolecular electron-hole recombination. The presence of the g-r noise term is correlated with the strong organic magnetoresistance (up to 25%) observed in the balanced devices. The noise spectra also have the shot noise contribution with the Fano factor 0.25-0.4. We found that time constant of the g-r term decreases and the magnitude of shot noise increases when magnetic field is applied. This behavior can be consistently explained within the polaron-polaron model of organic magnetoresistance. We have not found any evidence that the magnetoresistance in studied devices is affected by traps.

  20. Induced fermionic current by a magnetic flux in a cosmic string spacetime at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra de Mello, Eugênio R.; Saharian, Aram A.; Mohammadi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Here we analyze the finite temperature expectation values of the charge and current densities for a massive fermionic quantum field with nonzero chemical potential μ, induced by a magnetic flux running along the axis of an idealized cosmic string. These densities are decomposed into the vacuum expectation values and contributions coming from the particles and antiparticles. Specifically the charge density is an even periodic function of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the quantum flux and an odd function of the chemical potential. The only nonzero component of the current density corresponds to the azimuthal current and it is an odd periodic function of the magnetic flux and an even function of the chemical potential. Both analyzed are developed for the cases where |μ| is smaller than the mass of the field quanta m.

  1. Solar Magnetic Flux as a Function of Disk Position over the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T.

    2005-05-01

    A novel analysis of a SOHO/MDI full-disk magnetogram time series from March 1996 to November 2004 is presented. Each of the 26,052 magnetograms in the series are segmented into sectors of constant μ = cos θ, each sector having a width of Δμ = 0.05. Within each sector, a histogram of signed magnetic flux density, corrected for the line-of-sight angle θ, is compiled. For each magnetogram we thus obtain a distribution of signed magnetic flux density as a function of μ. Summing the signed flux in each μ bin gives the total signed flux as a function of μ. Plotting these totals for each μ-sector as a function of time over the course of Solar Cycle 22 reveals that cycle minimum and maximum are differentiated only by the magnitude of the flux distributions. In other words, in contrast to analogous plots of flux versus heliocentric latitude, there is no discernible pattern, or "Butterfly Diagram", of flux seen on the solar disk from Earth. The finding is relevant to investigations of total solar irradiance (TSI) since it is known that the primary cause of the ~ 0.1% TSI variation over the solar cycle is the distribution of non-sunspot magnetic flux at smaller μ-values (so-called "faculae").

  2. Modeling Barkhausen Noise in magnetic glasses with dipole-dipole interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Awadhesh K.; Hentschel, H. George E.; Jaiswal, Prabhat K.; Mondal, Chandana; Procaccia, Itamar; Gupta, Bhaskar Sen

    2015-10-01

    Long-ranged dipole-dipole interactions in magnetic glasses give rise to magnetic domains having labyrinthine patterns on the scale of about 1 micron. Barkhausen Noise then results from the movement of domain boundaries which is modeled by the motion of elastic membranes with random pinning. Here we propose that on the nanoscale new sources of Barkhausen Noise can arise. We propose an atomistic model of magnetic glasses in which we measure the Barkhausen Noise which results from the creation of new domains and the movement of domain boundaries on the nanoscale. The statistics of the Barkhausen Noise found in our simulations is in striking disagreement with the expectations in the literature. In fact we find exponential statistics without any power law, stressing the fact that Barkhausen Noise can belong to very different universality classes. In the present model the essence of the phenomenon is the fact that the spin response Green's function is decaying too rapidly for having sufficiently large magnetic jumps. A theory is offered in excellent agreement with the measured data without any free parameter.

  3. Negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise in single-molecule magnet junctions

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Liang, Jiu-Qing; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Molecular spintroinic device based on a single-molecule magnet is one of the ultimate goals of semiconductor nanofabrication technologies. It is thus necessary to understand the electron transport properties of a single-molecule magnet junction. Here we study the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise properties of electron transport through a single-molecule magnet weakly coupled to two electrodes with either one or both of them being ferromagnetic. We predict that the negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise, which can be tuned by a gate voltage, depend sensitively on the spin polarization of the source and drain electrodes. In particular, the shot noise in the negative differential conductance region can be enhanced or decreased originating from the different formation mechanisms of negative differential conductance. The effective competition between fast and slow transport channels is responsible for the observed negative differential conductance and super-Poissonian shot noise. In addition, we further discuss the skewness and kurtosis properties of transport current in the super-Poissonian shot noise regions. Our findings suggest a tunable negative differential conductance molecular device, and the predicted properties of high-order current cumulants are very interesting for a better understanding of electron transport through single-molecule magnet junctions. PMID:25736094

  4. Reducing media noise of perpendicular magnetic recording tape for over-50 TB class data cartridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunuma, S.; Inoue, T.; Watanabe, T.; Doi, T.; Gomi, S.; Mashiko, Y.; Hirata, K.; Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    To reduce medium noise inherent in a perpendicular magnetic recording tape, which is deposited by facing targets sputtering, we have examined an epitaxial double-layered structure consisting of a soft magnetic underlayer (SUL), bcc-FeCoB/fcc-NiFe/Si/bcc-FeCoB, on a 4.5 μm para-aromatic polyamide (aramid) film. An epitaxial soft magnetic bilayer reduces broadband noise by 5.6 dB at 337 kilo fluxchanges per inch (kfci) compared to a single SUL medium (Tape S). This is due to the reduction in the low-frequency noise, which originates from the domain walls of the SUL. Improvement of the crystal orientation of the magnetic layer hcp-CoPtCr-SiO2 and the intermediate layer hcp-Ru by inserting a fcc-NiFe spacer in laminated SULs extends the roll-off curve toward high linear density. When each SUL layer of the bilayer was made thinner, from 25 nm (Tape D2) to 10 nm (Tape D1), the medium noise decreased, improving the signal-to-noise ratio by 8.6 dB at 337 kfci compared to Tape S. In a high resolution playback test of Tape D1, an areal density of 45.0 gigabits per square inch (Gb/in.2) was confirmed. Achieved areal density means the capability of an over-50 terabyte (TB) capacity for a typical linear-formatted data cartridge.

  5. Composite pulses robust against charge noise and magnetic field noise for universal control of a singlet-triplet qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Barnes, Edwin; Kestner, Jason P.; Bishop, Lev S.; Das Sarma, Sankar

    2013-03-01

    We generalize our SUPCODE pulse sequences for singlet-triplet qubits to correct errors from imperfect control. This yields gates that are simultaneously corrected for both charge noise and magnetic field gradient fluctuations, addressing the two dominant T2* processes. By using this more efficient version of SUPCODE, we are able to introduce this capability while also substantially reducing the overall pulse time compared to the previous sequence. We show that our sequence remains realistic under experimental constraints such as finite bandwidth. This work is supported by LPS-NSA-CMTC, IARPA-MQCO and CNAM.

  6. Magnetic flux relaxation in YBa2Cu3)(7-x) thin film: Thermal or athermal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitta, Satish; Stan, M. A.; Warner, J. D.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic flux relaxation behavior of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin film on LaAlO3 for H is parallel to c was studied in the range 4.2 - 40 K and 0.2 - 1.0 T. Both the normalized flux relaxation rate S and the net flux pinning energy U increase continuously from 1.3 x 10(exp -2) to 3.0 x 10(exp -2) and from 70 to 240 meV respectively, as the temperature T increases from 10 to 40 K. This behavior is consistent with the thermally activated flux motion model. At low temperatures, however, S is found to decrease much more slowly as compared with kT, in contradiction to the thermal activation model. This behavior is discussed in terms of the athermal quantum tunneling of flux lines. The magnetic field dependence of U, however, is not completely understood.

  7. Mean-field and direct numerical simulations of magnetic flux concentrations from vertical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, A.; Gressel, O.; Jabbari, S.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Strongly stratified hydromagnetic turbulence has previously been found to produce magnetic flux concentrations if the domain is large enough compared with the size of turbulent eddies. Mean-field simulations (MFS) using parameterizations of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses show a large-scale negative effective magnetic pressure instability and have been able to reproduce many aspects of direct numerical simulations (DNS) regarding growth rate, shape of the resulting magnetic structures, and their height as a function of magnetic field strength. Unlike the case of an imposed horizontal field, for a vertical one, magnetic flux concentrations of equipartition strength with the turbulence can be reached, resulting in magnetic spots that are reminiscent of sunspots. Aims: We determine under what conditions magnetic flux concentrations with vertical field occur and what their internal structure is. Methods: We use a combination of MFS, DNS, and implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) to characterize the resulting magnetic flux concentrations in forced isothermal turbulence with an imposed vertical magnetic field. Results: Using DNS, we confirm earlier results that in the kinematic stage of the large-scale instability the horizontal wavelength of structures is about 10 times the density scale height. At later times, even larger structures are being produced in a fashion similar to inverse spectral transfer in helically driven turbulence. Using ILES, we find that magnetic flux concentrations occur for Mach numbers between 0.1 and 0.7. They occur also for weaker stratification and larger turbulent eddies if the domain is wide enough. Using MFS, the size and aspect ratio of magnetic structures are determined as functions of two input parameters characterizing the parameterization of the effective magnetic pressure. DNS, ILES, and MFS show magnetic flux tubes with mean-field energies comparable to the turbulent kinetic energy. These tubes can reach a length of about

  8. Line-Tied Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Laboratory: Equilibrium Force Balance and Eruptive Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, M.; Belova, E. V.

    2013-07-01

    Flux-rope-based models of solar eruptions rely on the formation of a line-tied flux rope equilibrium that persists until an ideal instability or a breakdown in force balance triggers an eruption. In this paper, we present a quantitative study of equilibrium force balance in solar-relevant flux ropes, focusing primarily on the role of the potential magnetic field in controlling the flux rope behavior. This study was conducted using a newly constructed laboratory experiment in conjunction with supporting three-dimensional MHD simulations that directly model the experimental geometry. The flux ropes studied here, which are produced in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX), evolve quasi-statically over many Alfvén times and have footpoints that are line-tied to two fixed electrodes [E. Oz, C. E. Myers, M. Yamada, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 102107 (2011)]. They are formed within a solar-relevant potential magnetic field configuration that can be systematically modified between discharges. Detailed in situ magnetic measurements from the experiments are compared directly to results from the simulations in order to quantitatively evaluate the various contributions to the equilibrium force balance. We find that forces derived from the applied toroidal guide field contribute significantly to the equilibrium—so much so that the flux ropes are often well confined even in the absence of a "strapping" arcade. These observed guide field forces arise from changes in the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension that result from a combination of effects within the expanding flux rope. With regard to eruptions, the aforementioned guide field forces supplement the well-known strapping field forces to largely prevent the flux ropes from erupting. In particular, many regimes were explored where the strapping field configuration is predicted to be "torus unstable" and yet the flux ropes do not erupt. Eruptions are observed in some regimes, however, and we will discuss the physical

  9. Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Mitsunobu Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto

    2014-05-07

    Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20 μm and 150 nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

  10. Solar Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the heating of the quiet corona by measuring the increase of coronal luminosity with the amount of magnetic flux in the underlying network at solar minimum when there were no active regions on the face of the Sun. The coronal luminosity is measured from Fe IX/X-Fe XII pairs of coronal images from SOHO/EIT. The network magnetic flux content is measured from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. We find that the luminosity of the corona in our quiet regions increases roughly in proportion to the square root of the magnetic flux content of the network and roughly in proportion to the length of the perimeter of the network magnetic flux clumps. From (1) this result, (2) other observations of many fine-scale explosive events at the edges of network flux clumps, and (3) a demonstration that it is energetically feasible for the heating of the corona in quiet regions to be driven by explosions of granule-sized sheared-core magnetic bipoles embedded in the edges of network flux clumps, we infer that in quiet regions that are not influenced by active regions the corona is mainly heated by such magnetic activity in the edges of the network flux clumps. Our observational results together with our feasibility analysis allow us to predict that (1) at the edges of the network flux clumps there are many transient sheared-core bipoles of the size and lifetime of granules and having transverse field strengths > approx. 100 G, (2) approx. 30 of these bipoles are present per supergranule, and (3) most spicules are produced by explosions of these bipoles.

  11. Solar Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2003-08-01

    We investigate the heating of the quiet corona by measuring the increase of coronal luminosity with the amount of magnetic flux in the underlying network at solar minimum when there were no active regions on the face of the Sun. The coronal luminosity is measured from Fe IX/X-Fe XII pairs of coronal images from SOHO/EIT, under the assumption that practically all of the coronal luminosity in our quiet regions comes from plasma in the temperature range 0.9×106K<=T<=1.3×106 K. The network magnetic flux content is measured from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. We find that the luminosity of the corona in our quiet regions increases roughly in proportion to the square root of the magnetic flux content of the network and roughly in proportion to the length of the perimeter of the network magnetic flux clumps. From (1) this result, (2) other observations of many fine-scale explosive events at the edges of network flux clumps, and (3) a demonstration that it is energetically feasible for the heating of the corona in quiet regions to be driven by explosions of granule-sized sheared-core magnetic bipoles embedded in the edges of network flux clumps, we infer that in quiet regions that are not influenced by active regions the corona is mainly heated by such magnetic activity in the edges of the network flux clumps. Our observational results together with our feasibility analysis allow us to predict that (1) at the edges of the network flux clumps there are many transient sheared-core bipoles of the size and lifetime of granules and having transverse field strengths greater than ~100 G, (2) ~30 of these bipoles are present per supergranule, and (3) most spicules are produced by explosions of these bipoles.

  12. Solar Coronal Heating and the Magnetic Flux Content of the Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the heating of the quiet corona by measuring the increase of coronal luminosity with the amount of magnetic flux in the underlying network at solar minimum when there were no active regions on the face of the Sun. The coronal luminosity is measured from Fe IX/X-Fe XII pairs of coronal images from SOHO/EIT. The network magnetic flux content is measured from SOHO/MDI magnetograms. We find that the luminosity of the corona in our quiet regions increases roughly in proportion to the square root of the magnetic flux content of the network and roughly in proportion to the length of the perimeter of the network magnetic flux clumps. From (1) this result, (2) other observations of many fine-scale explosive events at the edges of network flux clumps, and (3) a demonstration that it is energetically feasible for the heating of the corona in quiet regions to be driven by explosions of granule-sized sheared-core magnetic bipoles embedded in the edges of network flux clumps, we infer that in quiet regions that are not influenced by active regions the corona is mainly heated by such magnetic activity in the edges of the network flux clumps. Our observational results together with our feasibility analysis allow us to predict that (1) at the edges of the network flux clumps there are many transient sheared-core bipoles of the size and lifetime of granules and having transverse field strengths greater than approximately - 100 G, (2) approximately 30 of these bipoles are present per supergranule, and (3) most spicules are produced by explosions of these bipoles.

  13. Magnetic flux transport and the sun's dipole moment - New twists to the Babcock-Leighton model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms that give rise to the sun's large-scale poloidal magnetic field are explored in the framework of the Babcock-Leighton (BL) model. It is shown that there are in general two quite distinct contributions to the generation of the 'alpha effect': the first is associated with the axial tilts of the bipolar magnetic regions as they erupt at the surface, while the second arises through the interaction between diffusion and flow as the magnetic flux is dispersed over the surface. The general relationship between flux transport and the BL dynamo is discussed.

  14. Dynamics of local isolated magnetic flux tubes in a fast-rotating stellar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Tajima, C.T.; Matsumoto, R. |; Shibata, K.

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in the fast rotating stellar atmosphere is studied. We focus on the effects and signatures of the instability of the flux tube emergence influenced by the Coriolis force. We present the result from a linear stability analysis and discuss its possible signatures in the course of the evolution of G-type and M-type stars. We present a three dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulation of local isolated magnetic flux tubes under a magnetic buoyancy instability in co-rotating Cartesian coordinates. We find that the combination of the buoyancy instability and the Coriolis effect gives rise to a mechanism, to twist the emerging magnetic flux tube into a helical structure. The tilt angle, east-west asymmetry and magnetic helicity of the Twisted flux tubes in the simulations are studied in detail. The linear and nonlinear analyses provide hints as to what kind of pattern of large spots in young M-type main-sequence stars might be observed. We find that young and old G-type stars may have different distributions of spots while M-type stars may always have low latitudes spots. The size of stellar spots may decrease when a star becomes older, due to the decreasing of magnetic field. A qualitative comparison with solar observations is also presented.

  15. Magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.

    1985-11-01

    The flow of plasma and magnetic flux toward a wall is examined in a slab geometry where the magnetic field is parallel to the wall. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow with a quasisteady approximation is assumed that reduces the problem to three coupled ordinary differential equations. The calculated behavior shows that a thin current sheath is established at the wall in which a variety of phenomena appear, including significant resistive heating and rapid deceleration of the plasma flow. The sheath physics determines the speed at which flux and plasma flow toward the wall. The model has been applied to the field-reversal phase of a field-reversed theta pinch, during which the reduced magnetic field near the wall drives an outward flow of plasma and magnetic flux. The analysis leads to approximate expressions for the instantaneous flow speed, the loss of magnetic flux during the field reversal phase, the integrated heat flow to the wall, and the highest possible magnetic flux retained after reversal. Predictions from this model are compared with previous time-dependent MHD calculations and with experimental results from the TRX-1 [Proceedings of the 4th Symposium on the Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids, 27-29 October 1981 (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 1982), p. 61] and TRX-2 [Proceedings of the 6th U.S. Symposium on Compact Toroid Research, 20-23 February, 1984 (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, 1984), p. 154] experiments.

  16. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m2 (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m2. PMID:27077862

  17. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m² (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m². PMID:27077862

  18. Skin-layer of the eruptive magnetic flux rope in large solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kichigin, G. N.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.; Sidorov, V. I.; Yazev, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of observations of large solar flares made it possible to propose a hypothesis on existence of a skin-layer in magnetic flux ropes of coronal mass ejections. On the assumption that the Bohm coefficient determines the diffusion of magnetic field, an estimate of the skin-layer thickness of ~106 cm is obtained. According to the hypothesis, the electric field of ~0.01-0.1 V/cm, having the nonzero component along the magnetic field of flux rope, arises for ~5 min in the surface layer of the eruptive flux rope during its ejection into the upper corona. The particle acceleration by the electric field to the energies of ~100 MeV/nucleon in the skin-layer of the flux rope leads to their precipitation along field lines to footpoints of the flux rope. The skin-layer presence induces helical or oval chromospheric emission at the ends of flare ribbons. The emission may be accompanied by hard X-ray radiation and by the production of gamma-ray line at the energy of 2.223 MeV (neutron capture line in the photosphere). The magnetic reconnection in the corona leads to a shift of the skin-layer of flux rope across the magnetic field. The area of precipitation of accelerated particles at the flux-rope footpoints expands in this case from the inside outward. This effect is traced in the chromosphere and in the transient region as the expanding helical emission structures. If the emission extends to the spot, a certain fraction of accelerated particles may be reflected from the magnetic barrier (in the magnetic field of the spot). In the case of exit into the interplanetary space, these particles may be recorded in the Earth's orbit as solar proton events.

  19. Detection of a milling-induced surface damage by the magnetic Barkhausen noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakov, A.; Neslušan, M.; Perevertov, O.

    2016-07-01

    The potential of the magnetic Barkhausen noise method for a non-destructive evaluation of the steel surface damage cased by milling was comprehensively investigated. A typical bearing steel was heat treated to three different hardnesses and then machined using the cutting tools with different degrees of the flank wear. The magnetic low-frequency measurements with a high reading depth were performed using a unique laboratory system providing a full control of the magnetization process. The high-frequency measurements were performed using a commercial Rollscan device. To study the induced magnetic anisotropy, the measurements were performed in two magnetization directions. In the feeding direction, the Barkhausen noise profiles showed a second high-field peak ascribed to an induced hardened surface layer, a so-called white layer. The most reliable results were obtained with the controlled waveform of the surface magnetic field measured directly by Hall sensors. In the perpendicular rotation direction, formation of the preferentially oriented matrix resulted in an enormously high Barkhausen noise activity. Based on these results, new magnetic parameters were proposed for the non-destructive evaluation of the white layer formation.

  20. Twist accumulation and topology structure of a solar magnetic flux rope

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Cheng, X.; Zhao, J.; Pariat, E.

    2013-12-20

    To study the buildup of a magnetic flux rope before a major flare and coronal mass ejection (CME), we compute the magnetic helicity injection, twist accumulation, and topology structure of the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field, which is derived by the nonlinear force-free field model. The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory observed a series of confined flares without any CME before a major flare with a CME at 23:02 UT on 2005 January 15 in active region NOAA 10720. We derive the vector velocity at eight time points from 18:27 UT to 22:20 UT with the differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetic fields, which were observed by the Digital Vector Magnetograph at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The injected magnetic helicity is computed with the vector magnetic and velocity fields. The helicity injection rate was (– 16.47 ± 3.52) × 10{sup 40} Mx{sup 2} hr{sup –1}. We find that only about 1.8% of the injected magnetic helicity became the internal helicity of the magnetic flux rope, whose twist increasing rate was –0.18 ± 0.08 Turns hr{sup –1}. The quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) of the 3D magnetic field are computed by evaluating the squashing degree, Q. We find that the flux rope was wrapped by QSLs with large Q values, where the magnetic reconnection induced by the continuously injected magnetic helicity further produced the confined flares. We suggest that the flux rope was built up and heated by the magnetic reconnection in the QSLs.

  1. Magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Coffey, H.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems, focusing on the Holloman maglev rocket system. The paper also discusses simulating the damping plate, which is attached to the superconducting magnet by two short-circuited loop coils in the guideway. Closed-form formulas for the magnetic damping coefficient as functions of heave-and-sway displacements are derived by using a dynamic circuit model. These formulas are useful for dynamic stability studies.

  2. Formation processes of flux ropes downstream from Martian crustal magnetic fields inferred from Grad-Shafranov reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takuya; Seki, Kanako; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Brain, David A.; Matsunaga, Kazunari; Saito, Miho H.; Shiota, Daikou

    2014-09-01

    We applied the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction (GSR) technique to Martian magnetic flux ropes observed downstream from strong crustal magnetic fields in the southern hemisphere. The GSR technique can provide a two-dimensional axial magnetic field map as well as the axial orientation of flux ropes from single-spacecraft data under assumptions that the structure is magnetohydrostatic and time independent. The reconstructed structures, including their orientation, allowed us to evaluate possible formation processes for the flux ropes. We reconstructed 297 magnetic flux ropes observed by Mars Global Surveyor between April 1999 and November 2006. Based on characteristics of their geometrical axial orientation and transverse magnetic field topology, we found that they can be mainly distinguished according to whether draped interplanetary magnetic fields overlaying the crustal magnetic fields are involved or not. Approximately two thirds of the flux ropes can be formed by magnetic reconnection between neighboring crustal magnetic fields attached to the surface. The remaining events seem to require magnetic reconnection between crustal and overlaid draped magnetic fields. The latter scenario should allow planetary ions to be transferred from closed magnetic flux tube to flux tubes connected to interplanetary space, allowing atmospheric ions to escape from Mars. We quantitatively evaluate lower limits on potential ion escape rates from Mars owing to magnetic flux ropes.

  3. A tubular flux-switching permanent magnet machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wang, W.; Clark, R.; Atallah, K.; Howe, D.

    2008-04-01

    The paper describes a novel tubular, three-phase permanent magnet brushless machine, which combines salient features from both switched reluctance and permanent magnet machine technologies. It has no end windings and zero net radial force and offers a high power density and peak force capability, as well as the potential for low manufacturing cost. It is, therefore, eminently suitable for a variety of applications, ranging from free-piston energy converters to active vehicle suspensions.

  4. Improved thrust calculations of active magnetic bearings considering fringing flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Ji-Hwan; Sung, So-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-04-01

    A methodology for deriving fringing permeance in axisymmetric devices such as active thrust magnetic bearings (ATMBs) is presented. The methodology is used to develop an improved equivalent magnetic circuit (EMC) for ATMBs, which considers the fringing effect. This EMC was used to characterize the force between the housing and mover and the dependence of thrust and inductance on the air gap and input current, respectively. These characteristics were validated by comparison with those obtained by the finite element method and in experiments.

  5. Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Tubes in an Advective Flow around a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Giri, Kinsuk

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields cannibalized by an accretion flow would very soon have a dominant toroidal component. Without changing the topology, we study the movements of these flux tubes inside a geometrically thick advective disk which undergo centrifugal pressure supported shocks. We also consider the effects of the flux tubes on the flow. We use a finite element method (Total Variation Diminishing) for this purpose and specifically focussed whether the flux tubes contribute to changes in outflow properties in terms of its collimation and outflow rates. It is seen that depending upon the cross sectional radius of the flux tubes (which control the drag force), these field lines may move towards the central object or oscillate vertically before eventually escaping out of the funnel wall (pressure zero surface). These interesting results obtained with and without flux tubes point to the role the flux tubes play in collimation of jets and outflows.

  6. ON POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSAL AND SURFACE FLUX TRANSPORT DURING SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-10

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  7. Study on formation processes of Martian magnetic flux ropes observed downstream from crustal magnetic fields based on the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, T.; Seki, K.; Hasegawa, H.; Brain, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic flux ropes have been observed even in unmagnetized planets' ionosphere, such as Venus and Mars. In the case of Mars, the origin of Martian flux ropes is owing to not only the interplanetary magnetic field and associated draped magnetic fields, but also crustal magnetic fields. Planetary ions are energized through the direct interaction of the solar wind with the upper atmosphere, resulting in ion escape into interplanetary space. Hence magnetic flux ropes can contribute to the ion escape rates, because they may confine large amounts of ionospheric plasma. Here, we investigated formation processes of Martian magnetic flux ropes observed downstream from strong crustal magnetic fields in the southern hemisphere based on the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction (GSR) technique. The GSR technique can provide a two-dimensional axial magnetic field map as well as flux ropes axial orientation from single spacecraft data under assumptions that the structure is magneto-hydrostatic and time-independent. We reconstructed the 297 magnetic flux ropes from Mars Global Surveyor measurements between April 1999 and November 2006. Based on characteristics of their geometrical axial orientation and transverse magnetic field topology, we found that they can be mainly distinguished according to whether draped interplanetary magnetic fields overlaying on the crustal magnetic fields are involved or not. For approximately two-thirds of the events, they can be formed by magnetic reconnection between neighboring crustal magnetic fields attached to the surface. For the remaining events, however, magnetic reconnection between the crustal and overlaid draping magnetic fields seems to be necessary. Since the overlaid draping magnetic field connects to interplanetary space, planetary ions included inside those flux ropes can be easy to escape from Mars. We also quantitatively evaluate lower limits on potential ion escape rates from Mars owing to the magnetic flux ropes based on the GSR results

  8. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  9. Characterizing and modeling magnetic flux transport in the sun's photosphere and determining its impact on the sunspot cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, Lisa A.

    from one cycle to the next. The MF is faster at solar cycle minimum and slower at maximum. Furthermore, the MF speeds that preceded the Solar Cycle 23/24 minimum were ˜ 20% faster than the MF speeds that preceded the prior minimum. This faster MF may have led to weaker polar field strengths and thus the subsequent extended solar minimum and an unusually weak Cycle 24. To understand the impact flux transport on the evolution of the polar fields, I have conducted experiments using a surface magnetic flux transport model, introduced in Chapter 4, that we have developed. This model advects the magnetic flux emerging in active regions (sunspots) using detailed observations of the near-surface flows that transport the magnetic elements. These flows include the axisymmetric differential rotation and meridional flow and the non-axisymmetric cellular convective flows (supergranules), all of which vary in time in the model as indicated by direct observations. At each time step, magnetic maps of the entire Sun are created. These maps are used to create plots of the Sun's axial dipole moment, a measure of the polar field. Also in Chapter 4, I illustrate how this model is used to create a baseline. In this regime, the model assimilates (i.e. continually adds in data weighted by its noise level) magnetic data from magnetograms at all available latitudes. This ensures that it accurately represents the magnetic fields observed on the surface of the Sun. This baseline is used to illustrate the difference in the timing of the polar field reversals based on four different definitions of polar fields. Advantages and disadvantages of each of these definitions are discussed. In Chapter 5, I discuss how the model is used in a predictive or simulation regime. I have tested the predictability of this model using a baseline map as an initial condition, but with daily sunspot area data used to give the sources of new magnetic flux. I found that the strength of the polar fields at cycle minimum

  10. ABSORPTION OF p MODES BY THIN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rekha; Hindman, Bradley W.; Braun, Doug C.; Birch, Aaron C.

    2009-04-10

    We study the interaction between p modes and the many magnetic fibrils that lace the solar convection zone. In particular, we investigate the resulting absorption of p-mode energy by the fibril magnetic field. Through mechanical buffeting, the p modes excite tube waves on the magnetic fibrils-in the form of longitudinal sausage waves and transverse kink waves. The tube waves propagate up and down the magnetic fibrils and out of the p-mode cavity, thereby removing energy from the incident acoustic waves. We compute the absorption coefficient associated with this damping mechanism and model the absorption that would be observed for magnetic plage. We compare our results to the absorption coefficient that is measured using the local-helioseismic technique of ridge-filtered holography. We find that, depending on the mode order and the photospheric boundary conditions, we can achieve absorption coefficients for simulated plage that exceed 50%. The observed increase of the absorption coefficient as a function of frequency is reproduced for all model parameters.

  11. Tunable magnetic flux sensor using a metallic Rashba ring with half-metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Jalil, M. B. A.; Tan, S. G.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a magnetic field sensor consisting of a square ring made of metal with a strong Rashba spin-orbital coupling (RSOC) and contacted to half-metal electrodes. Due to the Aharonov-Casher effect, the presence of the RSOC imparts a spin-dependent geometric phase to conduction electrons in the ring. The combination of the magnetic flux emanating from the magnetic sample placed below the ring, and the Aharonov-Casher effect due to RSOC results in spin interference, which modulates the spin transport in the ring nanostructure. By using the tight-binding nonequilibrium Green's function formalism to model the transport across the nanoring detector, we theoretically show that with proper optimization, the Rashba ring can function as a sensitive and tunable magnetic probe to detect magnetic flux.

  12. Shot noise of charge current in a quantum dot responded by rotating and oscillating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hong-Kang Zou, Wei-Ke; Chen, Qiao

    2014-09-07

    We have investigated the shot noise and Fano factor of the dynamic spin-polarized quantum dot under the perturbations of a rotating magnetic field (RMF), and an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function approach. The shot noise is enhanced from sub-Poissonian to super-Poissonian due to the application of RMF and OMF, and it is controlled sensitively by the tilt angle θ of RMF. The magnitude of shot noise increases as the photon energy ℏω of OMF increases, and its valley eventually is reversed to peaks as the photon energy is large enough. Double-peak structure of Fano factor is exhibited as the frequency of OMF increases to cover a large regime. The Zeeman energy μ{sub 0}B{sub 0} acts as an effective gate bias to exhibit resonant behavior, and novel peak emerges associated with the applied OMF.

  13. Leak current estimated from the shot noise in magnetic tunneling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Arakawa, Tomonori; Maeda, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Nishihara, Yoshitaka; Ono, Teruo; Nozaki, Takayuki; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji

    2014-07-01

    We performed the shot noise measurement in epitaxial Fe/MgO/Fe-based magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) with various MgO thicknesses between 1.1 nm and 1.625 nm. While the Fano factor to characterize the shot noise is very close to 1 in MTJs with MgO barrier thicker than 1.2 nm, the magnetic configuration-dependent reduction of the Fano factor for MTJs with thin MgO barrier was observed, which is mainly due to the existence of leakage current. By using a simple parallel circuit model, we demonstrated that the contribution of the leak current can be sensitively derived from the shot noise.

  14. Shot noise of charge current in a quantum dot responded by rotating and oscillating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-Kang; Zou, Wei-Ke; Chen, Qiao

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the shot noise and Fano factor of the dynamic spin-polarized quantum dot under the perturbations of a rotating magnetic field (RMF), and an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function approach. The shot noise is enhanced from sub-Poissonian to super-Poissonian due to the application of RMF and OMF, and it is controlled sensitively by the tilt angle θ of RMF. The magnitude of shot noise increases as the photon energy ℏω of OMF increases, and its valley eventually is reversed to peaks as the photon energy is large enough. Double-peak structure of Fano factor is exhibited as the frequency of OMF increases to cover a large regime. The Zeeman energy μ0B0 acts as an effective gate bias to exhibit resonant behavior, and novel peak emerges associated with the applied OMF.

  15. Active control of the volume acquisition noise in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Method and psychoacoustical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, John; Akeroyd, Michael A.; Summerfield, A. Quentin; Palmer, Alan R.

    2001-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive tool for observing correlates of neural activity in the brain while a subject listens to sound. However, intense acoustic noise is generated in the process of capturing MR images. This noise stimulates the auditory nervous system, limiting the dynamic range available for displaying stimulus-driven activity. The noise is potentially damaging to hearing and is distracting for the subject. In an active noise control (ANC) system, a reference sample of a noise is processed to form a sound which adds destructively with the noise at the listener's ear. We describe an implementation of ANC in the electromagnetically hostile and physically compact MRI scanning environment. First, a prototype system was evaluated psychoacoustically in the laboratory, using the electrical drive to a noise-generating loudspeaker as the reference. This system produced 10-20 dB of subjective noise-reduction between 250 Hz and 1 kHz, and smaller amounts at higher frequencies. The system was modified to operate in a real MR scanner where the reference was obtained by recording the acoustic scanner noise. Objective reduction by 30-40 dB of the most intense component in scanner noises was realized between 500 Hz and 3500 Hz, and subjective reduction of 12 dB and 5 dB in tests at frequencies of 600 Hz and at 1.9 kHz, respectively. Although the benefit of ANC is limited by transmission paths to the cochlea other than air-conduction routes from the auditory meatus, ANC achieves worthwhile attenuation even in the frequency range of maximum bone conduction (1.5-2 kHz). ANC should, therefore, be generally useful during auditory fMRI.

  16. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Lai, J; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2014-03-01

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T(e) and n(e) fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ~60,000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50-75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60,000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained. PMID:24689579

  17. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of a three-dimensional MHD simulation we discuss the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B/sub yN/. As a consequence of b/sub yN/ /ne/ 0 the plasmid gets a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmid flux rope remain connected with the Earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of ad-hoc plasmid models. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  18. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD-simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of a 3D MHD simulation, the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration (including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B sub y N is discussed. As a consequence of B sub y N not equalling 0, the plasmoid assumes a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmoid flux rope remain connected with the earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage, topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of an ad hoc plasmoid model.

  19. Plasma β Scaling of Anisotropic Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Flux Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Aveek; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2014-03-01

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of "spaghetti"-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma β dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma β. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  20. Plasma β scaling of anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind flux tube

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Aveek; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima E-mail: amitava@princeton.edu

    2014-03-10

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of 'spaghetti'-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma β dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma β. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  1. A flux-mnemonic permanent magnet brushless machine for wind power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chuang; Chau, K. T.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the concept of flux mnemonics is newly extended to the wind power generator. By incorporating a small magnetizing winding into an outer-rotor doubly salient AlNiCo permanent magnet (PM) machine, a new flux-mnemonic PM brushless wind power generator is proposed and implemented. This generator can offer effective and efficient air-gap flux control. First, the characteristics of the proposed generator are analyzed by using the finite element method. Second, the closed-loop flux control is devised to achieve a constant generated voltage under time-varying wind speeds. Finally, the experimental results are given to verify the validity of the proposed generator and control system.

  2. Mass Flux and Terminal Velocities of Magnetically Driven Jets from Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Takahiro; Shibata, Kazunari

    1995-10-01

    In order to investigate astrophysical jets from accretion disks, we solve 1.5-dimensional steady MHD equations for a wide range of parameters, assuming the shape of poloidal magnetic field lines. We include a thermal effect to obtain the relation between the mass flux of the jet and the magnetic energy at the disk, although the jet is mainly accelerated by the magnetic force. It is found that the mass flux of the jets ( M dot ) is dependent on the magnetic energy at the disk surface, i.e., M dot ~ (rho Aa|Bp/B|)_{{slow}} ~ (rho Aa|Bp/Bphi|)_{{slow}} ~ Ealpha_{{mg}} [where rho is the density, a is the sound velocity, A is the cross section of the magnetic flux, B = (B2p + B2phi)^{1/2} , Bp and B phi are the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field strength, respectively, Emg is the magnetic energy in unit of the gravitational energy at the disk surface, and the suffix "slow" denotes the value at a slow point], when the magnetic energy is not too large. The parameter alpha increases from 0 to 0.5 with decreasing magnetic energy. Since the scaling law of Michel's minimum energy solution nearly holds in the magnetically driven flows, the dependence of the terminal velocity on the magnetic energy becomes weaker than had been expected, i.e., v_∞ ~ E^{(1-alpha)/3}_{{mg}} . It is shown that the terminal velocity of the jet is an order of Keplerian velocity at the footpoint of the jets for a wide range of values of Emg expected for accretion disks in star-forming regions and active galactic nuclei. We argue that the mass-loss rates observed in the star-forming regions would constrain the magnetic energies at the disk surfaces.

  3. Numerical simulations of magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a twisted solar flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Chmielewski, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-04-01

    The paper aims to study the response of a solar small-scale and weak magnetic flux tube to photospheric twisting motions. We numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to describe the evolution of the perturbation within the initially static flux tube, excited by twists in the azimuthal component of the velocity. These twists produce rotation of the magnetic field lines. Perturbation of magnetic field lines propagates upwardly, driving vertical and azimuthal flow as well as plasma compressions and rarefactions in the form of eddies. We conclude that these eddies result from the sheared azimuthal flow which seeds Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) between the flux tube and the ambient medium. Numerically obtained properties of the KHI confirm the analytical predictions for the occurrence of the instability.

  4. Parallel heat flux and flow acceleration in open field line plasmas with magnetic trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, Chris

    2014-10-15

    The magnetic field strength modulation in a tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) provides both flux expansion next to the divertor plates and magnetic trapping in a large portion of the SOL. Previously, we have focused on a flux expander with long mean-free-path, motivated by the high temperature and low density edge anticipated for an absorbing boundary enabled by liquid lithium surfaces. Here, the effects of magnetic trapping and a marginal collisionality on parallel heat flux and parallel flow acceleration are examined. The various transport mechanisms are captured by kinetic simulations in a simple but representative mirror-expander geometry. The observed parallel flow acceleration is interpreted and elucidated with a modified Chew-Goldberger-Low model that retains temperature anisotropy and finite collisionality.

  5. Improved magnetoelectric effect in magnetostrictive/piezoelectric composite with flux concentration effect for sensitive magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Lu, Caijiang; Xu, Changbao; Xiao, Yingjie; Gui, Junguo; Lin, Chenhui; Xiao, Yong

    2015-04-01

    The magnetoelectric (ME) composite with the flux concentration effect is designed, fabricated, and characterized for detecting weak ac magnetic-field. The high-permeability Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 (FeCuNbSiB) foils act as flux concentrators and are bonded at the free ends of traditional ME laminates. With the improved ME responses in the proposed ME composite based on the flux concentration effect, the output sensitivities under zero-biased magnetic field can reach 7 V/Oe and 15.8 mV/Oe under the resonance frequency of 177.36 kHz and the off-resonance frequency of 1 kHz, respectively. The results indicate that the proposed ME composites show promising applications for high-sensitivity self-biased magnetic field sensors and ME transducers.

  6. Numerical simulations of magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a twisted solar flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Chmielewski, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-07-01

    The paper aims to study the response of a solar small-scale and weak magnetic flux tube to photospheric twisting motions. We numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to describe the evolution of the perturbation within the initially static flux tube, excited by twists in the azimuthal component of the velocity. These twists produce rotation of the magnetic field lines. Perturbation of magnetic field lines propagates upwardly, driving vertical and azimuthal flow as well as plasma compressions and rarefactions in the form of eddies. We conclude that these eddies result from the sheared azimuthal flow which seeds Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) between the flux tube and the ambient medium. Numerically obtained properties of the KHI confirm the analytical predictions for the occurrence of the instability.

  7. Disc formation in turbulent cloud cores: is magnetic flux loss necessary to stop the magnetic braking catastrophe or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Lima, R.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2013-03-01

    Recent numerical analysis of Keplerian disc formation in turbulent, magnetized cloud cores by Santos-Lima et al. demonstrated that reconnection diffusion is an efficient process to remove the magnetic flux excess during the buildup of a rotationally supported disc. This process is induced by fast reconnection of the magnetic fields in a turbulent flow. In a similar numerical study, Seifried et al. concluded that reconnection diffusion or any other non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects would not be necessary and turbulence shear alone would provide a natural way to build up a rotating disc without requiring magnetic flux loss. Their conclusion was based on the fact that the mean mass-to-flux ratio (μ) evaluated over a spherical region with a radius much larger than the disc is nearly constant in their models. In this paper, we compare the two sets of simulations and show that this averaging over large scales can mask significant real increases of μ in the inner regions where the disc is built up. We demonstrate that turbulence-induced reconnection diffusion of the magnetic field happens in the initial stages of the disc formation in the turbulent envelope material that is accreting. Our analysis is suggestive that reconnection diffusion is present in both sets of simulations and provides a simple solution for the `magnetic braking catastrophe' which is discussed in the literature in relation to the formation of protostellar accretion discs.

  8. NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS ON THE TWO-STEP EMERGENCE OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2011-07-10

    We present the new results of the two-dimensional numerical experiments on the cross-sectional evolution of a twisted magnetic flux tube rising from the deeper solar convection zone (-20,000 km) to the corona through the surface. The initial depth is 10 times deeper than most of the previous calculations focusing on the flux emergence from the uppermost convection zone. We find that the evolution is illustrated by the following two-step process. The initial tube rises due to its buoyancy, subject to aerodynamic drag due to the external flow. Because of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field, the tube maintains its coherency and does not deform to become a vortex roll pair. When the flux tube approaches the photosphere and expands sufficiently, the plasma on the rising tube accumulates to suppress the tube's emergence. Therefore, the flux decelerates and extends horizontally beneath the surface. This new finding owes to our large-scale simulation, which simultaneously calculates the dynamics within the interior as well as above the surface. As the magnetic pressure gradient increases around the surface, magnetic buoyancy instability is triggered locally and, as a result, the flux rises further into the solar corona. We also find that the deceleration occurs at a higher altitude than assumed in our previous experiment using magnetic flux sheets. By conducting parametric studies, we investigate the conditions for the two-step emergence of the rising flux tube: field strength {approx}> 1.5 x 10{sup 4} G and the twist {approx}> 5.0 x 10{sup -4} km{sup -1} at -20,000 km depth.

  9. Cross-tail magnetic flux ropes as observed by the GEOTAIL spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Fairfield, D. H.; Jones, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kokubun, S.; Yamamoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    Ten transient magnetic structures in Earth's magnetotail, as observed in GEOTAIL measurements, selected for early 1993 (at (-) X(sub GSM) = 90 - 130 Earth radii), are shown to have helical magnetic field configurations similar to those of interplanetary magnetic clouds at 1 AU but smaller in size by a factor of approximately = 700. Such structures are shown to be well approximated by a comprehensive magnetic force-free flux-rope model. For this limited set of 10 events the rope axes are seen to be typically aligned with the Y(sub GSM) axis and the average diameter of these structures is approximately = 15 Earth radii.

  10. Downward catastrophe of solar magnetic flux ropes: another cause of flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Hu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Liu, R.

    2015-12-01

    Study about the evolutions of coronal magnetic flux ropes has important significance in understanding solar energetic activities. In previous studies, it is suggested that there exists a catastrophe, during which the flux rope jumps upward from the equilibrium at a lower altitude to another equilibrium at higher altitude or running away. This 'upward' catastrophe is believed to be an efficient mechanism for the solar eruptive activities, such as flares and coronal mass ejections. In this work, we numerically study and discuss the possibility of the catastrophe of a flux rope in the reversed way, i.e., the flux rope jumps from a higher altitude to a lower altitude, which we call it 'downward' catastrophe. From the simulation in force free magnetic field under a partially open bipolar magnetic configuration, we found that such 'downward' catastrophe does exists. Although the flux rope moves oppositely during the two different catastrophes, the magnetic energies are always released. This indicates that the flaring phenomenon might be also triggered by the 'downward' catastrophe, during which no coronal mass ejections will accompany.

  11. The Existence Condition for Magnetic Flux-Current Surfaces in Magnetohydrostatic Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G. S.; No, J.; Kim, S.; Jang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetohydrostatic equilibria, in which the Lorentz force, the plasma pressure force and the gravitational force balance out to zero, are widely adopted as the zeroth order states of many space plasma systems. A magnetic flux-current surface is a surface, whose tangent plane is locally spanned by the magnetic field vector and the current density vector at each point in it; in other words, it is a surface, in which both magnetic field lines and current lines lie. We have derived the necessary and sufficient condition for existence of magnetic flux-current surfaces in magnetohydrostatic equilibria. It is also shown that the existence of flux-current surfaces is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for the ratio of gravity-aligned components of current density and magnetic field to be constant along each field line. However, its necessary and sufficient condition is found to be very restrictive. This finding gives a significant constraint in modeling solar coronal magnetic fields as force-free fields using photospheric magnetic field observations.

  12. Flux trapping and magnetization of hollow superconducting cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, F.J.; Hibbs, A.D.; Campbell, A.M.

    1989-03-01

    The magnetization of hollow cylinders of high T/sub c/ materials, and the field trapped inside them, has been measured by integrating the signal from coils outside and inside the cylinders. The two coils allow the field trapped in the grains themselves to be separated from the field due to the circulating currents in the bulk material. The trapped field tells us the maximum field that can be expected in a magnet. For practical purposes the most important parameter is the field at which J/sub c/ drops to half its zero field value. Cylinders have been made from yttrium barium copper oxide, abbreviated to YBCO, and also from bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide, abbreviated to BiSCO. Various preparation methods have been employed and the properties of the resulting cylinders compared.

  13. Dynamic analysis of a magnetic bearing system with flux control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah; Walsh, Thomas; Virgin, Lawrence

    1994-01-01

    Using measured values of two-dimensional forces in a magnetic actuator, equations of motion for an active magnetic bearing are presented. The presence of geometric coupling between coordinate directions causes the equations of motion to be nonlinear. Two methods are used to examine the unbalance response of the system: simulation by direct integration in time; and determination of approximate steady state solutions by harmonic balance. For relatively large values of the derivative control coefficient, the system behaves in an essentially linear manner, but for lower values of this parameter, or for higher values of the coupling coefficient, the response shows a split of amplitudes in the two principal directions. This bifurcation is sensitive to initial conditions. The harmonic balance solution shows that the separation of amplitudes actually corresponds to a change in stability of multiple coexisting solutions.

  14. Exact scattering matrix of graphs in magnetic field and quantum noise

    SciTech Connect

    Caudrelier, Vincent; Mintchev, Mihail; Ragoucy, Eric

    2014-08-15

    We consider arbitrary quantum wire networks modelled by finite, noncompact, connected quantum graphs in the presence of an external magnetic field. We find a general formula for the total scattering matrix of the network in terms of its local scattering properties and its metric structure. This is applied to a quantum ring with N external edges. Connecting the external edges of the ring to heat reservoirs, we study the quantum transport on the graph in ambient magnetic field. We consider two types of dynamics on the ring: the free Schrödinger and the free massless Dirac equations. For each case, a detailed study of the thermal noise is performed analytically. Interestingly enough, in presence of a magnetic field, the standard linear Johnson-Nyquist law for the low temperature behaviour of the thermal noise becomes nonlinear. The precise regime of validity of this effect is discussed and a typical signature of the underlying dynamics is observed.

  15. Magnet safety and stability related coolant states: critical fluid dynamics at peak flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, K. V.; Carandang, R. M.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    The stability of superconducting magnets is endangered under certain distinct conditions of the fluid serving as magnet coolant. A severe compromising of safety takes place at the peak heat flux of nucleate boiling. Progress in analysing first order phase transitions for cryoliquids and room temperature liquids, in the presence of heat flow, has led to better understanding of the parameters related to vapour bubble phenomena. The present work addresses the consequences arising from bubble frequency results, including model calculations for the effective masses of the saturated fluids involved in the two-phase transport at the peak flux.

  16. Magnetic Flux Effect on a Kondo-Induced Electric Polarization in a Triangular Triple Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Mikito; Matsumoto, Masashige; Kusunose, Hiroaki

    2014-08-01

    A magnetic flux effect is studied theoretically on an electric polarization induced by the Kondo effect in a triangular triple-quantum-dot system, where one of the three dots is connected to a metallic lead. This electric polarization exhibits an Aharonov-Bohm oscillation as a function of the magnetic flux penetrating through the triangular loop. The numerical renormalization group analysis reveals how the oscillation pattern depends on the Kondo coupling of a local spin with lead electrons, which is sensitive to the point contact with the lead. It provides an experimental implication that the Kondo effect is the origin of the emergent electric polarization.

  17. Kondo-induced electric polarization modulated by magnetic flux through a triangular triple quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Kusunose, H.

    2015-03-01

    The Kondo effect plays an important role in emergence of electric polarization in a triangular triple-quantum-dot system, where one of the three dots is point-contacted with a single lead, and a magnetic flux penetrates through the triangular loop. The Kondo-induced electric polarization exhibits an Aharonov-Bohm type oscillation as a function of the magnetic flux. Our theoretical study shows various oscillation patterns associated with the field-dependent mixing of twofold orbitally degenerate ground states and their sensitivity to the point contact.

  18. The equilibrium structure of thin magnetic flux tubes. II. [in sun and late stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal structure of the medium inside thin, vertical magnetic flux tubes embedded in a given external atmosphere is investigated, assuming cylindrical symmetry and a depth-independent plasma beta. The variation with tube radius of the temperature on the tube axis is computed and the temperature on the tube wall is estimated. The temperature variation across the flux tube is found to be due to the depth variation of the intensity and to the density stratification of the atmosphere. Since the temperature difference between the axis and the wall is small in thin flux tubes (of the order of 10 percent), the horizontal temperature gradient may often be neglected and the temperature in a tube of given radius may be described by a single function of depth. Thus, a more detailed numerical treatment of the radiative transfer within thin flux tubes can be substantially simplified by neglecting horizontal temperature differences within the flux tube proper.

  19. Multiple Triangulation Analysis: another approach to determine the orientation of magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.-Z.; Zong, Q.-G.; Pu, Z. Y.; Fritz, T. A.; Dunlop, M. W.; Shi, Q. Q.; Wang, J.; Wei, Y.

    2006-07-01

    Another approach (Multiple Triangulation Analysis, MTA) is presented to determine the orientation of magnetic flux rope, based on 4-point measurements. A 2-D flux rope model is used to examine the accuracy of the MTA technique in a theoretical way. It is found that the precision of the estimated orientation is dependent on both the spacecraft separation and the constellation path relative to the flux rope structure. However, the MTA error range can be shown to be smaller than that of the traditional MVA technique. As an application to real Cluster data, several flux rope events on 26 January 2001 are analyzed using MTA, to obtain their orientations. The results are compared with the ones obtained by several other methods which also yield flux rope orientation. The estimated axis orientations are shown to be fairly close, suggesting the reliability of the MTA method.

  20. Bound oscillations on thin magnetic flux tubes - Convective instability and umbral oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Roberts, B.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility that 'tube waves' can be trapped on slender solar magnetic flux tubes is investigated. For rigid isothermal flux tubes, it is found that the flux tube geometry can by itself lead to waves which are trapped on the part of the tube that expands with height. Some geometries lead to trapped modes with eigenperiods near 180 s, if parameters appropriate to sunspot umbrae are chosen. It is possible that the umbral oscillations are a manifestation of such trapped waves, if sunspot umbrae consist of an assembly of slender flux tubes, as in the spaghetti model of Parker (1979). For flux tubes which have a constant ratio of Alfven speed to sound speed, it is found that it is primarily the variation of temperature with height which determines whether trapped waves can exist. Certain temperature profiles lead to disturbances for which omega squared is less than zero, corresponding to convective instability or Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  1. Bound oscillations on thin magnetic flux tubes: Convective instability and umbral oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, J.V.; Roberts, B.

    1981-11-01

    The possibility that ''tube waves'' can be trapped on slender solar magnetic flux tubes is investigated. For rigid isothermal flux tubes, we find that the flux tube geometry can by itself lead to waves which are trapped on the part of the tube that expands with height. Some geometries lead to trapped modes with eigenperiods near 180 s, if parameters appropriate to sunspot umbrae are chosen. It is possible that the umbral oscillations are a manifestation of such trapped waves, if sunspot umbrae consist of an assembly of slender flux tubes, as in the spaghetti model of Parker. For flux tubes which have a constant ratio of Alfven speed to sound speed, we find that it is primarily the variation of temperature with height which determines whether trapped waves can exist. Certain temperature profiles lead to disturbances for which ..omega../sup 2/<0, corresponding to convective instability or Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  2. Vector magnetic field observations of flux tube emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.

    2002-10-01

    With Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon borne Observatory high spatial and temporal resolution vector magnetograms have been obtained in an emerging active region. The comparison of the observations (FGE and TRACE) with a linear force-free field analysis of the region shows where the region is non-force-free. An analysis of the magnetic topology furnishes insights into the existence of "bald patches" regions (BPs are regions where the vector field is tangential to the boundary (photosphere) along an inversion line). Magnetic reconnection is possible and local heating of the chromopshere is predicted near the BPs. Ellerman bombs (EBs) were found to coincide with few BPs computed from a linear force-free extrapolation of the observed longitudinal field. But when the actual observations of transverse fields were used to identify BPs, then the correspondence with EB positions improved significantly. We conclude that linear force-free extrapolations must be done with the true observed vertical fields, which require the measurement of the three components of the magnetic field.

  3. Comparisons of Earthward Poynting flux and the kinetic energy flux of up-flowing transversely heated ions from the Polar spacecraft on cusp magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, S.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Scudder, J. D.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents estimates of the Poynting flux flowing along magnetic field lines in the Earth's cusp region over altitudes from 0.8 Re to 7 Re using measurements during several passes from the Polar spacecraft. The Poynting flux is calculated from measurements of electric fields from the University of California, Berkeley double probe electric field instrument, and from magnetic field measurements from the U.C.L.A. fluxgate magnetometer. The estimates of Poynting flux are of special interest because the high altitude mapping of the cusp magnetic flux tubes may connect to newly reconnected field lines and the low altitude mapping of these field lines is the scene of powerful acceleration processes, most notably transverse heating and outflow of ions. The data show that the Poynting flux is predominantly downward over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz . This frequency range includes the Poynting flux due to steady state convection and field-aligned current systems, Alfven waves, and kinetic Alfven waves. Measurement of transversely heated ions over the energy ranges from 10 eV to several keV and their associated ion kinetic energy flux are presented from the University of Iowa Hydra instrument and compared to the values of the downward Poynting flux. Generally the downward Poynting flux exceeds the upward kinetic energy flux of the ions.

  4. Evidence in Magnetic Clouds for Systematic Open Flux Transport on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Kahler, S. W.; Gosling, J. T.; Lepping, R. P.

    2008-01-01

    Most magnetic clouds encountered by spacecraft at 1 AU display a mix of unidirectional suprathermal electrons signaling open field lines and counterstreaming electrons signaling loops connected to the Sun at both ends. Assuming the open fields were originally loops that underwent interchange reconnection with open fields at the Sun, we determine the sense of connectedness of the open fields found in 72 of 97 magnetic clouds identified by the Wind spacecraft in order to obtain information on the location and sense of the reconnection and resulting flux transport at the Sun. The true polarity of the open fields in each magnetic cloud was determined from the direction of the suprathermal electron flow relative to the magnetic field direction. Results indicate that the polarity of all open fields within a given magnetic cloud is the same 89% of the time, implying that interchange reconnection at the Sun most often occurs in only one leg of a flux rope loop, thus transporting open flux in a single direction, from a coronal hole near that leg to the foot point of the opposite leg. This pattern is consistent with the view that interchange reconnection in coronal mass ejections systematically transports an amount of open flux sufficient to reverse the polarity of the heliospheric field through the course of the solar cycle. Using the same electron data, we also find that the fields encountered in magnetic clouds are only a third as likely to be locally inverted as not. While one might expect inversions to be equally as common as not in flux rope coils, consideration of the geometry of spacecraft trajectories relative to the modeled magnetic cloud axes leads us to conclude that the result is reasonable.

  5. SOLAR MAGNETIC TRACKING. III. APPARENT UNIPOLAR FLUX EMERGENCE IN HIGH-RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, D. A.; DeForest, C. E.; Hagenaar, H. J.; Parnell, C. E.; Welsch, B. T.

    2010-09-10

    Understanding the behavior of weak magnetic fields near the detection limit of current instrumentation is important for determining the flux budget of the solar photosphere at small spatial scales. Using 0.''3-resolution magnetograms from the Solar Optical Telescope's Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) on the Hinode spacecraft, we confirm that the previously reported apparent unipolar magnetic flux emergence seen in intermediate-resolution magnetograms is indeed the coalescence of previously existing flux. We demonstrate that similar but smaller events seen in NFI magnetograms are also likely to correspond to the coalescence of previously existing weak fields. The uncoalesced flux, detectable only in the ensemble average of hundreds of these events, accounts for 50% of the total flux within 3 Mm of the detected features. The spatial scale at which apparent unipolar emergence can be directly observed as coalescence remains unknown. The polarity of the coalescing flux is more balanced than would be expected given the imbalance of the data set, however without further study we cannot speculate whether this implies that the flux in the apparent unipolar emergence events is produced by a granulation-scale dynamo or is recycled from existing field.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Magnetic Flux Compression in Helical-Cone Magnetoexplosive Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryugin, Yu. N.; Korolev, P. V.; Kargin, V. I.; Pikar, A. S.; Popkov, N. F.; Ryaslov, E. A.

    2004-11-01

    We present the results of calculations of the physical processes of magnetic flux compression in a magnetocumulative generator with a large diameter spiral. The generator considered is a modification of the one developed for the multimegajoule energy source and intended for the PIRIT-EMG stationary electrophysical facility, pumping a pulsed energy of 80 MJ. The development of the magnetocumulative generator required calculating its output parameters and optimizing the generator dimensions, choosing the form and calculating the shape and thickness, insulation type and electric strength of the spiral wire. The authors developed a program package to simulate the helical-cone generator operation and numerically investigate the physical processes occurring at magnetic flux compression. To calculate the liner scatter dynamics, Eulerian equations were solved for counter-running sliding detonation waves. The system of equations is integrated using a finite-difference method for 2-D stationary grids adapting to the peculiarities of the flow. The liner collision with spiral coils as well as the destruction of the insulation is considered in 2-D through a model of nonviscous gas without heat conductivity. The magnetic flux compression is calculated using the analytical solutions of dynamic tasks and a 1-D non-linear diffusion of the magnetic field in conductors. Moreover, using a sufficiently simple algorithm, we managed to account for the basic losses of the magnetic flux related to diffusion, cuts-off at section and wire joints, and the losses related to spiral and liner misalignment.

  7. The influence of magnetic domain landscape on the flux pinning in ferromagnetic/superconducting bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marta Z.; Adamus, Z.; Konczykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2009-03-01

    A line of miniature Hall sensors has been used to study the influence of the disorder in the magnetic domain landscape on flux pinning in the ferromagnetic/superconducting (F/S) bilayers. The bilayers consist of Nb as the S layer and Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the F layer, separated by a Si buffer layer to avoid the proximity effect. By changing of the Pt layer thickness, the magnetic domain landscape with different degree of disorder, ranging from uniformly distributed narrow domains (quasi-ordered landscape) to highly disordered landscape with domains of different sizes, can be predefined in the F layer. The flux behavior is then measured in the superconducting state using the Hall sensors. It is found that the quasi-ordered landscape with domains width comparable to the magnetic penetration depth produces large enhancement of the vortex pinning and smooth flux penetration. The more disordered magnetic domain patterns cause less pinning and create large edge barrier for vortex entry followed by strongly inhomogeneous flux penetration. The possible origins of this behavior will be discussed.

  8. Gaussian approximation and single-spin measurement in magnetic resonance force microscopy with spin noise

    SciTech Connect

    Raghunathan, Shesha; Brun, Todd A.; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2010-11-15

    A promising technique for measuring single electron spins is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), in which a microcantilever with a permanent magnetic tip is resonantly driven by a single oscillating spin. The most effective experimental technique is the oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals (OSCAR) protocol, in which the signal takes the form of a frequency shift. If the quality factor of the cantilever is high enough, this signal will be amplified over time to the point where it can be detected by optical or other techniques. An important requirement, however, is that this measurement process occurs on a time scale that is short compared to any noise which disturbs the orientation of the measured spin. We describe a model of spin noise for the MRFM system and show how this noise is transformed to become time dependent in going to the usual rotating frame. We simplify the description of the cantilever-spin system by approximating the cantilever wave function as a Gaussian wave packet and show that the resulting approximation closely matches the full quantum behavior. We then examine the problem of detecting the signal for a cantilever with thermal noise and spin with spin noise, deriving a condition for this to be a useful measurement.

  9. Morphology and magnetic flux distribution in superparamagnetic, single-crystalline Fe3O4 nanoparticle rings

    PubMed Central

    Takeno, Yumu; Murakami, Yasukazu; Sato, Takeshi; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Park, Hyun Soon; Shindo, Daisuke; Ferguson, R. Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the correlation between crystal orientation and magnetic flux distribution of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the form of self-assembled rings. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the nanoparticles were single-crystalline, highly monodispersed, (25 nm average diameter), and showed no appreciable lattice imperfections such as twins or stacking faults. Electron holography studies of these superparamagnetic nanoparticle rings indicated significant fluctuations in the magnetic flux lines, consistent with variations in the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the nanoparticles. The observations provide useful information for a deeper understanding of the micromagnetics of ultrasmall nanoparticles, where the magnetic dipolar interaction competes with the magnetic anisotropy. PMID:25422526

  10. Setup and initial results from the magnetic flux surface diagnostics at Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, M.; Aßmus, D.; Biedermann, C.; Bozhenkov, S.; Bräuer, T.; Dudek, A.; Geiger, J.; Kocsis, G.; Lazerson, S.; Pedersen, T. S.; Schauer, F.; Szepesi, T.; Standley, B.; the W7-X Team

    2016-06-01

    Wendelstein 7-X is an optimized stellarator with superconducting magnetic field coils that just started plasma operation at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) Greifswald. Utilizing the electron beam technique the first vacuum flux surface measurements were performed during the commissioning of the magnet system. For the magnetic configurations investigated so far the existence of closed and nested flux surfaces has been validated. All features of the configuration designed for the initial plasma operation phase, including a predicted island chain, were confirmed. No evidence on significant magnetic field errors was found. Furthermore, the effect of the elastic deformation of the non-planar coils was confirmed by the measurements.

  11. Magnetic x-ray microscopy at low temperatures - Visualization of flux distributions in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Claudia; Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Bechtel, Michael; Schütz, Gisela; Albrecht, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) microscopy at liquid nitrogen temperature has been performed on bilayers of high-Tc superconducting YBCO (YBa2Cu3O7-δ) and soft-magnetic Co40Fe40B20. This should allow us to map the magnetic flux density distribution in the current-carrying state of the superconductor with high spatial resolution. For that purpose the UHV scanning X-ray microscope MAXYMUS has been upgraded by a MMR Micro Miniature Joule-Thompson cryostat capable of temperatures between 75 K and 580 K. Resulting XMCD images of the magnetic flux density in the superconductor with a field of view ranging from millimeters to micrometers are presented. The microscope's unique combination of total electron yield (TEY) measurements together with low temperatures offers novel possibilities concerning the current transport in superconductors on small length scales.

  12. Nonlinear fast sausage waves in homogeneous magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalyaev, Badma B.; Ruderman, Michael S.

    2015-12-01

    > We consider fast sausage waves in straight homogeneous magnetic tubes. The plasma motion is described by the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in the cold plasma approximation. We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger equation describing the nonlinear evolution of an envelope of a carrier wave. The coefficients of this equation are expressed in terms Bessel and modified Bessel functions. They are calculated numerically for various values of parameters. In particular, we show that the criterion for the onset of the modulational or Benjamin-Fair instability is satisfied. The implication of the obtained results for solar physics is discussed.

  13. Gauge thresholds in the presence of oblique magnetic fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Massimo; Trevigne, Elisa

    2006-01-01

    We compute the one-loop partition function and analyze the conditions for tadpole cancellation in type I theories compactified on tori in the presence of internal oblique magnetic fields. We check open-closed string channel duality and discuss the effect of T-duality. We address the issue of the quantum consistency of the toroidal model with stabilized moduli recently proposed by Antoniadis and Maillard (AM). We then pass to describe the computation of one-loop threshold corrections to the gauge couplings in models of this kind. Finally we briefly comment on coupling unification and dilaton stabilization in phenomenologically more viable models.

  14. Propagation of Long-Wavelength Nonlinear Slow Sausage Waves in Stratified Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbulescu, M.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of nonlinear, long-wavelength, slow sausage waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube, embedded in a non-magnetic stratified environment, is discussed. The governing equation for surface waves, which is akin to the Leibovich-Roberts equation, is derived using the method of multiple scales. The solitary wave solution of the equation is obtained numerically. The results obtained are illustrative of a solitary wave whose properties are highly dependent on the degree of stratification.

  15. An accurate symplectic calculation of the inboard magnetic footprint from statistical topological noise and field errors in the DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima

    2011-02-15

    Any canonical transformation of Hamiltonian equations is symplectic, and any area-preserving transformation in 2D is a symplectomorphism. Based on these, a discrete symplectic map and its continuous symplectic analog are derived for forward magnetic field line trajectories in natural canonical coordinates. The unperturbed axisymmetric Hamiltonian for magnetic field lines is constructed from the experimental data in the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon and L. E. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The equilibrium Hamiltonian is a highly accurate, analytic, and realistic representation of the magnetic geometry of the DIII-D. These symplectic mathematical maps are used to calculate the magnetic footprint on the inboard collector plate in the DIII-D. Internal statistical topological noise and field errors are irreducible and ubiquitous in magnetic confinement schemes for fusion. It is important to know the stochasticity and magnetic footprint from noise and error fields. The estimates of the spectrum and mode amplitudes of the spatial topological noise and magnetic errors in the DIII-D are used as magnetic perturbation. The discrete and continuous symplectic maps are used to calculate the magnetic footprint on the inboard collector plate of the DIII-D by inverting the natural coordinates to physical coordinates. The combination of highly accurate equilibrium generating function, natural canonical coordinates, symplecticity, and small step-size together gives a very accurate calculation of magnetic footprint. Radial variation of magnetic perturbation and the response of plasma to perturbation are not included. The inboard footprint from noise and errors are dominated by m=3, n=1 mode. The footprint is in the form of a toroidally winding helical strip. The width of stochastic layer scales as (1/2) power of amplitude. The area of footprint scales as first power of amplitude. The physical parameters such as toroidal angle, length, and poloidal angle covered before striking, and the

  16. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  17. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruoß, S. Stahl, C.; Weigand, M.; Schütz, G.; Albrecht, J.

    2015-01-12

    The penetration of magnetic flux into high-temperature superconductors has been observed using a high-resolution technique based on x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Superconductors coated with thin soft-magnetic layers are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electric currents in the superconductor create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor and lead to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. Measuring the local magnetization of the ferromagnet by x-ray absorption microscopy with circular-polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor with a spatial resolution on the nanoscale.

  18. Magnetic flux distortion in two-phase liquid metal flow: Model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Bergez, W.; Tordjeman, Ph.; Arinero, R.; Paumel, K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present the model experiments in order to study the magnetic flux distortion of a two-phase liquid metal flow excited by an AC magnetic field in a range of pulsation where Faraday induction and Lorentz force effects are significant. These experiments realized with solid aluminum rods allow to characterize the effects of flow velocity ( 0 ≲ U ≤1 ms-1 ), void fraction ( 0 ≤α≤6.9 % ), pulsation of the AC magnetic field ( 1.5 ×103≤ω≤12.5 ×103 rad s-1 ), and of two different void geometries. The results are analyzed on the basis of a first order expansion of magnetic flux in U and α. Despite the strong coupling between Faraday induction and Lorentz force effects, the results show that the contributions of U and α on a magnetic flux distortion can be well separated at both low magnetic Reynolds number and α values. These results are independent of void geometry.

  19. Predicting the sun's polar magnetic fields with a surface flux transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H. E-mail: lar0009@uah.edu

    2014-01-01

    The Sun's polar magnetic fields are directly related to solar cycle variability. The strength of the polar fields at the start (minimum) of a cycle determine the subsequent amplitude of that cycle. In addition, the polar field reversals at cycle maximum alter the propagation of galactic cosmic rays throughout the heliosphere in fundamental ways. We describe a surface magnetic flux transport model that advects the magnetic flux emerging in active regions (sunspots) using detailed observations of the near-surface flows that transport the magnetic elements. These flows include the axisymmetric differential rotation and meridional flow and the non-axisymmetric cellular convective flows (supergranules), all of which vary in time in the model as indicated by direct observations. We use this model with data assimilated from full-disk magnetograms to produce full surface maps of the Sun's magnetic field at 15 minute intervals from 1996 May to 2013 July (all of sunspot cycle 23 and the rise to maximum of cycle 24). We tested the predictability of this model using these maps as initial conditions, but with daily sunspot area data used to give the sources of new magnetic flux. We find that the strength of the polar fields at cycle minimum and the polar field reversals at cycle maximum can be reliably predicted up to 3 yr in advance. We include a prediction for the cycle 24 polar field reversal.

  20. Observation of the magnetic flux and three-dimensional structure of skyrmion lattices by electron holography.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Soon; Yu, Xiuzhen; Aizawa, Shinji; Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Kanazawa, Naoya; Onose, Yoshinori; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2014-05-01

    Skyrmions are nanoscale spin textures that are viewed as promising candidates as information carriers in future spintronic devices. Skyrmions have been observed using neutron scattering and microscopy techniques. Real-space imaging using electrons is a straightforward way to interpret spin configurations by detecting the phase shifts due to electromagnetic fields. Here, we report the first observation by electron holography of the magnetic flux and the three-dimensional spin configuration of a skyrmion lattice in Fe(0.5)Co(0.5)Si thin samples. The magnetic flux inside and outside a skyrmion was directly visualized and the handedness of the magnetic flux flow was found to be dependent on the direction of the applied magnetic field. The electron phase shifts φ in the helical and skyrmion phases were determined using samples with a stepped thickness t (from 55 nm to 510 nm), revealing a linear relationship (φ = 0.00173 t). The phase measurements were used to estimate the three-dimensional structures of both the helical and skyrmion phases, demonstrating that electron holography is a useful tool for studying complex magnetic structures and for three-dimensional, real-space mapping of magnetic fields. PMID:24727689

  1. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors.

    PubMed

    Egan, R; Philippe, M; Wera, L; Fagnard, J F; Vanderheyden, B; Dennis, A; Shi, Y; Cardwell, D A; Vanderbemden, P

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm(3)) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m(2) (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). PMID:25725888

  2. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, R.; Philippe, M.; Wera, L.; Fagnard, J. F.; Vanderheyden, B.; Dennis, A.; Shi, Y.; Cardwell, D. A.; Vanderbemden, P.

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm3) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m2 (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K).

  3. A magnetic flux leakage study of a self-decoupling magnetorheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chengbin; Wan, Faxue; Yu, Guojun

    2011-06-01

    The self-decoupling magnetorheological (SDMR) damper is a type of sensitive device with distinct damping characteristics at different amplitudes. This paper first describes the independently designed SDMR damper and its magnetic circuit structure. Then, through the combination of finite element analysis and experimental study, it discusses the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) of the magnetic circuits of the main piston and the sub-piston. The results show that large errors exist between the finite element analysis and the experimental results. Thus, in the magnetic circuit design phase, the impact of MFL should be properly considered. For the SDMR damper in this paper, setting the MFL factor at 2.2 for the magnetic circuit of the main piston and at 2.4 for the magnetic circuit of the sub-piston, the finite element simulation results and experimental results are in good agreement, and the results can be used as a reference for the design of similar dampers.

  4. White noise response of turbine blades subjected to heat flux and thermal gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Karadag, V.; Aba, E.; Morguel, O.K.

    1997-07-01

    Design and production of the complex mechanical structures rarely result in an optimal solution. A typical example for this is a turbine blade design. Fatigue failures of the turbine blades is one of the most vexing problems of turbo-machine manufacturers, ever since the steam turbine became the main stay for power generating equipment and the gas turbines are increasingly used in air transport. Turbine blade failures due to fatigue are predominantly vibration related. The dynamic loads on the blading can arise from many different sources such as the high rotational speed, the high operating temperatures, the asymmetric aerofil tapered form of the turbine blade etc. Therefore, vibratory analysis is one of the most important stage in the designing of the turbine blades. In this study, the random response of the turbine blade to white noise excitation has been consistently calculated, including the internal damping mechanisms of the blade. Beside the damping effects, the rotational speed and the linear thermal gradient along the turbine blade are incorporated into the analysis. Pressure difference between the two surfaces of the turbine blades are modelled as white noise excitation along all over the turbine blade. The system dynamic equation of motion are derived and solved by using the combined Finite Element-Modal Analysis Method.

  5. Investigation of surface magnetic noise by shallow spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Rosskopf, T; Dussaux, A; Ohashi, K; Loretz, M; Schirhagl, R; Watanabe, H; Shikata, S; Itoh, K M; Degen, C L

    2014-04-11

    We present measurements of spin relaxation times (T1, T1ρ, T2) on very shallow (≲5  nm) nitrogen-vacancy centers in high-purity diamond single crystals. We find a reduction of spin relaxation times up to 30 times compared to bulk values, indicating the presence of ubiquitous magnetic impurities associated with the surface. Our measurements yield a density of 0.01-0.1μB/nm2 and a characteristic correlation time of 0.28(3) ns of surface states, with little variation between samples and chemical surface terminations. A low temperature measurement further confirms that fluctuations are thermally activated. The data support the atomistic picture where impurities are associated with the top carbon layers, and not with terminating surface atoms or adsorbate molecules. The low spin density implies that the presence of a single surface impurity is sufficient to cause spin relaxation of a shallow nitrogen-vacancy center. PMID:24766015

  6. SLIPPING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION TRIGGERING A SOLAR ERUPTION OF A TRIANGLE-SHAPED FLAG FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-08-10

    We report the first simultaneous activities of the slipping motion of flare loops and a slipping eruption of a flux rope in 131 Å and 94 Å channels on 2014 February 2. The east hook-like flare ribbon propagated with a slipping motion at a speed of about 50 km s{sup –1}, which lasted about 40 minutes and extended by more than 100 Mm, but the west flare ribbon moved in the opposite direction with a speed of 30 km s{sup –1}. At the later phase of flare activity, there was a well developed ''bi-fan'' system of flare loops. The east footpoints of the flux rope showed an apparent slipping motion along the hook of the ribbon. Simultaneously, the fine structures of the flux rope rose up rapidly at a speed of 130 km s{sup –1}, much faster than that of the whole flux rope. We infer that the east footpoints of the flux rope are successively heated by a slipping magnetic reconnection during the flare, which results in the apparent slippage of the flux rope. The slipping motion delineates a ''triangle-shaped flag surface'' of the flux rope, implying that the topology of a flux rope is more complex than anticipated.

  7. Emergent 1/f noise in collections of individually oscillating magnetic dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Barry; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    We experimentally demonstrate an emergent 1/f spectrum from a superposition of the noise from random telegraph noise (RTN) oscillators. The system consists of individual square magnetic permalloy dots with dimensions on the order of 200nm x 200nm x 10nm that exhibit RTN in their magnetization at appropriate applied fields. The magnetization fluctuations are measured by the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). AMR is used to find applied fields necessary to exhibit RTN, which result in Lorentizan spectra in the power spectral density of the measurement. A composite AMR measurement of multiple oscillating dots at once, however, shows an emergent 1/f spectrum in the power spectral density. This agrees with the prediction of Van Der Ziel that, for an appropriate distribution of oscillators showing Lorentzian spectra, the composite spectrum will have a 1/f character. This experimental demonstration of 1/f noise from a system of two-state oscillators indicates a possible mechanism for the origin of 1/f spectra observed in both other magnetic systems, and potentially in other, more disparate systems. This work was supported by ONR Grant N00014-11-1-0850. Samples were fabricated in the Minnesota Nano Center, which receives funding from the NSF through the NNIN program.

  8. TWO-STEP EMERGENCE OF THE MAGNETIC FLUX SHEET FROM THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2010-05-01

    We perform two-dimensional magnetodydrodynamic simulations of the flux emergence from the solar convection zone to the corona. The flux sheet is initially located moderately deep in the adiabatically stratified convection zone (-20,000 km) and is perturbed to trigger the Parker instability. The flux rises through the solar interior due to the magnetic buoyancy, but suffers a gradual deceleration and a flattening in the middle of the way to the surface since the plasma piled on the emerging loop cannot pass through the convectively stable photosphere. As the magnetic pressure gradient enhances, the flux becomes locally unstable to the Parker instability so that the further evolution to the corona occurs. The second-step nonlinear emergence is well described by the expansion law by Shibata et al. To investigate the condition for this 'two-step emergence' model, we vary the initial field strength and the total flux. When the initial field is too strong, the flux exhibits the emergence to the corona without a deceleration at the surface and reveals an unrealistically strong flux density at each footpoint of the coronal loop, while the flux either fragments within the convection zone or cannot pass through the surface when the initial field is too weak. The condition for the 'two-step emergence' is found to be 10{sup 21}-10{sup 22} Mx with 10{sup 4} G at z = -20,000 km. We present some discussions in connection with recent observations and the results of the thin-flux-tube model.

  9. Magnetic Field-line Length and Twist Distributions within Interplanetary Flux Fopes from Wind Spacecraft Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q.; Qiu, J.; Krucker, S.; Wang, L.; Wang, B.; Chen, Y.; Moestl, C.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the detailed and systematic study of field-line twist and length distributions within magnetic flux ropes embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In particular we will utilize energetic electron burst observations at 1 AU together with associated type III radio emissions detected by the Wind spacecraft to provide unique measurements of magnetic field-line lengths within selected ICME events. These direct measurements will be compared with flux-rope model calculations to help assess the fidelity of different models and to provide diagnostics of internal structures. The Grad-Shafranov reconstruction method will be utilized together with a constant-twist nonlinear force-free (Gold-Hoyle) flux rope model and the commonly known Lundquist (linear force-free) model to reveal the close relation between the field-line twist and length in cylindrical flux ropes, based on in-situ Wind spacecraft magnetic field and plasma measurements. We show that our initial analysis of field-line twist indicates clear deviation from the Lundquist model, but better consistency with the Gold-Hoyle model. We will also discuss the implications of our analysis of flux-rope structures on the origination and evolution processes in their corresponding solar source regions.

  10. A method for embedding circular force-free flux ropes in potential magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, V. S.; Török, T.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method for constructing approximate force-free equilibria in pre-eruptive configurations in which a thin force-free flux rope is embedded into a locally bipolar-type potential magnetic field. The flux rope is assumed to have a circular-arc axis, a circular cross-section, and electric current that is either concentrated in a thin layer at the boundary of the rope or smoothly distributed across it with a maximum of the current density at the center. The entire solution is described in terms of the magnetic vector potential in order to facilitate the implementation of the method in numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes that evolve the vector potential rather than the magnetic field itself. The parameters of the flux rope can be chosen so that its subsequent MHD relaxation under photospheric line-tied boundary conditions leads to nearly exact numerical equilibria. To show the capabilities of our method, we apply it to several cases with different ambient magnetic fields and internal flux-rope structures. These examples demonstrate that the proposed method is a useful tool for initializing data-driven simulations of solar eruptions.

  11. DYNAMIC COUPLING OF CONVECTIVE FLOWS AND MAGNETIC FIELD DURING FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Fang; Manchester IV, Ward; Van der Holst, Bart; Abbett, William P.

    2012-01-20

    We simulate the buoyant rise of a magnetic flux rope from the solar convection zone into the corona to better understand the energetic coupling of the solar interior to the corona. The magnetohydrodynamic model addresses the physics of radiative cooling, coronal heating, and ionization, which allow us to produce a more realistic model of the solar atmosphere. The simulation illustrates the process by which magnetic flux emerges at the photosphere and coalesces to form two large concentrations of opposite polarities. We find that the large-scale convective motion in the convection zone is critical to form and maintain sunspots, while the horizontal converging flows in the near-surface layer prevent the concentrated polarities from separating. The footpoints of the sunspots in the convection zone exhibit a coherent rotation motion, resulting in the increasing helicity of the coronal field. Here, the local configuration of the convection causes the convergence of opposite polarities of magnetic flux with a shearing flow along the polarity inversion line. During the rising of the flux rope, the magnetic energy is first injected through the photosphere by the emergence, followed by energy transport by horizontal flows, after which the energy is subducted back to the convection zone by the submerging flows.

  12. Three-dimensional observations of magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Honda, Takashi; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2009-12-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find these cracks. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish the cracks that will grow fast and cause failure. We developed a three-dimensional scanning Hall probe microscope (3D-SHPM) and observed fatigue cracks at room temperature while they were growing. Four-point-bending fatigue tests were carried out using pre-cracked specimens (JIS-SUJ2, bearing steel). We observed the two-dimensional magnetic flux density distributions around the crack tips and found that there is a strong correlation between the changes in the magnetic flux densities and the crack growth. In order to understand this, we looked into all the three components of the magnetic flux densities, and found that they shape an arched bridge around a crack. We also found that the magnetic flux density moves in front of the crack tip along the crack growth direction.

  13. Three-dimensional observations of magnetic flux density around fatigue crack tips of bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Katsuyuki; Santos, Edson C.; Honda, Takashi; Tanabe, Hirotaka

    2010-03-01

    Fatigue failure of steel occurs when small cracks form in a component and then continue to grow to a size large enough to cause failure. In order to understand the strength of steel components it is important to find these cracks. However, at present, it is not easy to distinguish the cracks that will grow fast and cause failure. We developed a three-dimensional scanning Hall probe microscope (3D-SHPM) and observed fatigue cracks at room temperature while they were growing. Four-point-bending fatigue tests were carried out using pre-cracked specimens (JIS-SUJ2, bearing steel). We observed the two-dimensional magnetic flux density distributions around the crack tips and found that there is a strong correlation between the changes in the magnetic flux densities and the crack growth. In order to understand this, we looked into all the three components of the magnetic flux densities, and found that they shape an arched bridge around a crack. We also found that the magnetic flux density moves in front of the crack tip along the crack growth direction.

  14. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, F. A.; Beyer, P.; Fuhr, G.; Monnier, A.; Benkadda, S.

    2014-08-15

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work, we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry, the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindrical geometry, but in toroidal geometry the convective thermal flux and the poloidal rotation appear only with the islands overlapping of the linear coupling between neighbouring poloidal wavenumbers m, m – 1, and m + 1.

  15. Comparison of simulated and observed trapped and precipitating electron fluxes during a magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Lemon, Colby L.; Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri; Hecht, James; Walterscheid, R. L.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to accurately model precipitating electron distributions is crucial for understanding magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupling processes. We use the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) of the inner magnetosphere to assess how well different electron loss models can account for observed electron fluxes during the large 10 August 2000 magnetic storm. The strong pitch angle scattering rate produces excessive loss on the morning and dayside at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) compared to what is observed by a Los Alamos National Laboratory satellite. RCM-E simulations with parameterized scattering due to whistler chorus outside the plasmasphere and hiss inside the plasmasphere are able to account simultaneously for trapped electron fluxes at 1.2 keV to ~100 keV observed at GEO and for precipitating electron fluxes and electron characteristic energies in the ionosphere at 833 km measured by the NOAA 15 satellite.

  16. Turbulent transport of Small-scale magnetic flux elements on Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Piyush; Rempel, Matthias; Bellot Rubio, Luis; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We study the transport of small-scale magnetic elements on the solar photosphere using both observations and simulations. Observational data was obtained from Hinode - Solar Optical Telescope (SOT/SP) instrument and simulations from MURaM code. The magnetic flux elements were tracked in both data sets and statistics were obtained. We compute the probability density of the Eulerian distances traveled by the flux elements along Lagrangian trajectories. For a two-dimensional random walk process this distribution should be Rayleigh. Preliminary results show that the measured probability distribution in both the observed and simulated data approximates a random walk, on time scale close to the lifetime of granules, but deviates from it for longer times. This implies that diffusion may not be an appropriate framework for transport in the solar photosphere. We explore the roles of flux cancelation and element trapping in producing this result. Work is ongoing.

  17. Theoretical Noise Analysis on a Position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the theoretical noise analysis for a position-sensitive Metallic Magnetic Calorimeter (MMC), consisting of MMC read-out at both ends of a large X-ray absorber. Such devices are under consideration as alternatives to other cryogenic technologies for future X-ray astronomy missions. We use a finite-element model (FEM) to numerically calculate the signal and noise response at the detector outputs and investigate the correlations between the noise measured at each MMC coupled by the absorber. We then calculate, using the optimal filter concept, the theoretical energy and position resolution across the detector and discuss the trade-offs involved in optimizing the detector design for energy resolution, position resolution and count rate. The results show, theoretically, the position-sensitive MMC concept offers impressive spectral and spatial resolving capabilities compared to pixel arrays and similar position-sensitive cryogenic technologies using Transition Edge Sensor (TES) read-out.

  18. Magnetic forces and magnetized biomaterials provide dynamic flux information during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Bianchi, Michele; Sartori, Maria; Parrilli, Annapaola; Panseri, Silvia; Ortolani, Alessandro; Sandri, Monica; Boi, Marco; Salter, Donald M; Maltarello, Maria Cristina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Dediu, Valentin; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating prospect to direct tissue regeneration by magnetic activation has been recently explored. In this study we investigate the possibility to boost bone regeneration in an experimental defect in rabbit femoral condyle by combining static magnetic fields and magnetic biomaterials. NdFeB permanent magnets are implanted close to biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite resorbable scaffolds magnetized according to two different protocols . Permanent magnet only or non-magnetic scaffolds are used as controls. Bone tissue regeneration is evaluated at 12 weeks from surgery from a histological, histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. The reorganization of the magnetized collagen fibers under the effect of the static magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet produces a highly-peculiar bone pattern, with highly-interconnected trabeculae orthogonally oriented with respect to the magnetic field lines. In contrast, only partial defect healing is achieved within the control groups. We ascribe the peculiar bone regeneration to the transfer of micro-environmental information, mediated by collagen fibrils magnetized by magnetic nanoparticles, under the effect of the static magnetic field. These results open new perspectives on the possibility to improve implant fixation and control the morphology and maturity of regenerated bone providing "in site" forces by synergically combining static magnetic fields and biomaterials. PMID:26758898

  19. MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Erdos, G.; Balogh, A.

    2012-07-10

    The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

  20. Competition between electric field and magnetic field noise in the decoherence of a single spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamonneau, P.; Lesik, M.; Tetienne, J. P.; Alvizu, I.; Mayer, L.; Dréau, A.; Kosen, S.; Roch, J.-F.; Pezzagna, S.; Meijer, J.; Teraji, T.; Kubo, Y.; Bertet, P.; Maze, J. R.; Jacques, V.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the impact of electric field and magnetic field fluctuations in the decoherence of the electronic spin associated with a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond. To this end, we tune the amplitude of a magnetic field in order to engineer spin eigenstates protected either against magnetic noise or against electric noise. The competition between these noise sources is analyzed quantitatively by changing their relative strength through modifications of the host diamond material. This study provides significant insights into the decoherence of the NV electronic spin, which is valuable for quantum metrology and sensing applications.

  1. Magnetic flux leakage-based steel cable NDE and damage visualization on a cable climbing robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Won; Lee, Changgil; Park, Seunghee; Lee, Jong Jae

    2012-04-01

    The steel cables in long span bridges such as cable-stayed bridges and suspension bridges are critical members which suspend the load of main girders and bridge floor slabs. Damage of cable members can occur in the form of crosssectional loss caused by fatigue, wear, and fracture, which can lead to structural failure due to concentrated stress in the cable. Therefore, nondestructive examination of steel cables is necessary so that the cross-sectional loss can be detected. Thus, an automated cable monitoring system using a suitable NDE technique and a cable climbing robot is proposed. In this study, an MFL (Magnetic Flux Leakage- based inspection system was applied to monitor the condition of cables. This inspection system measures magnetic flux to detect the local faults (LF) of steel cable. To verify the feasibility of the proposed damage detection technique, an 8-channel MFL sensor head prototype was designed and fabricated. A steel cable bunch specimen with several types of damage was fabricated and scanned by the MFL sensor head to measure the magnetic flux density of the specimen. To interpret the condition of the steel cable, magnetic flux signals were used to determine the locations of the flaws and the level of damage. Measured signals from the damaged specimen were compared with thresholds set for objective decision making. In addition, the measured magnetic flux signal was visualized into a 3D MFL map for convenient cable monitoring. Finally, the results were compared with information on actual inflicted damages to confirm the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed cable monitoring method.

  2. Single ion as a shot-noise-limited magnetic-field-gradient probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, A.; Poschinger, U.; Ziesel, F.; Hettrich, M.; Wiens, A.; Welzel, J.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.

    2011-06-15

    It is expected that ion-trap quantum computing can be made scalable through protocols that make use of transport of ion qubits between subregions within the ion trap. In this scenario, any magnetic field inhomogeneity the ion experiences during the transport may lead to dephasing and loss of fidelity. Here we demonstrate how to measure, and compensate for, magnetic field gradients inside a segmented ion trap, by transporting a single ion over variable distances. We attain a relative magnetic field sensitivity of {Delta}B/B{sub 0{approx}}5x10{sup -7} over a test distance of 140 {mu}m, which can be extended to the mm range, still with sub-{mu}m resolution. A fast experimental sequence is presented, facilitating its use as a magnetic-field-gradient calibration routine, and it is demonstrated that the main limitation is the quantum shot noise.

  3. Direct observation of closed magnetic flux trapped in the high-latitude magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Fear, R C; Milan, S E; Maggiolo, R; Fazakerley, A N; Dandouras, I; Mende, S B

    2014-12-19

    The structure of Earth's magnetosphere is poorly understood when the interplanetary magnetic field is northward. Under this condition, uncharacteristically energetic plasma is observed in the magnetotail lobes, which is not expected in the textbook model of the magnetosphere. Using satellite observations, we show that these lobe plasma signatures occur on high-latitude magnetic field lines that have been closed by the fundamental plasma process of magnetic reconnection. Previously, it has been suggested that closed flux can become trapped in the lobe and that this plasma-trapping process could explain another poorly understood phenomenon: the presence of auroras at extremely high latitudes, called transpolar arcs. Observations of the aurora at the same time as the lobe plasma signatures reveal the presence of a transpolar arc. The excellent correspondence between the transpolar arc and the trapped closed flux at high altitudes provides very strong evidence of the trapping mechanism as the cause of transpolar arcs. PMID:25525244

  4. Depinning of flux lines and AC losses in magnet-superconductor levitation system

    SciTech Connect

    Terentiev, A. N.; Hull, J. R.; De Long, L. E.

    1999-11-29

    The AC loss characteristics of a magnet-superconductor system were studied with the magnet fixed to the free end of an oscillating cantilever located near a stationary melt-textured YBCO pellet. Below a threshold AC field amplitude {approx}2Oe, the dissipation of the oscillator is amplitude-independent, characteristic of a linear, non-hysteretic regime. Above threshold,dissipation increases with amplitude, reflecting the depinning and hysteretic motion of flux lines. The threshold AC field is an order of magnitude higher than that measured for the same YBCO material via AC susceptometry in a uniform DC magnetic field, A partial lock-in of flux lines between YBCO ab planes is proposed as the mechanism for the substantial increase of the depinning threshold.

  5. Thermal noise of mechanical oscillators in steady states with a heat flux.

    PubMed

    Conti, Livia; Lazzaro, Claudia; Karapetyan, Gagik; Bonaldi, Michele; Pegoraro, Matteo; Thakur, Ram-Krishna; De Gregorio, Paolo; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2014-09-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the statistical properties of the position fluctuations of low-loss oscillators in nonequilibrium steady states. The oscillators are coupled to a heat bath, and a nonequilibrium steady state is produced by flowing a constant heat flux, setting a temperature difference across the oscillators. We investigated the distribution of the measurements of the square of the oscillator position and searched for signs of changes with respect to the equilibrium case. We found that, after normalization by the mean value, the second, third, and fourth standardized statistical moments are not modified by the underlying thermodynamic state. This differs from the behavior of the absolute, i.e., not normalized, second moment, which is strongly affected by temperature gradients and heat fluxes. We illustrate this with a numerical experiment in which we study via molecular dynamics the fluctuations of the length of a one-dimensional chain of identical particles interacting via anharmonic interparticle potentials, with the extremes thermostated at different temperatures: we use the variance of the length in correspondence to its first elastic mode of resonance to define an effective temperature which we observe to depart from the thermodynamic one in the nonequilibrium states. We investigate the effect of changing the interparticle potential and show that the qualitative behavior of the nonequilibrium excess is unchanged. Our numerical results are consistent with the chain length being Gaussian distributed in the nonequilibrium states. Our experimental investigation reveals that the position variance is the only, and crucially easily accessible, observable for distinguishing equilibrium from nonequilibrium steady states. The consequences of this fact for the design of interferometric gravitational wave detectors are discussed. PMID:25314407

  6. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. IX - Umbral dots and longitudinal overstability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamical properties of the sunspot field and of a column of hot gas confined by such a vertical magnetic field are examined in order to understand the umbral dot within the context of the magnetic sunspot structure. Attention is given to the conditions necessary for gas intrusion, longitudinal as well as convective overstability, the growing modes, and the even mode. With the hypothesis that the subsurface magnetic field of a sunspot splits into many separate flux tubes with field-free gas between, it is suggested that the field-free columns occasionally punch their way up through the overlying magnetic field to the surface, appearing there as the bright, field-free umbral dots. Effects fostering the phenomenon are also discussed, that is, the enhanced temperature of a column of rising gas, the strongly reduced overhead magnetic pressure, and the initiated upward intrusion; these effects are illustrated with examples.

  7. Modelling the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections by Magnetic Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, F. P.; Soenen, A.; Poedts, S.

    2008-09-01

    The possible role of magnetic flux emergence as triggering mechanism for the initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is studied in the framework of the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model. The full MHD equations are solved numerically on a spherical, axisymmetric (2.5D) domain. All simulations are performed with a modified version of the Versatile Advection Code (VAC) (Toth 1996). The magnetic field of the solution is maintained divergence-free at machine precision by exploiting an approach similar to that of Balsara and Spicer (1999): instead of storing the magnetic field components on a staggered mesh, we use the vector potential components in the nodes. In order to get satisfactorily solar wind properties, the Manchester et al. (2004) source term is implemented in the energy equation and gravity is taken into account as well in the model. Finally, a magnetic vector potential is superimposed at the inlet boundary of the Parker wind solution so that, when the steady state is reached, the Antiochos et al. (1999) triple arcade 'break out' magnetic field configuration (symmetric with respect to the equator) of a helmet streamers is obtained. When the steady state has been reached, we impose a magnetic flux emergence at the inlet boundary that is linearly growing in time during a time interval of ? t = 24 hours. After this time the vector potential at the solar base is again fixed. Due to the magnetic flux emergence at the solar base, extra radial magnetic field, is built up near the neutral line of the central arcade that expands outward. This generates an extra upward magnetic pressure force. As a consequence, the central flux system expands outward. Also the overlying field expands and, therefore, the downward magnetic tension increases. As a result, the X-point is flattened. When the distance between the central expanding arcade field and the overlying streamer field is of the order of the grid resolution, the (numerical) reconnection between these fields

  8. Inelastic electron tunnelling and noise spectroscopies in organic magnetic tunnel junctions with PTCDA barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Farkhad; Martinez, Isidoro; Hong, Jhen-Yong; Cascales, Juan Pedro; Andres, Pablo; Lin, Minn-Tsong

    2015-03-01

    The influence of internal barrier dynamics on spin, charge transport and their fluctuations in organic spintronics remains poorly understood. Here we present inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS) and low frequency noise (LFN) studies in magnetic tunnel junctions with thin (1.2-5nm) organic PTCDA barriers in the tunnelling regime at temperatures down to 0.3K. Shot noise is superpoissonian with a Fano factor exceeding in 1.5-2 times the maximum values reported for magnetic tunnel junctions with inorganic barriers, indicating spin dependent bunching in tunneling. IETS results show energy relaxation of tunneling electrons through the excitation of collective (librons) and internal (phonons) vibrational modes of the molecules. The bias dependence of the normalised 1/f noise studied up to 350mV reveals that the excitation of some phonon modes has a strong impact on LFN with over a 10-fold reproducible increase near some specific biases. The dependence of the IETS and LFN anomalies with the relative magnetic alignment of the electrodes will also be discussed.

  9. Development of a low-cost double rotor axial flux motor with soft magnetic composite and ferrite permanent magnet materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Youhua; Guo, Youguang; Lei, Gang; Liu, Xiaojing

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a low-cost double rotor axial flux motor (DRAFM) with low cost soft magnetic composite (SMC) core and ferrite permanent magnets (PMs). The topology and operating principle of DRAFM and design considerations for best use of magnetic materials are presented. A 905 W 4800 rpm DRAFM is designed for replacing the high cost NdFeB permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) in a refrigerator compressor. By using the finite element method, the electromagnetic parameters and performance of the DRAFM operated under the field oriented control scheme are calculated. Through the analysis, it is shown that that the SMC and ferrite PM materials can be good candidates for low-cost electric motor applications.

  10. Numerical computation for a new way to reduce vibration and noise due to magnetostriction and magnetic forces of transformer cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihua; Yang, Qingxin; Yan, Rongge; Li, Yongjian; Zhang, Xian; Yan, Weili; Zhu, Jianguo

    2013-05-01

    Magnetostriction (MS) caused by the global magnetization of limbs and yokes and magnetic forces are the undisputed causes of the vibration and noise in power transformer cores. This paper presents a novel way to reduce the vibration and noise, in which nanocrystalline soft magnetic composite (NSMC) material with high permeability is used to fill the step-lap joint gaps of the power transformer magnetic cores. In order to numerically predict the effectiveness of the proposed method, a 3-D magneto-mechanical strong coupled model including MS and magnetic anisotropy of steel sheet was founded. Then, the numerical model was applied to analyze the step-lap joint region of the corner of magnetic cores. The analysis results illustrated that the deformation and noise of core with NSMC are lower than with the traditional epoxy damping material. Moreover, the validity of the proposed new way was verified by the simplified step-lap joint cores, which were achieved based on Epstein Frames.

  11. Permanent magnet online magnetization performance analysis of a flux mnemonic double salient motor using an improved hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyong; Quan, Li; Chen, Yunyun; Liu, Guohai; Shen, Yue; Liu, Hui

    2012-04-01

    The concept of the memory motor is based on the fact that the magnetization level of the AlNiCo permanent magnet in the motor can be regulated by a temporary current pulse and memorized automatically. In this paper, a new type of memory motor is proposed, namely a flux mnemonic double salient motor drive, which is particularly attractive for electric vehicles. To accurately analyze the motor, an improved hysteresis model is employed in the time-stepping finite element method. Both simulation and experimental results are given to verify the validity of the new method.

  12. FeCo-Zr-O nanogranular soft-magnetic thin films with a high magnetic flux density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuma, S.; Fujimori, H.; Masumoto, T.; Xiong, X. Y.; Ping, D. H.; Hono, K.

    2003-02-01

    Soft-magnetic thin films with high magnetic flux densities of about 23 kG have been fabricated in the (Fe-Co)-Zr-O nanogranular system. The films were prepared by reactive sputtering under an oxygen-argon atmosphere using a target of Fe-Co-Zr alloys. The microstructure was composed of base-centered-cubic Fe-Co nanograins, where nanoparticles of amorphous Zr oxide are dispersed. These Zr-oxide nanoparticles are thought to hinder the growth of Fe-Co grains during the film deposition, causing low coercivity.

  13. Flux jumps in high-J c MgB2 bulks during pulsed field magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, H.; Mochizuki, H.; Naito, T.; Ainslie, M. D.; Giunchi, G.

    2016-03-01

    Pulsed field magnetization (PFM) of a high-J c MgB2 bulk disk has been investigated at 20 K, in which flux jumps frequently occur for high pulsed fields. Using a numerical simulation of the PFM procedure, we estimated the time dependence of the local magnetic field and temperature during PFM. We analyzed the electromagnetic and thermal instability of the high-J c MgB2 bulk to avoid flux jumps using the time dependence of the critical thickness, d c(t), which shows the upper safety thickness to stabilize the superconductor magnetically, and the minimum propagation zone length, l m(t), to obtain dynamical stability. The values of d c(t) and l m(t) change along the thermally-stabilized direction with increasing temperature below the critical temperature, T c. However, the flux jump can be qualitatively understood by the local temperature, T(t), which exceeds T c in the bulk. Finally, possible solutions to avoid flux jumps in high-J c MgB2 bulks are discussed.

  14. Tidal disruption and magnetic flux capture: powering a jet from a quiescent black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-12-01

    The transient Swift J1644+57 is believed to have been produced by an unlucky star wandering too close to a supermassive black hole (BH) leading to a tidal disruption event. This unusual flare displayed highly super-Eddington X-ray emission which likely originated in a relativistic, collimated jet. This presents challenges to modern accretion and jet theory as upper limits of prior BH activity, which we obtain from the radio afterglow of this event, imply that both the pre-disruption BH and stellar magnetic fluxes fall many orders of magnitude short of what is required to power the observed X-ray luminosity. We argue that a pre-existing, `fossil' accretion disc can contain a sufficient reservoir of magnetic flux and that the stellar debris stream is capable of dragging this flux into the BH. To demonstrate this, we perform local, 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the disc-stream interaction and demonstrate that the interface between the two is unstable to mixing. This mixing entrains a sufficient amount of fossil disc magnetic flux into the infalling stellar debris to power the jet. We argue that the interaction with the fossil disc can have a pronounced effect on the structure and dynamics of mass fallback and likely the resulting transient. Finally, we describe possible ramifications of these interactions on unresolved problems in tidal disruption dynamics, in particular, the efficiency of debris circularization, and effects of the disruption on the pre-existing BH system.

  15. Plasma dynamics on current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. II - Low potential simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of plasma in a current-carrying magnetic flux tube of variable cross section is investigated using a one-dimensional numerical simulation. The flux tube is narrow at the two ends and broad in the middle. The middle part of the flux tube is loaded with a hot, magnetically trapped population, and the two ends have a more dense, gravitationally bound population. A potential difference larger than the gravitational potential but less than the energy of the hot population is applied across the domain. The general result is that the potential change becomes distributed along the anode half of the domain, with negligible potential change on the cathode half. The potential is supported by the mirror force of magnetically trapped particles. The simulations show a steady depletion of plasma on the anode side of the flux tube. The current steadily decreases on a time scale of an ion transit time. The results may provide an explanation for the observed plasma depletions on auroral field lines carrying upward currents.

  16. Equilibrium structure of solar magnetic flux tubes: Energy transport with multistream radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Kalkofen, W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the equilibrium structure of vertical intense magnetic flux tubes on the Sun. Assuming cylindrical geometry, we solve the magnetohydrostatic equations in the thin flux-tube approximation, allowing for energy transport by radiation and convection. The radiative transfer equation is solved in the six-stream approximation, assuming gray opacity and local thermodynamic equilibrium. This constitutes a significant improvement over a previous study, in which the transfer was solved using the multidimensional generalization of the Eddington approximation. Convection in the flux tube is treated using mixing-length theory, with an additional parameter alpha, characterizing the suppression of convective energy transport in the tube by the strong magnetic field. The equations are solved using the method of partial linearization. We present results for tubes with different values of the magnetic field strength and radius at a fixed depth in the atmosphere. In general, we find that, at equal geometric heights, the temperature on the tube axis, compared to the ambient medium, is higher in the photosphere and lower in the convection zone, with the difference becoming larger for thicker tubes. At equal optical depths the tubes are generally hotter than their surroundings. The results are comparatively insensitive to alpha but depend upon whether radiative and convective energy transport operate simultaneously or in separate layers. A comparison of our results with semiempirical models shows that the temperature and intensity contrast are in broad agreement. However, the field strengths of the flux-tube models are somewhat lower than the values inferred from observations.

  17. A FLUX ROPE NETWORK AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Daniel; Milosavljevic, Milos; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2013-09-01

    We investigate magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in relativistic pair plasmas with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a kinetic-scale current sheet in a periodic geometry. We include a guide field that introduces an inclination between the reconnecting field lines and explore outside-of-the-current sheet magnetizations that are significantly below those considered by other authors carrying out similar calculations. Thus, our simulations probe the transitional regime in which the magnetic and plasma pressures are of the same order of magnitude. The tearing instability is the dominant mode in the current sheet for all guide field strengths, while the linear kink mode is less important even without the guide field, except in the lower magnetization case. Oblique modes seem to be suppressed entirely. In its nonlinear evolution, the reconnection layer develops a network of interconnected and interacting magnetic flux ropes. As smaller flux ropes merge into larger ones, the reconnection layer evolves toward a three-dimensional, disordered state in which the resulting flux rope segments contain magnetic substructure on plasma skin depth scales. Embedded in the flux ropes, we detect spatially and temporally intermittent sites of dissipation reflected in peaks in the parallel electric field. Magnetic dissipation and particle acceleration persist until the end of the simulations, with simulations with higher magnetization and lower guide field strength exhibiting greater and faster energy conversion and particle energization. At the end of our largest simulation, the particle energy spectrum attains a tail extending to high Lorentz factors that is best modeled with a combination of two additional thermal components. We confirm that the primary energization mechanism is acceleration by the electric field in the X-line region. The highest-energy positrons (electrons) are moderately beamed with median angles {approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree

  18. Two Types of Magnetic Flux Cancellation in the Solar Eruption of 2007 May 20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterlin, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Mason, Helen

    2010-01-01

    We study a solar eruption of 2007 May 20, in an effort to understand the cause of the eruption's onset. The event produced a GOES class B6.7 flare peaking at 05:56 UT, while ejecting a surge/filament and producing a coronal mass ejection (CME). We examine several data sets, including H-alpha images from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode, EUV images from TRACE, and line-of-sight magnetograms from SOHO/MDI. Flux cancelation occurs among two different sets of flux elements inside of the erupting active region: First, for several days prior to eruption, opposite-polarity sunspot groups inside the region move toward each other, leading to the cancelation of approximately 10^{21} Mx of flux over three days. Second, within hours prior to the eruption, positive-polarity moving magnetic features (MMFs) flowing out of the positive-flux spots at approximately 1 kilometer per second repeatedly cancel with field inside a patch of negative-polarity flux located north of the sunspots. The filament erupts as a surge whose base is rooted in the location where the MMF cancelation occurs, while during the eruption that filament flows out along the polarity inversion line between the converging spot groups. We conclude that a plausible scenario is that the converging spot fields brought the magnetic region to the brink of instability, and the MMF cancelation pushed the system "over the edge." triggering the eruption.

  19. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. II. Flux rope eruptions with current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-11-20

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of a CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. In particular, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. This released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares, and the flux rope would, therefore, go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is inconsistent with the radio afterglow. Fortunately, in the latter case, i.e., the catastrophic escape, the flux rope could escape the magnetar and go to infinity in a dynamical way. This is more consistent with radio afterglow observations of giant flares. We find that the minor radius of the flux rope has important implications for its eruption. Flux ropes with larger minor radii are more prone to erupt. We stress that the CS provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection, which would further enhance the energy release during eruptions.

  20. The turbulent diffusion of toroidal magnetic flux as inferred from properties of the sunspot butterfly diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. In order to match observed properties of the solar cycle, flux-transport dynamo models require the toroidal magnetic flux to be stored in a region of low magnetic diffusivity, typically located at or below the bottom of the convection zone. Aims: We infer the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field on the basis of empirical data. Methods: We considered the time evolution of mean latitude and width of the activity belts of solar cycles 12-23 and their dependence on cycle strength. We interpreted the decline phase of the cycles as a diffusion process. Results: The activity level of a given cycle begins to decline when the centers of its equatorward propagating activity belts come within their (full) width (at half maximum) from the equator. This happens earlier for stronger cycles because their activity belts are wider. From that moment on, the activity and the belt width decrease in the same manner for all cycles, independent of their maximum activity level. In terms of diffusive cancellation of opposite-polarity toroidal flux across the equator, we infer the turbulent diffusivity experienced by the toroidal field, wherever it is located, to be in the range 150-450 km2 s-1. Strong diffusive latitudinal spreading of the toroidal flux underneath the activity belts can be inhibited by an inflow toward the toroidal field bands in the convection zone with a magnitude of several meters per second. Conclusions: The inferred value of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field agrees, to order of magnitude, with estimates based on mixing-length models for the solar convection zone. This is at variance with the requirement of flux-transport dynamo models. The inflows required to keep the toroidal field bands together before they approach the equator are similar to the inflows toward the activity belts observed with local helioseismology.

  1. Dual-spacecraft reconstruction of a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope at the Earth's magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, H.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Eriksson, S.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Kawano, H.

    2015-02-01

    We present the first results of a data analysis method, developed by Sonnerup and Hasegawa (2011), for reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D), magnetohydrostatic structures from data taken as two closely spaced satellites traverse the structures. The method is applied to a magnetic flux transfer event (FTE), which was encountered on 27 June 2007 by at least three (TH-C, TH-D, and TH-E) of the five THEMIS probes near the subsolar magnetopause. The FTE was sandwiched between two oppositely directed reconnection jets under a southward interplanetary magnetic field condition, consistent with its generation by multiple X-line reconnection. The recovered 3-D field indicates that a magnetic flux rope with a diameter of ~ 3000 km was embedded in the magnetopause. The FTE flux rope had a significant 3-D structure, because the 3-D field reconstructed from the data from TH-C and TH-D (separated by ~ 390 km) better predicts magnetic field variations actually measured along the TH-E path than does the 2-D Grad-Shafranov reconstruction using the data from TH-C (which was closer to TH-E than TH-D and was at ~ 1250 km from TH-E). Such a 3-D nature suggests that the field lines reconnected at the two X-lines on both sides of the flux rope are entangled in a complicated way through their interaction with each other. The generation process of the observed 3-D flux rope is discussed on the basis of the reconstruction results and the pitch-angle distribution of electrons observed in and around the FTE.

  2. Dual-spacecraft reconstruction of a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope at the Earth's magnetopause

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hasegawa, H.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Eriksson, S.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Kawano, H.

    2015-02-03

    We present the first results of a data analysis method, developed by Sonnerup and Hasegawa (2011), for reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D), magnetohydrostatic structures from data taken as two closely spaced satellites traverse the structures. The method is applied to a magnetic flux transfer event (FTE), which was encountered on 27 June 2007 by at least three (TH-C, TH-D, and TH-E) of the five THEMIS probes near the subsolar magnetopause. The FTE was sandwiched between two oppositely directed reconnection jets under a southward interplanetary magnetic field condition, consistent with its generation by multiple X-line reconnection. The recovered 3-D field indicates that amore » magnetic flux rope with a diameter of ~ 3000 km was embedded in the magnetopause. The FTE flux rope had a significant 3-D structure, because the 3-D field reconstructed from the data from TH-C and TH-D (separated by ~ 390 km) better predicts magnetic field variations actually measured along the TH-E path than does the 2-D Grad–Shafranov reconstruction using the data from TH-C (which was closer to TH-E than TH-D and was at ~ 1250 km from TH-E). Such a 3-D nature suggests that the field lines reconnected at the two X-lines on both sides of the flux rope are entangled in a complicated way through their interaction with each other. The generation process of the observed 3-D flux rope is discussed on the basis of the reconstruction results and the pitch-angle distribution of electrons observed in and around the FTE.« less

  3. Dual-spacecraft reconstruction of a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope at the Earth's magnetopause

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Eriksson, S.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Kawano, H.

    2015-02-03

    We present the first results of a data analysis method, developed by Sonnerup and Hasegawa (2011), for reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D), magnetohydrostatic structures from data taken as two closely spaced satellites traverse the structures. The method is applied to a magnetic flux transfer event (FTE), which was encountered on 27 June 2007 by at least three (TH-C, TH-D, and TH-E) of the five THEMIS probes near the subsolar magnetopause. The FTE was sandwiched between two oppositely directed reconnection jets under a southward interplanetary magnetic field condition, consistent with its generation by multiple X-line reconnection. The recovered 3-D field indicates that a magnetic flux rope with a diameter of ~ 3000 km was embedded in the magnetopause. The FTE flux rope had a significant 3-D structure, because the 3-D field reconstructed from the data from TH-C and TH-D (separated by ~ 390 km) better predicts magnetic field variations actually measured along the TH-E path than does the 2-D Grad–Shafranov reconstruction using the data from TH-C (which was closer to TH-E than TH-D and was at ~ 1250 km from TH-E). Such a 3-D nature suggests that the field lines reconnected at the two X-lines on both sides of the flux rope are entangled in a complicated way through their interaction with each other. The generation process of the observed 3-D flux rope is discussed on the basis of the reconstruction results and the pitch-angle distribution of electrons observed in and around the FTE.

  4. Confined partial filament eruption and its reformation within a stable magnetic flux rope

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Kayshap, Pradeep; Uddin, Wahab; Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Filippov, Boris; Chandra, Ramesh; Choudhary, Debi Prasad E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com

    2014-05-20

    We present observations of a confined partial eruption of a filament on 2012 August 4, which restores its initial shape within ≈2 hr after eruption. From the Global Oscillation Network Group Hα observations, we find that the filament plasma turns into dynamic motion at around 11:20 UT from the middle part of the filament toward the northwest direction with an average speed of ≈105 km s{sup –1}. A little brightening underneath the filament possibly shows the signature of low-altitude reconnection below the filament eruptive part. In Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å images, we observe an activation of right-handed helically twisted magnetic flux rope that contains the filament material and confines it during its dynamical motion. The motion of cool filament plasma stops after traveling a distance of ≈215 Mm toward the northwest from the point of eruption. The plasma moves partly toward the right foot point of the flux rope, while most of the plasma returns after 12:20 UT toward the left foot point with an average speed of ≈60 km s{sup –1} to reform the filament within the same stable magnetic structure. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, we find filament chirality to be sinistral, while the activated enveloping flux rope shows a clear right-handed twist. Thus, this dynamic event is an apparent example of one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). From the coronal magnetic field decay index, n, calculation near the flux rope axis, it is evident that the whole filament axis lies within the domain of stability (i.e., n < 1), which provides the filament stability despite strong disturbances at its eastern foot point.

  5. Numerical Investigations of Capabilities and Limits of Photospheric Data Driven Magnetic Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, Mark; Leake, James; Schuck, Peter W.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic field of the solar atmosphere is the primary driver of solar activity. Understanding the magnetic state of the solar atmosphere is therefore of key importance to predicting solaractivity. One promising means of studying the magnetic atmosphere is to dynamically build up and evolve this atmosphere from the time evolution of the magnetic field at the photosphere, where it can be measured with current solar vector magnetograms at high temporal and spatial resolution.We report here on a series of numerical experiments investigating the capabilities and limits of magnetohydrodynamical simulations of such a process, where a magnetic corona is dynamically built up and evolved from a time series of synthetic photospheric data. These synthetic data are composed of photospheric slices taken from self consistent convection zone to corona simulations of flux emergence. The driven coronae are then quantitatively compared against the coronae of the original simulations. We investigate and report on the fidelity of these driven simulations, both as a function of the emergence timescale of the magnetic flux, and as a function of the driving cadence of the input data.This work was supported by the Chief of Naval Research and the NASA Living with a Star and Heliophysics Supporting Research programs.

  6. Pulsating Magnetic Reconnection Driven by Three-Dimensional Flux-Rope Interactions.

    PubMed

    Gekelman, W; De Haas, T; Daughton, W; Van Compernolle, B; Intrator, T; Vincena, S

    2016-06-10

    The dynamics of magnetic reconnection is investigated in a laboratory experiment consisting of two magnetic flux ropes, with currents slightly above the threshold for the kink instability. The evolution features periodic bursts of magnetic reconnection. To diagnose this complex evolution, volumetric three-dimensional data were acquired for both the magnetic and electric fields, allowing key field-line mapping quantities to be directly evaluated for the first time with experimental data. The ropes interact by rotating about each other and periodically bouncing at the kink frequency. During each reconnection event, the formation of a quasiseparatrix layer (QSL) is observed in the magnetic field between the flux ropes. Furthermore, a clear correlation is demonstrated between the quasiseparatrix layer and enhanced values of the quasipotential computed by integrating the parallel electric field along magnetic field lines. These results provide clear evidence that field lines passing through the quasiseparatrix layer are undergoing reconnection and give a direct measure of the nonlinear reconnection rate. The measurements suggest that the parallel electric field within the QSL is supported predominantly by electron pressure; however, resistivity may play a role. PMID:27341240

  7. Pulsating Magnetic Reconnection Driven by Three-Dimensional Flux-Rope Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W.; De Haas, T.; Daughton, W.; Van Compernolle, B.; Intrator, T.; Vincena, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of magnetic reconnection is investigated in a laboratory experiment consisting of two magnetic flux ropes, with currents slightly above the threshold for the kink instability. The evolution features periodic bursts of magnetic reconnection. To diagnose this complex evolution, volumetric three-dimensional data were acquired for both the magnetic and electric fields, allowing key field-line mapping quantities to be directly evaluated for the first time with experimental data. The ropes interact by rotating about each other and periodically bouncing at the kink frequency. During each reconnection event, the formation of a quasiseparatrix layer (QSL) is observed in the magnetic field between the flux ropes. Furthermore, a clear correlation is demonstrated between the quasiseparatrix layer and enhanced values of the quasipotential computed by integrating the parallel electric field along magnetic field lines. These results provide clear evidence that field lines passing through the quasiseparatrix layer are undergoing reconnection and give a direct measure of the nonlinear reconnection rate. The measurements suggest that the parallel electric field within the QSL is supported predominantly by electron pressure; however, resistivity may play a role.

  8. FULLY RESOLVED QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE OBSERVED WITH THE SUNRISE/IMAX INSTRUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Domingo, V.; Knoelker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

  9. Fully Resolved Quiet-Sun Magnetic flux Tube Observed with the SUNRISE/IMAX Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Schüssler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Schmidt, W.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Bonet, J. A.; Barthol, P.; Berkefeld, T.; Domingo, V.; Gandorfer, A.; Knölker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-01

    Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

  10. Fast Solar Wind from Slowly Expanding Magnetic Flux Tubes (P54)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Dwivedi, B. N.

    2006-11-01

    aks.astro.itbhu@gmail.com We present an empirical model of the fast solar wind, emanating from radially oriented slowly expanding magnetic flux tubes. We consider a single-fluid, steady state model in which the flow is driven by thermal and non-thermal pressure gradients. We apply a non-Alfvénic energy correction at the coronal base and find that specific relations correlate solar wind speed and non-thermal energy flux with the aerial expansion factor. The results are compared with the previously reported ones.

  11. On the heating mechanism of magnetic flux loops in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, M. T.; Wu, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of physical heating mechanisms due to the ponderomotive forces exerted by turbulent waves along the solar atmosphere's curved magnetic flux loops. Results indicate that the temperature difference between the inside and outside of the flux loop can be classified into three parts, two of which represent the cooling or heating effect exerted by the ponderomotive force, while the third is the heating effect due to turbulent energy conversion from the localized plasma. This heating mechanism is used to illustrate solar atmospheric heating by means of an example that leads to the formulation of plages.

  12. Catastrophe versus instability for the eruption of a toroidal solar magnetic flux rope

    SciTech Connect

    Kliem, B.; Lin, J.; Forbes, T. G.; Priest, E. R.; Török, T.

    2014-07-01

    The onset of a solar eruption is formulated here as either a magnetic catastrophe or as an instability. Both start with the same equation of force balance governing the underlying equilibria. Using a toroidal flux rope in an external bipolar or quadrupolar field as a model for the current-carrying flux, we demonstrate the occurrence of a fold catastrophe by loss of equilibrium for several representative evolutionary sequences in the stable domain of parameter space. We verify that this catastrophe and the torus instability occur at the same point; they are thus equivalent descriptions for the onset condition of solar eruptions.

  13. Quantitative comparison of dynamic flux distribution of magnetic couplers for roadway electric vehicle wireless charging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chun; Chau, K. T.; Liu, Chunhua; Li, Wenlong; Lin, Fei

    2014-05-01

    This paper gives a quantitative comparison of magnetic couplers for electric vehicle (EV) wireless charging applications. Circular pad with ferrite spokes and coreless rectangular coils are specially selected for analysis. The dynamic flux density between couplers under high misalignment is studied by calculating the uncompensated power of the pick-up coupler. By using finite element analysis, the performance of each type of coupler is evaluated, and its adaptation to on-road EV charging are compared according to the flux distribution and effective charging area.

  14. MODELING OF STOCHASTIC MAGNETIC FLUX LOSS FROM THE EDGE OF A POOIDALLY DIVERTED TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    EVANS, TE,; MOYER, RA; MONAT, P

    2002-06-01

    OAK A271 MODELING OF STOCHASTIC MAGNETIC FLUX LOSS FROM THE EDGE OF A POOIDALLY DIVERTED TOKAMAK. A field line integration code is used to study the loss of edge poloidal magnetic flux due to stochastic magnetic fields produced by an error field correction coil (C-coil) in DIII-D for various plasma shapes, coil currents and edge magnetic shear profiles. The authors find that the boundary of a diverted tokamak is more sensitive to stochastic flux loss than a nondiverted tokamak. The C-coil has been used to produce a stochastic layer in an ohmic diverted discharge with characteristics similar to those seen in stochastic boundary experiments in circular limiter ohmic plasmas, including: (1) an overall increase in recycling, (2) a broadening of the recycling profile at the divertor, and (3) a flattening of the boundary profiles over the extent of the stochastic layer predicted by the field line integration code. Profile flattening consistent with field line integration results is also seen in some high performance discharges with edge transport barriers. The prediction of a significant edge stochastic layer even in discharges with high performance and edge radial transport barriers indicates that either the self-consistent plasma response heals the stochastic layer or that edge stochastic layers are compatible with edge radial transport barriers.

  15. Flux Consumption and Poloidal Magnetic Field Measurements in the MEDUSA TOKAMAK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstka, G. D.; Fonck, R. J.; Intrator, T.

    1996-11-01

    The Madison EDUcational Small-Aspect-ratio (MEDUSA) tokamak is a small (R=12 cm, a=8 cm) spherical tokamak designed to investigate features of ST plasmas on a laboratory scale. Recent experiments have been performed on MEDUSA to determine the consumption of ohmic flux during startup for several different operating scenarios. The primary diagnostic tool for these experiments was a low profile (0.3 cm diameter) internal magnetic probe array that provided poloidal field measurements crucial to the determination of the plasma internal inductance l_i. This probe consists of five fifteen-turn, 0.9 mm diameter coils. The coils are spaced at 1.5 cm intervals in the z direction at an installed major radius of 12 cm, and measure the radial component of the poloidal field (B_R). The flux consumption analysis was performed using the Poynting method, using the magnetic probe and the MEDUSA external magnetics to reconstruct the evolution of the MHD equilibria during startup. Results will be presented that identify the partition of poloidal flux into inductive and dissipative components. The magnetic probe array was also used to observe the redistribution of plasma current and the corresponding change in li caused by internal reconnection events. Results from these measurements will be presented.

  16. Are subsurface flows evidence of hidden magnetic flux during cycle minimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, Rudolf; Howe, Rachel; Hill, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Subsurface flows vary during the course of a solar cycle showing bands of faster- and slower-than-average rotation and bands of converging meridional flow. These flow patterns migrate with latitude; they first appear during the declining phase of a solar cycle and are present during cycle minimum. They appear several years before the magnetic pattern of a new cycle is apparent in synoptic maps and the values of magnetic flux at these locations are comparable to other quiet-Sun locations without such flow patterns. Do the precursory flow patterns thus indicate the presence of magnetic flux that is too small-scale or short-lived to be noticed in synoptic maps? How much flux would be required to generate these flow patterns?We quantify the relationship between subsurface flow patterns and magnetic activity during Cycles 23 and 24 and address these questions. We have analyzed GONG and SDO/HMI Dopplergrams using a dense-pack ring-diagram analysis and determined flows in the near-surface layers of the solar convection zone to a depth of about 16 Mm.

  17. Analytical computation of process noise matrix in Kalman filter for fitting curved tracks in magnetic field within dense, thick scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kolahal; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Mondal, Naba K.

    2016-07-01

    In the context of track fitting problems by a Kalman filter, the appropriate functional forms of the elements of the random process noise matrix are derived for tracking through thick layers of dense materials and magnetic field. This work complements the form of the process noise matrix obtained by Mankel [1].

  18. A Flux-Tube Tectonics Model for Solar Coronal Heating Driven by the Magnetic Carpet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priest, Eric R.; Heyvaerts, Jean F.; Title, Alan M.

    2002-09-01

    We explore some of the consequences of the magnetic carpet for coronal heating. Observations show that most of the magnetic flux in the quiet Sun emerges as ephemeral regions and then quickly migrates to supergranule boundaries. The original ephemeral concentrations fragment, merge, and cancel over a time period of 10-40 hr. Since the network photospheric flux is likely to be concentrated in units of 1017 Mx or smaller, there will be myriads of coronal separatrix surfaces caused by the highly fragmented photospheric magnetic configuration in the quiet network. We suggest that the formation and dissipation of current sheets along these separatrices are an important contribution to coronal heating. The dissipation of energy along sharp boundaries we call, by analogy with geophysical plate tectonics, the tectonics model of coronal heating. Similar to the case on Earth, the relative motions of the photospheric sources will drive the formation and dissipation of current sheets along a hierarchy of such separatrix surfaces at internal dislocations in the corona. In our preliminary assessment of such dissipation we find that the heating is fairly uniform along the separatrices, so that each elementary coronal flux tube is heated uniformly. However, 95% of the photospheric flux closes low down in the magnetic carpet and the remaining 5% forms large-scale connections, so the magnetic carpet will be heated more effectively than the large-scale corona. This suggests that unresolved observations of coronal loops should exhibit enhanced heating near their feet in the carpet, while the upper parts of large-scale loops should be heated rather uniformly but less strongly.

  19. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. I. Fully and partially open eruptions of flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Cong E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-04-01

    We propose a catastrophic eruption model for the enormous energy release of magnetars during giant flares, in which a toroidal and helically twisted flux rope is embedded within a force-free magnetosphere. The flux rope stays in stable equilibrium states initially and evolves quasi-statically. Upon the loss of equilibrium, the flux rope cannot sustain the stable equilibrium states and erupts catastrophically. During the process, the magnetic energy stored in the magnetosphere is rapidly released as the result of destabilization of global magnetic topology. The magnetospheric energy that could be accumulated is of vital importance for the outbursts of magnetars. We carefully establish the fully open fields and partially open fields for various boundary conditions at the magnetar surface and study the relevant energy thresholds. By investigating the magnetic energy accumulated at the critical catastrophic point, we find that it is possible to drive fully open eruptions for dipole-dominated background fields. Nevertheless, it is hard to generate fully open magnetic eruptions for multipolar background fields. Given the observational importance of the multipolar magnetic fields in the vicinity of the magnetar surface, it would be worthwhile to explore the possibility of the alternative eruption approach in multipolar background fields. Fortunately, we find that flux ropes may give rise to partially open eruptions in the multipolar fields, which involve only partial opening of background fields. The energy release fractions are greater for cases with central-arcaded multipoles than those with central-caved multipoles that emerged in background fields. Eruptions would fail only when the centrally caved multipoles become extremely strong.

  20. Non-contact main cable NDE technique for suspension bridge using magnetic flux-based B-H loop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Kim, Ju-Won; Moon, Dae-Joong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a noncontact main cable NDE method has been developed. This cable NDE method utilizes the direct current (DC) magnetization and a searching coil-based total flux measurement. A total flux sensor head prototype was fabricated that consists of an electro-magnet yoke and a searching coil sensor. To obtain a B-H loop, a magnetic field was generated by applying a cycle of low frequency direct current to the electro-magnet yoke. During the magnetization, a search coil sensor measures the electromotive force from magnetized cable. During the magnetization process, a search coil sensor was measured the magnetic flux density. Total flux was calculated by integrating the measured magnetic flux using a fluxmeter. A B-H loop is obtained by using relationship between a cycle of input DC voltage and measured total flux. The B-H loop can reflect the property of the ferromagnetic materials. Therefore, the cross-sectional loss of cable can be detected using variation of features from the B-H curve. To verify the feasibility of the proposed steel cable NDE method, a series of experimental studies using a main-cable mock-up specimen has been performed in this study.

  1. Reducing magnetic field induced noise in broad-band seismic recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbriger, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Seismic broad-band sensors are known to be sensitive to the magnetic field. Magnetic storms and man-made disturbances of the magnetic field can produce significant noise in seismic recordings. I show that variations in the magnetic field translate directly into apparent acceleration of the seismic sensor within the period range from 60 to 1200s for all leaf-spring sensors under investigation. For a Streckeisen STS-1V this is shown even for periods down to 1s. The sensitivity is quantified in magnitude and direction. Both are quite stable over many time windows and signal periods. The sensitivities obtained by linear regression of the acceleration signal on magnetic field recordings during a magnetic storm can effectively be applied to reduce noise in seismic signals. The sensitivity varies in magnitude from sensor to sensor but all are in the range from 0.05 to 1.2ms-2T-1. Seismograms from sensors at Black Forest Observatory (BFO) and stations of the German Regional Seismic Network were investigated. Although these are mainly equipped with leaf-spring sensors, the problem is not limited to this type of instrument. The effect is not observable on the horizontal component STS-1s at BFO while it is significant in the recordings of the vertical STS-1. The main difference between these instruments is the leaf-spring suspension in the vertical component that appears to be the source of the trouble. The suspension springs are made of temperature compensated Elinvar alloys that inherently are ferromagnetic and may respond to the magnetic field in various ways. However, the LaCoste Romberg ET-19 gravimeter at BFO, which uses this material too, does not respond to magnetic storms at a similar magnitude neither do the Invar-wire strainmeters. An active shielding, composed of three Helmholtz coils and a feedback system, is installed at station Stuttgart and provides an improvement of signal-to-noise ratio by almost a factor of 20 at this particular station. The passive

  2. Barkhausen noise in the random field Ising magnet Nd2Fe14B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Silevitch, D. M.; Dahmen, K. A.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-07-01

    With sintered needles aligned and a magnetic field applied transverse to its easy axis, the rare-earth ferromagnet Nd2Fe14B becomes a room-temperature realization of the random field Ising model. The transverse field tunes the pinning potential of the magnetic domains in a continuous fashion. We study the magnetic domain reversal and avalanche dynamics between liquid helium and room temperatures at a series of transverse fields using a Barkhausen noise technique. The avalanche size and energy distributions follow power-law behavior with a cutoff dependent on the pinning strength dialed in by the transverse field, consistent with theoretical predictions for Barkhausen avalanches in disordered materials. A scaling analysis reveals two regimes of behavior: one at low temperature and high transverse field, where the dynamics are governed by the randomness, and the second at high temperature and low transverse field, where thermal fluctuations dominate the dynamics.

  3. Kinetic models of magnetic flux ropes observed in the Earth magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, A. A.; Vasko, I. Y.; Artemyev, A. V.; Yushkov, E. V.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFR) are universal magnetoplasma structures (similar to cylindrical screw pinches) formed in reconnecting current sheets. In particular, MFR with scales from about the ion inertial length to MHD range are widely observed in the Earth magnetosphere. Typical MFR have force-free configuration with the axial magnetic field peaking on the MFR axis, whereas bifurcated MFR with an off-axis peak of the axial magnetic field are observed as well. In the present paper, we develop kinetic models of force-free and bifurcated MFR and determine consistent ion and electron distribution functions. The magnetic field configuration of the force-free MFR represents well-known Gold-Hoyle MFR (uniformly twisted MFR). We show that bifurcated MFR are characterized by the presence of cold and hot current-carrying electrons. The developed models are capable to describe MFR observed in the Earth magnetotail as well as MFR recently observed by Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission at the Earth magnetopause.

  4. Pb/InAs nanowire josephson junction with high critical current and magnetic flux focusing.

    PubMed

    Paajaste, J; Amado, M; Roddaro, S; Bergeret, F S; Ercolani, D; Sorba, L; Giazotto, F

    2015-03-11

    We have studied mesoscopic Josephson junctions formed by highly n-doped InAs nanowires and superconducting Ti/Pb source and drain leads. The current-voltage properties of the system are investigated by varying temperature and external out-of-plane magnetic field. Superconductivity in the Pb electrodes persists up to ∼7 K and with magnetic field values up to 0.4 T. Josephson coupling at zero backgate voltage is observed up to 4.5 K and the critical current is measured to be as high as 615 nA. The supercurrent suppression as a function of the magnetic field reveals a diffraction pattern that is explained by a strong magnetic flux focusing provided by the superconducting electrodes forming the junction. PMID:25671540

  5. Spatially Resolved Observation of Static Magnetic Flux States in YBa_2Cu_3O7-δ Grain Boundary Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, G. M.; Mayer, B.; Gross, R.; Nissel, T.; Husemann, K.-D.; Huebener, R. P.; Freltoft, T.; Shen, Y.; Vase, P.

    1994-02-01

    With low-temperature scanning electron microscopy, the magnetic flux states in high critical temperature Josephson junctions have been imaged. The experiments were performed with YBa_2Cu_3O7-δ thin-film grain boundary Josephson junctions fabricated on [001] tilt SrTiO_3 bicrystals. For applied magnetic fields parallel to the grain boundary plane, which correspond to local maxima of the magnetic field dependence of the critical current, the images clearly show the corresponding magnetic flux states in the grain boundary junction. The spatial modulation of the Josephson current density by the external magnetic field is imaged directly with a spatial resolution of about 1 micrometer.

  6. Reducing the Effects of Background Noise during Auditory Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Speech Processing: Qualitative and Quantitative Comparisons between Two Image Acquisition Schemes and Noise Cancellation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Graham A.; Hall, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The intense sound generated during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) complicates studies of speech and hearing. This experiment evaluated the benefits of using active noise cancellation (ANC), which attenuates the level of the scanner sound at the participant's ear by up to 35 dB around the peak at 600 Hz. Method: Speech and…

  7. A measure of acoustic noise generated from transcranial magnetic stimulation coils.

    PubMed

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Kothare, Raveena S; Yu, Camilla; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Anastasio, Elana M; Oberman, Lindsay; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of sound emanating from the discharge of magnetic coils used in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can potentially cause acoustic trauma. Per Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards for safety of noise exposure, hearing protection is recommended beyond restricted levels of noise and time limits. We measured the sound pressure levels (SPLs) from four rTMS coils with the goal of assessing if the acoustic artifact levels are of sufficient amplitude to warrant protection from acoustic trauma per OSHA standards. We studied the SPLs at two frequencies (5 and 10 Hz), three machine outputs (MO) (60, 80 and 100%), and two distances from the coil (5 and 10 cm). We found that the SPLs were louder at closer proximity from the coil and directly dependent on the MO. We also found that in all studied conditions, SPLs were lower than the OSHA permissible thresholds for short (<15 min) acoustic exposure, but at extremes of use, may generate sufficient noise to warrant ear protection with prolonged (>8 h) exposure. PMID:24582370

  8. Influence of magnetic domain landscape on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamus, Z.; Cieplak, Marta Z.; Kończykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-02-01

    We use a line of miniature Hall sensors to study the influence of the magnetic domain distribution on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers. Two bilayers are built of a ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a superconducting Nb layer, with the insulating layer in-between to avoid proximity effect. The magnetic domain patterns of various geometries are reversibly predefined in the Co/Pt multilayers using the appropriate magnetization procedure. The Pt thickness is different in the two bilayers, resulting in different width and length of the domains, which profoundly affects vortex dynamics. We show that narrow short domains lead to strong confinement of vortices at the sample edge, while narrow elongated domains of uniform width induce smaller confinement and easy vortex entry. Large enhancement of flux pinning and critical current density, by a factor of more than 7, is observed in the last case, while the former results in smaller enhancement. When domains are wide, the disorder in the domain widths becomes beneficial for larger enhancement of pinning, while more uniform distribution of domain widths results in a precipitous drop of the enhancement. The analysis of these results suggests that with increasing domain width, a transition occurs from vortex chains pinned by narrow domains to disordered triangular vortex lattice pinned by a maze of multiply interconnected magnetic domains.

  9. Dual-rotor, radial-flux, toroidally-wound, permanent-magnet machine

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Ronghai; Lipo, Thomas A.

    2005-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel dual-rotor, radial-flux, toroidally-wound, permanent-magnet machine. The present invention improves electrical machine torque density and efficiency. At least one concentric surface-mounted permanent magnet dual-rotor is located inside and outside of a torus-shaped stator with back-to-back windings, respectively. The machine substantially improves machine efficiency by reducing the end windings and boosts the torque density by at least doubling the air gap and optimizing the machine aspect ratio.

  10. Synthetic magnetic fluxes and topological order in one-dimensional spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graß, Tobias; Muschik, Christine; Celi, Alessio; Chhajlany, Ravindra W.; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2015-06-01

    Engineering topological quantum order has become a major field of physics. Many advances have been made by synthesizing gauge fields in cold atomic systems. Here we carry over these developments to other platforms which are extremely well suited for quantum engineering, namely, trapped ions and nano-trapped atoms. Since these systems are typically one-dimensional, the action of artificial magnetic fields has so far received little attention. However, exploiting the long-range nature of interactions, loops with nonvanishing magnetic fluxes become possible even in one-dimensional settings. This gives rise to intriguing phenomena, such as fractal energy spectra, flat bands with localized edge states, and topological many-body states. We elaborate on a simple scheme for generating the required artificial fluxes by periodically driving an XY spin chain. Concrete estimates demonstrating the experimental feasibility for trapped ions and atoms in wave guides are given.

  11. Magnetic flux loop in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Adrian; Nara, Yasushi; Petreska, Elena

    2013-09-01

    We consider the expectation value of a chromomagnetic flux loop in the immediate forward light cone of collisions of heavy nuclei at high energies. Such collisions are characterized by a nonlinear scale Qs where color fields become strong. We find that loops of area greater than ˜1.5/Qs2 exhibit area-law behavior, which determines the scale of elementary flux excitations (“vortices”). We also estimate the magnetic string tension, σM≃0.12Qs2. By the time t˜1/Qs even small loops satisfy area-law scaling. We describe corrections to the propagator of semihard particles at very early times in the background of fluctuating magnetic fields.

  12. Extracting, Tracking, and Visualizing Magnetic Flux Vortices in 3D Complex-Valued Superconductor Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; Phillips, Carolyn L; Peterka, Tom; Karpeyev, Dmitry; Glatz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for the vortex extraction and tracking of superconducting magnetic flux vortices for both structured and unstructured mesh data. In the Ginzburg-Landau theory, magnetic flux vortices are well-defined features in a complex-valued order parameter field, and their dynamics determine electromagnetic properties in type-II superconductors. Our method represents each vortex line (a 1D curve embedded in 3D space) as a connected graph extracted from the discretized field in both space and time. For a time-varying discrete dataset, our vortex extraction and tracking method is as accurate as the data discretization. We then apply 3D visualization and 2D event diagrams to the extraction and tracking results to help scientists understand vortex dynamics and macroscale superconductor behavior in greater detail than previously possible. PMID:26529730

  13. An axial-flux permanent-magnet generator for a gearless wind energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, B.J.; Wu, W.; Spooner, E.

    1999-06-01

    The paper discusses the development of an axial-flux permanent-magnet generator for a gearless wind energy system which aims to demonstrate the feasibility of integrating wind and photovoltaic energy converters for the generation of electricity and to achieve optimum exploitation of the two energy sources. The merits of an axial-flux generator topology are discussed with reference to the particular requirements of an electrical generator for a direct-coupled wind turbine application. The design, construction and test results of a 5 kW, 200 rev/min permanent-magnet generator, to form a 10 kW pilot power plant with a 5 kW photovoltaic array, are presented.

  14. Basic properties of magnetic flux tubes and restrictions on theories of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the mean longitudinal field in a magnetic flux tube is reduced, rather than enhanced, by twisting the tube to form a rope. It is shown that there is no magnetohydrostatic equilibrium when one twisted rope is wound around another. Instead there is rapid line cutting (neutral point annihilation). It is shown that the twisting increases, and the field strength decreases, along a flux tube extending upward through a stratified atmosphere. These facts are at variance with Piddington's (1975) recent suggestion that solar activity is to be understood as the result of flux tubes which are enormously concentrated by twisting, which consist of several twisted ropes wound around each other, and which came untwisted where they emerge through the photosphere.

  15. Magnetic flux disorder and superconductor-insulator transition in nanohole thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, Enzo

    2016-08-01

    We study the superconductor-insulator transition in nanohole ultrathin films in a transverse magnetic field by numerical simulation of a Josephson-junction array model. Geometrical disorder due to the random location of nanoholes in the film corresponds to random flux in the array model. Monte Carlo simulation in the path-integral representation is used to determine the critical behavior and the universal resistivity at the transition as a function of disorder and average number of flux quanta per cell, fo. The resistivity increases with disorder for noninteger fo while it decreases for integer fo, and reaches a common constant value in a vortex-glass regime above a critical value of the flux disorder Dfc. The estimate of Dfc and the resistivity increase for noninteger fo are consistent with recent experiments on ultrathin superconducting films with positional disordered nanoholes.

  16. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ∼60 000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60 000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  17. The effect of magnetic resonance imaging noise on cochlear function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Venn, R E; McBrearty, A R; McKeegan, D; Penderis, J

    2014-10-01

    Noise produced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners (which can peak at a sound pressure level of 131 dB) has been shown to cause noise-induced cochlear dysfunction in people. The aim of this study was to investigate whether noise produced during MRI had a deleterious effect on cochlear function in dogs, using distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing, which allows frequency specific, non-invasive assessment of cochlear function. DPOAE testing was performed before and after MRI in one or both ears under general anaesthesia at 14 frequency pairs (f2 frequency ranging from 0.84 kHz to 8.0 kHz). A control group comprised dogs undergoing anaesthesia of a similar duration for quiet procedures. Thirty-six dogs (66 ears) and 17 dogs (28 ears) were included in the MRI and control groups respectively. There was a reduction in DPOAE at all frequencies tested in the MRI group; a similar effect was not evident in the control group. This reduction in the MRI group was statistically significant in five of the 14 frequencies assessed (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that exposure to MRI noise results in a significant reduction in frequency-specific cochlear function in dogs, although it is not known whether this is reversible or permanent. This suggests that all dogs undergoing MRI studies should be provided with ear protection as a routine precautionary measure. PMID:25155216

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