Science.gov

Sample records for magnetic force control

  1. Force analysis of magnetic bearings with power-saving controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Most magnetic bearing control schemes use a bias current with a superimposed control current to linearize the relationship between the control current and the force it delivers. For most operating conditions, the existence of the bias current requires more power than alternative methods that do not use conventional bias. Two such methods are examined which diminish or eliminate bias current. In the typical bias control scheme it is found that for a harmonic control force command into a voltage limited transconductance amplifier, the desired force output is obtained only up to certain combinations of force amplitude and frequency. Above these values, the force amplitude is reduced and a phase lag occurs. The power saving alternative control schemes typically exhibit such deficiencies at even lower command frequencies and amplitudes. To assess the severity of these effects, a time history analysis of the force output is performed for the bias method and the alternative methods. Results of the analysis show that the alternative approaches may be viable. The various control methods examined were mathematically modeled using nondimensionalized variables to facilitate comparison of the various methods.

  2. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kohei; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  3. Measurement of the nonmagnetic coating thickness of core-shell magnetic nanoparticles by controlled magnetization magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloni, L.; Passeri, D.; Scaramuzzo, F. A.; Di Iorio, D.; Barteri, M.; Mantovani, D.; Rossi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent an interesting tool for several biomedical applications. In order to improve the dispersion stability, the biocompatibility and bio-functionality, MNPs need to be coated with non-magnetic films. The optimization of these systems requires the deep characterization not only of the magnetic core, but also of the coating features. Beside the chemical and physical properties of the coating, its thickness is another important property which can influence the size, the shape and the overall magnetic behavior of the NPs system. In this work we propose a possible method to measure the thickness of the non-magnetic coating of core-shell MNPs through the use of controlled magnetization-magnetic force microscopy (CM-MFM). A preliminary study on the applicability of the proposed method has been performed on Fe3O4 NPs coated with a Cu film.

  4. Design of Feedforward Controller to Reduce Force Ripple for Linear Motor using Halbach Magnet Array with T Shape Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moojong; Kim, Jinyoung; Lee, Moon G.

    Recently, in micro/nano fabrication equipments, linear motors are widely used as an actuator to position workpiece, machining tool and measurement head. To control them faster and more precise, the motor should have high actuating force and small force ripple. High actuating force enable us to more workpiece with high acceleration. Eventually, it may provide higher throughput. Force ripple gives detrimental effect on the precision and tracking performance of the equipments. In order to accomplish more precise motion, it is important to make lower the force ripple. Force ripple is categorized into cogging and mutual ripple. First is dependent on the shape of magnets and/or core. The second is not dependent on them but dependent on current commutation. In this work, coreless mover i.e. coil winding is applied to the linear motor to avoid the cogging ripple. Therefore, the mutual ripple is only considered to be minimized. Ideal Halbach magnet array has continuously varying magnetization. The THMA (Halbach magnet array with T shape magnets) is proposed to approximate the ideal one. The THMA can not produce ideal sinusoidal flux, therefore, the linear motor with THMA and sinusoidal commutation of current generates the mutual force ripple. In this paper, in order to compensate mutual force ripple by feedforward(FF) controller, we calculate the optimized commutation of input current. The ripple is lower than 1.17% of actuating force if the commutation current agree with the magnetic flux from THMA. The performance of feedforward(FF) controller is verified by experiment.

  5. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed.

  6. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed. PMID:27194591

  7. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed. PMID:27194591

  8. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  9. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  10. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  11. Van der Waals Forces in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeth, Melissa; Garbini, Joseph; Sidles, John; Dougherty, William; Chao, Shih-Hui

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy detects modulated spin-gradient forces by means of a soft, high phQ cantilever. When the magnetic tip of the cantilever is brought close to the sample surface, static forces significantly change the net restoring force, altering the cantilever mechanical resonance frequency. This frequency shift can be very large compared to the width of the cantilever resonance. As previously demonstrated, active feedback control of the cantilever motion greatly improves cantilever dynamics. The control algorithm is obtained by formal optimal control techniques and implemented with a digital signal processor (DSP). We have recently enabled the DSP to continuously evaluate the frequency of the cantilever as the tip approaches the sample and seamlessly adapt control parameters for optimized performance. Tip-sample approach under adaptive control can avoid snap-in and obtain much smaller separations than uncontrolled approach, and the static potential is reliably characterized.

  12. Dipolar Decoupling in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy using Optimal Control Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, William; Haas, Holger; Budakian, Raffi

    We present data showing how a modified gradient ascent pulse engineering method can be used to design nuclear magnetic resonance pulses that perform a single unitary transformation over a large range of maximum Rabi field strengths (B1) , while decoupling the secular dipolar interactions between spins. We designed dipolar-decoupling π-pulses that perform well over spins feeling maximum B1 fields from 131 - 274 G . By combining these π-pulses into a simple multiple pulse sequence, with fields produced by a silver microwire, we have increased T2* in a polystyrene sample attached to the tip of a silicon nanowire from 11 μs to ~ 250 ms . This dipolar decoupling could be used to improve the spatial resolution of nano-MRI experiments and to allow spectroscopy of chemical shifts in nanoscale samples.

  13. Force reflecting hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaffee, Douglas A. (Inventor); Snow, Edward R. (Inventor); Townsend, William T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A universal input device for interfacing a human operator with a slave machine such as a robot or the like includes a plurality of serially connected mechanical links extending from a base. A handgrip is connected to the mechanical links distal from the base such that a human operator may grasp the handgrip and control the position thereof relative to the base through the mechanical links. A plurality of rotary joints is arranged to connect the mechanical links together to provide at least three translational degrees of freedom and at least three rotational degrees of freedom of motion of the handgrip relative to the base. A cable and pulley assembly for each joint is connected to a corresponding motor for transmitting forces from the slave machine to the handgrip to provide kinesthetic feedback to the operator and for producing control signals that may be transmitted from the handgrip to the slave machine. The device gives excellent kinesthetic feedback, high-fidelity force/torque feedback, a kinematically simple structure, mechanically decoupled motion in all six degrees of freedom, and zero backlash. The device also has a much larger work envelope, greater stiffness and responsiveness, smaller stowage volume, and better overlap of the human operator's range of motion than previous designs.

  14. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    DOEpatents

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  15. Force control in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2015-05-01

    Force control deficits are common dysfunctions after a stroke. This review concentrates on various force control variables associated with motor impairments and suggests new approaches to quantifying force control production and modulation. Moreover, related neurophysiological mechanisms were addressed to determine variables that affect force control capabilities. Typically, post stroke force control impairments include: (a) decreased force magnitude and asymmetrical forces between hands, (b) higher task error, (c) greater force variability, (d) increased force regularity, and (e) greater time-lag between muscular forces. Recent advances in force control analyses post stroke indicated less bimanual motor synergies and impaired low-force frequency structure. Brain imaging studies demonstrate possible neurophysiological mechanisms underlying force control impairments: (a) decreased activation in motor areas of the ipsilesional hemisphere, (b) increased activation in secondary motor areas between hemispheres, (c) cerebellum involvement, and (d) relatively greater interhemispheric inhibition from the contralesional hemisphere. Consistent with identifying neurophysiological mechanisms, analyzing bimanual motor synergies as well as low-force frequency structure will advance our understanding of post stroke force control. PMID:25704075

  16. Force reflection with compliance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Won S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Two types of systems for force-reflecting control, which enables high force-reflection gain, are presented: position-error-based force reflection and low-pass-filtered force reflection. Both of the systems are combined with shared compliance control. In the position-error-based class, the position error between the commanded and the actual position of a compliantly controlled robot is used to provide force reflection. In the low-pass-filtered force reflection class, the low-pass-filtered output of the compliance control is used to provide force reflection. The increase in force reflection gain can be more than 10-fold as compared to a conventional high-bandwidth pure force reflection system, when high compliance values are used for the compliance control.

  17. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  18. A force calibration standard for magnetic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongbo; Dulin, David; Cnossen, Jelmer; Köber, Mariana; van Oene, Maarten M.; Ordu, Orkide; Berghuis, Bojk A.; Hensgens, Toivo; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-12-01

    To study the behavior of biological macromolecules and enzymatic reactions under force, advances in single-molecule force spectroscopy have proven instrumental. Magnetic tweezers form one of the most powerful of these techniques, due to their overall simplicity, non-invasive character, potential for high throughput measurements, and large force range. Drawbacks of magnetic tweezers, however, are that accurate determination of the applied forces can be challenging for short biomolecules at high forces and very time-consuming for long tethers at low forces below ˜1 piconewton. Here, we address these drawbacks by presenting a calibration standard for magnetic tweezers consisting of measured forces for four magnet configurations. Each such configuration is calibrated for two commonly employed commercially available magnetic microspheres. We calculate forces in both time and spectral domains by analyzing bead fluctuations. The resulting calibration curves, validated through the use of different algorithms that yield close agreement in their determination of the applied forces, span a range from 100 piconewtons down to tens of femtonewtons. These generalized force calibrations will serve as a convenient resource for magnetic tweezers users and diminish variations between different experimental configurations or laboratories.

  19. Verifying Magnetic Force on a Conductor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory measurement of the magnetic force acting on a straight wire of length "l" carrying a current of intensity "i" in a magnetic field "B" is usually made using current balances, which are offered by various physics apparatus suppliers' catalogues. These balances require an adequate magnet and commonly allow only the measurement of the…

  20. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium.

  1. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-27

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium. PMID:25736463

  2. A sub-Angstrom Sample Scanner for Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM): Contact Mechanics and Controlled Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shih-Hui; Dougherty, William; Garbini, Joseph; Sidles, John; MacBeth, Melissa

    2001-03-01

    A 3-D scan head for MRFM faces three challenges: 1) Experiments are conducted under ultrahigh vacuum and cryogenic conditions; 2) The scanner must achieve sub-Angstrom resolution; 3) Interferometric detection requires a stiff, compact mechanism. Our strategy is to use a piezoceramic tube to actuate two modes of positioning: "coarse positioning" to generate large range motion, and "fine positioning" to create high-resolution linear actuation. Inertial stick-slip friction is used for coarse positioning. We have applied contact mechanics to solve for the deflection and friction forces between the slider and piezoceramic actuator. Simulation combining classical contact theory with the reset integrator friction model of Hassig agrees closely with our experiments. The use of feedback control to damp piezoceramic tube oscillation during stick-slip cycles is an innovation in our design. Coarse steps as small as 2 nm are consistently achieved.

  3. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  4. Calculation of electromagnetic forces for magnet wheels

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kokichi; Horiuchi, Yoko; Fujii, Nobuo

    1997-03-01

    The characteristics of magnet wheels for magnetic levitation and linear drives are investigated by using a three-dimensional computer simulation. Magnet wheels levitate by revolving permanent magnets over a conducting plate, in which the eddy currents are induced. The thrust is also produced by making the torque unbalance. This paper deals with the ``partial overlap type`` magnet wheels, producing the lift force and the thrust. The magnetic flux density and eddy currents are examined for the 4-pole and the 2-pole structures.

  5. On unsteady-motion theory of magnetic force for maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Energy Technology

    1995-12-14

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. This paper presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance our understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique is a useful tool for measuring motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  6. On the unsteady-motion theory of magnetic forces for maglev

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1996-02-01

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. This paper presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance their understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique provides a useful tool to measure motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  7. Three-wire magnetic trap for direct forced evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shengwang; Oh, Eun

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple three-wire-based magnetic trap potential for direct forced evaporative cooling of neutral atoms without using induced spin-flip technologies. We have devised a method for controlling the trap depth without sacrificing its frequencies by only varying wire currents and external magnetic fields. By having multiples of these wires on different levels integrated into an atom chip, it is possible to attain Bose-Einstein condensation without the conventional forced evaporation technique.

  8. Low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, Koichi

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique whose goal is to combine the three-dimensional, chemically specific imaging capability of magnetic resonance imaging with the atomic-scale spatial resolution of scanning force microscopy. MRFM relies on the detection of small oscillatory magnetic forces between spins in the sample and a magnetic tip, using a micromechanical cantilever. The force resolution is a key issue for successfully operating MRFM experiments. Operating at low temperature improves the force resolution because of the reduced thermal energy and increased mechanical Q of the cantilever. The spin polarization is also enhanced at low temperature, leading to the improved magnetic resonance sensitivity for ensemble spin samples. A low-temperature magnetic resonance force detection apparatus was built and used to demonstrate a force resolution of 8×10sp{-17}\\ N/sqrt{Hz} at 6 K with a commercial single-crystal silicon cantilever. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were detected in micron-size samples. Force-detection technique was also applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance measurements, including inversion recovery, nutation, and spin echoes. Force-detected EPR spectra of phosphorus-doped silicon revealed hyperfine splitting, illustrating the possibility of using the MRFM technique for spectroscopic purposes. An improved low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscope was also built, incorporating a magnetic tip mounted directly on the cantilever. This allows a much wider variety of samples to be investigated and greatly improves the convenience of the technique. Using the improved microscope, three-dimensional EPR imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed a broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real

  9. Static forces in a superconducting magnet bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Stoye, P.; Fuchs, G.; Gawalek, W.; Goernert, P.; Gladun, A.

    1995-11-01

    Static levitation forces and stiffnesses in a superconducting bearing consisting of concentric ring magnets and a superconducting YBaCuO ring are investigated. In the field-cooled mode a levitation force of 20 N has been achieved. The axial and radial stiffnesses have values of 15 N/mm and 10 N/mm, respectively. An arrangement with two bearings supporting a high speed shaft is now under development. A possible application of superconducting magnetic bearings is flywheels for energy storage.

  10. Iron in the Fire: Searching for Fire's Magnetic Fingerprint using Controlled Heating Experiments, High-Resolution FORCs, IRM Coercivity Spectra, and Low-Temperature Remanence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, P. C.; Reiners, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Evidence for recent climate-wildfire linkages underscores the need for better understanding of relationships between wildfire and major climate shifts in Earth history, which in turn offers the potential for prognoses for wildfire and human adaptations to it. In particular, what are the links between seasonality and wildfire frequency and severity, and what are the feedbacks between wildfire, landscape evolution, and biogeochemical cycles, particularly the carbon and iron cycles? A key first step in addressing these questions is recovering well-described wildfire records from a variety of paleolandscapes and paleoclimate regimes. Although charcoal and organic biomarkers are commonly used indicators of fire, taphonomic processes and time-consuming analytical preparations often preclude their routine use in some environments and in high-stratigraphic resolution paleowildfire surveying. The phenomenological relationship between fire and magnetic susceptibility can make it a useful surveying tool, but increased magnetic susceptibility in sediments is not unique to fire, and thus limits its diagnostic power. Here we utilize component-specific rock magnetic methods and analytical techniques to identify the rock magnetic fingerprint of wildfire. We use a custom-designed air furnace, a series of iron-free laboratory soils, natural saprolites and soils, and fuels from Arizona Ponderosa pine forests and grasslands to simulate wildfire in a controlled and monitored environment. Soil-ash residues and soil and fuel controls were then characterized using First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) patterns, DC backfield IRM coercivity spectra, low-temperature SIRM demagnetization behavior, and low-temperature cycling of room-temperature SIRM behavior. We will complement these magnetic analyses with high-resolution TEM of magnetic extracts. Here we summarize the systematic changes to sediment magnetism as pyrolitized organic matter is incorporated into artificial and natural soils. These

  11. Recent advances in magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koblischka, M R; Hartmann, U

    2003-01-01

    During the past ten years magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has become probably the most powerful general-purpose method for magnetic imaging. MFM can be applied under various environmental conditions and requires only little sample preparation. Basic research on magnetic materials as well as the mentioned industrial applications create an increasing demand for high-resolution magnetic imaging methods. This contribution will review some new concepts which have been realized in the field of advanced probe preparation, based on electron beam methods in order to improve the spatial resolution beyond 100nm. It is shown that the advanced probes allow high-resolution imaging of magnetic fine structures within thin film permalloy elements exhibiting a complicated cooperative magnetization reversal process. These investigations are of importance for various concepts underlying modern magnetic data storage developments. Furthermore, we present some developments of MFM to suit the needs of the magnetic recording industry. PMID:12801662

  12. Magnetic forces produced by rectangular permanent magnets in static microsystems.

    PubMed

    Gassner, Anne-Laure; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Chen, Hong-Xu; Morandini, Jacques; Josserand, Jacques; Rossier, Joel S; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-08-21

    Finite element numerical simulations were carried out in 2D geometries to map the magnetic field and force distribution produced by rectangular permanent magnets as a function of their size and position with respect to a microchannel. A single magnet, two magnets placed in attraction and in repulsion have been considered. The goal of this work is to show where magnetic beads are preferentially captured in a microchannel. These simulations were qualitatively corroborated, in one geometrical case, by microscopic visualizations of magnetic bead plug formation in a capillary. The results show that the number of plugs is configuration dependent with: in attraction, one plug in the middle of the magnets; in repulsion, two plugs near the edges of the magnets; and with a single magnet, a plug close to the center of the magnet. The geometry of the magnets (h and l are the height and length of the magnets respectively) and their relative spacing s has a significant impact on the magnetic flux density. Its value inside a magnet increases with the h/l ratio. Consequently, bar magnets produce larger and more uniform values than flat magnets. The l/s ratio also influences the magnetic force value in the microchannel, both increasing concomitantly for all the configurations. In addition, a zero force zone in the middle appears in the attraction configuration as the l/s ratio increases, while with a single magnet, the number of maxima and minima goes from one to two, producing two focusing zones instead of only one. PMID:19636467

  13. Forced Magnetic Reconnection In A Tokamak Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.

    2015-11-01

    The theory of forced magnetic field reconnection induced by an externally imposed resonant magnetic perturbation usually uses a sheared slab or cylindrical magnetic field model and often focuses on the potential time-asymptotic induced magnetic island state. However, tokamak plasmas have significant magnetic geometry and dynamical plasma toroidal rotation screening effects. Also, finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) and banana width (FBW) effects can damp and thus limit the width of a nascent magnetic island. A theory that is more applicable for tokamak plasmas is being developed. This new model of the dynamics of forced magnetic reconnection considers a single helicity magnetic perturbation in the tokamak magnetic field geometry, uses a kinetically-derived collisional parallel electron flow response, and employs a comprehensive dynamical equation for the plasma toroidal rotation frequency. It is being used to explore the dynamics of bifurcation into a magnetically reconnected state in the thin singular layer around the rational surface, evolution into a generalized Rutherford regime where the island width exceeds the singular layer width, and assess the island width limiting effects of FLR and FBW polarization currents. Support by DoE grants DE-FG02-86ER53218, DE-FG02-92ER54139.

  14. Separation Control using Lorentz Force Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, H.; Tucker, A.; Thomas, S.

    2003-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of Lorentz force actuators for separation control, flow visualization experiments were conducted in a low-speed water tunnel. Salt was added to the tunnel to yield an electrical conductivity of one half of seawater. The setup consisted of a 1.3 m long flat plate followed by a 15^o ramp. The boundary layer was tripped near the flat plate leading edge, resulting in a fully turbulent 2D boundary layer. The Lorentz force actuator had 3 mm wide surface mounted electrodes and permanent magnets. The actuator, which was placed just upstream of the ramp, could be used to produce forces in the streamwise or spanwise direction. To reduce electrolysis and subsequent corrosion, the input power was modulated thus producing pulsatile forcing. The Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity and ramp length was ˜ 10^4. The flow separated shortly after the ramp and vortex shedding at a dimensionless frequency of ˜ 2 was observed. Although both streamwise and spanwise forcing were successful in reducing the separated region, the latter was much more effective. The spanwise forcing was most effective at frequencies 10 to 20 times the natural shedding frequency, whereas the streamwise forcing was effective at frequencies closer to the natural shedding frequency. The effectiveness of spanwise forcing is attributed to the generation of streamwise vorticity. Forcing in the direction opposite to the freestream resulted in complete separation at the start of the ramp.

  15. On the unsteady-motion theory of magnetic forces for maglev

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1993-11-01

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. In the past, most maglev-system designs were based on a quasisteady-motion theory of magnetic forces. This report presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance our understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique provides a useful tool to measure motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  16. Levitation forces in bearingless permanent magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, W.; Silber, S.; Nenninger, K.

    1999-09-01

    Bearingless motors combine brushless AC-motors with active magnetic bearings by the integration of two separate winding systems (torque and radial levitation force windings with different pole pairs) in one housing. This paper gives an insight into the influences of the motor design on the levitation force and torque generation. It is shown that especially for machines with small air gaps it can be very important to choose the right design parameters. Increasing the permanent magnet height in order to increase the motor torque can result in a remarkable reduction of radial forces. The interrelationships are discussed on the basis of Maxwell and Lorentz forces acting upon the stator surface. The investigations are presented for a bearingless low cost motor, suited for pump, fan or blower applications. The presented motor needs only four coils for operation.

  17. Lorentz Force Based Satellite Attitude Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Dipak Kumar; Sinha, Manoranjan

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of attitude control of a satellite, various active and passive control strategies have been developed. These include using thrusters, momentum wheels, control moment gyros and magnetic torquers. In this present work, a new technique named Lorentz force based Coulombic actuators for the active control is proposed. This method uses electrostatic charged shells, which interact with the time varying earth's magnetic field to establish a full three axes control of the satellite. It is shown that the proposed actuation mechanism is similar to a satellite actuated by magnetic coils except that the resultant magnetic moment vanishes under two different conditions. The equation for the required charges on the the Coulomb shells attached to the satellite body axes is derived, which is in turn used to find the available control torque for actuating the satellite along the orbit. Stability of the proposed system for very high initial angular velocity and exponential stability about the origin are proved for a proportional-differential control input. Simulations are carried out to show the efficacy of the proposed system for the attitude control of the earth-pointing satellite.

  18. Magnetic forces in high-Tc superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    In September 1987, researchers at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearings at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989, a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu307. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  19. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  20. Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

  1. Magnetic forces in high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1990-01-01

    In September 1987 research at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearing at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989 a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu3O7. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic drag forces of a magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the drag force reaches a constant value, independent of the speed. Dampling of lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  2. Magnetic Forces and DNA Mechanics in Multiplexed Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    van Loenhout, Marijn T. J.; Burnham, Daniel R.; Dekker, Cees

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers (MT) are a powerful tool for the study of DNA-enzyme interactions. Both the magnet-based manipulation and the camera-based detection used in MT are well suited for multiplexed measurements. Here, we systematically address challenges related to scaling of multiplexed magnetic tweezers (MMT) towards high levels of parallelization where large numbers of molecules (say 103) are addressed in the same amount of time required by a single-molecule measurement. We apply offline analysis of recorded images and show that this approach provides a scalable solution for parallel tracking of the xyz-positions of many beads simultaneously. We employ a large field-of-view imaging system to address many DNA-bead tethers in parallel. We model the 3D magnetic field generated by the magnets and derive the magnetic force experienced by DNA-bead tethers across the large field of view from first principles. We furthermore experimentally demonstrate that a DNA-bead tether subject to a rotating magnetic field describes a bicircular, Limaçon rotation pattern and that an analysis of this pattern simultaneously yields information about the force angle and the position of attachment of the DNA on the bead. Finally, we apply MMT in the high-throughput investigation of the distribution of the induced magnetic moment, the position of attachment of DNA on the beads, and DNA flexibility. The methods described herein pave the way to kilo-molecule level magnetic tweezers experiments. PMID:22870220

  3. Magnetic forces and magnetized biomaterials provide dynamic flux information during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Bianchi, Michele; Sartori, Maria; Parrilli, Annapaola; Panseri, Silvia; Ortolani, Alessandro; Sandri, Monica; Boi, Marco; Salter, Donald M; Maltarello, Maria Cristina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Dediu, Valentin; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating prospect to direct tissue regeneration by magnetic activation has been recently explored. In this study we investigate the possibility to boost bone regeneration in an experimental defect in rabbit femoral condyle by combining static magnetic fields and magnetic biomaterials. NdFeB permanent magnets are implanted close to biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite resorbable scaffolds magnetized according to two different protocols . Permanent magnet only or non-magnetic scaffolds are used as controls. Bone tissue regeneration is evaluated at 12 weeks from surgery from a histological, histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. The reorganization of the magnetized collagen fibers under the effect of the static magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet produces a highly-peculiar bone pattern, with highly-interconnected trabeculae orthogonally oriented with respect to the magnetic field lines. In contrast, only partial defect healing is achieved within the control groups. We ascribe the peculiar bone regeneration to the transfer of micro-environmental information, mediated by collagen fibrils magnetized by magnetic nanoparticles, under the effect of the static magnetic field. These results open new perspectives on the possibility to improve implant fixation and control the morphology and maturity of regenerated bone providing "in site" forces by synergically combining static magnetic fields and biomaterials. PMID:26758898

  4. Implicit Flux Feedback Control for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Frederick Joseph

    Design and implementation of a dynamic system that includes magnetic bearings is dependent on knowledge of the relationship between the command input to the magnetic actuator and the force that the bearing actually applies to the rotor (or other structure) being controlled. Traditional designs relate the bearing coil current to the developed bearing force; unfortunately, the current-to-force relationship is not invariant to magnetic hysteresis, magnetic saturation, eddy current effects, or changes in the bearing air gap length. To overcome these limitations, an approach known as implicit flux feedback is explored. Since the gap force in a magnetic circuit is directly related to the flux in that gap, measuring the gap flux and employing it as a feedback state results in a bearing with an improved command -to-force relation which is less subject to the error sources mentioned above. Confirmation of the flux-to-force relationship is accomplished via experiments on a test apparatus specifically designed to allow simultaneous force and flux measurements on a single-axis magnetic bearing (using both laminated and solid magnetic components). Successful implementation of the flux feedback algorithm simplifies the control system design of magnetic bearing systems by providing a more accurate, well characterized actuator model, and, by overcoming such effects as hysteresis, saturation, eddy currents and gap dependence, this approach provides magnetic bearings which exhibit significantly improved dynamic performance.

  5. Magnetic force on a magnetic particle within a high gradient magnetic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, S. K.; Ha, D. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Lee, Y. J.; Ko, R. K.

    2013-01-01

    HGMS (High Gradient Magnetic Separator) uses matrix to make high magnetic field gradient so that ferro- or para-magnetic particles can be attracted to them by high magnetic force. The magnetic force generated by the field gradient is several thousand times larger than that by background magnetic field alone. So the HGMS shows excellent performance compared with other magnetic separators. These matrixes are usually composed of stainless steel wires having high magnetization characteristics. This paper deals with superconducting HGMS which is aimed for purifying waste water by using stainless steel matrix. Background magnetic field up to 6 T is generated by a superconducting solenoid and the stainless steel matrixes are arranged inside of the solenoid. Based on magnetic field calculated by FEM (Finite Element Method), we could calculate magnetic force acting on a magnetic particle such as hematite and maghemite consisting of major impurities in the condenser water of a thermal power station.

  6. MICROFLARE ACTIVITY DRIVEN BY FORCED MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Crockett, P. J.; Keenan, F. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2010-03-20

    High cadence, multiwavelength, optical observations of a solar active region, obtained with the Swedish Solar Telescope, are presented. Two magnetic bright points are seen to separate in opposite directions at a constant velocity of 2.8 km s{sup -1}. After a separation distance of {approx}4400 km is reached, multiple Ellerman bombs are observed in both H{alpha} and Ca-K images. As a result of the Ellerman bombs, periodic velocity perturbations in the vicinity of the magnetic neutral line, derived from simultaneous Michelson Doppler Imager data, are generated with amplitude {+-}6 km s{sup -1} and wavelength {approx}1000 km. The velocity oscillations are followed by an impulsive brightening visible in H{alpha} and Ca-K, with a peak intensity enhancement of 63%. We interpret these velocity perturbations as the magnetic field deformation necessary to trigger forced reconnection. A time delay of {approx}3 minutes between the H{alpha}-wing and Ca-K observations indicates that the observed magnetic reconnection occurs at a height of {approx}200 km above the solar surface. These observations are consistent with theoretical predictions and provide the first observational evidence of microflare activity driven by forced magnetic reconnection.

  7. Nonlinear regimes of forced magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Vekstein, G.; Kusano, K.

    2015-09-15

    This letter presents a self-consistent description of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection in Taylor's model of this process. If external boundary perturbation is strong enough, nonlinearity in the current sheet evolution becomes important before resistive effects come into play. This terminates the current sheet shrinking that takes place at the linear stage and brings about its nonlinear equilibrium with a finite thickness. Then, in theory, this equilibrium is destroyed by a finite plasma resistivity during the skin-time, and further reconnection proceeds in the Rutherford regime. However, realization of such a scenario is unlikely because of the plasmoid instability, which is fast enough to develop before the transition to the Rutherford phase occurs. The suggested analytical theory is entirely different from all previous studies and provides proper interpretation of the presently available numerical simulations of nonlinear forced magnetic reconnection.

  8. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-01

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm. PMID:24651941

  9. Measuring the Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreman, W.; Huysentruyt, R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a fast and simple method for measuring the magnetic force acting on a current-carrying conductor using a digital balance. Discusses the influence of current intensity and wire length on the magnetic force on the conductor. (JRH)

  10. Magnetically Controlled Variable Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Improved variable-transformer circuit, output voltage and current of which controlled by use of relatively small current supplied at relatively low power to control windings on its magnetic cores. Transformer circuits of this type called "magnetic amplifiers" because ratio between controlled output power and power driving control current of such circuit large. This ratio - power gain - can be as large as 100 in present circuit. Variable-transformer circuit offers advantages of efficiency, safety, and controllability over some prior variable-transformer circuits.

  11. Novel magnetic tips developed for the switching magnetization magnetic force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Cambel, V.; Elias, P.; Gregusova, D.; Fedor, J.; Martaus, J.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Kostic, I.; Materials Science Division; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2010-07-01

    Using micromagnetic calculations we search for optimal magnetic properties of novel magnetic tips to be used for a Switching Magnetization Magnetic Force Microscopy (SM-MFM), a novel technique based on two-pass scanning with reversed tip magnetization. Within the technique the sum of two scans images local atomic forces and their difference maps the local magnetic forces. The tip magnetization is switched during the scanning by a small magnetic field. The technology of novel low-coercitive magnetic tips is proposed. For best performance the tips must exhibit low magnetic moment, low switching field, and single-domain state at remanence. Such tips are equipped with Permalloy objects of a precise shape that are defined on their tilted sides. We calculate switching fields of such tips by solving the micromagnetic problem to find the optimum shape and dimensions of the Permalloy objects located on the tips. Among them, hexagon was found as the best shape for the tips.

  12. Interfacial force sensor with force-feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, S.A.; Houston, J.E.; Smith, B.K.

    1990-01-01

    A new interfacial force microscope capable of measuring the forces between two surfaces over the entire range of surface separations, up to contact, has been developed. The design is centered around a differential capacitance displacement sensor where the common capacitor plate is supported by torsion bars. A force-feedback control system balances the interfacial forces at the sensor, maintaining the common capacitor plate at its rest position. This control eliminates the instability which occurs with the conventional cantilever-based force sensors when the attractive force gradient exceeds the mechanical stiffness of the cantilever. The ability to measure interfacial forces at surface separations smaller than this instability point using the feedback control is demonstrated. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Magnetic-enhanced normal force of magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xing-Yan; Yu, Miao; Fu, Jie

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the static and dynamic normal forces of magnetorheological (MR) fluids with and without shearing were investigated by using an advanced commercial rheometer. The effects of time history, shear rate, and temperature under sweeping magnetic field on the normal force of MR fluids were systematically studied. Moreover, the influence of shear stress, gap distance, and the comparison of static and dynamic normal force in various magnetic field were also studied. The experimental results indicated that the normal force of MR fluids largely depend on magnetic field, more than 170% normal force increased when the magnetic field increases from 0 to 1 T. This behavior can be regard as the magnetic field-dependent of normal force, moreover, the mechanism of interaction between the magnetic field and normal force was investigated by microstructure analysis. The results show that the gap distance changes step-wise with increasing the magnetic field instead of continue increase. When imposing shearing, three regions can be found in the relationship between normal forces and shear rate, the normal force first decreases to a minimum value and then increases by increasing shear rates. The temperature effect of the normal forces is also measured and the normal force would increase with increasing of temperature. Comparing between with static and dynamic normal force shows that the dynamic normal force is larger than static normal force. And the average normal force is also larger than the shear stress. Finally, a normal force was calculated based on the magnetic field energy theory.

  14. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  15. Secondary resonance magnetic force microscopy using an external magnetic field for characterization of magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongzi; Mo, Kangxin; Ding, Xidong; Zhao, Liangbing; Lin, Guocong; Zhang, Yueli; Chen, Dihu

    2015-09-01

    A bimodal magnetic force microscopy (MFM) that uses an external magnetic field for the detection and imaging of magnetic thin films is developed. By applying the external modulation magnetic field, the vibration of a cantilever probe is excited by its magnetic tip at its higher eigenmode. Using magnetic nanoparticle samples, the capacity of the technique which allows single-pass imaging of topography and magnetic forces is demonstrated. For the detection of magnetic properties of thin film materials, its signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity are demonstrated to be superior to conventional MFM in lift mode. The secondary resonance MFM technique provides a promising tool for the characterization of nanoscale magnetic properties of various materials, especially of magnetic thin films with weak magnetism.

  16. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample. PMID:22003461

  17. Toroidal linear force-free magnetic fields with axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandas, M.; Romashets, E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are often described as linear force-free fields. To account for their curvature, toroidal configurations must be used. The aim is to find an analytic description of a linear force-free magnetic field of the toroidal geometry in which the cross section of flux ropes can be controlled. Methods: The solution is found as a superposition of fields given by linear force-free cylinders tangential to a generating toroid. The cylindrical field is expressed in a series of terms that are not all cylindrically symmetric. Results: We found the general form of a toroidal linear force-free magnetic field. The field is azimuthally symmetric with respect to the torus axis. It depends on a set of coefficients that enables controlling the flux rope shape (cross section) to some extent. By varying the coefficients, flux ropes with circular and elliptic cross sections were constructed. Numerical comparison suggests that the simple analytic formula for calculating the helicity in toroidal flux ropes of the circular cross section can be used for flux ropes with elliptic cross sections if the minor radius in the formula is set to the geometric mean of the semi-axes of the elliptic cross section.

  18. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on force of finger pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Masato; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to explore many aspects of brain function, and to treat neurological disorders. Cortical motor neuronal activation by TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) produces efferent signals that pass through the corticospinal tracts. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are observed in muscles innervated by the stimulated motor cortex. TMS can cause a silent period (SP) following MEP in voluntary electromyography (EMG). The present study examined the effects of TMS eliciting MEP and SP on the force of pinching using two fingers. Subjects pinched a wooden block with the thumb and index finger. TMS was applied to M1 during the pinch task. EMG of first dorsal interosseous muscles and pinch forces were measured. Force output increased after the TMS, and then oscillated. The results indicated that the motor control system to keep isotonic forces of the muscles participated in the finger pinch was disrupted by the TMS.

  19. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are “stiffness weighted” and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery. PMID:18777934

  20. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed. PMID:27250433

  1. Effect of the repulsive force in the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, S.; Kobayashi, S.

    2009-10-01

    Magnetic levitation using the pinning force of the YBaCuO high- Tc bulk superconductor (HTSC) materials has an advantage to achieve stable levitation without control. To increase levitation force, the HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetic bearing system is introduced. A circular shaped three phase Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet is installed on the rotor, and HTSC bulk superconductor is set on the stator. The additional permanent magnet is installed under the HTSC. Repulsive force of the permanent magnet is used for levitation, and pinning force between the HTSC and permanent magnet is used for guidance force of the bearing. In this system, relationship between permanent magnet and the HTSC is important. When repulsive force of the permanent magnet is large, pinning force of superconductor is used to keep the rotor position. As a result, stability for the lateral direction is decreased with hybrid system. For levitation force, effect of the hybrid system is not observed with column HTSC. Compared with the ring HTSC results, the following thing is considered. Because there is no space that flux of one permanent magnet acts on the other one with the column HTSC configuration, interaction between two permanent magnets becomes small.

  2. Magnetic field dependence of magnetic domains in Co doped Mn2Sb using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vikram; Saha, Pampi; Kushwaha, Pallavi; Thamizhavel, A.; Rawat, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic domains in the ferrimagnetic state of Co doped Mn2Sb single crystal has been visualized using Magnetic Force Microscopy. It shows fractal like domain structure. With the application of magnetic field, single domain state is achieved around 2000 Oe. The MFM images collected during field increasing and decreasing cycles show different morphology for same field value.

  3. Control of parallel manipulators using force feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanua, Prabjot

    1994-01-01

    Two control schemes are compared for parallel robotic mechanisms actuated by hydraulic cylinders. One scheme, the 'rate based scheme', uses the position and rate information only for feedback. The second scheme, the 'force based scheme' feeds back the force information also. The force control scheme is shown to improve the response over the rate control one. It is a simple constant gain control scheme better suited to parallel mechanisms. The force control scheme can be easily modified for the dynamic forces on the end effector. This paper presents the results of a computer simulation of both the rate and force control schemes. The gains in the force based scheme can be individually adjusted in all three directions, whereas the adjustment in just one direction of the rate based scheme directly affects the other two directions.

  4. Magnetic forces associated with bursty bulk flows in Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Tomas; Hamrin, Maria; Nilsson, Hans; Kullen, Anita; Pitkänen, Timo

    2015-05-01

    We present the first direct measurements of magnetic forces acting on bursty bulk flow plasma in the magnetotail. The magnetic forces are determined using Cluster multispacecraft measurements. We analyze 67 bursty bulk flow (BBF) events and show that the curvature part of the magnetic force is consistently positive, acting to accelerate the plasma toward Earth between approximately 10 and 20 RE geocentrical distances, while the magnetic field pressure gradient increasingly brakes the plasma as it moves toward Earth. The net result is that the magnetic force accelerates the plasma at distances greater than approximately 14 RE, while it acts to decelerate it within that distance. The magnetic force, together with the thermal pressure gradient force, will determine the dynamics of the BBFs as they propagate toward the near-Earth tail region. The determination of the former provides an important clue to the ultimate fate of BBFs in the inner magnetosphere.

  5. Force generation by orthodontic samarium-cobalt magnets.

    PubMed

    von Fraunhofer, J A; Bonds, P W; Johnson, B E

    1992-01-01

    The use of samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets for light force application is a relatively new concept in orthodontic tooth movement. This study reports on the forces generated by these magnets. Magnets were attached to aluminum rods mounted in a universal testing machine. The magnets were initially separated by 10 mm were moved toward each other at 2.5mm/min in repulsion or attraction, depending upon the magnetic pole orientation. The magnets were also positioned initially in contact and then moved apart at a rate of 2.5mm/min, again producing repulsion or attraction, depending upon the pole orientation. The Sm-Co magnets exhibit very large forces when in close approximation but forces decrease markedly at separations greater than 2mm. The force, P, generated between magnets is determined by their separation, d, and follows the relationship P = dn. At magnet separations of 0 to 2mm, the exponent n is equal to -0.4; at separations of 2mm to 7mm, exponent n equals -2.1 for both attraction and repulsion. Thus the classic Coulomb law of magnetic force was followed only at magnet separations of greater than 2mm. Force-separation behavior and the high cost of these magnets may not justify their routine clinical use. PMID:1416238

  6. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  7. Electric and Magnetic Forces between Parallel-Wire Conductors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses electric and magnetic forces between parallel-wire conductors and derives, in a simple fashion, order of magnitude estimates of the ratio of the likely electrostatic and electromagnetic forces for a simple parallel-wire balance. (Author/HM)

  8. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  9. May the Magnetic Force Be with You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Jesse; Richey, Lindsey R.

    2012-01-01

    Although most elementary students have had experiences with magnets, they generally have misconceptions about magnetism (Driver et al. 1994; Burgoon, Heddle, and Duran 2010). For example, students may think magnets can attract all metals or that larger magnets are stronger than smaller magnets. Students often confuse magnets with magnetic…

  10. Active Control of Transition Using the Lorentz Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosenchuck, Daniel; Brown, Garry

    2007-01-01

    A new concept and technique has been developed to directly control boundary-layer transition and turbulence. Near-wall vertical motions are directly suppressed through the application of Lorentz force. Current (j) and magnetic (b) fields are applied parallel to the boundary and normal to each other to produce a Lorentz force (j x B) normal to the boundary. This approach is called magnetic turbulence control (MTC). Experiments have been performed on flat-plate transitional and turbulent boundary layers in water seeded with a weak electrolyte.

  11. Force reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    A force reflecting hand controller based upon a six degree of freedom fully parallel mechanism, often termed a Stewart Platform, has been designed, constructed, and tested as an integrated system with a slave robot manipulator test bed. A force reflecting hand controller comprises a kinesthetic device capable of transmitting position and orientation commands to a slave robot manipulator while simultaneously representing the environmental interaction forces of the slave manipulator back to the operator through actuators driving the hand controller mechanism. The Stewart Platform was chosen as a novel approach to improve force reflecting teleoperation because of its inherently high ratio of load generation capability to system mass content and the correspondingly high dynamic bandwidth. An additional novelty of the program was to implement closed loop force and torque control about the hand controller mechanism by equipping the handgrip with a six degree of freedom force and torque measuring cell. The mechanical, electrical, computer, and control systems are discussed and system tests are presented.

  12. Force reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.

    1991-12-01

    A force reflecting hand controller based upon a six degree of freedom fully parallel mechanism, often termed a Stewart Platform, has been designed, constructed, and tested as an integrated system with a slave robot manipulator test bed. A force reflecting hand controller comprises a kinesthetic device capable of transmitting position and orientation commands to a slave robot manipulator while simultaneously representing the environmental interaction forces of the slave manipulator back to the operator through actuators driving the hand controller mechanism. The Stewart Platform was chosen as a novel approach to improve force reflecting teleoperation because of its inherently high ratio of load generation capability to system mass content and the correspondingly high dynamic bandwidth. An additional novelty of the program was to implement closed loop force and torque control about the hand controller mechanism by equipping the handgrip with a six degree of freedom force and torque measuring cell. The mechanical, electrical, computer, and control systems are discussed and system tests are presented.

  13. Magnetically controllable 3D microtissues based on magnetic microcryogels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Li, Yaqian; Feng, Siyu; Ning, Jia; Wang, Jingyu; Gou, Maling; Chen, Huijun; Xu, Feng; Du, Yanan

    2014-08-01

    Microtissues on the scale of several hundred microns are a promising cell culture configuration resembling the functional tissue units in vivo. In contrast to conventional cell culture, handling of microtissues poses new challenges such as medium exchange, purification and maintenance of the microtissue integrity. Here, we developed magnetic microcryogels to assist microtissue formation with enhanced controllability and robustness. The magnetic microcryogels were fabricated on-chip by cryogelation and micro-molding which could endure extensive external forces such as fluidic shear stress during pipetting and syringe injection. The magnetically controllable microtissues were applied to constitute a novel separable 3D co-culture system realizing functional enhancement of the hepatic microtissues co-cultured with the stromal microtissues and easy purification of the hepatic microtissues for downstream drug testing. The magnetically controllable microtissues with pre-defined shapes were also applied as building blocks to accelerate the tissue assembly process under magnetic force for bottom-up tissue engineering. Finally, the magnetic microcryogels could be injected in vivo as cell delivery vehicles and tracked by MRI. The injectable magnetic microtissues maintained viability at the injection site indicating good retention and potential applications for cell therapy. The magnetic microcryogels are expected to significantly promote the microtissues as a promising cellular configuration for cell-based applications such as in drug testing, tissue engineering and regenerative therapy. PMID:24736804

  14. Magnetic control of convection in nonconducting paramagnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Edwards, Boyd F.; Gray, Donald D.

    1998-01-01

    An inhomogeneous magnetic field exerts a magnetic body force on magnetically permeable fluids. A recent experiment [D. Braithwaite, E. Beaugnon, and R. Tournier, Nature (London) 354, 134 (1991)] demonstrates that this force can be used to compensate for gravity and to control convection in a paramagnetic solution of gadolinium nitrate. We provide the theory of magnetically controlled convection in a horizontal paramagnetic fluid layer heated from either above or below. Our theoretical predictions agree with the experiments.

  15. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  16. Magnetic control assembly reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickler, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    Results are summarized of the qualification level vibration tests performed on the magnet control assembly (MCA) for Nimbus and ERTS satellites. The MCA electronics and probe units have demonstrated the capability to survive qualification sinusoidal and random vibration levels. The functional testing indicated normal operation of the units after each axis of vibration. Visual inspection indicated no evidence of degradation. Post vibration acceptance testing verified normal operation of the MCA.

  17. A flow simulation study of protein solution under magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hidehiko; Hirota, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a superconducting magnet system generating magnetic forces able to compensate gravity and suppress convection of diamagnetic protein solution from which protein crystals precipitate. A simulation model has been proposed to elucidate the motion of protein solutions and search for the optimal conditions of the crystal formation process. This model incorporates general, non-uniform magnetic forces as external forces, while the previous models involve only simple, uniform magnetic forces. The simulation results indicate that the vertical component can suppress the convection of protein solution, while the horizontal component induces minimal convection. We, therefore, need to take into account the both components when considering the formation of protein crystals under magnetic forces.

  18. Lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.

    1990-03-01

    The lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor is calculated as a function of displacement from its original position at rest using Bean's critical-state model to describe flux pinning. The force is linear for small displacements and saturates at large displacements. In the absence of edge effects the force always attracts the magnet to its original position. Thus it is a restoring force that contributes to the stability of the levitated magnet. In the case of a thick superconductor slab, the origin of the force is a magnetic dipole layer consisting of positive and negative supercurrents induced on the trailing side of the magnet. The qualitative behavior is consistent with experiments reported to date. Effects due to the finite thickness of the superconductor slab and the granular nature of high-Tc materials are also considered.

  19. Lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor is calculated as a function of displacement from its original position at rest using Bean's critical-state model to describe flux pinning. The force is linear for small displacements and saturates at large displacements. In the absence of edge effects the force always attracts the magnet to its original position. Thus it is a restoring force that contributes to the stability of the levitated magnet. In the case of a thick superconductor slab, the origin of the force is a magnetic dipole layer consisting of positive and negative supercurrents induced on the trailing side of the magnet. The qualitative behavior is consistent with experiments reported to date. Effects due to the finite thickness of the superconductor slab and the granular nature of high-Tc materials are also considered.

  20. Computation of unbalanced radial force in permanent magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Salon, S.J.; Howe, M.; Slavik, C.J.; DeBortoli, M.J.; Nevins, R.J.

    1998-10-01

    Nonuniformity in magnet strength in permanent magnet motors results in a vibration-inducing unbalanced force acting on the rotor. This force is the difference of two large numbers and as such is difficult to determine precisely with numerical models. In this paper, a permanent magnet motor with unbalanced magnets is analyzed by the finite element method. Three different techniques for computing the net force on the rotor, including a recently developed field-correction approach, are compared. Sensitivities of the techniques to computational limitations and finite element mesh characteristics are discussed.

  1. A potential MRI hazard: forces on dental magnet keepers.

    PubMed

    Gegauff, A G; Laurell, K A; Thavendrarajah, A; Rosenstiel, S F

    1990-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the forces on dental prosthetic magnet keepers, with a view to assessing the potential for patient injury during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Four pre-formed keepers and one castable keeper alloy were tested. Magnetizations and high field susceptibilities were determined for each of the five specimens using data from a vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnetic field intensity with respect to distance from the main magnet coil was obtained from the manufacturer (1-5 tesla General Electric Signa Imaging System). A plot of force versus distance from the main coil and the maximum force at the magnet portal was determined for each specimen. The maximum forces ranged from 0.12-0.24 N for the pre-formed keepers and 3.67 MNm-3 for the castable alloy. It was concluded that the risk of patient injury by displacement is minimal, if the keepers are properly attached to supporting structures. PMID:2231158

  2. Relativity and electromagnetism: The force on a magnetic monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindler, Wolfgang

    1989-11-01

    On the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the first publication, by Oliver Heaviside, of what is now known as the Lorentz force law in electromagnetic theory, the analogous force law for magnetic monopoles is examined. Its relevance and limitations in calculating the force and torque on small current loops are discussed, and both its heuristic and practical uses are demonstrated.

  3. Varying the effective buoyancy of cells using magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M.

    2004-06-01

    We introduce a magnetic force buoyancy variation (MFBV) technique that employs intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields to vary the effective buoyancy of cells and other diamagnetic systems in solution. Nonswimming Paramecia have been suspended, forced to sediment and driven to rise in solution using MFBV. Details of their response to MFBV have been used to determine the magnetic susceptibility of a single Paramecium. The use of MFBV as a means by which to suspend cell cultures indefinitely is also described.

  4. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.

    1999-10-14

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a nonnegligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analog of Earnshaw's theorem, in which at the field-cooling position the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffnesses, independent of angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  5. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  6. Advanced methods for controlling untethered magnetic devices using rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Arthur W., Jr.

    This dissertation presents results documenting advancements on the control of untethered magnetic devices, such as magnetic "microrobots" and magnetically actuated capsule endoscopes, motivated by problems in minimally invasive medicine. This dissertation focuses on applying rotating magnetic fields for magnetic manipulation. The contributions include advancements in the way that helical microswimmers (devices that mimic the propulsion of bacterial flagella) are controlled in the presence of gravitational forces, advancements in ways that groups of untethered magnetic devices can be differentiated and semi-independently controlled, advancements in the way that untethered magnetic device can be controlled with a single rotating permanent magnet, and an improved understanding in the nature of the magnetic force applied to an untethered device by a rotating magnet.

  7. Nonlinear control of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradeep, A. K.; Gurumoorthy, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a variety of nonlinear controllers for the magnetic bearing that ensure both stability and robustness. We utilize techniques of discontinuous control to design novel control laws for the magnetic bearing. We present in particular sliding mode controllers, time optimal controllers, winding algorithm based controllers, nested switching controllers, fractional controllers, and synchronous switching controllers for the magnetic bearing. We show existence of solutions to systems governed by discontinuous control laws, and prove stability and robustness of the chosen control laws in a rigorous setting. We design sliding mode observers for the magnetic bearing and prove the convergence of the state estimates to their true values. We present simulation results of the performance of the magnetic bearing subject to the aforementioned control laws, and conclude with comments on design.

  8. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a ferromagnetic tip mounted on the force detector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Hammel, P C

    1998-03-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) presents the opportunity for a magnetic resonance imaging probe with ultra-high, potentially atomic-scale, resolution. The successful application of this technique in detection of nuclear magnetic, electron-spin and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) highlights its significant potential. We discuss the capabilities of the MRFM with particular emphasis on the detection of FMR using MRFM techniques. A crucial remaining challenge in the development of the magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) is to place the magnetic probe on the mechanical resonator. We address the problem of spurious detector response arising from interactions between the magnetic tip and various external applied fields. We show that miniature, magnetically-polarized Nd2Fe14B particles show promise as magnetic probe tips. Our experience indicates it will be important to minimize the total polarized moment of the magnetic tip and to ensure that the applied fields are as uniform as possible. PMID:9650791

  9. Experiments with a Magnetically Controlled Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A magnetically controlled pendulum is used for observing free and forced oscillations, including nonlinear oscillations and chaotic motion. A data-acquisition system stores the data and displays time series of the oscillations and related phase plane plots, Poincare maps, Fourier spectra and histograms. The decay constant of the pendulum can be…

  10. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, Gill A.; Williamson, Matthew M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section.

  11. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, G.A.; Williamson, M.M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section. 30 figs.

  12. Power dissipation and magnetic forces and MAGLEV rebars

    SciTech Connect

    Zahn, M.

    1997-03-01

    Concrete guideways for proposed MAGLEV vehicles may be reinforced with electrically conducting and magnetizable steel rebars. Transient magnetic fields due to passing MAGLEV vehicles will then induce transient currents in the rebars leading to power dissipation and temperature rise as well as Lorentz and magnetization forces on the rebars. In order to evaluate if this heating and force on the rebars affects concrete life and performance, analysis is presented for an infinitely long conducting and magnetizable cylinder in imposed uniform axial or transverse magnetic fields. Exact and approximate solutions are presented for sinusoidal steady state and step transient magnetic fields inside and outside the cylinder, the induced current density, the vector potential for transverse magnetic fields, the time average dissipated power in the sinusoidal steady state, and the total energy dissipated for step transients. Forces are approximately calculated for imposed magnetic fields` with a weak spatial gradient. The analysis is applied to representative rebar materials.

  13. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James; Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Samuel; Mihalusova, Mariana

    2003-03-01

    We have commissioned a superconducting solenoid based apparatus designed to exert strong magnetic body forces on biological specimens and other organic materials in ambient environmental conditions for extended periods. In its room temperature bore, it can produce a maximum magnetic field-field gradient product of 16 T^2-cm-1 which is sufficient to levitate frog embryos Xenopus Laevis[1]. We will discuss how we are applying these magnetic body forces to probe the known influences of gravitational forces on frog embryos and the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. In the process, we will describe a novel method for measuring the diamagnetic susceptibilities of specimens such as paramecia.

  14. Analysis of magnetic forces in magnetically saturated permanent magnet motors by considering mechanical and magnetic coupling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Geun-Bae; Hwang, Sang-Moon; Jung, Weui-Bong; Kang, Beom-Soo; Hwang, I.-Cheol; Kim, Chul-U.

    2002-05-01

    Vibrations of magnetically induced origins are becoming more serious with the trend of high speed use in industrial applications. Vibration of motors with the rotor eccentricity, which may result from working allowances or errors in manufacturing processes, is a coupled phenomenon between mechanical and magnetic performance and dynamic characteristics of permanent magnet motors. This article investigates magnetic forces for interior permanent magnet (IPM) motors when the rotor eccentricity exists. An IPM motor, widely used in high speed applications, is significantly effected by the rotor eccentricity due to the magnetic saturation. Due to the magnetic saturation, amplitudes and frequency contents of magnetic forces for IPM motors are worse in vibration viewpoint than those for without the rotor eccentricity.

  15. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2006-05-29

    A comprehensive examination of theoretical models for the friction force, in use by the electron cooling community, was performed. Here, they present their insights about the models gained as a result of comparison between the friction force formulas and direct numerical simulations, as well as studies of the cooling process as a whole.

  16. Lateral-deflection-controlled friction force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Hamaoka, Satoshi; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Itoh, Shintaro; Zhang, Hedong

    2014-08-01

    Lateral-deflection-controlled dual-axis friction force microscopy (FFM) is presented. In this method, an electrostatic force generated with a probe-incorporated micro-actuator compensates for friction force in real time during probe scanning using feedback control. This equivalently large rigidity can eliminate apparent boundary width and lateral snap-in, which are caused by lateral probe deflection. The method can evolve FFM as a method for quantifying local frictional properties on the micro/nanometer-scale by overcoming essential problems to dual-axis FFM.

  17. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

    2014-05-20

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  18. A study of scaling and geometry effects on the forces between cuboidal and cylindrical magnets using analytical force solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Janhavi S.; Arnold, David P.

    2008-05-01

    Kelvin's formula is used to calculate forces acting on a permanent magnet in the presence of an external magnetic field from a second permanent magnet. This approach is used to derive explicit analytical solutions for the axial and lateral forces between cuboidal and cylindrical permanent magnets as functions of magnet dimensions and separation. While exact solutions can be found for cuboidal magnets, a hypergeometric expansion is used to approximate the elliptic integrals in solving for the fields and forces for the cylindrical magnets. The resulting equations are applied over a range of magnet sizes and geometries to explore scaling laws and other geometrical effects. It is shown that cuboidal magnets provide larger forces than equivalently sized cylindrical magnets. Also, the aspect ratio of the magnets significantly affects the forces. These results are intended to benefit the design and optimization of sensors, actuators and systems that rely on magnetic forces, particularly at the microscale.

  19. Quantification of manual force control and tremor.

    PubMed

    Spirduso, W W; Francis, K; Eakin, T; Stanford, C

    2005-05-01

    Isometric impulse frequencies associated with active tremor and force regulation were examined in 10 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and in 10 older adults (OAs) who performed an isometric tracing task. The authors decoupled and analyzed the data to determine whether PD-related tremor in the thumb and in the index finger during isometric force control are related and whether PD impairs the performance of volitional force control beyond the errors contributed by tremor. After decoupling, there were clear and robust differences in PD patients' control of isometric force that could not be attributed to action-tremor error. Those errors, which occurred in the absence of movement, suggest impairment in coordinated recruitment and derecruitment of motor units during a fine-motor task. PMID:15883117

  20. Adaptive Variable Bias Magnetic Bearing Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    Most magnetic bearing control schemes use a bias current with a superimposed control current to linearize the relationship between the control current and the force it delivers. With the existence of the bias current, even in no load conditions, there is always some power consumption. In aerospace applications, power consumption becomes an important concern. In response to this concern, an alternative magnetic bearing control method, called Adaptive Variable Bias Control (AVBC), has been developed and its performance examined. The AVBC operates primarily as a proportional-derivative controller with a relatively slow, bias current dependent, time-varying gain. The AVBC is shown to reduce electrical power loss, be nominally stable, and provide control performance similar to conventional bias control. Analytical, computer simulation, and experimental results are presented in this paper.

  1. Study on the Calculation of Magnetic Force Based on the Equivalent Magnetic Charge Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangang; Tan, Qingchang; Zhang, Yongqi; Zhang, Kuo

    Magnetic drivers have been used widely in the pharmaceutical, chemical, petroleum, food and other industries with its perfect sealing without contact. Common method of calculating of the magnetic force are the Maxwell equations, empirical formulas, and he equivalent magnetic charge method as well. The Maxwell equations method is the most complicated and the empirical formulas method is the simplest with low accuracy. The equivalent magnetic charge method is simpler than the Maxwell equations method and more accurate than the empirical formulas method. In this paper, the magnetic force of the magnetic driver of reciprocate in line is calculated with the equivalent magnetic charge method and was compared with the experiment.

  2. Detection of magnetic-labeled antibody specific recognition events by combined atomic force and magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xia; Liu, Yanmei; Li, Jun; Guo, Wei; Bai, Yubai

    2009-09-01

    Atomic force (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were developed to detect biomolecular specific interaction. Goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin (anti-IgG) was covalently attached onto gold substrate modified by a self-assembly monolayer of thioctic acid via 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino) propyl] carbodiimide (EDC) activation. Magnetic-labeled IgG then specifically adsorbed onto anti-IgG surface. The morphological variation was identified by AFM. MFM was proved to be a fine assistant tool to distinguish the immunorecognized nanocomposites from the impurities by detection of the magnetic signal from magnetic-labeled IgG. It would enhance the understanding of biomolecular recognition process.

  3. Amazing Magnetism - Demos of Invisible Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Bird, K.; Nevils-Noe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields are puzzling and a perplexing phenomenon to grasp. Pushes and pulls applied without objects touching are difficult to understand and to relate to everyday life. For this poster we will show some of our most interesting magnetic field demonstrations, including field line visualizations using an array of compasses, electromagnetic induction, and an inductive "cannon" that shoots a ring. We will relate the issues and lessons of electromagnetism to the Earth's and Sun's magnetic fields and to everyday technology that uses electromagnetism. This presentation is sponsored by NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS).

  4. EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; GALNANDER, B.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; LOFNES, T.; SIDORIN, A.O.; SMIRNOV, A.V.; ZIEMANN, V.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  5. Experimental Benchmarking of the Magnetized Friction Force

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Galnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-20

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  6. Electromagnetic tweezers with independent force and torque control.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang; Lionberger, Troy A; Wiener, Diane M; Meyhofer, Edgar

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers are powerful tools to manipulate and study the mechanical properties of biological molecules and living cells. In this paper we present a novel, bona fide electromagnetic tweezer (EMT) setup that allows independent control of the force and torque applied via micrometer-sized magnetic beads to a molecule under study. We implemented this EMT by combining a single solenoid that generates force (f-EMT) with a set of four solenoids arranged into a symmetric quadrupole to generate torque (τ-EMT). To demonstrate the capability of the tweezers, we attached optically asymmetric Janus beads to single, tethered DNA molecules. We show that tension in the piconewton force range can be applied to single DNA molecules and the molecule can simultaneously be twisted with torques in the piconewton-nanometer range. Furthermore, the EMT allows the two components to be independently controlled. At various force levels applied to the Janus bead, the trap torsional stiffness can be continuously changed simply by varying the current magnitude applied to the τ-EMT. The flexible and independent control of force and torque by the EMT makes it an ideal tool for a range of measurements where tensional and torsional properties need to be studied simultaneously on a molecular or cellular level. PMID:27587135

  7. System for Controlling a Magnetically Levitated Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    In a rotor assembly having a rotor supported for rotation by magnetic bearings, a processor controlled by software or firmware controls the generation of force vectors that position the rotor relative to its bearings in a "bounce" mode in which the rotor axis is displaced from the principal axis defined between the bearings and a "tilt" mode in which the rotor axis is tilted or inclined relative to the principal axis. Waveform driven perturbations are introduced to generate force vectors that excite the rotor in either the "bounce" or "tilt" modes.

  8. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  9. Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.H.; He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.; Rossing, T.D.

    1993-03-01

    For the first time, the lift, drag, and guidance forces acting on a permanent magnet are measured as the magnet passes over different arrays of figure-eight (null-flux) coils. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of dynamic circuit theory, which is used to explain more optimal coil arrays.

  10. Magnetic resonance force microscopy and a solid state quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    Pelekhov, D. V.; Martin, I.; Suter, A.; Reagor, D. W.; Hammel, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Quantum Computer (QC) is a device that utilizes the principles of Quantum Mechanics to perform computations. Such a machine would be capable of accomplishing tasks not achievable by means of any conventional digital computer, for instance factoring large numbers. Currently it appears that the QC architecture based on an array of spin quantum bits (qubits) embedded in a solid-state matrix is one of the most promising approaches to fabrication of a scalable QC. However, the fabrication and operation of a Solid State Quantum Computer (SSQC) presents very formidable challenges; primary amongst these are: (1) the characterization and control of the fabrication process of the device during its construction and (2) the readout of the computational result. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM)--a novel scanning probe technique based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance-provides an attractive means of addressing these requirements. The sensitivity of the MRFM significantly exceeds that of conventional magnetic resonance measurement methods, and it has the potential for single electron spin detection. Moreover, the MRFM is capable of true 3D subsurface imaging. These features will make MRFM an invaluable tool for the implementation of a spin-based QC. Here we present the general principles of MRFM operation, the current status of its development and indicate future directions for its improvement.

  11. Sensitive magnetic force detection with a carbon nanotube resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Willick, Kyle; Haapamaki, Chris; Baugh, Jonathan

    2014-03-21

    We propose a technique for sensitive magnetic point force detection using a suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) mechanical resonator combined with a magnetic field gradient generated by a ferromagnetic gate electrode. Numerical calculations of the mechanical resonance frequency show that single Bohr magneton changes in the magnetic state of an individual magnetic molecule grafted to the CNT can translate to detectable frequency shifts, on the order of a few kHz. The dependences of the resonator response to device parameters such as length, tension, CNT diameter, and gate voltage are explored and optimal operating conditions are identified. A signal-to-noise analysis shows that, in principle, magnetic switching at the level of a single Bohr magneton can be read out in a single shot on timescales as short as 10 μs. This force sensor should enable new studies of spin dynamics in isolated single molecule magnets, free from the crystalline or ensemble settings typically studied.

  12. Extending the Range for Force Calibration in Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J.; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  13. Extending the range for force calibration in magnetic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. PMID:25992733

  14. Controlling Casimir force via coherent driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashid; Abbas, Muqaddar; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-04-01

    A four level atom-field configuration is used to investigate the coherent control of Casimir force between two identical plates made up of chiral atomic media and separated by vacuum of width d. The electromagnetic chirality-induced negative refraction is obtained via atomic coherence. The behavior of Casimir force is investigated using Casimir-Lifshitz formula. It is noticed that Casimir force can be switched from repulsive to attractive and vice versa via coherent control of the driving field. This switching feature provides new possibilities of using the repulsive Casimir force in the development of new emerging technologies, such as, micro-electro-mechanical and nano-electro-mechanical systems, i.e., MEMS and NEMS, respectively.

  15. Critical Casimir forces in a magnetic system: An experimental protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes Cardozo, David; Jacquin, Hugo; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.

    2014-11-01

    We numerically test an experimentally realizable method for the extraction of the critical Casimir force based on its thermodynamic definition as the derivative of the excess free energy with respect to system size. Free energy differences are estimated for different system sizes by integrating the order parameter along an isotherm. The method could be developed for experiments on magnetic systems and could give access to the critical Casimir force for any universality class. By choosing an applied field that opposes magnetic ordering at the boundaries, the Casimir force is found to increase by an order of magnitude over zero-field results.

  16. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  17. Dual-tip magnetic force microscopy with suppressed influence on magnetically soft samples.

    PubMed

    Precner, Marián; Fedor, Ján; Šoltýs, Ján; Cambel, Vladimír

    2015-02-01

    Standard magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is considered as a powerful tool used for magnetic field imaging at nanoscale. The method consists of two passes realized by the magnetic tip. Within the first one, the topography pass, the magnetic tip directly touches the magnetic sample. Such contact perturbs the magnetization of the sample explored. To avoid the sample touching the magnetic tip, we present a new approach to magnetic field scanning by segregating the topological and magnetic scans with two different tips located on a cut cantilever. The approach minimizes the disturbance of sample magnetization, which could be a major problem in conventional MFM images of soft magnetic samples. By cutting the cantilever in half using the focused ion beam technique, we create one sensor with two different tips--one tip is magnetized, and the other one is left non-magnetized. The non-magnetized tip is used for topography and the magnetized one for the magnetic field imaging. The method developed we call dual-tip magnetic force microscopy (DT-MFM). We describe in detail the dual-tip fabrication process. In the experiments, we show that the DT-MFM method reduces significantly the perturbations of the magnetic tip as compared to the standard MFM method. The present technique can be used to investigate microscopic magnetic domain structures in a variety of magnetic samples and is relevant in a wide range of applications, e.g., data storage and biomedicine. PMID:25586704

  18. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  19. Probe-Sample Coupling in the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, A.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Roukes, M. L.; Hammel, P. C.

    2002-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) provides a route to achieving scanned probe magnetic resonance imaging with extremely high spatial resolution. Achieving this capability will require understanding the force exerted on a microscopic magnetic probe by a spatially extended sample over which the probe is scanned. Here we present a detailed analysis of this interaction between probe and sample. We focus on understanding the situation where the micromagnet mounted on the mechanical resonator generates a very inhomogeneous magnetic field and is scanned over a sample with at least one spatial dimension much larger than that of the micromagnet. This situation differs quite significantly from the conditions under which most MRFM experiments have been carried out where the sample is mounted on the mechanical resonator and placed in a rather weak magnetic field gradient. In addition to the concept of a sensitive slice (the spatial region where the magnetic resonance condition is met) it is valuable to map the forces exerted on the probe by spins at various locations; this leads to the concept of the force slice (the region in which spins exert force on the resonator). Results of this analysis, obtained both analytically and numerically, will be qualitatively compared with an initial experimental finding from an EPR-MRFM experiment carried out on DPPH at 4 K.

  20. Probe--sample coupling in the magnetic resonance force microscope.

    PubMed

    Suter, A; Pelekhov, D V; Roukes, M L; Hammel, P C

    2002-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) provides a route to achieving scanned probe magnetic resonance imaging with extremely high spatial resolution. Achieving this capability will require understanding the force exerted on a microscopic magnetic probe by a spatially extended sample over which the probe is scanned. Here we present a detailed analysis of this interaction between probe and sample. We focus on understanding the situation where the micromagnet mounted on the mechanical resonator generates a very inhomogeneous magnetic field and is scanned over a sample with at least one spatial dimension much larger than that of the micromagnet. This situation differs quite significantly from the conditions under which most MRFM experiments have been carried out where the sample is mounted on the mechanical resonator and placed in a rather weak magnetic field gradient. In addition to the concept of a sensitive slice (the spatial region where the magnetic resonance condition is met) it is valuable to map the forces exerted on the probe by spins at various locations; this leads to the concept of the force slice (the region in which spins exert force on the resonator). Results of this analysis, obtained both analytically and numerically, will be qualitatively compared with an initial experimental finding from an EPR-MRFM experiment carried out on DPPH at 4 K. PMID:11846579

  1. Fuzzy control of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, J. J.; Niederauer, G. M.; Ahlstrom, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of an adaptive fuzzy control algorithm implemented on a VLSI chip for the control of a magnetic bearing was considered. The architecture of the adaptive fuzzy controller is similar to that of a neural network. The performance of the fuzzy controller is compared to that of a conventional controller by computer simulation.

  2. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested. PMID:24697421

  3. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-01

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  4. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  5. Interaction Forces Between Multiple Bodies in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Some of the results from experiments to determine the interaction forces between multiple bodies in a magnetic field are presented in this paper. It is shown how the force values and the force directions depend on the configuration of the bodies, their relative positions to each other, and the vector of the primary magnetic field. A number of efficient new automatic loading and assembly machines, as well as manipulators and robots, have been created based on the relationship between bodies and magnetic fields. A few of these patented magnetic devices are presented. The concepts involved open a new way to design universal grippers for robot and other kinds of mechanisms for the manipulation of objects. Some of these concepts can be used for space applications.

  6. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response. PMID:20839658

  7. Detecting the gravitational sensitivity of Paramecium caudatum using magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2006-03-01

    Under normal conditions, Paramecium cells regulate their swimming speed in response to the pN level mechanical force of gravity. This regulation, known as gravikinesis, is more pronounced when the external force is increased by methods such as centrifugation. Here we present a novel technique that simulates gravity fields using the interactions between strong inhomogeneous magnetic fields and cells. We are able to achieve variable gravities spanning from 10xg to -8xg; where g is earth's gravity. Our experiments show that the swimming speed regulation of Paramecium caudatum to magnetically simulated gravity is a true physiological response. In addition, they reveal a maximum propulsion force for paramecia. This advance establishes a general technique for applying continuously variable forces to cells or cell populations suitable for exploring their force transduction mechanisms.

  8. Formation and Collimation of Jets by Magnetic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, K.; Kudoh, T.

    1999-12-01

    Recent development of theory and numerical simulations of magnetically driven jets from young stellar objects is reviewed. Topics to be discussed are: 1) Acceleration of jets: Magnetically driven jets are accelerated by both magneto-centrifugal force and magnetic pressure force. The former (latter) becomes important when magnetic field is strong (weak). The basic properties (i.e., terminal velocity and mass flux) of jets accelerated by these two forces is discussed in detail. We also discuss the condition of production of jets, which is applied to answer the following question: When do jets begin to be accelerated in the course of star formation ? 2) Collimation of jets: Magnetically driven jets can in principle be collimated by pinching effect of toroidal magnetic fields. Recently, some controvertial arguments have been put forward: Are all field lines (and jets) really collimated by pinching effect ? The current status of this issue is discussed. 3) Protostellar flares: Based on theory and numerical simulations, it has recently been recognized that the formation of jets has a close connection with occurrence of flares (possibly due to magnetic reconnection). We discuss how and when magnetic reconnection occurs in relation to jets.

  9. Calculation of forces on magnetized bodies using COSMIC NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheerer, John

    1987-01-01

    The methods described may be used with a high degree of confidence for calculations of magnetic traction forces normal to a surface. In this circumstance all models agree, and test cases have resulted in theoretically correct results. It is shown that the tangential forces are in practice negligible. The surface pole method is preferable to the virtual work method because of the necessity for more than one NASTRAN run in the latter case, and because distributed forces are obtained. The derivation of local forces from the Maxwell stress method involves an undesirable degree of manipulation of the problem and produces a result in contradiction of the surface pole method.

  10. Force-control at cellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Galic, Milos; Begemann, Isabell; Viplav, Abhiyan; Matis, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Force-regulation at cellular membranes relies on dynamic molecular platforms that integrate intra- and extracellular signals to control cell shape and function. To correctly respond to a continuously changing environment, activity of these platforms needs to be tightly controlled in space and time. Over the last few years, curvature-dependent mechano-chemical signal translation—a receptor-independent signaling mechanism where physical forces at the plasma membrane trigger nanoscale membrane deformations that are then translated into chemical signal transduction cascades—has emerged as a new signaling principle that cells use to regulate forces at the membrane. However, until recently, technical limitations have precluded studies of this force-induced curvature-dependent signaling at the physiological scale. Here, we comment on recent advancements that allow studying curvature-dependent signaling at membranes, and discuss processes where it may be involved in. Considering its general impact on cell function, a particular focus will be put on the curvature-dependence of feedback loops that control actin-based forces at cellular membranes. PMID:25715331

  11. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in magnetoelectric composites revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hongchen; Zhou, Xilong; Dong, Shuxiang; Luo, Haosu; Li, Faxin

    2014-07-01

    Controlling electric polarization (or magnetization) in multiferroic materials with external magnetic fields (or electric fields) is very important for fundamental physics and spintronic devices. Although there has been some progress on magnetic-field-induced polarization reversal in single-phase multiferroics, such behavior has so far never been realized in composites. Here we show that it is possible to reverse ferroelectric polarization using magnetic fields in a bilayer Terfenol-D/PMN-33%PT composite. We realized this by ferroelectric domain imaging using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) under applied magnetic field loading. The internal electric field caused by the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in the PMN-PT crystal is considered as the driving force for the 180° polarization switching, and its existence is verified by switching spectroscopy PFM testing under a series of external magnetic fields. A quantitative method is further suggested to estimate the local ME coefficient based on the switching spectroscopy PFM testing results.

  12. Magnetic-field-induced ferroelectric polarization reversal in magnetoelectric composites revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongchen; Zhou, Xilong; Dong, Shuxiang; Luo, Haosu; Li, Faxin

    2014-08-01

    Controlling electric polarization (or magnetization) in multiferroic materials with external magnetic fields (or electric fields) is very important for fundamental physics and spintronic devices. Although there has been some progress on magnetic-field-induced polarization reversal in single-phase multiferroics, such behavior has so far never been realized in composites. Here we show that it is possible to reverse ferroelectric polarization using magnetic fields in a bilayer Terfenol-D/PMN-33%PT composite. We realized this by ferroelectric domain imaging using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) under applied magnetic field loading. The internal electric field caused by the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in the PMN-PT crystal is considered as the driving force for the 180° polarization switching, and its existence is verified by switching spectroscopy PFM testing under a series of external magnetic fields. A quantitative method is further suggested to estimate the local ME coefficient based on the switching spectroscopy PFM testing results. PMID:24953042

  13. An improved analytical solution for predicting magnetic forces in permanent magnet motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Li, J. T.; Jiang, Q.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes an analytical model for analyzing magnetic forces developed in permanent magnet motors of radial field topology. The slotting effect is taken into consideration by solving the boundary value problem of the air gap field. The solution is expressed in the form of Fourier series with which the analysis of the harmonic contents in the magnetic forces can be readily performed. In particular, the curvature effect or the flux focusing effect in the slot opening regions is taken into consideration. The results of magnetic forces obtained from this model are verified with numerical simulations using the finite element method and experimental results.

  14. Levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Gong, Y. M.; Wang, G.; Zhou, D. J.; Zhao, L. F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying high and low magnetic fields generated from a superconducting magnet were investigated. The magnetic field intensity of the superconducting magnet was measured when the exciting current was 90 A. The magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field were both calculated. The YBCO bulk was cooled by liquid nitrogen in field-cooling (FC) and zero-field-cooling (ZFC) condition. The results showed that the levitation forces increased with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Moreover, the levitation forces were more dependent on magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field than magnetic field intensity.

  15. High performance magnetically controllable microturbines.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yong-Lai; Ku, Jin-Feng; He, Yan; Xu, Bin-Bin; Chen, Qi-Dai; Xia, Hong; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2010-11-01

    Reported in this paper is two-photon photopolymerization (TPP) fabrication of magnetic microturbines with high surface smoothness towards microfluids mixing. As the key component of the magnetic photoresist, Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were carefully screened for homogeneous doping. In this work, oleic acid stabilized Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles synthesized via high-temperature induced organic phase decomposition of an iron precursor show evident advantages in particle morphology. After modification with propoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (PO(3)-TMPTA, a kind of cross-linker), the magnetic nanoparticles were homogeneously doped in acrylate-based photoresist for TPP fabrication of microstructures. Finally, a magnetic microturbine was successfully fabricated as an active mixing device for remote control of microfluids blending. The development of high quality magnetic photoresists would lead to high performance magnetically controllable microdevices for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) applications. PMID:20721411

  16. Control Strategies for Accurate Force Generation and Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka, Chiaki; Fujiwara, Motoko

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics and motor strategies for force generation and force relaxation were examined using graded tasks during isometric force control. Ten female college students (M age = 20.2 yr., SD = 1.1) were instructed to accurately control the force of isometric elbow flexion using their right arm to match a target force level as quickly as possible. They performed: (1) a generation task, wherein they increased their force from 0% maximum voluntary force to 20% maximum voluntary force (0%-20%), 40% maximum voluntary force (0%-40%), or 60% maximum voluntary force (0%-60%) and (2) and a relaxation task, in which they decreased their force from 60% maximum voluntary force to 40% maximum voluntary force (60%-40%), 20% maximum voluntary force (60%-20%), or to 0% maximum voluntary force (60%-0%). Produced force parameters of point of accuracy (force level, error), quickness (reaction time, adjustment time, rate of force development), and strategy (force wave, rate of force development) were analyzed. Errors of force relaxation were all greater, and reaction times shorter, than those of force generation. Adjustment time depended on the magnitude of force and peak rates of force development and force relaxation differed. Controlled relaxation of force is more difficult with low magnitude of force control. PMID:27555365

  17. Spinmotive force due to motion of magnetic bubble arrays driven by magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Yuta; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between local magnetization and conduction electrons is responsible for a variety of phenomena in magnetic materials. It has been recently shown that spin current and associated electric voltage can be induced by magnetization that depends on both time and space. This effect, called spinmotive force, provides for a powerful tool for exploring the dynamics and the nature of magnetic textures, as well as a new source for electromotive force. Here we theoretically demonstrate the generation of electric voltages in magnetic bubble array systems subjected to a magnetic field gradient. It is shown by deriving expressions for the electric voltages that the present system offers a direct measure of phenomenological parameter β that describes non-adiabaticity in the current induced magnetization dynamics. This spinmotive force opens a door for new types of spintronic devices that exploit the field-gradient. PMID:25365971

  18. Magnetic Control of Solutal Buoyancy Driven Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Volumetric forces resulting from local density variations and gravitational acceleration cause buoyancy induced convective motion in melts and solutions. Solutal buoyancy is a result of concentration differences in an otherwise isothermal fluid. If the fluid also exhibits variations in magnetic susceptibility with concentration then convection control by external magnetic fields can be hypothesized. Magnetic control of thermal buoyancy induced convection in ferrofluids (dispersions of ferromagnetic particles in a carrier fluid) and paramagnetic fluids have been demonstrated. Here we show the nature of magnetic control of solutal buoyancy driven convection of a paramagnetic fluid, an aqueous solution of Manganese Chloride hydrate. We predict the critical magnetic field required for balancing gravitational solutal buoyancy driven convection and validate it through a simple experiment. We demonstrate that gravity driven flow can be completely reversed by a magnetic field but the exact cancellation of the flow is not possible. This is because the phenomenon is unstable. The technique can be applied to crystal growth processes in order to reduce convection and to heat exchanger devices for enhancing convection. The method can also be applied to impose a desired g-level in reduced gravity applications.

  19. Feedback Control of Floor Reaction Force Based on Force-Reflecting-Type Multilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kazuki; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Real-world haptics is being studied not only for improving feedback on real-world haptic information in teleoperation but also for developing key technologies for future human support. For the remote operating of systems at distant places, haptic information is required in addition to visual information. The haptic information around a work environment can be the floor reaction force, which can be obtained using a movement-type haptic device. The floor reaction force from the environment that the mobile haptic device touches is fed back accurately to the operator. First, this paper proposes a general force-reflecting-type multilateral control. Second, this paper extends the control to feedback control of the floor reaction force by using force-reflecting-type multilateral control and a novel haptic device employing a biped robot with a slave system. The position response of a master system is transformed to a leg tip position command for the biped-type haptic device. In addition, the floor reaction force determined by the biped-type haptic device is fed back to the master system. The proposed method can determine the force feedback to the sole of the foot, which is not possible with a conventional stationary system. As a result, the floor reaction force from a large area can be obtained, and the operability of the control system is improved by using the proposed system.

  20. Force override rate control for robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driels, Morris

    1994-01-01

    The work reported deals with the problem of operating a robot manipulator under a rate control mode while the end effector is not in contact with the external environment, and then switching to a force control mode when contact is made. The paper details how the modal changeover may be accomplished in a manner transparent to the operator, and will allow operator applied forces to be reflected at the robot end effector. A one degree of freedom demonstration system is used to illustrate the concept, which is then applied to a PUMA manipulator. Sample code for the implementation of the control is provided, experimental results show that the optimum setting for the gain is a function of the compliance of the end effector, and the compliance of the external constraint.

  1. Probing the duplex stainless steel phases via magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheno, S. M.; Santos, F. S.; Kuri, S. E.

    2008-03-01

    Duplex stainless steels are austenitic-ferritic alloys used in many applications, thanks to their excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. In this work, chemical analyses, x-ray diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were employed to characterize the solution annealed and aged duplex stainless steel. The samples exhibited no changes in lattice parameters and the MFM technique proved successful in clearly imaging the magnetic domain structure of the ferrite phase.

  2. Magnetic microswimmers: Controlling particle approach through magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Minjun; Fu, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We investigate magnetic microswimmers actuated by a rotating magnetic field that may be useful for drug delivery, micro-surgery, or diagnostics in human body. For modular swimmers, assembly and disassembly requires understanding the interactions between the swimmer and other modules in the fluid. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms for a frequency-dependent attraction/repulsion between a three-bead, achiral swimmer and other magnetic particles, which represent modular assembly elements. We first investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between a swimmer and nearby particle by studying the Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the swimmer. Then we show that the magnetic forces can be attractive or repulsive depending on the spatial arrangement of the swimmer and particle, with a magnitude that decreases with increasing frequency. Combining magnetic and hydrodynamic effects allows us to understand the overall behavior of magnetic particles near the swimmer. Interestingly, we find that the frequency of rotation can be used to control when the particle can closely approach the swimmer, with potential application to assembly.

  3. Design and optimization of force-reduced high field magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rembeczki, Szabolcs

    High field magnets have many important applications in different areas of research, in the power industry and also for military purposes. For example, high field magnets are particularly useful in: material sciences, high energy physics, plasma physics (as fusion magnets), high power applications (as energy storage devices), and space applications (in propulsion systems). One of the main issues with high-field magnets is the presence of very large electromagnetic stresses that must be counteracted and therefore require heavy support structures. In superconducting magnets, the problems caused by Lorentz forces are further complicated by the fact that superconductors for high field applications are pressure sensitive. The current carrying capacity is greatly reduced under stress and strain (especially in the case of Nb 3Sn and the new high temperature superconductors) so the reduction of the acting forces is of even greater importance. Different force-reduced magnet concepts have been studied in the past, both numerical and analytical methods have been used to solve this problem. The developed concepts are based on such complex winding geometries that the realization and manufacturing of such coils is extremely difficult and these concepts are mainly of theoretical interest. In the presented research, a novel concept for force-reduced magnets has been developed and analyzed which is easy to realize and therefore is of practical interest. The analysis has been performed with a new methodology, which does not require the time consuming finite element calculations. The developed computer models describe the 3-dimensional winding configuration by sets of filaments (filamentary approximation). This approach is much faster than finite element analysis and therefore allows rapid optimization of concepts. The method has been extensively tested on geometries of force-reduced solenoids where even analytical solutions exist. As a further cross check, the developed computer

  4. Controlling Magnetism by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasing, Theo

    2013-03-01

    From the discovery of sub-picosecond demagnetization over a decade ago to the recent demonstration of magnetization reversal by a single 40 femtosecond laser pulse, the manipulation of spins by ultra short laser pulses has become a fundamentally challenging topic with a potentially high impact for future spintronics, data storage and manipulation and quantum computation. In addition, when the time-scale of the perturbation approaches the characteristic time of the exchange interaction (~ 10-100 fs), the magnetization dynamics enters a novel, highly non-equilibrium, regime, which was recently demonstrated by both fs optical and X-ray experiments. Theoretically, this field is still in its infancy, using phenomenological descriptions of the none-equilibrium dynamics between electrons, spins and phonons via 2- or 3-temperature models and atomistic spin simulations. A proper description should include the time dependence of the exchange interaction and nucleation phenomena on the nanometer length scale. Such developments need to be supported by experimental investigations of magnetism at its fundamental time and length scales, i.e. with fs time and nanometer spatial resolution. Such studies require the excitation and probing of the spin and angular momentum contributions to the magnetic order at timescales of 10fs and below, a challenge that could be met by the future fs X-ray FEL's but in some cases also with purely optical techniques. This work is supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and the FP7 programme of the EU.

  5. Magnetic Control of Atomic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Tom; Bannerman, Travis; Chavez, Isaac; Clark, Rob; Libson, Adam; Raizen, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Using a sequence of pulsed electromagnetic coils, known as the atomic coilgun, we slowed supersonic beams of atomic neon and molecular oxygen. We report our progress toward adapting the atomic coilgun for magnetically trapping hydrogen isotopes. This work has motivated us to investigate other methods for magnetic control of atomic motion. We describe these techniques, and present calculations suggesting their utility in controlling atomic motion. We then outline our plans for using these methods in certain applications.

  6. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155... Controllability and Maneuverability § 23.155 Elevator control force in maneuvers. (a) The elevator control force... curve of stick force versus maneuvering load factor with increasing load factor....

  7. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155... Controllability and Maneuverability § 23.155 Elevator control force in maneuvers. (a) The elevator control force... curve of stick force versus maneuvering load factor with increasing load factor....

  8. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155... Controllability and Maneuverability § 23.155 Elevator control force in maneuvers. (a) The elevator control force... curve of stick force versus maneuvering load factor with increasing load factor....

  9. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155... Controllability and Maneuverability § 23.155 Elevator control force in maneuvers. (a) The elevator control force... curve of stick force versus maneuvering load factor with increasing load factor....

  10. 14 CFR 23.155 - Elevator control force in maneuvers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elevator control force in maneuvers. 23.155... Controllability and Maneuverability § 23.155 Elevator control force in maneuvers. (a) The elevator control force... curve of stick force versus maneuvering load factor with increasing load factor....

  11. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  12. Direction detectable static magnetic field imaging by frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy with an AC magnetic field driven soft magnetic tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hitoshi; Ito, Ryoichi; Egawa, Genta; Li, Zhenghua; Yoshimura, Satoru

    2011-04-01

    Direction detectable static magnetic field imaging, which directly distinguishes the up and down direction of static perpendicular magnetic field from a sample surface and the polarity of magnetic charges on the surface, was demonstrated for CoCrPt-SiO2 perpendicular magnetic recording media based on a frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy (FM-MFM), which uses a frequency modulation of the cantilever oscillation induced by an alternating force from the tip-sample magnetic interaction. In this study, to generate the alternating force, we used a NiFe soft magnetic tip driven by the ac magnetic field of a soft ferrite core and imaged the direction and the amplitude of the static magnetic field from the recorded bits. This method enables measurement of the static magnetic field near a sample surface, which is masked by short range forces of the surface. The present method will be effective in analyzing the microscopic magnetic domain structure of hard magnetic samples.

  13. Principle and Basic Characteristics of Variable-Magnetic-Force Memory Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kazuto; Yuki, Kazuaki; Hashiba, Yutaka; Takahashi, Norio; Yasui, Kazuya; Kovudhikulrungsri, Lilit

    A reduction in the power consumed by motors is required for energy saving in the case of electrical appliances and electric vehicles (EV). The motors used for operating these apparatus operate at variable speeds. Further, the motors operate with small load in stationary mode and with large load in start-up mode. A permanent magnet motor can operate at the rated power with a high efficiency. However, the efficiency is lower at small load or high speed because the large constant magnetic force results in substantial core loss. Furthermore, the flux-weakening current that depresses voltage at high speed leads to significant copper loss. Therefore, we have developed a new technique for controlling the magnetic force of permanent magnet on the basis of the load or speed of the motor. In this paper, we propose the novel motor that can vary magnetic flux and we clarify the principle.

  14. Prediction and analysis of magnetic forces in permanent magnet brushless dc motor with rotor eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Li, J. T.; Jabbar, M. A.

    2006-04-01

    In design of permanent magnet motors for high-precision applications, it is sometimes necessary, early in the design stage, to have a detailed analysis of the effect of rotor eccentricity that may result from manufacturing imperfectness or use of fluid dynamic or aerodynamic bearings. This paper presents an analytical model for electromagnetic torque and forces in permanent magnet motors with rotor eccentricity. The model gives an insight to the relationship between the effect of the eccentricity and the other motor design parameters on the electromagnetic forces. It is shown that the calculated magnetic forces obtained from this model agree well with those obtained from numerical simulations that are very computationally demanding.

  15. Local nonlinear rf forces in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2014-06-15

    The local nonlinear forces induced by radio frequency (rf) waves are derived in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, where the inhomogeneity exists in the rf fields, in the static magnetic field as well as in the equilibrium density and temperature. The local parallel force is completely resonant, but a novel component dependent on those inhomogeneities is obtained as the result of the inhomogeneous transport of parallel resonant-absorbed momentum by the nonlinear perpendicular drift flux. In the local poloidal force, the component induced by the inhomogeneity of rf power absorption is also confirmed and it can be recognized as the residual effect from the incomplete cancellation between the rate of the diamagnetic poloidal momentum gain and the Lorentz force due to the radial diffusion-like flux. The compact expression for radial force is also obtained for the first time, whose nonresonant component is expressed as the sum of the ponderomotive force on particles and the gradients of the nonresonant perpendicular pressure and of the nonresonant momentum flux due to the finite temperature effect. Numerical calculations in a 1-D slab model show that the resonant component dependent on the inhomogeneities may be significant when the ion absorption dominates the resonant wave-particle interaction. A quantitative estimation shows that the novel component in the parallel force is important to understand the experiments of the ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive.

  16. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1978-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  17. Magnetic nuclear core restraint and control

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A lateral restraint and control system for a nuclear reactor core adaptable to provide an inherent decrease of core reactivity in response to abnormally high reactor coolant fluid temperatures. An electromagnet is associated with structure for radially compressing the core during normal reactor conditions. A portion of the structures forming a magnetic circuit are composed of ferromagnetic material having a curie temperature corresponding to a selected coolant fluid temperature. Upon a selected signal, or inherently upon a preselected rise in coolant temperature, the magnetic force is decreased a given amount sufficient to relieve the compression force so as to allow core radial expansion. The expanded core configuration provides a decreased reactivity, tending to shut down the nuclear reaction.

  18. Probing cellular traction forces with magnetic nanowires and microfabricated force sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the use of magnetic nanowires for the study of cellular response to force is demonstrated. High-aspect ratio Ni rods with diameter 300 nm and lengths up to 20 μm were bound to or internalized by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on arrays of flexible micropost force sensors. Forces and torques were applied to the cells by driving the nanowires with AC magnetic fields in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, and the changes in cellular contractile forces were recorded with the microposts. These local stimulations yield global force reinforcement of the cells’ traction forces, but this contractile reinforcement can be effectively suppressed upon addition of a calcium channel blocker, ruthenium red, suggesting the role of calcium channels in the mechanical response. The responsiveness of the SMCs to actuation depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation. These results show that the combination of magnetic nanoparticles and micropatterned, flexible substrates can provide new approaches to the study of cellular mechanotransduction.

  19. The Mean Electromotive Force Resulting from Magnetic Buoyancy Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W.

    2011-02-01

    Motivated both by considerations of the generation of large-scale astrophysical magnetic fields and by potential problems with mean magnetic field generation by turbulent convection, we investigate the mean electromotive force (emf) resulting from the magnetic buoyancy instability of a rotating layer of stratified magnetic field, considering both unidirectional and sheared fields. We discuss why the traditional decomposition into α and β effects is inappropriate in this case, and that it is only consideration of the entire mean emf that is meaningful. By considering a weighted average of the unstable linear eigenmodes, and averaging over the horizontal plane, we obtain depth-dependent emfs. For the simplified case of isothermal, ideal MHD, we are able to obtain an analytic expression for the emf; more generally, the emf has to be determined numerically. We calculate how the emf depends on the various parameters of the problem, particularly the rotation rate and the latitude of the magnetic layer.

  20. Three-axis force actuator for a magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention features a three-axis force actuator that axially, radially and rotatably supports a bearing member for frictionless rotation about an axis of rotation generally coincident with a Z-axis. Also featured is a magnetic bearing having such an actuator. The actuator includes an inner member, a magnetic member and a pole assembly having a ring member and four pole extending therefrom. The poles are equi-angular spaced from each other and radially spaced about the Z-axis. The inner member extends along the Z-axis and is a highly magnetic permeable material. The magnetic member is formed about the inner member outer surface, extends along the Z-axis and is configured so one magnetic pole polarity is located at its outer surface and the other polarity pole is located at its inner surface. Preferably, the magnetic member is a radially magnetized permanent magnet. The inner surface of the ring member is magnetically coupled to the magnetic member and a face of each pole is coupled to the bearing member. The magnetic member, the pole assembly, the inner member and the bearing member cooperate to generate a magnetic field that radially and rotatably supports a rotating member secured to the bearing member. The actuator further includes a plurality of electromagnetic coils. Preferably, a coil is formed about each pole and at least 2 coils are formed about the inner member. When energized, the electromagnetic coils generate a modulated magnetic field that stabilizes the rotating member in the desired operational position.

  1. Single Molecule Magnetic Force Detection with a Carbon Nanotube Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willick, Kyle; Walker, Sean; Baugh, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Single molecule magnets (SMMs) sit at the boundary between macroscopic magnetic behaviour and quantum phenomena. Detecting the magnetic moment of an individual SMM would allow exploration of this boundary, and could enable technological applications based on SMMs such as quantum information processing. Detection of these magnetic moments remains an experimental challenge, particularly at the time scales of relaxation and decoherence. We present a technique for sensitive magnetic force detection that should permit such measurements. A suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) mechanical resonator is combined with a magnetic field gradient generated by a ferromagnetic gate electrode, which couples the magnetic moment of a nanomagnet to the resonant motion of the CNT. Numerical calculations of the mechanical resonance show that resonant frequency shifts on the order of a few kHz arise due to single Bohr magneton changes in magnetic moment. A signal-to-noise analysis based on thermomechanical noise shows that magnetic switching at the level of a Bohr magneton can be measured in a single shot on timescales as short as 10 μs. This sensitivity should enable studies of the spin dynamics of an isolated SMM, within the spin relaxation timescales for many available SMMs. Supported by NSERC.

  2. Corroboration of magnetic forces in US Maglev design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, H.; He, J.; Wang, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Four System Concept Definition (SCD) contractors to the National Maglev Initiative (NMI) developed conceptual designs of maglev systems in 1991--1992. The objective of the work reported here was to perform independent calculations of the magnetic forces and fields of these four systems to assess the reasonableness'' of the results presented to the government. Commercial computer software was used for computing forces in the system employing nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and for some calculations of induced eddy current effects in finite-sized systems. Other cases required the use of models developed at ANL and verified by experiment, or in a few cases, new computer programs that have not been validated by experiment. The magnetic forces calculated by the contractors were found to be credible in every case evaluated. The stray fields were also found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated by the contractors, but, for lack of spice, are not reported here.

  3. Corroboration of magnetic forces in US Maglev design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, H.; He, J.; Wang, Z.

    1993-06-01

    Four System Concept Definition (SCD) contractors to the National Maglev Initiative (NMI) developed conceptual designs of maglev systems in 1991--1992. The objective of the work reported here was to perform independent calculations of the magnetic forces and fields of these four systems to assess the ``reasonableness`` of the results presented to the government. Commercial computer software was used for computing forces in the system employing nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and for some calculations of induced eddy current effects in finite-sized systems. Other cases required the use of models developed at ANL and verified by experiment, or in a few cases, new computer programs that have not been validated by experiment. The magnetic forces calculated by the contractors were found to be credible in every case evaluated. The stray fields were also found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated by the contractors, but, for lack of spice, are not reported here.

  4. Ball lightning as a force-free magnetic knot

    PubMed

    Ranada; Soler; Trueba

    2000-11-01

    The stability of fireballs in a recent model of ball lightning is studied. It is shown that the balls shine while relaxing in an almost quiescent expansion, and that three effects contribute to their stability: (i) the formation in each one during a process of Taylor relaxation of a force-free magnetic field, a concept introduced in 1954 in order to explain the existence of large magnetic fields and currents in stable configurations of astrophysical plasmas; (ii) the so called Alfven conditions in magnetohydrodynamics; and (iii) the approximate conservation of the helicity integral. The force-free fields that appear are termed "knots" because their magnetic lines are closed and linked. PMID:11102074

  5. Principle and Basic Characteristics of a Hybrid Variable-Magnetic-Force Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Kazuto; Kuramochi, Satoru

    Reduction in the power consumed by motors is important for energy saving in the case of electrical appliances and electric vehicles (EVs). The motors used for operating these devices operate at variable speeds. Further, the motors operate with a small load in the stationary mode and a large load in the starting mode. A permanent magnet motor can be operated at the rated power with a high efficiency. However, the efficiency is low at a small load or at a high speed because the large constant magnetic force results in substantial core loss. Furthermore, the flux-weakening current that decreases the voltage at a high speed leads to significant copper loss and core loss. Therefore, we have developed a new technique for controlling the magnetic force of a permanent magnet on the basis of the load or speed of the motor. In this paper, we propose a novel motor that can vary the magnetic flux of a permanent magnet and clarify the principle and basic characteristics of the motor. The new motor has a permanent magnet that is magnetized by the magnetizing coil of the stator. The analysis results show that the magnetic flux linkage of the motor can be changed from 37% to 100% that a high torque can be produced.

  6. Force prediction in permanent magnet flat linear motors (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastham, J. F.; Akmese, R.

    1991-11-01

    The advent of neodymium iron boron rare-earth permanent magnet material has afforded the opportunity to construct linear machines of high force to weight ratio. The paper describes the design and construction of an axial flux machine and rotating drum test rig. The machine occupies an arc of 45° on a drum 1.22 m in diameter. The excitation is provided by blocks of NdFeB material which are skewed in order to minimize the force variations due to slotting. The stator carries a three-phase short-chorded double-layer winding of four poles. The machine is supplied by a PWM inverter the fundamental component of which is phase locked to the rotor position so that a ``dc brushless'' drive system is produced. Electromagnetic forces including ripple forces are measured at supply frequencies up to 100 Hz. They are compared with finite-element analysis which calculates the force variation over the time period. The paper then considers some of the causes of ripple torque. In particular, the force production due solely to the permanent magnet excitation is considered. This has two important components each acting along the line of motion of the machine, one is due to slotting and the other is due to the finite length of the primary. In the practical machine the excitation poles are skewed to minimize the slotting force and the effectiveness of this is confirmed by both results from the experiments and the finite-element analysis. The end effect force is shown to have a space period of twice that of the excitation. The amplitude of this force and its period are again confirmed by practical results.

  7. Magnetic fluid readily controlled in zero gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.

    1965-01-01

    Colloid composed of finely ground iron oxide in a fluid such as heptane, is controlled and directed magnetically in a zero gravity environment. It will not separate on standing for long periods or after exposure to magnetic or centrifugal forces. Because of its low density and low viscosity, it is easily pumped.

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed. PMID:26964007

  9. The Negative Effective Magnetic Pressure in Stratified Forced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kemel, Koen; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2012-04-01

    To understand the basic mechanism of the formation of magnetic flux concentrations, we determine by direct numerical simulations the turbulence contributions to the mean magnetic pressure in a strongly stratified isothermal layer with large plasma beta, where a weak uniform horizontal mean magnetic field is applied. The negative contribution of turbulence to the effective mean magnetic pressure is determined for strongly stratified forced turbulence over a range of values of magnetic Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. Small-scale dynamo action is shown to reduce the negative effect of turbulence on the effective mean magnetic pressure. However, the turbulence coefficients describing the negative effective magnetic pressure phenomenon are found to converge for magnetic Reynolds numbers between 60 and 600, which is the largest value considered here. In all these models, the turbulent intensity is arranged to be nearly independent of height, so the kinetic energy density decreases with height due to the decrease in density. In a second series of numerical experiments, the turbulent intensity increases with height such that the turbulent kinetic energy density is nearly independent of height. Turbulent magnetic diffusivity and turbulent pumping velocity are determined with the test-field method for both cases. The vertical profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity is found to agree with what is expected based on simple mixing length expressions. Turbulent pumping is shown to be down the gradient of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, but it is twice as large as expected. Corresponding numerical mean-field models are used to show that a large-scale instability can occur in both cases, provided the degree of scale separation is large enough and hence the turbulent magnetic diffusivity small enough.

  10. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  11. Magnetic bearings for vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweitzer, G.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is presented on the research of the Institute of Mechanics of the ETH in the field of vibration control with magnetic bearings. It shows a method for modelling an elastic rotor so that it can be represented by a low order model amenable to control techniques. It deals with the control law and spill-over effects, and it also discusses experimental results for an active resonance damper.

  12. Velocity-Controlled Magnetic Bearings with Solid Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming; Walton, James

    1996-01-01

    A methodology for designing velocity-controlled magnetic bearings with laminated cores has been extended to those with solid cores. The eddy-current effect of the solid cores is modeled as an opposing magnetomotive force. The bearing control dynamics is formulated in a dimensionless fashion which can be readily reviewed on a root-locus plot for stability. This facilitates the controller design and tuning process for solid core magnetic bearings using no displacement sensors.

  13. Atomic-resolution single-spin magnetic resonance detection concept based on tunneling force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A.; Ambal, K.; Boehme, C.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    A study of a force detected single-spin magnetic resonance measurement concept with atomic spatial resolution is presented. The method is based upon electrostatic force detection of spin-selection rule controlled single-electron tunneling between two electrically isolated paramagnetic states. Single-spin magnetic resonance detection is possible by measuring the force detected tunneling charge noise on and off spin resonance. Simulation results of this charge noise, based upon physical models of the tunneling and spin physics, are directly compared to measured atomic force microscopy system noise. The results show that the approach could provide single-spin measurement of electrically isolated qubit states with atomic spatial resolution at room temperature.

  14. Capaciflector-based virtual force control and centering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a novel concept of force control, called virtual force control. The virtual force concept avoids sudden step transition of position control to contact force control resulting in contact force disturbance when a robot end-effector makes contact with the environment. A virtual force/position control scheme consists of two loops: the force control loop and the position control loop. While the position control loop regulates the free motion, the force control loop regulates the contact force after making contact with the environment and the virtual force measured by a range sensor called capaciflector in the virtual environment. After presenting the concept of virtual force control, the report introduces a centering scheme in which the virtual force controller is employed to measure three points on a cone so that its center can be located. Experimental results of a one-degree-of-freedom virtual force control scheme applied in berthing an orbital replaceable unit are reported and compared with those of conventional pure contact force control cases.

  15. Magnetic bearing stiffness control using frequency band filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming

    1989-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings can be implemented with frequency band-reject filtering that decreases the bearing stiffness and damping at a small bandwidth around a chosen frequency. The control scheme was used for reducing a rotor dynamic force, such as an imbalance force, transmitted to the bearing stator. The scheme creates additional system vibration modes at the same frequency. It also shows that the amount of force reduction is limited by the stability requirement of these modes.

  16. Tethered satellite system control using electromagnetic forces and reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandi Hallaj, Mohammad Amin; Assadian, Nima

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel non-rotating space tethered configuration is introduced which its relative positions controlled using electromagnetic forces. The attitude dynamics is controlled by three reaction wheels in the body axes. The nonlinear coupled orbital dynamics of a dumbbell tethered satellite formation flight are derived through a constrained Lagrangian approach. These equations are presented in the leader satellite orbital frame. The tether is assumed to be mass-less and straight, and the J2 perturbation is included to the analysis. The forces and the moments of the electromagnetic coils are modeled based on the far-filed model of the magnetic dipoles. A guidance scheme for generating the desired positions as a function of time in Cartesian form is presented. The satellite tethered formation with variable length is controlled utilizing a linear controller. This approach is applied to a specified scenario and it is shown that the nonlinear guidance method and the linear controller can control the nonlinear system of the tethered formation and the results are compared with optimal control approach.

  17. Effect of magnet/slot combination on triple-frequency magnetic force and vibration of permanent magnet motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Mina; Wang, Shiyu; Xiu, Jie; Cao, Shuqian

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between magnet/slot combination and magnetic forces including unbalanced magnetic force (UMF) and cogging torque (CT) of permanent magnet (PM) motors is investigated by using superposition principle and mechanical and magnetic symmetries. The results show that magnetic force can be produced by all magnets passing a single slot, by all slots passing a single magnet, or by eccentricity, which respectively correspond to three frequency components. The results further show that net force/torque can be classified into three typical cases: UMF is suppressed and CT is excited, UMF excited and CT suppressed, and UMF and CT both suppressed, and consequently possible vibrations include three unique groups: rotational modes, translational modes, and balanced modes. The conclusion that combinations with the greatest common divisor (GCD) greater than unity can avoid UMF is mathematically verified, and at the same time lower CT harmonics are preliminarily addressed by the typical excitations. The above findings can create simple guidelines for the suppression of certain UMF and/or CT by using suitable combinations, which in turn can present approach to yield a more desirable response in high performance applications. The superposition effect and predicted relationship are verified by the transient magnetic Finite Element method. Since this work is motivated by symmetries, comparisons are made in order to give further insight into the inner force and vibration behaviors of general rotary power-transmission systems.

  18. Magnetic force microscope tip-induced remagnetization of CoPt nanodisks with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, V. L.; Gribkov, B. A.; Vdovichev, S. N.; Gusev, S. A.; Fraerman, A. A.; Ermolaeva, O. L.; Shubin, A. B.; Alexeev, A. M.; Zhdan, P. A.; Binns, C.

    2009-09-01

    We report on the results of a magnetic force microscopy investigation of remagnetization processes in arrays of CoPt nanodisks with diameters of 35 and 200 nm and a thickness of 9.8 nm fabricated by e-beam lithography and ion etching. The controllable magnetization reversal of individual CoPt nanodisks by the magnetic force microscope (MFM) tip-induced magnetic field was demonstrated. We observed experimentally two essentially different processes of tip-induced remagnetization. Magnetization reversal of 200 nm disks was observed when the probe moved across the particle while in case of 35 nm nanodisks one-touch remagnetization was realized. Micromagnetic modeling based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation demonstrated that the tip-induced magnetization reversal occurs through the essentially inhomogeneous states. Computer simulations confirmed that in case of 200 nm disks the mechanism of embryo nucleation with reversed magnetization and further dynamic propagation following the probe moving across the particle was realized. On the other hand one-touch remagnetization of 35 nm disks occurs through the inhomogeneous vortexlike state. Micromagnetic LLG simulations showed that magnetization reversal in an inhomogeneous MFM probe field has a lower energy barrier in comparison with the mechanism of coherent rotation, which takes place in a homogeneous external magnetic field.

  19. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  20. Multidisciplinary task force for controlling drug expenses.

    PubMed

    Hayman, J N; Crane, V S

    1993-11-01

    The establishment of a multidisciplinary task force to control increasing drug costs is described. From 1986 to 1992, dollars spent on drugs at a 964-bed teaching hospital increased from $9.8 million to $26.8 million, despite a tightly controlled formulary, prudent purchasing practices, prescribing restrictions, an antimicrobial order form program, a target-drug program, and an active pharmacy-run cost intervention program. These increases occurred as a result of changes in the mix of drugs prescribed, increases in outpatient volume, inflation, and price increases resulting from the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990. A multidisciplinary task force composed of seven teams--AIDS and related issues, ambulatory care, medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, surgery, and systems and procedures--was formed to identify ways to reduce drug expenses and enhance revenue. Each team made recommendations designed to reduce the rate of growth of pharmaceutical expenses. To implement these recommendations, the task force used a variety of verbal and written strategies to educate and communicate with physicians, pharmacists, nurses, pharmaceutical company representatives, and patients. A system was developed so that goal achievement could be monitored. The program, which was implemented on September 16, 1991, and continued through September 30, 1992, reduced the growth in drug expense by $2.33 million. As a result of the program, control of the drug expenses became an institutional priority, not merely a pharmacy department priority. By establishing a multidisciplinary team approach involving physicians, administrators, nurses, and pharmacists, a substantial reduction in the growth of drug expenses can be achieved. PMID:8266959

  1. A force-feedback control system for micro-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhe; Chen, Peter C. Y.; Ganapathy, Anand; Zhao, Guoyong; Nam, Joohoo; Yang, Guilin; Burdet, Etienne; Teo, Cheeleong; Meng, Qingnian; Lin, Wei

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we report the development of an explicit force-feedback control system for micro-assembly, focusing on the key issues of force transmission and control. The force-feedback system is incorporated with a compound flexure stage, which is driven by a voice-coil actuator and designed to provide frictionless translation motion along one axis. A force sensor measures the interaction force between the micromanipulator and its environment, while an explicit force controller controls the interaction force to follow a desired force trajectory. The effectiveness of this prototype force-control system has been demonstrated in an experimental application, where parts (with dimensions in microns) were picked up and assembled under explicit force-feedback control.

  2. Implementation of NMR pulse sequences for Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Bradley; Eichler, Alexander; Degen, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning microscopy technique that allows measuring nuclear spin densities with a resolution of a few nanometers. Ongoing efforts are aiming at improving this resolution, which might ultimately facilitate non-destructive 3D scans of complex molecules or solid state systems with atomic resolution. Here, we review our current efforts to utilize in an MRFM experiment pulsing techniques borrowed from the nuclear magnetic resonance community. The use of advanced pulsing schemes may improve signal-to-noise ratio, imaging resolution, and allow the investigation of novel phenomena.

  3. Effect of guideway discontinuities on magnetic levitation and drag forces

    SciTech Connect

    Rossing, T.D.; Korte, R.; Hull, J.R. )

    1991-11-15

    Transients in the lift and drag forces on a NdFeB permanent magnet were observed as the magnet passed over various discontinuities in a rotating aluminum disk at velocities of 4 to 25 m/s. For full cuts in the disk, the amplitude of the lift and drag transients and the wave form of the drag transient depend on the width, and the amplitudes are much larger than for partial cuts. The use of a backing plate to join two cut segments is ineffective.

  4. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  5. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  6. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  7. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  8. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  9. Fine-tuning of magnetic and microfluidic viscous forces for specific magnetic bead-based immunocomplex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, M.; Tekin, H. C.; Lehnert, T.; Gijs, M. A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the working principle of a novel type of microfluidic sandwich immunoassay, as used for the detection of biomarkers. The heterogeneous assay is based on the specific interactions between an array of functionalized superparamagnetic beads and a flow of secondary superparamagnetic beads that carry the antigens and are simultaneously used as detection labels. We identify the main forces governing the immunoassay performance and develop a combined finite element method/analytical model to predict and control these forces. The clue for the improved assay specificity is in the fine-tuning of inter-bead magnetic dipolar and microfluidic viscous forces, which allows strongly reducing non-specific interactions, while enhancing the specific formation of immunocomplexes. We exploit our theoretical model to explain the enhanced sensitivity of magnetic bead-based immunoassay experiments performed in microfluidic chips.

  10. Dynamic nanomagnetism characterization of individual magnetic nanoparticles by frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Zhenghua; Pan, Deng; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    In this study, stroboscopic imaging of an alternating magnetic field (AC magnetic field) from individual superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles was achieved using the developed frequency modulated-magnetic force microscopy (FM-MFM) technique, which enables the imaging of the vector signals of AC magnetic fields, such as a combination of in-phase and quadrature signals or that of amplitude and phase signals. FM-MFM uses the frequency modulation of cantilever oscillation, caused by the application of an off-resonant AC magnetic field to a mechanically oscillated cantilever, and visualises the vector signals of the AC magnetic field by adding a frequency demodulator and a lock-in amplifier to a conventional magnetic force microscope. Stroboscopic imaging of an AC magnetic field was carried out by varying the phase of the measured in-phase and quadrature signals via a signal processing technique. For the superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, stroboscopic imaging of the time-variable AC magnetic field, caused by the rotation of the magnetic moments within the particles, was demonstrated. This article describes the present status of FM-MFM technology, with particular attention to the feasibility of detecting magnetic moments of individual nanoparticles, and the possible application of FM-MFM in biological imaging.

  11. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  12. Force-free magnetic fields - The magneto-frictional method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, W. H.; Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    The problem under discussion is that of calculating magnetic field configurations in which the Lorentz force j x B is everywhere zero, subject to specified boundary conditions. We choose to represent the magnetic field in terms of Clebsch variables in the form B = grad alpha x grad beta. These variables are constant on any field line so that each field line is labeled by the corresponding values of alpha and beta. When the field is described in this way, the most appropriate choice of boundary conditions is to specify the values of alpha and beta on the bounding surface. We show that such field configurations may be calculated by a magneto-frictional method. We imagine that the field lines move through a stationary medium, and that each element of magnetic field is subject to a frictional force parallel to and opposing the velocity of the field line. This concept leads to an iteration procedure for modifying the variables alpha and beta, that tends asymptotically towards the force-free state. We apply the method first to a simple problem in two rectangular dimensions, and then to a problem of cylindrical symmetry that was previously discussed by Barnes and Sturrock (1972). In one important respect, our new results differ from the earlier results of Barnes and Sturrock, and we conclude that the earlier article was in error.

  13. Dielectrophoresis-magnetophoresis force driven magnetic nanoparticle movement in transformer oil based magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Sangyoup

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic fluid is a stable colloidal mixture contained magnetic nanoparticles coated with a surfactant. Recently, it was found that the fluid has properties to increase heat transfer and dielectric characteristics due to the added magnetic nanoparticles in transformer oils. The magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid experience an electrical force directed toward the place of maximum electric field strength when the electric field is applied. And when the external magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nanoparticles form long chains oriented along the direction of the field. The behaviors of magnetic nanoparticles in both the fields must play an important role in changing the heat transfer and dielectric characteristics of the fluids. In this study, we visualized the movement of magnetic nanoparticles influenced by both the fields applied in-situ. It was found that the magnetic nanoparticles travel in the region near the electrode by the electric field and form long chains along the field direction by the magnetic field. It can be inferred that the movement of magnetic nanoparticles appears by both the fields, and the breakdown voltage of transformer oil based magnetic fluids might be influenced according to the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:24205624

  14. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, Nicolas; Ruchotzke, William; Belding, Amanda; Cardellino, Jeremy; Blomberg, Erick; McCullian, Brendan; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Pelekhov, Denis; Hammel, P. Chris

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes are commercially-available, versatile structures that have a variety of applications. Although most commonly used as the support structure for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies, membranes are also ultrasensitive high-frequency mechanical oscillators. The sensitivity stems from the high quality factor Q 106 , which has led to applications in sensitive quantum optomechanical experiments. The high sensitivity also opens the door to ultrasensitive force detection applications. We report force detection of electron spin magnetic resonance at 300 K using a Si3N4 membrane with a force sensitivity of 4 fN/√{ Hz}, and a potential low temperature sensitivity of 25 aN/√{ Hz}. Given membranes' sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiN membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument that has superior spatial resolution to conventional NMR.

  15. Effect of Magnetic Film Thickness on the Spatial Resolution of Magnetic Force Microscope Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Katsumasa; Tobari, Kousuke; Ohtake, Mitsuru; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic force microscope (MFM) tips were prepared by coating commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) tips of 5 nm radius with Co and CoCrPt magnetic thin films varying the thickness in a range of 10-80 nm. The structural and the magnetic properties of coated magnetic thin films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, AFM, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The tip radius and the film surface roughness increase with increasing the film thickness. With increasing the film thickness, the MFM signal sensitivity increases, whereas the resolution decreases due to increase of tip radius. The MFM observation resolutions of 10 nm and 23 nm are obtained with the tips coated with 20-nm-thick Co and 40-nm-thick CoCrPt films, respectively. The MFM resolution is influenced by both the tip radius and the magnetic moment of coated material.

  16. Line-Tied Magnetic Flux Ropes in the Laboratory: Equilibrium Force Balance and Eruptive Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, M.; Belova, E. V.

    2013-07-01

    Flux-rope-based models of solar eruptions rely on the formation of a line-tied flux rope equilibrium that persists until an ideal instability or a breakdown in force balance triggers an eruption. In this paper, we present a quantitative study of equilibrium force balance in solar-relevant flux ropes, focusing primarily on the role of the potential magnetic field in controlling the flux rope behavior. This study was conducted using a newly constructed laboratory experiment in conjunction with supporting three-dimensional MHD simulations that directly model the experimental geometry. The flux ropes studied here, which are produced in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX), evolve quasi-statically over many Alfvén times and have footpoints that are line-tied to two fixed electrodes [E. Oz, C. E. Myers, M. Yamada, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 102107 (2011)]. They are formed within a solar-relevant potential magnetic field configuration that can be systematically modified between discharges. Detailed in situ magnetic measurements from the experiments are compared directly to results from the simulations in order to quantitatively evaluate the various contributions to the equilibrium force balance. We find that forces derived from the applied toroidal guide field contribute significantly to the equilibrium—so much so that the flux ropes are often well confined even in the absence of a "strapping" arcade. These observed guide field forces arise from changes in the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension that result from a combination of effects within the expanding flux rope. With regard to eruptions, the aforementioned guide field forces supplement the well-known strapping field forces to largely prevent the flux ropes from erupting. In particular, many regimes were explored where the strapping field configuration is predicted to be "torus unstable" and yet the flux ropes do not erupt. Eruptions are observed in some regimes, however, and we will discuss the physical

  17. Waveform control pulse magnetization for HTS bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Shigeuchi, Koji; Okuda, Sayo; Watasaki, Masahiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-01

    For the past 10 years, we have studied high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnets for use in electromagnetic rotating machines. If the magnetic field effectively magnetizes the HTS bulk, then the size of the motor and generator can be reduced without a reduction in output. We showed that the melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O HTS bulk effectively traps a high magnetic field using waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM). WCPM makes it possible to generate any pulsed magnetic field waveform by appropriately changing the duty ratio of the pulse width modulation. By chopping so that the pulsed magnetic field has a period of about 1ms, the WCPM technology enables active control of the rise time and suppresses magnetic flux motion that decreases magnetization efficiency. This method is also useful for any HTS bulk magnet, and the high magnetic flux density is trapped in the HTS bulk by a single pulse magnetic field. We developed a magnetizer that has a feedback system from the penetrated magnetic flux density to realize WCPM. In this research, using only a single pulse magnetic field of WCPM method at 77K, an HTS bulk with a 45mm diameter and 19mm thickness trapped a maximum magnetic field of 1.63T, which is more than 90% of the trapped magnetic flux density by FC magnetization. This result suggests that the pulse magnetizing method can replace the conventional field-cooled method and promote the practical use of HTS magnets for electromagnetic power applications.

  18. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-02-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features.

  19. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  20. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  1. Localized Spectroscopy using a Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Giorgio; Lin, Qiong; Mouaziz, Schahrazede; Hunkeler, Andreas; Degen, Christian; Meier, Urban; Brugger, Juerger; Meier, Beat

    2006-03-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) constitutes a promising next-generation magnetic resonance detection device at room temperature. A MRFM observes nuclear (or electron) spin magnetization as a force, which occurs when a paramagnetic sample is polarized in inhomogeneous static magnetic field (10E5 T/m) and a high frequency drives the cantilever on-resonance by a cyclic adiabatic modulation, which make able to measure T1 rho. In this contribution, we combine the MRFM with spin-echo spectroscopy to add spectral resolution to NMR signals of micro-scale objects at room temperature. First experimental spectra recorded with the amplitude detection technique from a sample of barium chlorate monohydrate and ammonium sulfate single crystals mounted on a non commercial cantilever show resolution of 2μm and a sensitivity of 10E13 spins. The new microscope, which uses the frequency detection down to m-Hz resolution and the annealed non-commercials cantilevers, which have Q factor up to 250000 at room temperature, improve the sensitivity to 10E9 spins. This new setup and a new measurement technique should make able to measure T1.

  2. Single layer and multilayer tip coatings in magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, S. M.; Lord, D. G.; Grundy, P. J.; Slade, M.; Lambrick, D.

    1999-04-01

    Interactions between the imaging tip and the sample in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) have been investigated by studying the magnetic microstructure of a range of epitaxial garnet films. Etched silicon cantilever probes, coated with CoPt alloy films and Co/Pt multilayers, provided a range of MFM probes for this study. Resonant torque magnetometry was used to characterize their magnetic properties. Phase change images were found to vary considerably in terms of relative "domain volumes" at the surface depending on which probe was used. Decreasing the moment of the alloy coated tips by using thinner layers reduces the "magnetizing" interaction of the tip field but also reduced the signal to noise ratio. By coating the tip with a multilayer a good signal to noise ratio could be obtained with very little interaction. Force-distance curves were used to study the response of the tips at various lift heights. The tips coated with alloy films gave a significant decrease in signal to noise ratio as the lift height increased whereas the multilayer tips maintained a signal which varied little with lift height.

  3. Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.; He, J.; Rote, D.M. ); Rossing, T.D. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-11-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the magnetic levitation of vehicles over guideways consisting of periodically-spaced conducting coils. Examples of proposed guideway configurations include arrays of independent coils (''loop track''), interconnected coils (''ladder track''), two layers of coils (double-layer ''null-flux'' track), and figure-eight coils (single-layer ''null-flux'' track). Typically, widely-separated superconducting magnets are mounted in the vehicle. A system that achieves both lift and guidance from vertical figure-eight coils in the guideway sidewalls has been developed in Japan. This system, when well designed, can have a very large lift-to-drag ratio. The authors conducted an experimental and theoretical investigation of the lift, drag, and guidance forces on a permanent magnet moving close to various arrays of figure-eight coils. The measured time-histories of the forces provide a basis for the evaluation of electrodynamic models and codes developed to analyze the magnetic levitation of vehicles using the discrete suspension coils of the null-flux type. Good correlation was found between the experimental data and the predictions of the code COIL GDWY. The authors report some of the results and discuss their application to the design of maglev systems.

  4. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  5. Elucidation of propulsive force of microrobot using magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Norihiko; Nakamura, Taro

    2002-05-01

    Using the pattern of the peristaltic movement of an earthworm, a microrobot was developed for traveling in a tube using a magnetic fluid. In this microrobot, a cell equivalent to a segment of the earthworm is composed of a natural rubber tube into which a water-based magnetic fluid is sealed up. The cells are connected with rod-like elastic bodies of natural rubber. It was confirmed that this robot can travel in an acrylic tube (inner diameter: 12 mm, outer diameter: 14 mm) by providing a shifting magnetic field from the exterior. This article will describe how our microrobot is propelled, the mechanism of its propulsion, and the analytical results of the propulsive force.

  6. Force-free magnetic fields - Generating functions and footpoint displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Verma, Ritu

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents analytic and numerical calculations that explore equilibrium sequences of bipolar force-free magnetic fields in relation to displacments of their magnetic footpoints. It is shown that the appearance of magnetic islands - sometimes interpreted as marking the loss of equilibrium in models of the solar atmosphere - is likely associated only with physically unrealistic footpoint displacements such as infinite separation or 'tearing' of the model photosphere. The work suggests that the loss of equilibrium in bipolar configurations, sometimes proposed as a mechanism for eruptive solar events, probably requires either fully three-dimensional field configurations or nonzero plasma pressure. The results apply only to fields that are strictly bipolar, and do not rule out equilibrium loss in more complex structures such as quadrupolar fields.

  7. Wireless control and selection of forces and torques - towards wireless engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyvat, M.; Hafner, C.; Leuthold, J.

    2014-07-01

    Powering and manipulating translational and rotational motions of objects wirelessly, and controlling several objects independently is of significant importance in numerous fields such as robotics, medicine, biology, fluid dynamics, optics. We propose a method based on coupled LC resonators, to control objects selectively by steering the frequency of an external magnetic field. This concept does not need any magnetic materials and it brings a rich variety of features concerning forces and torques. We theoretically and experimentally show that the forces can be enhanced by the interaction of resonators and that both direction and magnitude of forces can be controlled by the frequency of the applied external magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate interesting rotational effects, such as bi-directionally controllable torques, controllable stable orientations, and spinning, which leads to a wirelessly powered motor.

  8. Wireless control and selection of forces and torques - towards wireless engines

    PubMed Central

    Boyvat, M.; Hafner, C.; Leuthold, J.

    2014-01-01

    Powering and manipulating translational and rotational motions of objects wirelessly, and controlling several objects independently is of significant importance in numerous fields such as robotics, medicine, biology, fluid dynamics, optics. We propose a method based on coupled LC resonators, to control objects selectively by steering the frequency of an external magnetic field. This concept does not need any magnetic materials and it brings a rich variety of features concerning forces and torques. We theoretically and experimentally show that the forces can be enhanced by the interaction of resonators and that both direction and magnitude of forces can be controlled by the frequency of the applied external magnetic field. Moreover, we demonstrate interesting rotational effects, such as bi-directionally controllable torques, controllable stable orientations, and spinning, which leads to a wirelessly powered motor. PMID:25034467

  9. Magnetic Control of Convection during Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    force counteract terrestrial gravity. The genera1 objective is to test the hypothesis of convective control using a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient and to understand the nature of the various forces that come into play. Specifically we aim to delineate causative factors and to quantify them through experiments, analysis and numerical modeling. The paper will report on the experimental results using paramagentic salts and solutions in magnetic fields and compare them to analyticalprctions.

  10. Thermal field fluctuations in a magnetic tip / implications for magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, J. D.; Chantrell, R. W.; Rugar, D.

    2000-05-01

    Thermally excited magnetic fluctuations are fundamental to the behavior of small ferromagnetic particles and have practical consequences for the proposed detection of individual spins by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). In particular, fluctuating fields from a nearby magnetic tip can increase the relaxation rate of spins in a sample if there is significant spectral density of field fluctuation at the Larmor frequency of the target spin. As an initial step toward understanding this issue, magnetic field fluctuations have been simulated which emanate from a magnetic tip with dimensions 60 nm×60 nm×2 μm. It was found that the fluctuations in a cobalt magnetic tip were too strong for MRFM experiments aimed at detecting individual electron spins. However, the results obtained for a PrFeB tip fell within the tolerance required.

  11. Alternating Magnetic Field Forces for Satellite Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stnaley O.

    2012-01-01

    Selected future space missions, such as large aperture telescopes and multi-component interferometers, will require the precise positioning of a number of isolated satellites, yet many of the suggested approaches for providing satellites positioning forces have serious limitations. In this paper we propose a new approach, capable of providing both position and orientation forces, that resolves or alleviates many of these problems. We show that by using alternating fields and currents that finely-controlled forces can be induced on the satellites, which can be individually selected through frequency allocation. We also show, through analysis and experiment, that near field operation is feasible and can provide sufficient force and the necessary degrees of freedom to accurately position and orient small satellites relative to one another. In particular, the case of a telescope with a large number of free mirrors is developed to provide an example of the concept. We. also discuss the far field extension of this concept.

  12. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10‑16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications.

  13. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10−16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  14. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10(-16) emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  15. The rate of separation of magnetic lines of force in a random magnetic field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The mixing of magnetic lines of force, as represented by their rate of separation, as a function of distance along the magnetic field, is considered with emphasis on neighboring lines of force. This effect is particularly important in understanding the transport of charged particles perpendicular to the average magnetic field. The calculation is carried out in the approximation that the separation changes by an amount small compared with the correlation scale normal to the field, in a distance along the field of a few correlation scales. It is found that the rate of separation is very sensitive to the precise form of the power spectrum. Application to the interplanetary and interstellar magnetic fields is discussed, and it is shown that in some cases field lines, much closer together than the correlation scale, separate at a rate which is effectively as rapid as if they were many correlation lengths apart.

  16. Grip force control during virtual object interaction: effect of force feedback,accuracy demands, and training.

    PubMed

    Gibo, Tricia L; Bastian, Amy J; Okamura, Allison M

    2014-03-01

    When grasping and manipulating objects, people are able to efficiently modulate their grip force according to the experienced load force. Effective grip force control involves providing enough grip force to prevent the object from slipping, while avoiding excessive force to avoid damage and fatigue. During indirect object manipulation via teleoperation systems or in virtual environments, users often receive limited somatosensory feedback about objects with which they interact. This study examines the effects of force feedback, accuracy demands, and training on grip force control during object interaction in a virtual environment. The task required subjects to grasp and move a virtual object while tracking a target. When force feedback was not provided, subjects failed to couple grip and load force, a capability fundamental to direct object interaction. Subjects also exerted larger grip force without force feedback and when accuracy demands of the tracking task were high. In addition, the presence or absence of force feedback during training affected subsequent performance, even when the feedback condition was switched. Subjects' grip force control remained reminiscent of their employed grip during the initial training. These results motivate the use of force feedback during telemanipulation and highlight the effect of force feedback during training. PMID:24845744

  17. Particle energization in a chaotic force-free magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaocan; Li, Gang; Dasgupta, Brahmananda

    2015-04-01

    A force-free field (FFF) is believed to be a reasonable description of the solar corona and in general a good approximation for low-beta plasma. The equations describing the magnetic field of FFF is similar to the ABC fluid equations which has been demonstrated to be chaotic. This implies that charged particles will experience chaotic magnetic field in the corona. Here, we study particle energization in a time-dependent FFF using a test particle approach. An inductive electric field is introduced by turbulent motions of plasma parcels. We find efficient particle acceleration with power-law like particle energy spectra. The power-law indices depend on the amplitude of plasma parcel velocity field and the spatial scales of the magnetic field fluctuation. The spectra are similar for different particle species. This model provide a possible mechanism for seed population generation for particle acceleration by, e.g., CME-driven shocks. Generalization of our results to certain non-force-free-field (NFFF) is straightforward as the sum of two or multiple FFFs naturally yield NFFF.

  18. Bimanual force control: cooperation and interference?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Deanna M; Boyle, Jason B; Wang, Chaoyi; Shea, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Three experiments were designed to determine the level of cooperation or interference observed from the forces generated in one limb on the forces exhibited by the contralateral limb when one or both limbs were producing a constant force (Experiment 1), one limb was producing a dynamic force while the other limb was producing a constant force (Experiment 2), and both limbs were producing dynamic force patterns (Experiment 3). The results for both Experiments 1 and 2 showed relatively strong positive time series cross correlations between the left and right limb forces indicating increases or decreases in the forces generated by one limb resulted in corresponding changes in the forces produced by the homologous muscles of the contralateral limb. Experiment 3 required participants to coordinate 1:1 and 1:2 rhythmical bimanual force production tasks when provided Lissajous feedback. The results indicated very effective performance of both bimanual coordination patterns. However, identifiable influences of right limb forces on the left limb force time series were observed in the 1:2 coordination pattern but not in the 1:1 pattern. The results of all three experiments support the notion that neural crosstalk is partially responsible for the stabilities and instabilities associated with bimanual coordination. PMID:25481636

  19. Time-optimal control of the magnetically levitated photolithography platen

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Tucker, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes two approaches to time-optimal control of a nonlinear magnetically levitated platen. The system of interest is a candidate technology for next-generation photolithography machines used in the manufacture of integrated circuits. The dynamics and the variable peak control force of the electro-magnetic actuators preclude the direct application of classical time-optimal control methodologies for determining optimal rest-to-rest maneuver strategies. Therefore, this study explores alternate approaches using a previously developed computer simulation. In the first approach, conservative estimates of the available control forces are used to generate suboptimal switching curves. In the second approach, exact solutions are determined iteratively and used as a training set for an artificial neural network. The trained network provides optimal actuator switching times that incorporate the full nonlinearities of the magnetic levitation actuators. Sample problems illustrate the effectiveness of these techniques as compared to traditional proportional-derivative control.

  20. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a permanent magnet on the cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P.C.

    1997-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) is a microscopic 3-D imaging instrument based on a recent proposal to detect magnetic resonance signals mechanically using a micro-mechanical resonator. MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in various magnetic resonance experiments including electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonances and nuclear magnetic resonance. In order to apply this ultra-high, 3-D spatial resolution technique to samples of arbitrary size and shape, the magnetic particle which generates the field gradient {del}{bold B}, (and, therefore, the force {bold F = (m {center_dot} {del}B)} between itself and the spin magnetization {bold m} of the sample) will need to be mounted on the mechanical resonator. Up to the present, all experiments have been performed with the sample mounted on the resonator. This is done, in part, to avoid the spurious response of the mechanical resonator which is generated by the variation of the magnetization of the magnetic particle as the external field is varied.

  1. Design of force/position controllers for manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents simple methods for the design of adaptive force and position controllers for robot manipulators within the hybrid control architecture. The force controller is composed of an adaptive PID feedback controller, an auxiliary signal and a force feedforward term, and achieves tracking of desired force setpoints in the constraint directions. The position controller consists of adaptive feedback and feedforward controllers and an auxiliary signal; and accomplishes tracking of desired position trajectories in the free directions. The controllers are capable of compensating for dynamic cross-couplings that exist between the position and force control loops in the hybrid control architecture. The adaptive controllers do not require knowledge of the complex dynamic model or parameter values of the manipulator or the environment. The proposed control schemes are computationally fast and suitable for implementation in on-line control with high sampling rates.

  2. Magnetic resonance force microscopy combined with surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, S.; Yoshinari, Y.; Kawai, E.; Nakajima, K.; Park, H. S.; Shindo, D.

    2007-10-01

    A new method of surface microscopy is proposed, which combines three-dimensional electron spin resonance imaging by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and topographic imaging of the sample surface by scanning force microscopy (SFM). In order to demonstrate its potential for the identification of microscale objects, the individual and combined images are used to provide the locations, shapes and spin density distributions of target phantom objects. We report spatial resolution in MRFM of 2.8 × 2.8 × 2.0μm 3. This could be improved to the theoretical limit of 0.08 × 0.08 × 0.04μm 3 through reduction of the thermal noise by cooling to cryogenic temperatures ˜0.5 K. We believe that this type of microscopy will become a very useful tool for the investigation of anomalies induced in surfaces by materials buried below the surface.

  3. Variable force, eddy-current or magnetic damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An object of the invention is to provide variable damping for resonant vibrations which may occur at different rotational speeds in the range of rpms in which a rotating machine is operated. A variable force damper in accordance with the invention includes a rotating mass carried on a shaft which is supported by a bearing in a resilient cage. The cage is attached to a support plate whose rim extends into an annular groove in a housing. Variable damping is effected by tabs of electrically conducting nonmagnetic material which extend radially from the cage. The tabs at an index position lie between the pole face of respective C shaped magnets. The magnets are attached by cantilever spring members to the housing.

  4. Implementation of Akiyama probe in low temperature magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, Paul; Wu, Weida

    Exotic phenomena often call for high sensitivity scanning probe microscopic techniques working at extremely low temperatures. Specifically, it is of great fundamental interest to detect the weak magnetic signals in a range of interesting systems such as, quantum anomalous Hall, skyrmion, heavy-fermion, and multiferroic systems. To this end, we are developing low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) using a self-sensing cantilever called Akiyama-probe (A-probe). The main advantage of this specific probe is its extremely low power-dissipation compared to other self-sensing (e.g. piezoresistive) cantilevers for low temperature application. We will present progress of the implementation of A-probe and preliminary results under various conditions. This work is supported by DOE BES under Award DE-SC0008147.

  5. Atomic micromotion and geometric forces in a triaxial magnetic trap

    PubMed

    Muller; Morsch; Ciampini; Anderlini; Mannella; Arimondo

    2000-11-20

    Nonadiabatic motion of Bose-Einstein condensates of rubidium atoms arising from the dynamical nature of a time-orbiting-potential (TOP) trap was observed experimentally. The orbital micromotion of the condensate in velocity space at the frequency of the rotating bias field of the TOP was detected by a time-of-flight method. A dependence of the equilibrium position of the atoms on the sense of rotation of the bias field was observed. We have compared our experimental findings with numerical simulations. The nonadiabatic following of the atomic spin in the trap rotating magnetic field produces geometric forces acting on the trapped atoms. PMID:11082569

  6. Experimental analysis of retention forces of different magnetic devices for bone-anchored auricular facial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Voigt, A; Christ, S; Klein, M

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which combination of differently designed magnetic abutments provides the best retention for an auricular prosthesis. The withdrawal forces of eight combinations of abutments were measured and results compared. There was a significantly higher withdrawal force in arrangements containing three magnets over only two. The highest withdrawal force was found in the combination of one telescopic magnet and two large spherical magnets (median: 7.69 N), whereas two telescopic magnets alone showed the lowest withdrawal force (3.41 N). The use of two conical magnets increased retention slightly, but the median retention force remained the same (3.41 N). The commonly used combination of two small spherical magnets and one telescopic magnet showed the lowest retention of combinations consisting of three magnets (4.94 N). There seems to be no difference in median withdrawal force if a conical magnet instead of a telescopic magnet is used. The withdrawal force at a 45 degrees angle was about 10% higher than the vertical force but the difference was not significant. The rupture force needed to tear the magnet completely out of the silicone was 240.6-519.7 N (mean 331.74 N) and therefore over 10 times higher than magnetic retention. PMID:18440779

  7. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Vibration Control in Turbomachinery Using Active Magnetic Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah D.

    1996-01-01

    The effective use of active magnetic bearings for vibration control in turbomachinery depends on an understanding of the forces available from a magnetic bearing actuator. The purpose of this project was to characterize the forces as functions shaft position. Both numerical and experimental studies were done to determine the characteristics of the forces exerted on a stationary shaft by a magnetic bearing actuator. The numerical studies were based on finite element computations and included both linear and nonlinear magnetization functions. Measurements of the force versus position of a nonrotating shaft were made using two separate measurement rigs, one based on strain gage measurement of forces, the other based on deflections of a calibrated beam. The general trends of the measured principal forces agree with the predictions of the theory while the magnitudes of forces are somewhat smaller than those predicted. Other aspects of theory are not confirmed by the measurements. The measured forces in the normal direction are larger than those predicted by theory when the rotor has a normal eccentricity. Over the ranges of position examined, the data indicate an approximately linear relationship between the normal eccentricity of the shaft and the ratio of normal to principal force. The constant of proportionality seems to be larger at lower currents, but for all cases examined its value is between 0.14 and 0.17. The nonlinear theory predicts the existence of normal forces, but has not predicted such a large constant of proportionality for the ratio. The type of coupling illustrated by these measurements would not tend to cause whirl, because the coupling coefficients have the same sign, unlike the case of a fluid film bearing, where the normal stiffness coefficients often have opposite signs. They might, however, tend to cause other self-excited behavior. This possibility must be considered when designing magnetic bearings for flexible rotor applications, such as gas

  9. Magnetic Forces Simulation of Bulk HTS over Permanent Magnetic Railway with Numerical Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiyun; Zhuang, Shujun

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic levitation forces of bulk high temperature superconductor (HTS) above two types permanent magnet railway (PMR) is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The models are formulated by H-formulation and resolving codes is developed using Finite Element Program Generator (FEPG). The E- J power law is used to describe the electrical field vs. current density nonlinear characteristic of HTS. The applied magnetic fields induced by the PMR are calculated by the standard analysis method with the equivalent surface current model. By the method, the calculation formulation of magnetic fields generated by Halbach PMR and symmetrical PMR is derived respectively. The simulation results show that the finite element dynamic mesh rebuilding problem of HTS magnetic levitation transportation system comprised of bulk HTS and PMR can be easily avoided by the methods.

  10. Motion and force control for multiple cooperative manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    The motion and force control of multiple robot arms manipulating a commonly held object is addressed. A general control paradigm that decouples the motion and force control problems is introduced. For motion control, there are three natural choices: (1) joint torques, (2) arm-tip force vectors, and (3) the acceleration of a generalized coordinate. Choice (1) allows a class of relatively model-independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open-loop system; (2) and (3) require the full model information but produce simpler problems. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, the allocation of the desired end-effector control force to the joint actuators can be optimized; otherwise the internal force can be controlled about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  11. Study on control method of running velocity for the permanent magnet-HTSC hybrid magnetically levitated conveyance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, R.; Ikeda, M.; Sasaki, R.; Ohashi, S.

    2011-11-01

    We have developed the magnetically levitated carrying system. In this system, pinning force of high temperature bulk super conductor (HTSC) is used for the levitation and guidance. Four HTSCs are installed on the carrier. The magnetic rail is set on the ground, and flux from the magnetic rail is pinned by HTSCs. To increase levitation force, repulsive force of the permanent magnet is used. The hybrid levitation system is composed. The permanent magnet is installed under the load stage of the carrier. Repulsive force by the permanent magnet between the load stage on the carrier and the magnetic rail on the ground is used to support the load weight. Levitation and guidance one by pinning effect of the YBaCuO HTSC in the carrier is used to levitate the carrier body. The load stage is separated from the carrier flame and can move freely for vertical direction levitation. For the propulsion system, electromagnet is installed on the surface of the magnetic rail. In this paper, control method of running velocity of the carrier is studied. Propulsion force is given as follows; Air core copper coils are installed on the magnetic rail. Interaction between current of these coils and permanent magnets on the carrier generates propulsion force. Running velocity is controlled by current of the propulsion coils. It is also changed by position of the carrier and the load weight. From the results, stability of the propulsion system is given, and propulsion characteristics are improved.

  12. Learning hybrid force and position control of robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Doyoung; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    1993-08-01

    When a robot performs the same task repeatedly, a learning controller can enhance the performance of the system significantly. The learning control, however, has not been studied in the force control of robot manipulators as extensively as in the position control of robot manipulators. In this paper, the learning control is applied to hybrid force and position control of robot manipulators. When the geometry and position of a constraint surface is known, the hybrid force and position controller and the feedforward compensator can be designed in the constraint coordinates. When the operation is periodic, the learning hybrid force and position control enhances the control performance as the feedforward compensator is updated in each cycle by the force and position error in the preceding trials. This scheme is proved to be asymptotically stable. A two degree of freedom SCARA-type direct-drive robot manipulator is used to test the learning hybrid force and position control. The deburring tool mounted on the upper link of the robot could follow a flat, tilted flat, and curved 1/4 inch aluminum plate with a desired contact force of 10 N (within the root-mean-square force error of 1.95 N) and with a desired tangential velocity. The experiments confirmed the effectiveness of the learning hybrid force and position controller.

  13. Relation between the alignment dependence of coercive force decrease ratio and the angular dependence of coercive force of ferrite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yutaka; Kitai, Nobuyuki; Hosokawa, Seiichi; Hoshijima, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The relation of the coercive force decrease ratio (CFDR) and the angular dependence of the coercive force (ADCF) of ferrite magnets and their temperature properties were investigated. When we compared that against the angle of the magnetization reverse area obtained from these calculation results, which was obtained from the Gaussian distribution of the grain alignment and the postulation that every grain follows the Kondorskii law or the 1/cos θ law, and against the angle of the reverse magnetization area calculated from the experiment CFDR data of these magnets, it was found that this latter expanded at room temperature, to 36° from the calculated angle, for magnet with α=0.96. It was also found that, as temperature increased from room temperature to 413 K, the angle of the reverse magnetization area of ferrite magnets obtained from the experiment data expanded from 36° to 41°. When we apply these results to the temperature properties of ADCF, it seems that the calculated ADCF could qualitatively and reasonably explain these temperature properties, even though the difference between the calculated angular dependence and the experimental data still exists in the high angle range. These results strongly suggest that the coercive force of these magnets is determined by the magnetic domain wall motion. The magnetic domain walls are strongly pinned at tilted grains, and when the domain walls are de-pinned from their pinning sites, the coercive force is determined.

  14. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  15. Motion and force controlled vibration testing. [of aerospace hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.; Boatman, David J.; Kern, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for controlling both the input acceleration and force in vibration tests is proposed to alleviate the overtesting risks and the problems associated with response limiting in conventional vibration tests of aerospace hardware. Previous research on impedance and force controlled vibration tests is reviewed and a simple equation governing the dual control of acceleration and force is derived. A practical method for implementing the dual control technique in random vibration tests has been demonstrated in JPL's environmental test facility using a conventional digital controller operating in the extremal mode. The dual control technique provides appropriate real-time notching of the input acceleration and a corresponding reduction of the test item response at resonances. Issues concerning the need for force and acceleration phase information, the adequacy of specifying the blocked force, and the derivation of the total force for multipoint supports are discussed.

  16. Tornado-like flows driven by magnetic body forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbeth, Gunter; Grants, Ilmars; Vogt, Tobias; Eckert, Sven

    2014-11-01

    Alternating magnetic fields produce well-defined flow-independent body forces in electrically conducting media. This property is used to construct a laboratory analogue of the Fiedler chamber with a room-temperature liquid metal as working fluid. A continuously applied rotating magnetic field (RMF) provides the source of the angular momentum. A pulse of a much stronger travelling magnetic field drives a converging flow at the metal surface, which focuses this angular momentum towards the axis of the container. The resulting vortex is studied experimentally and numerically. In a certain range of the ratio of both driving actions the axial velocity changes its direction in the vortex core, resembling the subsidence in an eye of a tropical cyclone or a large tornado. During the initial deterministic spin-up stage the vortex is well described by axisymmetric direct numerical simulation. Being strong enough the flow develops a funnel-shaped surface depression that enables visual observation of the vortex structure. As the RMF strength is increased the eyewall diameter grows until it breaks down to multiple vortices. A number of further observed similarities to tornado-like vortices will be discussed. The work is supported by the German Helmholtz Association in frame of the LIMTECH alliance.

  17. Magnetic Force Microscopy of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Tanya M.

    In recent years, both synthetic as well as naturally occurring superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in biomedicine. For instance, iron deposits in many pathological tissues are known to contain an accumulation of the superparamagnetic protein, ferritin. Additionally, man-made SPNs have found biomedical applications ranging from cell-tagging in vitro to contrast agents for in vivo diagnostic imaging. Despite the widespread use and occurrence of SPNs, detection and characterization of their magnetic properties, especially at the single-particle level and/or in biological samples, remains a challenge. Magnetic signals arising from SPNs can be complicated by factors such as spatial distribution, magnetic anisotropy, particle aggregation and magnetic dipolar interaction, thereby confounding their analysis. Techniques that can detect SPNs at the single particle level are therefore highly desirable. The goal of this thesis was to develop an analytical microscopy technique, namely magnetic force microscopy (MFM), to detect and spatially localize synthetic and natural SPNs for biomedical applications. We aimed to (1) increase MFM sensitivity to detect SPNs at the single-particle level and (2) quantify and spatially localize iron-ligated proteins (ferritin) in vitro and in biological samples using MFM. Two approaches were employed to improve MFM sensitivity. First, we showed how exploitation of magnetic anisotropy could produce a higher, more uniform MFM signal from single SPNs. Second, we showed how an increase in probe magnetic moment increased both the magnitude and range up to which the MFM signal could be detected from a single SPN. We further showed how MFM could enable accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin-apoferritin mixtures. Finally, we demonstrated how MFM could be used to detect iron/ferritin in serum and animal tissue with spatial resolution and sensitivity surpassing that obtained using

  18. The Physical Connection and Magnetic Coupling of the MICE CoolingChannel Magnets and the Magnet Forces for Various MICE OperatingModes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Baynham, D.E.; Fabricatore, Pasquale; Farinon, Stefania; Green, Michael A.; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Lau, Wing W.; Maldavi, S.M.; Virostek, Steve P.; Witte, Holger

    2006-08-20

    A key issue in the construction of the MICE cooling channel is the magnetic forces between various elements in the cooling channel and the detector magnets. This report describes how the MICE cooling channel magnets are hooked to together so that the longitudinal magnetic forces within the cooling channel can be effectively connected to the base of the experiment. This report presents a magnetic force and stress analysis for the MICE cooling channel magnets, even when longitudinal magnetic forces as large as 700 kN (70 tons) are applied to the vacuum vessel of various magnets within the MICE channel. This report also shows that the detector magnets can be effectively separated from the central MICE cooling channel magnets without damage to either type of magnet component.

  19. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-05-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  20. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-04-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  1. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod. [LMFBR

    DOEpatents

    Germer, J.H.

    1982-09-30

    A magnetic reed switch assembly is described for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electro-magnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  2. How Can Magnetic Forces Do Work? Investigating the Problem with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students' reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been…

  3. Expanded Equations for Torque and Force on a Cylindrical Permanent Magnet Core in a Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1997-01-01

    The expanded equations for torque and force on a cylindrical permanent magnet core in a large-gap magnetic suspension system are presented. The core is assumed to be uniformly magnetized, and equations are developed for two orientations of the magnetization vector. One orientation is parallel to the axis of symmetry, and the other is perpendicular to this axis. Fields and gradients produced by suspension system electromagnets are assumed to be calculated at a point in inertial space which coincides with the origin of the core axis system in its initial alignment. Fields at a given point in the core are defined by expanding the fields produced at the origin as a Taylor series. The assumption is made that the fields can be adequately defined by expansion up to second-order terms. Examination of the expanded equations for the case where the magnetization vector is perpendicular to the axis of symmetry reveals that some of the second-order gradient terms provide a method of generating torque about the axis of magnetization and therefore provide the ability to produce six-degree-of-freedom control.

  4. Construction of a 3He magnetic force microscope with a vector magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinho; Yang, Ilkyu; Kim, Yun Won; Shin, Dongwoo; Jeong, Juyoung; Wulferding, Dirk; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2016-02-01

    We constructed a 3He magnetic force microscope operating at the base temperature of 300 mK under a vector magnetic field of 2-2-9 T in the x-y-z direction. Fiber optic interferometry as a detection scheme is employed in which two home-built fiber walkers are used for the alignment between the cantilever and the optical fiber. The noise level of the laser interferometer is close to its thermodynamic limit. The capabilities of the sub-Kelvin and vector field are demonstrated by imaging the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity in a ferromagnetic superconductor (ErNi2B2C) at T = 500 mK and by probing a dipole shape of a single Abrikosov vortex with an in-plane tip magnetization.

  5. MATra - Magnet Assisted Transfection: combining nanotechnology and magnetic forces to improve intracellular delivery of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Bertram, J

    2006-08-01

    Recent efforts combining nanotechnology and magnetic properties resulted in the development and commercialization of magnetic nanoparticles that can be used as carriers for nucleic acids for in vitro transfection and for gene therapy approaches including DNA-based vaccination strategies. The efficiency of intracellular delivery is still a limiting factor for basic cell biological research and also for emerging technologies such as temporary gene silencing based on inhibitory RNA/siRNA. Nanotechnology has resulted in a variety of different nanostructures and especially nanoparticles as carriers in a wide range of new drug delivery systems for conventional drugs, recombinant proteins, vaccines and more recently nucleic acids. It is possible to combine superparamagnetic nanoparticles with magnetic forces to increase, direct and optimize intracellular delivery of biomolecules. This article discusses the main approaches in the field of magnet assisted transfection (MATra) focusing on the transfection or intracellular delivery of nucleic acids, although also suitable to improve the intracellular delivery of other biomolecules. PMID:16918404

  6. Magnetic control of convection in nonconducting diamagnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jie; Gray, Donald D.; Edwards, Boyd F.

    1998-10-01

    Inhomogeneous magnetic fields exert a body force on electrically nonconducting, diamagnetic fluids. This force can be used to compensate for gravity and to control convection. The field effect on convection is represented by a dimensionless vector parameter Rm=(μ0αχ0d3ΔT/ρ0νDT)(H.∇H)extr=0, which measures the relative strength of the induced magnetic buoyancy force due to the applied field gradient. The vertical component of this parameter competes with the gravitational buoyancy effect and a critical relationship between this component and the Rayleigh number is identified for the onset of convection. Magnetically driven convection should be observable even in pure water using current technology.

  7. Adaptive Force Control For Compliant Motion Of A Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun

    1995-01-01

    Two adaptive control schemes offer robust solutions to problem of stable control of forces of contact between robotic manipulator and objects in its environment. They are called "adaptive admittance control" and "adaptive compliance control." Both schemes involve use of force-and torque sensors that indicate contact forces. These schemes performed well when tested in computational simulations in which they were used to control seven-degree-of-freedom robot arm in executing contact tasks. Choice between admittance or compliance control is dictated by requirements of the application at hand.

  8. Magnetic Control of Concentration Gradient in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Fred; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2005-01-01

    A report describes a technique for rapidly establishing a fluid-concentration gradient that can serve as an initial condition for an experiment on solutal instabilities associated with crystal growth in microgravity. The technique involves exploitation of the slight attractive or repulsive forces exerted on most fluids by a magnetic-field gradient. Although small, these forces can dominate in microgravity and therefore can be used to hold fluids in position in preparation for an experiment. The magnetic field is applied to a test cell, while a fluid mixture containing a concentration gradient is prepared by introducing an undiluted solution into a diluting solution in a mixing chamber. The test cell is then filled with the fluid mixture. Given the magnetic susceptibilities of the undiluted and diluting solutions, the magnetic-field gradient must be large enough that the magnetic force exceeds both (1) forces associated with the flow of the fluid mixture during filling of the test cell and (2) forces imposed by any residual gravitation and fluctuations thereof. Once the test cell has been filled with the fluid mixture, the magnetic field is switched off so that the experiment can proceed, starting from the proper initial conditions.

  9. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Manzin, Alessandra; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction is taken into account numerically, and exploited experimentally, to influence the side of the square where nucleation of the vortex preferably occurs, therefore providing a way to both measure and drive chirality with the present technique. PMID:27426442

  10. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Manzin, Alessandra; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction is taken into account numerically, and exploited experimentally, to influence the side of the square where nucleation of the vortex preferably occurs, therefore providing a way to both measure and drive chirality with the present technique. PMID:27426442

  11. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Manzin, Alessandra; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction is taken into account numerically, and exploited experimentally, to influence the side of the square where nucleation of the vortex preferably occurs, therefore providing a way to both measure and drive chirality with the present technique.

  12. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  13. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

    1991-04-09

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Combined with Surface Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Shigenori; Yoshinari, Yohsuke

    2007-03-01

    In this presentation, we will show magnetic resonance force microscopy imaging combined with surface topography. The individual and combined images taken in the same coordinate are presented for extraction of the position, shapes and spin density distribution of target phantoms. This imaging technique is useful applied when the surface needs to be investigated in relation to the influence of a material buried below the surface. In our method, the surface topography was observed by the AFM with tapping mode. The spin density distribution was measured by the MRFM with the cyclic saturation technique. The AFM and MRFM experiments were made one after another by using the same experimental set-up, and their images were merged together afterwards. The sample consists of two kind of materials, one is DPPH containing unpaird spins and the other is a glass bead. DPPH particles with the size of 5˜8 micrometer and a 8.8 micrometer single bead were glued on a commercial cantilever.

  15. Magnetic switch for reactor control rod

    DOEpatents

    Germer, John H.

    1986-01-01

    A magnetic reed switch assembly for activating an electromagnetic grapple utilized to hold a control rod in position above a reactor core. In normal operation the magnetic field of a permanent magnet is short-circuited by a magnetic shunt, diverting the magnetic field away from the reed switch. The magnetic shunt is made of a material having a Curie-point at the desired release temperature. Above that temperature the material loses its ferromagnetic properties, and the magnetic path is diverted to the reed switch which closes and short-circuits the control circuit for the control rod electromagnetic grapple which allows the control rod to drop into the reactor core for controlling the reactivity of the core.

  16. Design framework of a teleoperating system for a magnetically levitated robot with force feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Naoaki; Kato, Norihiko; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2002-02-01

    Precise works and manipulating micro objects are tough jobs for operators both mentally and physically. To execute these jobs smoothly without feeling wrongness, use of master-slave system is preferable because position and force are able to be scaled up and down as well under the system. In this study we develop a master-slave system where the size of a slave robot is very small and the slave robot is levitated by magnetic forces. In distinction from ordinary master- slave systems, the levitated robot does not get any other contact forces from outside. Thus we introduce a method using an impedance model for constructing the master-slave system. We confirmed the effectiveness of the positioning control algorithm through experiments.

  17. Force or pressure feedback control for seismic vibrators

    SciTech Connect

    Bedenbender, J.W.; Kelly, G.H.

    1985-05-21

    A seismic vibrator source having an hydraulic vibrator coupled to vibrate a ground pad is provided with one or more force transducers such as, for example, load cells, strain gauges, or piezoelectric elements for measuring the force applied to the earth. Signals indicative of the pressure force are applied to a controller for the hydraulic vibrator to adjust control signals to prevent decoupling of the ground pad from the earth during ground seismic operations.

  18. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from -{{25}\\circ} to {{25}\\circ} at intervals of {{5}\\circ} . The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 dB. Simulation studies

  19. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Reyhan; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2016-08-21

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] at intervals of [Formula: see text]. The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 d

  20. Frequency tuning of piezoelectric energy harvesters by magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ashtari, Waleed; Hunstig, Matthias; Hemsel, Tobias; Sextro, Walter

    2012-03-01

    A piezoelectric energy harvester is an electromechanical device that converts ambient mechanical vibration into electric power. Most existing vibration energy harvesting devices operate effectively at a single frequency only, dictated by the design of the device. This frequency must match the frequency of the host structure vibration. However, real world structural vibrations rarely have a specific constant frequency. Therefore, piezoelectric harvesters that generate usable power across a range of exciting frequencies are required to make this technology commercially viable. Currently known harvester tuning techniques have many limitations, in particular they miss the ability to work during harvester operation and most often cannot perform a precise tuning. This paper describes the design and testing of a vibration energy harvester with tunable resonance frequency, wherein the tuning is accomplished by changing the attraction force between two permanent magnets by adjusting the distance between the magnets. This tuning technique allows the natural frequency to be manipulated before and during operation of the harvester. Furthermore the paper presents a physical description of the frequency tuning effect. The experimental results achieved with a piezoelectric bimorph fit the calculated results very well. The calculation and experimental results show that using this tuning technique the natural frequency of the harvester can be varied efficiently within a wide range: in the test setup, the natural frequency of the piezoelectric bimorph could be increased by more than 70%.

  1. The "Newton Challenge": Properties of Forced Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    2005-05-01

    Inspired by the observations of thin (ion-scale) current sheets at important magnetospheric boundaries, the study of the properties of thin current sheets has become very popular in recent years. Most of these investigations, however, have ignored the question of how the sheets are formed. Instead, usually a simple Harris-type current sheet is postulated at the outset, and the resulting behavior is then determined. Recently, a collaborative effort, dubbed the "Newton Challenge" and involving J. Birn, K. Galsgaard, M. Hesse, M. Hoshino, J. Huba, G. Lapenta, P.~L. Pritchett, K. Schindler, L. Yin, J. Büchner, T. Neukirch, and E.~R. Priest, was begun to investigate the transition from thicker to thin current sheets that can occur as a result of magnetopause deformations imposed by the solar wind. A standard 2-D model problem in which current sheet thinning was forced by imposing a finite deformation of the field above and below the current sheet was studied by a variety of physical models ranging from resistive MHD to fully kinetic particle models. The aim was to determine whether differences would arise between the fluid and kinetic treatments that might affect the onset of magnetic reconnection. The initial results indicate that full-particle, hybrid, and Hall-MHD models lead to fast reconnection and similar final states despite differences in energy transfer and dissipation. Resistive MHD simulations show reduced reconnection rates that depend on the magnitude of the resistivity. These results will be reviewed, and additional features of forced reconnection, including continuous forcing, open boundaries, the presence of a normal field component, and 3-D effects, will be discussed.

  2. A shared position/force control methodology for teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jin S.

    1987-01-01

    A flexible and computationally efficient shared position/force control concept and its implementation in the Robot Control C Library (RCCL) are presented form the point of teleoperation. This methodology enables certain degrees of freedom to be position-controlled through real time manual inputs and the remaining degrees of freedom to be force-controlled by computer. Functionally, it is a hybrid control scheme in that certain degrees of freedom are designated to be under position control, and the remaining degrees of freedom to be under force control. However, the methodology is also a shared control scheme because some degrees of freedom can be put under manual control and the other degrees of freedom put under computer control. Unlike other hybrid control schemes, which process position and force commands independently, this scheme provides a force control loop built on top of a position control inner loop. This feature minimizes the computational burden and increases disturbance rejection. A simple implementation is achieved partly because the joint control servos that are part of most robots can be used to provide the position control inner loop. Along with this control scheme, several menus were implemented for the convenience of the user. The implemented control scheme was successfully demonstrated for the tasks of hinged-panel opening and peg-in-hole insertion.

  3. A Method for Implementing Force-Limited Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel B.

    1997-01-01

    NASA/GSFC has implemented force-limited vibration control on a controller which can only accept one profile. The method uses a personal computer based digital signal processing board to convert force and/or moment signals into what appears to he an acceleration signal to the controller. This technique allows test centers with older controllers to use the latest force-limited control techniques for random vibration testing. The paper describes the method, hardware, and test procedures used. An example from a test performed at NASA/GSFC is used as a guide.

  4. Adaptive hybrid position/force control of robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourboghrat, F.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of position and force control for the compliant motion of the manipulators is considered. The external force and the position of the end-effector are related by a second order impedance function. The force control problem is then translated into a position control problem. For that, an adaptive controller is designed to achieve the compliant motion. The design uses the Liapunov's direct method to derive the adaptation law. The stability of the process is guaranteed from the Liapunov's stability theory. The controller does not require the knowledge of the system parameters for the implementation, and hence is easy for applications.

  5. CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Firing Control Building, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Force control techniques for robot manipulators and their military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, P.; Chrystall, K.

    An overview is presented of existing techniques for providing compliant motion control to robot manipulators. Active compliance of robot manipulators can be achieved by using either logic branching feedback or continuous feedback methods, but the latter has a broader range of potential applications. The theoretical background, working principles, and advantages and drawbacks of two continuous feedback approaches are discussed. These approaches are hybrid position/force control, which integrates explicit force control and pure position control concepts, and impedance control, in which a specific mechanical impedance is achieved at the manipulator end-effector. The requirements of compliant motion control (force control) for military robotics are outlined and three scenarios of force control applications are presented: ordnance handling, refuelling of vehicles, and mine field clearing.

  7. Magnetic force microscopy of iron oxide nanoparticles and their cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Mo; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy has the capability to detect magnetic domains from a close distance, which can provide the magnetic force gradient image of the scanned samples and also simultaneously obtain atomic force microscope (AFM) topography image as well as AFM phase image. In this work, we demonstrate the use of magnetic force microscopy together with AFM topography and phase imaging for the characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their cellular uptake behavior with the MCF7 carcinoma breast epithelial cells. This method can provide useful information such as the magnetic responses of nanoparticles, nanoparticle spatial localization, cell morphology, and cell surface domains at the same time for better understanding magnetic nanoparticle-cell interaction. It would help to design magnetic-related new imaging, diagnostic and therapeutic methods. PMID:19562741

  8. Force-Control Algorithm for Surface Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Quadrelli, Marco B.; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    A G-FCON algorithm is designed for small-body surface sampling. It has a linearization component and a feedback component to enhance performance. The algorithm regulates the contact force between the tip of a robotic arm attached to a spacecraft and a surface during sampling.

  9. Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rawls, J.M.; Peuron, A.U.

    1980-07-01

    Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma and a toroidal field coil. A mechanism for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

  10. Thermomagnetic burn control for magnetic fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Rawls, John M.; Peuron, Unto A.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for controlling the plasma energy production rate of a magnetic-confinement fusion reactor, by controlling the magnetic field ripple. The apparatus includes a group of shield sectors (30a, 30b, etc.) formed of ferromagnetic material which has a temperature-dependent saturation magnetization, with each shield lying between the plasma (12) and a toroidal field coil (18). A mechanism (60) for controlling the temperature of the magnetic shields, as by controlling the flow of cooling water therethrough, thereby controls the saturation magnetization of the shields and therefore the amount of ripple in the magnetic field that confines the plasma, to thereby control the amount of heat loss from the plasma. This heat loss in turn determines the plasma state and thus the rate of energy production.

  11. Adaptive Force Control in Compliant Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a manipulator in compliant motion while in contact with an environment having an unknown stiffness. Two classes of solutions are discussed: adaptive admittance control and adaptive compliance control. In both admittance and compliance control schemes, compensator adaptation is used to ensure a stable and uniform system performance.

  12. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  13. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.; Morgan, John P,.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  14. Formation of magnetic discontinuities through superposition of force-free magnetic fields: Periodic boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2013-11-15

    In ideal magnetohydrodynamics characterized by an infinite electrical conductivity, the magnetic flux across an arbitrary fluid surface is conserved in time. The magnetofluid then can be partitioned into contiguous subvolumes of fluid, each of which entraps its own subsystem of magnetic flux. During dynamical evolution of the magnetofluid, these subvolumes press into each other; and in the process, two such subvolumes may come into direct contact while ejecting a third interstitial subvolume. Depending on the orientations of magnetic fields of the two interacting subvolumes, the magnetic field at the common surface of interaction may become discontinuous and a current sheet is formed there. This process of current sheet formation and their subsequent decay is believed to be a plausible mechanism for coronal heating and may also be responsible for various eruptive phenomena at the solar corona. In this work, we explore this theoretical concept through numerical simulations of a viscous, incompressible magnetofluid characterized by infinite electrical conductivity. In particular, we show that if the initial magnetic field is prescribed by superposition of two linear force-free fields with different torsion coefficients, then formation of current sheets are numerically realizable in the neighborhood of magnetic nulls.

  15. Motor control differs for increasing and releasing force.

    PubMed

    Park, Seoung Hoon; Kwon, MinHyuk; Solis, Danielle; Lodha, Neha; Christou, Evangelos A

    2016-06-01

    Control of the motor output depends on our ability to precisely increase and release force. However, the influence of aging on force increase and release remains unknown. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine whether force control differs while increasing and releasing force in young and older adults. Sixteen young adults (22.5 ± 4 yr, 8 females) and 16 older adults (75.7 ± 6.4 yr, 8 females) increased and released force at a constant rate (10% maximum voluntary contraction force/s) during an ankle dorsiflexion isometric task. We recorded the force output and multiple motor unit activity from the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle and quantified the following outcomes: 1) variability of force using the SD of force; 2) mean discharge rate and variability of discharge rate of multiple motor units; and 3) power spectrum of the multiple motor units from 0-4, 4-10, 10-35, and 35-60 Hz. Participants exhibited greater force variability while releasing force, independent of age (P < 0.001). Increased force variability during force release was associated with decreased modulation of multiple motor units from 35 to 60 Hz (R(2) = 0.38). Modulation of multiple motor units from 35 to 60 Hz was further correlated to the change in mean discharge rate of multiple motor units (r = 0.66) and modulation from 0 to 4 Hz (r = -0.64). In conclusion, these findings suggest that force control is altered while releasing due to an altered modulation of the motor units. PMID:26961104

  16. Levitation force on a permanent magnet over a superconducting plane: Modified critical-state model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.J.

    1997-08-01

    The authors consider a model system of a permanent magnet above a semi-infinite superconductor. They introduce a modified critical-state model, and carry out derivations of the levitation force acting on the magnet. A key feature of the modification allows the current density to be less than the critical value. The theoretical results show an exponential relationship between the force and the distance. Analytical expressions are developed for permanent magnets in the form of a point dipole, a tip of a magnetic force microscope, and a cylindrical magnet. In the latter case, the exponential relationship has been observed in numerous experiments but without previous interpretation.

  17. Motion and force control of multiple robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the motion and force control problem of multiple robot arms manipulating a cooperatively held object. A general control paradigm is introduced which decouples the motion and force control problems. For motion control, different control strategies are constructed based on the variables used as the control input in the controller design. There are three natural choices; acceleration of a generalized coordinate, arm tip force vectors, and the joint torques. The first two choices require full model information but produce simple models for the control design problem. The last choice results in a class of relatively model independent control laws by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the open loop system. The motion control only determines the joint torque to within a manifold, due to the multiple-arm kinematic constraint. To resolve the nonuniqueness of the joint torques, two methods are introduced. If the arm and object models are available, an optimization can be performed to best allocate the desired and effector control force to the joint actuators. The other possibility is to control the internal force about some set point. It is shown that effective force regulation can be achieved even if little model information is available.

  18. Trapping and micromanipulation using ultrasonic fields and dual ultrasonic/magnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Harris, Nicholas R.; Boltryk, Rosemary J.; Stanley, Christopher; Bond, Damian

    2010-08-01

    Ultrasonic fields can be used to trap and manipulate micron-scale particles and second-phase fluids, utilising energy densities that do not impair cell viability. The technology can be seen as complementary to optical trapping as the size of the potential wells generated can be relatively large, making ultrasound suitable for the formation and manipulation of cell agglomerates, but less suitable for the manipulation of individual cells. This paper discusses physical phenomena associated with ultrasonic manipulation, including radiation forces, cavitation, and acoustic streaming. The technology is well suited to integration within "Lab on a Chip" devices and can involve excitation by plane, focussed, flexural, or surface acoustic waves. Example applications of resonators are discussed including particle filtration and concentration, cell washing, and biosensor enhancement. A recently developed device that uses both ultrasonic and magnetic forces to enhance the detection of tuberculosis bacteria using magnetic beads is discussed in detail. This approach uses ultrasonic levitation forces to overcome some of the issues associated with purely magnetic trapping. The technology has been implemented in a device in which the main fluidic components are disposable to allow for low production costs and improved control of biohazards.

  19. Force-controlled lifting of molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, N.; Wagner, C.; Weiss, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Lifting a single molecular wire off the surface with a combined frequency-modulated atomic force and tunneling microscope it is possible to monitor the evolution of both the wire configuration and the contacts simultaneously with the transport conductance experiment. In particular, critical points where individual bonds to the surface are broken and instabilities where the wire is prone to change its contact configuration can be identified in the force gradient and dissipation responses of the junction. This additional mechanical information can be used to unambiguously determine the conductance of a true molecular wire, that is, of a molecule that is contacted via a pointlike “crocodile clip” to each of the electrodes but is otherwise free.

  20. Magnetically-controlled bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed magnetic-lubricant ball-bearing assembly has permanently-magnetized bearing retainer fabricated of porous material. Pores of retainer are filled with ferrolubricant. Surface tension causes retainer to deliver sufficient lubricant to nonmagnetic ball bearings.

  1. Force and motion control of a constrained flexible manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fon-Lin

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation reports the results of a comprehensive research study on the combined joint motion control, vibration control, and force control of a constrained rigid-flexible robot arm. An efficient and accurate approach to modeling for controller design is provided. Both regulation and tracking problems are considered, and a modified version of a Corless-Leitmann controller is developed. Experimental studies, which demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods, are presented. In this work, the dynamic modeling of a constrained spherical coordinate robot arm, whose last link is very flexible, is studied for the purpose of combined force and motion control. The model is derived using a consistent modeling procedure which accounts for the axial force effects due to contract, and the coupling due to the effects of flexible motions on the rigid body motions. These effects are shown to be important in the prediction of the vibration frequencies. Galerkin's method is employed for spatial discretization of the flexible link deflections. A convergence study is presented to evaluate the appropriateness of the spatial approximating functions and to determine the number of modes required for obtaining accurate simulation results. Linear control design methods are shown to be adequate for solving the problem of hybrid force and position regulation for the constrained flexible robot arm. However, nonlinear control strategies show advantages (i.e., good response of the joint motion and contact force, and small magnitude of the structural vibration) in the tracking control of motion and force. A modified Corless-Leitmann controller is presented to enhance the control of the flexible motion using only joint actuators. Finally, an experimental implementation is used to validate the proposed controller designs, to assess the merit of measuring and feeding back the flexible motion and the contact force, and to evaluate the feasibility of combined force and motion control

  2. A preliminary investigation of the dynamic force-calibration of a magnetic suspension and balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments acting upon a magnetically suspended wind tunnel model are derived from calibrations of suspension electro magnet currents against known forces. As an alternative to the conventional calibration method of applying steady forces to the model, early experiences with dynamic calibration are outlined, that is a calibration obtained by oscillating a model in suspension and deriving a force/current relationship from its inertia force and the unsteady components of currents. Advantages of dynamic calibration are speed and simplicity. The two methods of calibration applied to one force component show good agreement.

  3. Software for System for Controlling a Magnetically Levitated Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    In a rotor assembly having a rotor supported for rotation by magnetic bearings, a processor controlled by software or firmware controls the generation of force vectors that position the rotor relative to its bearings in a 'bounce' mode in which the rotor axis is displaced from the principal axis defined between the bearings and a 'tilt' mode in which the rotor axis is tilted or inclined relative to the principal axis. Waveform driven perturbations are introduced to generate force vectors that excite the rotor in either the 'bounce' or 'tilt' modes.

  4. Modeling and vector control of planar magnetic levitator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.; Trumper, D.L.; Lang, J.H.

    1998-11-01

    The authors designed and implemented a magnetically levitated stage with large planar motion capability. This planar magnetic levitator employs four novel permanent-magnet linear motors. Each motor generates vertical force for suspension against gravity, as well as horizontal force for drive. These linear levitation motors can be used as building blocks in the general class of multi-degree-of-freedom motion stages. In this paper, the authors discuss electromechanical modeling and real-time vector control of such a permanent-magnet levitator. They describe the dynamics in a dq frame introduced to decouple the forces acting on the magnetically levitated moving part, namely, the platen. A transformation similar to the Blondel-Park transformation is derived for commutation of the stator phase currents. The authors provide test results on step responses of the magnetically levitated stage. It shows 5-nm rms positioning noise in x and y, which demonstrates the applicability of such stages in the next-generation photolithography in semiconductor manufacturing.

  5. Levitation and lateral forces between a point magnetic dipole and a superconducting sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, M. Al-Khateeb; M, K. Alqadi; F, Y. Alzoubi; B, Albiss; M, K. Hasan (Qaseer; N, Y. Ayoub

    2016-05-01

    The dipole–dipole interaction model is employed to investigate the angular dependence of the levitation and lateral forces acting on a small magnet in an anti-symmetric magnet/superconducting sphere system. Breaking the symmetry of the system enables us to study the lateral force which is important in the stability of the magnet above a superconducting sphere in the Meissner state. Under the assumption that the lateral displacement of the magnet is small compared to the physical dimensions of our proposed system, analytical expressions are obtained for the levitation and lateral forces as a function of the geometrical parameters of the superconductor as well as the height, the lateral displacement, and the orientation of the magnetic moment of the magnet. The dependence of the levitation force on the height of the levitating magnet is similar to that in the symmetric magnet/superconducting sphere system within the range of proposed lateral displacements. It is found that the levitation force is linearly dependent on the lateral displacement whereas the lateral force is independent of this displacement. A sinusoidal variation of both forces as a function of the polar and azimuthal angles specifying the orientation of the magnetic moment is observed. The relationship between the stability and the orientation of the magnetic moment is discussed for different orientations.

  6. Novel concepts in near-field optics: from magnetic near-field to optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Honghua

    near-field response of a linear rod antenna is studied with Babinet's principle. Babinet's principle connects the magnetic field of a structure to the electric field of its complement structure. Using combined far- and near-field spectroscopy, imaging, and theory, I identify magnetic dipole and higher order bright and dark magnetic resonances at mid-infrared frequencies. From resonant length scaling and spatial field distributions, I confirm that the theoretical requirement of Babinet's principle for a structure to be infinitely thin and perfectly conducting is still fulfilled to a good approximation in the mid-infrared. Thus Babinet's principle provides access to spatial and spectral magnetic field properties, leading to targeted design and control of magnetic optical antennas. Lastly, a novel form of nanoscale optical spectroscopy based on mechanical detection of optical gradient force is explored. It is to measure the optical gradient force between induced dipole moments of a sample and an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. My study provides the theoretical basis in terms of spectral behavior, resonant enhancement, and distance dependence of the optical gradient force from numerical simulations for a coupled nanoparticle model geometry. I show that the optical gradient force is dispersive for local electronic and vibrational resonances, yet can be absorptive for collective polaronic excitations. This spectral behavior together with the distance dependence scaling provides the key characteristics for its measurement and distinction from competing processes such as thermal expansion. Furthermore, I provide a perspective for resonant enhancement and control of optical forces in general.

  7. Magnetic Control of Convection in Electrically Nonconducting Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jie; Gray, Donald D.; Edwards, Boyd F.

    1999-01-01

    Inhomogeneous magnetic fields exert a body force on electrically nonconducting, magnetically permeable fluids. This force can be used to compensate for gravity and to control convection. The effects of uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields on a laterally unbounded fluid layer heated from below or above are studied using a linear stability analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations supplemented by Maxwell's equations and the appropriate magnetic body force. For a uniform oblique field, the analysis shows that longitudinal rolls with axes parallel to the horizontal component of the field are the rolls most unstable to convection. The corresponding critical Rayleigh number and critical wavelength for the onset of such rolls are less than the well-known Rayleigh-Benard values in the absence of magnetic fields. Vertical fields maximize these deviations, which vanish for horizontal fields. Horizontal fields increase the critical Rayleigh number and the critical wavelength for all rolls except longitudinal rolls. For a nonuniform field, our analysis shows that the magnetic effect on convection is represented by a dimensionless vector parameter which measures the relative strength of the induced magnetic buoyancy force due to the applied field gradient. The vertical component of this parameter competes with the gravitational buoyancy effect, and a critical relationship between this component and the Rayleigh number is identified for the onset of convection. Therefore, Rayleigh-Benard convection in such fluids can be enhanced or suppressed by the field. It also shows that magnetothermal convection is possible in both paramagnetic and diamagnetic fluids. Our theoretical predictions for paramagnetic fluids agree with experiments. Magnetically driven convection in diamagnetic fluids should be observable even in pure water using current technology.

  8. Gravitoinertial force level influences arm movement control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, J.; Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The ability to move the forearm between remembered elbow joint angles immediately after rapid increases or decreases of the background gravitoinertial force (G) level was measured. The movements had been well-practiced in a normal 1G environment before the measurements in high-(1.8G) and low-force (0G) environments. The forearm and upper arm were always unsupported to maximize the influence of altered G-loading and to minimize extraneous cues about arm position. 2. Horizontal and vertical movement planes were studied to measure the effects of varying the G load in the movement plane within a given G background. Rapid and slow movements were studied to assess the role of proprioceptive feedback. 3. G level did not affect the amplitude of rapid movements, indicating that subjects were able to plan and to generate appropriate motor commands for the new G loading of the arm. The amplitude of slow movements was affected by G level, indicating that proprioceptive feedback is influenced by G level. 4. The effects of G level were similar for horizontal and vertical movements, indicating that proprioceptive information from supporting structures, such as the shoulder joint and muscles, had a role in allowing generation of the appropriate motor commands. 5. The incidence and size of dynamic overshoots were greater in 0G and for rapid movements. This G-related change in damping suggests a decrease in muscle spindle activity in 0G. A decrease in muscle spindle activity in 0G and an increase in 1.8G are consistent with the results of our prior studies on the tonic vibration reflex, locomotion, and perception of head movement trajectory in varying force backgrounds.

  9. Electrically Controllable Spontaneous Magnetism in Nanoscale Mixed Phase Multiferroics

    SciTech Connect

    He, Q.; Chu, Y. H.; Heron, J. T.; Yang, S. Y.; Wang, C. H.; Kuo, C. Y.; Lin, H. J.; Yu, P.; Liang, C. W.; Zeches, R. J.; Chen, C. T.; Arenholz, E.; Scholl, A.; Ramesh, R.

    2010-08-02

    The emergence of enhanced spontaneous magnetic moments in self-assembled, epitaxial nanostructures of tetragonal (T-phase) and rhombohedral phases (R-phase) of the multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} system is demonstrated. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism based photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) was applied to investigate the local nature of this magnetism. We find that the spontaneous magnetization of the R-phase is significantly enhanced above the canted antiferromagnetic moment in the bulk phase, as a consequence of a piezomagnetic coupling to the adjacent T-phase and the epitaxial constraint. Reversible electric field control and manipulation of this magnetic moment at room temperature is shown using a combination of piezoresponse force microscopy and PEEM studies.

  10. Modelling and control of a rotor supported by magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Pradeep, A. K.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we develop a dynamical model of a rotor and the active magnetic bearings used to support the rotor. We use this model to develop a stable state feedback control of the magnetic bearing system. We present the development of a rigid body model of the rotor, utilizing both Rotation Matrices (Euler Angles) and Euler Parameters (Quaternions). In the latter half of the paper we develop a stable state feedback control of the actively controlled magnetic bearing to control the rotor position under inbalances. The control law developed takes into account the variation of the model with rotational speed. We show stability over the whole operating range of speeds for the magnetic bearing system. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the closed loop system performance. We develop the model of the magnetic bearing, and present two schemes for the excitation of the poles of the actively controlled magnetic bearing. We also present a scheme for averaging multiple sensor measurements and splitting the actuation forces amongst redundant actuators.

  11. A novel adaptive force control method for IPMC manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lina; Sun, Zhiyong; Li, Zhi; Su, Yunquan; Gao, Jianchao

    2012-07-01

    IPMC is a type of electro-active polymer material, also called artificial muscle, which can generate a relatively large deformation under a relatively low input voltage (generally speaking, less than 5 V), and can be implemented in a water environment. Due to these advantages, IPMC can be used in many fields such as biomimetics, service robots, bio-manipulation, etc. Until now, most existing methods for IPMC manipulation are displacement control not directly force control, however, under most conditions, the success rate of manipulations for tiny fragile objects is limited by the contact force, such as using an IPMC gripper to fix cells. Like most EAPs, a creep phenomenon exists in IPMC, of which the generated force will change with time and the creep model will be influenced by the change of the water content or other environmental factors, so a proper force control method is urgently needed. This paper presents a novel adaptive force control method (AIPOF control—adaptive integral periodic output feedback control), based on employing a creep model of which parameters are obtained by using the FRLS on-line identification method. The AIPOF control method can achieve an arbitrary pole configuration as long as the plant is controllable and observable. This paper also designs the POF and IPOF controller to compare their test results. Simulation and experiments of micro-force-tracking tests are carried out, with results confirming that the proposed control method is viable.

  12. Role of external magnetic field and current closure in the force balance mechanism of a magnetically stabilized plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G, Ravi; Goyal, Vidhi

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigations on the role of applied external magnetic field and return current closure in the force balance mechanism of a plasma torch are reported. The plasma torch is of low power and has wall, gas and magnetic stabilization mechanisms incorporated in it. Gas flow is divided into two parts: axial-central and peripheral-shroud, applied magnetic field is axial and return current is co-axial. Results indicate that application of large external magnetic field gives rise to not only J x B force but also, coupled with gas flow, to a new drag-cum-centrifugal force that acts on the plasma arc root and column. The magnetic field also plays a role in the return current closure dynamics and thus in the overall force balance mechanism. This in turn affects the electro-thermal efficiency of the plasma torch. Detailed experimental results, analytical calculations and physical model representing the processes will be presented and discussed.

  13. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  14. Force characteristics in continuous path controlled crankpin grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Manchao; Yao, Zhenqiang

    2015-03-01

    Recent research on the grinding force involved in cylindrical plunge grinding has focused mainly on steady-state conditions. Unlike in conventional external cylindrical plunge grinding, the conditions between the grinding wheel and the crankpin change periodically in path controlled grinding because of the eccentricity of the crankpin and the constant rotational speed of the crankshaft. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of various grinding conditions on the characteristics of the grinding force during continuous path controlled grinding. Path controlled plunge grinding is conducted at a constant rotational speed using a cubic boron nitride (CBN) wheel. The grinding force is determined by measuring the torque. The experimental results show that the force and torque vary sinusoidally during dry grinding and load grinding. The variations in the results reveal that the resultant grinding force and torque decrease with higher grinding speeds and increase with higher peripheral speeds of the pin and higher grinding depths. In path controlled grinding, unlike in conventional external cylindrical plunge grinding, the axial grinding force cannot be disregarded. The speeds and speed ratios of the workpiece and wheel are also analyzed, and the analysis results show that up-grinding and down-grinding occur during the grinding process. This paper proposes a method for describing the force behavior under varied process conditions during continuous path controlled grinding, which provides a beneficial reference for describing the material removal mechanism and for optimizing continuous controlled crankpin grinding.

  15. GravitoMagnetic force in modified Newtonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2013-08-01

    We introduce the Gauge Vector-Tensor (GVT) theory by extending the AQUAL's approach to the GravitoElectroMagnetism (GEM) approximation of gravity. GVT is a generally covariant theory of gravity composed of a pseudo Riemannian metric and two U(1) gauge connections that reproduces MOND in the limit of very weak gravitational fields while remains consistent with the Einstein-Hilbert gravity in the limit of strong and Newtonian gravitational fields. GVT also provides a simple framework to study the GEM approximation to gravity. We illustrate that the gravitomagnetic force at the edge of a galaxy can be in accord with either GVT or ΛCDM but not both. We also study the physics of the GVT theory around the gravitational saddle point of the Sun and Jupiter system. We notice that the conclusive refusal of the GVT theory demands measuring either both of the gravitoelectric and gravitomagnetic fields inside the Sun-Jupiter MOND window, or the gravitoelectric field inside two different solar GVT MOND windows. The GVT theory, however, will be favored by observing an anomaly in the gravitoelectric field inside a single MOND window.

  16. Parallel RF force driven by the inhomogeneity of power absorption in magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhe; Chen, Jiale; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2013-06-01

    A nonlinear parallel force can be exerted through the inhomogeneity of rf resonant absorption in a magnetized plasma. While providing no integrated force over a plasma volume, this force can redistribute momentum parallel to the magnetic field. Because flows and currents parallel to the magnetic field encounter different resistances, this redistribution can play a large role, in addition to the role played by the direct absorption of parallel momentum. For nearly perpendicular propagating waves in a tokamak plasma, this additional force is expected to affect significantly the toroidal rf-driven current and the toroidal flow drive. PMID:25167505

  17. A short model excitation of an asymmetric force free superconducting transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wake, M.; Sato, H.; Carcagno, R.; Foster, W.; Hays, S.; Kashikhin, V.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Rabehl, R,; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    A short model of asymmetric force free magnet with single beam aperture was tested at Fermilab together with the excitation test of VLHC transmission line magnet. The design concept of asymmetric force free superconducting magnet was verified by the test. The testing reached up to 104 kA current and no indication of force imbalance was observed. Since the model magnet length was only 10cm, A 0.75m model was constructed and tested at KEK with low current to ensure the validity of the design. The cool down and the excitation at KEK were also successful finding very small thermal contraction of the conductor and reasonable field homogeneity.

  18. Controlling Force and Depth in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Glynn; Loftus, Zachary; McCormac, Nathan; Venable, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Feedback control of the penetration force applied to a pin tool in friction stir welding has been found to be a robust and reliable means for controlling the depth of penetration of the tool. This discovery has made it possible to simplify depth control and to weld with greater repeatability, even on workpieces with long weld joints. Prior to this discovery, depths of penetration in friction stir welding were controlled by hard-tooled roller assemblies or by depth actuators controlled by feedback from such external sensors as linear variable-differential transformers or laser-based devices. These means of control are limited: A hard-tooled roller assembly confines a pin tool to a preset depth that cannot be changed easily during the welding process. A measurement by an external sensor is only an indirect indicative of the depth of penetration, and computations to correlate such a measurement with a depth of penetration are vulnerable to error. The present force-feedback approach exploits the proportionality between the depth and the force of penetration Unlike a depth measurement taken by an external sensor, a force measurement can be direct because it can be taken by a sensor coupled directly to the pin tool. The reading can be processed through a modern electronic servo control system to control an actuator to keep the applied penetration force at the desired level. In comparison with the older depth-control methods described above, this method offers greater sensitivity to plasticizing of the workpiece metal and is less sensitive to process noise, resulting in a more consistent process. In an experiment, a tapered panel was friction stir welded while controlling the force of penetration according to this method. The figure is a plot of measurements taken during the experiment, showing that force was controlled with a variation of 200 lb (890 N), resulting in control of the depth of penetration with a variation of 0.004 in. (0.1 mm).

  19. Visualization and quantification of magnetic nanoparticles into vesicular systems by combined atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, C.; Corsetti, S.; Passeri, D.; Rossi, M.; Carafa, M.; Marianecci, C.; Pantanella, F.; Rinaldi, F.; Ingallina, C.; Sorbo, A.

    2015-06-23

    We report a phenomenological approach for the quantification of the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) incorporated in non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). After a simple specimen preparation, i.e., by putting a drop of solution containing MNPs-loaded niosomes on flat substrates, topography and MFM phase images are collected. To attempt the quantification of the diameter of entrapped MNPs, the method is calibrated on the sole MNPs deposited on the same substrates by analyzing the MFM signal as a function of the MNP diameter (at fixed tip-sample distance) and of the tip-sample distance (for selected MNPs). After calibration, the effective diameter of the MNPs entrapped in some niosomes is quantitatively deduced from MFM images.

  20. Classical diamagnetism, magnetic interaction energies, and repulsive forces in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, H.

    2011-05-01

    The Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem is often summarized as saying that there is no classical magnetic susceptibility, in particular no diamagnetism. This is seriously misleading. The theorem assumes position-dependent interactions but this is not required by classical physics. Since the work of Darwin in 1920 it has been known that the magnetism due to classical charged point particles can only be described by allowing velocity-dependent interactions in the Lagrangian. Legendre transformation to an approximate Hamiltonian can give an estimate of the Darwin diamagnetism for a system of charged point particles. Comparison with experiment, however, requires knowledge of the number of classically behaving electrons in the sample. A new repulsive effective many-body force, which should be relevant in plasmas, is predicted by the Hamiltonian.

  1. An ABS control logic based on wheel force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, D.; Galvagno, E.; Ondrak, V.; van Leeuwen, B.; Vigliani, A.

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents an anti-lock braking system (ABS) control logic based on the measurement of the longitudinal forces at the hub bearings. The availability of force information allows to design a logic that does not rely on the estimation of the tyre-road friction coefficient, since it continuously tries to exploit the maximum longitudinal tyre force. The logic is designed by means of computer simulation and then tested on a specific hardware in the loop test bench: the experimental results confirm that measured wheel force can lead to a significant improvement of the ABS performances in terms of stopping distance also in the presence of road with variable friction coefficient.

  2. Limitations of the Pilot in Applying Forces to Airplane Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, M N; Beard, A P

    1936-01-01

    Measurements were made to determine the relative maximum forces a pilot can exert on the controls of an airplane with the view of obtaining systematic data upon which to base the location of controls within the cockpit and the design of the control surfaces. A cockpit model of generous proportions, capable of being rotated to any attitude, was built with the location of the control stick and rudder pedals adjustable over a wide range of positions with respect to the seat. Besides measurements of maximum forces obtainable with various control locations and with the pilot in several attitudes, estimates of forces within the range normally encountered in flight were made to gain an indication of the accuracy of estimating control forces. The maximum aileron forces measured were of the order of 90 pounds, maximum elevator 200 pounds, and maximum rudder 450 pounds. The average forces applied with the controls in the neutral position for the various cockpit attitudes were of the order of 35, 95, and 400 pounds, respectively, for the ailerons, elevators, and rudder.

  3. Preliminary investigation of force-reduced superconducting magnet configurations for advanced technology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-12-01

    The feasibility of new high-field low specific weight superconducting magnet designs using force-free fields is being explored analytically and numerically. This report attempts to assess the technical viability of force-free field concepts to produce high-field, low specific weight and large bore volume magnets, which could promote the use of high temperature superconductors. Several force-free/force-reduced magnet configurations are first reviewed, then discussed and assessed. Force-free magnetic fields, fields for which the current flows parallel to the field, have well-known mathematical solutions extending upon infinite domains. These solutions, however, are no longer force-free everywhere for finite geometries. In this preliminary study, force-free solutions such as the Lundquist solutions truncated to a size where the internal field of the coil matches an externally cylindrical magnetic field (also called a Lundquist coil) are numerically modeled and explored. Significant force-reduction for such coils was calculated, which may have some importance for the design of lighter toroidal magnets used in thermonuclear fusion power generation, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), and mobile MHD power generation and propulsion.

  4. Vertically polarizing undulator with the dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for the next generation of light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, N.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I.; Xu, J.; Gluskin, E.

    2014-11-01

    A short prototype (847-mm-long) of an Insertion Device (ID) with the dynamic compensation of ID magnetic forces has been designed, built, and tested at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of the Argonne National Laboratory. The ID magnetic forces were compensated by the set of conical springs placed along the ID strongback. Well-controlled exponential characteristics of conical springs permitted a very close fit to the ID magnetic forces. Several effects related to the imperfections of actual springs, their mounting and tuning, and how these factors affect the prototype performance has been studied. Finally, series of tests to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of the ID magnetic gap settings have been carried out. Based on the magnetic measurements of the ID Beff, it has been demonstrated that the magnetic gaps within an operating range were controlled accurately and reproducibly within ±1 μm. Successful tests of this ID prototype led to the design of a 3-m long device based on the same concept. The 3-m long prototype is currently under construction. It represents R&D efforts by the APS toward APS Upgrade Project goals as well as the future generation of IDs for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  5. Vertically polarizing undulator with the dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for the next generation of light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Strelnikov, N.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I.; Xu, J.; Gluskin, E.

    2014-11-15

    A short prototype (847-mm-long) of an Insertion Device (ID) with the dynamic compensation of ID magnetic forces has been designed, built, and tested at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of the Argonne National Laboratory. The ID magnetic forces were compensated by the set of conical springs placed along the ID strongback. Well-controlled exponential characteristics of conical springs permitted a very close fit to the ID magnetic forces. Several effects related to the imperfections of actual springs, their mounting and tuning, and how these factors affect the prototype performance has been studied. Finally, series of tests to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of the ID magnetic gap settings have been carried out. Based on the magnetic measurements of the ID B{sub eff}, it has been demonstrated that the magnetic gaps within an operating range were controlled accurately and reproducibly within ±1 μm. Successful tests of this ID prototype led to the design of a 3-m long device based on the same concept. The 3-m long prototype is currently under construction. It represents R and D efforts by the APS toward APS Upgrade Project goals as well as the future generation of IDs for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

  6. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, E; Camunas-Soler, J; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Seifert, U; Ritort, F

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force. PMID:27575077

  7. Control of force through feedback in small driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2016-07-01

    Controlling a time-dependent force applied to single molecules or colloidal particles is crucial for many types of experiments. Since in optical tweezers the primary controlled variable is the position of the trap, imposing a target force requires an active feedback process. We analyze this feedback process for the paradigmatic case of a nonequilibrium steady state generated by a dichotomous force protocol, first theoretically for a colloidal particle in a harmonic trap and then with both simulations and experiments for a long DNA hairpin. For the first setup, we find there is an optimal feedback gain separating monotonic from oscillatory response, whereas a too strong feedback leads to an instability. For the DNA molecule, reaching the target force requires substantial feedback gain since weak feedback cannot overcome the tendency to relax towards the equilibrium force.

  8. Multidigit control of contact forces during transport of handheld objects.

    PubMed

    Winges, Sara A; Soechting, John F; Flanders, Martha

    2007-08-01

    When an object is lifted vertically, the normal force increases and decreases in tandem with tangential (load) force to safely avoid slips. For horizontal object transport, horizontal forces at the contact surfaces can be decomposed into manipulation forces (producing acceleration/deceleration) and grasping forces. Although the grasping forces must satisfy equilibrium constraints, it is not clear what determines their modulation across time, nor the extent to which they result from active muscle contraction or mechanical interactions of the digits with the moving object. Grasping force was found to increase in an experimental condition where the center of mass was below the contact plane, compared with when it was in the contact plane. This increase may be aimed at stabilizing object orientation during translation. In another experimental condition, more complex moments were introduced by allowing the low center of mass to swing around a pivot point. Electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from several intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles failed to reveal active feedback regulation of contact force in this situation. Instead, in all experimental conditions, EMG data revealed a strategy of feedforward stiffness modulation. Multiple regression analysis revealed that muscle activity at remote digits (e.g., the index and ring fingers) was highly correlated with the contact force measured at another digit (e.g., the thumb). The data suggest that to maintain grasp stability during horizontal translation, predictable as well as somewhat unpredictable inertial forces are compensated for by controlling the stiffness of the hand through cocontraction and modulation of hand muscle activity. PMID:17553950

  9. The vectorial control of magnetization by light.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Natsuki; Higuchi, Takuya; Shimizu, Hirokatsu; Konishi, Kuniaki; Yoshioka, Kosuke; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Application of coherent light-matter interactions has recently been extended to the ultrafast control of magnetization. An important but unrealized technique is the manipulation of magnetization vector motion to make it follow an arbitrarily designed multidimensional trajectory. Here we demonstrate a full manipulation of two-dimensional magnetic oscillations in antiferromagnetic NiO with a pair of polarization-twisted femtosecond laser pulses. We employ Raman-type nonlinear optical processes, wherein magnetic oscillations are impulsively induced with a controlled initial phase. Their azimuthal angle follows well-defined selection rules that have been determined by the symmetries of the materials. We emphasize that the temporal variation of the laser-pulse polarization angle enables us to control the phase and amplitude of the two degenerate modes, independently. These results lead to a new concept of the vectorial control of magnetization by light. PMID:21694710

  10. Non-Linear Fuzzy Logic Control for Forced Large Motions of Spinning Shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEI, SHULIANG; PALAZZOLO, ALAN; NA, UHNJOO; KASCAK, ALBERT

    2000-08-01

    A unique control approach is developed for prescribed large motion control using magnetic bearings in a proposed active stall control test rig. A finite element based, flexible shaft is modeled in a closed loop system with PD controllers that generate the control signals to support and to shake the rotor shaft. A linearized force model of the stall rig with 16 magnetic poles (4 opposing C-cores) yields stability and frequency responses. The non-linear model retains the non-linearities in Ampere's law, Faraday's law and the Maxwell stress tensor. A fuzzy logic control system is then designed to show the advantages over the conventional controllers with the fully non-linear model.

  11. Unmanned Turning Force Control Based on the Spindle Drive Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Kunsoo; Pak, Changho

    While the rough turning process is machining a workpiece at various cutting depth, the feedrate is usually selected based on the maximum depth of cut. Even if this selection can avoid power saturation or tool breakage, it is very conservative compared to the capacity of machine tools and can reduce the productivity significantly. Many adaptive control techniques have been reported that can adjust the feedrate to maintain the constant cutting force. However, these controllers are not very widely used in manufacturing industry because of the limitations in measuring the cutting force signals and selecting the appropriate cutting force level. In this paper, an unmanned turning process control system is proposed based on the spindle drive characteristics. A synthesized cutting force monitor is introduced to estimate the cutting force as accurately as a dynamometer does. The reference cutting force level as well as the feed-rate is selected considering the spindle motor characteristics. Because the cutting process is highly nonlinear, a fuzzy logic controller is applied to maintain the desired cutting force level. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system can be easily realized in CNC lathe with requiring little additional hardware.

  12. Cross-sectional magnetic force microscopy of MnAs/GaAs(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salles, B. Rache; Marangolo, M.; David, C.; Girard, J. C.

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic domain structure and stray field of MnAs/GaAs(001) thin films by magnetic force microscopy of the growth surface and of cleavage edges. The strong uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of MnAs makes the magnetic properties very similar to those of a rectangular bar magnet with constant magnetization along the easy axis direction. By analytical calculations we estimate the out-of-plane magnetic stray field component acting on electrons injected by a MnAs contact into a GaAs-based device.

  13. Hysteresis loops of individual Co nanostripes measured by magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic imaging is of utmost importance to understand magnetism at the nanoscale. In the present work, we use a magnetic force microscope (MFM) operating under in-plane magnetic field in order to observe with high accuracy the domain configuration changes in Co nanowires as a function of the externally applied magnetic field. The main result is the quantitative evaluation of the coercive field of the individual nanostructures. Such characterization is performed by using an MFM-based technique in which a map of the magnetic signal is obtained as a function of both the lateral displacement and the magnetic field. PMID:21711935

  14. Fully Suspended, Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig With Forced Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew; Kurkov, Anatole; Montague, Gerald; Duffy, Kirsten; Mehmed, Oral; Johnson, Dexter; Jansen, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    The Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig, a significant advancement in the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR), is used to perform vibration tests of turbomachinery blades and components under rotating and nonrotating conditions in a vacuum. The rig has as its critical components three magnetic bearings: two heteropolar radial active magnetic bearings and a magnetic thrust bearing. The bearing configuration allows full vertical rotor magnetic suspension along with a feed-forward control feature, which will enable the excitation of various natural blade modes in bladed disk test articles. The theoretical, mechanical, electrical, and electronic aspects of the rig are discussed. Also presented are the forced-excitation results of a fully levitated, rotating and nonrotating, unbladed rotor and a fully levitated, rotating and nonrotating, bladed rotor in which a pair of blades was arranged 180 degrees apart from each other. These tests include the bounce mode excitation of the rotor in which the rotor was excited at the blade natural frequency of 144 Hz. The rotor natural mode frequency of 355 Hz was discerned from the plot of acceleration versus frequency. For nonrotating blades, a blade-tip excitation amplitude of approximately 100 g/A was achieved at the first-bending critical (approximately 144 Hz) and at the first-torsional and second-bending blade modes. A blade-tip displacement of 70 mils was achieved at the first-bending critical by exciting the blades at a forced-excitation phase angle of 908 relative to the vertical plane containing the blades while simultaneously rotating the shaft at 3000 rpm.

  15. Magnetic control of Leidenfrost drops.

    PubMed

    Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2012-05-01

    We show how a magnetic field can influence the motion of a paramagnetic drop made of liquid oxygen in a Leidenfrost state on solids at room temperature. It is demonstrated that the trajectory can be modified in both direction and velocity and that the results can be interpreted in terms of classical mechanics as long as the drop does not get too close to the magnet. We study the deviation and report that it can easily overcome 180∘ and even diverge under certain conditions, leading to situations where a drop gets captured. In the vicinity of the magnet, another type of trapping is observed, due to the deformation of the drop in this region, which leads to a strong energy dissipation. Conversely, drops can be accelerated by moving magnets (slingshot effect). PMID:23004866

  16. Concentric Magnetic Structures for Magnetophoretic Bead Collection, Cell Trapping and Analysis of Cell Morphological Changes Caused by Local Magnetic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Concentric magnetic structures (ring and square) with domain wall (DW) pinning geometry are designed for biological manipulation. Magnetic beads collection was firstly demonstrated to analyse the local magnetic field generated by DWs and the effective regions to capture magnetic targets of size 1 μm. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are magnetically labeled by internalizing poly (styrene sulfonic acid) stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) and then are selectively trapped by head-to-tail DWs (HH DWs) or tail-to-tail DWs (TT DWs) to be arranged into linear shape or cross shape. The morphologies and the nuclear geometry of the cells growing on two kinds of concentric magnetic structures are shown to be distinctive. The intracellular magnetic forces generated by the local magnetic field of DWs are found to influence the behaviour of cells. PMID:26270332

  17. Comparison of digital controllers used in magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, William A.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic systems that were once controlled by analog circuits are now controlled by digital computers. Presented is a comparison of the digital controllers presently used with magnetic suspension and balance systems. The overall responses of the systems are compared using a computer simulation of the magnetic suspension and balance system and the digital controllers. The comparisons include responses to both simulated force and position inputs. A preferred digital controller is determined from the simulated responses.

  18. How can magnetic forces do work? Investigating the problem with students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2013-11-01

    We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students’ reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been tested with about 150 high school students and 50 pre-service teachers. Results indicate that students’ understanding of the direction and magnitude of the magnetic force improved markedly and that some typical difficulties were overcome. Comparison of the two types of forces and of their effects allowed focusing on their crucial difference with respect to the possibility of doing work and encouraged students to search for models that are able to link one force to another.

  19. Levitation force and magnetic stiffness in bulk high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.Z.; Moon, F.C. ); Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Levitation forces between a small permanent magnet and a disk of bulk high-temperature superconductor at 77 K were measured as a function of vertical separation for disks of composition Y-Ba-Cu-O, Ag/Y-Ba-Cu-O, (Pb,Bi)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O. The forces were highly hysteretic; however, for all samples, on the initial descent of the magnet toward the disk, the force was unique, independent of magnet speed, and varied approximately as the negative exponential of the separation distance. Magnetic stiffness, associated with minor hysteresis loops, was found to be approximately proportional to the levitation force, and nearly independent of magnet configuration and superconductor composition.

  20. Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement System at Any Low Temperatures From 20 K To 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, S. Baris; Coskun, Elvan

    2015-03-01

    Most of the magnetic levitation force measurements in previous studies were performed at liquid nitrogen temperatures. For the levitation force of MgB2 and iron based superconducting samples, magnetic levitation force measurement system is needed. In this study, magnetic levitation force measurement system was designed. In this system, beside vertical force versus vertical motion, lateral and vertical force versus lateral motion measurements, the vertical force versus temperature at the fixed distance between permanent magnet PM - superconducting sample SS and the vertical force versus time measurements were performed at any temperatures from 20 K to 300 K. Thanks to these measurements, the temperature dependence, time dependence, and the distance (magnetic field) and temperature dependences of SS can be investigated. On the other hand, the magnetic stiffness MS measurements can be performed in this system. Using the measurement of MS at different temperature in the range, MS dependence on temperature can be investigated. These measurements at any temperatures in the range help to the superconductivity properties to be characterized. This work was supported by TUBTAK-the Scientific and technological research council of Turkey under project of MFAG - 110T622. This system was applied to the Turkish patent institute with the Application Number of 2013/13638 on 22/11/2013.

  1. Controlling the flux dynamics in superconductors by nanostructured magnetic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapra, Andrey

    In this thesis we investigate theoretically how the critical current jc of nano-engineered mesoscopic superconducting film can be improved and how one can control the dynamics of the magnetic flux, e.g., the transition from flux-pinned to flux-flow regime, using arrays of magnetic nanostructures. In particularly we investigate: (1) Vortex transport phenomena in superconductors with deposited ferromagnetic structures on top, and the influence of the sample geometry on the critical parameters and on the vortex configurations. Changing geometry of the magnetic bars and magnetization of the bars will affect the critical current jc of the superconducting film. Such nanostructured ferromagnets strongly alter the vortex structure in its neighborhood. The influence of geometry, position and magnetization of the ferromagnet (single bar or regular lattice of the bars) on the critical parameters of the superconductor is investigated. (2) Effect of flux confinement in narrow superconducting channels with zigzag-shaped banks: the flux motion is confined in the transverse (perpendicular) direction of a diamond-cell-shape channel. The matching effect for the magnetic flux is found in the system relevantless of boundary condition. We discuss the dynamics of vortices in the samples and vortex pattern formation in the channel. We show how the inclusion of higher-Tc superconductor into the sample can lead to enhanced properties of the system. By adding an external driving force, we study the vortex dynamics. The different dynamic regimes are discussed. They allowed an effective control of magnetic flux in superconductors.

  2. Training augmentation device for the Air Force satellite Control Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoates, Keith B.

    1993-01-01

    From the 1960's and into the early 1980's satellite operations and control were conducted by Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), now Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), out of the Satellite Control Facility at Onizuka AFB, CA. AFSC was responsible for acquiring satellite command and control systems and conducting routine satellite operations. The daily operations, consisting of satellite health and status contacts and station keeping activities, were performed for AFSC by a Mission Control Team (MCT) staffed by civilian contractors who were responsible for providing their own technically 'qualified' personnel as satellite operators. An MCT consists of five positions: mission planner, ground controller, planner analyst, orbit analyst, and ranger controller. Most of the training consisted of On-the-Job-Training (OJT) with junior personnel apprenticed to senior personnel until they could demonstrate job proficiency. With most of the satellite operators having 15 to 25 years of experience, there was minimal risk to the mission. In the mid 1980's Air Force Space Command (AFSPACOM) assumed operational responsibility for a newly established control node at Falcon AFB (FAFB) in CO. The satellites and ground system program offices (SPO's) are organized under AFSC's Space and Missiles Systems Center (SMC) to function as a systems engineering and acquisition agency for AFSPACECOM. The collection of the satellite control nodes, ground tracking stations, computer processing equipment, and connecting communications links is referred to as the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN).

  3. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  4. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-09

    We develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Also, 3 G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to traditional heterodyne based MFM on model systems including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) and electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstratemore » its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode coupling phenomena. Finally we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any AFM platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties as well as their mutual interactions.« less

  5. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  6. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments. PMID:25933864

  7. Force Transmission Control in Multilateral System for Teletraining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Seiichiro; Suzuyama, Toshiyuki; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    Recently, skill preservation of an expert has been a serious problem of the medical or production fields. It is difficult to acquire a human motion including touching motion by the conventional visual-based system. A touching motion is inherently bilateral, since an action is always accompanied by a reaction. A bilateral force feedback control is necessary to acquire the human's skill. This paper proposes a haptic teletraining system by multilateral force feedback control. Since the multilateral control transmits haptic information among three or more remote systems, it is possible to train remote trainee by one skilled trainer simultaneously. In the proposed haptic teletraining system, each local system consists of a master-slave system. Since a touching motion is subject to the “law of action and reaction”, it is possible to decompose the force information into action force and reaction force by using the bilateral control. Thus the skilled motion by a trainer is acquired and saved as a digital database integrated with his haptic information. The proposed system is applied to one-trainer/two-trainee system. As a result, a motion including contact with the environment is transmitted and trained with vivid force feedback. The experimental results show viability of the proposed method.

  8. Optimum control forces for multibody systems with intermittent motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ider, Sitki Kemal; Amirouche, F. M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to address the continuity of motion when a dynamical system is suddenly subjected to constraint conditions. Motion discontinuity due to the initial constraint violation is avoided by prior control forces that adjust the motion and yield velocity and acceleration consistent at the point of application of the constraint. The optimum control forces are determined for a specified control interval. The method proposed provides an optimum adjustment of the system's motion and assures that the stresses developed at the system components are kept within acceptable limits. The procedures developed will be illustrated making use of inequality constraints applied to obstacle avoidance problems in robotics.

  9. Myoelectric hand prosthesis force control through servo motor current feedback.

    PubMed

    Sono, Tálita Saemi Payossim; Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the prehension force closed-loop control design of a mechanical finger commanded by electromyographic signal (EMG) from a patient's arm. The control scheme was implemented and tested in a mechanical finger prototype with three degrees of freedom and one actuator, driven by arm muscles EMG of normal volunteers. Real-time indirect estimation of prehension force was assessed by measuring the DC servo motor actuator current. A model of the plant comprising finger, motor, and grasped object was proposed. Model parameters were identified experimentally and a classical feedback phase-lead compensator was designed. The controlled mechanical finger was able to provide a more accurate prehension force modulation of a compliant object when compared to open-loop control. PMID:19681841

  10. Decoupling suspension controller based on magnetic flux feedback.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output) state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module's antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced. PMID:23844415

  11. Decoupling Suspension Controller Based on Magnetic Flux Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenqing; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun; Cui, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output) state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module's antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced. PMID:23844415

  12. Forced dynamic position control of PMSM with DTC utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Michal

    2012-11-01

    Almost one and a half century after the publication of Maxwell’s On Governors, feedback theory with PID controllers in cascade structure is still an essential part of control structures of most controlled electric drives. There are a few control strategies which are “ready” to replace it but they usually miss one of the essential fundamentals of every successful approach - simplicity hand in hand with lucidity. But there is one close relative which is simple and powerful at the same time, is not excessively abstract and without complicated mathematics. The name of this technique is Forced Dynamic Control. In this paper forced dynamic control is presented together with direct torque controlled PMSM drive as unique combination of simple algorithms for inner and outer loop of cascade structure.

  13. Torsional resonance mode magnetic force microscopy: enabling higher lateral resolution magnetic imaging without topography-related effects.

    PubMed

    Kaidatzis, A; García-Martín, J M

    2013-04-26

    We present experimental work that reveals the benefits of performing magnetic force microscopy measurements employing the torsional resonance mode of cantilever oscillation. This approach provides two clear advantages: the ability of performing magnetic imaging without topography-related interference and the significant lateral resolution improvement (approximately 15%). We believe that this work demonstrates a significant improvement to a versatile magnetic imaging technique widely used in academia and in industry. PMID:23535607

  14. Force control for robotic manipulators with structurally flexible links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latornell, Douglas John

    1992-01-01

    This thesis reports on the development of strategies for the control of contact forces exerted by a structurally flexible robotic manipulator on surfaces in its working environment. The controller is based on a multivariable, explicitly adaptive, long range predictive control algorithm. A static equilibrium bias term which is particularly applicable to the contact force control problem has been incorporated into the control algorithm cost function. A general formulation for the discrete time domain characteristic polynomial of the closed loop system has been derived and shown useful in tuning the controller. Kinematic and dynamic models of a robotic manipulator with structurally flexible links interacting with its working environment are derived. These models include inertia and damping effects in the contact dynamics in addition to the contact stiffness employed in most previous work. Linear analyses of the dynamic models for a variety of manipulator configurations reveal that the controlled variable, the contact force, is dominated by different open loop modes of the system depending on the effective stiffness of the contacting surfaces. This result has important implications for the selection of the controller parameters. The performance of the controller has been evaluated using computer simulation. A special purpose simulation program, TWOFLEX, which includes the dynamics models of the manipulator and the environment as well as the control algorithm was developed during the research. The configurations investigated using the simulation include a single flexible manipulator link, two link manipulators with both rigid and flexible links, and a two link prototype model of the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) manipulator for the proposed Space Station Freedom. The results show that the controller can be tuned to provide fast contact force step responses with minimal overshoot and zero steady-state error. The problem of maintaining control through the discontinuous

  15. Implementation of robotic force control with position accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    As the need for robotic manipulation in fields such as manufacturing and telerobotics increases, so does the need for effective methods of controlling the interaction forces between the manipulators and their environment. Position Accommodation (PA) is a form of robotic force control where the nominal path of the manipulator is modified in response to forces and torques sensed at the tool-tip of the manipulator. The response is tailored such that the manipulator emulates a mechanical impedance to its environment. PA falls under the category of position-based robotic force control, and may be viewed as a form of Impedance Control. The practical implementations are explored of PA into an 18 degree-of-freedom robotic testbed consisting of two PUMA 560 arms mounted on two 3 DOF positioning platforms. Single and dual-arm architectures for PA are presented along with some experimental results. Characteristics of position-based force control are discussed, along with some of the limitations of PA.

  16. Forced Field Extrapolation of the Magnetic Structure of the Hα fibrils in the Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoshuai, Zhu; Huaning, Wang; Zhanle, Du; Han, He

    2016-07-01

    We present a careful assessment of forced field extrapolation using the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager magnetogram. We use several metrics to check the convergence property. The extrapolated field lines below 3600 km appear to be aligned with most of the Hα fibrils observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope. In the region where magnetic energy is far larger than potential energy, the field lines computed by forced field extrapolation are still consistent with the patterns of Hα fibrils while the nonlinear force-free field results show a large misalignment. The horizontal average of the lorentz force ratio shows that the forced region where the force-free assumption fails can reach heights of 1400–1800 km. The non-force-free state of the chromosphere is also confirmed based on recent radiation magnetohydrodynamics simulations.

  17. Diamagnetically stabilized levitation control of an intraluminal magnetic capsule.

    PubMed

    Lam, Michael; Mintchev, Martin

    2009-08-01

    Controlled navigation promotes full utilization of capsule endoscopy for reliable real-time diagnosis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but intermittent natural peristalsis can disturb the navigational control, destabilize the capsule and take it out of levitation. The focus of the present work was to develop an economical and effective real-time magnetic capsule-guiding system that can operate in the presence of naturally existing peristalsis while retaining navigational control. A real-size magnetic navigation system that can handle peristaltic forces of up to 1.5 N was designed utilizing the computer-aided design (CAD) system Maxwell 3D (Ansoft, Pittsburg, PA) and was verified using a small-size physical experimental setup. The proposed system contains a pair of 50 cm diameter, 10,000-turn copper electromagnets with a 10 cm x 10 cm ferrous core driven by currents of up to 300 A and can successfully maintain position control over the levitating capsule during peristalsis. The addition of bismuth diamagnetic casing for stabilizing the levitating capsule was also studied. A modeled magnetic field around the diamagnetically cased permanent magnet was shown to be redistributed aligning its interaction with the external electromagnets, thus stabilizing the levitating capsule. In summary, a custom-designed diamagnetically facilitated capsule navigation system can successfully steer an intraluminal magnet-carrying capsule. PMID:19550023

  18. High sensitivity piezomagnetic force microscopy for quantitative probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Ma, Feiyue; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Yuanming; Proksch, Roger; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-07-01

    Accurate scanning probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale is essential for developing and characterizing magnetic nanostructures, yet quantitative analysis is difficult using the state of the art magnetic force microscopy, and has limited spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this communication, we develop a novel piezomagnetic force microscopy (PmFM) technique, with the imaging principle based on the detection of magnetostrictive response excited by an external magnetic field. In combination with the dual AC resonance tracking (DART) technique, the contact stiffness and energy dissipation of the samples can be simultaneously mapped along with the PmFM phase and amplitude, enabling quantitative probing of magnetic materials and structures at the nanoscale with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PmFM has been applied to probe magnetic soft discs and cobalt ferrite thin films, demonstrating it as a powerful tool for a wide range of magnetic materials. PMID:23720016

  19. Detection of silica-mediated dissolution of magnetic grains in sediments using FORC diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, Laura; Verosub, Ken; Russell, James

    2007-06-01

    Recently silica-mediated dissolution has been recognized as a potentially important factor influencing magnetic studies of marine and lacustrine sediments. Although direct evidence for the dissolution of magnetic particles in silica-rich environments is lacking, the process is expected to produce changes in the magnetic grain-size distribution, a hypothesis that is tested in this study on sediments from Lake Tanganyika, East Africa, using First Order Reversal Curves (FORCs). Results from different magnetic intensity zones within the studied samples clearly show changes in the grain-size distribution of magnetic minerals. In particular, zones with high biogenic silica content (BSi) correlated with depletion in fine-grained magnetic material, whereas zones with lower BSi showed no depletion. These results are consistent with the idea that silica-mediated dissolution results in the preferential removal of fine-grained magnetic material, and indicate that FORC diagrams are effective in characterizing silica-mediated dissolution in sediments.

  20. A study on the changes in attractive force of magnetic attachments for overdenture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Choi, Yu-Sung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Although magnetic attachment is used frequently for overdenture, it is reported that attractive force can be decreased by abrasion and corrosion. The purpose of this study was to establish the clinical basis about considerations and long term prognosis of overdenture using magnetic attachments by investigating the change in attractive force of magnetic attachment applied to the patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Among the patients treated with overdenture using magnetic attachments in Dankook University Dental Hospital, attractive force records of 61 magnetic attachments of 20 subjects who re-visited from July 2013 to June 2014 were analyzed. Dental magnet tester (Aichi Micro Intelligent Co., Aichi, Japan) was used for measurement. The magnetic attachments used in this study were Magfit IP-B Flat, Magfit DX400, Magfit DX600 and Magfit DX800 (Aichi Steel Co., Aichi, Japan) filled with Neodymium (NdFeB), a rare-earth magnet. RESULTS Reduction ratio of attractive force had no significant correlation with conditional variables to which attachments were applied, and was higher when the maintenance period was longer (P<.05, r=.361). Reduction ratio of attractive force was significantly higher in the subject group in which attachments were used over 9 years than within 9 years (P<.05). Furthermore, 16.39% of total magnetic attachments showed detachment of keeper or assembly. CONCLUSION Attractive force of magnetic attachment is maintained regardless of conditional variables and reduction ratio increased as the maintenance period became longer. Further study on adhesive material, attachment method and design improvement to prevent detachment of magnetic attachment is needed. PMID:26949482

  1. Multimodal chemo-magnetic control of self-propelling microbots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Dey, Krishna Kanti; Chattopadhyay, Arun; Mandal, Tapas Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2014-01-01

    We report a controlled migration of an iron nanoparticle (FeNP) coated polymer micromotor. The otherwise diffusive motion of the motor was meticulously directed through an in situ pH-gradient and an external magnetic field. The self-propulsion owing to the asymmetric catalytic decomposition of peroxide fuel was directed through a pH gradient imposed across the motor-surface, while the magnetic field induced an external control on the movement and the speed of the motor. Interestingly, the sole influence of the pH gradient could move the motor as high as ~25 body lengths per second, which was further magnified by the external assistance from the magnetic field. Applying a magnetic field against the pH directed motion helped in the quantitative experimental estimation of the force-field required to arrest the chemotactic migration. The influence of the coupled internal and external fields could halt, steer or reverse the direction the motor inside a microchannel, rotate the motor around a target, and deliver the motor to a cluster of cells. This study showcases a multimodal chemical-magnetic field regulated migration of micro-machines for sensing, transport, and delivery inside a fluidic environment.We report a controlled migration of an iron nanoparticle (FeNP) coated polymer micromotor. The otherwise diffusive motion of the motor was meticulously directed through an in situ pH-gradient and an external magnetic field. The self-propulsion owing to the asymmetric catalytic decomposition of peroxide fuel was directed through a pH gradient imposed across the motor-surface, while the magnetic field induced an external control on the movement and the speed of the motor. Interestingly, the sole influence of the pH gradient could move the motor as high as ~25 body lengths per second, which was further magnified by the external assistance from the magnetic field. Applying a magnetic field against the pH directed motion helped in the quantitative experimental estimation of

  2. Controlling colloidal phase transitions with critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Duc; Faber, Suzanne; Hu, Zhibing; Wegdam, Gerard H; Schall, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The critical Casimir force provides a thermodynamic analogue of the quantum mechanical Casimir force that arises from the confinement of electromagnetic field fluctuations. In its thermodynamic analogue, two surfaces immersed in a critical solvent mixture attract each other due to confinement of solvent concentration fluctuations. Here, we demonstrate the active assembly control of colloidal equilibrium phases using critical Casimir forces. We guide colloidal particles into analogues of molecular liquid and solid phases via exquisite control over their interactions. By measuring the critical Casimir pair potential directly from density fluctuations in the colloidal gas, we obtain insight into liquefaction at small scales. We apply the van der Waals model of molecular liquefaction and show that the colloidal gas-liquid condensation is accurately described by the van der Waals theory, even on the scale of a few particles. These results open up new possibilities in the active assembly control of micro and nanostructures. PMID:23481392

  3. Formation control of robotic swarm using bounded artificial forces.

    PubMed

    Qin, Long; Zha, Yabing; Yin, Quanjun; Peng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Formation control of multirobot systems has drawn significant attention in the recent years. This paper presents a potential field control algorithm, navigating a swarm of robots into a predefined 2D shape while avoiding intermember collisions. The algorithm applies in both stationary and moving targets formation. We define the bounded artificial forces in the form of exponential functions, so that the behavior of the swarm drove by the forces can be adjusted via selecting proper control parameters. The theoretical analysis of the swarm behavior proves the stability and convergence properties of the algorithm. We further make certain modifications upon the forces to improve the robustness of the swarm behavior in the presence of realistic implementation considerations. The considerations include obstacle avoidance, local minima, and deformation of the shape. Finally, detailed simulation results validate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, and the direction of possible futrue work is discussed in the conclusions. PMID:24453809

  4. Formation Control of Robotic Swarm Using Bounded Artificial Forces

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yabing; Peng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Formation control of multirobot systems has drawn significant attention in the recent years. This paper presents a potential field control algorithm, navigating a swarm of robots into a predefined 2D shape while avoiding intermember collisions. The algorithm applies in both stationary and moving targets formation. We define the bounded artificial forces in the form of exponential functions, so that the behavior of the swarm drove by the forces can be adjusted via selecting proper control parameters. The theoretical analysis of the swarm behavior proves the stability and convergence properties of the algorithm. We further make certain modifications upon the forces to improve the robustness of the swarm behavior in the presence of realistic implementation considerations. The considerations include obstacle avoidance, local minima, and deformation of the shape. Finally, detailed simulation results validate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, and the direction of possible futrue work is discussed in the conclusions. PMID:24453809

  5. Magnetic force Optical Coherence Elastography at 1.5 million a-lines per second

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Singh, Manmohan; Liu, Chih-Hao; Li, Jiasong; Schill, Alexander; Raghunathan, Raksha; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) has been widely used to characterize tissue elasticity. In this paper we introduce a new excitation method using magnetic force to induce shear waves in phantoms and tissues. The shear waves were imaged using an Optical Coherence Tomography system with an A-scan rate of ~1.5 million a-lines per second and the speed of the waves were used to quantify elasticity of different concentrations of agar sampled and porcine liver. The OCE results acquired from this magnetic force excitation were compared with the mechanical compressional tests for validation. The results showed that magnetic force OCE and mechanical testing results were in good agreement, demonstrating the ability of magnetic force OCE to accurately quantify the Young's modulus of tissue.

  6. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  7. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  8. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  9. Effective method to control the levitation force and levitation height in a superconducting maglev system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng-Tao; Yang, Wan-Min; Wang, Miao; Li, Jia-Wei; Guo, Yu-Xia

    2015-11-01

    The influence of the width of the middle magnet in the permanent magnet guideways (PMGs) on the levitation force and the levitation height of single-domain yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) bulks has been investigated at 77 K under the zero field cooled (ZFC) state. It is found that the largest levitation force can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG equal to the size of the YBCO bulk when the gap between the YBCO bulk and PMG is small. Both larger levitation force and higher levitation height can be obtained in the system with the width of the middle magnet of the PMG larger than the size of the YBCO bulk. The stiffness of the levitation force between the PMG and the YBCO bulk is higher in the system with a smaller width of the middle magnet in the PMG. These results provide an effective way to control the levitation force and the levitation height for the superconducting maglev design and applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51342001 and 50872079), the Key-grant Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 311033), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120202110003), the Innovation Team in Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014KTC-18), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. GK201101001 and GK201305014), and the Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Foundation Project of Shaanxi Normal University, China (Grant Nos. X2011YB08 and X2012YB05).

  10. Vibration and shape control of hinged light structures using electromagnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yuji; Miyachi, Shigenobu; Sasaki, Toshiyuki

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes a new electromagnetic device for vibration control of a light-weighted deployable/retractable structure which consists of many small units connected with mechanical hinges. A typical example of such a structure is a solar cell paddle of an artificial satellite which is composed of many thin flexible blankets connected in series. Vibration and shape control of the paddle is not easy, because control force and energy do not transmit well between the blankets which are discretely connected by hinges with each other. The new device consists of a permanent magnet glued along an edge of a blanket and an electric current-conducting coil glued along an adjoining edge of another adjacent blanket. Conduction of the electric current in a magnetic field from the magnet generates an electromagnetic force on the coil. By changing the current in the coil, therefore, we may control the vibration and shape of the blankets. To confirm the effectiveness of the new device, constructing a simple paddle model consisting eight hinge- panels, we have carried out a model experiment of vibration and shape control of the paddle. In addition, a numerical simulation of vibration control of the hinge structure is performed to compare with measured data.

  11. Calculation of the hysteretic force between a superconductor and a magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M. J.; Li, G.; Liu, H. K.; Dou, S. X.; Brandt, E. H.

    2002-07-01

    The magnetic levitation forces exerted on a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) disk by a cylindrical permanent magnet (PM) are calculated from first principles for superconductors with finite thickness. The current j(ρ,z) and field B(ρ,z) profiles in the HTS in the nonuniform magnetic field generated by the PM are derived. The levitation force depends nonlinearly on the critical current density jc and on the thickness of the HTS. The flux creep is described by a current-voltage law E(j)=Ec(j/jc)n, from which we show that the levitation force depends on the speed at which the PM approaches or recedes from the HTS, which accounts for the experimentally observed force creep phenomenon. The stiffness of the system is derived by calculating minor force loops. The numerical results reproduce many of the features observed in experiments.

  12. Variable force solenoid pressure control for an automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, G.E.

    1989-05-30

    This patent describes a hydraulic pressure control circuit for an automatic transmission having fluid pressure operated clutch and brake servo. The controlling transmission consists of: a pump and a main pressure regulator valve means for establishing a regulated pressure in the control circuit; a variable force solenoid valve means for developing a pressure proportional to engine torque including a variable force solenoid connected to pressure regulating portions of the torque proportional pressure; a torque signal passage connecting to the variable force solenoid valve means with the pressure regulator valve means whereby the regulated pressure level maintained by the main regulator valve means is controlled in response to changes in the torque proportional pressure; and a variable force solenoid pressure relief valve means communicating with the torque signal passage and with the variable force solenoid valve means whereby the variable force solenoid valve means is adapted to regulate and to develop a pressure of reduced value relative to the regulated pressure of the main pressure regulator valve means as it establishes the torque proportional pressure, the solenoid pressure relief valve means comprising a pressure regulating valve spool, a valve chamber receiving the spool. The spool and the valve chamber having registering valve lands, a valve spring on one side of the spool urging the spool in one direction, a first pressure area on the pool being exposed to the torque proportional pressure, a second pressure area on the valve spool exposed to the pressure of reduced value whereby the spring, the pressure of reduced value and the torque proportional pressure establish a balanced force on the spool.

  13. Investigation of the influence of magnetostriction and magnetic forces on transformer core noise and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phophongviwat, Teeraphon

    Transformer noise is of increasing environmental concern so continued efforts are being made by electrical steel and transformer producers to satisfy users by reducing the noise. Magnetostriction and magnetic forces are the main causes of transformer core noise and vibration. Understanding of the relationship from the core material to core structure and core vibration to core noise can help the design of low noise transformer cores. The most appropriate parameter for investigating the relationship between noise and vibration is sound pressure (in the unit of Pascals) in the frequency domain because it is not A-weighted. In this study, the side surfaces of transformer cores were found to emit higher noise than front and top surfaces at low magnetic induction. When the magnetic induction was increased, the effect of magnetic force increased and caused the front surfaces to emit higher noise. For three phase three limb transformer cores, the front surface of the middle limb generated higher noise than the outer limbs due to the effect of T-joint. However this does not translate higher noise level because of the phase difference of the vibration between the limbs. Due to this A-weighted sound power level of three phase, three limb transformer cores were shown to be lower than single phase transformer cores, although at the same cross sectional area and core window size the three phase cores has larger size.. A model, developed to separate the effects of magnetostriction and magnetic forces on transformer core vibration, showed that at low induction, magnetostriction is more significant than magnetic forces. The magnetic forces become more significant than magnetostriction when the induction is increased. Magnetostriction primarily depends on material and stress but magnetic forces principally depend on core building. Louder noise can be generated from a core built with low magnetostriction material than higher magnetostriction if the building tolerances are worse. The

  14. Effects of Forcing Frequency in Controlling a Supersonic Impinging Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Jeff; Samimy, Mo

    2002-11-01

    A series of experiments were performed to explore the effects of forcing frequency in controlling an ideally expanded Mach 1.3 axisymmetric impinging jet operating in a strong resonance regime. The Hartmann Tube Fluidic Actuator (HTFA), which is an actuator with high bandwidth and high amplitude characteristics, was used for the forcing. Three HTFAs with zero frequency (steady injection), low frequency of 5.4 kHz (near the impinging jet resonance frequency of 5.3 kHz), and high frequency of 12 kHz were used. Measurements were performed to characterize the near- and far-field acoustic of the unforced and forced jets. Detailed flow visualization is currently being used to correlate changes in the acoustic field with changes in the large-scale coherent structures. The results show that using steady injection and high frequency forcing behave similarly in suppressing the impingement tone, but both raise the broadband acoustic level around the impingement tone. The low frequency forcing also suppresses the impingement tone but with less rise in the broadband noise. Both the high frequency and low frequency forcing leave their imprint at the forcing frequency.

  15. MAGNETICALLY CONTROLLED CIRCULATION ON HOT EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Konstantin; Stanley, Sabine; Stevenson, David J.

    2013-10-10

    Through the process of thermal ionization, intense stellar irradiation renders hot Jupiter atmospheres electrically conductive. Simultaneously, lateral variability in the irradiation drives the global circulation with peak wind speeds of the order of ∼km s{sup –1}. In turn, the interactions between the atmospheric flows and the background magnetic field give rise to Lorentz forces that can act to perturb the flow away from its purely hydrodynamical counterpart. Using analytical theory and numerical simulations, we show here that significant deviations away from axisymmetric circulation are unstable in presence of a non-negligible axisymmetric magnetic field. Specifically, our results suggest that dayside-to-nightside flows, often obtained within the context of three-dimensional circulation models, only exist on objects with anomalously low magnetic fields, while the majority of highly irradiated exoplanetary atmospheres are entirely dominated by zonal jets.

  16. Harmonic Fluxes and Electromagnetic Forces of Concentric Winding Brushless Permanent Magnet Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Fuminori; Takemasa, Ryo; Matsushita, Makoto; Nishizawa, Takashi; Noda, Shinichi

    Brushless permanent magnet motors have been widely used in home applications and industrial fields. These days, high efficiency and low noise motors are demanded from the view point of environment. Electromagnetic noise and iron loss of the motor are produced by the harmonic fluxes and electromagnetic forces. However, order and space pattern of these have not been discussed in detail. In this paper, fluxes, electromagnetic forces and magneto-motive forces of brushless permanent magnet motors with concentric winding were analyzed analytically, experimentally and numerically. Time harmonic fluxes and time electromagnetic forces in the air gap were measured by search coils on the inner surface of the stator teeth and analyzed by FEM. Space pattern of time harmonic fluxes and time electromagnetic forces were worked out with experiments and FEM. Magneto motive forces due to concentric winding were analyzed with equations and checked by FEM.

  17. Electric control of magnetism at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liaoyu; Wang, Dunhui; Cao, Qingqi; Zheng, Yuanxia; Xuan, Haicheng; Gao, Jinlong; Du, Youwei

    2012-01-01

    In the single-phase multiferroics, the coupling between electric polarization (P) and magnetization (M) would enable the magnetoelectric (ME) effect, namely M induced and modulated by E, and conversely P by H. Especially, the manipulation of magnetization by an electric field at room-temperature is of great importance in technological applications, such as new information storage technology, four-state logic device, magnetoelectric sensors, low-power magnetoelectric device and so on. Furthermore, it can reduce power consumption and realize device miniaturization, which is very useful for the practical applications. In an M-type hexaferrite SrCo2Ti2Fe8O19, large magnetization and electric polarization were observed simultaneously at room-temperature. Moreover, large effect of electric field-controlled magnetization was observed even without magnetic bias field. These results illuminate a promising potential to apply in magnetoelectric devices at room temperature and imply plentiful physics behind them. PMID:22355737

  18. Spacecraft Magnetic Cleanliness Prediction and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weikert, S.; Mehlem, K.; Wiegand, A.

    2012-05-01

    The paper describes a sophisticated and realistic control and prediction method for the magnetic cleanliness of spacecraft, covering all phases of a project till the final system test. From the first establishment of the so-called magnetic moment allocation list the necessary boom length can be determined. The list is then continuously updated by real unit test results with the goal to ensure that the magnetic cleanliness budget is not exceeded at a given probability level. A complete example is described. The synthetic spacecraft modeling which predicts only quite late the final magnetic state of the spacecraft is also described. Finally, the most important cleanliness verification, the spacecraft system test, is described shortly with an example. The emphasis of the paper is put on the magnetic dipole moment allocation method.

  19. Toward Standardized Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF)-Based Ultrasound Elasticity Measurements With Robotic Force Control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shalki; Lily, Kuo; Sen, H. Tutkun; Iordachita, Iulian; Kazanzides, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acoustic radiation force (ARF)-based approaches to measure tissue elasticity require transmission of a focused high-energy acoustic pulse from a stationary ultrasound probe and ultrasound-based tracking of the resulting tissue displacements to obtain stiffness images or shear wave speed estimates. The method has established benefits in biomedical applications such as tumor detection and tissue fibrosis staging. One limitation, however, is the dependence on applied probe pressure, which is difficult to control manually and prohibits standardization of quantitative measurements. To overcome this limitation, we built a robot prototype that controls probe contact forces for shear wave speed quantification. Methods The robot was evaluated with controlled force increments applied to a tissue-mimicking phantom and in vivo abdominal tissue from three human volunteers. Results The root-mean-square error between the desired and measured forces was 0.07 N in the phantom and higher for the fatty layer of in vivo abdominal tissue. The mean shear wave speeds increased from 3.7 to 4.5 m/s in the phantom and 1.0 to 3.0 m/s in the in vivo fat for compressive forces ranging from 2.5 to 30 N. The standard deviation of shear wave speeds obtained with the robotic approach were low in most cases (< 0.2 m/s) and comparable to that obtained with a semiquantitative landmark-based method. Conclusion Results are promising for the introduction of robotic systems to control the applied probe pressure for ARF-based measurements of tissue elasticity. Significance This approach has potential benefits in longitudinal studies of disease progression, comparative studies between patients, and large-scale multidimensional elasticity imaging. PMID:26552071

  20. Bifurcation of magnetic island saturation controlled by plasma viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maget, P.; Février, O.; Lütjens, H.; Luciani, J.-F.; Garbet, X.

    2016-05-01

    Two nonlinear regimes, depending on the magnetic Prandtl number Prm, are identified for the magnetic islands described by resistive MHD equations. The frontier between these two regimes is sharp, and has the characteristics of a phase transition controlled by plasma viscosity. In the low Prm regime, a new form of the so-called flip instability, consisting of a sudden change in the island phase, is identified. Already known in the context of the forcing by external magnetic perturbations and localized current drive, it occurs spontaneously at low Prm. The main characteristics of this new structural instability are described. The low Prm regime is well described by the slab visco-resistive model in the linear phase, and is characterized by both a large saturation of the island and strong nonlinearly driven zonal flows (that do not significantly impact the island dynamics, however), while curvature physics strongly impacts the viscous regime.

  1. Magnetic force microscopy of conducting nanodots in NiO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meang, Wan Joo; Seo, Jeongdae; Ahn, Yoonho; Son, J. Y.

    2016-03-01

    We report a nanoscale magnetic conducting filament in a resistive random access memory (RRAM) device by the direct investigation of conducting nanobits in NiO thin films using magnetic force microscopy. The conducting nanobit in a NiO RRAM capacitor formed by CAFM and KFM exhibited a typical bistable resistive switching characteristic. The magnetizations of the conducting nanobit were measured as a function of the set-reset switching cycle and as the switching cycles were increased, a strong ferromagnetic signal was observed. The metallic Ni formation in the nanoscale magnetic conducting filament could be a possible reason for the origin of the magnetism. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Ann. N.; Anderson, Richard E.; Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

  3. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, A.N.; Anderson, R.E.; Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1995-11-07

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits are disclosed. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits. 17 figs.

  4. Telerobotic hand controller study of force reflection with position control mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, Kelli F.; Hankins, Walter W.; Morris, A. Terry; Mixon, Randolph W.

    1992-01-01

    To gain further information about the effectiveness of kinesthetic force feedback or force reflection in position control mode for a telerobot, two Space Station related tasks were performed by eight subjects with and without the use of force reflection. Both time and subjective responses were measured. No differences due to force were found, however, other differences were found, e.g., gender. Comparisons of these results with other studies are discussed.

  5. Experimental studies of protozoan response to intense magnetic fields and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    Intense static magnetic fields of up to 31 Tesla were used as a novel tool to manipulate the swimming mechanics of unicellular organisms. It is shown that homogenous magnetic fields alter the swimming trajectories of the single cell protozoan Paramecium caudatum, by aligning them parallel to the applied field. Immobile neutrally buoyant paramecia also oriented in magnetic fields with similar rates as the motile ones. It was established that the magneto-orientation is mostly due to the magnetic torques acting on rigid structures in the cell body and therefore the response is a non-biological, passive response. From the orientation rate of paramecia in various magnetic field strengths, the average anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the cell was estimated. It has also been demonstrated that magnetic forces can be used to create increased, decreased and even inverted simulated gravity environments for the investigation of the gravi-responses of single cells. Since the mechanisms by which Earth's gravity affects cell functioning are still not fully understood, a number of methods to simulate different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been employed. Exploiting the ability to exert magnetic forces on weakly diamagnetic constituents of the cells, we were able to vary the gravity from -8 g to 10 g, where g is Earth's gravity. Investigations of the swimming response of paramecia in these simulated gravities revealed that they actively regulate their swimming speed to oppose the external force. This result is in agreement with centrifugation experiments, confirming the credibility of the technique. Moreover, the Paramecium's swimming ceased in simulated gravity of 10 g, indicating a maximum possible propulsion force of 0.7 nN. The magnetic force technique to simulate gravity is the only earthbound technique that can create increased and decreased simulated gravities in the same experimental setup. These findings establish a general

  6. PARTICULATE CONTROL HIGHLIGHTS: FLUX FORCE/CONDENSATION WET SCRUBBING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives highlights of EPA's flux force/condensation (FF/C) program, a system that involves the use of water vapor condensation effects to enhance fine particle collection. FF/C scrubbing offers significant cost advantages over conventional control equipment for a large n...

  7. Geometric Aspects of Force Controllability for a Swimming Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khapalov, A. Y.

    2008-02-15

    We study controllability properties (swimming capabilities) of a mathematical model of an abstract object which 'swims' in the 2-D Stokes fluid. Our goal is to investigate how the geometric shape of this object affects the forces acting upon it. Such problems are of interest in biology and engineering applications dealing with propulsion systems in fluids.

  8. Robotic Gripper With Force Control And Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, James L.

    1992-01-01

    Robotic gripper locates, measures, recognizes and manipulates objects in assembly-line setting. Fiber-optic sensors in fingertips help locate and identify object. Gripper grasps object and determines size from finger-position feedback, while grasped under force control. Prototype handles geranium cuttings in commercial greenhouse, basic concept and design modified for other objects (rods or nuts), including sorting to size.

  9. Magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Coffey, H.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems, focusing on the Holloman maglev rocket system. The paper also discusses simulating the damping plate, which is attached to the superconducting magnet by two short-circuited loop coils in the guideway. Closed-form formulas for the magnetic damping coefficient as functions of heave-and-sway displacements are derived by using a dynamic circuit model. These formulas are useful for dynamic stability studies.

  10. A long-lived coronal X-ray arcade. [force-free magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, J. P.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Krall, K. R.; Wu, S. T.; Smith, J. B., Jr.; Speich, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A large, long-lived, soft X-ray emitting arch system observed during a Skylab mission is analyzed. The supposition is that these arches owe their stability to the stable coronal magnetic-field configuration. A global constant alpha force-free magnetic field analysis, is used to describe the arches which stayed in the same approximate position for several solar rotations. A marked resemblance is noted between the theoretical magnetic field configuration and the observed X-ray emmitting feature.

  11. Direct visualization and identification of biofunctionalized nanoparticles using a magnetic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Block, Stephan; Glöckl, Gunnar; Weitschies, Werner; Helm, Christiane A

    2011-09-14

    Because of its outstanding ability to image and manipulate single molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) established itself as a fundamental technique in nanobiotechnology. (1) We present a new modality that distinguishes single nanoparticles by the surrounding magnetic field gradient. Diamagnetic gold and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles become discernible under ambient conditions. Images of proteins, magnetolabeled with nanoparticles, demonstrate the first steps toward a magnetic analogue to fluorescence microscopy, which combines nanoscale lateral resolution of AFM with unambiguous detection of magnetic markers. PMID:21819124

  12. Detecting the magnetic response of iron oxide capped organosilane nanostructures using magnetic sample modulation and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Lewandowski, Brian R; Xu, Song; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-06-15

    A new imaging strategy using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated for mapping magnetic domains at size regimes below 100 nm. The AFM-based imaging mode is referred to as magnetic sample modulation (MSM), since the flux of an AC-generated electromagnetic field is used to induce physical movement of magnetic nanomaterials on surfaces during imaging. The AFM is operated in contact mode using a soft, nonmagnetic tip to detect the physical motion of the sample. By slowly scanning an AFM probe across a vibrating area of the sample, the frequency and amplitude of vibration induced by the magnetic field is tracked by changes in tip deflection. Thus, the AFM tip serves as a force and motion sensor for mapping the vibrational response of magnetic nanomaterials. Essentially, MSM is a hybrid of contact mode AFM combined with selective modulation of magnetic domains. The positional feedback loop for MSM imaging is the same as that used for force modulation and contact mode AFM; however, the vibration of the sample is analyzed using channels of a lock-in amplifier. The investigations are facilitated by nanofabrication methods combining particle lithography with organic vapor deposition and electroless deposition of iron oxide, to prepare designed test platforms of magnetic materials at nanometer length scales. Custom test platforms furnished suitable surfaces for MSM characterizations at the level of individual metal nanostructures. PMID:19453164

  13. Improved High-Force Magnetic Tweezers for Stretching and Refolding of Proteins and Short DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hu; Fu, Hongxia; Zhu, Xiaoying; Cong, Peiwen; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Yan, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Although magnetic tweezers have many unique advantages in terms of specificity, throughput, and force stability, this tool has had limited application on short tethers because accurate measurement of force has been difficult for short tethers under large tension. Here, we report a method that allows us to apply magnetic tweezers to stretch short biomolecules with accurate force calibration over a wide range of up to 100 pN. We demonstrate the use of the method by overstretching of a short DNA and unfolding/refolding a protein of filamin A immunoglobulin domains 1–8. Other potential applications of this method are also discussed. PMID:21244848

  14. Development of force-feedback-controlled Nafion micromanipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenli; Li, Wen J.; Xi, Ning; Ma, Shugen

    2001-07-01

    The ability to manipulation of biological cells while having reflective-force information from the cells is a key technology necessary for many new applications in Bio-MEMS, but is currently lacking in all cellular manipulators. We will report on our preliminary experimental work in using an Ionic Conducting Polymer Film (ICPF) to develop a biological cell robotic gripper with force sensing capability. ICPF actuators are able to give large deflection with small input voltage (~5V), and also able to give relatively large output voltage due to deflection by a mechanical forces, thus are investigated as a possible material to make force-feedback controlled cellular manipulators in our work. A laser micromachining process is introduced to fabricate arrays of ICPF griping devices, which can be potentially integrated onto a substrate to develop a micro manipulation system. Individual multi-finger grippers with dimensions of 200micrometers x 200micrometers x 3000micrometers for each finger were realized. We will report on the design, fabrication procedures, and operating performance of these micro-grippers. Further development in the reduction of size of these actuators will enable effective force-feedback control of underwater micro objects and lead to new frontiers in cellular manipulation.

  15. Characterizing local anisotropy of coercive force in motor laminations with the moving magnet hysteresis comparator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garshelis, I. J.; Crevecoeur, G.

    2014-05-01

    Non oriented silicon steels are widely used within rotating electrical machines and are assumed to have no anisotropy. There exists a need to detect the anisotropic magnetic properties and to evaluate the local changes in magnetic material properties due to manufacturing cutting processes. In this paper, the so called moving magnet hyteresis comparator is applied to non destructively detect directional variations in coercive force in a variety of local regions of rotor and stator laminations of two materials commonly used to construct induction motors cores. Maximum to minimum coercive force ratios were assessed, varying from 1.4 to 1.7.

  16. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  17. On some properties of force-free magnetic fields in infinite regions of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for solving boundary value problems (BVP) for a force free magnetic field (FFF) in infinite space are presented. A priori inequalities are defined which must be satisfied by the force-free equations. It is shown that upper bounds may be calculated for the magnetic energy of the region provided the value of the magnetic normal component at the boundary of the region can be shown to decay sufficiently fast at infinity. The results are employed to prove a nonexistence theorem for the BVP for the FFF in the spatial region. The implications of the theory for modeling the origins of solar flares are discussed.

  18. Nonlinear force-free magnetic fields: Calculation and applicatin to astrophysics. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wei-Hong

    1987-01-01

    The problem concerned in this work is that of calculating magnetic field configurations in which the Lorentz force (vector)j x (vector)B is everywhere zero, subject to specified boundary conditions. The magnetic field is represented in terms of Clebsch variables in the form (vector)B = del alpha x del beta. These variables are constant on any field line. The most appropriate choice of boundary conditions is to specify the values of alpha and beta on the bounding surface. It is proposed that the field lines move in the direction of local Lorentz force and relax towards a force-free field configuration. This concept leads to an iteration procedure for modifying the variables alpha and beta that tends asymptotically towards the force-free state. This method is first applied to a simple problem in two rectangular dimensions; the calculation shows that the convergence of magnetic field energy to a minimum state (force-free) is close to exponential. This method is then applied to study some astrophysical force-free magnetic fields, such as the structures and evolution of magnetic fields of rotating sunspots and accretion disks. The implication of the results, as related to the mechanisms of solar flares, extragalactic radio sources and radio jets, are discussed.

  19. Electromagnetic Forces in a Hybrid Magnetic-Bearing Switched-Reluctance Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnetic force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel hybrid magnetic-bearing switched-reluctance motor (MBSRM) have been performed. A MBSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The MBSRM discussed in this report has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of four stator poles, while a second set of four stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Static torque and radial force analysis were done for rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental and the theoretical radial force loads predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  20. Magnetothermal Convection of Water with the Presence or Absence of a Magnetic Force Acting on the Susceptibility Gradient.

    PubMed

    Maki, Syou

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer of magnetothermal convection with the presence or absence of the magnetic force acting on the susceptibility gradient (fsc) was examined by three-dimensional numerical computations. Thermal convection of water enclosed in a shallow cylindrical vessel (diameter over vessel height = 6.0) with the Rayleigh-Benard model was adopted as the model, under the conditions of Prandtl number 6.0 and Ra number 7000, respectively. The momentum equations of convection were nondimensionalized, which involved the term of fsc and the term of magnetic force acting on the magnetic field gradient (fb). All the computations resulted in axisymmetric steady rolls. The values of the averaged Nu, the averaged velocity components U, V, and W, and the isothermal distributions and flow patterns were almost completely the same, regardless of the presence or absence of the term of fsc. As a result, we found that the effect of fsc was extremely small, although much previous research emphasized the effect with paramagnetic solutions under an unsteady state. The magnitude of fsc depends not only on magnetic conditions (magnitudes of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic flux density), but also on the thermal properties of the solution (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity). Therefore the effect of fb becomes dominant on the magnetothermal convection. Active control over the density gradient with temperature will be required to advance heat transfer with the effect of fsc. PMID:27606823

  1. Performance enhancement of a Lorentz force velocimeter using a buoyancy-compensated magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Leineweber, J.; Resagk, C.

    2015-07-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a highly feasible method for measuring flow rate in a pipe or a duct. This method has been established for liquid metal flows but also for electrolytes such as saltwater. A decrease in electrical conductivity of the medium causes a decrease of the Lorentz force which needs to be resolved, affecting the accuracy of the measurement. We use an electrical force compensation (EFC) balance for the determination of the tiny force signals in a test channel filled with electrolyte solution. It is used in a 90°-rotated orientation with a magnet system hanging vertically on its load bar. The thin coupling elements of its parallel guiding system limit the mass of the magnets to 1 kg. To overcome this restriction, which limits the magnetic flux density and hence the Lorentz forces, a weight force compensation mechanism is developed. Therefore, different methods such as air bearing are conceivable, but for the elimination of additional horizontal force components which would disturb the force signal, only compensation by lift force provided by buoyancy is reasonable. We present a swimming body setup that will allow larger magnet systems than before, because a large amount of the weight force will be compensated by this lift force. Thus the implementation of this concept has to be made with respect to hydrodynamical and mechanical stability. This is necessary to avoid overturning of the swimming body setup and to prevent inelastic deformation. Additionally, the issue will be presented and discussed whether thermal convection around the lifting body diminishes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) significantly or not.

  2. Enhanced quality factors and force sensitivity by attaching magnetic beads to cantilevers for atomic force microscopy in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoof, Sebastian; Nand Gosvami, Nitya; Hoogenboom, Bart W.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid remains complicated due to the strong viscous damping of the cantilever resonance. Here, we show that a high-quality resonance (Q >20) can be achieved in aqueous solution by attaching a microgram-bead at the end of the nanogram-cantilever. The resulting increase in cantilever mass causes the resonance frequency to drop significantly. However, the force sensitivity—as expressed via the minimum detectable force gradient—is hardly affected, because of the enhanced quality factor. Through the enhancement of the quality factor, the attached bead also reduces the relative importance of noise in the deflection detector. It can thus yield an improved signal-to-noise ratio when this detector noise is significant. We describe and analyze these effects for a set-up that includes magnetic actuation of the cantilevers and that can be easily implemented in any AFM system that is compatible with an inverted optical microscope.

  3. Magnetic energy dissipation in force-free jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Konigl, Arieh

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that a magnetic pressure-dominated, supersonic jet which expands or contracts in response to variations in the confining external pressure can dissipate magnetic energy through field-line reconnection as it relaxes to a minimum-energy configuration. In order for a continuous dissipation to occur, the effective reconnection time must be a fraction of the expansion time. The dissipation rate for the axisymmetric minimum-energy field configuration is analytically derived. The results indicate that the field relaxation process could be a viable mechanism for powering the synchrotron emission in extragalactic jets if the reconnection time is substantially shorter than the nominal resistive tearing time in the jet.

  4. Magnus force and the inertial properties of magnetic vortices in weak ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvezdin, A. K.; Zvezdin, K. A.

    2010-08-01

    The Magnus force (gyroscopic force) acting on magnetic vortices (Bloch lines) within domain boundaries in weak ferromagnets is discussed. A general formula is derived for the Magnus force in weak ferromagnets. The Magnus force is found to be nonzero for most types of domain boundaries and is determined by the average sublattice magnetization and the constants for the Dzyaloshinsky interaction and the exchange interaction between sublattices. Generalized expressions are obtained for the effective Lagrange and Rayleigh functions in weak ferromagnets taking their vortex structure into account. The question of the vortex mass, which has been found to be on the order of m*˜10-14g/cm in YFeO3, is discussed. The dynamic flexure of domain boundaries when moving vortices are present is analyzed. A formula is derived for the magnetic field dependence of the velocity of a vortex in a motionless domain boundary.

  5. Multimodal chemo-magnetic control of self-propelling microbots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Dey, Krishna Kanti; Chattopadhyay, Arun; Mandal, Tapas Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar

    2014-01-01

    We report a controlled migration of an iron nanoparticle (FeNP) coated polymer micromotor. The otherwise diffusive motion of the motor was meticulously directed through an in situ pH-gradient and an external magnetic field. The self-propulsion owing to the asymmetric catalytic decomposition of peroxide fuel was directed through a pH gradient imposed across the motor-surface, while the magnetic field induced an external control on the movement and the speed of the motor. Interestingly, the sole influence of the pH gradient could move the motor as high as ∼25 body lengths per second, which was further magnified by the external assistance from the magnetic field. Applying a magnetic field against the pH directed motion helped in the quantitative experimental estimation of the force-field required to arrest the chemotactic migration. The influence of the coupled internal and external fields could halt, steer or reverse the direction the motor inside a microchannel, rotate the motor around a target, and deliver the motor to a cluster of cells. This study showcases a multimodal chemical-magnetic field regulated migration of micro-machines for sensing, transport, and delivery inside a fluidic environment. PMID:24310180

  6. Multiparameter magnetic inspection system with magnetic field control and plural magnetic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, David C.

    1991-04-16

    A multiparameter magnetic inspection system for providing an efficient and economical way to derive a plurality of independent measurements regarding magnetic properties of the magnetic material under investigation. The plurality of transducers for a plurality of different types of measurements operatively connected to the specimen. The transducers are in turn connected to analytical circuits for converting transducer signals to meaningful measurement signals of the magnetic properties of the specimen. The measurement signals are processed and can be simultaneously communicated to a control component. The measurement signals can also be selectively plotted against one another. The control component operates the functioning of the analytical circuits and operates and controls components to impose magnetic fields of desired characteristics upon the specimen. The system therefore allows contemporaneous or simultaneous derivation of the plurality of different independent magnetic properties of the material which can then be processed to derive characteristics of the material.

  7. Multiparameter magnetic inspection system with magnetic field control and plural magnetic transducers

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, D.C.

    1991-04-16

    A multiparameter magnetic inspection system is disclosed for providing an efficient and economical way to derive a plurality of independent measurements regarding magnetic properties of the magnetic material under investigation. The plurality of transducers for a plurality of different types of measurements operatively connected to the specimen. The transducers are in turn connected to analytical circuits for converting transducer signals to meaningful measurement signals of the magnetic properties of the specimen. The measurement signals are processed and can be simultaneously communicated to a control component. The measurement signals can also be selectively plotted against one another. The control component operates the functioning of the analytical circuits and operates and controls components to impose magnetic fields of desired characteristics upon the specimen. The system therefore allows contemporaneous or simultaneous derivation of the plurality of different independent magnetic properties of the material which can then be processed to derive characteristics of the material. 1 figure.

  8. Active Control of Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY, PATRICK S.; LAUFFER, JAMES P.; REDMOND, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, WILLIAM N.

    2001-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental and test results from a two year LDRD project entitled Real Time Error Correction Using Electromagnetic Bearing Spindles. This project was designed to explore various control schemes for levitating magnetic bearings with the goal of obtaining high precision location of the spindle and exceptionally high rotational speeds. As part of this work, several adaptive control schemes were devised, analyzed, and implemented on an experimental magnetic bearing system. Measured results, which indicated precision positional control of the spindle was possible, agreed reasonably well with simulations. Testing also indicated that the magnetic bearing systems were capable of very high rotational speeds but were still not immune to traditional structural dynamic limitations caused by spindle flexibility effects.

  9. Electrical control of magnetism in oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Song; Bin, Cui; Jingjing, Peng; Haijun, Mao; Feng, Pan

    2016-06-01

    Recent progress in the electrical control of magnetism in oxides, with profound physics and enormous potential applications, is reviewed and illustrated. In the first part, we provide a comprehensive summary of the electrical control of magnetism in the classic multiferroic heterostructures and clarify the various mechanisms lying behind them. The second part focuses on the novel technique of electric double layer gating for driving a significant electronic phase transition in magnetic oxides by a small voltage. In the third part, electric field applied on ordinary dielectric oxide is used to control the magnetic phenomenon originating from charge transfer and orbital reconstruction at the interface between dissimilar correlated oxides. At the end, we analyze the challenges in electrical control of magnetism in oxides, both the mechanisms and practical applications, which will inspire more in-depth research and advance the development in this field. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51322101, 51202125, and 51231004) and the National Hi-tech Research and Development Project of China (Grant Nos. 2014AA032904 and 2014AA032901).

  10. Direct torque control of permanent magnet drives

    SciTech Connect

    French, C.; Acarnley, P.

    1995-12-31

    Many permanent magnet motor drives use an open loop form of torque control, based on the assumption that output torque is proportional to applied current. In a practical motor this assumption may not always be correct, due to sub-optimal alignment of magnets, non-uniformity of magnetic material, current sensor non-linearities and current controller limitations. These factors, together with non-optimized current references, can lead to high values of torque ripple and copper loss. This paper describes a method of estimating the electro-magnetic torque from the rate of change of co-energy with respect to position, thus taking account of mutual torque, reluctance torque and saturation effects. The paper shows how the estimator can be used in a direct torque control scheme. The direct torque controller maximizes the torque:copper loss ratio. Implementation of the direct torque controller in a DSP based drive system is described, with steady-state and transient experimental results illustrating the effectiveness of the direct torque control scheme.

  11. Novel Applications of Magnetic Fields for Fluid Flow Control and for Simulating Variable Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    Static and dynamic magnetic fields have been used to control convection in many materials processing applications. In most of the applications, convection control (damping or enhancement) is achieved through the Lorentz force that can be tailored to counteract/assist dominant system flows. This technique has been successfully applied to liquids that are electrically conducting, such as high temperature melts of semiconductors, metals and alloys, etc. In liquids with low electrical conductivity such as ionic solutions of salts in water, the Lorentz force is weak and hence not very effective and alternate ways of flow control are necessary. If the salt in solution is paramagnetic then the variation of magnetic susceptibility with temperature and/or concentration can be used for flow control. For thermal buoyancy driven flows this can be accomplished in a temperature range below the Curie point of the salt. The magnetic force is proportional to the magnetic susceptibility and the product of the magnetic field and its gradient. By suitably positioning the experiment cell in the magnet, system flows can be assisted or countered, as desired. A similar approach can be extended to diamagnetic substances and fluids but the required magnetic force is considerably larger than that required for paramagnetic substances. The presentation will provide an overview of work to date on a NASA fluid physics sponsored project that aims to test the hypothesis of convective flow control using strong magnetic fields in protein crystal growth. The objective is to understand the nature of the various forces that come into play, delineate causative factors for fluid flow and to quantify them through experiments, analysis, and numerical modeling. The seminar will report specifically on the experimental results using paramagnetic salts and solutions in magnetic fields and compare them to analytical predictions. Applications of the concept to protein crystallization studies will be discussed

  12. Voltage-Controlled Magnetic Dynamics in Nanoscale Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate Vinasco, Juan Guillermo

    Spintronic devices, i.e., those utilizing the interaction of magnetic moments with electric voltages and currents in magnetic nanostructures, offer an exceptionally promising set of candidates for future electronic memory needs. Recently, the possibility of reversing the magnetization of nanoscale magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices using the spin transfer torque (STT) effect has attracted the attention of industry and academia, since STT-MRAM has been demonstrated to be a strong candidate for a high speed, high density, and high endurance nonvolatile memory. Further, by replacing the current-driven (e.g., STT) switching mechanism for a voltage-controlled effect, a novel magnetoelectric RAM (MeRAM) architecture could result in considerable improvements in terms of density and dissipated energy during switching, both factors which are limited in STT-MRAM by the large currents required. In this dissertation, the possibility of exploiting the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect on nanoscale MTJ devices as the driving mechanism for MeRAM will be introduced. Experimental results on the demonstration of current-assisted and purely voltage-controlled switching in the thermally-activated and precessional regimes are presented. The write energies in VCMA-driven switching of nanoscale MTJs are shown to be at least one order of magnitude smaller compared to STT-based schemes. The advantages and challenges in terms of scalability and energy-efficiency of this voltage-driven approach are discussed. Further, a compact model for co-simulation of VCMA-driven MTJs with CMOS is established and validated against experimental data. The compact model is refined by the parameters extracted from a detailed characterization of the voltage-driven dynamics in these devices. This includes experimental results on the accurate characterization of the temperature dependence of the perpendicular anisotropy and the VCMA effect in MTJs, as well as on the influence of higher

  13. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: The NMR-CUFF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, Carel W.; Soltner, Helmut; Dusschoten, Dagmar van; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5 mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings.

  14. Dynamic control of spin states in interacting magnetic elements

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn

    2014-10-07

    A method for the control of the magnetic states of interacting magnetic elements comprising providing a magnetic structure with a plurality of interacting magnetic elements. The magnetic structure comprises a plurality of magnetic states based on the state of each interacting magnetic element. The desired magnetic state of the magnetic structure is determined. The active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the desired magnetic state is determined. Each magnetic element of the magnetic structure is then subjected to an alternating magnetic field or electrical current having a frequency and amplitude below the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of said desired magnetic state and above the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the current state of the magnetic structure until the magnetic state of the magnetic structure is at the desired magnetic state.

  15. A magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure utilizing magnetic force interaction to optimize the sensitivity of current sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chen; Chung, Tien-Kan; Lai, Chen-Hung; Wang, Chieh-Min

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetic-piezoelectric smart material-structure using a novel magnetic-force-interaction approach to optimize the sensitivity of conventional piezoelectric current sensing technologies. The smart material-structure comprises a CuBe-alloy cantilever beam, a piezoelectric PZT sheet clamped to the fixed end of the beam, and an NdFeB permanent magnet mounted on the free end of the beam. When the smart material-structure is placed close to an AC conductor, the magnet on the beam of the smart structure experiences an alternating magnetic attractive and repulsive force produced by the conductor. Thus, the beam vibrates and subsequently generates a strain in the PZT sheet. The strain produces a voltage output because of the piezoelectric effect. The magnetic force interaction is specifically enhanced through the optimization approach (i.e., achieved by using SQUID and machining method to reorient the magnetization to different directions to maximize the magnetic force interaction). After optimizing, the beam's vibration amplitude is significantly enlarged and, consequently, the voltage output is substantially increased. The experimental results indicated that the smart material-structure optimized by the proposed approach produced a voltage output of 4.01 Vrms with a sensitivity of 501 m Vrms/A when it was placed close to a conductor with a current of 8 A at 60 Hz. The optimized voltage output and sensitivity of the proposed smart structure were approximately 316 % higher than those (1.27 Vrms with 159 m Vrms/A) of representative piezoelectric-based current sensing technologies presented in other studies. These improvements can significantly enable the development of more self-powered wireless current sensing applications in the future.

  16. Influence of stator slots on the development of noise-generating magnetic force waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachta, B.

    The calculation of noise in electrical machines is important in the design of these machines. It is shown that the magnetic anisotropy of a laminated stator core caused by stator slots has a substantial effect on the force waves acting on the yoke. The force waves are described simply using a modulation function and the Fourier coefficients of the waves. The effects of the amplitude of the magnetic force waves are discussed, and the effectiveness of stator slot skewing is determined. It is shown that subharmonics can be generated by the slotting (affecting the harmonic number of the force waves), and that for specific harmonic numbers, a reversal in the direction of rotation of force waves takes place. The effectiveness of the method is substantiated by a practical example.

  17. Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian X.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical tuning of magnetism is of great fundamental and technical importance for fast, compact and ultra-low power electronic devices. Multiferroics, simultaneously exhibiting ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism, have attracted much interest owing to the capability of controlling magnetism by an electric field through magnetoelectric (ME) coupling. In particular, strong strain-mediated ME interaction observed in layered multiferroic heterostructures makes it practically possible for realizing electrically reconfigurable microwave devices, ultra-low power electronics and magnetoelectric random access memories (MERAMs). In this review, we demonstrate this remarkable E-field manipulation of magnetism in various multiferroic composite systems, aiming at the creation of novel compact, lightweight, energy-efficient and tunable electronic and microwave devices. First of all, tunable microwave devices are demonstrated based on ferrite/ferroelectric and magnetic-metal/ferroelectric composites, showing giant ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) tunability with narrow FMR linewidth. Then, E-field manipulation of magnetoresistance in multiferroic anisotropic magnetoresistance and giant magnetoresistance devices for achieving low-power electronic devices is discussed. Finally, E-field control of exchange-bias and deterministic magnetization switching is demonstrated in exchange-coupled antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic/ferroelectric multiferroic hetero-structures at room temperature, indicating an important step towards MERAMs. In addition, recent progress in electrically non-volatile tuning of magnetic states is also presented. These tunable multiferroic heterostructures and devices provide great opportunities for next-generation reconfigurable radio frequency/microwave communication systems and radars, spintronics, sensors and memories. PMID:24421373

  18. Controlling Magnetization using Spin Orbit Torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that spin orbit coupling (SOC) and/or broken inversion symmetry in vertical heterostructures can generate accumulation of spins when a charge current is flowing through them. In doing so, it can exert a torque on an adjacent magnet. Indeed, high Z metals (Ta, Pt, W, etc.) with strong SOC have been used to inject spin currents into adjacent ferromagnetic layers and thereby to induce magnetic switching, oscillation, domain wall movement etc. SOC physics promises to significantly reduce the required current for current induced magnetic switching for next generation data-storage applications. In this presentation we shall discuss some of our recent work on SOC induced control of magnets with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). A current flowing in-plane presents interesting symmetry problems with respect to a PMA magnet. We shall discuss how these symmetry relations can be utilized for switching of and domain wall movement in the PMA magnets. In addition to storage applications, we shall also discuss possibility of exploiting SOC for spintronic logic applications.

  19. Charge and Strain Control of Interface Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Dumesnil, K.; Jaouen, N.; Maroutian, T.; Agnus, G.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Kirby, B.; Fohtung, E.; Holladay, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Shpyrko, O.; Sinha, S. K.; Wang, Q.; Chen, A.; Jia, Q. X.

    2015-03-01

    We studied the influence of an electric field applied to an La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) layer in a LSMO/Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8) O3 (PZT)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (STO) heterostructure by measuring its magnetization depth profile using resonant x-ray magnetic reflectivity. The saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetically-ordered LSMO was not affected by the direction of the polarization of the PZT. However, the ferromagnetic thickness and magnetization of the LSMO film at remanence were reduced for hole-charge accumulation at the LSMO/PZT interface. To understand the independent roles of strain and hole-doping, we performed neutron scattering experiments of La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 films grown on Nb-doped STO in which bending strain (via 4-point bending jig) or electric field (via parallel plate capacitor) was applied to the films. We observed that bending strain affects the saturation magnetization of the LSMO film, whereas electric field affects the remanent magnetization of the film. These observations suggest strain may be a more effective means to control magnetism than charge. This work has benefited from use of CINT(LANL), NIST Center for Neutron Research and the Synchrotron SOLEIL and funding from LANL/LDRD program, DOE-BES (UCSD) and DOD (NMSU).

  20. Molten metal feed system controlled with a traveling magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous metal casting system in which the feed of molten metal is controlled by means of a linear induction motor capable of producing a magnetic traveling wave in a duct that connects a reservoir of molten metal to a caster. The linear induction motor produces a traveling magnetic wave in the duct in opposition to the pressure exerted by the head of molten metal in the reservoir so that p.sub.c =p.sub.g -p.sub.m where p.sub.c is the desired pressure in the caster, p.sub.g is the gravitational pressure in the duct exerted by the force of the head of molten metal in the reservoir, and p.sub.m is the electromagnetic pressure exerted by the force of the magnetic field traveling wave produced by the linear induction motor. The invention also includes feedback loops to the linear induction motor to control the casting pressure in response to measured characteristics of the metal being cast.

  1. Fluidic Control of Aerodynamic Forces on an Axisymmetric Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Philip; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2007-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a wind tunnel model of an axisymmetric bluff body are modified by induced local vectoring of the separated base flow. Control is effected by an array of four integrated aft-facing synthetic jets that emanate from narrow, azimuthally-segmented slots, equally distributed around the perimeter of the circular tail end within a small backward facing step that extends into a Coanda surface. The model is suspended in the wind tunnel by eight thin wires for minimal support interference with the wake. Fluidic actuation results in a localized, segmented vectoring of the separated base flow along the rear Coanda surface and induces asymmetric aerodynamic forces and moments to effect maneuvering during flight. The aerodynamic effects associated with quasi-steady and transitory differential, asymmetric activation of the Coanda effect are characterized using direct force and PIV measurements.

  2. Force Model for Control of Tendon Driven Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pena, Edward; Thompson, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Knowing the tendon forces generated for a given task such as grasping via a model, an artificial hand can be controlled. A two-dimensional force model for the index finger was developed. This system is assumed to be in static equilibrium, therefore, the equations of equilibrium were applied at each joint. Constraint equations describing the tendon branch connectivity were used. Gaussian elimination was used to solve for the unknowns of the Linear system. Results from initial work on estimating tendon forces in post-operative hands during active motion therapy were discussed. The results are important for understanding the effects of hand position on tendon tension, elastic effects on tendon tension, and overall functional anatomy of the hand.

  3. Flow-controlled magnetic particle manipulation

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA; Holman, David A [Las Vegas, NV

    2011-02-22

    Inventive methods and apparatus are useful for collecting magnetic materials in one or more magnetic fields and resuspending the particles into a dispersion medium, and optionally repeating collection/resuspension one or more times in the same or a different medium, by controlling the direction and rate of fluid flow through a fluid flow path. The methods provide for contacting derivatized particles with test samples and reagents, removal of excess reagent, washing of magnetic material, and resuspension for analysis, among other uses. The methods are applicable to a wide variety of chemical and biological materials that are susceptible to magnetic labeling, including, for example, cells, viruses, oligonucleotides, proteins, hormones, receptor-ligand complexes, environmental contaminants and the like.

  4. Magnetically controlled single-electron shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilinskaya, O. A.; Kulinich, S. I.; Krive, I. V.; Shekhter, R. I.; Jonson, M.

    2015-01-01

    A theory of single-electron shuttling in an external magnetic field in nanoelectromechanical system with magnetic leads is presented. We consider partially spin-polarized electrons in the leads and electron transport in both the Coulomb blockade regime and in the limit of large bias voltages when the Coulomb blockade is lifted. The influence of the degree of spin polarization on shuttle instability is considered. It is shown that there is certain degree of spin polarization above which the magnetic field ceases to control electron transport. In the Coulomb blockade regime the dependence of the threshold magnetic field, which separates the "shuttle" and vibron regimes, on the degree of polarization is evaluated. The possibility of re-entrant transitions to the shuttle phase is discussed.

  5. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  6. Magnetic Force Microscopy and Energy Loss Imaging of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles”

    PubMed Central

    Torre, Bruno; Bertoni, Giovanni; Fragouli, Despina; Falqui, Andrea; Salerno, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2011-01-01

    We present quantitative, high spatially resolved magnetic force microscopy imaging of samples based on 11 nm diameter superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in air at room temperature. By a proper combination of the cantilever resonance frequency shift, oscillation amplitude and phase lag we obtain the tip-sample interaction maps in terms of force gradient and energy dissipation. These physical quantities are evaluated in the frame of a tip-particle magnetic interaction model also including the tip oscillation amplitude. Magnetic nanoparticles are characterized both in bare form, after deposition on a flat substrate, and as magnetically assembled fillers in a polymer matrix, in the form of nanowires. The latter approach makes it possible to reveal the magnetic texture in a composite sample independently of the surface topography. PMID:22355717

  7. Magnetic Field, Force, and Inductance Computations for an Axially Symmetric Solenoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Immer, Christopher D.; Simpson, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The pumping of liquid oxygen (LOX) by magnetic fields (B field), using an array of electromagnets, is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Oxygen is paramagnetic so that LOX, like a ferrofluid, can be forced in the direction of a B field gradient. It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient magnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. It has been proposed that this phenomenon can be utilized in transporting (i.e., pumping) LOX not only on earth, but on Mars and in the weightlessness of space. In order to design and evaluate such a magnetic pumping system, it is essential to compute the magnetic and force fields, as well as inductance, of various types of electromagnets (solenoids). In this application, it is assumed that the solenoids are air wrapped, and that the current is essentially time independent.

  8. Enhanced buckled-beam piezoelectric energy harvesting using midpoint magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yang; Zu, Jean W.

    2013-07-01

    Aiming to improve the functionality of a buckled-beam piezoelectric energy harvester, a midpoint magnetic force is utilized to enable snap-through motions under low-frequency (<30 Hz) small-amplitude (0.2 g-0.8 g) excitations. The noncontact midpoint magnetic force is introduced through a local magnetic levitation system created by neodymium magnets and is capable of triggering the second buckling mode that helps the beam easily snap through between equilibriums when subjected to excitations. Significant enhancements, along with distinct nonlinear phenomena, are observed at low frequencies in terms of large-amplitude voltage output and extended frequency bandwidth. Frequency tuning is also achievable by adjusting the separation distance between magnets.

  9. Practice effects in bimanual force control: does age matter?

    PubMed

    Vieluf, Solveig; Godde, Ben; Reuter, Eva-Maria; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined age-related differences in fine motor control during a bimanual coordination task. The task required the modulation of fingertip forces in the precision grip according to a visually presented sinusoidal antiphase pattern (force range 2-12 N; frequency 0.2 Hz). Thirty-four right-handed participants of three age groups (young, early middle-aged, and late middle-aged) practiced 30 trials of the task. Accuracy and variability of relative timing and relative forces at minima and maxima of the sine wave were analyzed for hand-hand and hand-stimulus couplings and compared between age groups. Analysis showed for relative timing and force weaker hand-hand than hand-stimulus coupling as well as lower accuracy and higher variability for minima as compared to maxima. Further, we analyzed practice effects by comparing the first and last trials and characterized the course of practice by detecting the transition of a steeper to a shallower acquisition slope for the different age groups. Late middle-aged participants demonstrated poorer performance than both other groups for all parameters. All groups improved performance to a similar amount. However, an age-related difference in acquisition strategy is visible. Late middle-aged participants seemed to have focused on improvement of force amplitude, whereas young and early middle-aged focused on timing. PMID:25575223

  10. Digital control of magnetic bearings in a cryogenic cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, J.; Law, A.; Lind, F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a digital control system for control of magnetic bearings used in a spaceborne cryogenic cooler. The cooler was developed by Philips Laboratories for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Six magnetic bearing assemblies are used to levitate the piston, displacer, and counter-balance of the cooler. The piston and displacer are driven by linear motors in accordance with Stirling cycle thermodynamic principles to produce the desired cooling effect. The counter-balance is driven by a third linear motor to cancel motion induced forces that would otherwise be transmitted to the spacecraft. An analog control system is currently used for bearing control. The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities for improved performance using digital control. Areas for potential improvement include transient and steady state control characteristics, robustness, reliability, adaptability, alternate control modes, size, weight, and cost. The present control system is targeted for the Intel 80196 microcontroller family. The eventual introduction of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) technology to this problem may produce a unique and elegant solution both here and in related industrial problems.

  11. Kinematics and control of a fully parallel force-reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.; Nguyen, Charles C.; Antrazi, Sami S.; Chiou, Peter C.

    1993-01-01

    Design of a parallel force-reflecting hand controller that implements a friction- and inertia canceling control loop about the entire mechanism based on wrench sensing in the mechanism handgrip is discussed. Kinematics of the controller under consideration is analyzed and results are presented using a closed-form solution for the inverse kinematics and Newton-Raphson's method for the forward kinematics. Results indicate that the force control scheme based on a handgrip force sensor provides smaller steady-state errors than the scheme without a handigrip sensor.

  12. Stochastic Resonance Magnetic Force Microscopy imaging of Josephson Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naibert, Tyler; Polshyn, Hryhoriy; Wolin, Brian; Durkin, Malcolm; Garrido Menacho, Rita; Mondragon Shem, Ian; Chua, Victor; Hughes, Taylor; Mason, Nadya; Budakian, Raffi

    Vortex interactions are key to explaining the behavior of many two dimensional superconducting systems. We report on the development of a technique to locally probe vortex interactions in a 2D array of Josephson junctions. Scanning a magnetic tip attached to an ultra-soft cantilever over the array produces changes in the frequency of the cantilever along certain lines, forming geometric patterns in the scans. Different tip-surface separations and external magnetic fields produce a number of different patterns. These patterns correspond to tip locations in which two configurations of vortices in the lattice have degenerate energies. By imaging the locations of these degeneracies, information on the local vortex interactions may be obtained.

  13. In Silico Magnetic Nanocontainers Navigation in Blood Vessels: A Feedback Control Approach.

    PubMed

    Do, Ton Duc; Noh, Yeongil; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are recently used in a drug delivery system to pass the blood brain barrier. However, because the magnetic force acting on particles is proportional to their volumes, as the size of particles is small, the large magnetic field is required to produce enough magnetic force for overcoming the hydrodynamic drag force as well as other forces in blood vessels. Other difficulties for controlling MNPs are the complicated behavior of hydrodynamic drag force and uncertain factors in their dynamics. Therefore, open-loop control methods cannot guarantee guiding every MNP to the correct location. Considering these challenges, this paper introduces a feedback control approach for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in blood vessels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time feedback controller that is designed for MNPs without aggregation. Simulation studies in MATLAB and real-time verifications on a physical model in COMSOL-MATLAB interface are performed to prove the feasibility of the proposed approach. It is shown that the proposed control scheme can accurately and effectively navigate the MNP to the correct path with feasible hardware supports. PMID:27427720

  14. Mechanically implementable accommodation matrices for passive force control

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Peshkin, M.

    1999-08-01

    Robot force control implemented by means of passive mechanical devices has inherent advantages over active implementations with regard to stability, response rapidity, and physical robustness. The class of devices considered in this paper consists of a Stewart platform-type mechanism interconnected with a network of adjustable mechanical elements such as springs and dampers. The control law repertoire of such a device, imagined as a robot wrist, is given by the range of admittance matrices that it may be programmed to possess. This paper focuses on wrists incorporating damper networks for which the admittance matrices reduce to accommodation or inverse-damping matrices. The authors show that a hydraulic network of fully adjustable damper elements may attain any diagonally dominant accommodation matrix. They describe the technique of selecting the individual damping coefficients to design a desired matrix. They identify the set of dominant matrices as a polyhedral convex cone in the space of matrix entries, and show that each dominant matrix can be composed of a positive linear combination of a fixed set of basis matrices. The overall wrist-accommodation matrix is obtained by projecting the accommodation matrix of the damper network through the wrist kinematics. The linear combination of the dominant basis matrices projected through the wrist kinematics generates the entire space of mechanically implementable force-control laws. The authors quantify the versatility of mechanically implementable force-control laws by comparing this space to the space of all matrices.

  15. Structural responses of cells to intracellular magnetic force induced by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Han; Tong, Sheng; Bao, Gang; Wang, Biao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of intracellular force on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We generated intracellular force on endothelial cells under different magnetic fields using the cell uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Cell responses to intracellular force were observed using fluorescent microscopy. Our results indicated that nanoparticles were taken up by the cell by endocytosis and were deposited in lysosomes. Nanoparticles and lysosomes inside the cell could be relocated by the application of a magnetic force. The intracellular magnetic force could also be used to accelerate cell migration by adjusting the magnetic fields and giving the cell free culture space. No cytotoxicity of nanoparticles was found in our experiments. By comparing intracellular relocalization with migration of the whole cell, we obtained a better understanding of the self-defence mechanisms of cells based on their mechanical properties. Based on the promising mechanical properties and low cytotoxicity of our magnetic nanoparticles, their potential applications in cytomechanics and cell patterning are discussed. PMID:24336693

  16. VARIFORC: a powerful FORC analysis tool specially suited to environmental magnetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    VARIFORC is a new tool for the analysis of first-order reversal curves (FORC), especially developed for the highly demanding applications typically occurring in environmental magnetism (e.g. quantitative magnetic component unmixing in weak samples). The currently unique capabilities of VARIFORC are illustrated with examples where the magnetic signature of authigenic minerals (e.g. magnetofossils) is isolated from other magnetic contributions associated with detrital or aeolian inputs in pelagic carbonates. Life demonstrations at the poster stand are possible. VARIFORC is freely available at http://www.conrad-observatory.at/cmsjoomla/de/download.

  17. A Smart Magnetically Active Nanovehicle for on-Demand Targeted Drug Delivery: Where van der Waals Force Balances the Magnetic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Panja, Sudipta; Maji, Somnath; Maiti, Tapas K; Chattopadhyay, Santanu

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic field is a promising external stimulus for controlled and targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Here, we focused on the preparation of a novel magnetically active polymeric micelle (MAPM) for magnetically targeted controlled drug delivery. To accomplish this, a number of superparamagnetic as well as biocompatible hybrid micelles were prepared by grafting four armed pentaerythretol poly(ε-caprolactone) (PE-PCL) onto the surface of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of two different ranges of size (∼5 nm and ∼15 nm). PE-PCL (four-armed) was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization, and it has been subsequently grafted onto the surface of modified MNP through urethane (-NHCO-) linkage. Polymer-immobilized MNP (5 and 15 nm) showed peculiar dispersion behavior. One displayed uniform dispersion of MNP (5 nm), while the other (15 nm) revealed associated structure. This type of size dependent contradictory dispersion behavior was realized by taking the van der Waals force as well as magnetic dipole-dipole force into consideration. The uniformly dispersed polymer immobilized MNP (5 nm) was used for the preparation of MAPM. The hydrodynamic size and bulk morphology of MAPM were studied by dynamic light scattering and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The anticancer drug (DOX) was encapsulated into the MAPM. The magnetic field triggers cell uptake of MAPM micelles preferentially toward targeted cells compare to untargeted ones. The cell viabilities of MAMP, DOX-encapsulated MAPM, and free DOX were studied against HeLa cell by MTT assay. In vitro release profile displayed about 51.5% release of DOX from MAPM (just after 1 h) under the influence of high frequency alternating magnetic field (HFAMF; prepared in-house device). The DOX release rate has also been tailored by on-demand application of HFAMF. PMID:26458134

  18. Effect of Low-Pass Filtering in Force Calibration of Magnetic Tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hai-Zi; Nong, Da-Guan; Li, Ming

    2013-11-01

    In typical experiments where magnetic tweezers are involved, precise measurement of the magnetic forces is of crucial importance. To achieve this, a widely applied method is to track the bead's Brownian motion trajectory and to calculate the force from its mean-squared-displacement. However, this method does not take into account the fact that the bead-tracking device always has a finite bandwidth, acting effectively as a low-pass filter. The result could be subjected to significant system errors, which overestimates the magnetic force. We analyze the power spectrum of the bead's Brownian motion, and provide a corrected formula to calculate the magnetic force, which is free of system errors induced by limited detection bandwidth. A dsDNA force-extension curve is experimentally measured. The curve is consistent with the WLC model, exhibiting correctness of the new formula. On the other hand, the force given by the traditional method shows significant deviation from the WLC model, which is 3 times larger at most.

  19. Switching of both local ferroelectric and magnetic domains in multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film by mechanical force

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Tingting; Kimura, Hideo; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhao, Hongyang

    2016-01-01

    Cross-coupling of ordering parameters in multiferroic materials by multiple external stimuli other than electric field and magnetic field is highly desirable from both practical application and fundamental study points of view. Recently, mechanical force has attracted great attention in switching of ferroic ordering parameters via electro-elastic coupling in ferroelectric materials. In this work, mechanical force induced both polarization and magnetization switching were visualized in a polycrystalline multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film using a scanning probe microscopy system. The piezoresponse force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy responses suggest that both the ferroelectric domains and the magnetic domains in Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 film could be switched by mechanical force as well as by electric field. High tip stress applied on our thin film is demonstrated as able to induce ferroelastic switching and thus induce both ferroelectric dipole and magnetic spin flipping, as a consequence of electro-elastic coupling and magneto-electric coupling. The demonstration of mechanical force control of both the ferroelectric and the magnetic domains at room temperature provides a new freedom for manipulation of multiferroics and could result in devices with novel functionalities. PMID:27546488

  20. Switching of both local ferroelectric and magnetic domains in multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film by mechanical force.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tingting; Kimura, Hideo; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Zhao, Hongyang

    2016-01-01

    Cross-coupling of ordering parameters in multiferroic materials by multiple external stimuli other than electric field and magnetic field is highly desirable from both practical application and fundamental study points of view. Recently, mechanical force has attracted great attention in switching of ferroic ordering parameters via electro-elastic coupling in ferroelectric materials. In this work, mechanical force induced both polarization and magnetization switching were visualized in a polycrystalline multiferroic Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 thin film using a scanning probe microscopy system. The piezoresponse force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy responses suggest that both the ferroelectric domains and the magnetic domains in Bi0.9La0.1FeO3 film could be switched by mechanical force as well as by electric field. High tip stress applied on our thin film is demonstrated as able to induce ferroelastic switching and thus induce both ferroelectric dipole and magnetic spin flipping, as a consequence of electro-elastic coupling and magneto-electric coupling. The demonstration of mechanical force control of both the ferroelectric and the magnetic domains at room temperature provides a new freedom for manipulation of multiferroics and could result in devices with novel functionalities. PMID:27546488

  1. Magnetic Amplifier for Power Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-24

    GENI Project: ORNL is developing an electromagnet-based, amplifier-like device that will allow for complete control over the flow of power within the electric grid. To date, complete control of power flow within the grid has been prohibitively expensive. ORNL’s controller could provide a reliable, cost-effective solution to this problem. The team is combining two types of pre-existing technologies to assist in flow control, culminating in a prototype iron-based magnetic amplifier. Ordinarily, such a device would require expensive superconductive wire, but the magnetic iron core of ORNL’s device could serve as a low-cost alternative that is equally adept at regulating power flow.

  2. Resolving sub-cellular force dynamics using arrays of magnetic microposts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The biological response of cells to mechanical forces is integral to both normal cell function and the progression of many diseases, such as hypertensive vascular wall thickening. This likely results from the fact that mechanical stresses can directly affect many cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, growth, differentiation, and survival. The need to understand the relationship between applied forces and the mechanical response of cells as a critical step towards understanding mechanotransduction calls for tools that can apply forces to cells while measuring their contractile response. This talk will describe an approach that simultaneously allows local mechanical stimulation of the adherent surface of a cell and spatially resolved measurement of the local force fields generated throughout the cell in response to this stimulation. Cells are cultured on the top surfaces of arrays of micrometer-scale posts made from a flexible elastomer (PDMS), and the contractile forces generated by an adherent cell bend the posts. Measurements of the displacement of each post allow the contractile force field of the cell to be mapped out with sub-cellular precision. To apply forces to cells, rod- shaped magnetic nanoparticles are embedded in some of the posts so that externally applied magnetic fields selectively deform these ``magnetic posts,'' thereby exerting tunable local, mechanical stresses to the adherent surface of attached cells. Alternatively, magnetic particles bound to or internalized by the cell may be employed to apply forces and torques to the cell. With either approach, measuring the deflection of the surrounding non-magnetic posts probes the full mechanical response of the cell to these stresses. Results that illustrate the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of the non-local response of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells to local stresses will be discussed.

  3. A magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three dimensional forces

    SciTech Connect

    Punyabrahma, P.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-02-15

    Magnetic manipulation finds diverse applications in actuation, characterization, and manipulation of micro- and nano-scale samples. This paper presents the design and development of a novel magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three-dimensional forces on a magnetic micro-bead. A simple analytical model is proposed to obtain the forces of interaction between the magnetic micro-manipulator and a magnetic micro-bead. Subsequently, guidelines are proposed to perform systematic design and analysis of the micro-manipulator. The designed micro-manipulator is fabricated and evaluated. The manipulator is experimentally demonstrated to possess an electrical bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The ability of the micro-manipulator to apply both in-plane and out-of-plane forces is demonstrated by actuating permanent-magnet micro-beads attached to micro-cantilever beams. The deformations of the micro-cantilevers are also employed to calibrate the dependence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces on the position of the micro-bead relative to the micro-manipulator. The experimentally obtained dependences are found to agree well with theory.

  4. A magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three dimensional forces.

    PubMed

    Punyabrahma, P; Jayanth, G R

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic manipulation finds diverse applications in actuation, characterization, and manipulation of micro- and nano-scale samples. This paper presents the design and development of a novel magnetic micro-manipulator for application of three-dimensional forces on a magnetic micro-bead. A simple analytical model is proposed to obtain the forces of interaction between the magnetic micro-manipulator and a magnetic micro-bead. Subsequently, guidelines are proposed to perform systematic design and analysis of the micro-manipulator. The designed micro-manipulator is fabricated and evaluated. The manipulator is experimentally demonstrated to possess an electrical bandwidth of about 1 MHz. The ability of the micro-manipulator to apply both in-plane and out-of-plane forces is demonstrated by actuating permanent-magnet micro-beads attached to micro-cantilever beams. The deformations of the micro-cantilevers are also employed to calibrate the dependence of in-plane and out-of-plane forces on the position of the micro-bead relative to the micro-manipulator. The experimentally obtained dependences are found to agree well with theory. PMID:25725878

  5. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  6. A decoupling control method of reluctance type bearingless motors considering magnetic saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Michioka, Chikara; Sakamoto, Tomokazu; Ichikawa, Osamu; Fukao, Tadashi; Chiba, Akira

    1995-12-31

    The interference of torque component current of the motor to the radial position control of reluctance type bearingless motors is investigated. In order to cancel this interference, a decoupling control method has been proposed. With this method, machine parameters identification of radial force production is very important. It is shown that the radial force constants exhibit significant variations in accordance with the torque component current due to magnetic saturation. The parameter tuning of the decoupling compensator taking into account of the magnetic saturation is found to realize very stable operation in radial rotor position control.

  7. Sensorless Control of Axial Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumo, Daichi; Yoshida, Toshiya; Ohniwa, Katsumi

    This paper describes a sensorless control method of axial active magnetic bearings (AMBs). At high frequencies, inductance of the axial electromagnets is hardly dependent on the airgap because of the eddy current effects of the non-laminated core. Therefore the carrier frequency should be 3 kHz below to improve the sensitivity to the airgap. In the experiment, Sensorless controll of the axial AMBs have been achieved.

  8. Transmission and Reproduction of Force Sensation by Bilateral Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) which thinks a great deal of patient’s quality of life (QOL) has attracted attention during about ten years. In this paper, it aims at development of the technology for transmitting force sensation required in medical treatment especially through surgical instruments, such as forceps. In bilateral control, it is a problem how master and slave robots realize the law of action and reaction to the environment. Mechanism of contact with environment and bilateral controller based on stiffness are shown. Master arm in contact with human and slave arm in contact with environment are given compliance, and stable contact with environment can be realized. The proposed method is applied to 3-link master-slave manipulators. As a result, transmission and reproduction of force sensation can be realized. The experimental results show viability of the proposed method.

  9. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  10. Thin-foil magnetic force system for high-numerical-aperture microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J K; Cribb, J; Desai, K V; Vicci, L; Wilde, B; Keller, K; Taylor, R M; Haase, J; Bloom, K; O'Brien, E Timothy; Superfine, R

    2006-02-01

    Forces play a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena from single-protein conformational dynamics to transcription and cell division, to name a few. The majority of existing microbiological force application methods can be divided into two categories: those that can apply relatively high forces through the use of a physical connection to a probe and those that apply smaller forces with a detached probe. Existing magnetic manipulators utilizing high fields and high field gradients have been able to reduce this gap in maximum applicable force, but the size of such devices has limited their use in applications where high force and high-numerical-aperture (NA) microscopy must be combined. We have developed a magnetic manipulation system that is capable of applying forces in excess of 700 pN on a 1 mum paramagnetic particle and 13 nN on a 4.5 mum paramagnetic particle, forces over the full 4pi sr, and a bandwidth in excess of 3 kHz while remaining compatible with a commercially available high-NA microscope objective. Our system design separates the pole tips from the flux coils so that the magnetic-field geometry at the sample is determined by removable thin-foil pole plates, allowing easy change from experiment to experiment. In addition, we have combined the magnetic manipulator with a feedback-enhanced, high-resolution (2.4 nm), high-bandwidth (10 kHz), long-range (100 mum xyz range) laser tracking system. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system in a study of the role of forces in higher-order chromosome structure and function. PMID:16858495

  11. Thin-foil magnetic force system for high-numerical-aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, J. K.; Cribb, J.; Desai, K. V.; Vicci, L.; Wilde, B.; Keller, K.; Taylor, R. M.; Haase, J.; Bloom, K.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Superfine, R.

    2006-01-01

    Forces play a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena from single-protein conformational dynamics to transcription and cell division, to name a few. The majority of existing microbiological force application methods can be divided into two categories: those that can apply relatively high forces through the use of a physical connection to a probe and those that apply smaller forces with a detached probe. Existing magnetic manipulators utilizing high fields and high field gradients have been able to reduce this gap in maximum applicable force, but the size of such devices has limited their use in applications where high force and high-numerical-aperture (NA) microscopy must be combined. We have developed a magnetic manipulation system that is capable of applying forces in excess of 700 pN on a 1 μm paramagnetic particle and 13 nN on a 4.5 μm paramagnetic particle, forces over the full 4π sr, and a bandwidth in excess of 3 kHz while remaining compatible with a commercially available high-NA microscope objective. Our system design separates the pole tips from the flux coils so that the magnetic-field geometry at the sample is determined by removable thin-foil pole plates, allowing easy change from experiment to experiment. In addition, we have combined the magnetic manipulator with a feedback-enhanced, high-resolution (2.4 nm), high-bandwidth (10 kHz), long-range (100 μm xyz range) laser tracking system. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system in a study of the role of forces in higher-order chromosome structure and function. PMID:16858495

  12. Detection of Silica-Mediated Dissolution of Magnetic Grains in Sediments Using FORC Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, L.; Verosub, K.; Acton, G.; Russell, J.

    2005-12-01

    Recently silica-mediated dissolution has been recognized as a potentially important factor in magnetic studies of marine and lacustrine sediments. Although direct evidence for the dissolution of magnetic particles in silica-rich environments is still lacking, the process is expected to produce changes in the magnetic grain-size distribution. This hypothesis can be tested using FORC diagrams, which provide detailed information about the magnetic grain-size distributions of small quantities of material. For the present study, four cores were investigated from Lake Tanganyika in East Africa, where high levels of dissolved silica are present. Large variations in both natural and artificial remanent magnetization intensities were observed during the initial paleomagnetic investigation of the cores. These variations in magnetic intensity could not be explained by simple dilution by inert silica in the sediment, suggesting that silica-mediated dissolution might be involved. To study this phenomenon, FORC diagrams were collected from zones of both high and low magnetic intensity. Results from the different zones clearly show that changes in the magnetic intensity are associated with changes in the magnetic grain-size distribution. In particular, zones with high silica content correlated with a depletion in fine-grained magnetic material, whereas zones with lower silica content showed no depletion. These results are consistent with the idea that silica-mediated dissolution results in the preferential removal of fine-grained magnetic material. The results of this study suggest that FORC diagrams are an effective way of determining the presence of silica-mediated dissolution in sediments.

  13. Improvement of the propulsion force for HTSC-permanent magnet hybrid magnetically levitated carrying system by using the pinned flux of HTSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Sasaki, R.; Ueno, T.; Ohashi, S.

    Magnetically levitated carrying system has been developed. In this system, pinning force of high temperature bulk superconductor (HTSC) is used for the levitation and guidance. The magnetic rail is set on the ground, and flux from the magnetic rail is pinned by HTSCs. To increase levitation force, repulsive force of the permanent magnet is used. For the propulsion system, electromagnets are installed on the surface of the magnetic rail. Improvement of the propulsion force is studied. In the previous system, only flux of the permanent magnet of the carrier is used for propulsion. To increase propulsion force, that of the HTSC of the carrier is also used. Using this excitation method, the propulsion force is improved even though total number of the excited coil is the same.

  14. Smart Rehabilitation Devices: Part I – Force Tracking Control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J. Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This article presents prototypes of smart variable resistance exercise devices using magneto-rheological fluid dampers. An intelligent supervisory control for regulating the resistive force or torque of the device is developed, and is validated both numerically and experimentally. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training for the human joints including knee, elbow, hip, and ankle. PMID:18504509

  15. Wireless Magnetic-Based Closed-Loop Control of Self-Propelled Microjets

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Islam S. M.; Magdanz, Veronika; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Misra, Sarthak

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate closed-loop motion control of self-propelled microjets under the influence of external magnetic fields. We control the orientation of the microjets using external magnetic torque, whereas the linear motion towards a reference position is accomplished by the thrust and pulling magnetic forces generated by the ejecting oxygen bubbles and field gradients, respectively. The magnetic dipole moment of the microjets is characterized using the U-turn technique, and its average is calculated to be 1.310−10 A.m2 at magnetic field and linear velocity of 2 mT and 100 µm/s, respectively. The characterized magnetic dipole moment is used in the realization of the magnetic force-current map of the microjets. This map in turn is used for the design of a closed-loop control system that does not depend on the exact dynamical model of the microjets and the accurate knowledge of the parameters of the magnetic system. The motion control characteristics in the transient- and steady-states depend on the concentration of the surrounding fluid (hydrogen peroxide solution) and the strength of the applied magnetic field. Our control system allows us to position microjets at an average velocity of 115 m/s, and within an average region-of-convergence of 365 m. PMID:24505244

  16. Experimental signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative magnetic monopoles in spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, C.; Giblin, S. R.; Lhotel, E.; Prabhakaran, D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Matsuhira, K.; Bramwell, S. T.

    2016-07-01

    A non-Ohmic current that grows exponentially with the square root of applied electric field is well known from thermionic field emission (the Schottky effect), electrolytes (the second Wien effect) and semiconductors (the Poole-Frenkel effect). It is a universal signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative electrical charges, which is revealed as the charges are driven in opposite directions by the force of an applied electric field. Here we apply thermal quenches to spin ice to prepare metastable populations of bound pairs of positive and negative emergent magnetic monopoles at millikelvin temperatures. We find that the application of a magnetic field results in a universal exponential-root field growth of magnetic current, thus confirming the microscopic Coulomb force between the magnetic monopole quasiparticles and establishing a magnetic analogue of the Poole-Frenkel effect. At temperatures above 300 mK, gradual restoration of kinetic monopole equilibria causes the non-Ohmic current to smoothly evolve into the high-field Wien effect for magnetic monopoles, as confirmed by comparison to a recent and rigorous theory of the Wien effect in spin ice. Our results extend the universality of the exponential-root field form into magnetism and illustrate the power of emergent particle kinetics to describe far-from-equilibrium response in complex systems.

  17. Manipulating forces by interactive separation and circulation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagib, Hassan; Reinhard, Paul; Rozier, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Steady, unsteady and intermittent suction and blowing from localized or distributed slots are used to reveal the physical mechanisms and their interaction in order to manipulate (enhance or reduce) the forces on various aerodynamic bodies and surfaces. Performance under ideal inviscid conditions is used as a standard of performance to compare the outcomes to. While high-lift airfoils were part of the focus, flow over humps which lead to large separation zones was also investigated. Surface pressure measurements, wake surveys and surface visualization were utilized over a wide range of operating conditions in the NDF at IIT. Velocities ranged from 20 to 110 m/s (0 . 06 < M < 0 . 31), corresponding to chord Reynolds numbers from 500 , 000 to 3 , 700 , 000 , and included a full range of airfoil angles of attack with flap deflections from 10 to 55 degrees and various leading edge configurations. Steady suction control was more effective at eliminating the large separation bubble created by the model, requiring a pressure ratio between the applied force and inviscid force of approximately unity, whereas blowing required a two to one ratio. Pulsed suction was superior and enhanced by the operating frequency or duty cycle. Separation control (SC) was modified by the presence of circulation control (CC). Steady-blowing SC near the leading edge reduced the effect of blown-flap CC, whereas steady-suction SC increased the performance gain.

  18. Force-controlled dynamic wear testing of total ankle replacements.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Jörn; von Stillfried, Falko; Altan, Emel; Sonntag, Robert; Heitzmann, Daniel W W; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Currently, our knowledge of wear performance in total ankle replacements is limited. The aim of this study is to develop a scenario for force-controlled testing and wear testing of total ankle replacements. A force-controlled wear test was developed: based on cadaver measurements, the passive stabilization (ligaments and soft tissue) of the ankle joint was characterized and a restraint model for ankle stabilization was developed. Kinematics and kinetics acting at the replaced ankle joint were defined based on literature data and gait analysis. Afterwards, force-controlled wear testing was carried out on a mobile, three-component, total ankle replacement design. Wear was assessed gravimetrically and wear particles were analyzed. Wear testing resulted in a mean wear rate of 18.2±1.4mm(3)/10(6) cycles. Wear particles showed a mean size of 0.23μm with an aspect ratio of 1.61±0.96 and a roundness of 0.62±0.14. Wear testing of total ankle replacement shows that a relevant wear mass is generated with wear particles in a biologically relevant size range. The developed wear test provides a basis for future wear testing of total ankle replacements. PMID:25448342

  19. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10(-20) A m(2), respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  20. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10−20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  1. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10-20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution.

  2. Calculation of levitation forces in permanent magnet-superconductor systems using finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, D.; Mora, J.; Fontcuberta, J.; Obradors, X.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper we present calculations of levitation forces between a cylindrical permanent magnet and a cylindrical superconductor using a commercial finite element program. Force limits for zero field cooled and field cooled processes have been obtained using the Meissner effect and the perfect pinning hypothesis, respectively. Comparison of the experimentally determined forces with respect to these limits provides a simple estimation of the sample quality. The hysteretical behavior of the forces has been reproduced assuming a critical state model for the superconductor. Results are compared with experimental data. Excellent agreement has been found for forces measured after zero field cooled process thus allowing us to estimate the critical current of the samples. As a further exploitation of the software capabilities we have investigated the effects of the superconducting sample geometry and the effects of different strategies of flux conditioning to optimize the levitation forces. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Magnetic field sensor based on the Ampere's force using dual-polarization DBR fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuang; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Baiou

    2015-08-01

    A novel magnetic field sensor using distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser by Ampere's force effect is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key sensing element, that is the dual-polarization DBR fiber laser, is fixed on the middle part of two copper plates which carry the current. Ampere's force is applied onto the coppers due to an external magnetic field generated by a DC solenoid. Thus, the lateral force from the coppers is converted to a corresponding beat frequency signal shift produced by the DBR laser. The electric current sensing is also realized by the same configuration and same principle simultaneously in an intuitive manner. Good agreement between the theory calculation and the experimental results is obtained, which shows a good linearity. This sensor's sensitivity to the magnetic field and to the electric current finally reaches ~258.92 kHz/mT and ~1.08727 MHz/A, respectively.

  4. Forced magnetic reconnection and field penetration of an externally applied rotating helical magnetic field in the TEXTOR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Y; de Bock, M F M; Finken, K H; Jakubowski, M; Jaspers, R; Koslowski, H R; Kraemer-Flecken, A; Lehnen, M; Liang, Y; Matsunaga, G; Reiser, D; Wolf, R C; Zimmermann, O

    2006-08-25

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fluid rotation. The differential rotation frequency between the DED field and the plasma plays an important role in the process of the excitation of tearing modes. The momentum input from the rotating DED field to the plasma is interpreted by both a ponderomotive force at the rational surface and a radial electric field modified by an edge ergodization. PMID:17026312

  5. Cellular control lies in the balance of forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    Mechanical tension generated within the cytoskeleton of living cells is emerging as a critical regulator of biological function in diverse situations ranging from the control of chromosome movement to the morphogenesis of the vertebrate brain. In this article, we review recent advances that have been made in terms of understanding how cells generate, transmit and sense mechanical tension, as well as how they use these forces to control their shape and behavior. An integrated view of cell regulation that incorporates mechanics and structure as well as chemistry is beginning to emerge.

  6. New Thermodynamical Force in Plasma Phase Space that Controls Turbulence and Turbulent Transport

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2012-01-01

    Physics of turbulence and turbulent transport has been developed on the central dogma that spatial gradients constitute the controlling parameters, such as Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. Recent experiments with the nonequilibrium plasmas in magnetic confinement devices, however, have shown that the turbulence and transport change much faster than global parameters, after an abrupt change of heating power. Here we propose a theory of turbulence in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, showing that the heating power directly influences the turbulence. New mechanism, that an external source couples with plasma fluctuations in phase space so as to affect turbulence, is investigated. A new thermodynamical force in phase-space, i.e., the derivative of heating power by plasma pressure, plays the role of new control parameter, in addition to spatial gradients. Following the change of turbulence, turbulent transport is modified accordingly. The condition under which this new effect can be observed is also evaluated. PMID:23155481

  7. New Thermodynamical Force in Plasma Phase Space that Controls Turbulence and Turbulent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2012-11-01

    Physics of turbulence and turbulent transport has been developed on the central dogma that spatial gradients constitute the controlling parameters, such as Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. Recent experiments with the nonequilibrium plasmas in magnetic confinement devices, however, have shown that the turbulence and transport change much faster than global parameters, after an abrupt change of heating power. Here we propose a theory of turbulence in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, showing that the heating power directly influences the turbulence. New mechanism, that an external source couples with plasma fluctuations in phase space so as to affect turbulence, is investigated. A new thermodynamical force in phase-space, i.e., the derivative of heating power by plasma pressure, plays the role of new control parameter, in addition to spatial gradients. Following the change of turbulence, turbulent transport is modified accordingly. The condition under which this new effect can be observed is also evaluated.

  8. Magnetically controlled single-nanoparticle detection via particle-electrode collisions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Germano P; Melo, Antonio F A A; Crespilho, Frank N

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports the magnetic control of nanoparticle collisions on gold ultramicroelectrode surface. Magnetite nanoparticles with diameters of 10 nm and modified with Prussian blue (Fe3O4-NPs-PB) were directed by gravitational force on the electrode surface, and spikes in current-time transients were observed. By modulating a magnetic field parallel to the electrode surface, the number of nanoparticle collisions and the nanoparticle positions could be controlled. PMID:24647862

  9. Development of forced flow cooled current leads for fusion magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, R.; Fink, S.; Friesinger, G.; Kienzler, A.; Lingor, A.; Schleinkofer, G.; Süßer, M.; Ulbricht, A.; Wüchner, F.; Zahn, G.

    2001-03-01

    During the past 15 years, the Institut für Technische Physik of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, has developed current leads cooled by forced-flow supercritical helium in the current range from 20 to 80 kA. The design is based on a separation of the current carrying part and the heat exchanger part as well as the presence of the so-called superconductor inserts made of Nb 3Sn wires inside the conductor in the heat exchanger area which allows the operation of the current lead at minimum helium mass flow in a wide current range. The paper describes the design and construction of the current leads as well as operation results obtained during various tests performed in the coil test facility TOSKA at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe.

  10. Dynamic analysis of a magnetic bearing system with flux control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Josiah; Walsh, Thomas; Virgin, Lawrence

    1994-01-01

    Using measured values of two-dimensional forces in a magnetic actuator, equations of motion for an active magnetic bearing are presented. The presence of geometric coupling between coordinate directions causes the equations of motion to be nonlinear. Two methods are used to examine the unbalance response of the system: simulation by direct integration in time; and determination of approximate steady state solutions by harmonic balance. For relatively large values of the derivative control coefficient, the system behaves in an essentially linear manner, but for lower values of this parameter, or for higher values of the coupling coefficient, the response shows a split of amplitudes in the two principal directions. This bifurcation is sensitive to initial conditions. The harmonic balance solution shows that the separation of amplitudes actually corresponds to a change in stability of multiple coexisting solutions.

  11. Single-spin measurements for quantum computation using magnetic resonance force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, G. P.; Borgonovi, F.; Rinkevicius, Z.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2004-01-01

    The quantum theory of a singlespin measurements using a magnetic resonance force microscopy is presented. We use an oscillating cantilever-driven adiabatic reversals technique. The frequency shift of the cantilever vibrations is estimated. We show that the frequency shift causes the formation of the Schroedinger cat state for the cantilever. The interaction between the cantilever and the environment quickly destroys the coherence between the two cantilever trajectories. It is shown that using partial adiabatic reversals one can obtain a significant increase in the frequency shift. We discuss the possibility of sub-magneton spin density detection in molecules using magnetic resonance force microscopy.

  12. Simultaneous Single-Molecule Force and Fluorescence Sampling of DNA Nanostructure Conformations Using Magnetic Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Swoboda, Marko; Kauert, Dominik J; Grieb, M Svea; Hahn, Steffen; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Seidel, Ralf; Schlierf, Michael

    2016-01-13

    We present a hybrid single-molecule technique combining magnetic tweezers and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Through applying external forces to a paramagnetic sphere, we induce conformational changes in DNA nanostructures, which are detected in two output channels simultaneously. First, by tracking a magnetic bead with high spatial and temporal resolution, we observe overall DNA length changes along the force axis. Second, the measured FRET efficiency between two fluorescent probes monitors local conformational changes. The synchronized orthogonal readout in different observation channels will facilitate deciphering the complex mechanisms of biomolecular machines. PMID:26632021

  13. Effect of size on levitation force in a magnet/superconductor system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.J.; Hull, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    We consider a model system consisting of an infinitely long magnetic dipole line placed symmetrically above an infinitely long superconducting strip. Using the Meissner effect of superconductors, we derive analytical expressions of the levitation forces acting on the dipole line. At lowest-order approximation, we discuss the possible application of our model system to estimate the upper limit of the levitation forces in some magnetic bearing systems. In one example, the model correctly calculated the vertical vibration frequency of an experimental superconducting bearing.

  14. Effect of reciprocating motions around working points on levitation force of superconductor-magnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jimin; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Tao; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Cuiping

    2016-09-01

    In order to simulate vibration around working points in practical operation of superconducting levitation system, magnet in a simple superconductor-magnet system are conducted reciprocating motions around static height in this study. Two YBCO cylindrical samples with different grain orientations are used to investigate the effect of reciprocating motions of magnet on superconducting magnetic force. The c-axis of sample S1 is perpendicular to the top surface while sample S2 is parallel to the top surface. The initial cooling processes for the superconductors include zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and filed-cooled (FC). Compared to the levitation force before reciprocating motions, the ZFC levitation force at static height becomes smaller after reciprocating while the FC force presents opposite phenomenon. It is found that levitation force at static height tends to be stable after several times of reciprocating under ZFC and FC conditions and its time-decay phenomenon is suppressed in some extent, which is meaningful for the practical application of superconducting levitation system. Based on vortex dynamic, some physical discussions are presented to the experimental results.

  15. Characteristics and computer model simulation of magnetic damping forces in maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the magnetic damping force in electrodynamic suspension (EDS) maglev systems. The computer model simulations, which combine electrical system equations with mechanical motion equations on the basis of dynamic circuit theory, were conducted for a loop-shaped coil guideway. The intrinsic damping characteristics of the EDS-type guideway are investigated, and the negative damping phenomenon is confirmed by the computer simulations. The report also presents a simple circuit model to aid in understanding damping-force characteristics.

  16. Controller Design for EMA in TVC Incorporating Force Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinstock, Dale E.; Scott, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop control schemes and control design procedures for electromechanical actuators (EMA) in thrust vector control (TVC) applications. For a variety of reasons, there is a tendency within the aerospace community to use electromechanical actuators in applications where hydraulics have traditionally been employed. TVC of rocket engines is one such application. However, there is considerable research, development, and testing to be done before EMA will be accepted by the community at large for these types of applications. Besides the development of design procedures for the basic position controller, two major concerns are dealt with in this research by incorporating force feedback: 1) the effects of resonance on the performance of EMA-TVC-rocket-engine systems, and 2) the effects of engine start transients on EMA. This report only highlights the major contributions of this research.

  17. Air Force Satellite Control Network and SDI development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleier, T.

    The Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN) represents a military, worldwide network of control centers and remote tracking sites (RTS). A relatively large and growing constellation of DOD satellites is supported. The near term and long term plans for the AFSCN are discussed, taking into account also the impact of the Space Defense Initiative (SDI) on the AFSCN. It is pointed out that the SDI adds a new dimension to the support provided by the AFSCN to the DOD satellites, because some SDI scenarios being considered include many more satellite platforms, each containing multiple kinetic energy weapons. Space-ground link sites are discussed along with AFSCN control sites, and communication between RTS and control centers. Attention is given to changing roles and responsibilities, the Satellite Test Center (STC) as an excellent site for the R and D phase of SDI development, and an operational concept for a highly proliferated weapons platforms architecture, and goals of developing more survivable satellite systems.

  18. Diagonal control design for atomic force microscope piezoelectric tube nanopositioners.

    PubMed

    Bhikkaji, B; Yong, Y K; Mahmood, I A; Moheimani, S O R

    2013-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are used for generating surface topography of samples at micro to atomic resolutions. Many commercial AFMs use piezoelectric tube nanopositioners for scanning. Scanning rates of these microscopes are hampered by the presence of low frequency resonant modes. When inadvertently excited, these modes lead to high amplitude mechanical vibrations causing the loss of accuracy, while scanning, and eventually to break down of the tube. Feedback control has been used to damp these resonant modes. Thereby, enabling higher scanning rates. Here, a multivariable controller is designed to damp the first resonant mode along both the x and y axis. Exploiting the inherent symmetry in the piezoelectric tube, the multivariable control design problem is recast as independent single-input single-output (SISO) designs. This in conjunction with integral resonant control is used for damping the first resonant mode. PMID:23464216

  19. Ferrofluid Microwave Devices With Magnetically Controlled Impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Stefu, N.; Marin, C. N.; Malaescu, I.; Totoreanu, R.

    2010-08-01

    Ferrofluid filled transmission lines are microwave electronic devices. The complex dielectric permittivity and the complex magnetic permeability of a kerosene based ferrofluid with magnetite nanoparticles, in the frequency range (0.5-6) GHz were measured, for several values of polarising field, H. Afterwards, the input impedance of a short-circuited transmission line filled with this ferrofluid was computed using the equation Z = Zc tanh(γl). Here Zc and l are the characteristic impedance and the length of the coaxial line and γ is the propagation constant, depending on the dielectric and magnetic parameters of the material within the line. It is demonstrated how the impedance displays a frequency and polarizing field dependence, which has application in the design of magnetically controlled microwave devices.

  20. Electric contributions to magnetic force microscopy response from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lu Hua Chen, Ying

    2014-12-07

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) signals have recently been detected from whole pieces of mechanically exfoliated graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanosheets, and magnetism of the two nanomaterials was claimed based on these observations. However, non-magnetic interactions or artefacts are commonly associated with MFM signals, which make the interpretation of MFM signals not straightforward. A systematic investigation has been done to examine possible sources of the MFM signals from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets and whether the MFM signals can be correlated with magnetism. It is found that the MFM signals have significant non-magnetic contributions due to capacitive and electrostatic interactions between the nanosheets and conductive cantilever tip, as demonstrated by electric force microscopy and scanning Kevin probe microscopy analyses. In addition, the MFM signals of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets are not responsive to reversed magnetic field of the magnetic cantilever tip. Therefore, the observed MFM response is mainly from electric artefacts and not compelling enough to correlate with magnetism of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets.

  1. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by multi-control forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An unstiffened cylindrical model was used to study the control of sound transmission into aircraft cabins by the use of multi-control forces applied directly to the cylinder wall. External acoustic monopoles were located on each side of the cylinder to approximate the propeller noise source. This allowed the study of a dual control system utilizing multi-control forces in conjunction with synchrophasing of the twin acoustic monopole sources. For acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity, a spatially averaged noise reduction of approximately 30 dB was achieved using the active control system for both in-phase and out-of-phase monopoles; however, effective reduction of the sound field was dependent upon judiciously positioning the control forces for optimal control of the sound field.

  2. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  3. Optimizing the flux coupling between a nanoSQUID and a magnetic particle using atomic force microscope nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, M.; Jubert, P. O.; Fruchart, O.; Wernsdorfer, W.; Bouchiat, V.

    2009-06-01

    We present results of niobium based SQUID magnetometers for which the weak links are engineered by the local oxidation of thin films using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Firstly, we show that this technique allows the creation of variable thickness bridges with 10 nm lateral resolution. Precise control of the weak link milling is offered by the possibility to monitor, in real-time, the weak link conductance. Such a process is shown to enhance the magnetic field modulation and hence the sensitivity of the magnetometer. Secondly, AFM lithography is used to provide a precise alignment of nanoSQUID weak links with respect to a ferromagnetic iron dot. The magnetization switching of the near-field coupled particle is studied as a function of the applied magnetic field direction.

  4. Controlled levitation of a large magnet above superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Takamori, T.; Boland, J.J.; Dove, D.B. )

    1990-07-01

    The levitation of a permanent magnet over a type-II superconductor may be modified and controlled by the addition of a variable magnetic field to the magnet-superconductor system. Using this scheme, levitation of a magnet of significantly larger mass was established by the direct interaction of the additonal field with the levitating magnet.

  5. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; Deluca, Edward E.

    2015-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun’s corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such ‘failed torus’ events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  6. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E.

    2015-12-23

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has notmore » yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. In this paper, we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. Lastly, this magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.« less

  7. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions.

    PubMed

    Myers, Clayton E; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E

    2015-12-24

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events. PMID:26701052

  8. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E.

    2015-12-23

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. In this paper, we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. Lastly, this magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  9. Nanomachining by rubbing at ultrasonic frequency under controlled shear force.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Mikio

    2011-03-01

    This study proposes a new method of proximal-probe machining that uses a rubbing process by introducing concentrated-mass (CM) cantilevers. At the second resonance of the CM cantilever vibration, the tip site of the cantilever becomes a node of the standing deflection wave because of the sufficient inertia of the attached concentrated mass. The tip makes a cyclic motion that is tangential to the sample surface, not vertical to it, as in a tapping motion. This lateral tip motion that is selectively excited by CM cantilevers was effective for the material modification of a sample due to the friction between the tip and the sample. Imaging and nanomachining under controlled shear force were demonstrated by means of the modified cantilever and a normal atomic force microscope. We were able to write a micron-sized letter "Z" having a line width of 30-100 nm on a resin surface. PMID:21449337

  10. Magnetic Control of Rigid Achiral Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U.; Meshkati, Farshad; Fu, Henry; Kim, Minjun

    2013-11-01

    We report control of rigid achiral microswimmers in low Reynolds number environments. A rotating magnetic field was used to actuate the microswimmers wirelessly by rotating the microswimmers, which produces propulsion. Previous magnetically actuated microswimmers in bulk fluids have been designed with either flexibility or chiral geometry; we show that simpler geometries with neither flexibility nor chirality can produce propulsion. The microswimmer consists of three magnetic beads conjugated using avidin-biotin linkages into an arc formation. We designed a magnetic field generator consisting of electromagnetic coils arranged in an approximate Helmholtz configuration. A highspeed camera provided realtime imaging of the microswimmers' motion in a PDMS chamber. The rigidity of the microswimmer was characterized by tracking the position of the individual beads and calculating their relative distances. As a function of field strength and rotation frequency, we observed changes in the rotational axis of the microswimmers and the corresponding effects on their velocities. The achiral microswimmers exhibited active propulsion and were controllable in both speed and direction, which demonstrates the possibility for future biomedical applications such as drug delivery.

  11. Using Strong Magnetic Fields to Control Solutal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    force counteracts terrestrial gravity. The general objective is to test the hypothesis of convective control using a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient and to understand the nature of the various forces that come into play. Specifically we aim to delineate causative factors and to quantify them through experiments, analysis and numerical modeling. The paper will report on the experimental results using paramagnetic salts and solutions in magnetic fields and compare them to analytical predictions.

  12. Design considerations of electromagnetic force in a direct drive permanent magnet brushless motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. S.; Tsai, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a numerical study of electromagnetic force associated with the width of stator teeth, width of rotor back iron, and slot opening for a ten-pole nine-slot direct drive permanent magnet brushless motor is presented. The study calculates the amplitude of the electromagnetic force on the rotating rotor by using the finite-element method. The results show that the amplitude of electromagnetic force, which may cause the noise and vibration of motors, changes with the variation of these above mentioned three factors. The relationship between the considerations of output torque and the minimization of noise and vibration is also established in this paper.

  13. Self-magnetized effects in relativistic cold plasmas due to ponderomotive forces: application to relativistic magnetic guiding of light.

    PubMed

    Lehner, T; di Menza, L

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear equations are derived relevant to describe the propagation of powerful electromagnetic fields launched within a plasma. The nonlinear generation of self-induced collective electromagnetic perturbations are obtained with matter lying in the relativistic regime. Our main result is the self-consistent treatment of the coupled equations between the pump and its self-induced fields. In particular, a mechanism is pointed out for self-generation of quasistatic magnetic field that is due to the relativistic ponderomotive force. This process is found to be more efficient to produce quasistatic magnetic fields, as confirmed by recent experiments, as compared to known effects such as the inverse Faraday effect. As an application, we investigate conditions for relativistic magnetic guiding of light to occur under the combined action of the self-induced density and magnetic field. PMID:11800797

  14. A magnetic bearing control approach using flux feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1989-01-01

    A magnetic bearing control approach using flux feedback is described and test results for a laboratory model magnetic bearing actuator are presented. Test results were obtained using a magnetic bearing test fixture, which is also described. The magnetic bearing actuator consists of elements similar to those used in a laboratory test model Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD).

  15. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  16. Magnetic force microscopy: General principles and application to longitudinal recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, D.; Mamin, H. J.; Guethner, P.; Lambert, S. E.; Stern, J. E.; McFadyen, I.; Yogi, T.

    1990-08-01

    This paper discusses the principles of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and its application to magnetic recording studies. We use the ac detection method which senses the force gradient acting on a small magnetic tip due to fields emanating from the domain structure in the sample. Tip fabrication procedures are described for two types of magnetic tips: etched tungsten wires with a sputter-deposited magnetic coating and etched nickel wires. The etched nickel wires are shown to have an apex radius on the order of 30 nm and a taper half-angle of approximately 3°. Lorentz-mode transmission electron microscopy of the nickel tips reveals that the final 20 μm is essentially single domain with magnetization approximately parallel with the tip axis. Images of written bit transitions are presented for several types of magnetic media, including CoPtCr, CoSm, and CoCr thin films, as well as γ-Fe2O3 particulate media. In general, the written magnetization patterns are seen with high contrast and with resolution better than 100 nm. A number of magnetic recording applications are discussed, including the investigation of overwrite behavior and the writing characteristics in CoSm media at high data density. Computer calculations were performed to simulate the MFM response to written magnetic transitions. By including the extended geometry of the tip, the nonparallel orientation of the cantilever, and the finite width of the magnetic transitions, good agreement with experiment was obtained. The model calculations correctly predict the experimentally observed change in image contrast that occurs as a function of tip orientation. Computer calculations showing the dependence of resolution on tip geometry are also presented.

  17. A rehabilitation robot with force-position hybrid fuzzy controller: hybrid fuzzy control of rehabilitation robot.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ming-Shaung; Lin, Chou-Ching K; Lin, Dong-Huang; Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Chen, Shu-Min

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to design a robot system for assisting in the rehabilitation of patients with neuromuscular disorders by performing various facilitation movements. The robot should be able to guide patient's wrist to move along planned linear or circular trajectories. A hybrid position/force controller incorporating fuzzy logic was developed to constrain the movement in the desired direction and to maintain a constant force along the moving direction. The controller was stable in the application range of movements and forces. Offline analyses of data were used to quantitatively assess the progress of rehabilitation. The results show that the robot could guide the upper limbs of subjects in linear and circular movements under predefined external force levels and apply a desired force along the tangential direction of the movements. PMID:16200758

  18. Magnetic field regulation control system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Badelt, Steven W.

    1996-05-01

    This study comprises (1) an analytical characterization of the Cameca ion microscope`s magnetic field regulation circuitry and (2) comparisons between the analytical predictions and the measured performance of the control system. It is the first step in a project to achieve routine field regulation better than 10ppm. The control loop was decomposed into functional subcircuits and simulated in SPICE to determine DC, AC, and transient response. Transfer functions were extracted from SPICE, simplified, and analyzed in MATLAB. Both SPICE and MATLAB simulations were calculated for step inputs, and these results were compared to actual measurements. Magnetic field fluctuations were measured at high mass resolving power. The frequency spectrum of the fluctuations was analyzed by FFT. Difficulties encountered and implications for future work are discussed.

  19. Self-sensing piezoresistive cantilever and its magnetic force microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ando, Kazunori; Shirakawabe, Yoshiharu

    2002-05-01

    A newly developed Si self-sensing piezoresistive cantilever is presented. Si piezoresistive cantilevers for scanning microscopy are fabricated by Si micro-machining technique. The sensitivity of the piezoresistive cantilever is comparable to the current laser detecting system. Topographic images are successfully obtained with the piezoresistive cantilever and some comparisons are made with the laser detecting system. Furthermore, the magnetic film (Co-Cr-Pt) is coated on the tip of the piezoresistive cantilever for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) application. The magnetic images are successfully obtained with the self-sensing MFM piezoresistive cantilever. The self-sensing piezoresistive cantilevers have been successfully applied in scanning probe microscopy and MFM. PMID:12211485

  20. Force control of a tri-layer conducting polymer actuator using optimized fuzzy logic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itik, Mehmet; Sabetghadam, Mohammadreza; Alici, Gursel

    2014-12-01

    Conducting polymers actuators (CPAs) are potential candidates for replacing conventional actuators in various fields, such as robotics and biomedical engineering, due to their advantageous properties, which includes their low cost, light weight, low actuation voltage and biocompatibility. As these actuators are very suitable for use in micro-nano manipulation and in injection devices in which the magnitude of the force applied to the target is of crucial importance, the force generated by CPAs needs to be accurately controlled. In this paper, a fuzzy logic (FL) controller with a Mamdani inference system is designed to control the blocking force of a trilayer CPA with polypyrrole electrodes, which operates in air. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) method is employed to optimize the controller’s membership function parameters and therefore enhance the performance of the FL controller. An adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system model, which can capture the nonlinear dynamics of the actuator, is utilized in the optimization process. The optimized Mamdani FL controller is then implemented on the CPA experimentally, and its performance is compared with a non-optimized fuzzy controller as well as with those obtained from a conventional PID controller. The results presented indicate that the blocking force at the tip of the CPA can be effectively controlled by the optimized FL controller, which shows excellent transient and steady state characteristics but increases the control voltage compared to the non-optimized fuzzy controllers.

  1. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-15

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries (δB/B∼10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4}) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas (β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error

  2. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-01

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries ( δB /B ˜10-3 to 10-4 ) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas ( β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error fields at low

  3. Control of fracture reduction robot using force/torque measurement.

    PubMed

    Douke, T; Nakajima, Y; Mori, Y; Onogi, S; Sugita, N; Mitsuishi, M; Bessho, M; Ohhashi, S; Tobita, K; Ohnishi, I; Sakuma, I; Dohi, T; Maeda, Y; Koyama, T; Sugano, N; Yonenobu, K; Matsumoto, Y; Nakamura, K

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a surgical robotic system for femoral fracture reduction employing indirect traction. Indirect traction in fracture reduction is a generally used surgical method for preventing complications such as bone splits caused by high stress on bones. For traction, a patient's foot is gripped by a jig and pulled to the distal side. Indirect traction has the advantage of distributing bone stress by utilizing a strong traction force; however, this procedure does not accurately control the proper positioning of fractured fragments when a surgical robot is used. The human leg has knee and an ankle joints, and thus robotic motion presents problems in not being able to directly propagate reduction motion to a fractured femoral fragment, rendering control of bone position difficult. We propose a control method for fracture reduction robots using external force/torque measurements of the human leg to achieve precise fracture reduction. Results showed that the proposed method reduced repositioning error from 6.8 mm and 15.9 degrees to 0.7 mm and 5.3 degrees, respectively. PMID:19163404

  4. Control of Thermal Convection in Layered Fluids Using Magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2003-01-01

    Immiscible fluid layers are found in a host of applications ranging from materials processing, for example the use of encapsulants in float zone crystal growth technique and a buffer layer in industrial Czochralski growth of crystals to prevent Marangoni convection, to heat transfer phenomena in day-to-day processes like the presence of air pockets in heat exchangers. In the microgravity and space processing realm, the exploration of other planets requires the development of enabling technologies in several fronts. The reduction in the gravity level poses unique challenges for fluid handling and heat transfer applications. The present work investigates the efficacy of controlling thermal convective flow using magnetic fluids and magnetic fields. The setup is a two-layer immiscible liquids system with one of the fluids being a diluted ferrofluid (super paramagnetic nano particles dispersed in carrier fluid). Using an external magnetic field one can essentially dial in a volumetric force - gravity level, on the magnetic fluid and thereby affect the system thermo-fluid behavior. The paper will describe the experimental and numerical modeling approach to the problem and discuss results obtained to date.

  5. Stability improvement of AC superconducting magnet by forced-convection cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ishigohka, T.; Kasuya, A.; Ninomiya, A.

    1996-07-01

    The authors propose a new improved cooling system of an AC(50/60Hz) superconducting magnet introducing a forced-convection flow of liquid helium. In this system, the flow through the cooling channel between the winding layers is generated by a screw rotating in a cylinder surrounding the magnet. A small experimental device composed of an AC superconducting magnet and a rotating screw was manufactured. The screw was rotated by an extended driving shaft. The experimental result shows that the stability of the magnet is improved by the rotation of the screw. That is, the thermal disturbance (heater input power) which generates the quench of the magnet increases as the rotational speed of the screw does. It is expected that this technique can be successfully applied to superconducting AC power apparatuses as transformers or reactors.

  6. GENERATION OF SEED MAGNETIC FIELD AROUND FIRST STARS: EFFECTS OF RADIATION FORCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Masashi; Doi, Kentaro; Susa, Hajime E-mail: mn921009@center.konan-u.ac.j

    2010-06-20

    We investigate seed magnetic field generation in the early universe by the radiation force of first stars. In a previous study with the steady assumption, large amplitudes ({approx}10{sup -15} G for first stars, {approx}10{sup -11} G for QSOs) are predicted. In this study, we formulate this issue in an unsteady framework. Then, we consider a specific model of magnetic field generation around a very massive first star. Consequently, we (1) find that the steady assumption is not valid in realistic situations and (2) obtain a much smaller magnetic field strength than that predicted by Langer et al. In addition, we find that the momentum transfer process during photoionization is more important than Thomson scattering. The resultant magnetic flux density around the first star is {approx_lt}10{sup -19} G. This seed magnetic field will not affect subsequent star formation in the neighborhood of first stars.

  7. Generation of Seed Magnetic Field Around First Stars: Effects of Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masashi; Doi, Kentaro; Susa, Hajime

    2010-06-01

    We investigate seed magnetic field generation in the early universe by the radiation force of first stars. In a previous study with the steady assumption, large amplitudes (~10-15 G for first stars, ~10-11 G for QSOs) are predicted. In this study, we formulate this issue in an unsteady framework. Then, we consider a specific model of magnetic field generation around a very massive first star. Consequently, we (1) find that the steady assumption is not valid in realistic situations and (2) obtain a much smaller magnetic field strength than that predicted by Langer et al. In addition, we find that the momentum transfer process during photoionization is more important than Thomson scattering. The resultant magnetic flux density around the first star is lsim10-19 G. This seed magnetic field will not affect subsequent star formation in the neighborhood of first stars.

  8. Magnetic levitation force and penetration depth in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.H.; Miller, J.H. Jr.; Ting, C.S. )

    1995-01-01

    The superconducting levitation force [ital F] acting on a magnet placed above a type-II superconductor in both Meissner and mixed states is calculated as a function of temperature, based upon the London model. A simple relationship between the levitation force and the London penetration depth [lambda] is found. In particular, in the limit of [ital a]/[lambda][much gt]1, where [ital a] is the separation between the magnet and the superconductor, [ital F] varies linearly with [lambda], regardless of the shape of the magnet. The temperature dependences of [lambda] and [ital F] are examined for various superconducting pairing states, including [ital s]-wave, [ital d]-wave, and [ital s]+[ital id] states. It is found that, at low temperatures, both [lambda] and [ital F] show an exponential temperature dependence for [ital s]-wave, linear-[ital T] for [ital d]-wave, and [ital T][sup 2] dependence in a wide low-temperature range for the [ital s]+[ital id] state with a dominant [ital d]-wave component. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is proposed to accurately measure the temperature-dependent levitation force. It is shown that the microscopic size of the MFM tip enables one to obtain the intrinsic temperature-dependent penetration depth of a single grain, in spite of the overall quality of the superconducting sample.

  9. Meta-Stable Magnetic Domain States That Prevent Reliable Absolute Palaeointensity Experiments Revealed By Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, L. V.; Fabian, K.; Bakelaar, I. A.; Dekkers, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the absolute palaeointensity of the Earth's magnetic field is notoriously difficult. Many methods to obtain paleointensities from suitable records such as lavas and archeological artifacts involve heating the samples. These heating steps are believed to induce 'magnetic alteration' - a process that is still poorly understood but prevents obtaining correct paleointensity estimates. To observe this magnetic alteration directly we imaged the magnetic domain state of titanomagnetite particles - a common carrier of the magnetic remanence in samples used for paleointensity studies. We selected samples from the 1971-flow of Mt. Etna from a site that systematically yields underestimates of the known intensity of the paleofield - in spite of rigorous testing by various groups. Magnetic Force Microscope images were taken before and after a heating step typically used in absolute palaeointensity experiments. Before heating, the samples feature distinct, blocky domains that sometimes seem to resemble a classical magnetite domain structure. After imparting a partial thermo-remanent magnetization at a temperature often critical to paleointensity experiments (250 °C) the domain state of the same titanomagnetite grains changes into curvier, wavy domains. Furthermore, these structures appeared to be unstable over time: after one-year storage in a magnetic field-free environment the domain states evolved into a viscous remanent magnetization state. Our observations may qualitatively explain reported underestimates from technically successful paleointensity experiments for this site and other sites reported previously. Furthermore the occurrence of intriguing observations such as 'the drawer storage effect' by Shaar et al (EPSL, 2011), and viscous magnetizations observed by Muxworthy and Williams (JGR, 2006) may be (partially) explained by our observations. The major implications of our study for all palaeointensity methods involving heating may be

  10. Spin Hall Control of Magnetization in a Perpendicularly-Magnetized Magnetic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Chi-Feng; Quindeau, Andy; Tang, Astera; Onbasli, Mehmet; Mann, Maxwell; Caretta, Lucas; Ross, Caroline; Beach, Geoffrey

    Spin Hall effect (SHE)-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) has been shown to be an efficient mechanism to control the magnetization in magnetic heterostructures. Although numerous works have demonstrated the efficacy of SOT in manipulating the magnetization of ferromagnetic metals (FM), SOT-controlled switching of ferromagnetic insulators (FMIs) has not yet been observed. In this work we show that spin Hall currents in Pt and Ta can generate SOTs strong enough to control the magnetization direction in an adjacent thulium iron garnet FMI film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We find that dc current in the heavy metal (HM) generates an out-of-plane effective field in the FMI consistent with an antidamping torque whose magnitude is comparable to that observed in all-metallic systems. Spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) measurements reveal a large spin-mixing conductance, which implies considerable spin transparency at the metal/insulator interface and explains the observed strong current-induced torque. Our results show that charge currents flowing in a HM can be used to both control and detect the magnetization direction in a FMI electrically.

  11. Radiation pressure excitation of Low Temperature Atomic Force & Magnetic Force Microscope (LT-AFM/MFM) for Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karci, Ozgur; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet; NanoMagnetics Instruments Ltd. Team; Middle East Tech Univ Team

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel method for excitation of Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilevers by means of radiation pressure for imaging in an AFM for the first time. Piezo excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, but it may cause spurious resonance peaks. A fiber optic interferometer with 1310 nm laser was used both to measure the deflection of cantilever and apply a force to the cantilever in a LT-AFM/MFM from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever`s resonance frequency by a digital Phase Lock Loop (PLL). The force exerted by the radiation pressure on a perfectly reflecting surface by a laser beam of power P is F = 2P/c. We typically modulate the laser beam by ~ 800 μW and obtain 10nm oscillation amplitude with Q ~ 8,000 at 2.5x10-4 mbar. The cantilever's stiffness can be accurately calibrated by using the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging a hard disk sample between 4-300K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO single crystal at 4K to for the first time.

  12. Position Sensorless Vector Control for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors Based on Maximum Torque Control Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Hajime; Tomigashi, Yoshio; Kishimoto, Keiji

    High efficiency drive can be achieved by the maximum torque-per-ampere (MTPA) control which used reluctance torque effectively. However, the calculations for estimating rotor position and for controlling the d-axis current are required. The motor parameters of inductance etc. that are easily affected by magnetic saturation are included in those calculations. This paper proposes a new MTPA control method, which is robust against changes of motor parameters caused by magnetic saturation. In addition, complex calculation for d-axis current or reference to the table is not necessary. In this method, we define a novel coordinate frame, which has one axis aligned with the current vector of the MTPA control, and estimate the frame directly. Because the parameter Lqm for estimating the frame is less affected by the magnetic saturation than the conventional Lq, the effect of magnetic saturation on the position estimation can be greatly suppressed. First, an extended electromotive force model based on the proposed frame and a parameter Lqm for an estimation of the frame are derived. Next, the effectiveness of this proposed method is confirmed by simulations and experiments.

  13. Time-delay control of a magnetic levitated linear positioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, J. H.; Juang, K. Y.; Lin, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy linear positioning system with a linear force actuator and magnetic levitation is proposed. By locating a permanently magnetized rod inside a current-carrying solenoid, the axial force is achieved by the boundary effect of magnet poles and utilized to power the linear motion, while the force for levitation is governed by Ampere's Law supplied with the same solenoid. With the levitation in a radial direction, there is hardly any friction between the rod and the solenoid. The high speed motion can hence be achieved. Besides, the axial force acting on the rod is a smooth function of rod position, so the system can provide nanometer resolution linear positioning to the molecule size. Since the force-position relation is highly nonlinear, and the mathematical model is derived according to some assumptions, such as the equivalent solenoid of the permanently magnetized rod, so there exists unknown dynamics in practical application. Thus 'robustness' is an important issue in controller design. Meanwhile the load effect reacts directly on the servo system without transmission elements, so the capability of 'disturbance rejection; is also required. With the above consideration, a time-delay control scheme is chosen and applied. By comparing the input-output relation and the mathematical model, the time-delay controller calculates an estimation of unmodeled dynamics and disturbances and then composes the desired compensation into the system. Effectiveness of the linear positioning system and control scheme are illustrated with simulation results.

  14. Paramagnetic and ferromagnetic resonance imaging with a tip-on-cantilever magnetic resonance force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, K.; Botkin, D.; Yannoni, C. S.; Rugar, D.

    1998-05-01

    A magnetic resonance force microscope with a "tip-on-cantilever" configuration was used to compare imaging characteristics of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic samples. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real-space magnetization image to be successfully reconstructed. In contrast to the EPR case, ferromagnetic resonance imaging of a micron-scale yttrium iron garnet sample showed no significant line broadening despite the strong field gradient (˜10 G/μm). Two-dimensional force maps revealed spatial dependence of magnetostatic and magnetoelastic modes.

  15. Comparison of Paramagnetic and Ferromagnetic Resonance Imaging with an Improved Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, K.; Botkin, D.; Yannoni, C. S.; Rugar, D.

    1998-03-01

    A magnetic resonance force microscope with an improved ``tip-on-cantilever'' configuration was used to compare imaging characteristics of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic samples. Three-dimensional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real-space magnetization image to be successfully reconstructed. In contrast to the EPR case, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) imaging of a micron-scale yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sample showed no significant line broadening despite the strong field gradient ( ~ 10 G/μm). Two-dimensional force maps revealed spatial dependence of magnetostatic and magnetoelastic modes.

  16. A time delay controller for magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youcef-Toumi, K.; Reddy, S.

    1991-01-01

    The control of systems with unknown dynamics and unpredictable disturbances has raised some challenging problems. This is particularly important when high system performance needs to be guaranteed at all times. Recently, the Time Delay Control has been suggested as an alternative control scheme. The proposed control system does not require an explicit plant model nor does it depend on the estimation of specific plant parameters. Rather, it combines adaptation with past observations to directly estimate the effect of the plant dynamics. A control law is formulated for a class of dynamic systems and a sufficient condition is presented for control systems stability. The derivation is based on the bounded input-bounded output stability approach using L sub infinity function norms. The control scheme is implemented on a five degrees of freedom high speed and high precision magnetic bearing. The control performance is evaluated using step responses, frequency responses, and disturbance rejection properties. The experimental data show an excellent control performance despite the system complexity.

  17. Using Magnetic Forces to Probe the Gravi-response of Swimming Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Paramecium Caudatum, a single celled ciliate, alters its swimming behavior when subjected to different gravity environments (e.g. centrifugation and micro-gravity). To dissect the mechanisms behind this gravi-response and that of other biological systems, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means of creating a rapidly tunable, simulated variable gravity environment. Since biological materials are weakly diamagnetic, we must subject them to intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields with characteristic field-field gradient products on the order of 16 T^2/cm. We will describe experiments on Paramecium Caudatum in which we adjust their net buoyancy with magnetic forces and measure the resulting changes in their swimming behavior.

  18. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Jun; Valentine, Megan T.

    2012-05-15

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to {approx}4.5 {mu}m paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as {approx}1 kPa.

  19. A 6 degree-of-freedom Lorentz force vibration isolator with nonlinear controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenn, Ralph; Johnson, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    This program demonstrated the technical feasibility of constructing large-stroke magnetic suspensions that can meet the active vibration isolation requirements of Space Station. These requirements include: (1) strokes over 1 cm in all directions, (2) actuator bandwidths over 100 Hz, (3) isolator roll-off frequencies below 10(exp -2) Hertz, and (4) force capability over 1 Newton in all axes. The 100 Hz actuator bandwidth allows the suspension to reject any direct force disturbances that act on the microgravity experiment, for example forces created by cable connections. The low isolator roll-off frequency and large stroke allow the magnetic suspension to isolate the microgravity experiment from Space Station vibrations above the roll-off frequency. The capability to meet these requirements was demonstrated by designing, constructing and testing a six-degree-of-freedom, prototype magnetic suspension system that featured high-performance, Lorentz-force actuators and full multi-input, multi-output control. This prototype suspension is designed to isolate large orbiter locker experiments under typical spacecraft constraints of size, weight, and power. Suspension in the full six-degrees-of-freedom was successfully demonstrated in this program while using a gravity-force unload mechanism to simulate a space environment. The prototype isolator is capable of space-based isolation service with relatively minor modification. The use of advanced, nonlinear control algorithms were investigated on a specially designed single-degree-of-freedom testbed. This low acceleration test facility simulates the Space Station vibration isolation problem in a single horizontal axis with low-friction, air-slide support. This allowed testing at the desired microgravity levels, without the gravity bias effects that are seen in a full six-degrees-of-freedom suspension. Precision components were used to reduce residual accelerations to microgravity levels so that the effects of sensor, actuator

  20. ON THE FORCE-FREE NATURE OF PHOTOSPHERIC SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS AS OBSERVED FROM HINODE (SOT/SP)

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic field is force-free if there is no interaction between it and the plasma in the surrounding atmosphere, i.e., electric currents are aligned with the magnetic field, giving rise to zero Lorentz force. The computation of various magnetic parameters, such as magnetic energy (using the virial theorem), gradient of twist of sunspot magnetic fields (computed from the force-free parameter {alpha}), and any kind of extrapolation, heavily hinges on the force-free approximation of the photospheric sunspot magnetic fields. Thus, it is of vital importance to inspect the force-free behavior of sunspot magnetic fields. The force-free nature of sunspot magnetic fields has been examined earlier by some researchers, ending with incoherent results. Accurate photospheric vector field measurements with high spatial resolution are required to inspect the force-free nature of sunspots. For this purpose, we use several vector magnetograms of high spatial resolution obtained from the Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro-Polarimeter on board Hinode. Both the necessary and sufficient conditions for force-free nature are examined by checking the global and local nature of equilibrium magnetic forces over sunspots. We find that sunspot magnetic fields are not very far from the force-free configuration, although they are not completely force-free on the photosphere. The umbral and inner penumbral fields are more force-free than the middle and outer penumbral fields. During their evolution, sunspot magnetic fields are found to maintain their proximity to force-free field behavior. Although a dependence of net Lorentz force components is seen on the evolutionary stages of the sunspots, we do not find a systematic relationship between the nature of sunspot magnetic fields and the associated flare activity. Further, we examine whether the fields at the photosphere follow linear or nonlinear force-free conditions. After examining this in various complex and simple sunspots, we conclude that