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Sample records for magnetic gellan gum

  1. Effect of environmental factors and carbohydrate on gellan gum production.

    PubMed

    Kanari, Basundhara; Banik, Ratindra Ram; Upadhyay, Siddha Nath

    2002-01-01

    Submerged culture fermentation studies were carried out in batch mode for optimizing the environmental parameters and carbon source requirement by Pseudomonas elodea for the production of gellan gum. The maximum production of gellan gum was obtained with 16-h-old culture and 8% inoculum at 30 degrees C and pH 7.0 after 52 h of incubation (6.0 g/L). Of the various carbon sources tested, 2% sucrose, glucose, and soluble starch yielded considerably high amounts of gellan. Studies on the concentration of various carbohydrates on gellan gum production indicated that the optimum concentration of glucose and starch was 3%, whereas for sucrose it was 4%. The addition of glucose in the medium above 3% had a detrimental effect on gellan yield. The investigation of intermediate two-step addition of glucose under identical conditions of fermentation showed an enhanced production of gellan (8.12 g/L) as compared with the control (6.0 g/L). To optimize the recovery of gellan from fermented broth, different solvents were tested for precipitation of gellan gum. Among the various solvents tested, tetrahydrofuran gave better recovery of gellan (82%) as compared with the conventional solvent isopropanol (49%). PMID:12396117

  2. In vitro and in vivo ocular safety and eye surface permanence determination by direct and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of ion-sensitive hydrogels based on gellan gum and kappa-carrageenan.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; González Barcia, Miguel; Gil-Martínez, María; Vieites-Prado, Alba; Lema, Isabel; Argibay, Barbara; Blanco Méndez, José; Lamas, Maria Jesus; Otero-Espinar, Francisco Javier

    2015-08-01

    Gellan gum, kappa-carrageenan and alginates are natural polysaccharides able to interact with different cations that can be used to elaborate ion-activated in situ gelling systems for different uses. The interaction between fluid solutions of these polysaccharides and cations presents into the tear made these biopolymers very interesting to elaborate ophthalmic drug delivery systems. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of mixtures of these polymers to obtain ion-activated ophthalmic in situ gelling systems with optimal properties for ocular use. To achieve this purpose different proportion of the biopolymers were analyzed using a mixture experimental design evaluating their transparency, mechanical properties and bioadhesion in the absence and presence of simulated tear fluid. Tear induces a rapid sol-to-gel phase transition in the mixtures forming a consistent hydrogel. The solution composed by 80% of gellan gum and 20% kappa-carrageenan showed the best mechanical and mucoadhesive properties. This mixture was evaluated for rheological behavior, microstructure, cytotoxicity, acute corneal irritancy, ex-vivo and in vivo ocular toxicity and in vivo corneal contact time using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) techniques. Result indicates that the system is safe at ophthalmic level and produces an extensive ocular permanence higher than 6h. PMID:26079831

  3. Optimization of culture medium compositions for gellan gum production by a halobacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Ya-chen; Fan, Lin-lin; Jiao, Zhi-hua; Chen, Qi-he

    2015-01-22

    The effect of culture medium compositions on gellan gum production produced by fermentation with a halobacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis QHZJUJW CGMCC2428 was studied. In this work, a fractional factorial design was applied to investigate the main factors that affected gellan gum production by S. paucimobilis QHZJUJW CGMCC2428. Sucrose was the best carbon source for gellan gum and peptone displayed better inducing effect. Central composite design and response surface methodology were adopted to derive a statistical model for optimizing submerged culture medium composition. These experimental results showed that the optimum culture medium for producing gellan gum was composed of 40.00 (w/v) sucrose, 3.00% peptone (w/v), MgSO4 (w/v), 9.20% KH2PO4 (w/v), 7.50% Na2HPO4 (w/v), 4.30% K2SO4 (w/v), pH 6.8-7.0. The maximal gellan gum was 19.89±0.68 g/L, which was agreed closely with the predicated value (20.12 g/L). After incubated for 72 h under the optimized culture medium in 5-L bioreactor, the gellan gum fermentation reached about 19.90±0.68 g/L, which was higher than that in the initial cultivation medium. PMID:25439950

  4. Multi-modality gellan gum-based tissue-mimicking phantom with targeted mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Roland K.; Shih, A. J.

    2013-08-01

    This study develops a new class of gellan gum-based tissue-mimicking phantom material and a model to predict and control the elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity by adjusting the mass fractions of gellan gum, propylene glycol, and sodium chloride, respectively. One of the advantages of gellan gum is its gelling efficiency allowing highly regulable mechanical properties (elastic modulus, toughness, etc). An experiment was performed on 16 gellan gum-based tissue-mimicking phantoms and a regression model was fit to quantitatively predict three material properties (elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity) based on the phantom material's composition. Based on these material properties and the regression model developed, tissue-mimicking phantoms of porcine spinal cord and liver were formulated. These gellan gum tissue-mimicking phantoms have the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties approximately equivalent to those of the spinal cord and the liver.

  5. Gellan gum-graft-polyaniline-An electrical conducting biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Karthika, J S; Vishalakshi, B; Naik, Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Grafting of polyaniline (PANI) on to gellan gum (GG) was carried out in the presence of catalytic amount of ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) as oxidant/initiator under mild acidic conditions by microwave irradiation technique. The grafting condition was optimized by varying the microwave power, exposure time and the composition of the reaction mixture. The graft copolymer GG-g-PANI was characterized by FTIR, TGA, UV/vis, (1)H NMR and SEM techniques. The characteristic peaks at 1506, 1462, 1070 and 830cm(-1) in the IR spectrum and signals at 7.3, 7.2, 7.1 and 4.0 ? in the (1)H NMR spectrum confirms the grafting process. The TGA data reveals GG-g-PANI to be thermally less stable than GG. The optimum grafting was observed when the reaction mixture containing 0.066mmol APS, 0.1M aniline, 1M hydrochloric acid and 0.1g/dL GG was exposed to 80W microwave power for 40s. The DC and AC conductivity of the GG-g-PANI were measured using the 'Two-point probe' method based on which the dielectric properties were evaluated. GG-g-PANI exhibited appreciable electrical conductivity, which increased with the extent of grafting. The results indicate threefold increase in DC conductivity of graft copolymer as compared to GG. PMID:26526174

  6. Development of mucoadhesive sprayable gellan gum fluid gels.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Mohammed H; Conway, Barbara R; Smith, Alan M

    2015-07-01

    The nasal mucosa provides a potentially good route for local and systemic drug delivery. However, the protective feature of the nasal cavity make intranasal delivery challenging. The application of mucoadhesive polymers in nasal drug delivery systems enhances the retention of the dosage form in the nasal cavity. Several groups have investigated using low acyl gellan as a drug delivery vehicle but only limited research however, has been performed on high acyl gellan for this purpose, despite its properties being more conducive to mucoadhesion. High acyl gellan produces highly elastic gels below 60°C which make it difficult to spray using a mechanical spray device. Therefore, in this study we have tried to address this problem by making fluid gels by introducing a shear force during gelation of the gellan polymer. These fluid gel systems contain gelled micro-particles suspended in a solution of un-gelled polymer. These systems can therefore behave as pourable viscoelastic fluids. In this study we have investigated the rheological behavior and mucoadhesion of fluid gels of two different types of gellan (high and low acyl) and fluid gels prepared from blends of high and low acyl gellan at a 50:50 ratio. The results demonstrated that by preparing fluid gels of high acyl gellan, the rheological properties were sufficient to spray through a standard nasal spray device. Moreover fluid gels also significantly enhance both high acyl and low acyl gellan mucoadhesion properties. PMID:25863119

  7. Biological evaluation of intervertebral disc cells in different formulations of gellan gum-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Khang, G; Lee, S K; Kim, H N; Silva-Correia, J; Gomes, M E; Viegas, C A A; Dias, I R; Oliveira, J M; Reis, R L

    2015-03-01

    Gellan gum (GG)-based hydrogels are advantageous in tissue engineering not only due to their ability to retain large quantities of water and provide a similar environment to that of natural extracellular matrix (ECM), but also because they can gelify in situ in seconds. Their mechanical properties can be fine-tuned to mimic natural tissues such as the nucleus pulposus (NP). This study produced different formulations of GG hydrogels by mixing varying amounts of methacrylated (GG-MA) and high-acyl gellan gums (HA-GG) for applications as acellular and cellular NP substitutes. The hydrogels were physicochemically characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis. Degradation and swelling abilities were assessed by soaking in a phosphate buffered saline solution for up to 170 h. Results showed that as HA-GG content increased, the modulus of the hydrogels decreased. Moreover, increases in HA-GG content induced greater weight loss in the GG-MA/HA-GG formulation compared to GG-MA hydrogel. Potential cytotoxicity of the hydrogel was assessed by culturing rabbit NP cells up to 7 days. An MTS assay was performed by seeding rabbit NP cells onto the surface of 3D hydrogel disc formulations. Viability of rabbit NP cells encapsulated within the different hydrogel formulations was also evaluated by Calcein-AM and ATP assays. Results showed that tunable GG-MA/HA-GG hydrogels were non-cytotoxic and supported viability of rabbit NP cells. PMID:23225767

  8. Rheological and mechanical properties of acellular and cell-laden methacrylated gellan gum hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Silva-Correia, Joana; Gloria, Antonio; Oliveira, Mariana B; Mano, João F; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Ambrosio, Luigi; Reis, Rui L

    2013-12-01

    Tissue engineered hydrogels hold great potential as nucleus pulposus substitutes (NP), as they promote intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration and re-establish its original function. But, the key to their success in future clinical applications greatly depends on its ability to replicate the native 3D micro-environment and circumvent their limitation in terms of mechanical performance. In the present study, we investigated the rheological/mechanical properties of both ionic- (iGG-MA) and photo-crosslinked methacrylated gellan gum (phGG-MA) hydrogels. Steady shear analysis, injectability and confined compression stress-relaxation tests were carried out. The injectability of the reactive solutions employed for the preparation of iGG-MA and phGG-MA hydrogels was first studied, then the zero-strain compressive modulus and permeability of the acellular hydrogels were evaluated. In addition, human intervertebral disc (hIVD) cells encapsulated in both iGG-MA and phGG-MA hydrogels were cultured in vitro, and its mechanical properties also investigated under dynamic mechanical analysis at 37°C and pH 7.4. After 21 days of culturing, hIVD cells were alive (Calcein AM) and the E' of ionic-crosslinked hydrogels and photo-crosslinked was higher than that observed for acellular hydrogels. Our study suggests that methacrylated gellan gum hydrogels present promising mechanical and biological performance as hIVD cells were producing extracellular matrix. PMID:23568694

  9. Preparation of polymer gel dosimeters based on less toxic monomers and gellan gum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, A.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, N.; Ohta, A.; Seito, H.; Yamabayashi, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Taguchi, M.; Tamada, M.; Kojima, T.

    2013-10-01

    New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), triethylene glycol monoethyl ether monomethacrylate (TGMEMA), polyethylene glycol 400 dimethacrylate (9G), tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride as an antioxidant, and gellan gum as a gel matrix were prepared. They were optically analyzed by measuring absorbance to evaluate a dose response. The absorbance of the polymer gel dosimeters that were exposed to 60Co ?-rays increased with increasing dose. The dosimeters comprising HEMA and 9G showed a linear increase in absorbance in the dose range from 0 to 10 Gy. The dose response depended on the 9G concentration. For others comprising HEMA, 9G and TGMEMA, the absorbance of the polymer gel dosimeters drastically increased above a certain dose, and then leveled off up to 10 Gy. The optical variations in these polymer gel dosimeters were also induced by x-irradiation from Cyberknife radiotherapy equipment. Furthermore, the exposed region of the latter polymer gel dosimeter exhibited a thermo-responsive behavior.

  10. 3D printing of layered brain-like structures using peptide modified gellan gum substrates.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Stevens, Leo; Thompson, Brianna C; Gilmore, Kerry J; Gorkin, Robert; Stewart, Elise M; in het Panhuis, Marc; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-10-01

    The brain is an enormously complex organ structured into various regions of layered tissue. Researchers have attempted to study the brain by modeling the architecture using two dimensional (2D) in vitro cell culturing methods. While those platforms attempt to mimic the in vivo environment, they do not truly resemble the three dimensional (3D) microstructure of neuronal tissues. Development of an accurate in vitro model of the brain remains a significant obstacle to our understanding of the functioning of the brain at the tissue or organ level. To address these obstacles, we demonstrate a new method to bioprint 3D brain-like structures consisting of discrete layers of primary neural cells encapsulated in hydrogels. Brain-like structures were constructed using a bio-ink consisting of a novel peptide-modified biopolymer, gellan gum-RGD (RGD-GG), combined with primary cortical neurons. The ink was optimized for a modified reactive printing process and developed for use in traditional cell culturing facilities without the need for extensive bioprinting equipment. Furthermore the peptide modification of the gellan gum hydrogel was found to have a profound positive effect on primary cell proliferation and network formation. The neural cell viability combined with the support of neural network formation demonstrated the cell supportive nature of the matrix. The facile ability to form discrete cell-containing layers validates the application of this novel printing technique to form complex, layered and viable 3D cell structures. These brain-like structures offer the opportunity to reproduce more accurate 3D in vitro microstructures with applications ranging from cell behavior studies to improving our understanding of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26231917

  11. Artocarpus heterophyllus L. seed starch-blended gellan gum mucoadhesive beads of metformin HCl.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2014-04-01

    Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam., family: Moraceae) seed starch (JFSS)-gellan gum (GG) mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl were developed through ionotropic gelation technique. The effect of GG to JFSS ratio and CaCl2 concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release at 10h (R10h, %) was optimized and analyzed using response surface methodology based on 3(2) factorial design. The optimized JFSS-GG beads containing metformin HCl showed DEE of 92.67±4.46%, R10h of 61.30±2.37%, and mean diameter of 1.67±0.27 mm. The optimized beads showed pH-dependent swelling and mucoadhesivity with the goat intestinal mucosa. The in vitro drug release from all these JFSS-GG beads containing metformin HCl was followed zero-order pattern (R(2)=0.9907-0.9975) with super case-II transport mechanism over a period of 10 h. The beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR. The optimized JFSS-GG beads containing metformin HCl exhibited significant hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration. PMID:24447799

  12. Gastroretentive extended release of metformin from methacrylamide-g-gellan and tamarind seed gum composite matrix.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, Rosy; Nandi, Gouranga; Changder, Abhijit; Chowdhury, Sailee; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Ghosh, Lakshmi Kanta

    2016-02-10

    Formulation of a gastroretentive extended release tablet of metformin based on polymethacrylamide-g-gellan (Pmaa-g-GG)-tamarind seed gum (TSG) composite matrix is the main purpose of this study. Tablets were prepared employing wet granulation method taking amount of Pmaa-g-GG, TSG and NaHCO3 (SBC, buoyancy contributor) as independent formulation variables. The tablets were then evaluated for in vitro drug release, buoyancy, ex vivo mucoadhesion, swelling and surface morphology. Compatibility between drug and excipients was checked by DSC, FTIR and XRD analysis. Buoyancy-lag-time, mucoadhesive strength, % drug release and release-rate constant were statistically analyzed using Design-Expert software (version 9.0.4.1) and the formulation was then numerically optimized to obtain USP-reference release profile. The optimized formulation showed excellent buoyancy over a 10h period with buoyancy lag time of 2.76min, significant mucoadhesion and drug release over a period of 10h with f2=71.58. Kinetic modeling unveiled anomalous non-Fickian transport based drug release mechanism. PMID:26686110

  13. Strain-rate and temperature dependent material properties of Agar and Gellan Gum used in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Schiavi, Alessandro; Cuccaro, Rugiada; Troia, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Agar and Gellan Gum are biocompatible polymers extensively used in several fields of tissue engineering research (e.g. tissue replacement, tissue support, tissue mimicking), due to their mechanical behaviour effectively representative of actual biological tissues. Since mechanical properties of artificial tissues are related to biocompatibility and functionality of medical implants and significantly influence adhesion, growth and differentiation of cells in tissue-engineering scaffolds, an accurate characterization of Young?s modulus and relaxation time processes is needed. In this study, the strain-rate and temperature dependent material properties of Agarose and one among the numerous kind of Gellan Gum commercially available, known as Phytagel(®), have been investigated. Nine hydrogel samples have been realized with different mechanical properties: the first one Agar-based as a reference material, the further eight samples Gellan Gum based in which the effect of dispersed solid particles like kieselguhr and SiC, as enhancing mechanical properties factors, have been investigated as a function of concentration. Stress-strain has been investigated in compression and relaxation time has been evaluated by means of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts time decay function. Mechanical properties have been measured as a function of temperature between 20°C and 35°C and at different strain rates, from ~10(-3)s(-1) and ~10(-2)s(-1) (or deformation rate from ~0.01mms(-1) to ~0.1mms(-1)). From experimental data, the combined temperature and strain-rate dependence of hydrogels Young?s modulus is determined on the basis of a constitutive model. In addition to a dependence of Young?s modulus on temperature, a remarkable influence of strain-rate has been observed, especially in the sample containing solid particles; in same ranges of temperature and strain-rate, also relaxation time variations have been monitored in order to identify a possible dependence of damping properties on temperature and strain-rate. The result is the impossibility to determine univocally mechanical properties of studied biomaterials without a proper definition of boundary conditions at which they have been obtained. PMID:26318572

  14. Optimization of a chromatographic stationary phase based on gellan gum using central composite design.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, A I C; Rocha, L A; Dias, J M L; Passarinha, L A; Sousa, A

    2014-04-15

    To develop a new stationary phase of easy production, low cost, biocompatible, biodegradable and low unspecific adsorption, a three-dimensional network was prepared by combining the natural polysaccharide of gellan with divalent cations. The stability of this cation exchange chromatographic matrix was optimized by using an experimental design tool. The optimal conditions proposed for the gellan gel formulation were 48mM ZnSO4, 0% DMF, 25°C, 0.75% gellan and 0.5h. The applicability of gellan matrix was tested by chromatographic assays with three model proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA), ?-chymotripsin and lysozyme). The results showed that the retention occurred in function of the net charge of each protein in MES buffer pH 6.2 and the elution was performed by increase of ionic strength to 750mM NaCl in MES buffer pH 6.2. Lysozyme was the more retained protein due to its positive charge more effective than ?-chymotripsin, while BSA did not interact with the matrix due to its negative charge at these conditions. Dynamic binding capacity assays were accomplished to characterize this matrix and to compare with commercial resins. The values of dynamic binding capacity from gellan gel were 3.9mg/mL and 17.4mg/mL, at 10% and 50% of breakthrough, respectively. In this way, gellan gel might be a promising chromatographic matrix to explore ionic interactions and to be applied in different purification strategies, getting the best benefit from its use at low cost. PMID:24657410

  15. A novel in situ gel base of deacetylase gellan gum for sustained ophthalmic drug delivery of ketotifen: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lina; Ao, Junping; Li, Peiling

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an ion-activated ketotifen ophthalmic delivery system was developed by using a natural polysaccharide, deacetylase gellan gum. Its rheological characteristics, stability, in vitro gelation, release in vitro, and pharmacodynamic activity in vivo were investigated. The formulation had an optimum viscosity that will allow easy drop as a liquid, which then underwent a rapid sol–gel transition due to ionic interaction. There were negligible alterations in the initial values of viscosity of the formulations over a storage period of 180 days. The in vitro release profiles indicated that the release of ketotifen from in situ gels exhibited a sustained feature. Scintigraphic studies indicated that deacetylase gellan gum could increase the residence time of the formulation. At the same dose, in situ gels demonstrated a typical sustained and prolonged drug-effects behavior compared with the common drops. PMID:26251573

  16. Injectable gellan gum-based nanoparticles-loaded system for the local delivery of vancomycin in osteomyelitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Posadowska, Urszula; Brzychczy-Wloch, Monika; Pamula, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Infection spreading in the skeletal system leading to osteomyelitis can be prevented by the prolonged administration of antibiotics in high doses. However systemic antibiotherapy, besides its inconvenience and often low efficacy, provokes numerous side effects. Thus, we formulated a new injectable nanoparticle-loaded system for the local delivery of vancomycin (Vanc) applied in a minimally-invasive way. Vanc was encapsulated in poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (NPs) by double-emulsification. The size (258 ± 11 nm), polydispersity index (0.240 ± 0.003) and surface potential (-25.9 ± 0.2 mV) of NPs were determined by dynamic light scattering and capillary electrophoresis measurements. They have a spherical morphology and a smooth topography as observed using atomic force microscopy. Vanc loading and encapsulation efficiencies were 8.8 ± 0.1 and 55.2 ± 0.5 %, respectively, based on fluorescence spectroscopy assays. In order to ensure injectability, NPs were suspended in gellan gum and cross-linked with Ca(2+); also a portion of dissolved antibiotic was added to the system. The resulting system was found to be injectable (extrusion force 11.3 ± 1.1 N), reassembled its structure after breaking as shown by rheology tests and ensured required burst release followed by sustained Vanc delivery. The system was cytocompatible with osteoblast-like MG-63 cells (no significant impact on cells' viability was detected). Growth of Staphylococcus spp. reference strains and also those isolated from osteomyelitic joints was inhibited in contact with the injectable system. As a result we obtained a biocompatible system displaying ease of application (low extrusion force), self-healing ability after disruption, adjustable drug release and antimicrobial properties. PMID:26621310

  17. Gellan gum-hyaluronic acid spongy-like hydrogels and cells from adipose tissue synergize promoting neoskin vascularization.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; da Silva, Lucília Pereira; Santos, Tírcia Carlos; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Correlo, Vítor Manuel; Reis, Rui Luís; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2014-11-26

    Currently available substitutes for skin wound healing often result in the formation of nonfunctional neotissue. Thus, urgent care is still needed to promote an effective and complete regeneration. To meet this need, we proposed the assembling of a construct that takes advantage of cell-adhesive gellan gum-hyaluronic acid (GG-HA) spongy-like hydrogels and a powerful cell-machinery obtained from adipose tissue, human adipose stem cells (hASCs), and microvascular endothelial cells (hAMECs). In addition to a cell-adhesive character, GG-HA spongy-like hydrogels overpass limitations of traditional hydrogels, such as reduced physical stability and limited manipulation, due to improved microstructural arrangement characterized by pore wall thickening and increased mean pore size. The proposed constructs combining cellular mediators of the healing process within the spongy-like hydrogels that intend to recapitulate skin matrix aim to promote neoskin vascularization. Stable and off-the-shelf dried GG-HA polymeric networks, rapidly rehydrated at the time of cell seeding then depicting features of both sponges and hydrogels, enabled the natural cell entrapment/encapsulation and attachment supported by cell-polymer interactions. Upon transplantation into mice full-thickness excisional wounds, GG-HA spongy-like hydrogels absorbed the early inflammatory cell infiltrate and led to the formation of a dense granulation tissue. Consequently, spongy-like hydrogel degradation was observed, and progressive wound closure, re-epithelialization, and matrix remodelling was improved in relation to the control condition. More importantly, GG-HA spongy-like hydrogels promoted a superior neovascularization, which was enhanced in the presence of human hAMECs, also found in the formed neovessels. These observations highlight the successful integration of a valuable matrix and prevascularization cues to target angiogenesis/neovascularization in skin full-thickness excisional wounds. PMID:25361388

  18. Free radical grafting of gallic acid (GA) on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCS) and evaluation of antioxidant reinforced gellan gum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado, P.; Fraschini, C.; Salmieri, S.; Becher, D.; Safrany, A.; Lacroix, M.

    2016-01-01

    Antiradical properties were introduced on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by redox pair (RP) initiator and ?-radiation treatments. Different procedures were tested on CNC, first a 2 h reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/ascorbic acid (AA) was performed on CNC solution. ?-Radiation treatment at 20 kGy dose was then applied and immediately after GA was reacted during 24 h with the pretreated CNCs, giving CNC-H2O2-AA-?-GA. The formation of new carboxylic acids and carbonyl groups were characterized by FT-IR at 1650 and 1730 cm-1 respectively. Carboxylic acid functionalities were also analyzed by conductometric titration where an increase from 49 to 134 mmol COOH kg-1 was found from native to irradiated CNCs. A similar increase in the carboxylic acid content (132 mmol kg-1) was observed for CNC-H2O2-AA-?-GA, showing the highest radical scavenging properties (8 mM Trolox eq/mg CNC). Thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the structural changes onto CNC. Film packaging containing 20% of CNC-H2O2-AA-?-GA was then added to a gellan-based film packaging. A significant improvement (p<0.05) of the tensile strength (TS), the tensile modulus (TM) and the elongation at break (EB) and water vapor permeability reduction was observed when CNC-H2O2-AA-?-GA was added to the film packaging formulation.

  19. Biochemical characterization of the beta-1,4-glucuronosyltransferase GelK in the gellan gum-producing strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis A.T.C.C. 31461.

    PubMed Central

    Videira, P; Fialho, A; Geremia, R A; Breton, C; Sá-Correia, I

    2001-01-01

    Biosynthesis of bacterial polysaccharide-repeat units proceeds by sequential transfer of sugars, from the appropriate sugar donor to an activated lipid carrier, by committed glycosyltransferases (GTs). Few studies on the mechanism of action for this type of GT are available. Sphingomonas paucimobilis A.T.C.C. 31461 produces the industrially important polysaccharide gellan gum. We have cloned the gelK gene from S. paucimobilis A.T.C.C. 31461. GelK belongs to family 1 of the GT classification [Campbell, Davies, Bulone, Henrissat (1997) Biochem. J. 326, 929-939]. Sequence similarity studies suggest that GelK consists of two protein modules corresponding to the -NH(2) and -CO(2)H halves, the latter possibly harbouring the GT activity. The gelK gene and the open reading frames coding for the -NH(2) (GelK(NH2)) and -CO(2)H (GelK(COOH)) halves were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. GelK and GelK(NH2) were present in both the soluble and membrane fractions of E. coli, whereas GelK(COOH) was only present in the soluble fraction. GelK catalysed the transfer of [(14)C]glucuronic acid from UDP-[(14)C]glucuronic acid into a glycolipid extracted from S. paucimobilis or E. coli, even in the presence of EDTA, and the radioactive sugar was released from the glycolipid by beta-1,4-glucuronidase. GelK was not able to use synthetic glucosyl derivatives as acceptors, indicating that the PP(i)-lipid moiety is needed for enzymic activity. Recombinant GelK(NH2) and GelK(COOH) did not show detectable activity. Based on the biochemical characteristics of GelK and on sequence similarities with N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, we propose that GT families 1 and 28 form a superfamily. PMID:11513745

  20. Gellan gum-based mucoadhesive microspheres of almotriptan for nasal administration: Formulation optimization using factorial design, characterization, and in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaheer; Marihal, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Almotriptan malate (ALM), indicated for the treatment of migraine in adults is not a drug candidate feasible to be administered through the oral route during the attack due to its associated symptoms such as nausea and vomiting. This obviates an alternative dosage form and nasal drug delivery is a good substitute to oral and parenteral administration. Materials and Methods: Gellan gum (GG) microspheres of ALM, for intranasal administration were prepared by water-in-oil emulsification cross-linking technique employing a 23 factorial design. Drug to polymer ratio, calcium chloride concentration and cross-linking time were selected as independent variables, while particle size and in vitro mucoadhesion of the microspheres were investigated as dependent variables. Regression analysis was performed to identify the best formulation conditions. The microspheres were evaluated for characteristics such as practical percentage yield, particle size, percentage incorporation efficiency, swellability, zeta potential, in vitro mucoadhesion, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction study, and in vitro drug diffusion studies. Results: The shape and surface characteristics of the microspheres were determined by scanning electron microscopy, which revealed spherical nature and nearly smooth surface with drug incorporation efficiency in the range of 71.65 ± 1.09% – 91.65 ± 1.13%. In vitro mucoadhesion was observed the range of 79.45 ± 1.69% – 95.48 ± 1.27%. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results indicated a molecular level dispersion of drug in the microspheres. In vitro drug diffusion was Higuchi matrix controlled and the release mechanism was found to be non-Fickian. Stability studies indicated that there were no significant deviations in the drug content, in vitro mucoadhesion and in vitro drug diffusion characteristics. Conclusion: The investigation revealed promising potential of GG microspheres for delivering ALM intranasally for the treatment of migraine. PMID:25400410

  1. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States...: http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. (e) The additive is used or intended... glucuronic acid, and two molecules of glucose. The glucuronic acid is neutralized to a mixed...

  2. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the... containing one molecule of rhamnose and glucuronic acid, and two molecules of glucose. The glucuronic acid...

  3. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the... containing one molecule of rhamnose and glucuronic acid, and two molecules of glucose. The glucuronic acid...

  4. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the... containing one molecule of rhamnose and glucuronic acid, and two molecules of glucose. The glucuronic acid...

  5. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the... containing one molecule of rhamnose and glucuronic acid, and two molecules of glucose. The glucuronic acid...

  6. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...the above solution is drawn into a wide bore pipet and transferred into a solution of 10-percent calcium chloride. A tough worm-like gel will form instantly. (ii) To the 1-percent distilled water solution prepared for identification test...

  7. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...the above solution is drawn into a wide bore pipet and transferred into a solution of 10-percent calcium chloride. A tough worm-like gel will form instantly. (ii) To the 1-percent distilled water solution prepared for identification test...

  8. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...the above solution is drawn into a wide bore pipet and transferred into a solution of 10-percent calcium chloride. A tough worm-like gel will form instantly. (ii) To the 1-percent distilled water solution prepared for identification test...

  9. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...neutralized to a mixed potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium salt...solution of 10-percent calcium chloride. A tough worm-like gel will...identification test (i), 0.50 gram of sodium chloride is added. The solution is...

  10. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...neutralized to a mixed potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium salt...solution of 10-percent calcium chloride. A tough worm-like gel will...identification test (i), 0.50 gram of sodium chloride is added. The solution is...

  11. Magnetorheology of xanthan-gum-coated soft magnetic carbonyl iron microspheres and their polishing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Seung Hyuk; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Lee, Jung Won; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Cho, Myeong Woo

    2013-06-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are colloidal suspensions of soft magnetic particles dispersed in a non-magnetic liquid. Among their applications, MR polishing has attracted considerable attention owing to its smart control of the polishing characteristics for dedicated microelectromechanical system applications. To improve the polishing characteristics of MR fluids, we fabricated carbonyl iron (CI) microspheres coated with xanthan gum (XG) by using a solvent casting method. The morphologies and densities of both pure CI and CI/XG particles were characterized using a scanning electron microscope and a pycnometer, respectively. In addition, the rheological characteristics of the MR fluids under various applied magnetic field strengths were examined using a rotational rheometer. The MR polishing characteristics were conducted using an MR polishing machine to examine the surface roughness and the material removal by MR polishing with added nano-ceria slurry abrasives.

  12. Magnetic Parkia pendula seed gum as matrix for Concanavalin A lectin immobilization and its application in affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Rêgo, Moacyr J B M; Almeida, Sinara M; Bezerra, Sérgio A; Carvalho Júnior, Luiz B; Beltrão, Eduardo I C

    2014-09-01

    The present work aimed to magnetize Parkia pendula seeds gum and use it as a matrix for Concanavalin A covalent immobilization. This composite was applied in affinity purification of glycoconjugates. Parkia pendula seeds were hydrated and the gum provenient from the supernatant was precipitated and washed with ethanol and dried. The gum was magnetized in co-precipitation using solutions of Fe+2 and Fe+3. Matrix activation was accomplished with NaIO4. Magnetized Parkia pendula seeds gum with covalently immobilized Concanavalin A was used as an affinity matrix for the recognition of bovine serum fetuin glycoprotein. Fetuin elution was carried out with a solution of glucose (300mM) and evaluated through SDS-PAGE. The efficiency of lectin immobilization and fetuin purification were 63% and 14%, respectively. These results indicate that the composite produced is a promising magnetic polysaccharide matrix for lectins immobilization. Thus, such system can be applied for affinity purification allowing an easy recovery by magnetic field. PMID:25140501

  13. Nicotine Gum

    MedlinePLUS

    Nicotine chewing gum is used to help people stop smoking cigarettes. Nicotine chewing gum should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine gum is in a class of medications called ...

  14. Spontaneous synthesis of gold nanoparticles on gum arabic-modified iron oxide nanoparticles as a magnetically recoverable nanocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst was fabricated by spontaneous green synthesis of Au nanoparticles on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A layer of Au nanoparticles with thickness of about 2?nm was deposited on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles, because gum arabic acted as a reducing agent and a stabilizing agent simultaneously. The resultant magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst exhibited good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride. The rate constants evaluated in terms of pseudo-first-order kinetic model increased with increase in the amount of Au nanocatalyst or decrease in the initial concentration of 4-nitrophenol. The kinetic data suggested that this catalytic reaction was diffusion-controlled, owing to the presence of gum arabic layer. In addition, this nanocatalyst exhibited good stability. Its activity had no significant decrease after five recycles. This work is useful for the development and application of magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst on the basis of green chemistry principles. PMID:22713480

  15. Spontaneous synthesis of gold nanoparticles on gum arabic-modified iron oxide nanoparticles as a magnetically recoverable nanocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chien-Chen; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2012-06-01

    A novel magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst was fabricated by spontaneous green synthesis of Au nanoparticles on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A layer of Au nanoparticles with thickness of about 2 nm was deposited on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles, because gum arabic acted as a reducing agent and a stabilizing agent simultaneously. The resultant magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst exhibited good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride. The rate constants evaluated in terms of pseudo-first-order kinetic model increased with increase in the amount of Au nanocatalyst or decrease in the initial concentration of 4-nitrophenol. The kinetic data suggested that this catalytic reaction was diffusion-controlled, owing to the presence of gum arabic layer. In addition, this nanocatalyst exhibited good stability. Its activity had no significant decrease after five recycles. This work is useful for the development and application of magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst on the basis of green chemistry principles.

  16. Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease. It ranges from simple gum inflammation, called gingivitis, to serious damage to the tissue and bone ... the worst cases, you can lose teeth. In gingivitis, the gums become red and swollen. They can ...

  17. Gum biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    A painkiller is sprayed into the mouth in the area of the abnormal gum tissue. You may also have ... The painkiller put in your mouth should numb the area during the procedure. You may feel some tugging or ...

  18. A novel gellan gel-based microcarrier for anchorage-dependent cell delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunming; Gong, Yihong; Lin, Yongming; Shen, Jiangbo; Wang, Dong-An

    2008-09-01

    Competent vehicles are highly sought after as a means to transplant cells for tissue regeneration. In this study, novel hydrogel-based microspherical cell carriers are designed and developed with an FDA-approved natural polysaccharide, gellan gum. The bulk fabrication of these microspheres is performed via a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion process followed by a series of redox (oxidation-reduction) crosslinking treatments; this enables the microspherical dimensions to be precisely manipulated in terms of injectability, and simultaneously ensures the structural stability. To acquire adhesion affinity with anchorage-dependent cells (ADCs), a covalent coating of gelatin is further applied on the microspherical surfaces. The final product is constructed as a variety of gelatin-grafted-gellan microspherical cell carriers, abbreviated as "TriG" microcarriers. The cell-loading tests are conducted, respectively, with human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and human fetal osteoblasts (hFOBs). Morphological observation from optical microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy indicates that the HDFs spread well and populate rapidly on surfaces of TriG microcarriers. Immunofluorescent staining reveals the activation of focal adhesion and subsequent organization of F-actin from the attached cell surfaces, which suggests the TriG microspherical substrate is favorable to ADC adhesion and therefore capable of promoting HDF proliferation to achieve confluence by turning over three times within 10 days. The hFOBs are also cultivated on the TriG carriers, where ideal viability and clear potentials for osteogenesis are demonstrated by fluorescent "Live/Dead" screening and specific histobiochemical indications. All these findings suggest that the TriG microcarriers are suitable to provide open platforms for therapeutic ADC proliferation and differentiation. PMID:18434266

  19. Oscillatory and steady shear rheology of gellan/dextran blends.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nurul Hawa; Ahmed, Jasim; Hashim, Dzulkifly M; Manap, Yazid Abdul; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2015-05-01

    Oscillatory and steady shear rheology of gellan (G) and dextran (D) solution individually, and in blends (G/D ratio 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 w/v) with a total hydrocolloid concentration of 3 % (w/v) were studied at 25 °C. Individually, 1.5 % dextran and 1.5 % gellan in solution exhibited Newtonian and non-Newtonian behavior, respectively. A blend of equal proportion of dextran and gellan (G/D?=?1:1) exhibits a distinct gel point (G' = G?), and further addition of dextran in the blend (G/D?=?1:2 and 1:3) resulted predominating liquid-like (G? > G') behavior. A plot of G' vs G? distinctly showed the gradual transition of the blend. Shear stress (?)-shear rate ([Formula: see text]) data fitted well the Herschel-Bulkley model. The G/D blend exhibited shear thinning behavior with flow behavior index less than unity. The Cox-Merz rule did not fit well for the complex shear viscosity (?*) and apparent viscosity (?) of the blend. PMID:25892789

  20. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... forms of gum disease are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis and Periodontitis In gingivitis, the gums become red, swollen and can bleed easily. Gingivitis can usually be reversed with daily brushing and ...

  1. Gum Disease in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find a Periodontist Gum Disease In Children Chronic gingivitis. aggressive periodontitis and generalized aggressive periodontitis are types ... children. Types of periodontal diseases in children Chronic gingivitis is common in children. It usually causes gum ...

  2. Gum Disease and Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With Member ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With Find ...

  3. Gum Disease Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With Member ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With Find ...

  4. Gum Graft Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With Member ... Augmentation Ridge Modification Periodontal Pocket Reduction Procedures Periodontal Plastic Surgery Procedures Love the Gums You're With Find ...

  5. What Happens to Swallowed Gum?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chew a lot of sugary gum. But the human digestive tract can't digest the gum resin. It's moved through the digestive tract by the normal pushing (peristaltic) actions of the gut. The gum's journey ends during ...

  6. A novel gellan-PVA nanofibrous scaffold for skin tissue regeneration: Fabrication and characterization.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Priya; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha; Pruthi, Parul A; Singh, Rajesh P; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-01-20

    In this investigation, we have introduced novel electrospun gellan based nanofibers as a hydrophilic scaffolding material for skin tissue regeneration. These nanofibers were fabricated using a blend mixture of gellan with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). PVA reduced the repulsive force of resulting solution and lead to formation of uniform fibers with improved nanostructure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) confirmed the average diameter of nanofibers down to 50nm. The infrared spectra (IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis evaluated the crosslinking, thermal stability and highly crystalline nature of gellan-PVA nanofibers, respectively. Furthermore, the cell culture studies using human dermal fibroblast (3T3L1) cells established that these gellan based nanofibrous scaffold could induce improved cell adhesion and enhanced cell growth than conventionally proposed gellan based hydrogels and dry films. Importantly, the nanofibrous scaffold are biodegradable and could be potentially used as a temporary substrate/or biomedical graft to induce skin tissue regeneration. PMID:26572421

  7. Modification of palm kernel oil esters nanoemulsions with hydrocolloid gum for enhanced topical delivery of ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Norazlinaliza; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Mohd BA; Abdullah, Dzulkefly K; Basri, Hamidon

    2012-01-01

    Introduction During recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of nanoemulsion as a drug-carrier system for topical delivery. A nanoemulsion is a transparent mixture of oil, surfactant and water with a very low viscosity, usually the product of its high water content. The present study investigated the modification of nanoemulsions with different hydrocolloid gums, to enhanced drug delivery of ibuprofen. The in vitro characterization of the initial and modified nanoemulsions was also studied. Methods A palm kernel oil esters nanoemulsion was modified with different hydrocolloid gums for the topical delivery of ibuprofen. Three different hydrocolloids (gellan gum, xanthan gum, and carrageenan) were selected for use. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed using palm kernel oil esters as the oil, Tween 80 as the surfactant, and water. Nanoemulsions were prepared by phase inversion composition, and were gradually mixed with the freshly prepared hydrocolloids. The initial nanoemulsion and modified nanoemulsions were characterized. The abilities of the nanoemulsions to deliver ibuprofen were assessed in vitro, using a Franz diffusion cell fitted with rat skin. Results No significant changes were observed in droplet size (~16–20 nm) but a significant difference in polydispersity indexes were observed before and after the modification of nanoemulsions using gellan gum, carrageenan, and xanthan gum. The zeta potentials of the initial nanoemulsions (?11.0 mV) increased to ?19.6 mV, ?13.9 mV, and ?41.9 mV, respectively. The abilities of both the initial nanoemulsion (T802) and the modified nanoemulsion to deliver ibuprofen through the skin were evaluated in vitro, using Franz diffusion cells fitted with rat skin. The in vitro permeation data showed that the modified nanoemulsion (Kp value of 55.4 × 10?3 cm · h?1) increased the permeability of ibuprofen 4.40 times over T802 (Kp value of 12.6 × 10?3 cm · h?1) (P < 0.05). Conclusion The modified nanoemulsion may be a promising vehicle to enhance the permeation of ibuprofen for topical delivery. PMID:22973096

  8. Gum Disease and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... feel tender. Menstruation Occasionally, some women experience menstruation gingivitis. Women with this condition may experience bleeding gums, ... sores on the inside of the cheek. Menstruation gingivitis typically occurs right before a woman's period and ...

  9. Tips for Removing Gum without Cutting Hair

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a jar of creamy style peanut butter or vegetable oil, such as olive oil. Cover the gum completely ... to work. Remove the gum from the hair. Vegetable oil is especially useful when removing gum from eyebrows ...

  10. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as..., methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil, tragacanth, and xanthan gum. Esophageal obstruction...

  11. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as..., methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil, tragacanth, and xanthan gum. Esophageal obstruction...

  12. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as..., methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil, tragacanth, and xanthan gum. Esophageal obstruction...

  13. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as..., methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil, tragacanth, and xanthan gum. Esophageal obstruction...

  14. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as... gum, kelp, methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil tragacanth, and xanthan gum) as..., methylcellulose, plantago seed (psyllium), polycarbophil, tragacanth, and xanthan gum. Esophageal obstruction...

  15. Enzymatically-treated guar gums

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.H.; Srivastava, V.K.

    1987-07-28

    A method is described of recovering oil from an oil bearing formation by fracturing the step of inserting into the formation, at high pressure, an aqueous composition comprising guar gum in water. The guar gum is first coated and impregnated, while in the solid particulate state, with an aqueous solution of a hydrolytic enzyme.

  16. [Smoking cessation using nicotine gum].

    PubMed

    Schioldborg, P

    1990-04-10

    Smoking cessation in matched groups with (n = 54) versus without (n = 63) nicotine gum took place in order to test the gum with regard to abstinence rate and experienced value. In all, 71% quit smoking, 23% reduced consumption to half, while in 6% there was no change. The frequency was approximately even in the two groups. One month later, 79% of the quitters in the nicotine gum group still remained abstinent, compared with 54% in the control group (p less than 0.05). Six months later these frequencies were reduced to 34% and 20% respectively. Side effects were reported among one third of the users (aching of the jaw, sore throat), while two thirds found the gum useful. These persons found it hard to be without the gum, and that it reduced the craving for tobacco. In other words, it renders smoking cessation more certain. PMID:2333643

  17. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333 Gum ghatti. (a) Gum ghatti (Indian gum)...

  18. Microwave assisted synthesis of acrylamide grafted locust bean gum and its application in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kaity, Santanu; Isaac, Jinu; Kumar, P Mahesh; Bose, Anirbandeep; Wong, Tin Wui; Ghosh, Animesh

    2013-10-15

    Acrylamide grafted copolymer of locust bean gum was prepared by microwave irradiation using ceric ammonium nitrate as redox initiator. The grafting process was optimized in terms of irradiation time, amount of initiator and acrylamide by using constant amount of native locust bean gum. The grafted gum was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction study (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), elemental analysis, contact angle, viscosity, molecular weight, swelling and biodegradability studies. The grafted gum was found to be biodegradable and non-toxic. It was further used to prepare controlled-release matrix tablet of buflomedil hydrochloride. The in vitro release profile of the tablet showed the rate controlling property of acrylamide grafted locust bean gum was similar to that of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC-K15M). PMID:23987450

  19. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Preservatives § 582.3336 Gum guaiac. (a) Product. Gum guaiac. (b) Tolerance. 0.1 percent (equivalent antioxidant activity 0.01 percent). (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally...

  20. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Preservatives § 582.3336 Gum guaiac. (a) Product. Gum guaiac. (b) Tolerance. 0.1 percent (equivalent antioxidant activity 0.01 percent). (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally...

  1. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Preservatives § 582.3336 Gum guaiac. (a) Product. Gum guaiac. (b) Tolerance. 0.1 percent (equivalent antioxidant activity 0.01 percent). (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Preservatives § 582.3336 Gum guaiac. (a) Product. Gum guaiac. (b) Tolerance. 0.1 percent (equivalent antioxidant activity 0.01 percent). (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally...

  3. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Preservatives § 582.3336 Gum guaiac. (a) Product. Gum guaiac. (b) Tolerance. 0.1 percent (equivalent antioxidant activity 0.01 percent). (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This substance is generally...

  4. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with...

  5. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with...

  6. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with...

  7. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with...

  8. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with...

  9. Mind Your Mouth: Preventing Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and mild type of gum disease is called gingivitis. The gums become red and swollen, and they ... cleanings by dental professionals can usually clear up gingivitis. If gingivitis is not treated, it can become ...

  10. 21 CFR 573.1010 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.1010 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be safely used in animal feed as follows: (a) The food additive is xanthan gum as defined in § 172.695 of this chapter and meets all of...

  11. 21 CFR 573.1010 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.1010 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be safely used in animal feed as follows: (a) The food additive is xanthan gum as defined in § 172.695 of this chapter and meets all of...

  12. Alginate beads of Captopril using galactomannan containing Senna tora gum, guar gum and locust bean gum.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Harshal A; Lalitha, K G; Ruckmani, K

    2015-05-01

    Gastro-retentive Captopril loaded alginate beads were prepared by an ionotropic gelation method using sodium alginate in combination with natural gums containing galactomannans (Senna tora seed gum, guar gum and locust bean gum) in the presence of calcium chloride. The process variables such as concentration of sodium alginate/natural polymer, concentration of calcium chloride, curing time, stirring speed and drying condition were optimized. Prepared beads were evaluated for various parameters such as flow property, drug content and entrapment efficiency, size and shape, and swelling index. Surface morphology of the beads was studied using scanning electron microscopy. In vitro mucoadhesion and in vitro drug release studies were carried out on the prepared beads. From the entrapment efficiency and dissolution study, it was concluded that galactomannans in combination with sodium alginate show sustained release property. The bead formulation F4 prepared using combination of sodium alginate and guar gums in the ratio 2:1 showed satisfactory sustained release for 12h. The release of Captopril from the prepared beads was found to be controlled by the swelling of the polymer followed by drug diffusion through the swelled polymer and slow erosion of the beads. PMID:25720832

  13. TECHNICAL NOTE: The strengthening effect of guar gum on the yield stress of magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei Ping; Zhao, Bin Yuan; Wu, Qing; Chen, LeSheng; Hu, Ke Ao

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach for producing obvious strengthening of the magnetorheological (MR) effect of MR fluids. Carbonyl iron powders coated with guar gum were used as magnetic particles in the MR fluid. Experimental results showed that inducing a guar gum coating not only greatly improved the sedimentation stability but also strengthened the yield stress of the MR fluid. An intermolecular force based model was proposed for explaining the strengthening effect.

  14. Preparation and characterization of antimicrobial wound dressings based on silver, gellan, PVA and borax.

    PubMed

    Cencetti, C; Bellini, D; Pavesio, A; Senigaglia, D; Passariello, C; Virga, A; Matricardi, P

    2012-10-15

    Silver-loaded dressings are designed to provide the same antimicrobial activity of topical silver, with the advantages of a sustained silver release and a reduced number of dressing changes. Moreover, such type of dressing must provide a moist environment, avoiding fiber shedding, dehydration and adherence to the wound site. Here we describe the preparation of a novel silver-loaded dressing based on a Gellan/Hyaff(®) (Ge-H) non woven, treated with a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/borax system capable to enhance the entrapment of silver in the dressing and to modulate its release. The new hydrophilic non woven dressings show enhanced water uptake capability and slow dehydration rates. A sustained silver release is also achieved. The antibacterial activity was confirmed on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22939352

  15. GumTree: Data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Hugh; Hathaway, Paul; Hauser, Nick; Fei, Yang; Franceschini, Ferdi; Lam, Tony

    2006-11-01

    Access to software tools for interactive data reduction, visualisation and analysis during a neutron scattering experiment enables instrument users to make informed decisions regarding the direction and success of their experiment. ANSTO aims to enhance the experiment experience of its facility's users by integrating these data reduction tools with the instrument control interface for immediate feedback. GumTree is a software framework and application designed to support an Integrated Scientific Experimental Environment, for concurrent access to instrument control, data acquisition, visualisation and analysis software. The Data Reduction and Analysis (DRA) module is a component of the GumTree framework that allows users to perform data reduction, correction and basic analysis within GumTree while an experiment is running. It is highly integrated with GumTree, able to pull experiment data and metadata directly from the instrument control and data acquisition components. The DRA itself uses components common to all instruments at the facility, providing a consistent interface. It features familiar ISAW-based 1D and 2D plotting, an OpenGL-based 3D plotter and peak fitting performed by fityk. This paper covers the benefits of integration, the flexibility of the DRA module, ease of use for the interface and audit trail generation.

  16. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section 172.780...Additives § 172.780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive may be...prescribed conditions: (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy exudate...

  17. Gum chewing affects academic performance in adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chewing gum may have an impact on improved memory during specific tasks of recognition and sustained attention. Research objective was to determine the effect of gum chewing on standardized test scores and math class grades of eighth grade students. Four math classes, 108 students, were randomized i...

  18. The mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of cell-laden double-network hydrogels based on photocrosslinkable gelatin and gellan gum biomacromolecules

    E-print Network

    Shin, Hyeongho

    A major goal in the application of hydrogels for tissue engineering scaffolds, especially for load-bearing tissues such as cartilage, is to develop hydrogels with high mechanical strength. In this study, a double-network ...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ghatti (Indian gum) is an exudate from wounds in the bark of Anogeissus latifolia, a large tree found in the dry deciduous forests of India and Ceylon. (b) The ingredient complies with the following specifications: (1) Viscosity of...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ghatti (Indian gum) is an exudate from wounds in the bark of Anogeissus latifolia, a large tree found in the dry deciduous forests of India and Ceylon. (b) The ingredient complies with the following specifications: (1) Viscosity of...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...ghatti (Indian gum) is an exudate from wounds in the bark of Anogeissus latifolia, a large tree found in the dry deciduous forests of India and Ceylon. (b) The ingredient complies with the following specifications: (1) Viscosity of...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ghatti (Indian gum) is an exudate from wounds in the bark of Anogeissus latifolia, a large tree found in the dry deciduous forests of India and Ceylon. (b) The ingredient complies with the following specifications: (1) Viscosity of...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ghatti (Indian gum) is an exudate from wounds in the bark of Anogeissus latifolia, a large tree found in the dry deciduous forests of India and Ceylon. (b) The ingredient complies with the following specifications: (1) Viscosity of...

  4. Gum Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... List of All Topics All Gum Disease - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ...

  5. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is a polysaccharide gum derived from Xanthomonas campestris by a pure-culture fermentation process and purified by recovery with isopropyl alcohol. It contains D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-glucuronic...

  6. Locust bean gum: a versatile biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Moradiya, Naresh G; Randeria, Narayan P; Nagar, Bhanu J

    2013-05-15

    Biopolymers or natural polymers are an attractive class of biodegradable polymers since they are derived from natural sources, easily available, relatively cheap and can be modified by suitable reagent. Locust bean gum is one of them that have a wide potentiality in drug formulations due to its extensive application as food additive and its recognized lack of toxicity. It can be tailored to suit its demands of applicants in both the pharmaceutical and biomedical areas. Locust bean gum has a wide application either in the field of novel drug delivery system as rate controlling excipients or in tissue engineering as scaffold formation. Through keen references of reported literature on locust bean gum, in this review, we have described critical aspects of locust bean gum, its manufacturing process, physicochemical properties and applications in various drug delivery systems. PMID:23544637

  7. Manilkara zapota (Linn.) Seeds: A Potential Source of Natural Gum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudarshan; Bothara, Sunil B.

    2014-01-01

    Mucilage isolated from seeds of Manilkara zapota (Linn.) P. Royen syn. is a plant growing naturally in the forests of India. This mucilage is yet to be commercially exploited, and characterized as polymer. Various physicochemical methods like particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been employed to characterize this gum in the present study. Particle size analyses suggest that mucilage has particle size in nanometer. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the mucilage has irregular particle size. The glass transition temperature of the gum was observed to be 138°C and 136°C by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis, respectively. The thermogravimetric analysis suggested that mucilage had good thermal stability. The average molecular weight of mucilage was determined to be 379180, by gel permeation chromatography, while the viscosity of mucilage was observed to be 219.1 cP. The X-ray diffraction spectrometry pattern of the mucilage indicates a completely amorphous structure. Elemental analysis of the gum revealed the contents of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and sulfur to be 80.9 (%), 10.1 (%), 1.58 (%), and 512 (mg/kg), respectively. Mucilage had specific content of calcium, magnesium, potassium, lower concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, lead, and nickel. The major functional groups identified from FT-IR spectrum include 3441?cm?1 (–OH), 1660?cm?1 (Alkenyl C–H & C=C Stretch), 1632?cm?1 (–COO–), 1414?cm?1 (–COO–), and 1219?cm?1 (–CH3CO). Analysis of mucilage by paper chromatography and 1D NMR, indicated the presence of rhamnose, xylose, arabinose, mannose, and fructose. PMID:24729907

  8. Manilkara zapota (Linn.) Seeds: A Potential Source of Natural Gum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudarshan; Bothara, Sunil B

    2014-01-01

    Mucilage isolated from seeds of Manilkara zapota (Linn.) P. Royen syn. is a plant growing naturally in the forests of India. This mucilage is yet to be commercially exploited, and characterized as polymer. Various physicochemical methods like particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been employed to characterize this gum in the present study. Particle size analyses suggest that mucilage has particle size in nanometer. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the mucilage has irregular particle size. The glass transition temperature of the gum was observed to be 138°C and 136°C by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis, respectively. The thermogravimetric analysis suggested that mucilage had good thermal stability. The average molecular weight of mucilage was determined to be 379180, by gel permeation chromatography, while the viscosity of mucilage was observed to be 219.1 cP. The X-ray diffraction spectrometry pattern of the mucilage indicates a completely amorphous structure. Elemental analysis of the gum revealed the contents of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and sulfur to be 80.9 (%), 10.1 (%), 1.58 (%), and 512 (mg/kg), respectively. Mucilage had specific content of calcium, magnesium, potassium, lower concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, lead, and nickel. The major functional groups identified from FT-IR spectrum include 3441?cm(-1) (-OH), 1660?cm(-1) (Alkenyl C-H & C=C Stretch), 1632?cm(-1) (-COO-), 1414?cm(-1) (-COO-), and 1219?cm(-1) (-CH3CO). Analysis of mucilage by paper chromatography and 1D NMR, indicated the presence of rhamnose, xylose, arabinose, mannose, and fructose. PMID:24729907

  9. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rostami, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems’ researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We’ve reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmented through years. The advantages and therapeutic benefits of chewing gum support its development as we can see new formulations with new drugs contained have been produced from past and are going to find a place in market by formulation of new medicated chewing gums. Potential applications of medicated chewing gums are highly widespread as they will be recognized in future. Nowadays standards for qualifying chewing gums are the same as tablets. Patient-centered studies include medicated chewing gums as a delivery system too which creates compliance for patients. PMID:26109999

  10. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and..., Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.615 Chewing gum base. The food additive chewing gum base... Having an acid number of 3-8, a minimum drop-softening point of 109 °C, and a color of M or...

  11. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and..., Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances § 172.615 Chewing gum base. The food additive chewing gum base... Having an acid number of 3-8, a minimum drop-softening point of 109 °C, and a color of M or...

  12. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree,...

  15. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree,...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree,...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree, Ceratonia siliqua (Linne), a leguminous...

  19. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree,...

  1. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section...Specific Usage Additives § 172.780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive...following prescribed conditions: (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy...

  3. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section...Specific Usage Additives § 172.780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive...following prescribed conditions: (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy...

  4. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section...Specific Usage Additives § 172.780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive...following prescribed conditions: (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy...

  5. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section...Specific Usage Additives § 172.780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive...following prescribed conditions: (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1330 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 184.1330 Section 184.1330 Food and...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1330 Acacia (gum arabic). (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy exudate from stems and...

  7. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related...

  8. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances...

  9. Biobased alternatives to guar gum as tackifiers for hydromulch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guar gum, obtained from guar [Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.] seeds, is currently the principal gum used as a tackifier (binder) for hydraulically-applied mulches (hydromulches) used in erosion control. The oil industry’s increased use of guar gum in hydraulic fracturing together with lower glo...

  10. The Gum Nebula and Related Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Proceedings of a symposium concerning the Gum Nebula (GN) and related topics are reported. Papers presented include: Colin Gum and the discovery of the GN; identification of the GN as the fossil Stromgren sphere of Vela X Supernova; size and shape of GN; formation of giant H-2 regions following supernova explosions; radio astronomy Explorer 1 observations of GN; cosmic ray effects in the GN; low intensity H beta emission from the interstellar medium; and how to recognize and analyze GN. Astronomical charts and diagrams are included.

  11. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Jalilian, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caffeine which exists in drinks such as coffee as well as in drug dosage forms in the global market is among the materials that increase alertness and decrease fatigue. Compared to other forms of caffeine, caffeine gum can create faster and more prominent effects. In this study, the main goal is to design a new formulation of caffeine gum with desirable taste and assess its physicochemical properties. Materials and Methods: Caffeine gum was prepared by softening of gum bases and then mixing with other formulation ingredients. To decrease the bitterness of caffeine, sugar, aspartame, liquid glucose, sorbitol, manitol, xylitol, and various flavors were used. Caffeine release from gum base was investigated by mechanical chewing set. Content uniformity test was also performed on the gums. The gums were evaluated in terms of organoleptic properties by the Latin-Square design at different stages. Results: After making 22 formulations of caffeine gums, F11 from 20 mg caffeine gums and F22 from 50 mg caffeine gums were chosen as the best formulation in organoleptic properties. Both types of gum released about 90% of their own drug content after 30 min. Drug content of 20 and 50 mg caffeine gum was about 18.2-21.3 mg and 45.7-53.6 mg respectively. Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release) were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test. PMID:24223387

  12. Molecular structure of exudate gums with special reference to gums of the sterculia genus 

    E-print Network

    Sanderson, George R.

    1981-01-01

    The term 'gum', in its broadest sense, refers to both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances of high molecular weight which usually exhibit colloidal properties when dispersed in an appropriate solvent. Hydrophobic ...

  13. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... recovery with isopropyl alcohol. It contains D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-glucuronic acid as the dominant...) Positive for xanthan gum when subjected to the following procedure: Pyruvic Acid Test Pipet 10 milliliters... 1N hydrochloric acid. Weigh the flask. Reflux the mixture for 3 hours. Take precautions to avoid...

  14. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... recovery with isopropyl alcohol. It contains D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-glucuronic acid as the dominant...) Positive for xanthan gum when subjected to the following procedure: Pyruvic Acid Test Pipet 10 milliliters... 1N hydrochloric acid. Weigh the flask. Reflux the mixture for 3 hours. Take precautions to avoid...

  15. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... recovery with isopropyl alcohol. It contains D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-glucuronic acid as the dominant...) Positive for xanthan gum when subjected to the following procedure: Pyruvic Acid Test Pipet 10 milliliters... 1N hydrochloric acid. Weigh the flask. Reflux the mixture for 3 hours. Take precautions to avoid...

  16. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... recovery with isopropyl alcohol. It contains D-glucose, D-mannose, and D-glucuronic acid as the dominant...) Positive for xanthan gum when subjected to the following procedure: Pyruvic Acid Test Pipet 10 milliliters... 1N hydrochloric acid. Weigh the flask. Reflux the mixture for 3 hours. Take precautions to avoid...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1351 - Gum tragacanth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Gum tragacanth. 184.1351 Section 184.1351 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  2. Effect of GutsyGum(tm), A Novel Gum, on Subjective Ratings of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Following A Refluxogenic Meal.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel; Sam, Cecilia H Y; Green, Tim; Wood, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Chewing gum alleviates symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) following a refluxogenic meal. GutsyGum(tm), a chewing gum developed to alleviate the symptoms of GER contains calcium carbonate, with a proprietary blend of licorice extract, papain, and apple cider vinegar (GiGs®). The efficacy of GutsyGum(tm) was determined in alleviating the symptoms of GER after a refluxogenic meal compared to placebo gum. This double-blind, placebo-controlled-crossover trial with a one-week washout between treatments had 24 participants with a history of GER consume a refluxogenic meal and then chew GutsyGum(tm) or placebo gum. Participants completed GER symptom questionnaires, consisting of symptom based 10 cm Visual Analogue Scales, immediately following the meal and then at regular intervals out to four hours postmeal. Adjusted mean ± SEM heartburn score (15-min postmeal to 240 min) was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo gum treatment (0.81 ± 0.20 vs. 1.45 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.034). Mean acid reflux score was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo treatment (0.72 ± 0.19 vs. 1.46 ± 0.19 cm; p = 0.013). There were no significant differences for any of the secondary outcomes. However, pain approached significance with less pain reported in GutsyGum(tm) versus placebo treatment (0.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.081). Although nausea (p = 0.114) and belching (p = 0.154) were lower following GutsyGum(tm), the difference was not statistically significant. GutsyGum(tm) is more effective than a placebo gum in alleviating primary symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux (Clinical Trial Registration: ACTRN12612000973819). PMID:25144853

  3. Direct photography of the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Roosen, R. G.; Thompson, J.; Ludden, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses a series of wide-angle photographs taken of the Gum Nebula in the traditional region including H-alpha with the aid of a 40-cm and an 80-cm lens in both the red and the green. The photographs support the large dimensions (75 deg in galactic longitude by 40 deg in galactic latitude) of the Gum Nebula suggested earlier, and the appearance is consistent with an origin due to photons from a supernova outburst. The relatively high-density gas has cooled and is visible on the red plates. The low-density gas has remained at a high temperature and may be visible as diffuse emission on the green plates.

  4. The Gum nebula and related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.; Brandt, J. C.; Stecher, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Papers were presented in conference sessions on the Gum nebula, the Vela X remnant, the hot stars gamma Velorum and zeta Puppis, the B associations in the Vela-Puppis complex, and pulsars. Ground-based optical and radio astronomy; rocket and satellite observations in the radio, visible, ultraviolet, and X-ray regions; and theoretical problems in the physical state of the interstellar medium, stellar evolution, and runaway star dynamics were considered.

  5. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and... § 172.615 Chewing gum base. The food additive chewing gum base may be safely used in the manufacture of... ester of partially dimerized rosin Having an acid number of 3-8, a minimum drop-softening point of...

  6. Validating the applicability of the GUM procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Maurice G.; Harris, Peter M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper is directed at practitioners seeking a degree of assurance in the quality of the results of an uncertainty evaluation when using the procedure in the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) (JCGM 100?:?2008). Such assurance is required in adhering to general standards such as International Standard ISO/IEC 17025 or other sector-specific standards. We investigate the extent to which such assurance can be given. For many practical cases, a measurement result incorporating an evaluated uncertainty that is correct to one significant decimal digit would be acceptable. Any quantification of the numerical precision of an uncertainty statement is naturally relative to the adequacy of the measurement model and the knowledge used of the quantities in that model. For general univariate and multivariate measurement models, we emphasize the use of a Monte Carlo method, as recommended in GUM Supplements 1 and 2. One use of this method is as a benchmark in terms of which measurement results provided by the GUM can be assessed in any particular instance. We mainly consider measurement models that are linear in the input quantities, or have been linearized and the linearization process is deemed to be adequate. When the probability distributions for those quantities are independent, we indicate the use of other approaches such as convolution methods based on the fast Fourier transform and, particularly, Chebyshev polynomials as benchmarks.

  7. Guar gum: processing, properties and food applications-A Review.

    PubMed

    Mudgil, Deepak; Barak, Sheweta; Khatkar, Bhupendar Singh

    2014-03-01

    Guar gum is a novel agrochemical processed from endosperm of cluster bean. It is largely used in the form of guar gum powder as an additive in food, pharmaceuticals, paper, textile, explosive, oil well drilling and cosmetics industry. Industrial applications of guar gum are possible because of its ability to form hydrogen bonding with water molecule. Thus, it is chiefly used as thickener and stabilizer. It is also beneficial in the control of many health problems like diabetes, bowel movements, heart disease and colon cancer. This article focuses on production, processing, composition, properties, food applications and health benefits of guar gum. PMID:24587515

  8. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Stefan W; van der Mei, Henny C; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8) bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity. PMID:25602256

  9. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 108 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity. PMID:25602256

  10. Tragacanth gum as a natural polymeric wall for producing antimicrobial nanocapsules loaded with plant extract.

    PubMed

    Ghayempour, Soraya; Montazer, Majid; Mahmoudi Rad, Mahnaz

    2015-11-01

    Tragacanth gum as a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer with good properties including emulsifying, viscosity and cross-linking ability can be used as the wall material in encapsulation of different compounds, specifically plant extracts. In this paper, for the first time, Tragacanth gum was used to produce nanocapsules containing plant extract through microemulsion method. The effect of different parameters on the average size of prepared nanocapsules in presence of aluminum and calcium chloride through ultrasonic and magnetic stirrer was investigated. The high efficient nanocapsules were prepared with spherical shape and smooth surface. The average size of nanocapsules prepared through ultrasonic using aluminum chloride (22nm) was smaller than other products. The structure of prepared nanocapsules was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. Antimicrobial activity of different nanocapsules against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans was investigated by shake flask method during their release showed 100% microbial reduction after 12h stirring. PMID:26311653

  11. Gum Sensor: A Stretchable, Wearable, and Foldable Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotube/Chewing Gum Membrane.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Mohammad Ali; Khosrozadeh, Ali; Wang, Quan; Xing, Malcolm

    2015-12-01

    Presented in this work is a novel and facile approach to fabricate an elastic, attachable, and cost-efficient carbon nanotube (CNT)-based strain gauge which can be efficiently used as bodily motion sensors. An innovative and unique method is introduced to align CNTs without external excitations or any complicated procedure. In this design, CNTs are aligned and distributed uniformly on the entire chewing gum by multiple stretching and folding technique. The current sensor is demonstrated to be a linear strain sensor for at least strains up to 200% and can detect strains as high as 530% with a high sensitivity ranging from 12 to 25 and high durability. The gum sensor has been used as bodily motion sensors, and outstanding results are achieved; the sensitivity is quite high, capable of tracing slow breathing. Since the gum sensor can be patterned into various forms, it has wide applications in miniaturized sensors and biochips. Interestingly, we revealed that our gum sensor has the ability to monitor humidity changes with high sensitivity and fast resistance response capable of monitoring human breathing. PMID:26524110

  12. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lei Zhao Qinglin Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-02-15

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C{sub 3}A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C{sub 3}A and ettringite have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welan gum retards the process of C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  13. 78 FR 43226 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Register of February 27, 2013 (78 FR 13379). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on May 23, 2013, and... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... with material injury by reason of imports from China of xanthan gum provided for in subheading...

  14. Seed gum of Stryphnodendron barbatiman (Barbatimao)

    SciTech Connect

    Reicher, F.; Leitner, S.C.S.; Fontana, J.D.; Correa, J.B.C.; Sierakowski, M.R.

    1991-12-31

    Stryphnodendron barbatiman (barbatimao) is a native tree that is found throughout the {open_quotes}Cerrados,{close_quotes} a region of Central Brazil. Plant seeds, on water extraction, furnished 28 g% galactomannan (dry-weight basis), the monosaccharide composition of which (galactose to mannose ratio, 1.0:1.5) fits in the legume heteromannan group. This seed gum, after Sevag deproteinization, still retained 6 g% of associated protein and had a molecular weight of about 1.8 MD on gel filtration. A high intrinsic viscosity (1300 cP) was observed for the polysaccharide sample obtained after reflux of the crushed seeds in 80% aqueous methanol.

  15. Determination of locust bean gum and guar gum by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K; Rosa, C; Hischenhuber, C; Meyer, R

    2001-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to differentiate the thickening agents locust bean gum (LBG) and the cheaper guar gum in finished food products. Universal primers for amplification of the intergenic spacer region between trnL 3' (UAA) exon and trnF (GAA) gene in the chloroplast (cp) genome and subsequent restriction analysis were applied to differentiate guar gum and LBG. The presence of <5% (w/w) guar gum powder added to LBG powder was detectable. Based on data obtained from sequencing this intergenic spacer region, a second PCR method for the specific detection of guar gum DNA was also developed. This assay detected guar gum powder in LBG in amounts as low as 1% (w/w). Both methods successfully detected guar gum and/or LBG in ice cream stabilizers and in foodstuffs, such as dairy products, ice cream, dry seasoning mixes, a finished roasting sauce, and a fruit jelly product, but not in products with highly degraded DNA, such as tomato ketchup and sterilized chocolate cream. Both methods detected guar gum and LBG in ice cream and fresh cheese at levels <0.1%. PMID:11234856

  16. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...product for human use containing a water-soluble gum, hydrophilic...products for human use containing a water-soluble gum, hydrophilic...Cosmetic Act unless their labeling bears the following warnings (under the...8 ounces (a full glass) of water or other fluid. Taking this...

  17. Flavor-Enhanced Modulation of Cerebral Blood Flow during Gum Chewing

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Tachibana, Yoshihisa; Sakagami, Joe; Zhang, Min; Urade, Masahiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Flavor perception, the integration of taste and odor, is a critical factor in eating behavior. It remains unclear how such sensory signals influence the human brain systems that execute the eating behavior. Methods We tested cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the frontal lobes bilaterally while subjects chewed three types of gum with different combinations of taste and odor: no taste/no odor gum (C-gum), sweet taste/no odor gum (T-gum), and sweet taste/lemon odor gum (TO-gum). Simultaneous recordings of transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) and near infrared spectrometer (NIRS) were used to measure CBF during gum chewing in 25 healthy volunteers. Bilateral masseter muscle activity was also monitored. Results We found that subjects could discriminate the type of gum without prior information. Subjects rated the TO-gum as the most flavorful gum and the C-gum as the least flavorful. Analysis of masseter muscle activity indicated that masticatory motor output during gum chewing was not affected by taste and odor. The TCD/NIRS measurements revealed significantly higher hemodynamic signals when subjects chewed the TO-gum compared to when they chewed the C-gum and T-gum. Conclusions These data suggest that taste and odor can influence brain activation during chewing in sensory, cognitive, and motivational processes rather than in motor control. PMID:23840440

  18. Production of Recombinant Plant Gum With Tobacco Cell Culture in Bioreactor

    E-print Network

    Kieliszewski, Marcia

    are highly repetitive, structural glycoproteins unique to green algae and plants, where they contrib- uteProduction of Recombinant Plant Gum With Tobacco Cell Culture in Bioreactor and Gum.interscience.wiley.com). DOI: 10.1002/bit.20441 Abstract: Many plant gums, such as gum arabic, contain hydroxyproline

  19. Hydrophobic derivatives of guar gum hydrolyzate and gum Arabic as matrices for microencapsulation of mint oil.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shatabhisa; Gupta, Sumit; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun; Singhal, Rekha S

    2013-06-01

    Guar gum hydrolyzate (GGH) modified with n-octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA) and oleic acid having induced hydrophobicity was evaluated for encapsulation of mint oil and compared with gum Arabic (GA) and GA-OSA as wall material. Spray dried microcapsules prepared with these wall materials were evaluated for qualitative changes by principal component analysis and for percent retention of mint oil during 8-week storage. Results revealed that microcapsules with GGH-OSA and GGH-oleate showed slightly lower retention of mint oil as compared to GA. GA-OSA microcapsules showed better retention of mint oil than GA itself, as observed from the t1/2, the time required for the mint oil to come down to 50% of its original content. The t1/2 of mint oil in microcapsules of GA, GGH-oleate, GGH-OSA and GA-OSA was 26.12, 23.50, 24.11 and 29.67 weeks, respectively. The results suggested that GGH-OSA has the potential to replace gum Arabic for encapsulation of mint oil. PMID:23618256

  20. Material and tableting properties of Azadirachta indica gum with reference to official acacia gum.

    PubMed

    Ogunjimi, Abayomi T; Alebiowu, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the material and tableting properties of Azadirachta indica gum (NMG) relative to acacia gum (ACA). The morphological properties were assessed with size and shape factors of aspect ratio, roundness, irregularity and equivalent-circle-diameter. The tableting properties of the gums were determined using compressional characteristics, tensile strength (TS), brittle fracture index (BFI) and crushing-strength-friability/disintegration-time ratio (CSFR/DT). The results suggest that NMG possesses larger, irregular and more elongated particles than ACA. The onset and amount of plastic deformation occurring in NMG was faster and higher, respectively, than in ACA. The result shows that, although ACA tablets were stronger, their tendency to cap/laminate was higher than in NMG tablets. The NMG tablets possess lower DT than those of ACA, while the CSFR/DT result suggests that a better balance exists between the strength and weakness of NMG tablets. The study concluded that NMG can be a useful excipient in tablet formulation. PMID:24779199

  1. Evaluation of a Treatment Approach Combining Nicotine Gum with Self-Guided Behavioral Treatments for Smoking Relapse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killen, Joel D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Randomly assigned 1,218 smokers to cells in 4 (nicotine gum delivered ad lib, fixed regimen nicotine gum, placebo gum, no gum) x 3 (self-selected relapse prevention modules, randomly administered modules, no modules) design. Subjects receiving nicotine gum were more likely to be abstinent at 2- and 6-month followups. Fixed regimen accounted for…

  2. GUM Analysis for TIMS and SIMS Isotopic Ratios in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Steven L.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  3. Design, formulation and evaluation of green tea chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Khalafi, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study is to design, formulate and evaluate the green tea gums with a suitable taste and quality in order to produce an anti-oxidant chewing gum. Materials and Methods: Fresh green tea leaves obtained from Northern Iran for extraction. Maceration is the extraction method that is used in this study. The contents of caffeine, catechin and flavonoids of the hydro alcoholic extract were measured. Various formulations of the 120 mg green tea extract chewing gums with different sweeteners, flavoring agents and various gum bases were prepared afterward release pattern, content uniformity, organoleptic results and other properties were characterized. Results: The contents of caffeine, catechin and flavonoid of the hydro alcoholic extraction were 207.32 mg/g, 130.00 mg/g and 200.82 mg/g, respectively. Release pattern of green tea chewing gum with different gum base ratios and various sweeteners in phosphate buffer were prepared. A total of 60 persons who were 20-30 years of age, participated in our panel test for organoleptic properties such as taste, stiffness, stickiness, etc., Acceptable gum was the one with the same ratio of the used rubber bases. Cinnamon selected as the preferred taste by volunteers. Combination of aspartame, sugar and maltitol has appropriate taste. The effect of various sweetener on release pattern was negligible, on the other hand rubber bases ratio variation, changed the release pattern obviously. Conclusion: The green tea chewing gum with sugar, maltitol and aspartame sweeteners and cinnamon flavor, using the same rubber bases ratio may be a desirable antioxidant product. PMID:25161989

  4. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  5. Ultrasound assisted enzymatic depolymerization of aqueous guar gum solution.

    PubMed

    Prajapat, Amrutlal L; Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of application of low intensity ultrasonic irradiation for the intensification of enzymatic depolymerization of aqueous guar gum solution. The extent of depolymerization of guar gum has been analyzed in terms of intrinsic viscosity reduction. The effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters related to the enzyme activity as well as the intrinsic viscosity reduction of guar gum using enzymatic approach has been evaluated. The kinetic rate constant has been found to increase with an increase in the temperature and cellulase loading. It has been observed that application of ultrasound not only enhances the extent of depolymerization but also reduces the time of depolymerization as compared to conventional enzymatic degradation technique. In the presence of cellulase enzyme, the maximum extent of depolymerization of guar gum has been observed at 60W of ultrasonic rated power and ultrasonic treatment time of 30min. The effect of ultrasound on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as well as the molecular structure of cellulase enzyme was evaluated with the help of the chemical reaction kinetics model and fluorescence spectroscopy. Application of ultrasound resulted in a reduction in the thermodynamic parameters of activation energy (Ea), enthalpy (?H), entropy (?S) and free energy (?G) by 47%, 50%, 65% and 1.97%, respectively. The changes in the chemical structure of guar gum treated using ultrasound assisted enzymatic approach in comparison to the native guar gum were also characterized by FTIR. The results revealed that enzymatic depolymerization of guar gum resulted in a polysaccharide with low degree of polymerization, viscosity and consistency index without any change in the core chemical structure which could make it useful for incorporation in food products. PMID:26584988

  6. Efficacy of chewing gum in preventing extrinsic tooth staining.

    PubMed

    Yankell, S L; Emling, R C

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this six-week clinical study was to determine the efficacy of sugar-free chewing gum versus no chewing on preventing Peridex (0.12% chlorhexidine)-associated stain. One-hundred and fifty healthy adult subjects, categorized by tea or coffee intake and smoking, were randomly assigned to a chewing or no chewing gum group. All subjects were given Peridex and an ADA-approved toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste to use twice a day. Gum was chewed for 20 minutes five times each day, after toothbrushing and Peridex rinse in the morning and evening, and after each meal. At baseline, all subjects received a professional cleaning to remove all supragingival deposits and extrinsic strain. At three and six weeks, safety and stain intensity and area were monitored on the anterior teeth and posterior Ramfjord teeth using the Lobene stain scoring method. Seventy-two subjects in each group completed the study. Attrition was unrelated to product use. No untoward reactions were reported or observed at any time in the study. At the six-week evaluations, the chewing gum group exhibited significantly lower (p < 0.05-0.001) total stain scores on both anterior and posterior areas evaluated compared to the no chewing group scores. In addition to the stain evaluations, a randomly selected subset of 60 subjects was evaluated for gingivitis at baseline prior to cleaning, and at three and six weeks, on the buccal and lingual surfaces of the Ramfjord teeth. Both the chewing gum and no chewing gum subset subjects had a significant decrease in gingivitis scores from baseline to three weeks (p < 0.001) and from baseline to six weeks (p < 0.05-0.001). There were no significant statistical differences between the two groups at anytime during the study on gingivitis levels. Chewing gum, after product use, did not reduce the efficacy of chlorhexidine on gingivitis scores. PMID:9586534

  7. Delivery of active agents from chewing gum for improved remineralization.

    PubMed

    Dodds, M W J; Chidichimo, D; Haas, M S

    2012-09-01

    Most surrogate measures of caries were developed to test products containing fluoride, typically at relatively high and closely controlled oral concentrations. However, since the primary mechanism for the remineralization of early enamel caries lesions by chewing gum is through stimulation of saliva, delivering Ca and Pi to the demineralized enamel lesion, established methods may lack the sensitivity to detect the additional benefit of an active agent without the strong remineralizing potential of fluoride. Issues related to the release of active agents from the gum matrix, dilution in the saliva, and limited oral retention time, along with taste, safety, regulatory, and cost concerns, impose further limitations. This paper reviews the efficacy of some active agents used in chewing gum for improved remineralization and includes results from in situ testing of calcium-containing gums, including calcium lactate, tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous, calcium citrate/encapsulated phosphate, and a calcium lactate/sodium phosphate blend. Despite promising in vitro data from these agents, they did not provide consistently superior results from in situ testing. There is a need to develop better predictive in vitro models for chewing gum, as well as improved sensitivity of in situ models to discriminate relatively small amounts of remineralization against a background of high biological variability. PMID:22899681

  8. Studies on gum of Moringa oleifera for its emulsifying properties

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Dibya Sundar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emulsion has been a form of presenting water insoluble substances for a long period of time. Now a day, it has been a way of presenting various intravenous additives and diagnostic agents in X-ray examinations. Various substances can be used as emulsifying agent, which can be operationally defined as a stabilizer of the droplets formed of the internal phase. Materials and Methods: Gum from Moringa oleifera was evaluated for its emulsifying properties. Castor oil emulsions 30 percent (o/w), containing 2 to 4% Moringa oleifera gum was prepared. Emulsions containing equivalent concentration of acacia were also prepared for comparison. All the emulsions prepared were stored at room temperature and studied for stability at various time intervals for 8 weeks. The prepared emulsions were evaluated for creaming rate, globule size and rate of coalescence. 23 factorial design was chosen to investigate the effects of centrifugation, pH, temperature changes and electrolytes on the creaming rate and globule size. Results: The results of the investigations show that the gum of Moringa oleifera possesses better emulsifying properties as compared to gum acacia. Conclusion: Gum of Moringa oleifera could be used in pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical preparation. PMID:24741276

  9. Effects of xanthan, guar, carrageenan and locust bean gum addition on physical, chemical and sensory properties of meatballs.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Zeynep Ozben; Y?lmaz, Ismail; Demirci, Ahmet ?ukru

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of xanthan gum, guar gum, carrageenan and locust bean gum on physical, chemical and sensory properties of meatballs. Meatball samples were produced with three different formulations including of 0.5, 1, and 1.5% each gum addition and gum added samples were compared with the control meatballs. Physical and chemical analyses were carried out on raw and cooked samples separately. Moisture contents of raw samples decreased by addition of gums. There were significant decreases (p?gum when compared with control. Ash contents and texture values increased with gum addition to meatballs. Meatball redness decreased with more gum addition in raw and cooked meatball samples, which means that addition of gums resulted in a lighter-coloured product. According to sensory analysis results, locust bean gum added (1%) samples were much preferred by the panelists. PMID:24803701

  10. TECHNICAL NOTE: The effect of the green additive guar gum on the properties of magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chen; Zhao, Bin Yuan; Chen, LeSheng; Wu, Qing; Liu, Nan; Hu, Ke Ao

    2005-02-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid containing guar gum was prepared for the first time by ball-milling the guar gum powder together with silicone oil and carbonyl iron powder. By forming a coating layer over the ground carbonyl iron powder, the guar gum improves the sedimentation stability and thixotropy of the MR fluid effectively.

  11. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH.

    PubMed

    Karami Nogourani, Maryam; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Kowsari Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2012-01-01

    Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women) healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6?min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for 6 consecutive days. After unstimulated saliva was collected, stimulated saliva was collected at interval of 0-1, 1-3, and 3-6 minutes after the start of different flavored chewing gums. The SFR and salivary pH were measured. The SFR increased in all five flavored gums at 1, 3, and 6 minutes after start of chewing gums (P < 0.001). The flow rate of all products reached peak in the 1st minute of stimulation, except spearmint-flavored gums which reached peak in the 6th minute. In the 1st minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest SFR. During 1-3 minutes, strawberry- and apple-flavored gums showed higher SFR, respectively. Only the spearmint- and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased salivary pH. Gum flavored can affect the SFR and pH and special flavors can be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions. PMID:22505903

  12. Metabolic Effects of Nicotine Gum and Cigarette Smoking: Potential Implications for Postcessation Weight Gain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klesges, Robert C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Twenty smoking women participated in nicotine gum and smoking administration, after which resting energy expenditures (REEs) were measured. Results indicated acute increase in REE for both nicotine gum and cigarettes. Metabolic rates for nicotine gum slowly returned to baseline; rates for cigarettes quickly fell significantly below baseline.…

  13. Iodine derivatives of chemically modified gum Arabic microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ganie, Showkat A; Ali, Akbar; Mazumdar, Nasreen

    2015-09-20

    Acetylated gum Arabic (AGA) derivatives with different degrees of substitution (DS 0.97-2.74) were synthesized using acetyl chloride and a base under varying reaction conditions. The AGA derivatives were obtained in the form of microspheres and thereafter stable iodine products were prepared by doping the microspheres with an iodinating agent, iodine monochloride (ICl). The reaction between electrophilic iodine and polar carbonyl groups was studied by FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, and UV-VIS spectroscopies. The products were also characterized by DSC, TGA and SEM studies. The incorporated iodine was released in aqueous medium as iodide ions (I(-)). A reaction scheme has been proposed for the iodination and de-iodination of the gum derivatives. This work suggests that the iodine derivatives of modified gum Arabic could be used as a source of iodide ions which is the nutritional form of iodine. PMID:26050909

  14. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydrate content was determined according to mannose and phenolic compounds in terms of gallic acid. Aloe vera powder, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, sweeteners and different flavors were added to the soft gum bases. In Aloe vera chewing gum formulation, 10% of dried Aloe vera extract entered the gum base. Then the chewing gum was cut into pieces of suitable sizes. Weight uniformity, content uniformity, the organoleptic properties evaluation, releasing the active ingredient in the phosphate buffer (pH, 6.8) and taste evaluation were examined by Latin square method. Results: One gram of Aloe vera powder contained 5.16 ± 0.25 mg/g of phenolic compounds and 104.63 ± 4.72 mg/g of carbohydrates. After making 16 Aloe vera chewing gum formulations, the F16 formulation was selected as the best formulation according to its physicochemical and organoleptic properties. In fact F16 formulation has suitable hardness, lack of adhesion to the tooth and appropriate size and taste; and after 30 min, it released more than 90% of its drug content. Conclusion: After assessments made, the F16 formulation with maltitol, aspartame and sugar sweeteners was selected as the best formulation. Among various flavors used, peppermint flavor which had the most acceptance between consumers was selected. PMID:26605214

  15. Rheological properties and thickening mechanism of aqueous diutan gum solution: Effects of temperature and salts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Gong, Houjian; Dong, Mingzhe; Li, Yajun

    2015-11-01

    Rheological properties of a new microbial polysaccharide, diutan gum in aqueous solution have been systematically investigated. It is found that molecular aggregates of diutan gum can be formed at a very low concentration (0.12 g/L), and the mechanism of thickening by diutan gum is proposed. The viscosity retention rate of diutan gum changes little when increasing the temperature from 298 K to 348 K or in a high salinity solution (55.5 g L(-1)). Gel structure can be formed in the diutan gum solution, owing to the finding that the dynamic modulus has an exponential relationship with the concentration. The gel properties of diutan gum are not sensitive to temperature, and are virtually independent of cationic environment (Na(+) and Ca(2+)). The temperature/salt tolerance of the diutan gum solution is mainly attributed to its perfect double helix molecular conformation, the location of the side chains of its molecules, and its water retention capacity. PMID:26256389

  16. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure and chemical reduction on the emulsification properties of gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fanyi; Bell, Alan E; Davis, Fred J; Chai, Yunxi

    2015-04-15

    Gum arabic is widely used in the food industry as an additive, both as a thickener and an emulsifier. This study has compared the emulsification properties of two types of gums, KLTA (Acacia senegal) and GCA (Acacia seyal), both in their native/untreated forms and after exposure to high pressure (800 MPa). Further studies were undertaken to chemically modify the disulphide linkages present and to investigate the effects of their reduction on the diffusion of the carbohydrate materials. The emulsification properties of the gum samples were examined by determining the droplet size distribution in a "model" oil-in-water system. Results showed that high pressure treatment and chemical reduction of gums changed the emulsification properties of both gums. The high molecular weight component in arabinogalactan-proteins (AGP/GP), and more "branched" carbohydrates present in gum arabic, may be responsible for the emulsification properties of GCA gum, indicating that the emulsification mechanisms for KLTA and GCA were different. PMID:25466061

  17. Viscofying properties of corn fiber gum with various polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of corn fiber gum (CFG) on the aqueous solutions of a series of widely-used commercial polysaccharides has been studied by rheological techniques using stress synergism index to evaluate its viscosifying action. Though CFG solution exhibited Newtonian fluid behaviour with a very low vis...

  18. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section 172.780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives §...

  19. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section 172.780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives §...

  20. Identification from a bitemark in a wad of chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, P; Carson, G; Taylor, J A; Brown, K A

    2001-06-01

    A wad of used chewing gum recovered from the scene of a burglary contained impressions of human teeth. Casts of these impressions displayed unique morphological characteristics which were found to show concordance with corresponding features present on casts of the posterior teeth of a suspect. PMID:11494677

  1. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 172.780 Section 172.780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives §...

  2. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive may be safely used in... incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from...

  3. Components responsible for the emulsification properties of corn fibre gum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An emulsion was prepared using corn fibre gum (CFG) and the resulting oil and aqueous phases were separated by centrifugation. The material adsorbed onto the surface of the oil droplets in the oil phase was desorbed using surfactant. The desorbed CFG and the non adsorbed CFG that remained present in...

  4. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention, 12601.../federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. (c) The ingredient is used in food in accordance with good....780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  5. Improved emulsification performance of corn fiber gum following maturation treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) in the solid state (milled powder form) was subjected to a maturation treatment by heating under atmospheric pressure at 110 degrees C for 5 (CFG5) and 24 hours (CFG24). The treatment reduced the solubility and aggregation of the proteinaceous component with increased heating t...

  6. Guaranteed uncertainty management (GUM) for sensor provisioning in missile defense

    E-print Network

    Hero, Alfred O.

    Guaranteed uncertainty management (GUM) for sensor provisioning in missile defense Alfred O Hero or discriminating between N targets. It is a central problem in missile defense radar systems where the number was sensor management for engagement planning in missile defense. The guaranteed un- certainty management

  7. Contribution of lipids, phenolic acids, and protein rich components to emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum and acacia gum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is an arabinoxylan enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a proprietary alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. When purified CFG prepared by this process was hydrolyzed with concentrated base (1.5 N methanolic KOH at 70 °C for one hour) considerable ...

  8. Saffron and beetroot extracts encapsulated in maltodextrin, gum Arabic, modified starch and chitosan: Incorporation in a chewing gum system.

    PubMed

    Chranioti, Charikleia; Nikoloudaki, Aspasia; Tzia, Constantina

    2015-08-20

    Maltodextrin (MD-21DE), gum Arabic (GA), gum Arabic-modified starch (GA-MS), modified starch-chitosan (MS-CH) and modified starch-maltodextrin-chitosan (MS-MD-CH) were used as agents for beetroot and saffron coloring-extracts microencapsulation by freeze drying. The produced powders were evaluated in terms of coloring strength (E) during storage at 40°C for 10 weeks and a first-order kinetic was applied. Color parameters (L(*), a(*), b(*), C(*) and ?E(*)) and water sorption behavior was also studied. Moreover, incorporation of the powders in a chewing gum model system was conducted. The type of encapsulating agent significantly (P<0.05) affected the studied parameters with the order of protection in both extracts being as follows: MD>GA>GA-MS>MS-CH>MS-MD-CH. The water sorption study revealed that MD and GA kept their structural integrity up to water activities of 0.66 and 0.82, respectively. The chewing gum samples produced with coloring extracts encapsulated in GA-MS showed the greatest a(*)(for beetroot) and b(*) (for saffron) values indicating a better protection. PMID:25965482

  9. Characterization and in vitro antioxidant activity of Albizia stipulata Boiv. gum exudates.

    PubMed

    Thanzami, K; Malsawmtluangi, C; Lalhlenmawia, H; Seelan, T Veenus; Palanisamy, Selvamani; Kandasamy, Ruckmani; Pachuau, Lalduhsanga

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the present study is to characterize the physicochemical properties and to determine the in vitro antioxidant activity of Albizia stipulata Boiv. gum exudates collected from Northeast India. The total carbohydrate, uronic acid and protein contents, monosaccharide composition and the molecular weight distribution of the purified gum was determined. The powder flow property and preliminary compressibility test were performed on the dried gum exudates. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study was performed to analyze the functional groups present in the structure. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTA) analyses were performed to study the thermal stability of the gum. The antioxidant properties of the gum were evaluated by determining 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl scavenging activities and reducing power. The total carbohydrate and protein contents of the gum were found to be 75.17±3.21% and 2.60±1.05% respectively. The viscosity of 2% aqueous solution of the gum exhibited non-Newtonian type of flow showing pH dependent swelling. Arabinose and galactose were found to be the main monosaccharides present in the gum exudates and the molecular weight distribution of the gum was also found to be polydispersed. Results from DPPH, hydroxyl scavenging and reducing power studies showed the gum possesses antioxidant properties. PMID:26118486

  10. Effect of guar gum and xanthan gum on pasting and noodle-making properties of potato, corn and mung bean starches.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amritpal; Shevkani, Khetan; Singh, Narpinder; Sharma, Parul; Kaur, Seeratpreet

    2015-12-01

    The effect of xanthan and guar-gum on pasting and noodle-making properties of potato, corn and mung bean starches was studied. Mung bean starch showed the highest amylose content (43.4 %) followed by potato (23.2 %) and corn starch (15.5 %). Potato starch showed the highest swelling power (19.0 g/g) and solubility index (17.5 %) and exhibited the highest paste viscosities. Addition of both gums improved peak viscosity, hot paste viscosity and final viscosity for mung and corn starches; while for potato starch, guar gum increased peak and final viscosities and decreased hot paste viscosity while xanthan gum increased hot paste and final viscosities and decreased peak viscosity. The noodles made from mung bean starch showed the most desirable characteristics in terms of the lowest-cooking loss and adhesiveness. The gums increased noodle cooking time and decreased cooking loss, firmness and cohesiveness. PMID:26604384

  11. In situ remineralization of subsurface enamel lesion after the use of a fluoride chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Lamb, W J; Corpron, R E; More, F G; Beltran, E D; Strachan, D S; Kowalski, C J

    1993-01-01

    In situ remineralization of early enamel lesions by a fluoride chewing gum was studied. Human enamel specimens with subsurface lesions were mounted in removable lower appliances for 6 adults. Subjects used a F-free dentifrice 3x/day and chewed five sticks/day for the F gum group (0.1 mg F/stick) or five sticks of sugarless gum. No gum was chewed for controls. Surface microhardness was performed on: (1) sound enamel; (2) lesions; (3) after intraoral exposure, and (4) after acid-resistance testing (ART). Separate specimens were etched and measured for F uptake and image analyses on microradiographs were performed for all regimens. delta Z values were calculated and converted to percent of mineralization. Values for F gum were significantly higher (p > 0.05) than non-F gum and controls for ART, percent remineralization, and F uptake up to 70 microns depth. PMID:8319253

  12. Functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Maphalla, Thabelang Gladys; Emmambux, Mohammad Naushad

    2016-01-20

    Consumer concerns to synthetic chemicals have led to strong preference for 'clean' label starches. Lipid and hydrocolloids are food friendly chemicals. This study determines the effects of stearic acid and xanthan gum alone and in combination on the functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches. An increase in viscosity was observed for all starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum compared to the controls with cassava having the least increase. A further increase in viscosity was observed for the cereal starches with combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum. Stearic acid reduced retrogradation, resulting in soft textured pastes. Combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum reduced the formation of type IIb amylose-lipid complexes, syneresis, and hysteresis in cereal starches compared to stearic acid alone. A combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum produce higher viscosity non-gelling starches and xanthan gum addition increases physical stability to freezing and better structural recovery after shear. PMID:26572436

  13. Strategy to identify and quantify polysaccharide gums in gelled food concentrates.

    PubMed

    Grün, Christian H; Sanders, Peter; van der Burg, Monique; Schuurbiers, Eric; van Adrichem, Linda; van Velzen, Ewoud J J; de Roo, Niels; Brunt, Kommer; Westphal, Yvonne; Schols, Henk A

    2015-01-01

    A strategy for the unambiguous identification and selective quantification of xanthan gum and locust bean gum (LBG) in gelled food concentrates is presented. DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed to be a fast, sensitive, and selective method that can be used as a first screening tool in intact gelled food concentrates. An efficient isolation procedure is described removing components that may interfere with subsequent analyses. NMR spectroscopy enabled the direct identification of xanthan gum and the discrimination between different galactomannans in the isolated polysaccharide fraction. An enzymatic fingerprinting method using endo-?-mannanase, in addition to being used to differentiate between galactomannans, was developed into a selective, quantitative method for LBG, whereas monosaccharide analysis was used to quantify xanthan gum. Recoveries for xanthan gum and LBG were 87% and 70%, respectively, with in-between day relative standard deviations below 20% for xanthan gum and below 10% for LBG. PMID:25053026

  14. Locust bean gum: Exploring its potential for biopharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Dionísio, Marita; Grenha, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Polysaccharides have been finding, in the last decades, very interesting and useful applications in the biomedical and, specifically, in the biopharmaceutical field. Locust bean gum is a polysaccharide belonging to the group of galactomannans, being extracted from the seeds of the carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua). This polymer displays a number of appealing characteristics for biopharmaceutical applications, among which its high gelling capacity should be highlighted. In this review, we describe critical aspects of locust bean gum, contributing for its role in biopharmaceutical applications. Physicochemical properties, as well as strong and effective synergies with other biomaterials are described. The potential for in vivo biodegradation is explored and the specific biopharmaceutical applications are discussed. PMID:22923958

  15. Effect of salt on turbulent drag reduction of xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheng Hai; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Zhang, Ke; Renou, Frederic; Grisel, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The turbulent flow of an aqueous KCl solution driven by a rotating disc in a closed chamber showed significant drag reduction (DR) when a small amount of xanthan gum (XG) was added. The effects of the experimental parameters (XG and KCl concentrations, and time) on the drag reduction efficiency were examined. While the DR efficiency of XG decreased with increasing salt (KCl) concentration, the time-dependent DR efficiency was found to be fitted well using Brostow model equation. PMID:25659708

  16. On the Structure of Gum Arabic in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Yael; Yerushalmi-Rozen, Rachel

    2005-03-01

    Gum arabic (GA), a natural composite polysaccharide derived from exudates of Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal trees, is commonly used in food hydrocolloids. It was shown to effectively disperse carbon nanotubes in water. GA consists mainly of a highly branched polysaccharide and a protein-polysaccharide complex (GAGP) as a minor component. In this work the microstructure of the gum in water was studied by small angle x-ray and neutron scattering combined with cryo-transmission electrons microscopy. An intricate structure is revealed, composed of many spheroidal polysaccharide aggregates and a small amount of large coils of GAGP. Inter-aggregate correlations result in a scattering peak, the spacing of which exhibits a -1/3 power-law dependence on concentration, and which diminishes with increased ionic strength. Changes in the conformation of the large GAGP coils can be followed at very low scattering vectors (q). A coil to rod transition with decreasing concentration is indicated by a change from -2 to -1 in the power-law q-dependence of the scattering intensity. It is suggested that the concentration of the GA in solution affects the structural correlations between the polysaccharide and the GAGP complex, and thus may also affect the surface activity of the gum.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse copper nanoparticles using gum acacia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chunfa; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Xianglin; Cao, Chuanliang

    2014-03-01

    A simple method was put forward in this paper for preparing colloidal copper nanoparticles in aqueous solutions using copper sulfate, gum acacia and hydrazine hydrate as copper precursor, capping agents and reducing agents, respectively, without any inert gas. The formation of nanosized copper was confirmed by its characteristic surface plasmon absorption peak at 604 nm in UV-vis spectra. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that the as-synthesized copper fine spherical particles are distributed uniformly with a narrow distribution from 3 nm to 9 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) demonstrated that the obtained metallic nanoparticles are single crystalline copper nanoparticles. Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopic data suggested that the copper nanoparticles are coated with gum acacia. The effects of the quantity of gum acacia on the particle size were investigated by the UV-vis spectra and TEM images. The growth process of the nanoparticles was monitored by the UV-vis spectra. The mechanism of the formation copper nanoparticles was discussed. The process raised in this study can be served as an excellent candidate for the preparation of copper nanoparticles in a large scale production.

  18. Rapid screening of guar gum using portable Raman spectral identification methods.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Hirsch K; Wolfgang, Steven; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-01-25

    Guar gum is a well-known inactive ingredient (excipient) used in a variety of oral pharmaceutical dosage forms as a thickener and stabilizer of suspensions and as a binder of powders. It is also widely used as a food ingredient in which case alternatives with similar properties, including chemically similar gums, are readily available. Recent supply shortages and price fluctuations have caused guar gum to come under increasing scrutiny for possible adulteration by substitution of cheaper alternatives. One way that the U.S. FDA is attempting to screen pharmaceutical ingredients at risk for adulteration or substitution is through field-deployable spectroscopic screening. Here we report a comprehensive approach to evaluate two field-deployable Raman methods-spectral correlation and principal component analysis-to differentiate guar gum from other gums. We report a comparison of the sensitivity of the spectroscopic screening methods with current compendial identification tests. The ability of the spectroscopic methods to perform unambiguous identification of guar gum compared to other gums makes them an enhanced surveillance alternative to the current compendial identification tests, which are largely subjective in nature. Our findings indicate that Raman spectral identification methods perform better than compendial identification methods and are able to distinguish guar gum from other gums with 100% accuracy for samples tested by spectral correlation and principal component analysis. PMID:26609678

  19. Locust bean gum: processing, properties and food applications--a review.

    PubMed

    Barak, Sheweta; Mudgil, Deepak

    2014-05-01

    Locust bean gum or carob gum is a galactomannan obtained from seed endosperm of carob tree i.e. Ceratonia siliqua. It is widely utilized as an additive in various industries such as food, pharmaceuticals, paper, textile, oil well drilling and cosmetics. Industrial applications of locust bean gum are due to its ability to form hydrogen bonding with water molecule. It is also beneficial in the control of many health problems like diabetes, bowel movements, heart disease and colon cancer due to its dietary fiber action. This article focuses on production, processing, composition, properties, food applications and health benefits of locust bean gum. PMID:24548746

  20. Pressure-controlled injection of guar gum stabilized microscale zerovalent iron for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Luna, M; Gastone, F; Tosco, T; Sethi, R; Velimirovic, M; Gemoets, J; Muyshondt, R; Sapion, H; Klaas, N; Bastiaens, L

    2015-10-01

    The paper reports a pilot injection test of microsized zerovalent iron (mZVI) dispersed in a guar gum shear thinning solution. The test was performed in the framework of the EU research project AQUAREHAB in a site in Belgium contaminated by chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The field application was aimed to overcome those critical aspects which hinder mZVI field injection, mainly due to the colloidal instability of ZVI-based suspensions. The iron slurry properties (iron particles size and concentration, polymeric stabilizer type and concentration, slurry viscosity) were designed in the laboratory based on several tests (reactivity tests towards contaminants, sedimentation tests and rheological measurements). The particles were delivered into the aquifer through an injection well specifically designed for controlled-pressure delivery (approximately 10 bars). The well characteristics and the critical pressure of the aquifer (i.e. the injection pressure above which fracturing occurs) were assessed via two innovative injection step rate tests, one performed with water and the other one with guar gum. Based on laboratory and field preliminary tests, a flow regime at the threshold between permeation and preferential flow was selected for mZVI delivery, as a compromise between the desired homogeneous distribution of the mZVI around the injection point (ensured by permeation flow) and the fast and effective injection of the slurry (guaranteed by high discharge rates and injection pressure, resulting in the generation of preferential flow paths). A monitoring setup was designed and installed for the real-time monitoring of relevant parameters during injection, and for a fast determination of the spatial mZVI distribution after injection via non-invasive magnetic susceptibility measurements. PMID:25971233

  1. Physical and chemical stability of gum arabic-stabilized conjugated linoleic acid oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaolin; Xu, Qiong; Tian, Dazhi; Wang, Nana; Fang, Yapeng; Deng, Zhongyang; Phillips, Glyn O; Lu, Jiang

    2013-05-15

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions have been used as a delivery system to protect conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid, from oxidation. Conventional gum arabic (GA) and two matured gum arabic samples (EM2 and EM10) were used as emulsifiers to prepare CLA-in-water emulsions. The emulsions have optimal physical and chemical stability at gum concentrations of 5% for all three gums. Emulsions with higher gum concentrations are more susceptible to lipid oxidation. This is attributed to reduced physical stability at higher gum concentrations because of the coalescence and depletion-induced flocculation of the emulsion droplets. The prooxidants iron and copper intrinsically contained in the gums could also contribute to this instability. Among the three gums, EM10 provides the most effective protection for CLA both physically and chemically, because of its superior interfacial properties over GA and EM2. PMID:23614832

  2. Characterisation and molecular association of Nigerian and Sudanese Acacia gum exudates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemical and physicochemical characteristics of gum exudate samples harvested from mature trees of Acacia senegal at two specific locations in Nigeria have been investigated together with gum samples harvested from Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal originating from Sudan. The monosaccharide sugar ...

  3. Effect of thermal and freezing treatments on rheological, textural and color properties of basil seed gum.

    PubMed

    Zameni, Akefe; Kashaninejad, Mahdi; Aalami, Mehran; Salehi, Fakhreddin

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocolloids are macromolecular carbohydrates that are added to many foodstuffs to achieve the appropriate rheological and textural properties and to prevent synersis or to increase the viscosity and stability of foodstuffs. In this study the effect of different thermal treatments (25, 50, 75, 100 and 121°C for 20 min) and freezing treatments (-18 and -25 °C for 24 h) on rheological, textural and color change of basil seed gum as a new source of hydrocolloids was investigated. The results demonstrated that basil seed gum solutions had desirable rheological and textural properties. Power law model well described non-newtonian pseudoplastic behavior of basil seed gum in all conditions. When the hydrocolloid samples were heated or frozen, increase in viscosity of basil seed gum solutions was observed. Hardness, adhesiveness and consistency of basil seed gel for control sample were 13.5 g, 16.79, 52.59 g.s, respectively and all increased after thermal treatments. The results revealed that basil seed gum has the excellent ability to stand against heat treatment and the highest hardness, adhesiveness and consistency value of gum gels were observed in sample treated at 121 °C for 20 min. In addition this gum gel has the good ability to stand against freeze-thaw treatment and its textural properties improved after freezing. Therefore, basil seed gum can be employed as a textural and rheological modifier in formulation of foods exposed to thermal and freezing temperatures. PMID:26345008

  4. SPECIES RICHNESS AND ABUNDANCE OF BIRDS IN MT LOFTY RANGES GUM WOODLAND HABITAT: YEAR 2001 SURVEY

    E-print Network

    Queensland, University of

    SPECIES RICHNESS AND ABUNDANCE OF BIRDS IN MT LOFTY RANGES GUM WOODLAND HABITAT: YEAR 2001 SURVEY sites in 48 patches of gum woodland from early September 2001 to early January 2002 . Each patch. This is an abridged version of the report format used previously for the years 1999 and 2000 stringybark woodland

  5. Gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants: effects on lipid oxidation of peanuts.

    PubMed

    Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Azam, Mahmood; Hasnain, Abid

    2015-04-01

    Performance of antioxidants is improved by incorporating them into polymer matrix such as polysaccharides based edible coatings. Gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the fruits of Cordia.myxa could be used as carrier of antioxidants by virtue of its strong adhering and emulsifying properties. This study aimed to explore the potential of gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants when applied as edible coating on peanuts. Gum Cordia was compared with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in delivering of antioxidants: butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and ascorbic acid (AA). Coated and uncoated peanuts were stored at 35 °C for 126 days and coating carrier effectiveness was measured by following lipid oxidation using chemical parameters (peroxide value and thiobarbituric acid reactive species) and sensory evaluation (oxidized flavor). Significant differences (p?Gum cordia was found better than CMC to deliver the antioxidants. Gum cordia based coating in combination with BHA/BHT exhibited highest protection (290 % higher shelf life than control) based on peroxide value (40 meq.O2 kg(-1)) followed by gum codia plus BHT (244 %), gum cordia plus BHA (232 %), CMC plus BHA/BHT (184 %), CMC plus BHA (139 %), CMC plus BHT (119 %), gum cordia plus AA (96 %) and CMC plus AA (46 %). PMID:25829621

  6. Combined psychological and nicotine gum treatment for smoking: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J R

    1991-01-01

    The results from seven studies suggest that both adding nicotine gum to a psychological therapy and adding a psychological therapy to nicotine gum increase long-term quit rates among smokers. Behavioral mechanisms to account for the increased quit rates are not clear. Suggestions for better reporting of trials and future research are made. PMID:1821290

  7. Terminological aspects of the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Charles

    2014-08-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) provided for the first time an international consensus on how to approach the widespread difficulties associated with conveying information about how reliable the value resulting from a measurement is thought to be. This paper examines the evolution in thinking and its impact on the terminology that accompanied the development of the GUM. Particular emphasis is put on the very clear distinction in the GUM between measurement uncertainty and measurement error, and on the reasons that even though ‘true value’ and ‘error’ are considered in the GUM to be ‘unknowable’ and, sometimes by implication, of little (or even no) use in measurement analysis, they remain as key concepts, especially when considering the objective of measurement. While probability theory in measurement analysis from a frequentist perspective was in widespread use prior to the publication of the GUM, a key underpinning principle of the GUM was to instead consider probability as a ‘degree of belief.’ The terminological changes necessary to make this transition are also covered. Even twenty years after the publication of the GUM, the scientific and metrology literatures sometimes contain uncertainty analyses, or discussions of measurement uncertainty, that are not terminologically consistent with the GUM, leading to the inability of readers to fully understand what has been done and what is intended in the associated measurements. This paper concludes with a discussion of the importance of using proper methodology and terminology for reporting measurement results.

  8. Gum chewing improves adolescents’ math performance in an SAT preparatory course

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of gum chewing on students’ performance in a preparatory course for the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). A total of 182 adolescents enrolled in an SAT preparatory class were randomized into one of two treatments: 1) gum chewing condition (G...

  9. Physicochemical characteristics and antioxidant activity of Prunus cerasoides D. Don gum exudates.

    PubMed

    Malsawmtluangi, C; Thanzami, K; Lalhlenmawia, H; Selvan, Veenus; Palanisamy, Selvamani; Kandasamy, Ruckmani; Pachuau, Lalduhsanga

    2014-08-01

    The physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of Prunus cerasoides D. Don gum exudates was investigated in this study. The total carbohydrate and protein content were found to be 73.72±2.44% and 2.33±1.25%, respectively. Analysis of monosaccharide composition by HPLC-RI system after acid hydrolysis of the gum showed the presence of arabinose, galactose, glucose, rhamnose and xylose. The molecular weight of the gum was also found to be 5.55×10(5)Da. FTIR and DSC studies showed characteristics typical of a natural polysaccharide. The viscosity of 2% aqueous solution of the gum exhibited non-Newtonian type of flow and the gum was also found to show pH dependent swelling. Determination of the angle of repose, Carr's index and Hausner ratio indicate the gum possess fairly good powder flow property. The antioxidant properties of the gum were evaluated by determining DPPH and hydroxyl scavenging activities, reducing power and total phenolic contents which showed the gum possess antioxidant property. PMID:24875319

  10. CORN FIBER: A POTENTIAL GUM ARABIC REPLACER FOR BEVERAGE FLAVOR EMULSIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. food industry needs a domestically produced food gum with a dependable supply and consistent quality, which can be used for preparing oil-in-water emulsions, such as citrus oil emulsions for beverages. Corn Fiber Gum (CFG) is an arabinoxylan (hemicellulose) extracted from the corn kernel p...

  11. Adverse Reaction to Nicotine Gum in Malay Female Smoker: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noorzurani, Md Haris Robson; Bond, Alyson; Wolff, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) are prescribed in smoking cessation programmes to help smokers stop smoking. The ideal dosage of NRT should control cravings and withdrawal symptoms but avoid adverse reactions. This report describes a case of adverse reaction to nicotine gum in a female Malay smoker. Assays taken 2 h after the gum, showed that…

  12. 78 FR 13379 - Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation AGENCY... from Austria and/or China of xanthan gum, provided for in subheading 3913.90.20 of the Harmonized... preliminary determinations by the Department of Commerce that imports of xanthan gum from Austria and...

  13. 78 FR 73434 - Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Acacia (Gum Arabic)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ...for Human Consumption; Acacia (Gum Arabic) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...the expanded safe use of acacia (gum arabic) in foods. This action is in response...regulations in Sec. 172.780, Acacia (gum arabic) (21 CFR 172.780) to...

  14. The effect of chewing gum flavor on the negative affect associated with tobacco abstinence among dependent cigarette smokers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lee M; Collins, Frank L; Vanderveen, Joseph W; Weaver, Cameron C

    2010-11-01

    Many smokers relapse during cessation attempts due to increases in negative affect. Previous research has shown that chewing confectionary chewing gum appears to lessen the severity of acute nicotine withdrawal symptoms and help individuals who are trying to reduce smoking in part due to the flavor of the gum chewed. The current study compared the effects of three flavored gums to a No Gum Control during 48-hour cessation periods for young dependent smokers. Forty-nine smokers participated in three experimental conditions (peppermint, vanilla, and baked apple cardamom flavored gum) as well as a No Gum Control across four weeks while abstaining from smoking for 48-hours each week. Compared to the No Gum Control, participants in the Gum conditions reported lower levels of anxiety, dysphoria, and tension. Vanilla and baked apple cardamom flavored gum resulted in lower levels of negative affect while peppermint flavored gum was not different from the No Gum Control. These findings indicate that some flavors of gum are effective in reducing the negative affect associated with nicotine withdrawal and may serve as a valuable tool in helping smokers quit. PMID:20598808

  15. Psychological and Pharmacological Influences in Cigarette Smoking Withdrawal: Effects of Nicotine Gum and Expectancy on Smoking Withdrawal Symptoms and Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Andrew M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined effects of expectancy and nicotine depletion on withdrawal symptoms by giving 109 smokers nicotine gum or placebo. Subjects who believed they had nicotine gum reported fewer physical symptoms of withdrawal, showed less arousal, and smoked fewer cigarettes than did those who thought they had placebo. Actual nicotine content of gum had no…

  16. Interaction of calcium sulfate with xanthan gum: effect on in vitro bioadhesion and drug release behavior from xanthan gum based buccal discs of buspirone.

    PubMed

    Jaipal, A; Pandey, M M; Abhishek, A; Vinay, S; Charde, S Y

    2013-11-01

    Bioadhesive polymers in buccal drug delivery systems play an important role in delivery of therapeutic drug molecules for local and systemic action. Xanthan gum, a GRAS listed natural polymer was used to design buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride by direct compression method. Effect of calcium sulfate on bioadhesive and drug release behavior of xanthan gum buccal discs was studied. Varying amount of calcium sulfate (0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50%, w/w) in combination with xanthan gum was used to prepare buccal bioadhesive discs. Increase in calcium sulfate concentration resulted in faster drug release and decreased the bioadhesive strength of the designed discs. Further, in rheological evaluation it was observed that viscosity of xanthan gum gel reduces with increasing concentration of calcium sulfate. Compatibility of drug with various excipients was assessed using DSC and FTIR techniques. PMID:23907052

  17. Modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Cinthya, Kuriakose; Jayakrishnan, A; Anilkumar, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2014-10-01

    The present work deals with development of modified gum arabic cross-linked gelatin scaffold for cell culture. A new biocompatible scaffold was developed by cross-linking gelatin (Gel) with gum arabic, a polysaccharide. Gum arabic was subjected to periodate oxidation to obtain gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). GAA was reacted with gelatin under appropriate pH to prepare the cross-linked hydrogel. Cross-linking occurred due to Schiff's base reaction between aldehyde groups of oxidized gum arabic and amino groups of gelatin. The scaffold prepared from the hydrogel was characterized by swelling properties, degree of cross-linking, in vitro degradation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cytocompatibility evaluation using L-929 and HepG2 cells confirmed non-cytotoxic and non-adherent nature of the scaffold. These properties are essential for generating multicellular spheroids and hence the scaffold is proposed to be a suitable candidate for spheroid cell culture. PMID:25175214

  18. Sulfation of Aegle marmelos gum: synthesis, physico-chemical and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Manish; Rana, Vikas; Kumar, Vineet; Singh, Ram S; Kennedy, John F; Tiwary, Ashok K

    2013-02-15

    The present investigation was aimed at optimizing the conditions for preparing sulfated derivative of gum obtained from partially ripe fruits of Aegle marmelos. Elemental analysis, FTIR-ATR and NMR studies confirmed successful sulfation. The ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to pyridine exerted maximum influence on the degree of substitution followed by reaction temperature and reaction time. The sulfated derivative showed higher swelling in both acidic and alkaline pH as compared to unmodified gum. It also possessed higher negative zeta potential, higher viscosity, work of shear, firmness, consistency, cohesiveness and index of viscosity as compared to both unmodified gum as well as sodium alginate. Sulfated derivative was superior to unmodified gum and sodium alginate in terms of antimicrobial and anticoagulant activity. The sulfated sample appears to be a potential substitute over the unmodified gum sample and sodium alginate for modulating physicochemical properties of food and drug release dosage forms. PMID:23399204

  19. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (part 1): porous medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging.

    PubMed

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in porous media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in porous media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative impact on the permeability of the porous medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60°C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a porous medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in porous media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries. PMID:25065767

  20. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (Part 1): Porous medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in porous media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in porous media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative impact on the permeability of the porous medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60 °C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4 g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a porous medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in porous media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries.

  1. Antinociceptive activity of Astragalus gummifer gum (gum tragacanth) through the adrenergic system: A in vivo study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Keyhani, Leila; Heydari, Mehrangiz; Dashti-R, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Iranian traditional medicine, gum obtained from Astragalus gummifer and some other species of Astragalus was used as analgesic agent. Objective: In this study, we investigated the antinociceptive effect of several concentrations (125, 250, and 500 ?g/kg body weight) of Astragalus gummifer gum (AGG) on thermal and acetic acid induced pain in mice. Materials and Methods: AGG was dissolved in distillated water and injected i.p to male mice 15 minute before the onset of experiment. Writhing and hot-plate tests were applied to study the analgesic effect of AGG and compared with that of diclofenac sodium (30 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (8 mg/kg, i.p). To investigate the mechanisms involved in antinociception, yohimbine, naloxone, glibenclamide, and theophylline were used in writhing test. These drugs were injected intraperitoneally 15 min before the administration of AGG. The number of writhes were counted in 30 minutes and analyzed. Results: AGG exhibited a significant antinociceptive effect and the most effective dose of AGG was 500 ?g/kg. The most maximum possible effect (%MPE) was observed (117.4%) 15 min after drug administration. The %inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing in AGG 125, 250 and 500 was 47%, 50% and 54% vs %15 of control and 66.3% of diclofenac sodium group. The antinociceptive effect induced by this gum in the writhing test was reversed by the systemic administration of yohimbine (?2-adrenergic antagonist), but naloxone, glibenclamide, and theophylline did not reverse this effect. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicated that AGG induced its antinociceptive through the adrenergic system. PMID:25878459

  2. Gum containing calcium fluoride reinforces enamel subsurface lesions in situ.

    PubMed

    Kitasako, Y; Sadr, A; Hamba, H; Ikeda, M; Tagami, J

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing gum containing phosphoryl oligosaccharides of calcium (POs-Ca) and a low concentration of fluoride (F) on the hardness of enamel subsurface lesions, utilizing a double-blind, randomized, and controlled in situ model. Fifteen individuals wore removable lingual appliances with 3 bovine-enamel insets containing subsurface demineralized lesions. Three times a day for 14 days, they chewed one of the 3 chewing gums (placebo, POs-Ca, POs-Ca+F). After the treatment period, cross-sectional mineral content, nanoindentation hardness, and fluoride ion mapping by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) were evaluated. Although there were no statistical differences in overall mineral content and hardness recovery rates between POs-Ca and POs-Ca+F subsurface lesions (p > 0.05), nanoindentation at 1-?m distance increments from the surface showed statistical differences in hardness recovery rate between POs-Ca and POs-Ca+F in the superficial 20-?m region (p < 0.05). Fluoride mapping revealed distribution of the ion up to 20 ?m from the surface in the POs-Ca+F group. Nanoindentation and TOF-SIMS results highlighted the benefits of bioavailability of fluoride ion on reinforcement of the superficial zone of subsurface lesions in situ (NCT01377493). PMID:22337700

  3. New structural features of Acacia tortuosa gum exudate.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Maritza; Beltrán, Olga; Rincón, Fernando; León de Pinto, Gladys; Igartuburu, José Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Acacia tortuosa produces a clear gum, very soluble in water. Previous reports showed that it was constituted by four fractions, one of them an arabinogalactan-protein complex. The elucidation of the A. tortuosa gum structure by the combination of classical chemical methods, size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy, was the objective of this investigation. The data obtained show that the heteropolysaccharide is an arabinogalactan type II, highly ramified, with lateral chains at C-2 as well as at C-6 of the galactose 3-O residues; mono-O-substituted galactoses were not detected. There are residues of mannose, the arabinose, pyranose predominantly, is terminal and 2-O-linked. The abundance of the 4-O-methyl-?-d-glucuronic acid was not previously reported. The proteic fraction is probably represented by an arabinogalactan-protein complex that binds poorly with ?-glucosyl Yariv reagent, and two glycoproteins. The NMR spectra suggest that the carbohydrate links to hydroxyproline through the galactose (galactosylation). PMID:25842315

  4. Mechanically modified xanthan gum: Rheology and polydispersity aspects.

    PubMed

    Eren, Necla Mine; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo

    2015-12-10

    Xanthan gum solutions were treated with high-pressure homogenization (HPH) in order to provide alternative treatments to enzymatic and chemical modification of this carbohydrate. Rheological properties of the treated and control samples were investigated in detail to gain an understanding of functional consequences of physical modification. The molecular structural properties were investigated via Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with Multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and Circular dichroism (CD). Structured network of xanthan gum solutions was lost gradually depending on the severity of the HPH treatment as evidenced by the observed changes in the viscosity and viscoelasticity of the treated solutions. Reduction in molecular weight and a significant increase in polydispersity of the polymer were the expected causes of these rheological changes. Observed increase in hydrodynamic volume upon HPH treatment was not surprising and attributed to the loss of structured networks. Changes in the rheological and structural characteristics of biopolymer were irreversible and significant recovery was not detected over a period of 11 weeks. PMID:26428149

  5. Improved welan gum production by Alcaligenes sp. ATCC31555 from pretreated cane molasses.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongxia; Liu, Min; Yu, Pingru; Zhang, Shaozhi; Suo, Yukai; Luo, Ping; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jufang

    2015-09-20

    Welan gum production by Alcaligenes sp. ATCC31555 from cane molasses was studied in batch fermentation to reduce production costs and enhance gum production. The pretreatment of cane molasses, agitation speed and the addition of supplements were investigated to optimize the process. Sulfuric acid hydrolysis was found to be the optimal pretreatment, resulting in a maximum gum concentration of 33.5 g/L, which is 50.0% higher than those obtained from the molasses' mother liquor. Agitation at 600 rpm at 30°C and addition of 10% n-dodecane following fermentation for 36 h increased the maximum gum production up to 41.0 ± 1.41 g/L, which is 49.1% higher than the greatest welan gum concentration in the literature so far. The welan gum product showed an acceptable molecular weight, similar rheological properties and better thermal stability to that obtained from glucose. These results indicate that cane molasses may be a suitable and inexpensive substrate for cost-effective industrial-scale welan gum production. PMID:26050885

  6. Viscosity of gums in vitro and their ability to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Brenelli, S L; Campos, S D; Saad, M J

    1997-12-01

    Experiments were carried out in vitro with three viscous polysaccharides (guar gum, pectin, and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) of similar initial viscosity submitted to conditions that mimic events occurring in the stomach and duodenum, and their viscosity in these situations was compared to their actions on postprandial hyperglycemia in normal human subjects. Guar gum showed greater viscosity than the other gums during acidification and/or alkalinization and also showed larger effects on plasma glucose levels (35% reduction in maximum rise in plasma glucose) and on the total area under the curve of plasma glucose (control: 20,314 +/- 1007 mg dl-1 180 min-1 vs guar gum: 18,277 +/- 699 mg dl-1 180 min-1, P < 0.01). Pectin, which showed a marked reduction in viscosity at 37 degrees C and after events mimicking those that occur in the stomach and duodenum, did not have a significant effect on postprandial hyperglycemia. The performance of viscosity and the glycemia response to CMC were at an intermediate level between guar gum and pectin. In conclusion, these data suggest that temperature, the process of acidification, alkalinization and exposure to intestinal ions induce different viscosity changes in gums having similar initial viscosity, establishing a direct relationship between a minor decrease of gum viscosity in vitro and a reduction of postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:9686163

  7. Effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain and fatigue in human jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Farella, M; Bakke, M; Michelotti, A; Martina, R

    2001-04-01

    Gum chewing has been accepted as an adjunct to oral hygiene, as salivary stimulant and vehicle for various agents, as well as for jaw muscle training. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain, fatigue and pressure tenderness of the masticatory muscles. Fifteen women without temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were requested to perform one of the following chewing tasks in three separate sessions: chewing a very hard gum, chewing a soft gum, and empty-chewing with no bolus. Unilateral chewing of gum or empty chewing was performed for 40 min at a constant rate of 80 cycles/min. In each session, perceived muscle pain and masticatory fatigue were rated on visual analog scales (VAS) before, throughout, and after the chewing task. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were assessed before and immediately after the chewing tasks, and again after 24 h. The VAS scores for pain and fatigue significantly increased only during the hard gum chewing, and after 10 min of recovery VAS scores had decreased again, almost to their baseline values. No significant changes were found for PPTs either after hard or soft gum chewing. The findings indicate that the jaw muscles recover quickly from prolonged chewing activity in subjects without TMD. PMID:11347660

  8. Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew P.; Smith, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies) examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on well-being and performance, as well as postwork mood and cognitive performance. In Study 4, performance and well-being were reported throughout the workday and at the end of the day, and heart rate and cortisol were measured. Under experimental conditions, gum was associated with higher alertness regardless of whether performance tasks were completed and altered sustained attention. Rate of chewing and subjective force of chewing did not alter mood but had some limited effects on attention. Chewing gum during the workday was associated with higher productivity and fewer cognitive problems, raised cortisol levels in the morning, and did not affect heart rate. The results emphasise that chewing gum can attenuate reductions in alertness, suggesting that chewing gum enhances worker performance. PMID:26075253

  9. [Sugar of substitute stevioside in chewing gum: comparative double blind controllable study].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, V A; Beliaev, V V; Zubtsov, V A; Esaian, L K; Namestnikova, I V

    2011-01-01

    In double blind controllable study on 126 volunteers - students of medical academy - influence on ?? the mixed saliva of 5 kinds of chewing gums with the different contents of substitute of sugar as xylitol and sorbitol, and also the chewing sweets R.O.C.S., two kinds of chewing gums containing a basis with substitute of sugar stevioside (1.25 and 2.5%) and placebo (a basis without additives) were investigated. Products chewed within 10 minutes. In one of groups surveyed such chewing was preceded with rinsing a mouth by a test solution of saccharose. ?? determined within 30 minutes. At chewing gums with substitute of sugar displacement ?? the mixed saliva in the alkaline side was revealed a different degree. Thus gums with stevioside did not concede and even surpassed in this action of chewing gums with other substitutes of sugar. In comparison with placebo chewing gums and sweets restored acid-alkaline balance of oral cavities faster. Hence, use of stevioside in structure of chewing gum allows at preservation of its positive actions in oral cavity essentially to reduce concentration substitute of sugar and, hence, its collateral action by an organism. PMID:21378715

  10. Rheological Behavior of Xanthan Gum Solution Related to Shear Thinning Fluid Delivery for Subsurface Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Szecsody, James E.

    2013-01-15

    Xanthan gum, a biopolymer, forms shear thinning fluids which can be used as delivery media to improve the distribution of remedial amendments injected into heterogeneous subsurface environments. The rheological behavior of the shear thinning solution needs to be known to develop an appropriate design for field injection. In this study, the rheological properties of xanthan gum solutions were obtained under various chemical and environmental conditions relevant to delivery of remedial amendments to groundwater. Higher xanthan concentration raised the absolute solution viscosity and increased the degree of shear thinning. Addition of remedial amendments (e.g., phosphate, sodium lactate, ethyl lactate) caused the dynamic viscosity of xanthan gum to decrease, but the solutions maintained shear-thinning properties. Use of simple salt (e.g. Na+, Ca2+) to increase the solution ionic strength also decreased the dynamic viscosity of xanthan and the degree of shear thinning, although the effect is a function of xanthan gum concentration and diminished as the xanthan gum concentration was increased. At high xanthan concentration, addition of salt to the solution increased dynamic viscosity. In the absence of sediments, xanthan gum solutions maintain their viscosity properties for months. However, xanthan gum solutions were shown to lose dynamic viscosity over a period of days to weeks when contacted with saturated site sediment. Loss of viscosity is attributed to physical and biodegradation processes.

  11. Reactivity recovery of guar gum coupled mZVI by means of enzymatic breakdown and rinsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Chen, Hong; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2012-11-01

    Microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) reduces chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) to harmless compounds, but the sedimentation of the mZVI particles in the injection fluid limits the injectability of the particles during field applications. In this study, mZVI particles in suspension were stabilized by green polymer guar gum, which had a positive impact on mZVI stability, but decreased the reactivity of the particles towards CAHs by 1 to 8 times. Guar gum (GG) was found to adsorb onto the mZVI surface, inhibiting contact between the chlorinated compounds and the reactive iron surface. Indications were found for intermolecular hydrogen bonding between mZVI and the guar gum. Subsequent addition of commercially available enzymes resulted in the cleavage of the polysaccharide guar gum into lower molecular fragments, but not in improved reactivity. The reactivity recovery of guar gum coupled mZVI was recovered after intensive rinsing of the iron particles, removing the guar gum fragments from the particles. Overall, this study shows that CAHs can be treated efficiently by guar gum stabilized mZVI after reactivation by means of enzymatic breakdown and rinsing.

  12. Thiol derivatization of Xanthan gum and its evaluation as a mucoadhesive polymer.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Meenakshi; Ahuja, Munish; Mehta, Heena

    2015-10-20

    Thiol-derivatization of xanthan gum polysaccharide was carried out by esterification with mercaptopropionic acid and thioglycolic acid. Thiol-derivatization was confirmed by Fourier-transformed infra-red spectroscopy. Xanthan-mercaptopropionic acid conjugate and xanthan-thioglycolic acid conjugate were found to possess 432.68mM and 465.02mM of thiol groups as determined by Ellman's method respectively. Comparative evaluation of mucoadhesive property of metronidazole loaded buccal pellets of xanthan and thiolated xanthan gum using chicken buccal pouch membrane revealed higher ex vivo bioadhesion time of thiolated xanthan gum as compared to xanthan gum. Improved mucoadhesive property of thiolated xanthan gum over the xanthan gum can be attributed to the formation of disulfide bond between mucus and thiolated xanthan gum. In vitro release study conducted using phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) revealed a sustained release profile of metronidazole from thiolated xanthan pellets as compared to xanthan pellets. In conclusion, thiolation of xanthan improves its mucoadhesive property and sustained the release of metronidazole over a prolonged period. PMID:26256167

  13. Native and structurally modified gum arabic: exploring the effect of the gum's microstructure in obtaining electroactive nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cornelsen, Patricia A; Quintanilha, Ronaldo C; Vidotti, Marcio; Gorin, Philip A J; Simas-Tosin, Fernanda F; Riegel-Vidotti, Izabel C

    2015-03-30

    Electroactive nanoparticles combining gum arabic (GA) and polyaniline (PANI) were prepared by chemical synthesis. The gum consists of highly branched anionic polysaccharides with some protein content. GA was structurally modified by Smith controlled degradation, in order to reduce its degree of branching (GAD), aiming the elucidation of the relationship between the structure and the properties of complex polysaccharides. The modification was studied by SEC, GC-MS, (13)C NMR and colorimetric methods. GAD has lower molecular mass, lower degree of branching and lower uronic acid content. Besides it is enriched in galactose and protein when compared with GA. The obtained composites (GA-PANI and GAD-PANI) were thoroughly characterized. Although the use of both polysaccharides (GA and GAD) produced highly stable electroactive nanoparticles, the best combination of properties was achieved for GA-PANI. The sample GAD was not able to prevent the occurrence of crosslinking between PANI chains, possibly due to its lower microstructural complexity which diminishes the occurrence of hydrogen bonds between the polymers. PMID:25563942

  14. Rheology of dispersions of xanthan gum, locust bean gum and mixed biopolymer gel with silicon dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jordan R M; Kent, Katherine E; Brown, Jennifer R

    2015-03-01

    Mixed xanthan gum (XG) and locust bean gum (LBG) biopolymers form thermally reversible gels of interest in tissue engineering and drug delivery. 1% solutions of XG, LBG and 1:1 ratio XG/LBG mixed gels (LX) containing silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles were rheologically characterized with respect to nanoparticle concentration and temperature. 10% nanoparticles in XG created larger domains of associated polymer, resulting in enhanced viscosity and viscoelastic moduli. In LBG with 10% particles, transient viscosity and a gel-sol transition occurred due to particle bridging and aggregation. In the LX gel, 10% SiO2 particles caused an increase in elasticity. When ramping temperature from 25°C to 85°C, the complex modulus for all solutions containing 10% SiO2 was relatively constant, indicating that nanoparticles counteracted the effect of temperature on the material properties. Understanding the influence of nanoparticle loading on material properties is necessary for biopolymer material development where property prediction and control are critical. PMID:25579932

  15. Compatibility of chewing gum excipients with the amino acid L-cysteine and stability of the active substance in directly compressed chewing gum formulation.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Alma; Björkqvist, Mikko; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Juppo, Anne Mari; Marvola, Martti; Sivén, Mia

    2008-09-01

    Using L-cysteine chewing gum to eliminate carcinogenic acetaldehyde in the mouth during smoking has recently been introduced. Besides its efficacy, optimal properties of the gum include stability of the formulation. However, only a limited number of studies exist on the compatibility of chewing gum excipients and stability of gum formulations. In this study we used the solid-state stability method, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and isothermal microcalorimetry to investigate the interactions between L-cysteine (as a free base or as a salt) and excipients commonly used in gum. These excipients include xylitol, sorbitol, magnesium stearate, Pharmagum S, Every T Toco and Smily 2 Toco. The influence of temperature and relative humidity during a three-month storage period on gum formulation was also studied. Cysteine alone was stable at 25 degrees C/60% RH and 45 degrees C/75% RH whether stored in open or closed glass ambers. As a component of binary mixtures, cysteine base remained stable at lower temperature and humidity but the salt form was incompatible with all the studied excipients. The results obtained with the different methods corresponded with each other. At high temperature and humidity, excipient incompatibility with both forms of cysteine was obvious. Such sensitivity to heat and humidity during storage was also seen in studies on gum formulations. It was also found that cysteine is sensitive to high pressure and increase in temperature induced by compression. The results suggest that the final product should be well protected from temperature and humidity and, for example, cooling process before compression should be considered. PMID:18718115

  16. Ex vivo skin permeation and retention studies on chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan ternary nanogel prepared by in situ ionic gelation technique--a tool for controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Abioye, Amos Olusegun; Issah, Sureya; Kola-Mustapha, Adeola Tawakalitu

    2015-07-25

    The chemical potentials of drug-polymer electrostatic interaction have been utilized to develop a novel ternary chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan nanogel as controlled transdermal delivery tool for ibuprofen. The ternary nanogels were prepared by a combination of electrostatic nanoassembly and ionic gelation techniques. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding between ibuprofen and chitosan were confirmed with FTIR, while DSC, TGA and SEM confirmed the physical state, thermal and morphological characteristics, respectively. The ex vivo delivery of ibuprofen onto and across the skin was evaluated based on system specific drug release parameters such as steady state permeation rate, permeability coefficient, permeability enhancement ratio, skin/gel partition coefficient, diffusion coefficient, lag time and release rate constant and mechanisms of release were determined using mathematical models. Interaction between ibuprofen and chitosan produced new spherical eutectic nanoconjugates with remarkable decrease in particle size of ibuprofen from 4580 (length-to-breadth aspect ratio) to a minimum of 14.15 nm (324-times), and thermally stable amorphous characteristics. The nanogels exhibited significant elastic and pseudoplastic characteristics dictated by the concentration of chitosan with maximum swelling capacity of 775% w/w at 6.55 mM chitosan compared with 281.16 and 506.50% for plain gellan and control ibuprofen hydrogel, respectively. Chitosan enhanced the skin penetration, permeability and the rate of transdermal release of ibuprofen by a factor of 4, dictated by the extent of ibuprofen-chitosan ionic interaction and its concentration. The major mechanism of ibuprofen release through the pig skin was drug diffusion however drug partition and matrix erosion also occurred. It was evident that ternary nanogels are novel formulations with potential application in controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen. PMID:25997660

  17. A radio-polarisation and rotation measure study of the Gum Nebula and its environment

    E-print Network

    Purcell, C R; Sun, X H; Carretti, E; Bernardi, G; Haverkorn, M; Kesteven, M J; Poppi, S; Schnitzeler, D H F M; Staveley-Smith, L

    2015-01-01

    The Gum Nebula is 36 degree wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only 450 pc. It has been hypothesised to be an old supernova remnant, fossil HII region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H-alpha data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionised gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte-Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H-halpha data to constrain average electron density in the shell $n_e$. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in RM we find $n_e=1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.4} {\\rm cm}^{-3}$, angular radius $\\phi_{\\rm outer}=22.7^{+0.1}_{-0.1} {\\rm deg}$, shell thickness $dr=18.5^{+1.5}_{-1.4} {\\rm pc}$, ambient magnetic field strength $B_0=3.9^{+4.9}_{-2.2} \\mu{\\rm G}$ and warm ...

  18. Application and Characterization of Gum from Bombax buonopozense Calyxesas an Excipient in Tablet Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Ngwuluka, Ndidi C.; Kyari, Jehu; Taplong, John; Uwaezuoke, Onyinye J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore gum from Bombax buonopozense calyxes as a binding agent in formulation of immediate release dosage forms using wet granulation method. The granules were characterized to assess the flow and compression properties and when compressed, non-compendial and compendial tests were undertaken to assess the tablet properties for tablets prepared with bombax gum in comparison with those prepared with tragacanth and acacia gums. Granules prepared with bombax exhibited good flow and compressible properties with angle of repose 28.60°, Carr’s compressibility of 21.30% and Hausner’s quotient of 1.27. The tablets were hard, but did not disintegrate after one hour. Furthermore, only 52.5% of paracetamol was released after one hour. The drug release profile followed zero order kinetics. Tablets prepared with bombax gum have the potential to deliver drugs in a controlled manner over a prolonged period at a constant rate. PMID:24300296

  19. Effect of chewing gum on the postoperative recovery of gastrointestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Wei; Chen, Gang; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction remains a source of morbidity and the major determinant of length of stay after abdominal operation. There are many different reasons for postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction such as stress response, perioperative interventions, bowel manipulation and so on. The mechanism of enhanced recovery from postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction with the help of chewing gum is believed to be the cephalic-vagal stimulation of digestion which increases the promotability of neural and humoral factors that act on different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, there were a series of randomized controlled trials to confirm the role of chewing gum in the recovery of gastrointestinal function. The results suggested that chewing gum enhanced early recovery of bowel function following abdominal surgery expect the gastrointestinal surgery. However, the effect of chewing gum in gastrointestinal surgery was controversial. PMID:26550107

  20. Origin and thermodynamic properties of the instability of synthetic azo colorants in gum arabic solutions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yapeng; Al-Assaf, Saphwan; Sakata, Makoto; Phillips, Glyn O; Schultz, Matthias; Monnier, Vivianne

    2007-10-31

    The instability of some industrially important synthetic azo colorants, including sunset yellow, azorubine, and allura red, toward gum arabic in aqueous solution has been a long-standing problem for the beverage and confectionery industries. Precipitation of these colorants causes the deterioration of product appearance and properties. This work examines the origin and nature of the problem by analysis of the precipitate and thermodynamic studies of gum arabic-colorant interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The presence of divalent alkaline earth metals in gum arabic samples, that is, calcium and magnesium, is shown to be responsible for the precipitation of the azo colorants. There is no direct interaction between gum arabic and the colorant molecules, and the precipitate is formed likely due to the mediation/bridging by the divalent cations. The thermodynamic knowledge gained from the ITC studies, for example, binding affinity, stoichiometry, and enthalpy, enables interpretation of many industrial observations. PMID:17910512

  1. ISO/GUM UNCERTAINTIES AND CIAAW (UNCERTAINTY TREATMENT FOR RECOMMENDED ATOMIC WEIGHTS AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCES)

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2007-07-23

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published a Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). The IUPAC Commission on Isotopic Abundance and Atomic Weight (CIAAW) began attaching uncertainty limits to their recommended values about forty years ago. CIAAW's method for determining and assigning uncertainties has evolved over time. We trace this evolution to their present method and their effort to incorporate the basic ISO/GUM procedures into evaluations of these uncertainties. We discuss some dilemma the CIAAW faces in their present method and whether it is consistent with the application of the ISO/GUM rules. We discuss the attempt to incorporate variations in measured isotope ratios, due to natural fractionation, into the ISO/GUM system. We make some observations about the inconsistent treatment in the incorporation of natural variations into recommended data and uncertainties. A recommendation for expressing atomic weight values using a tabulated range of values for various chemical elements is discussed.

  2. Effect of concentration on shear and extensional rheology of guar gum solutions

    E-print Network

    Torres, M. D.; Hallmark, B.; Wilson, D. I.

    2014-03-06

    and stabilising agent (Duxenneuner et al., 2008; Bourbon et al., 58 2010). In contrast to synthetic polymers, guar gum can form highly viscous solutions at low 59 concentrations (electrolytes and heating... temperature, between 19 °C and 21 °C, overnight to ensure complete hydration of the guar gum. 150 Some air was incorporated into the solution during stirring and deaerated samples of the continuous 151 phase were obtained by centrifugation at 2250 rpm (500 g...

  3. Strong Band-Edge Emission from ZnS Quantum Dots Stabilized by Gum Arabic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatim, Dirar Mohamed El-Khair

    2008-12-01

    ZnS quantum dots (QDs), prepared by soft-condensation, exhibit robust structure of a quantum size equal 3.13 nm mediated two-dimensional gum Arabic surfactant as characterized by scan tunnelling microscope (STM). Strong blue-shifted absorption and emission bands are depicted by optical characterization even for the sample stored under ambient condition for two weeks. These enhancements can be attributed to the completely passivated surface trap states by Gum Arabic.

  4. Pasting properties of Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) kernel powder in the presence of Xanthan, Carboxymethylcellulose and Locust bean gum in comparison to Rice and Potato flour.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Maninder; Sandhu, Kawaljit Singh; Kaur, Jasmeen

    2013-08-01

    Effects of addition of different levels of gums (xanthan, carboxymethylcellulose and locust bean gum) on the pasting properties of tamarind kernel, potato and rice flour were studied by using Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA). Tamarind kernel powder (TKP) varied significantly (P?gum mixtures were dependent upon the concentration and type of the gums. Peak, breakdown and final viscosity increased with increase in gum concentration in the flour/gum mixture, but the effect was more pronounced for rice and potato flour than for TKP which showed much lower viscosity responses to all of the gums. Among the three gums studied, the increase in viscosity was significantly higher with addition of locust bean gum followed by xanthan while the lowest was observed with carboxymethylcellulose. PMID:24425986

  5. A Radio-Polarisation and Rotation Measure Study of the Gum Nebula and Its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, C. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Sun, X. H.; Carretti, E.; Bernardi, G.; Haverkorn, M.; Kesteven, M. J.; Poppi, S.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Gum Nebula is 36°-wide shell-like emission nebula at a distance of only ˜450 pc. It has been hypothesized to be an old supernova remnant, fossil H ii region, wind-blown bubble, or combination of multiple objects. Here we investigate the magneto-ionic properties of the nebula using data from recent surveys: radio-continuum data from the NRAO VLA and S-band Parkes All Sky Surveys, and H ? data from the Southern H-Alpha Sky Survey Atlas. We model the upper part of the nebula as a spherical shell of ionized gas expanding into the ambient medium. We perform a maximum-likelihood Markov chain Monte Carlo fit to the NVSS rotation measure data, using the H ? data to constrain average electron density in the shell ne. Assuming a latitudinal background gradient in rotation measure, we find {{n}e}=1.3-0.4+0.4 c{{m}-3}, angular radius {{? }outer}=22\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7-0.1+0.1, shell thickness dr=18.5-1.4+1.5 pc, ambient magnetic field strength {{B}0}=3.9-2.2+4.9 ? G, and warm gas filling factor f=0.3-0.1+0.3. We constrain the local, small-scale (˜260 pc) pitch-angle of the ordered Galactic magnetic field to +7{}^\\circ ? \\wp ? +44{}^\\circ , which represents a significant deviation from the median field orientation on kiloparsec scales (˜-7.°2). The moderate compression factor X=6.0-2.5+5.1 at the edge of the H ? shell implies that the “old supernova remnant” origin is unlikely. Our results support a model of the nebula as a H ii region around a wind-blown bubble. Analysis of depolarization in 2.3 GHz S-PASS data is consistent with this hypothesis and our best-fitting values agree well with previous studies of interstellar bubbles.

  6. Implications of partial conjugation of whey protein isolate to durian seed gum through Maillard reactions: foaming properties, water holding capacity and interfacial activity.

    PubMed

    Amid, Bahareh Tabatabaee; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Poorazarang, Hashem; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the conjugation of durian seed gum (DSG) with whey protein isolate (WPI) through Maillard reactions. Subsequently, the functional properties of durian seed gum in the non-conjugated (control sample) and conjugated forms were compared with several commercial gums (i.e., Arabic gum, sodium alginate, kappa carrageenan, guar gum, and pectin). The current study revealed that the conjugation of durian seed gum with whey protein isolate significantly (p < 0.05) improved its foaming properties. In this study, the conjugated durian seed gum produced the most stable foam among all samples. On the other hand, the emulsion stabilized with the conjugated durian seed gum also showed more uniform particles with a larger specific surface area than the emulsion containing the non-conjugated durian seed gum. The conjugated durian seed gum showed significant different foaming properties, specific surface area, particle uniformity and water holding capacity (WHC) as compared to the target polysaccharide gums. The conjugated durian seed gum showed more similar functional properties to Arabic gum rather than other studied gums. PMID:24322494

  7. Effects of nicotine-containing chewing gum on oral soft and hard tissues: A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Christen, A G; Beiswanger, B B; Mallatt, M E; Tomich, C E; Drook, C A; McDonald, J L; Olson, B L; Stookey, G K

    1985-01-01

    A double-blind clinical trial was conducted to determine whether the use of a chewing gum containing 2.0 mg nicotine (as an adjunct to a stop-smoking program) had any effects upon oral health. A total of 193 adults who smoked cigarettes volunteered with informed consent, were given routine dental prophylaxes, and were examined for the presence of plaque, stained pellicle, gingivitis, calculus, and general oral pathosis. The subjects were then randomly assigned to use either a nicotine-containing or a placebo chewing gum. After 15 weeks the subjects were recalled and re-examined. Smoking cessation was determined through questionnaire and analysis of the carbon monoxide content of alveolar air. At the completion of the study, 79 subjects had used the placebo gum and 78 had used the nicotine gum. Data analysis indicated that the nicotine chewing gum had no significant influence on any of the oral health parameters graded, as compared to the placebo gum. The continuation of smoking, however, was associated with significant increases in gingivitis and calculus rates. PMID:3919352

  8. Glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism after guar gum ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes Nunes, C.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six non-anaesthetized Large White pigs (mean body weight 59 +/- 1.7 kg) were fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein and with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery. The animals were provided a basal none-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 6% guar gum (diet B) or 15% purified cellulose (diet C). The diets were given for 1 week and according to a replicated 3 x 3 latin-square design. On the last day of each adaptation period test meals of 800 g were given prior to blood sampling. The sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced the glucose absorption as well as the insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production. However, the reduction in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum was not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly produced by the gut. The liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion also appeared to decrease pancreatic glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very little effect on the parameters considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the latter internal metabolic effects.

  9. Prosopis alba exudate gum as excipient for improving fish oil stability in alginate-chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Vasile, Franco Emanuel; Romero, Ana María; Judis, María Alicia; Mazzobre, María Florencia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to employ an exudate gum obtained from a South American wild tree (Prosopis alba), as wall material component to enhance the oxidative stability of fish oil encapsulated in alginate-chitosan beads. For this purpose, beads were vacuum-dried and stored under controlled conditions. Oxidation products, fatty acid profiles and lipid health indices were measured during storage. Alginate-chitosan interactions and the effect of gum were manifested in the FT-IR spectra. The inclusion of the gum in the gelation media allowed decreasing the oxidative damage during storage in comparison to the free oil and alginate-chitosan beads. The gum also improved wall material properties, providing higher oil retention during the drying step and subsequent storage. Fatty acids quality and lipid health indices were widely preserved in beads containing the gum. Present results showed a positive influence of the gum on oil encapsulation and stability, being the main mechanism attributed to a physical barrier effect. PMID:26213081

  10. Effect of Chewing Xylitol Containing and Herbal Chewing Gums on Salivary Mutans Streptococcus Count among School Children

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Sangeeta; Lakashminarayan, Nagesh; Kemparaj, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study aims to assess and compare the reduction in salivary Mutans Streptococci counts after chewing Xylitol, herbal and placebo gums among high school children. Methods: The study was conducted among 72 school children (12–15 years) from 3 randomly selected schools (blocks). Xylitol, herbal and placebo gums were randomly allocated to 3 blocks. Subjects were instructed to chew one pellet four times a day for 21 days. The mean reduction in salivary Streptococcus mutans count was assessed. Results: The 100% Xylitol sweetened chewing gum “Xylitol”has shown statistically significant reduction in salivary Mutans Streptococci colony forming units at the end of 21 days (P < 0.01). The reduction was not statistically significant in herbal and placebo chewing gum. Conclusions: Hundred percentage Xylitol sweetened chewing gum was found to be more effective in reducing salivary Mutans Streptococci count when compared to herbal and placebo chewing gums. PMID:26097673

  11. Changes in electrical energy requirements to operate an ice cream freezer as a function of sweeteners and gums

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.E.; Bakshi, A.S.; Gay, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in electrical energy required to operate a continuous freezer were monitored for various ice cream formulae. Ice cream formulae consisted of nine different combinations of sucrose, 36 DE corn syrup, and 42 high fructose corn syrup as well as two ratios of guar gum to locust bean gum. Within the same sweetening system, a mix high in locust bean gum tended to have a lower energy demand than mix with large amounts of guar gum. This was especially pronounced in mixes with 50% 42 high fructose corn syrup and/or 50% 36 DE corn syrup solids.

  12. Study of water vapour permeability of protein and gum-based edible films by a photothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás, S. A.; Saavedra, R.; Cruz, A.; Pedroza-Islas, R.; San Martín, E.

    2005-06-01

    The water vapour permeability of protein and gum-based edible films was studied by means of a photothermal method. The films were prepared with two basic ingredients, whey protein concentrate and mesquite gum, according to the proportions 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100 (weight:weight). The water vapour diffusion coefficient of the analyzed films was found within the interval 0.37 × 10-6 to 2.04 × 10-6 cm^2/s, increasing linearly by increasing the mesquite gum composition in the films. The incorporation of mesquite gum in films produces less effective moisture barriers due to its highly hydrophilic property.

  13. Jumping mechanisms in gum treehopper insects (Hemiptera, Eurymelinae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2013-07-15

    Jumping in a species of Australian gum treehopper was analysed from high-speed images. Pauroeurymela amplicincta adults and nymphs lived together in groups that were tended by ants, but only adults jumped. The winged adults with a body mass of 23 mg and a body length of 7 mm had some morphological characteristics intermediate between those of their close relatives the leafhoppers (Cicadellidae) and the treehoppers (Membracidae). They, like leafhoppers, lacked the prominent prothoracic helmets of membracid treehoppers, and their large hind coxae were linked by press studs (poppers), that are present in leafhoppers but not treehoppers. The hindlegs were only 30-40% longer than the other legs and 67% of body length. They are thus of similar proportion to the hindlegs of treehoppers but much shorter than those of most leafhoppers. Jumping was propelled by the hindlegs, which moved in the same plane as each other beneath and almost parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body. A jump was preceded by full levation of the coxo-trochanteral joints of the hindlegs. In its best jumps, the rapid depression of these joints then accelerated the insect in 1.4 ms to a take-off velocity of 3.8 m s(-1) so that it experienced a force of almost 280 g. In 22% of jumps, the wings opened before take-off but did not flap until the gum treehopper was airborne, when the body rotated little in any plane. The energy expended was 170 ?J, the power output was 122 mW and the force exerted was 64 mN. Such jumps are predicted to propel the insect forwards 1450 mm (200 times body length) and to a height of 430 mm if there is no effect of wind resistance. The power output per mass of jumping muscle far exceeded the maximum active contractile limit of muscle and indicates that a catapult-like action must be used. This eurymelid therefore out-performs both leafhoppers and treehoppers in i ts faster acceleration and in its higher take-off velocity. PMID:23619401

  14. Influence of xanthan gum on the structural characteristics of myofibrillar proteins treated by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Villamonte, Gina; Jury, Vanessa; Jung, Stéphanie; de Lamballerie, Marie

    2015-03-01

    The effects of xanthan gum on the structural modifications of myofibrillar proteins (0.3 M NaCl, pH 6) induced by high pressure (200, 400, and 600 MPa, 6 min) were investigated. The changes in the secondary and tertiary structures of myofibrillar proteins were analyzed by circular dichroism. The protein denaturation was also evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry. Likewise, the protein surface hydrophobicity and the solubility of myofibrillar proteins were measured. High pressure (600 MPa) induced the loss of ?-helix structures and an increase of ?-sheet structures. However, the presence of xanthan gum hindered the former mechanism of protein denaturation by high pressure. In fact, changes in the secondary (600 MPa) and the tertiary structure fingerprint of high-pressure-treated myofibrillar proteins (400 to 600 MPa) were observed in the presence of xanthan gum. These modifications were confirmed by the thermal analysis, the thermal transitions of high-pressure (400 to 600 MPa)-treated myofibrillar proteins were modified in systems containing xanthan gum. As consequence, the high-pressure-treated myofibrillar proteins with xanthan gum showed increased solubility from 400 MPa, in contrast to high-pressure treatment (600 MPa) without xanthan gum. Moreover, the surface hydrophobicity of high-pressure-treated myofibrillar proteins was enhanced in the presence of xanthan gum. These effects could be due to the unfolding of myofibrillar proteins at high-pressure levels, which exposed sites that most likely interacted with the anionic polysaccharide. This study suggests that the role of food additives could be considered for the development of meat products produced by high-pressure processing. PMID:25656483

  15. Antiglycating potential of gum arabic capped-silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M; Ansari, Mohammad Azam; Choi, Inho; Khan, Haris M; Alzohairy, Mohammad A

    2014-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products are major contributors to the pathology of diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and atherosclerosis; accordingly, identification of antiglycation compounds is attracting considerable interest. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of gum arabic capped-silver nanoparticles on advanced glycation end products formation was monitored by several biophysical techniques. Silver nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet-visible, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Bovine serum albumin and methylglyoxal mixtures incubated with increasing concentrations of silver nanoparticles showed significant reductions in advanced glycation end product formation that were confirmed by ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques. High-performance liquid chromatography showed decreased adduct formation of glycated protein in the presence of silver nanoparticles. The structural changes induced by silver nanoparticles were further confirmed by circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Strong inhibition of advanced glycation end product formation was observed in the presence of elevated silver nanoparticles. The results of this study suggest that silver nanoparticles are a potent antiglycating agent. PMID:25080376

  16. Effect of molecular configuration of Xanthan gum drage reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochefort, Skip; Middleman, Stanley

    1986-01-01

    Drag reduction in turbulent pipe flow has been studied using dilute xanthan gum solutions. The primary goal of the studies was torelate the molecular configuration of xanthan in solutions of varying ionic strength to its effectiveness as a drag reducer. Xanthan solutions of various concentrations (10-250 wppm) in glycerine/water (12.5/87.5) and with 0.5%NaCl, added were studied over a wide Reynolds number range (1000< Re<2×104). A Rheometrics Fluids Rheometer was used to characterize the solutions in steady shear and to perform transient start-up experiments. The steady shear viscosity and transient shear stress overshoot are both significantly reduced with the addition of salt to the solution, indicating that the xanthan configuration is altered. The form of the drag reduction is similar to that which is expected for an extended molecule in dilute solution. For a given xanthan concentration, the drag reduction at high Reynolds numbers is also much lower in salt solution. Combining a knowledge of the molecular structure of xanthan and the results of recent analytical studies by several research groups, with the rheological data of this study, it is possible to speculate as to the configuration change which occurs with the addition of salt and to relate that to its effect on drag reduction. With this information, some insight into the mechanisms for drag reduction in semi-rigid polymer systems is obtained.

  17. Hormonal regulation of gummosis and composition of gums from bulbs of hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis).

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kensuke; Kotake, Toshihisa; Boncela, Anna Jarecka; Saniewski, Marian; Ueda, Junichi

    2015-02-01

    Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis) bulbs infected by Fusarium oxysporum showed the symptoms of gummosis. The purpose of this study was to clarify the hormonal regulation of gummosis and composition of gums from hyacinth bulbs. The application of ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid), an ethylene-releasing compound, at 2% (w/w, in lanolin) induced gummosis in hyacinth bulbs. Methyl jasmonate (JA-Me) at 1.5% (w/w, in lanolin) induced gummosis as well. Simultaneous application of JA-Me and ethephon further enhanced gummosis. Molecular mass distribution of hyacinth gums analyzed by gel permeation chromatography indicated that the gums were mainly homogenous polysaccharides with an average molecular weight of ca. 30kDa. Analysis of the sugar composition of the gums after hydrolysis revealed that the majority were arabinose (ca. 35%) and galactose (ca. 40%) together with small amounts of fucose, rhamnose and uronic acids (ca. 5%, respectively), suggesting that the gums are pectic arabinogalactans. These results indicate that jasmonates (JAs) interact with ethylene to stimulate sugar metabolism, producing pectic arabinogalactans, and vice versa, leading to gummosis. These findings, together with those from our previous studies in tulips (Tulipa gesneriana) and grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum), revealed that sugar metabolism and hormonal regulation relating to gummosis are different among species of bulbous plants. PMID:25462960

  18. Mechanical and barrier properties of guar gum based nano-composite films.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Chaturbhuj K; Gupta, Sumit; Bahadur, Jitendra; Mazumder, S; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun

    2015-06-25

    Guar gum based nano-composite films were prepared using organically modified (cloisite 20A) and unmodified (nanofil 116) nanoclays. Effect of nanoclay incorporation on mechanical strength, water vapor barrier property, chromatic characteristics and opacity of films was evaluated. Nano-composites were characterized using X-ray scattering, FTIR and scanning electron microscopy. A nanoclay concentration dependent increase in mechanical strength and reduction in water vapor transmission rate was observed. Films containing nanofil 116 (2.5% w/w guar gum) and closite 20A (10% w/w guar gum) demonstrated a 102% and 41% higher tensile strength, respectively, as compared to the control. Lower tensile strength of cloisite 20A films as compared to nanofil 116 films was due to its incompatibility with guar gum. X-ray scattering analysis revealed that interstitial spacing between nanofil 116 and cloisite 20A sheets increased due to intercalation by guar gum polymer. This resulted in improved mechanical and barrier properties of nano-composites compared to control. PMID:25839796

  19. Utilizing guar gum for development of "tabs in cap' system of losartan potassium for chronotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Guarav; Kumar, Anil; Pathak, Kamla

    2015-01-01

    The project was aimed to achieve biphasic pulsed drug release of losartan potassium by fabricating 'Tabs in cap' system wherein drug loaded tablets sandwiched the erodible guar gum time spacer tablet. The system was capsulated in non biodegradable body capped with water soluble cap. The system was investigated for in-vitro release and ex-vivo continuous dissolution-absorption and stability. The influence of spray dried lactose (SDL): guar gum ratio on lag time was investigated. In-vitro release capsule evidenced immediate release followed by delayed pulse (>90%) and a lag time 6h was achieved by maintaining an optimum ratio of SDL: guar gum in erodible guar gum tablet. Ex-vivo continuous dissolution-absorption study demonstrated two successive pulses for dissolution and indicated delay in absorption of drug. Histological study revealed viability of intestinal cells and the system had shelf- life of 15 months. Conclusively, using guar gum spacer tablet, biphasic pulsed drug release 'Tabs in Cap' system of losartan potassium was successfully developed that has potential for chronotherapeutics in hypertension. PMID:25268456

  20. Statistical experimental design optimization of rhamsan gum production by Sphingomonas sp. CGMCC 6833.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ying; Dong, Shu-Hao; Li, Sha; Chen, Xiao-Ye; Wu, Ding; Xu, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Rhamsan gum is a type of water-soluble exopolysaccharide produced by species of Sphingomonas bacteria. The optimal fermentation medium for rhamsan gum production by Sphingomonas sp. CGMCC 6833 was explored definition. Single-factor experiments indicate that glucose, soybean meal, K(2)HPO(4) and MnSO(4) compose the optimal medium along with and initial pH 7.5. To discover ideal cultural conditions for rhamsan gum production in a shake flask culture, response surface methodology was employed, from which the following optimal ratio was derived: 5.38 g/L soybean meal, 5.71 g/L K(2)HPO(4) and 0.32 g/L MnSO(4). Under ideal fermentation rhamsan gum yield reached 19.58 g/L ± 1.23 g/L, 42.09% higher than that of the initial medium (13.78 g/L ± 1.38 g/L). Optimizing the fermentation medium results in enhanced rhamsan gum production. PMID:25845540

  1. Structure and Mechanism of GumK, a Membrane-Associated Glucuronosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Barreras, M.; Salinas, S; Abdian, P; Kampel, M; Lelpi, L

    2008-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris GumK (?-1,2-glucuronosyltransferase) is a 44-kDa membrane-associated protein that is involved in the biosynthesis of xanthan, an exopolysaccharide crucial for this bacterium's phytopathogenicity. Xanthan also has many important industrial applications. The GumK enzyme is the founding member of the glycosyltransferase family 70 of carbohydrate-active enzymes, which is composed of bacterial glycosyltransferases involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis. No x-ray structures have been reported for this family. To better understand the mechanism of action of the bacterial glycosyltransferases in this family, the x-ray crystal structure of apo-GumK was solved at 1.9A resolution. The enzyme has two well defined Rossmann domains with a catalytic cleft between them, which is a typical feature of the glycosyltransferase B superfamily. Additionally, the crystal structure of GumK complexed with UDP was solved at 2.28A resolution. We identified a number of catalytically important residues, including Asp157, which serves as the general base in the transfer reaction. Residues Met231, Met273, Glu272, Tyr292, Met306, Lys307, and Gln310 interact with UDP, and mutation of these residues affected protein activity both in vitro and in vivo. The biological and structural data reported here shed light on the molecular basis for donor and acceptor selectivity in this glycosyltransferase family. These results also provide a rationale to obtain new polysaccharides by varying residues in the conserved ?/?/? structural motif of GumK.

  2. Nicotine Gum and Self-Help Behavioral Treatment for Smoking Relapse Prevention: Results from a Trial Using Population-Based Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortmann, Stephen P.; Killen, Joel D.

    1995-01-01

    Smokers were randomized using a factorial design to compare nicotine gum use to no gum use, and self-help materials to no materials. Compared with the no-gum group, relapse occurred at a significantly lower rate in the gum group for the entire 12 months of follow-up. There was no significant main effect for the self-help materials and no…

  3. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  4. 76 FR 20666 - Streptomyces Strain K61, and Wood Oils and Gums; Registration Review Final Decisions; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ...). Streptomyces Strain K61 is a naturally occurring soil bacterium registered for control of seed, root and stem..., Alternaria, and Phomopsis. Streptomyces Strain K61 also suppresses root rots of Pythium, Phytophthora and... root rot. 2. Wood Oils and Gums (3150). The Wood Oils and Gums registration review case no...

  5. Effects of sugarless chewing gum as a stimulant on progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone concentrations assessed in saliva

    E-print Network

    Schultheiss, Oliver C.

    concentrations assessed in saliva Oliver C. Schultheiss Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen, Germany a b Testosterone Cortisol Progesterone Chewing gum Saliva collection Sugarless chewing gum is a frequently used stimulant to collect saliva samples for hormone analyses. This study tested the effect of sugarless chewing

  6. Natural Giesekus fluids: shear and extensional behaviour of food gum solutions in the semi-dilute regime

    E-print Network

    Torres, M. D.; Hallmark, B.; Hilliou, L.; Wilson, D. I.

    2014-09-16

    The shear and extensional behaviour of two aqueous gum solutions, namely (i) 1-20 g/L guar gum and (ii) ?/?-hybrid carrageenan solutions (5-20 g/L), are shown to exhibit Giesekus-fluid behaviour when in the semi-dilute regime. In this regime a...

  7. Tragacanth gum-based nanogel as a superparamagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for quercetin recognition and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Khadijeh; Masoumi, Arameh; Ghaemy, Mousa

    2016-01-20

    A highly selective magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP) with core-shell structure has been synthesized by a sol-gel process composed of Tragacanth Gum (TG) crosslinker, Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles, and N-vinyl imidazole(VI) functional monomer in the presence of template Quercetin (QC). Different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to verify the successful synthesis of MIP on the surface of Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles. The swelling behavior of MMIP, its recognition and selectivity for QC and structural analog, Catechin (CT), were tested and compared with magnetic non imprinted polymer (MNIP). MMIP adsorbs the template drug quickly and equilibrium could be reached in 2h. The mechanism for adsorption was found to follow the Langmuir model with the maximum capacity of 175.43mgg(-1). The MMIP indicated excellent recognition and binding affinity toward QC, selectivity factor (?) relative to CT was 2.16. Finally, the MMIP was evaluated as a drug delivery device by performing in vitro release studies in PBS. PMID:26572395

  8. Xylitol Gum Chewing to Achieve Early Postoperative Restoration of Bowel Motility After Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yunhui; Zhang, Qianwen; Qiao, Lin; Lv, Donghao; Ruan, Jiaying; Chen, Hongqin; Gong, Junming; Shi, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effects of postoperative xylitol gum chewing on gastrointestinal functional recovery after laparoscopy. Altogether, 120 patients undergoing elective gynecologic laparoscopy were randomly divided into 2 groups of 60 each (final numbers: 53 controls, 56 patients). Controls underwent a routine postoperative regimen. Starting 6 hour after surgery, study patients chewed mint-flavored, sugarless xylitol gum until flatus occurred thrice a day. Other postoperative management was routine. First bowel sounds, first flatus, first bowel movement, and discharge times were recorded. Symptoms included abdominal distension, nausea, and vomiting. First flatus and first bowel sounds occurred significantly (P<0.001) earlier in the study patients. No significant differences were found for first defecation time, hospitalization duration, or mild/severe intestinal obstruction (all P>0.05). Thus, xylitol gum chewing after laparoscopy can effectively shorten the time to first flatus and helps with postoperative gastrointestinal functional recovery. It is simple, convenient, and well tolerated. PMID:26121546

  9. Gum arabic-curcumin conjugate micelles with enhanced loading for curcumin delivery to hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel; Kumar, P R Anil; Raj, Deepa K; Kumary, T V

    2015-12-10

    Curcumin is conjugated to gum arabic, a highly water soluble polysaccharide to enhance the solubility and stability of curcumin. Conjugation of curcumin to gum arabic is confirmed by (1)H NMR, fluorescence and UV spectroscopy studies. The conjugate self assembles to spherical nano-micelles (270±5nm) spontaneously, when dispersed in aqueous medium. Spherical morphology of the self assembled conjugate is evidenced by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The self assembly of the amphiphilic conjugate into micelle in aqueous medium significantly enhances the solubility (900 fold of that of free curcumin) and stability of curcumin in physiological pH. The anticancer activity of the conjugate micelles is found to be higher in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells than in human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) cells. The conjugate exhibits enhanced accumulation and toxicity in HepG2 cells due to the targeting efficiency of the galactose groups present in gum arabic. PMID:26428113

  10. Paste, wrap, and shimmy: a regimen for the prevention of gum disease.

    PubMed

    Jester, Craig W

    2013-01-01

    The body of evidence showing a possible correlation between gum infection and systemic diseases is well documented and growing. At the same time, the prevalence of gum infection is increasing in the general populace. Gum infection and disease are routinely seen in patients who adhere to regular dental hygiene regimens and see their dentists on a regular basis. One of the reasons typical daily dental care does not eradicate gum disease (gingivitis) is that the usual home care regimens do not attack a major underlying cause of gingivitis: the layer of biofilm in the sulcus surrounding the tooth's root. This biofilm harbors and protects the bacteria that cause gum disease and root decay. Research has shown that there are no "magic bullets" in the form of rinses, pills, or special tools that effectively destroy the bacteria and its protective calyx. Therefore, daily dental regimens must be changed until the absence of gum infection and inflammation becomes the standard of care. The Paste, Wrap, and Shimmy method is presented in a way that can be understood by all patients. It can be reproduced and used as a teaching supplement by the dental team. The method is conceptually simple and inexpensive, but not intuitive or easy. It must be coached and reinforced; however, if implemented, it can be very effective. The author's office has increased the length of new patient and recurring hygiene visits so that the method can be properly taught through repetitive practice and visual presentations. Prevention is not insurance-driven, so dentists most often provide it as a free service. The rewards are significant, however, and on initial exposure to this method, patients routinely ask: "Why haven't I been shown this before?" They will also have an expectation that the learning process will be repeated at each visit until they are free of infection. PMID:23302359

  11. Cardiovascular responses in humans to experimental chewing of gums of different consistencies.

    PubMed

    Farella, M; Bakke, M; Michelotti, A; Marotta, G; Martina, R

    1999-10-01

    Although the cardiovascular effects of exercise have been extensively investigated in man, little attention has been paid to such responses to jaw muscle activity. The aim here was to investigate the general cardiovascular effects of chewing activity in a single-blind, cross-over design. Ten healthy individuals performed one of the following chewing tasks in four separate sessions: chewing a very hard gum, chewing a moderately hard gum, chewing a soft gum, and "empty chewing" without a bolus. Unilateral chewing of gum or empty chewing was performed for 20 min on the participant's most convenient chewing side at a constant rate of 80 cycles/min. In each session, heart rate and arterial blood pressure were recorded together with electromyographic activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles on the chewing side. Ratings of perceived masticatory fatigue were recorded with visual analogue scales. The heart rate and blood pressure were significantly increased (ANOVA; p < or= 0.01) during the chewing tasks and the increases were, in parallel with the muscle activity, more pronounced the harder the gum. With the very hard gum, heart rate increased by up to 11 beats/min, the systolic blood pressure was 14 mmHg (1.9kPa) higher, and the diastolic blood pressure was 11 mmHg (1.5kPa) higher. The perceived fatigue was proportional to the level of muscle activity. After 10 min of recovery from exercise, heart rate and arterial blood pressures were slightly but still significantly elevated. The results demonstrate that chewing is associated with general circulatory effects proportional to the bolus resistance. PMID:10530916

  12. Development of a peptide-containing chewing gum as a sustained release antiplaque antimicrobial delivery system.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Jabar A; Dorati, Rossella; Schoubben, Aurélie; Worthen, David; Selmin, Francesca; Capan, Yilmaz; Leung, Kai; DeLuca, Patrick P

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the stability of KSL-W, an antimicrobial decapeptide shown to inhibit the growth of oral bacterial strains associated with caries development and plaque formation, and its potential as an antiplaque agent in a chewing gum formulation. KSL-W formulations with or without the commercial antibacterial agent cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) were prepared. The release of KSL-W from the gums was assessed in vitro using a chewing gum apparatus and in vivo by a chew-out method. A reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for assaying KSL-W. Raw material stability and temperature and pH effects on the stability of KSL-W solutions and interactions of KSL-W with tooth-like material, hydroxyapatite discs, were investigated. KSL-W was most stable in acidic aqueous solutions and underwent rapid hydrolysis in base. It was stable to enzymatic degradation in human saliva for 1 hour but was degraded by pancreatic serine proteases. KSL-W readily adsorbed to hydroxyapatite, suggesting that it will also adsorb to the teeth when delivered to the oral cavity. The inclusion of CPC caused a large increase in the rate and extent of KSL-W released from the gums. The gum formulations displayed promising in vitro/in vivo release profiles, wherein as much as 90% of the KSL-W was released in a sustained manner within 30 minutes in vivo. These results suggest that KSL-W possesses the stability, adsorption, and release characteristics necessary for local delivery to the oral cavity in a chewing gum formulation, thereby serving as a novel antiplaque agent. PMID:17408225

  13. The deformation of gum metal under nanoindentation and sub-micron pillar compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann

    Reaching ideal strength has proven to be difficult in most materials. Dislocation slip, phase transformations, twinning, and fracture all tend to occur at stresses well below the ideal strength of a material. Only on very small scales has it been possible to approach ideal strength. Thus, it was of great interest when a set of beta-Ti alloys, Gum Metal, were found to have a bulk yield strength close to half of its ideal strength. However, some recent studies have questioned the reliability of this claim. Several studies have suggested Gum Metal deforms by dislocation slip. Others have suggested the possibility of transformation-induced plasticity. The present study was undertaken in order to help clarify if and how Gum Metal can reach ideal strength. Two different experiments, ex situ nanoindentation and quantitative in situ nanopillar compression in a transmission electron microscope to correlate real-time deformation behavior, were performed on a single composition of Gum Metal, Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-1.20 at. %, obtained from Toyota Central R&D Laboratories. Nanoindented specimens were thinned from the bottom surface until the pits of multiple indentations became electron-transparent allowing for qualitative analysis of the deformation microstructure in both fully cold-worked and solution-treated specimens. Real-time load-displacement behavior from the nanopillar compression tests was correlated with real-time video recorded during each compression to determine both the compressive strength of each pillar and the timing and strengths of different deformation behaviors observed. Combining the results from both experiments provided several important conclusions. First, Gum Metal approaches and can attain ideal strength in nanopillars regardless of processing condition. While dislocations exist in Gum Metal, they can be tightly pinned by obstacles with spacing less than ˜20 nm, which should inhibit their motion at strengths below the ideal shear strength. The plastic deformation of Gum Metal is not controlled by giant faults or by stress-induced phase transformations. Both of these phenomena, while active, are not the source of plasticity in Gum Metal.

  14. Covalent coupling of gum arabic onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI cell labeling: physicochemical and in vitro characterization.

    PubMed

    Palma, Susana I C J; Carvalho, Alexandra; Silva, Joana; Martins, Pedro; Marciello, Marzia; Fernandes, Alexandra R; del Puerto Morales, Maria; Roque, Ana C A

    2015-01-01

    Gum arabic (GA) is a hydrophilic composite polysaccharide derived from exudates of Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal trees. It is biocompatible, possesses emulsifying and stabilizing properties and has been explored as coating agent of nanomaterials for biomedical applications, namely magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Previous studies focused on the adsorption of GA onto MNPs produced by co-precipitation methods. In this work, MNPs produced by a thermal decomposition method, known to produce uniform particles with better crystalline properties, were used for the covalent coupling of GA through its free amine groups, which increases the stability of the coating layer. The MNPs were produced by thermal decomposition of Fe(acac)3 in organic solvent and, after ligand-exchange with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), GA coating was achieved by the establishment of a covalent bond between DMSA and GA moieties. Clusters of several magnetic cores entrapped in a shell of GA were obtained, with good colloidal stability and promising magnetic relaxation properties (r2 /r1 ratio of 350). HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cell line was used for in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation and cell-labeling efficiency studies. We show that, upon administration at the respective IC50 , GA coating enhances MNP cellular uptake by 19 times compared to particles bearing only DMSA moieties. Accordingly, in vitro MR images of cells incubated with increasing concentrations of GA-coated MNP present dose-dependent contrast enhancement. The obtained results suggest that the GA magnetic nanosystem could be used as a MRI contrast agent for cell-labeling applications. PMID:25766788

  15. Chronotherapeutic drug delivery of Tamarind gum, Chitosan and Okra gum controlled release colon targeted directly compressed Propranolol HCl matrix tablets and in-vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Newton, A M J; Indana, V L; Kumar, Jatinder

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to develop a chronotherapeutic drug delivery of various natural polymers based colon targeted drug delivery systems to treat early morning sign in BP. The polymers such as Tamarind gum, Okra gum and Chitosan were used in the formulation design. A model drug Propranolol HCl was incorporated in the formulation in order to assess the controlled release and time dependent release potential of various natural polymers. A novel polymer Tamarind gum was extracted and used as a prime polymer in this study to prove the superiority of this polymer over other leading natural polymer. Propranolol HCl was used as a model drug which undergoes hepatic metabolism and witnesses the poor bioavailability. The matrix tablets of Propranolol HCl were prepared by direct compression. The tablets were evaluated for various quality control parameters and found to be within the limits. Carbopol 940 was used as an auxiliary polymer to modify the drug release and physicochemical characteristics of the tablets. The in vitro release studies were performed in 0.1N HCl for 1.5h, followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer for 2h and pH 7.4 phosphate buffer till maximum amount of drug release. The in vitro release profile of the formulations were fitted with various pharmacokinetic mathematical models and analyzed for release profile. The formulations prepared with Tamarind gum prolonged the release for an extended period of time compared to other polymer based formulation and showed an excellent compression characteristic. PMID:25936283

  16. Chemical composition and rheology of low-fat Iranian white cheese incorporated with guar gum and gum arabic as fat replacers.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Hannan; Khosrowshahi Asl, Asghar; Madadlou, Ashkan; Alizadeh, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    The effects of incorporating guar gum (GG) and gum arabic (GA) in cheese-making milk with various fat contents (0.4, 0.9, and 1.4 %) on chemical and rheological properties of Iranian white cheese were evaluated by response surface method (RSM). As GG concentration increased, dry matter content of cheese samples decreased due to the high water binding capacity of this gum. A similar trend was also observed for GA at concentrations less than 150 ppm. The higher the GG concentration, the higher was the free fatty acid content of cheese samples. GA at concentrations more than 150 ppm, increased the storage modulus (G'), causing an undesirable hard texture for the product. The G' and stress at fracture (?f) of samples decreased by the increasing concentration of GG incorporated into the cheese-making milk. Response surface minimization of rheological indices for Iranian white cheese showed that combination of two hydrocolloids (GG in the concentration range 75-170 ppm and GA at concentrations <75 ppm) would provide the softest texture. PMID:25328199

  17. Effectiveness of almond gum trees exudate as a novel edible coating for improving postharvest quality of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruits.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Nesrine; Chouaibi, Moncef; Hamdi, Salem

    2014-01-01

    The use of coatings is a technique used to increase postharvest life of the fruit. Almond gum exudate was used, in comparison with gum arabic, at concentrations of 10% as a novel edible coating, to preserve the quality parameters of tomato (Solanumlycopersicum). Fruits were harvested at the mature-green stage of ripening. Results showed that the coatings delayed significantly (p?gum and gum arabic coatings to maintain the overall quality of tomato fruits during storage period (20 days). In addition, the difference between gum arabic and almond gum coatings was not significant (p?>?0.05) except for pulp color. Therefore, we can suggest the use of almond gum exudate as a novel edible coating extends the shelf-life of tomato fruits on postharvest. PMID:23733822

  18. The use of Hibiscus esculentus (Okra) gum in sustaining the release of propranolol hydrochloride in a solid oral dosage form.

    PubMed

    Zaharuddin, Nurul Dhania; Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim; Kadivar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of Okra gum in sustaining the release of propranolol hydrochloride in a tablet was studied. Okra gum was extracted from the pods of Hibiscus esculentus using acetone as a drying agent. Dried Okra gum was made into powder form and its physical and chemical characteristics such as solubility, pH, moisture content, viscosity, morphology study using SEM, infrared study using FTIR, crystallinity study using XRD, and thermal study using DSC and TGA were carried out. The powder was used in the preparation of tablet using granulation and compression methods. Propranolol hydrochloride was used as a model drug and the activity of Okra gum as a binder was compared by preparing tablets using a synthetic and a semisynthetic binder which are hydroxylmethylpropyl cellulose (HPMC) and sodium alginate, respectively. Evaluation of drug release kinetics that was attained from dissolution studies showed that Okra gum retarded the release up to 24 hours and exhibited the longest release as compared to HPMC and sodium alginate. The tensile and crushing strength of tablets was also evaluated by conducting hardness and friability tests. Okra gum was observed to produce tablets with the highest hardness value and lowest friability. Hence, Okra gum was testified as an effective adjuvant to produce favourable sustained release tablets with strong tensile and crushing strength. PMID:24678512

  19. Effects of high-hydrostatic pressure and pH treatments on the emulsification properties of gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fanyi; Bell, Alan E; Davis, Fred J

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the emulsification properties of the native gums and those treated at high pressure (800 MPa) both at their "natural" pH (4.49 and 4.58, respectively) and under "acidic and basic" pH (2.8 and 8.0) conditions. The emulsification behaviour of KLTA gum was found to be superior to that of the GCA gum. High pressure and pH treatment changed the emulsification properties of both gums. The acidic amino acids in gum arabic were shown to play an important role in their emulsification behaviour, and mechanisms of emulsification for the two gums were suggested to be different. The highly "branched" nature of the carbohydrate in GCA gum was also thought to be responsible for the "spreading" of droplet size distributions observed. Coomassie brilliant blue binding was used to indicate conformational changes in protein structure and Ellman's assay was used to estimate any changes in levels of free thiols present. PMID:25872433

  20. Design and evaluation of fast dissolving tablets containing diclofenac sodium using fenugreek gum as a natural superdisintegrant

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M. Uday; Babu, M. Kishore

    2014-01-01

    Objective To formulate diclofenac sodium as fast dissolving tablets (FDTs) using fenugreek gum as a natural superdisintegrant which also possess anti-inflammatory activity. Methods An attempt was made to extract the fenugreek gum and evaluated it for various physicochemical characterizations. The swelling index and viscosity of fenugreek gum was 221% and 293.4 mpa.s respectively. FDTs of diclofenac sodium was formulated by direct compression technique using different concentrations (1%-6%, w/w) of fenugreek gum as a natural superdisintegrant and compared with renowned synthetic superdisintegrants like sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium. The anti-inflammatory activity of a formulation was evaluated with carrageenan induced experimental rats. Results The formulated tablets were evaluated for various physical tests like weight variation, friability, hardness and results complied with the limits. The drug release from all the formulations ascertained first order kinetics. Among all the formulations F3 containing fenugreek gum with the concentration of 6% produced least disintegrating time 21 seconds resulting in higher drug release rate 93.74% at the end of 25 min. Hence, it was considered as optimized formulation. The present study revealed that the fenugreek gum as a natural superdisintegrant showed better disintegrating property than the most widely used synthetic superdisintegrants like sodium starch glycolate and croscarmellose sodium in the formulations of FDTs. Conclusions The results suggested that the fenugreek gum act as a good super disintegrating agent and it showed promising additive anti-inflammatory activity with diclofenac sodium. PMID:25183106

  1. Corn fiber gum: New structure/function relationships for this potential beverage flavor stabilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber arabinoxylan is a hemicellulose B isolated from the fibrous portions (pericarp, tip cap, and endosperm cell wall fractions) of corn kernels by alkaline solution, often in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and is commonly referred to as “Corn fiber gum” (CFG). The unique polysaccharide, C...

  2. Effectiveness of a GUM-Compliant Course for Teaching Measurement in the Introductory Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Seshini; Buffler, Andy; Lubben, Fred; Allie, Saalih

    2008-01-01

    An evaluation of a course aimed at developing university students' understanding of the nature of scientific measurement and uncertainty is described. The course materials follow the framework for metrology as recommended in the "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement" (GUM). The evaluation of the course is based on responses to…

  3. Molecular characteristics of corn fiber gum and their influence on its emulsifying properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular characteristics of two purified arabinoxylan fractions derived from corn kernels, corn fiber gum-1 and 2 (CFG-1 and 2), have been studied and correlated with their emulsifying properties. CFG-1 and 2 fractions were isolated from different corn fiber sources by (a) a sequential alkali...

  4. Isolation, purification and identification of protein associated with corn fiber gum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG), an alkaline hydrogen peroxide extract of corn kernel milling by-product “corn fiber” is a proteinaceous arabinoxylan with a protein content ranging from ca. 2 to 9% by weight for the CFG samples isolated from different corn milling fiber sources. Several studies have suggested...

  5. Colon Targeted Guar Gum Compression Coated Tablets of Flurbiprofen: Formulation, Development, and Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Bontha, Vijaya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The rationale of the present study is to formulate flurbiprofen colon targeted compression coated tablets using guar gum to improve the therapeutic efficacy by increasing drug levels in colon, and also to reduce the side effects in upper gastrointestinal tract. Direct compression method was used to prepare flurbiprofen core tablets, and they were compression coated with guar gum. Then the tablets were optimized with the support of in vitro dissolution studies, and further it was proved by pharmacokinetic studies. The optimized formulation (F4) showed almost complete drug release in the colon (99.86%) within 24?h without drug loss in the initial lag period of 5?h (only 6.84% drug release was observed during this period). The pharmacokinetic estimations proved the capability of guar gum compression coated tablets to achieve colon targeting. The Cmax of colon targeted tablets was 11956.15?ng/mL at Tmax of 10?h whereas it was 15677.52?ng/mL at 3?h in case of immediate release tablets. The area under the curve for the immediate release and compression coated tablets was 40385.78 and 78214.50?ng-h/mL and the mean resident time was 3.49 and 10.78?h, respectively. In conclusion, formulation of guar gum compression coated tablets was appropriate for colon targeting of flurbiprofen. PMID:24260738

  6. Low-dose caffeine administered in chewing gum does not enhance cycling to exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Edward J; Kim, Chul-Ho; Muller, Matthew D; Bellar, David M; Barkley, Jacob E; Bliss, Matthew V; Jankowski-Wilkinson, Andrea; Russell, Morgan; Otterstetter, Ronald; Macander, Daniela; Glickman, Ellen L; Kamimori, Gary H

    2012-03-01

    Low-dose caffeine administered in chewing gum does not enhance cycling to exhaustion. The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the effect of low-dose caffeine (CAF) administered in chewing gum at 3 different time points during submaximal cycling exercise to exhaustion. Eight college-aged (26 ± 4 years), physically active (45.5 ± 5.7 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) volunteers participated in 4 experimental trials. Two pieces of caffeinated chewing gum (100 mg per piece, total quantity of 200 mg) were administered in a double-blind manner at 1 of 3 time points (-35, -5, and +15 minutes) with placebo at the other 2 points and at all 3 points in the control trial. The participants cycled at 85% of maximal oxygen consumption until volitional fatigue and time to exhaustion (TTE) were recorded in minutes. Venous blood samples were obtained at -40, -10, and immediately postexercise and analyzed for serum-free fatty acid and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Oxygen consumption, respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate, glucose, lactate, ratings of perceived exertion, and perceived leg pain measures were obtained at baseline and every 10 minutes during cycling. The results showed that there were no significant differences between the trials for any of the parameters measured including TTE. These findings suggest that low-dose CAF administered in chewing gum has no effect on TTE during cycling in recreational athletes and is, therefore, not recommended. PMID:22293680

  7. Effects of caffeine chewing gum on race performance and physiology in male and female cyclists.

    PubMed

    Paton, Carl; Costa, Vitor; Guglielmo, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This investigation reports the effects of chewing caffeinated gum on race performance with trained cyclists. Twenty competitive cyclists completed two 30-km time trials that included a maximal effort 0.2-km sprint each 10-km. Caffeine (~3-4 mg · kg(-1)) or placebo was administered double-blind via chewing gum at the 10-km point following completion of the first sprint. Measures of power output, oxygen uptake, heart rate, lactate and perceived exertion were taken at set intervals during the time trial. Results indicated no substantial differences in any measured variables between caffeine and placebo conditions during the first 20-km of the time trial. Caffeine gum did however lead to substantial enhancements (mean ± 90% confidence limits (CLs)) in mean power during the final 10-km (3.8% ± 2.3%), and sprint power at 30-km (4.0% ± 3.6%). The increases in performance over the final 10-km were associated with small increases in heart rate and blood lactate (effect size of 0.24 and 0.28, respectively). There were large inter-individual variations in the response to caffeine, and apparent gender related differences in sprint performance. Chewing caffeine gum improves mean and sprint performance power in the final 10-km of a 30-km time trial in male and female cyclists most likely through an increase in nervous system activation. PMID:25517202

  8. "JCE" Classroom Activity #105. A Sticky Situation: Chewing Gum and Solubility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montes-Gonzalez, Ingrid; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.; Perez-Medina, Ilia E.; Montes-Berrios, Veronica; Roman-Lopez, Saurie N.

    2010-01-01

    In this Activity, students perform several solubility tests using common food items such as chocolate, chewing gum, water, sugar, and oil. From their observations during the Activity, students will initially classify the substances tested as soluble or insoluble. They will then use their understanding of the chemistry of solubility to classify the…

  9. Gemcitabine combined with gum mastic causes potent growth inhibition and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin-yu; Wang, Hong-cheng; Yuan, Zhou; Li, Ang; He, Mei-lan; Ai, Kai-xing; Zheng, Qi; Qin, Huan-long

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of gemcitabine combined with gum mastic and the underlying mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Methods: Cell proliferation and apoptosis were examined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and propidium iodine staining, respectively. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax, NF-?B p65 subunit, and I?B? protein was measured using Western blotting. Results: Gemcitabine 0.01?100 ?g/mL inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in both pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 and COLO 357 cells. Gum mastic 40 ?g/mL significantly potentiated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of gemcitabine 10 ?g/mL after 72-h treatment. When cells were treated with gemcitabine in combination with gum mastic, the I?B? level was increased, whereas NF-?B activation was blocked; the expression of Bax protein was substantially increased, but Bcl-2 protein was down-regulated. Conclusion: Gemcitabine combined with gum mastic causes potent apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. The combination may be an effective therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:20523344

  10. 77 FR 65361 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and the People's Republic of China: Postponement of Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... Austria and the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Investigations, 77 FR 39210... Determination Deadlines Pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930, as Amended, 70 FR 24533 (May 10, 2005). This notice... International Trade Administration Xanthan Gum From Austria and the People's Republic of China: Postponement...

  11. Modified Alternan: A Novel Microbial Gum with Potential as a Low-Viscosity Bulking Agent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternan is a microbial gum produced by rare strains of the GRAS lactic acid bacterium, Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The unique alternating alpha-(1,6) and alpha-(1,3) linkage pattern of this glucan imparts high solubility and resistance to most digestive enzymes. Previously, we invented a bioconver...

  12. Starch-guar gum extrudates: Microstructure, physicochemical properties and in-vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    von Borries-Medrano, Erich; Jaime-Fonseca, Mónica R; Aguilar-Méndez, Miguel A

    2016-03-01

    Starch-guar gum mixtures were obtained by extrusion using a three-variable Box-Behnken statistic design. Morphology, expansion index, viscosity, crystallinity and digestion in vitro of the extruded samples were analyzed through response surface methodology (RSM). The extrusion temperature and the moisture content were the factors that significantly affected the physicochemical properties of the samples. Starch-guar gum samples showed expansion index and viscosity up to 1.55 and 1400mPas, respectively. The crystallinity of the samples was modified by adding guar gum to the extrudates, showing correlation between long-range order (X-ray diffraction) and short-range order (FTIR spectroscopy). Guar induced microstructural changes and its role in gelatinization-melting processes was significant. The rate of glucose release decreased from 0.47 to 0.43mM/min when the extrusion temperature decreased. However, adding guar gum to starch had no significant effect on glucose release. Overall, the extrusion temperature and the moisture content were the factors that significantly affected the physicochemical properties of the extruded samples. PMID:26471632

  13. Corn fiber gum and milk protein conjugates with improved emulsion stability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG), an alkaline hydrogen peroxide extract of the corn kernel milling by-product “corn fiber” was covalently conjugated with Beta-lactoglobulin (Beta-LG) and whey protein isolate (WPI). Covalent coupling of CFG to protein was achieved by dry heating reaction (Maillard-type) of CFG ...

  14. Effects of chewing gum on driving performance as evaluated by the STISIM driving simulator

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ingyu; Kim, Eun-Joo; Lee, Joo-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of chewing gum on driving performance in a driving simulator. [Subjects] In total, 26 young licensed drivers participated. [Methods] The driving scenario was typical of an urban environment: a single-carriageway, two-way road consisting of a mix of curved and straight sections, with considerable levels of traffic, pedestrians, and parked cars. Mean distance driven above the speed limit, lane position, mean distance driven across the center line, and mean distance driven off the road were used as estimates of brake, accelerator, and steering control. The results were compared with those of a non-chewing gum control condition. [Results] The driving performance while chewing gum was significantly better: the mean distance driven above the speed limit was 26.61% shorter, and the mean distance driven off the road was 31.99% shorter. Lane position and mean distance driven across the center line did not differ significantly between the two conditions. [Conclusion] Chewing gum appears to enhance driving performance during a sustained attention driving task. PMID:26180329

  15. Effect of Regular Gum Chewing on Levels of Anxiety, Mood, and Fatigue in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki-Otomaru, Akiyo; Sakuma, Yumiko; Mochizuki, Yoshiko; Ishida, Sadayo; Kanoya, Yuka; Sato, Chifumi

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The effect of regular gum chewing on psychological status is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of gum chewing for fourteen days on psychological status and physical and mental fatigue in healthy young adults. Methods: We assigned 50 volunteers randomly to an intervention group (n = 26) and a control group (n = 24). Participants in the intervention group were requested to chew the gum twice per a day for fourteen days. The volunteers were required to complete a questionnaire related to lifestyle for baseline assessment. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Profile of Mood State (POMS), the World Health Organization Quality of Life 26, and assessment of physical and mental fatigue by visual analog scale were used at baseline, 2 weeks (after intervention), and 4 weeks (follow-up). Results: At 2 weeks, the score of state anxiety was significantly lower in the intervention group than the control group. The intervention participants’ scores of depression-dejection, fatigue and confusion in POMS were better than the control group scores. Mental fatigue were also relieved after the intervention. At 4 weeks, there were no significant differences between both groups. Conclusion: Fourteen days’ gum chewing may improve the levels of anxiety, mood and fatigue. PMID:21866229

  16. Production of corn fiber gum under conditions that retain its functional components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is a hemicellulose (arabinoxylan)-enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a mild alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. The unique polysaccharide, CFG, with its low solution viscosity has been proposed as a stabilizer for oil-in-water emulsions. We ha...

  17. Kinetic release studies of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate from gum acacia crosslinked hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Aderibigbe, B A; Varaprasad, K; Sadiku, E R; Ray, S S; Mbianda, X Y; Fotsing, M C; Owonubi, S J; Agwuncha, S C

    2015-02-01

    Natural polymer hydrogels are useful for controlling release of drugs. In this study, hydrogels containing gum acacia were synthesized by free-radical polymerization of acrylamide with gum acacia. The effect of gum acacia in the hydrogels on the release mechanism of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (BP) was studied at pH 1.2 and 7.4. The hydrogels exhibited high swelling ratios at pH 7.4 and low swelling ratios at pH 1.2. The release study was performed using UV-Visible spectroscopy via complex formation with Fe(III) ions. At pH 1.2, the release profile was found to be anomalous while at pH 7.4, the release kinetic of BP was a perfect zero-order release mechanism. The hydrogels were found to be pH-sensitive and the release profiles of the BP were found to be influenced by the degree of crosslinking of the hydrogel network with gum acacia. The preliminary results suggest that these hydrogels are promising devices for controlled delivery of bisphosphonate to the gastrointestinal region. PMID:25445681

  18. Want to block earworms from conscious awareness? B(u)y gum!

    PubMed

    Beaman, C Philip; Powell, Kitty; Rapley, Ellie

    2015-01-01

    Three experiments examine the role of articulatory motor planning in experiencing an involuntary musical recollection (an "earworm"). Experiment 1 shows that interfering with articulatory motor programming by chewing gum reduces both the number of voluntary and the number of involuntary-unwanted-musical thoughts. This is consistent with other findings that chewing gum interferes with voluntary processes such as recollections from verbal memory, the interpretation of ambiguous auditory images, and the scanning of familiar melodies, but is not predicted by theories of thought suppression, which assume that suppression is made more difficult by concurrent tasks or cognitive loads. Experiment 2 shows that chewing the gum affects the experience of "hearing" the music and cannot be ascribed to a general effect on thinking about a tune only in abstract terms. Experiment 3 confirms that the reduction of musical recollections by chewing gum is not the consequence of a general attentional or dual-task demand. The data support a link between articulatory motor programming and the appearance in consciousness of both voluntary and unwanted musical recollections. PMID:25896521

  19. Effects of corn fiber gum (CFG) on the pasting and thermal behaviors of maize starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is a novel arabinoxylan hydrocolloid. Recent research showed its considerable potential in food processing. In this study, the interactions of maize starch and CFG were studied. Maize starch/CFG blend gels were prepared from maize starch suspension mixed with 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, ...

  20. The development of a new corn fiber gum isolation process that preserves its functional components

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is a hemicellulose (arabinoxylan)-enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a mild alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. The unique polysaccharide, CFG, with its low solution viscosity has been proposed as a stabilizer for oil-in-water emulsions. We ha...

  1. Biobased adhesives, gums, emulsions and binders: current trends and future prospects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biopolymers derived from renewable resources are an emerging class of advanced materials that offer many useful properties for a wide range of food and non-food applications. Current state of the art in research and development of renewable polymers as adhesives, gums, binders and emulsions will be ...

  2. Effects of gum chewing on memory and attention: reply to Scholey (2004).

    PubMed

    Tucha, Oliver; Mecklinger, Lara; Hammerl, Marianne; Lange, Klaus W

    2004-10-01

    Recent studies have reported varying results regarding cognitive performance while chewing gum. The differences between the results of these studies may be explained by methodological and statistical factors. Future studies are needed to assess various aspects of cognitive functioning using extensive standardised neuropsychological test batteries, adequate experimental designs and appropriate statistical methods. PMID:15458811

  3. Peroxidase mediated conjugation of corn fibeer gum and bovine serum albumin to improve emulsifying properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum (CFG), a naturally-occurring polysaccharide protein complex, were improved by kinetically controlled formation of hetero-covalent linkages with bovine serum albumin (BSA), using horseradish peroxidase. The formation of hetero-crosslinked CFG-BSA conjugate...

  4. Effect of organic matter on estuarine flocculation: a laboratory study using montmorillonite, humic acid, xanthan gum, guar gum and natural estuarine flocs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Riverine particles undergo a rapid transformation when they reach estuaries. The rapid succession of hydrodynamic and biogeochemical regimes forces the particles to flocculate, settle and enter the sediment pool. The rates and magnitudes of flocculation depend on the nature of the particles which are primarily affected by the types and quantities of organic matter (OM). Meanwhile, the OM characteristics vary widely between environments, as well as within a single environment due to seasonal climate and land use variability. We investigated the effect of the OM types and quantities through laboratory experiments using natural estuarine particles from the Mississippi Sound and Atchafalaya Bay as well as model mixtures of montmorillonite and organic molecules (i.e., biopolymers (guar/xanthan gums) and humic acid). Results Biopolymers promote flocculation but the magnitude depends on the types and quantities. Nonionic guar gum yields much larger flocs than anionic xanthan gum, while both of them exhibit a nonlinear behavior in which the flocculation is the most pronounced at the intermediate OM loading. Moreover, the effect of guar gum is independent of salinity whereas the effect of xanthan gum is pronounced at higher salinity. Meanwhile, humic acid does not affect flocculation at all salinity values tested in this study. These results are echoed in the laboratory manipulation of the natural estuarine particles. Flocculation of the humic acid-rich Mississippi Sound particles is unaffected by the OM, whereas that of biopolymer-rich Atchafalaya Bay particles is enhanced by the OM. Conclusions Flocculation is positively influenced by the presence of biopolymers that are produced as the result of marine primary production. Meanwhile, humic acid, which is abundant in the rivers that drain the agricultural soils of Southeastern United States, has little influence on flocculation. Thus, it is expected that humic acid-poor riverine particles (e.g., Mississippi River, and Atchafalaya River, to a lesser degree) may be prone to rapid flocculation and settling in the immediate vicinity of the river mouths when mixed with biopolymer-rich coastal waters. It is also expected that humic acid-rich riverine particles (e.g., Pearl River) may resist immediate flocculation and be transported further away from the river mouth. PMID:24386944

  5. Chewing Sugar-Free Gum Reduces Ileus After Cesarean Section in Nulliparous Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenzadeh Ledari, Farideh; Barat, Shanaz; Delavar, Mouloud Agajani; Banihosini, Seyed Zahra; Khafri, Soriya

    2013-01-01

    Background Gum chewing after cesarean section may stimulate bowel motility and decrease duration of postoperative ileus. Objectives The current study assessed the effect of chewing sugar-free gum on the return of bowel function, where cesarean section had been performed in nulliparous women. Materials and Methods In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients, scheduled for cesarean section were randomly divided in to 2 groups gum-chewing group (n = 30) and control group (n = 30) postoperatively. The patients in the gum-chewing group postoperatively chewed sugar free gum 3 times daily each time for 1 hour until discharge. The patients' demographic characteristics, duration of surgery, mean hunger time, flatus and bowel motility were compared in the two groups. Results There was no significant difference between the 2 groups regarding patient demographics, intraoperative, and postoperative care. In the gum-chewing and the control group there was a significant difference in the mean postoperative interval of the first bowel movement (20.89 ± 8.8 versus 27.93 ± 9.3 hours, P = 0.004), the first feeling of hunger (10.37 ± 6.0 versus 16.33 ± 9.3 hours, P = 0.005), the first passage of flatus (25.02 ± 5.8 versus 31.08 ± 9.7 hours, P = 0.003), and the first defecation (31.17 ± 5.3versus 40.08 ± 8.8 hours, P = 0.000) respectively, which were significantly shorter in the gum-chewing group compared to those of the control group. There were no major complications in either group. All patients in the gum-chewing group tolerated it without any major complications and side effects. Conclusions The study results demonstrated that bowel motility after cesarean section in nulliparous women can be accelerated by gum chewing which is a useful, inexpensive and well-tolerated method for mothers in post-cesarean section. PMID:24083008

  6. Dietary guar gum and pectin stimulate intestinal microbial polyamine synthesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Noack, J; Kleessen, B; Proll, J; Dongowski, G; Blaut, M

    1998-08-01

    The effects of two highly fermentable dietary fibers (guar gum and pectin) on the type and concentrations of cecal polyamines as affected by the intestinal microflora were studied in groups of germ-free (n = 10/group) and conventional rats (n = 6/group). Both germ-free and conventional rats were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as follows: 1) fiber-free control diet, 2) control diet + 10% guar gum and 3) control diet + 10% pectin. In germ-free rats, guar gum and pectin had no effect on cecal polyamine concentrations. Putrescine was confirmed to be the major endogenous polyamine within the gut lumen. In cecal contents of conventional rats, both guar gum and pectin led to the appearance of cadaverine and to elevated putrescine concentrations in comparison with the fiber-free control diet (1.35 +/- 0.15 and 2.27 +/- 0.32, respectively, vs. 0.20 +/- 0.03 micromol/g dry weight, P < 0.05). The cecal cadaverine concentration was higher in pectin- than in guar-fed rats (8.20 +/- 0.89 vs. 1.92 +/- 0.27 micromol/g dry weight, P < 0.05). Counts of total bacteria, bacteroides, fusobacteria and enterobacteria were higher (P < 0.05) in rats fed guar gum and pectin. Bifidobacteria were found exclusively in guar-fed rats. In vitro studies on selected species representing the numerically dominant population groups of the human gut flora (bacteroides, fusobacteria, anaerobic cocci and bifidobacteria) were examined for their ability to synthesize intracellular polyamines. These experiments demonstrated the ability of bacteroides, fusobacteria and anaerobic cocci to synthesize high amounts of putrescine and spermidine. Calculations based on these results suggest that the intestinal microflora are a major source of polyamines in the contents of the large intestine. PMID:9687560

  7. Locust bean gum as superdisintegrant--formulation and evaluation of nimesulide orodispersible tablets.

    PubMed

    Malik, Karan; Arora, Gurpreet; Singh, Inderbir

    2011-01-01

    Orodispersible tablets disperse instantaneously in the mouth so that they can be swallowed without the aid of water. The aim of the present study was to formulate nimesulide orodispersible tablets using locust bean gum as a natural superdisintegrant. The gum was evaluated for powder flow properties, swelling index and loss on drying. Excellent powder flow properties were observed, swelling index was found to be 20 which indicated appreciable capability of locust bean gum to be used as superdisintegrant. The prepared tablets were evaluated against standard superdisintegrant i.e. cross-carmellose sodium. Disintegration time of tablets containing 10 % locust bean gum was found to be 13 seconds. The prepared batches were also evaluated for wetting time, water absorption ratio, effective pore radius, porosity, in vitro and in vivo disintegration time, in vitro release and stability studies. Wetting time was found to reduce from 19 +/- 2 to 11 +/- 3 sec (A1-A4) and 51 +/- 2 to 36 +/- 3 sec (B1-B4). Effective pore radius and porosity were found to be increase with increase in polymer concentration. The superdisintegrant property of locust bean gum may be due to concentration dependent wicking action leading to formation of porous structure which disintegrates the tablet within seconds. In-vivo results were complementary to in-vitro disintegration time results. The in-vitro release studies were compared against marketed nimesulide fast dissolving tablets (Nimulid MD). Stability studies showed that there was no significant change in hardness, friability, tensile strength and assay of the prepared formulations. The f2 values (in comparison with Nimulid MD) of 92.27 and 98.19 were obtained with A3 and A4 batches respectively. PMID:21739929

  8. Extensional flow behavior of aqueous guar gum derivative solutions by capillary breakup elongational rheometry (CaBER).

    PubMed

    Szopinski, Daniel; Handge, Ulrich A; Kulicke, Werner-Michael; Abetz, Volker; Luinstra, Gerrit A

    2016-01-20

    The extensional rheological properties of aqueous ionic carboxymethyl hydroxypropyl guar gum (CMHPG) and non-ionic hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) solutions between the semi-dilute solution state and the concentrated network solution state were investigated by capillary breakup elongational rheometry (CaBER). Carboxymethylated guar gum derivatives show an instable filament formation in deionized water. The ratio of elongational relaxation time ?E over the shear relaxation time ?S follows a power law of ?E/?S?(c·[?])(-2). The difference of the relaxation times in shear and elongation can be related to the loss of entanglements and superstructures in elongational flows at higher strains. PMID:26572419

  9. Physical, antioxidant and structural characterization of blend films based on hsian-tsao gum (HG) and casein (CAS).

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Wen, Xiao Long; Guo, Shan Guang; Chen, Ming Tsao; Jiang, Ai Min; Lai, Lih-Shiuh

    2015-12-10

    The effects of hsian-tsao gum (HG) addition on the physical properties, antioxidant activities and structure of casein (CAS) film have been investigated. It has been observed that HG addition provided CAS film with better mechanical properties and resistant to moisture, stronger barrier properties against light and higher antioxidant activities than pure CAS film. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) data indicated that hydrogen bonding interactions and Maillard reactions occurred between CAS and HG, giving rise to a more compact structure than CAS film. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicated that CAS and HG were compatible, and addition of HG destroyed the original crystalline domains of CAS film, and the blend films exhibited higher glass transition temperatures than CAS film. Moreover, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis showed that HG addition significantly changed the mobility of water molecule in CAS film. Especially, ratio of the high mobility water of CAS/HG films significantly decreased as compared to CAS film. PMID:26428119

  10. The nearby Galaxy structure toward the Vela Gum nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, E. E.; Solivella, G. R.; Perren, G. I.; Vázquez, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    We report on UBVI photometry and spectroscopy for MK classification purposes carried out in the fields of five open clusters projected against the Vela Gum in the Third Galactic Quadrant of the Galaxy. They are Ruprecht 20, Ruprecht 47, Ruprecht 60, NGC 2660 and NGC 2910. We could improve/confirm the parameters of these objects derived before. Ruprecht 20 is not a real physical entity, in agreement with earlier suggestions. Ruprecht 47, a young cluster in the Galactic plane, at 4.4 kpc from the Sun is quite farther than in previous distance estimations and becomes, therefore, a member of the Puppis OB2 association. For the first time Ruprecht 60 was surveyed in UBVI photometry. We found it to be placed at 4.2 kpc from the Sun of about and 1 Gyr old. NGC 2660 is another old object in our survey for which distance and age are coincident with previous findings. NGC 2910 turns out to be a young cluster of Vela OB1 association at a distance of 1.4 kpc approximately and 60 Myr old. The spectroscopic parallax method has been applied to several stars located in the fields of four out of the five clusters to get their distances and reddenings. With this method we found two blue stars in the field of NGC 2910 at distances that make them likely members of Vela OB1 too. Also, projected against the fields of Ruprecht 20 and Ruprecht 47 we have detected other young stars favoring not only the existence of Puppis OB1 and OB2 but conforming a young stellar group at ? 1 kpc from the Sun and extending for more than 6 kpc outward the Galaxy. If this is the case, there is a thickening of the thin Galactic disk of more than 300 pc at just 2-3 kpc from the Sun. Ruprecht 60 and NGC 2660 are too old objects that have no physical relation with the associations under discussion. An astonishing result has been the detection in the background of Ruprecht 47 of a young star at the impressive distance of 9.5 kpc from the Sun that could be a member of the innermost part of the Outer Arm. Another far young star in the field of NGC 2660, at near 6.0 kpc, may become a probable member of the Perseus Arm or of the inner part of the Local Arm. The distribution of young clusters and stars onto the Third Galactic Quadrant agrees with recent findings concerning the extension of the Local Arm as revealed by parallaxes of regions of star formation. We show evidences too that added to previous ones found by our group explain the thickening of the thin disk as a combination of flare and warp.

  11. 78 FR 73434 - Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption; Acacia (Gum Arabic)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending the food additive regulations to provide for the expanded safe use of acacia (gum arabic) in foods. This action is in response to a petition filed by...

  12. 77 FR 39210 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ...According to Petitioner, lysine and MSG are both produced via fermentation, use similar production equipment as that required to produce...salts. Xanthan gum is a polysaccharide produced by aerobic fermentation of Xanthomonas campestris. The chemical structure of...

  13. The effects of chewing frequency and duration of gum chewing on salivary flow rate and sucrose concentration.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Puckett, A D; Dawes, C

    1995-07-01

    On ten separate occasions, unstimulated saliva was collected from 12 adults and then eight samples of saliva over a 20-min period while chewing, in random order, 3 g of either Wrigley's Spearmint chewing-gum or gum-base at frequencies of 35, 50, 70, 90, or 130 chews/min. With both stimuli, flow rates peaked in the first minute of stimulation and then fell with time. A repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that for both the gum and the gum-base, flow rates were independent of chewing frequency, except during the first minute with the chewing-gum. The gum elicited a significantly higher flow rate over the first 4 min of chewing, while the base elicited a significantly higher flow rate over the 8-20-min period of chewing. The sucrose concentration in saliva was also independent of chewing frequency. The salivary sucrose concentration peaked during the second minute of chewing (mean +/- SE = 424.7 +/- 20.0 mM) and the concentration then fell progressively with time. However, sucrose was still being released into saliva during the 15-20 min period of chewing (12.6 +/- 0.8 mM). Gum-base which had been chewed without access to saliva was softer than unchewed base but showed no change in filler content or a reduction in the average molecular weight. The decrease in hardness of the chewed gum-base may have resulted from improved mixing of heterogeneous phases and increased dispersion of plasticizing agents. PMID:7503931

  14. Gum Chewing Inhibits the Sensory Processing and the Propagation of Stress-Related Information in a Brain Network

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongbo; Chen, Xi; Liu, Jinting; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2013-01-01

    Stress is prevalent in human life and threatens both physical and mental health; stress coping is thus of adaptive value for individual's survival and well-being. Although there has been extensive research on how the neural and physiological systems respond to stressful stimulation, relatively little is known about how the brain dynamically copes with stress evoked by this stimulation. Here we investigated how stress is relieved by a popular coping behavior, namely, gum chewing. In an fMRI study, we used loud noise as an acute stressor and asked participants to rate their feeling of stress in gum-chewing and no-chewing conditions. The participants generally felt more stressful when hearing noise, but less so when they were simultaneously chewing gum. The bilateral superior temporal sulcus (STS) and the left anterior insula (AI) were activated by noise, and their activations showed a positive correlation with the self-reported feeling of stress. Critically, gum chewing significantly reduced the noise-induced activation in these areas. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis showed that the functional connectivity between the left AI and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was increased by noise to a lesser extent when the participants were chewing gum than when not chewing gum. Dynamic causality modeling (DCM) demonstrated that gum chewing inhibited the connectivity from the STS to the left AI. These findings demonstrate that gum chewing relieves stress by attenuating the sensory processing of external stressor and by inhibiting the propagation of stress-related information in the brain stress network. PMID:23573184

  15. The effect of two types chewing gum containing casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and xylitol on salivary Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Emamieh, Shila; Khaterizadeh, Yosra; Goudarzi, Hossein; Ghasemi, Amir; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Torabzadeh, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of sugar-free chewing gum containing casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and xylitol on salivary Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 dental students of 20-25 years old, who volunteered after checking their health condition and signing an informed consent, were randomly allocated to receive one of the following interventions: (A) Chewing gum containing CPP-ACP; (B) containing xylitol. Subjects within the experimental groups were taken the gums 3 times daily, after each meal for a period of 3 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention unstimulated saliva samples were quantified for S. mutans counts. Results: A statistically significant reduction of salivary S. mutans was displayed in both groups A and B after the intervention when compared with baseline (P < 0.001), and group A shows more statistically significant reduction of salivary S. mutans than group B (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Daily consumption of chewing gum containing CPP-ACP and xylitol significantly reduces the level of salivary S. mutans, but chewing gum containing CPP-ACP can reduce the level of salivary S. mutans in more than xylitol chewing gum. PMID:26069402

  16. Synthesis, characterization of thiolated karaya gum and evaluation of effect of pH on its mucoadhesive and sustained release properties.

    PubMed

    Bahulkar, Swati S; Munot, Neha M; Surwase, Sachin S

    2015-10-01

    Present study aims at synthesis and characterization of thiolated gum karaya by reacting karaya gum with 80% thioglycolic acid resulting in esterification and immobilization of thiol groups on polymeric backbone. Immobilized thiol groups were found to be 5.026 mM/g determined by Ellman's method. It was characterized by FTIR, DSC and XRD. Directly compressible tablets prepared using thiolated gum displayed more disintegration time, swelling and mucoadhesion with increase in pH of medium simulating gastric and intestinal environment than plain gum. Controlled drug release for more than 24h by Fickian diffusion following Korsemeyer-Peppas model was observed with Metoprolol Succinate as a model drug as compared to plain gum which released more than 90% of the drug within 2h. Synthesized thiomer showed no cytotoxicity determined using HepG2 cell line. According to these results, thiolated gum karaya seems to be promising excipient for the development of mucoadhesive drug delivery systems. PMID:26076615

  17. Effect of gum arabic on glucose levels and microbial short-chain fatty acid production in white rice porridge model and mixed grain porridge model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie-Lun; Nie, Shao-Ping; Li, Na; Min, Fang-Fang; Li, Chang; Gong, Deming; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2014-07-01

    White rice porridge and mixed grain porridge, which are often consumed in many countries, were used as two models to evaluate the effects of gum arabic on glucose levels and microbial short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). Gum arabic was incorporated into the two porridges individually. Apparent viscosity of the two porridges was significantly increased, and their glucose productions during gastrointestinal digestion were notably lowered (p < 0.05). Diffused glucose amount was significantly decreased after gum arabic addition (p < 0.05). Furthermore, blood glucose rise after oral administration of porridges in mice was considerably lowered after fortified with gum arabic (p < 0.05). Microbial SCFA production during in vitro fermentation of porridges was significantly increased after gum arabic addition, which may also have beneficial effects on reducing postprandial glycemic response. Therefore, gum arabic may be a helpful ingredient, which could be added in porridges to have benefits for the reduction of postprandial glycemic response. PMID:24941348

  18. Molecular and functional characteristics of purified gum from Australian chia seeds.

    PubMed

    Timilsena, Yakindra Prasad; Adhikari, Raju; Kasapis, Stefan; Adhikari, Benu

    2016-01-20

    Chia seed gum (CSG) was extracted from the seed coat of Salvia hispanica, purified in the laboratory and its chemical composition and functional properties were investigated. CSG was found to comprise 93.8% carbohydrate consisting of xylose, glucose, arabinose, galactose, glucuronic acid and galacturonic acid as monosaccharide units. The presence of uronic acids was reflected in the anionic behavior of the CSG solution over a wide range of pH (?1.8). The solubility of CSG increased slightly with temperature and pH of the aqueous medium. CSG was able to resist pyrolytic decomposition at temperatures well in excess of 250°C, and exhibited a high water holding capacity (23 times of its own weight). The surface activity and emulsifying properties of CSG were found to be either superior or comparable to other common gums and industrial polysaccharides indicating the potential of CSG as an effective thickener and stabilizer of processed foods. PMID:26572338

  19. Synthesis of carbamoylethyl Cassia angustifolia seed gum in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Gaurav; Pandey, I P; Joshi, H C

    2016-01-20

    The Cassia angustifolia seed gum (CAG), a galactomannan, isolated from the seeds of C. angustifolia was subjected to the carbamoylethylation which involved the reaction of CAG with acrylamide in an aqueous medium (water) in the presence of alkali (NaOH) as a catalyst. Alkali concentration, acrylamide concentration, liquor:gum ratio as well as reaction temperature and time were found to affect the extent of carbamoylethylation of CAG (expressed in terms of nitrogen content) and so, these were optimized. Degree of substitution (DS) and reaction efficiency was also determined. FTIR revealed the successful carbamoylethylation of CAG and rheological study conducted on 1 and 2% (w/w) solutions of the carbamoylethyl-CAG not only brought out the non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behaviour, but also high stability of carbamoylethyl-CAG solutions in comparison to solutions of the unmodified CAG. PMID:26572469

  20. High Temperature Stable Separator for Lithium Batteries Based on SiO? and Hydroxypropyl Guar Gum.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diogo Vieira; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    A novel membrane based on silicon dioxide (SiO?) and hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) as binder is presented and tested as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The separator is made with renewable and low cost materials and an environmentally friendly manufacturing processing using only water as solvent. The separator offers superior wettability and high electrolyte uptake due to the optimized porosity and the good affinity of SiO? and guar gum microstructure towards organic liquid electrolytes. Additionally, the separator shows high thermal stability and no dimensional-shrinkage at high temperatures due to the use of the ceramic filler and the thermally stable natural polymer. The electrochemical tests show the good electrochemical stability of the separator in a wide range of potential, as well as its outstanding cycle performance. PMID:26512701

  1. The conformational transitions in organic solution on the cress seed gum nanoparticles production.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Afsaneh; Razavi, Seyed M A

    2015-09-01

    The seeds of Lepidium sativum (garden cress) were selected as a new hydrocolloid source to fabricate cress seed gum nanoparticles (CSGN) by the desolvation method. The intrinsic viscosity of the CSGN solutions was measured to evaluate the conformational differences of the CSG resulted by the various production conditions. The intrinsic viscosity of CSGN solutions was estimated by using various models, i.e. Huggins, Kraemer, Tanglertpaibul-Rao and Higiro, and then the intrinsic viscosity was an objective function aimed at optimizing the conditions for the solubilization of CSG nanoparticles by the response surface method. The results indicated that among the conditions for the preparation of nanoparticles, acetone and gum concentrations had significant effects on the intrinsic viscosity of nanoparticles. Hereby, CSG served as a source of anionic polyelectrolyte molecules in dilute solutions with acetone-water mixtures. This compound goes on to display a coil-globule transition above a certain threshold of acetone. PMID:26143122

  2. Oral adverse reactions due to cinnamon-flavoured chewing gums consumption.

    PubMed

    Calapai, G; Miroddi, M; Mannucci, C; Minciullo, Pl; Gangemi, S

    2014-10-01

    Cinnamon-flavoured products (toothpaste, chewing gum, food, candy and mouthwash) can cause oral adverse reactions; among these, the most common is contact stomatitis (cinnamon contact stomatitis, CCS). Signs and symptoms of contact allergic reactions affecting the oral mucosa can mimic other common oral disorders, making diagnosis difficult. As CCS may be more prevalent than believed and its clinical features can frequently determine misdiagnosis, we reviewed case reports and case series of oral adverse reactions due to cinnamon-containing chewing gums, emphasizing clinical aspects, diagnostic and management procedures. We also proposed an algorithm to perform a diagnosis of CCS as in the previous published literature the diagnostic approach was not based on a harmonized and shared evidence-based procedure. Moreover, as patients can refer to different specialists as dentists, dermatologists and allergists, a multidisciplinary approach is suggested. PMID:24004186

  3. EFFECT OF GUM CHEWING ON AIR SWALLOWING, SALIVA SWALLOWING AND BELCHING.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Cristina Viana da; Aprile, Lilian Rose Otoboni; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2015-09-01

    BackgroundEructation is a physiologic event which allows gastric venting of swallowed air and most of the time is not perceived as a symptom. This is called gastric belching. Supragastric belching occurs when swallowed air does not reach the stomach and returns by mouth a short time after swallowing. This situation may cause discomfort, life limitations and problems in daily life.ObjectiveOur objective in this investigation was to evaluate if gum chewing increases the frequency of gastric and/or supragastric belches.MethodsEsophageal transit of liquid and gas was evaluated by impedance measurement in 16 patients with complaint of troublesome belching and in 15 controls. The Rome III criteria were used in the diagnosis of troublesome belching. The esophageal transit of liquid and gas was measured at 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm and 20 cm from the lower esophageal sphincter. The subjects were evaluated for 1 hour which was divided into three 20-minute periods: (1) while sitting for a 20-minute base period; (2) after the ingestion of yogurt (200 mL, 190 kcal), in which the subjects were evaluated while chewing or not chewing gum; (3) final 20-minute period in which the subjects then inverted the task of chewing or not chewing gum. In gastric belch, the air flowed from the stomach through the esophagus in oral direction and in supragastric belch the air entered the esophagus rapidly from proximal and was expulsed almost immediately in oral direction. Air swallows were characterized by an increase of at least 50% of basal impedance and saliva swallow by a decrease of at least 50% of basal impedance, that progress from proximal to distal esophagus.ResultsIn base period, air swallowing was more frequent in patients than in controls and saliva swallowing was more frequent in controls than in patients. There was no difference between the medians of controls and patients in the number of gastric belches and supragastric belches. In six patients, supragastric belches were seen at least once during the 20-minute base period. None of the controls had supragastric belches. In the control group, the ingestion of yogurt caused no significant alteration in the number of air swallows, saliva swallows, gastric belches and supragastric belches. In the patient group, there was an increase in the number of air swallows. If the subjects were chewing gum during this 20-minute period, there was an increase in the number of saliva swallows in both groups, without alterations of the number of air swallow, gastric belches and supragastric belches. There was no alteration in the number of the saliva swallows, air swallows, gastric belches and supragastric belches in both groups for subjects who did not chew gum in the 20-40 minute period after yogurt ingestion. When the subjects were chewing the gum, there was an increase in saliva swallows in the control and patients groups and in air swallows in the patients group.ConclusionGum chewing causes an increase in saliva swallowing in both patients with excessive belching and in controls, and an increase in air swallowing in patients with excessive belching 20 minutes after yogurt ingestion. Gum chewing did not increase or decrease the frequency of gastric or supragastric belches. PMID:26486285

  4. Unusual cause for gum hypertrophy and skin nodules in a child.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Priyadharshini; Karmegaraj, Balaganesh; Vij, Mukul; Scott, Julius Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile hyaline fibromatosis (JHF) is a rare progressive autosomal recessive disease that is characterised by papulonodular skin lesions, soft tissue masses, joint contractures, gingival hypertrophy and osteolytic bone lesions. We present an 18-month-old boy with JHF. This case demonstrates that JHF should be considered in the differential diagnosis when multiple subcutaneous nodules are observed in the face, head and neck. Gum hypertrophy with palatal nodules is unusual in JHF. PMID:26682835

  5. Diameter prediction mathematical models for xanthan gum-alginate capsules produced by extrusion-dripping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Hui-Yen; Lee, Boon-Beng; Zakaria, Zarina; Chan, Eng-Seng

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the applicability of particle diameter prediction mathematical models (i.e. Tate's Law equation, the modified Tate's Law equation, the modified Yildirim's model) to determine diameter of liquid core capsules. The capsules were produced by extruding xanthan gum-calcium chloride solution through a hypodermic needle into sodium alginate solution. The effects of two types of xanthan gum with different concentrations and needle diameters on capsule diameter were investigated in this work. The results showed that there was no significant difference in capsule diameter despite different types and concentrations of xanthan gum were used. However, the diameter of the capsules increased when the diameter of needles increased. As a whole, the produced capsules were in the range of 3.47 mm to 4.86 mm. Among the three studied prediction models, the modified Tate's Law mathematical equation was the most suitable model for the diameter prediction of the liquid core capsules with AAD of 2.74% and MAD of 6.55%.

  6. Formulation and In Vitro Evaluation of Ofloxacin Tablets using Natural Gums as Binders

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Amisha K.; Nagda, Chirag D.; Nagda, Dhruti C.; Dixit, Bharat C.; Dixit, Ritu B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural gums are economical, easily available, and useful as tablet binders. In the present investigation, an attempt was made to formulate Ofloxacin tablets using three natural binders, namely Acacia arabica, Hibiscus esculentus, and xanthan gum. Such six batches of Ofloxacin tablets were prepared by using different types and amounts of the natural binders by the wet granulation method. The tablets were analyzed for their hardness, friability, and weight variation, and in vitro release was performed in a phosphate buffer at pH 6.8. The prepared tablets were also evaluated for their various release kinetics and similarity factors f2. The physical properties of the tablets containing the natural binders showed sufficient hardness, desirable disintegration time, and low friability. Their better percentage of drug release was observed as compared to the marketed formulation showing more than 85% drug release within 45 minutes. The in vitro release data was well-fitted into zero-order and the values of release exponent ‘n’ were between 0.303 and 0.514. The high similarity factor f2 of 64.50 was achieved with the best batch in comparison to the marketed tablets. The results obtained indicated that the gum Acacia arabica performed as well as gelatin compared to the other binders for the Ofloxacin tablet formulation. PMID:24959411

  7. [Chewing gum as an additional agent in maintaining oral hygiene versus smoking status--preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Nakonieczna-Rudnicka, Marta; Strycharz-Dudziak, Ma?gorzata; Bachanek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays chewing gum is widely used in different age groups, so complying with proper duration and frequency of chewing is an important factor influencing the state of masticatory system. The study involved 112 dental students of the Medical University of Lublin. Everyday use of chewing gum declared 47,32% of cases. Chewing time up to 10 minutes was stated in 23,08% of respondents, 11-20 minutes in 40,38% of interviewees. Among the examined students 17,3% smoked cigarettes. In smokers group 83,33% of questioned chewed the gum every day, while among non-smokers - 43,37%. Chewing time shorter than 10 minutes declared 22,22% of smokers and 23,26% of non-smokers, while chewing time between 11-20 minutes - 27,78% i 44,35% of smokers and non-smokers respectively. Obtained results indicate the need of carrying out further studies aimed at the nicotine influence on saliva parameters with respect to development of diseases of hard tooth tissues. PMID:23421028

  8. Pharmacology and Phytochemistry of Oleo-Gum Resin of Commiphora wightii (Guggulu)

    PubMed Central

    Sarup, Prerna; Bala, Suman; Kamboj, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Guggulu is an oleo-gum resin which exudes out as a result of injury from the bark of Commiphora wightii (Arnott) Bhandari [syn.??Commiphora mukul (Hook. Ex Stocks) Engl; Balsamodendron mukul (Hook. Ex Stocks); Family, Burseraceae]. It has been used in the Ayurveda since time immemorial for the treatment of variety of disorders such as inflammation, gout, rheumatism, obesity, and disorders of lipids metabolism. It is a mixture of phytoconstituents like volatile oil which contains terpenoidal constituents such as monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, diterpenoids, and triterpenoids; steroids; flavonoids; guggultetrols; lignans; sugars; and amino acids. This review is an effort to compile all the information available on all of its chemical constituents which are responsible for its therapeutic potential. The wild occurrence of this species is restricted mainly to the dry regions of Rajasthan and Gujarat States of India, and the bordering regions of Pakistan. Oleo-gum resin, guggulu, tapped from the stems of this species, is consumed in high volumes by the Indian herbal industries. There has been a decline in its wild population over the last several decades, as a result of habitat loss and degradation, coupled with unregulated harvesting and tapping of oleo-gum resin. This species is consequently assessed as Critically Endangered and enlisted in the IUCN red list of threatened species. PMID:26587309

  9. Pressure cell assisted solubilization of xyloglucans: tamarind seed polysaccharide and detarium gum.

    PubMed

    Picout, David R; Ross-Murphy, Simon B; Errington, Neil; Harding, Stephen E

    2003-01-01

    To improve the solubilization of two water-soluble xyloglucans, tamarind seed polysaccharide and detarium gum, by reducing substantially molecular aggregation, a "pressure cell" heating method was used. Conditions allowing solubilization and chain depolymerization were produced by varying appropriately the pressure, time, and temperature applied. The various MW fractions of solubilized xyloglucans were characterized by capillary viscometry and light scattering techniques in order to extract, with reliability, fundamental macromolecular parameters. Mark-Houwink and Flory exponents were found to be 0.67 +/- 0.04 and 0.51 +/- 0.06, respectively for both xyloglucan data combined, consistent with linear random coil behavior. A detailed analysis of the data seems to suggest that tamarind gum solutions are slightly perturbed by the effect of excluded volume, whereas detarium gum samples are close to the theta state. Chain flexibility parameters such characteristic ratio, C( proportional, variant ), and persistence length, L(p), were calculated for tamarind and detarium using the Burchard-Stockmayer-Fixman (BSF) geometric method. L(p) values of 6-8 nm were estimated for xyloglucans. The seemingly linear structure of tamarind and detarium, as suggested by the value of the Mark-Houwink and Flory exponents obtained, follows from analysis of the data by the classical Zimm method but not when employing the square root or Berry method which suggests a more branched chain profile. This was the approach adopted in our previous work on the characterization of detarium samples. PMID:12741801

  10. Structural characterization of a glucuronoarabinoxylan from pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merrill) gum exudate.

    PubMed

    Simas-Tosin, Fernanda F; de Souza, Lauro M; Wagner, Ricardo; Pereira, Graciele C Z; Barraza, Ruth R; Wendel, Cinthia F; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Iacomini, Marcello; Gorin, Philip A J

    2013-04-15

    Native polysaccharide from pineapple gum (PANP) was obtained following alkaline extraction of gum and fractionation with cetylpyridinium chloride. It was characterized as a glucuronoarabinoxylan using NMR, methylation data, controlled Smith degradation, carboxy-reduction, and ESI-MS of oligosaccharides produced on mild acid hydrolysis of PANP. HSPEC-MALLS-RI of carboxy-reduced fraction showed homogeneous profile (Mw 1.943×10(5) g/mol). PANP was composed of Ara, Xyl, Gal, and GlcpA (40:23:7:30 molar ratio). Its main chain presented (1?4)-linked ?-xylan, highly substituted at O-2 and O-3 by side chains of 3-O- and 3,5-di-O-linked ?-Araf, 2-O- and 4-O-linked ?-GlcpA, and nonreducing end-units of ?-Araf, ?-Arap, ?-Galp, and ?-GlcpA. ESI-MS of a mixture of oligosaccharides formed on the mild acid hydrolysis of PANP was consistent with repetitive structures of ?-GlcpA O-3 linked at ?-Xylp units, whereas in others glucuronoarabinoxylan-type gum exudates, ?-GlcpA units had been previously found to be linked at O-2. PMID:23544593

  11. Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) gum: a potent inhibitor of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Sehitoglu, M Hilal; Han, Hatice; Kalin, P?nar; Gülçin, ?lhami; Ozkan, Ali; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, in order to evaluate antioxidant and radical scavenging properties of Pistachio gum (P-Gum), different bioanalytical methods such as DPPH(•) scavenging activity, DMPD(•+) radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, reducing ability Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) transformation, Cuprac and FRAP assays, O2(•-) scavenging by riboflavin-methionine-illuminate system and ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activities by 2,2'-bipyridyl reagent were performed separately. P-Gum inhibited 54.2% linoleic acid peroxidation at 10?µg/ml concentration. On the other hand, BHA, BHT, ?-tocopherol and trolox, pure antioxidant compounds, indicated inhibition of 80.3%, 73.5%, 36.2% and 72.0% on peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, all of sample had an effective DPPH(•), DMPD(•+) and O2(•-) scavenging, Fe(3+) reducing power by Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) transformation and FRAP assay, Cu(2+) reducing ability by Cuprac method and Fe(2+) chelating activities. PMID:24939094

  12. The effect of guar gum on fluid friction in spiral pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuar, Gunawan, Baqi, M.

    2012-06-01

    Pipeline is the most effective equipment to transport of fluid. Based on the shape, pipe can classify as circular, square, triangle and spiral. Each shape has different characteristics. On the transport of fluid using pipe, pressure drop is very important aspect because related with energy consumption. Special pipe as spiral pipe is used as a fuel mixing system of fuel. It is intended to prevent precipitation and to reduce the pressure drop. The purpose of this research is to investigate the reduction of pressure drop in a spiral pipe with the addition biopolymer (guar gum). Spiral pipe with the best aspect ratio, P/Di = 7 is used in this study. Working fluid used guar gum solution of 150 ppm and 200 ppm. Circular pipe with same diameter is used for comparison. Analysis of flow characteristics based on the power law model for non-Newtonian fluid. Experimental was conducted from low to high Reynolds number up to 60,000. The results showed that the effect of biopolymer guar gum solution can reduce drag either on a circular pipe and spiral pipe.

  13. Application of image processing to assess emulsion stability and emulsification properties of Arabic gum.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Abdullah; Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Mirzaei, Habibollah; Asghari, Ali; Akhavan, Sahar

    2015-08-01

    This paper focuses on the development of an effective methodology to determine the optimum levels of independent variables leading to maximize stability of O/W emulsions containing Arabic gum, as a natural emulsifier and stabilizer. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to determine the effect of Arabic gum content (2%, 5%, and 8% (w/w)), homogenization time (5, 12.5, and 20 min) and storage temperature (4, 22, and 40 °C). Image processing was used to determine emulsion stability based on responses including creaming index, centrifugal stability, viscosity, color parameters, and D32 and D43 indices. For each response, a second-order polynomial model with high coefficient of determination (R(2)) values ranging from 0.95 to 0.989 was developed using multiple linear regression analysis. The optimization results showed that the overall optimum region with the highest stability was found to be at the combined levels of 5.81% (w/w) Arabic gum content, 5 min homogenization time, and 22 °C for storage temperature. PMID:25933515

  14. Facile synthesis of palladium nanocatalyst using gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium): a natural biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Lori; Beedu, Sashidhar Rao; Kora, Aruna Jyothi

    2015-12-01

    Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) were synthesised by using gum kondagogu (GK), a non-toxic ecofriendly biopolymer. GK acted as both reducing and stabilising agent for the synthesis of Pd NPs. Various reaction parameters, such as concentration of gum, Pd chloride and reaction pH were standardised for the stable synthesis of GK reduced stabilised Pd NPs (GK-Pd NPs). The nanoparticles have been characterised using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Physical characterisation revealed that the gum synthesised Pd NPs were in the size range of 6.5 ± 2.3 nm and crystallised in face centred cubic (FCC) symmetry. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy implicated the role of carboxyl, amine and hydroxyl groups in the synthesis. The synthesised Pd NPs were found to be highly stable in nature. The synthesised nanoparticles were found to function as an effective green catalyst (k = 0.182 min(-1)) in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride, which was evident from the colour change of bright yellow (nitrophenolate; ?max - 400 nm) to colourless (4-AP; ?max - 294 nm) solution. The overall objectives of the current communication were: (i) to synthesize the Pd NPs using a green reducing/capping agent; GK and (ii) to determine the catalytic performance of the synthesised Pd NPs. PMID:26647812

  15. Complex coacervates obtained from peptide leucine and gum arabic: Formation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Gulão, Eliana da S; de Souza, Clitor J F; Andrade, Cristina T; Garcia-Rojas, Edwin E

    2016-03-01

    In this study, interactions between polypeptide-leucine (0.2% w/w) and gum arabic (0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12, and 0.15% w/w) were examined at concentrations of NaCl (0, 0.01, 0.25, 0.3, 0.5mol/l) and at different pH values (from 1.0 to 12.0). Formation of insoluble complex coacervates was highest at pH 4.0. At pH 2.0, which is the pKa of the gum Arabic, the dissociation of precipitate occurred. The pHØ2 positively shifted with the addition of higher concentrations of salt. Samples containing 0.2% PL and 0.03% GA and no salt had higher turbidity and increased formation of precipitates showing greater turbidity and particle sizes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the complex coacervate formation of leucine and gum arabic, and rheological measurements suggest the elastic behavior of 0.2% PL and 0.03% GA complex. Overall, the study suggests that complex coacervates of PLs could be one feasible ways of incorporating amino acids in food products. PMID:26471607

  16. Rheological and kinetic study of the ultrasonic degradation of xanthan gum in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruoshi; Feke, Donald L

    2015-04-01

    The effectiveness of ultrasound to degrade the molecular weight of xanthan gum in aqueous solutions was investigated for sonication times up to 60 min at 20 °C and for polymer concentrations up to 0.1g/dl. The Huggins equation was found to be applicable to the intrinsic viscosity of xanthan gum prior to sonication, while a truncated form was found to be adequate for estimating the intrinsic viscosity of the degraded xanthan. To better understand the influence of salting-in and salting-out salts (classified on the basis of the Hofmeister series) on degradation, xanthan-gum solutions were pre-mixed with 0.1, 10(-2), 10(-3), or 10(-4)M NaCl or Na2SO4, prior to ultrasonication. A kinetic model was developed and successfully applied to quantify and predict the degradation rates and efficiency. The various reaction rate constants and reaction orders were found to correlate with the different salt species and concentrations used, suggesting that salting-in and salting-out salts could increase or inhibit ultrasonic degradation by adjusting the molecular conformation of the xanthan. PMID:25442624

  17. Starch-based edible film with gum arabic for fruits coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Aqeela Salfarina; Lazim, Azwan Mat

    2015-09-01

    Packaging waste forms a significant part of municipal solid waste and has caused increasing environmental concerns, resulting in a strengthening of various regulations aimed at reducing the amounts generated. The introduction of biodegradable materials such as edible film and coating which can be disposed directly into the soil, can be one possible solution to this problem. Edible coating is defined as a thin layer of edible material form as a film on the surface of the fruits and vegetables. This coating can affect the respiration and moisture loss. In this study, edible film and coating were used as fruit coating. The edible film were prepared with different ratios which is 2:2, 3:1, and 1:3 of starch and gum Arabic with 10% of glycerol and sorbitol as plasticiser. A study of practical application for the edible film and coating from starch with gum Arabic for fruit coating was conducted. Banana were coated with an aqueous solution of starch with gum Arabic and stored at ambient temperature (26 ± 1°C; 70 ± 10% RH). The results indicate that with the coating application, the fruits lost about 30% less weight than the uncoated fruits. The coating application was also effective in retaining the firmness of the banana and slow down the ripening process.

  18. Microencapsulation of grape (Vitis labrusca var. Bordo) skin phenolic extract using gum Arabic, polydextrose, and partially hydrolyzed guar gum as encapsulating agents.

    PubMed

    Kuck, Luiza Siede; Noreña, Caciano Pelayo Zapata

    2016-03-01

    Bordo grape skin extract was microencapsulated by spray-drying and freeze-drying, using gum arabic (GA), partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG), and polydextrose (PD) as encapsulating agents. Total phenolics and total monomeric anthocyanin, antioxidant activity, color, moisture, water activity (aw), solubility, hygroscopicity, glass transition temperature (Tg), particle size, and microstructure of the powders were evaluated. The retention of phenolics and anthocyanins ranged from 81.4% to 95.3%, and 80.8% to 99.6%, respectively, while the retention of antioxidant activity ranged from 45.4% to 83.7%. Treatments subjected to spray-drying had lower moisture, aw, and particle size, and greater solubility, while the freeze-dried samples were less hygroscopic. Tg values ranged from 10.1 to 52.2°C, and the highest values corresponded to the spray-dried microparticles. The spray-dried particles had spherical shape, while the freeze-dried powders showed irregular structures. The spray drying technique and the use of 5% PHGG and 5% PD has proven to be the best treatment. PMID:26471594

  19. Mapping brain region activity during chewing: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, M; Fujita, M; Watanabe, K; Hirano, Y; Niwa, M; Nishiyama, K; Saito, S

    2002-11-01

    Mastication has been suggested to increase neuronal activities in various regions of the human brain. However, because of technical difficulties, the fine anatomical and physiological regions linked to mastication have not been fully elucidated. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during cycles of rhythmic gum-chewing and no chewing, we therefore examined the interaction between chewing and brain regional activity in 17 subjects (aged 20-31 years). In all subjects, chewing resulted in a bilateral increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, insula, thalamus, and cerebellum. In addition, in the first three regions, chewing of moderately hard gum produced stronger BOLD signals than the chewing of hard gum. However, the signal was higher in the cerebellum and not significant in the thalamus, respectively. These results suggest that chewing causes regional increases in brain neuronal activities which are related to biting force. PMID:12407087

  20. Effects of guar gum and cellulose on glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism in the pig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, C. S.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six Large White pigs (mean body-weight 59 (SE 1.7) kg) were surgically fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein, as well as with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery, and allowed to recover. The non-anaesthetized animals were given a basal non-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 60 g guar gum/kg (diet B) or 150 g purified cellulose/kg (diet C) by substitution for mica. The diets were given for weekly periods and according to a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design. On the last day of each such adaptation period, test meals of 800 g were given before blood sampling. Sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced glucose apparent absorption without changing the absorption and the hepatic uptake profiles. Production rates of insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were lowest after guar gum ingestion. However, the reductions in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum were not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly secreted by the gut, whereas the liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut-produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion appeared also to decrease glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very few effects on the variables considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the metabolic effects described.

  1. Real-time investigation of mannosyltransferase function of a Xylella fastidiosa recombinant GumH protein using QCM-D.

    PubMed

    Alves, Claudia A; Pedroso, Mariele M; de Moraes, Marcela C; Souza, Dulce H F; Cass, Quezia B; Faria, Ronaldo C

    2011-05-20

    Xylella fastidiosa is a gram-negative bacterium that causes serious diseases in economically important crops, including grapevine, coffee, and citrus fruits. X. fastidiosa colonizes the xylem vessels of the infected plants, thereby blocking water and nutrient transport. The genome sequence of X. fastidiosa has revealed an operon containing nine genes possibly involved in the synthesis of an exopolisaccharide (EPS) named fastidian gum that can be related with the pathogenicity of this bacterium. The ?-1,3-mannosyltransferase (GumH) enzyme from X. fastidiosa is involved in fastidian gum production. GumH is responsible for the transfer of mannose from guanosine diphosphate mannose (GDP-man) to the cellobiose-pyrophosphate-polyprenol carrier lipid (CPP-Lip) during the assembly and biosynthesis of EPS. In this work, a method for real-time detection of recombinant GumH enzymatic activity was successfully developed using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The QCM-D transducer was strategically modified with CPP-Lip by using a solid-supported lipid bilayer that makes use of a self-assembled monolayer of 1-undecanethiol. Monitoring the real-time CPP-Lip QCM-D transducer in the presence of GDP-man and GumH enzyme shows a mass increase, indicating the transfer of mannose. The real-time QCM-D determination of mannosyltransferase function was validated by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (LC) method developed for determination of GDP produced by enzymatic reaction. LC results confirmed the activity of recombinant GumH protein, which is the first enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the EPS from X. fastidiosa enzymatically characterized. PMID:21521632

  2. Dietary supplementation with pectin and guar gum on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Heitman, D W; Hardman, W E; Cameron, I L

    1992-05-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with pectin and/or guar gum on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis was studied using 120 male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were given a weekly injection of DMH for 8 weeks and were maintained on a basal fiber-free diet supplemented with 5% cellulose. The rats were then subdivided into four groups and kept on the basal fiber-free diet supplemented with either no fiber, 10% pectin, 10% guar gum or a combination of 5% pectin/5% guar gum for a period of 24 weeks. The 8 weeks of DMH administration were defined as the initiation stage of carcinogenesis and the next 24 weeks were defined as the promotional stage of carcinogenesis. Food and water were available ad libitum. The rats were killed 32 weeks after the start of the experiment and tumor incidence, location and frequency in the colon were determined. Other parameters measured were body weight and caloric intake. Dietary fiber supplementation with 10% pectin or with 10% guar gum but not with the combination of 5% pectin/5% guar gum (fed during the promotional stage of carcinogenesis), was found to suppress colon cancer incidence to a significant extent. PMID:1316814

  3. Size-controlled green synthesis of silver nanoparticles mediated by gum ghatti (Anogeissus latifolia) and its biological activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gum ghatti is a proteinaceous edible, exudate tree gum of India and is also used in traditional medicine. A facile and ecofriendly green method has been developed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate using gum ghatti (Anogeissus latifolia) as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The influence of concentration of gum and reaction time on the synthesis of nanoparticles was studied. UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analytical techniques were used to characterize the synthesized nanoparticles. Results By optimizing the reaction conditions, we could achieve nearly monodispersed and size controlled spherical nanoparticles of around 5.7 ± 0.2 nm. A possible mechanism involved in the reduction and stabilization of nanoparticles has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Conclusions The synthesized silver nanoparticles had significant antibacterial action on both the Gram classes of bacteria. As the silver nanoparticles are encapsulated with functional group rich gum, they can be easily integrated for various biological applications. PMID:22571686

  4. Chemical composition and functional properties of gum exudates from the trunk of the almond tree (Prunus dulcis).

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, N; Chouaibi, M; Donsì, F; Ferrari, G; Hamdi, S

    2012-06-01

    The physicochemical components and functional properties of the gum exudates from the trunk of the almond tree (Prunus dulcis) have been investigated, along with the emulsification and foaming properties. The gum exudates are composed on dry weight basis by 2.45% of proteins, 0.85% of fats and 92.36% of carbohydrates. The latter consist of arabinose, xylitol, galactose and uronic acid (46.8?:?10.9?:?35.5?:?6.0 mass ratio) with traces of rhamnose, mannose and glucose. Moreover, gum exudates are rich in minerals, such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium and iron. The emulsifying capacity was studied for a 20% w/w olive oil in water emulsion as a function of gum concentration (from 3% to 12% w/w in the aqueous phase) as well as pH levels (from 3.0 to 10.0). The most stable and homogeneous emulsion was prepared with an 8% w/w aqueous almond gum solution at a pH between 5.0 and 8.0. In particular, for the same formulation, the emulsion processed by high pressure homogenization (5 passes at 200?MPa) resulted to be extremely stable under accelerated ageing, exhibiting no significant change in droplet size distribution for 14 days at 55?°C. All the tested systems exhibited an extremely low foaming capacity. PMID:22701057

  5. Reliability and validity of a quantitative color scale to evaluate masticatory performance using color-changeable chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Hama, Yohei; Kanazawa, Manabu; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Uchida, Tatsuro; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we developed a novel color scale for visual assessment, conforming to theoretical color changes of a gum, to evaluate masticatoryperformance; moreover, we investigated the reliability and validity of this evaluation method using the color scale. Ten participants (aged 26.30 years) with natural dentition chewed the gum at several chewing strokes. Changes in color were measured using a colorimeter, and then, linearregression expressions that represented changes in gum color were derived. The color scale was developed using these regression expressions. Thirty-two chewed gums were evaluated using colorimeter and were assessed three times using the color scale by six dentists aged 25.27 (mean, 25.8) years, six preclinical dental students aged 21.23 (mean, 22.2) years, and six elderly individuals aged 68.84 (mean, 74.0) years. The intrarater and interrater reliability of evaluations was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Validity of the method compared with a colorimeter was assessed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. All intraclass correlation coefficients were > 0.90, and Spearman's rank-correlation coefficients were > 0.95 in all groups. These results indicated that the evaluation method of the color-changeable chewing gum using the newly developed color scale is reliable and valid. PMID:24658959

  6. The comparative effect of propolis in two different vehicles; mouthwash and chewing-gum on plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Nuray; Erdemir, Ebru Olgun; Ozkan, Serdar Yucel; Hendek, Meltem Karsiyaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In general, chemical plaque agents have been used in mouthwashes, gels, and dentifrices. In some situations, application of mouthwashes and dentifrices can be difficult. Therefore, different approaches for oral health-care have been needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of propolis chewing-gum compared to propolis-containing mouthwash on gingival inflammation and plaque accumulation on patients that refrained from daily oral hygiene procedures for 5 days. Materials and Methods: 10 college students with systemically healthy and very good oral hygiene and gingival health were included in this randomized, single-blind, crossover 5-day plaque regrowth with a 3-day washout period clinical study. After plaque scores were reduced to zero, participants were asked to refrain from oral hygiene procedures and allocated to either propolis mouthwash or chewing-gum group. Chewing-gum was performed after meals 3 times a day for 20 min mouthwash group was instructed to rinse mouthwash 2 times a day for 1 min. On day 5, the clinical periodontal measurements containing plaque and gingival indexes were taken from the participants. Results: The both plaque and gingival indexes of propolis mouthwash group were significantly lower than that of the propolis chewing-gum group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: It was demonstrated that the propolis mouthwash was more effective than the propolis chewing gum on the plaque inhibition and the gingival inflammation. PMID:26038663

  7. The effect of over-the-counter sales of the nicotine patch and nicotine gum on smoking cessation in California.

    PubMed

    Reed, Mark B; Anderson, Christy M; Vaughn, Jerry W; Burns, David M

    2005-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration approved over-the-counter (OTC) sale of nicotine gum and nicotine patches in 1996. We used data from the 1996 California Tobacco Survey to compare the rates of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) use and smoking abstinence in California for each month during a period immediately preceding and immediately following the OTC availability of nicotine gum and patches. For smokers eligible to report a quit attempt, the proportion making a quit attempt using NRT and the proportion remaining abstinent was calculated for each of the 12 months prior to the survey interview. Multiple regression modeling of quit attempts and abstinence included a term for the number of months between the quit attempt and survey interview and dummy variables for the months before and after the OTC availability of NRT. Results showed a significant increase in the fraction of smokers using the patch (P < 0.01) and gum (P < 0.05) immediately following their availability OTC. There was also a significantly higher proportion of smokers reporting abstinence with gum use (P < 0.01) and a significant increase in reported abstinence with patch use (P < 0.01) during the period of time immediately following the availability of these products without a prescription. The results of this study suggest that removing the prescription status of NRT products resulted in an immediate increase in quit attempts and smoking abstinence with the use of nicotine gum or patches. PMID:16172221

  8. Effect of gum tragacanth on rheological and physical properties of a flavored milk drink made with date syrup.

    PubMed

    Keshtkaran, Maryam; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Asadi, Gholam Hassan; Nejad, Reza Azizi; Balaghi, Sima

    2013-08-01

    Date syrup as a nutritional additive and safe alternative to added sugar is one of the best choices for milk flavoring. In this study, a flavored milk beverage was formulated using date syrup for flavoring the product and gum tragacanth to obtain an acceptable mouth feel. Steady shear and dynamic oscillatory rheological properties of the samples contained 3 concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3%, wt/wt) of 2 types of gum tragacanth (Astragalus gossypinus and Astragalus rahensis) which at 3°C, were studied. Particle size distribution and colorimetric assays were determined by laser diffractometry and using reflection spectrometer, respectively. Sensory analysis was performed with 25 semitrained panelists, using a 5-point hedonic scale. The results showed that viscoelastic properties, flow behavior parameters, particle size, and color parameters (L*, a*, and b*, where L* represents lightness, a* represents the redness/greenness quality of the color, and b* represents the yellowness and blueness quality of the colors) were significantly affected by the concentration of the gum tragacanth and the severity of this effect was influenced by the type of gum. The use of appropriate type and concentration of gum tragacanth in date milk formulation can improve the texture and mouth feel by affecting on particle size and the flow behavior of this product. PMID:23746580

  9. Sonication-based improvement of the physicochemical properties of Guar Gum as a potential substrate for modified drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Siddique Akber; Matricardi, Pietro; Cencetti, Claudia; Di Meo, Chiara; Carafa, Maria; Mazzuca, Claudia; Palleschi, Antonio; Capitani, Donatella; Alhaique, Franco; Coviello, Tommasina

    2013-01-01

    Guar Gum is a natural polysaccharide that, due to its physicochemical properties, is extensively investigated for biomedical applications as a matrix for modified drug delivery, but it is also used in the food industry as well as in cosmetics. A commercial sample of Guar Gum was sonicated for different periods of time, and the reduction in the average molecular weight was monitored by means of viscometric measurements. At the same time, the rheological behaviour was also followed, in terms of viscoelasticity range, flow curves, and mechanical spectra. Sonicated samples were used for the preparation of gels in the presence of borate ions. The effect of borax on the new samples was investigated by recording mechanical spectra, flow curves, and visible absorption spectra of complexes with Congo Red. The anisotropic elongation, observed in previous studies with tablets of Guar Gum and borax, was remarkably reduced when the sonicated samples were used for the preparation of the gels. PMID:23984426

  10. GUM 48d: AN EVOLVED H II REGION WITH ONGOING STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, J. L.; Ohashi, N.; Manoj, P.

    2009-05-20

    High-mass star formation and the evolution of H II regions have a substantial impact on the morphology and star formation history of molecular clouds. The H II region Gum 48d, located in the Centaurus Arm at a distance of 3.5 kpc, is an old, well evolved H II region whose ionizing stars have moved off the main sequence. As such, it represents a phase in the evolution of H II regions that is less well studied than the earlier, more energetic, main-sequence phase. In this paper, we use multiwavelength archive data from a variety of sources to perform a detailed study of this interesting region. Morphologically, Gum 48d displays a ring-like faint H II region associated with diffuse emission from the associated photodissociation region, and is formed from part of a large, massive molecular cloud complex. There is extensive ongoing star formation in the region, at scales ranging from low to high mass, which is consistent with triggered star formation scenarios. We investigate the dynamical history and evolution of this region, and conclude that the original H II region was once larger and more energetic than the faint region currently seen. The proposed history of this molecular cloud complex is one of multiple, linked generations of star formation, over a period of 10 Myr. Gum 48d differs significantly in morphology and star formation from the other H II regions in the molecular cloud; these differences are likely the result of the advanced age of the region, and its different evolutionary status.

  11. Variations in tongue-palate swallowing pressures when swallowing xanthan gum-thickened liquids.

    PubMed

    Steele, Catriona M; Molfenter, Sonja M; Péladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Polacco, Rebecca C; Yee, Clemence

    2014-12-01

    Thickened liquids are frequently recommended to reduce the risk of aspiration in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Although it has previously been reported that tongue-palate pressures increase when swallowing spoon-thick and semi-solid consistencies compared to thin liquids, relatively little is known about how swallowing behaviors differ when swallowing liquids of nectar- or honey-thick consistency. Furthermore, previous studies have primarily used starch-based thickeners, and little is known about swallowing behaviors with xanthan gum-thickened liquids, which have recently been introduced for dysphagia management. In this study, we measured variations in tongue-palate pressures during the swallowing of liquids thickened to apparent viscosities of 190, 250, and 380 mPa s at 50/s using increasing concentrations of xanthan gum (0.5, 0.63 and 0.87 w/w%). The viscosity differences between these nectar- and honey-thick stimuli were confirmed to exceed sensory perceptual discrimination thresholds. Data were collected from 78 healthy adults in two sex-balanced age-groups (young; mature) and compared to reference values obtained during water swallowing. The results confirm that increased amplitudes of tongue-palate pressure were used when swallowing the thickened liquid stimuli, compared to swallows of water, and for the honey-thick liquid compared to the two nectar-thick liquids. Age-related reductions were seen in tongue strength but not in swallowing pressures, which fell below 40 % of maximum isometric pressure values. Thus, the use of xanthan gum-thickened liquids is unlikely to tax the swallowing system in terms of tongue pressure generation requirements, even in seniors with reduced maximum isometric tongue pressure measures. PMID:25087111

  12. What can we learn from the saga of chitosan gums in hyperphosphatemia therapy?

    PubMed

    Oh, Man S; Uribarri, Jaime

    2014-05-01

    Control of high serum phosphorus, a marker of poor outcome, is still a poorly achieved goal in dialysis therapy. Therefore, the 2009 study (Savica et al., J Am Soc Nephrol 20: 639-644, 2009) showing a significant drop of serum phosphate (2.35 mg/dl) after only 2 weeks of chewing a chitosan-containing gum two times per day was received with great hopes by the renal community. Chitosan is a polymer of glucosamine, similar to sevelamer, which allegedly would bind phosphate present in high concentrations in the saliva of renal patients. Recent randomized studies, however, have been unable to duplicate these results. A systematic and detailed quantitative analysis of the available data was performed. It concluded that the amount of chitosan contained in the chewing gum (20 mg) is too little to account for the originally observed reduction in serum phosphate and be of any use as a phosphate binding agent in the management of hyperphosphatemia. It was postulated that the original marked drop in serum phosphate may have been caused by the Hawthorne effect, which is frequently observed in nonrandomized clinical trials. Two important lessons derived from this analysis are emphasized. The first lesson is the demonstration of the importance of randomized, placebo-controlled studies in clinical research. If randomization had been performed in the original study, the Hawthorne effect would have been detected. The second lesson is showing the importance of quantitative analysis, which in this case, would have avoided the time and effort expended in several randomized clinical trials that eventually concluded the ineffectiveness of the chitosan-containing chewing gums as a phosphate binder. PMID:24408115

  13. Mapping Land Use Land Cover Using NDVI in a Semi-arid Areas in Gum Arabic Belt, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnour Adam, Hassan; Csaplovics, Elmar

    Gum arabic belt is most important region in Sudan with producing gum arabic in global level. Each land cover type has different spectral characteristics, absorbing some frequencies of light and reflecting others. With an understanding of the reflectance characteristics and some ground observations, it is possible to use remotely sensed data to make inferences about the type of land cover and land use. The objective of this study is to measure and classify the vegetation cover in semi-arid area in gum arbic belt in Sudan using NDVI. The remotely sensed data used in this study were NDVI images created from Terra-ASTER (2007), ETM+ (1999) and TM (1985) images of the study area (35x35 km) in the gum arabic in Kordofan region, Sudan. The values of the NDVI were examined and evaluated on pixel-by-pixel using ERDAS software and the training points collected from the field work. Supervised classification of a multi-temporal Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data set was used to analyse the temporal land-cover changes. The magnitude of green vegetation was quantified to several levels and separated from other classes using the advantage of the stratification of cover classes as a function of the NDVI. Using this stratification, the study found many similarities in the value of NDVI in land use land cover classes in gum arabic belt region. Four LULC classes were indicated using the range (0.184 and below) to represent the bare and farm lands, (0.185 -0.254) represents the grass and bush lands, (0.255 -0.334) represents forest dominated by Hashab trees (0.335 and high) represents mixed woodlands. Maximum NDVI values (0.90) were found in images 1972. Further research is needed to fully determine the spatial and temporal range of the NDVI values over non-vegetated and partially vegetated areas in semi-arid areas. Key words: vegetation cover, NDVI, gum arabic belt, mapping

  14. Multi-temporal and Change Analysis of Land Use Land Cover in the Gum Arabic Belt in Kordofan, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Hassan Elnour; Csaplovics, Elmar

    2012-07-01

    The gum arabic belt in Sudan plays a significant role in environmental, social and economical aspects. The belt has suffered from deforestation and degradation due to natural hazards and human activities. The research was conducted in North Kordofan State, which is affected by modifications in conditions and composition of vegetation cover trends in the gum arabic belt as in the rest of the Sahelian Sudan zone. The research investigated the possibility of identification, monitoring and mapping of the land use land cover changes and dynamics in the gum arabic belt during the last 35 years. Also a newly approach of object-based classification was applied for image classification. The study used imageries from different satellites (Landsat and ASTER) and multi-temporal dates (MSS 1972, TM 1985, ETM+ 1999 and ASTER 2007) acquired in dry season (November). The imageries were geo-referenced and radiometrically corrected by using ENVI-FLAASH software. Application of multi-temporal remote sensing data in gum arabic belt demonstrated successfully the identification and mapping of land use land cover into five main classes. Forest dominated by Acacia senegal class was separated covering an area of 21% and 24% in the year 2007 for areas A and B, respectively. The land use land cover structure in the gum arabic belt has obvious changes and reciprocal conversions between the classes indicating the trends and conditions caused by the human interventions as well as ecological impacts on Acacia senegal trees. The study revealed a drastic loss of Acacia senegal cover by 25% during the period of 1972 to 2007. The study come out with some valuable recommendations and comments which could contribute positively in using remotely sensed imagery and GIS techniques to explore management tools of Acacia senegal stands in gum Arabic belt.

  15. Shear rheology and filament stretching behaviour of xanthan gum and carboxymethyl cellulose solution in presence of saliva

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyejung; Mitchell, John R.; Gaddipati, Sanyasi R.; Hill, Sandra E.; Wolf, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the work reported in this paper is to determine if saliva addition has an effect on the rheology of xanthan gum solutions. The reasons for the interest was that it has been previously reported that flavour release from high viscosity xanthan thickened foods is not reduced in the same way as foods thickened by other hydrocolloids at comparable viscosities. It was previously postulated that this could be due to an interaction between saliva and xanthan that could change the microstructure and rheology of xanthan solutions. In this work the effect of saliva on the rheology of CMC and xanthan solutions was compared. Solutions of molecularly dissolved xanthan gum and CMC mixed with water or human whole saliva at a ratio of 5:1 showed little impact of the presence of saliva on steady shear or dynamic viscosity for the two hydrocolloids. In filament thinning experiments saliva addition significantly increased filament break-up time for xanthan gum while it had little effect on the break-up time of the CMC filament. Also, filament thinning appeared a lot less even and was not as reproducible in the case of xanthan gum. Addition of CMC and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) to xanthan gum solutions showed a similar increase in break-up time to saliva, but to see this effect the viscosity of the added CMC or HPMC solution had to be very much higher than the viscosity of saliva. The results are discussed in the context of the structure of xanthan gum and the reported extensional rheology of saliva. PMID:25284950

  16. Oral ulceration due to chronic use of Nicorette gum: case report.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Nagamani; Meinberg, Trudy

    2010-01-01

    Oral ulceration is a common presentation in a dental clinic. These ulcers may be acute or chronic, based on the duration of symptoms. The etiology of oral ulceration can range from trauma to squamous cell carcinoma. It is the responsibility of the dentist to differentiate the various etiologies of oral ulceration for proper management. This case report is presented to remind dentists that the long-term use of Nicorette gum should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic oral ulcers. PMID:20591780

  17. Dissolution Improvement of Atorvastatin Calcium using Modified Locust Bean Gum by the Solid Dispersion Technique

    PubMed Central

    Panghal, Dharmila; Nagpal, Manju; Thakur, Gurjeet Singh; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    The present research was aimed at the enhancement of the dissolution rate of atorvastatin calcium by the solid dispersion technique using modified locust bean gum. Solid dispersions (SD) using modified locust bean gum were prepared by the modified solvent evaporation method. Other mixtures were also prepared by physical mixing, co-grinding, and the kneading method. The locust bean gum was subjected to heat for modification. The prepared solid dispersions and other mixtures were evaluated for equilibrium solubility studies, content uniformity, FTIR, DSC, XRD, in vitro drug release, and in vivo pharmacodynamic studies. The equilibrium solubility was enhanced in the solid dispersions (in a drug:polymer ratio of 1:6) and other mixtures such as the co-grinding mixture (CGM) and kneading mixture (KM). Maximum dissolution rate was observed in the solid dispersion batch SD3 (i.e. 50% within 15 min) with maximum drug release after 2 h (80%) out of all solid dispersions. The co-grinding mixture also exhibited a significant enhancement in the dissolution rate among the other mixtures. FTIR studies revealed the absence of drug-polymer interaction in the solid dispersions. Minor shifts in the endothermic peaks of the DSC thermograms of SD3 and CGM indicated slight changes in drug crystallinity. XRD studies further confirmed the results of DSC and FTIR. Topological changes were observed in SEM images of SD3 and CGM. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies indicated an improved efficacy of the optimized batch SD3 as compared to the pure drug at a dose of 3 mg/kg/day. Modified locust bean gum can be a promising carrier for solubility enhancement of poorly water-soluble drugs. The lower viscosity and wetting ability of MLBG, reduction in particle size, and decreased crystallinity of the drug are responsible for the dissolution enhancement of atorvastatin. The co-grinding mixture can be a good alternative to solid dispersions prepared by modified solvent evaporation due to its ease of preparation and significant improvement in dissolution characteristics. PMID:24634850

  18. Dislocation mobility in gum metal ?-titanium alloy studied via insitu transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castany, Philippe; Besse, Magali; Gloriant, Thierry

    2011-07-01

    In situ tensile tests in a transmission electron microscope were carried out on a “Gum Metal” ?-titanium alloy. Conventional dislocation slip was observed to be the only mechanism occurring during the plastic deformation. The low mobility of screw dislocations was shown to be due to their core structure configuration. Nanometer-sized obstacles were also present but have a weaker effect on the dislocation mobility. The density of these obstacles and the variation in energy due to the core structure of screw dislocations were measured and compared to theoretical data in the literature.

  19. Modeling and steady state simulation: production of xanthan gum from sugarcane broth.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, P; Arumugam, A; Ponnusami, V

    2015-01-01

    The work is focused on developing a mathematical model for continuous process of xanthan gum production. The main objective of the study is to simulate the model, observe the behavior of substrate consumption, biomass and product formation with respect to dilution rate and determine the optimum dilution rate for which the reactor is to be designed. Systems with and without recycling of cells are considered and the optimum dilution rate is found. For the kinetic parameters used, the optimum dilution rate for the system with no recycling is 0.205 and 0.35 h(-1) for the system that includes recycling of cells. PMID:24992981

  20. Green synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of palladium nanoparticles by xanthan gum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoshi kumari, Amrutham; Venkatesham, Maragoni; Ayodhya, Dasari; Veerabhadram, Guttena

    2015-03-01

    Here, we report the synthesis, characterization and catalytic evaluation of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) using xanthan gum, acting as both reducing and stabilizing agent without using any synthetic reagent. The uniqueness of our method lies in its fast synthesis rates using hydrothermal method in autoclave at a pressure of 15 psi and at 120 °C temperature by 10 min time. The formation and size of the PdNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The catalytic activity of PdNPs was evaluated on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by sodium borohydride using spectrophotometry.

  1. Dissolution Improvement of Atorvastatin Calcium using Modified Locust Bean Gum by the Solid Dispersion Technique.

    PubMed

    Panghal, Dharmila; Nagpal, Manju; Thakur, Gurjeet Singh; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-03-01

    The present research was aimed at the enhancement of the dissolution rate of atorvastatin calcium by the solid dispersion technique using modified locust bean gum. Solid dispersions (SD) using modified locust bean gum were prepared by the modified solvent evaporation method. Other mixtures were also prepared by physical mixing, co-grinding, and the kneading method. The locust bean gum was subjected to heat for modification. The prepared solid dispersions and other mixtures were evaluated for equilibrium solubility studies, content uniformity, FTIR, DSC, XRD, in vitro drug release, and in vivo pharmacodynamic studies. The equilibrium solubility was enhanced in the solid dispersions (in a drug:polymer ratio of 1:6) and other mixtures such as the co-grinding mixture (CGM) and kneading mixture (KM). Maximum dissolution rate was observed in the solid dispersion batch SD3 (i.e. 50% within 15 min) with maximum drug release after 2 h (80%) out of all solid dispersions. The co-grinding mixture also exhibited a significant enhancement in the dissolution rate among the other mixtures. FTIR studies revealed the absence of drug-polymer interaction in the solid dispersions. Minor shifts in the endothermic peaks of the DSC thermograms of SD3 and CGM indicated slight changes in drug crystallinity. XRD studies further confirmed the results of DSC and FTIR. Topological changes were observed in SEM images of SD3 and CGM. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies indicated an improved efficacy of the optimized batch SD3 as compared to the pure drug at a dose of 3 mg/kg/day. Modified locust bean gum can be a promising carrier for solubility enhancement of poorly water-soluble drugs. The lower viscosity and wetting ability of MLBG, reduction in particle size, and decreased crystallinity of the drug are responsible for the dissolution enhancement of atorvastatin. The co-grinding mixture can be a good alternative to solid dispersions prepared by modified solvent evaporation due to its ease of preparation and significant improvement in dissolution characteristics. PMID:24634850

  2. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate tooth stain reduction with nicotine replacement gum during a smoking cessation program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to its general and periodontal health effects smoking causes tooth staining. Smoking cessation support interventions with an added stain removal or tooth whitening effect may increase motivation to quit smoking. Oral health professionals are well placed to provide smoking cessation advice and support to patients. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Nicorette® Freshmint Gum used in a smoking cessation programme administered in a dental setting, on extrinsic stain and tooth shade among smokers. Methods An evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-week parallel-group controlled trial was conducted among 200 daily smokers motivated to quit smoking. Participants were randomised to use either the Nicorette® Freshmint Gum or Nicorette® Microtab (tablet). Tooth staining and shade were rated using the modified Lobene Stain Index and the Vita® Shade Guide at baseline, weeks 2, 6 and 12. To maintain consistency with other whitening studies, the primary end-point was the mean change in stain index between baseline and week 6. Secondary variables included changes in stain measurements and tooth shade at the other time points the number of gums or tablets used per day and throughout the trial period; and the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Treatments were compared using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), using treatment and nicotine dependence as factors and the corresponding baseline measurement as a covariate. Each comparison (modified intention-to-treat) was tested at the 0.05 level, two-sided. Within-treatment changes from baseline were compared using a paired t-test. Results At week 6, the gum-group experienced a reduction in mean stain scores whilst the tablet-group experienced an increase with mean changes of -0.14 and +0.12 respectively, (p?=?0.005, ANCOVA). The change in mean tooth shade scores was statistically significantly greater in the gum-group than in the tablet group at 2 (p?=?0.015), 6 (p?=?0.011) and 12 weeks (p?=?0.003) with greater lightening in the gum-group at each examination period. Conclusion These results support the efficacy of the tested nicotine replacement gum in stain reduction and shade lightening. These findings may help dentists to motivate those wishing to quit smoking using a nicotine replacement gum. Trial registration NCT01440985 PMID:22695211

  3. Gum Tragacanth-Mediated Synthesis of Nanocrystalline ZnO Powder for Use in Varistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Mao-Hua; Su, Hang; Chen, Xi; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Ruo-Chen

    2015-10-01

    Zinc oxide nanopowders were synthesized by a sol-gel method with gum tragacanth and zinc nitrate as raw materials. Gum tragacanth was used as stabilizer to control the mobility of zinc cations and the growth of the nanopowders. Thermo-gravimetric analysis, x-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the as-prepared samples. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles calcined at different temperatures had a hexagonal wurtzite structure with average particle size ranging from 32.29 nm to 42.83 nm. The crystallinity of ZnO nanoparticles was improved by increasing the calcination temperature. The density of ZnO varistor ceramics sintered at 1150°C for 2 h in air was 5.46 g/cm3, which was 97.5% of the theoretical density, their breakdown voltage was 4572 V/cm, and their nonlinear coefficient was ~16.8. This method can be used as an excellent alternative method for synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles with a plant extract as a raw material. Our experimental results show our method had the advantage of improving the electrical performance of ZnO varistors.

  4. Simultaneous determination of five aluminum lake dyes in chewing gum by HPLC with photodiode array detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Yin, Jie; Shao, Bing

    2011-09-01

    A simple and rapid method has been developed and validated for the determination of five food aluminum lake dyes (Tartrazine Al lake, Sunset Yellow Al lake, Ponceau 4R Al lake, Allura Red Al lake and Brilliant Blue Al lake) in chewing gum. The dye portions of the target aluminum lakes were simultaneous extracted with 0.25 M NaOH and cleaned up by liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane, followed by further purification using Oasis WAX solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. Analytes were separated by HPLC using an Inertsil ® ODS-3 column coupled to a photodiode array detector. The amounts of the aluminum lake dyes were finally quantified and indicated as their dye portions using corresponding calibration curves over ranges of 0.5 to 50 µg ml(-1), with correlation coefficients >0.9999. Recoveries of the dye parts in aluminum lake dyes (spiked at levels of 1, 5, 25 µg g(-1)) ranged from 72.5 to 116.4%, with relative standard deviations between 0.9 and 6.5%. Limits of detection and limits of quantification for all analytes were 0.15 and 0.50 µg g(-1), respectively. This method was successfully applied in real samples of chewing gum. PMID:21707267

  5. Starch-free grewia gum matrices: Compaction, swelling, erosion and drug release behaviour.

    PubMed

    Nep, E I; Asare-Addo, K; Ghori, M U; Conway, B R; Smith, A M

    2015-12-30

    Polysaccharides are suitable for application as hydrophilic matrices because of their ability to hydrate and swell upon contact with fluids, forming a gel layer which controls drug release. When extracted from plants, polysaccharides often contain significant quantities of starch that impacts upon their functional properties. This study aimed to evaluate differences in swelling, erosion and drug release from matrix tablets prepared from grewia gum (GG) and starch-free grewia gum (GDS) extracted from the stems of Grewia mollis. HPMC was used as a control polymer with theophylline as a model drug. Swelling, erosion, and in-vitro release were performed in deionized water, pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 media. The Vergnaud and Krosmeyer-Peppas model were used for swelling and drug release kinetics, respectively. However, linear regression technique was used to determine the erosion rate. GDS compacts were significantly harder than the native GG and HPMC compacts. GDS matrices exhibited the fastest erosion and drug release in deionised water and phosphate buffer compared with the GG and HPMC. At pH 1.2, GDS exhibited greater swelling than erosion, and drug release was similar to GG and HPMC. This highlights the potential of GDS as a matrix for controlled release similar to HPMC and GG at pH 1.2 but with a more rapid release at pH 6.8. GDS may have wider application in reinforcing compacts with relatively low mechanical strength. PMID:26536530

  6. Some physico-chemical properties of Prunus armeniaca L. gum exudates.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Morteza; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Koocheki, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this paper were to investigate some physicochemical properties of Prunus armeniaca L. gum exudates (PAGE). PAGE had, on average, 66.89% carbohydrate, 10.47% uronic acids, 6.9% moisture (w.b.), 2.91% protein, 4% ash and 1.59% fat. PAGE was composed of monosaccharides including l-arabinose, d-galactose, xylose, mannose and rhamnose in molar percentages of 41.52%, 23.72%, 17.82%, 14.40% and 2.54%, respectively. Elemental analysis showed that PAGE had high values of nutrients. FTIR analysis demonstrated the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and methyl groups and glycoside bonds. The weight average molecular weight, number average molecular weight and polydispersity index were found to be approximately 5.69×10(5)g/mol, 4.33g/mol and 1.31, respectively. Rheological measurement of PAGE solutions as a function of concentration (8, 10 and 12% (w/w)) and temperature (10, 20, 30 and 40°C) demonstrated that the gum solutions had a non Newtonian shear thinning behaviour. Intrinsic viscosity for PAGE in deionized water was 3.438dl/g based on Kramer equation. PMID:26434520

  7. The use of molecular dynamics for the study of solution properties of guar gum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna, M. Teresa R.; Tarazona, M. Pilar; Saiz, Enrique

    2003-07-01

    Size exclusion chromatography with dual detection, i.e., employing a refractive index, concentration sensitive, detector together with a multiangle light scattering detector which is sensitive to molecular size, has been applied to study the solution properties of guar gum in water with different concentrations of K2SO4 at 25 °C. The analysis of a single highly polydisperse sample is enough for obtaining calibration curves for molecular weight and radius of gyration and the scaling law coefficients. The influence of the ionic strength on the conformational properties of the polymer can also be analyzed. Moreover, unperturbed dimensions can be obtained by extrapolation of the values measured in a good solvent. The value of the characteristic ratio of the unperturbed dimensions thus obtained is Cn=0/nl2?19±1. A theoretical analysis is also included. Thus, molecular dynamics procedures were employed to analyze the conformational properties of an oligomer of guar gum under different conditions; namely, standing alone in vacuo, in bulk solid state and in water solution, both with and without salt. These conformational properties were then employed to compute molecular dimensions of Monte Carlo generated chains with different lengths according to standard procedures of the matrix multiplication scheme, thus allowing the evaluation of both perturbed and unperturbed dimensions which are in very good agreement with the experimental values. Moreover our result permits the explanation of the discrepancies among experimental and theoretical values reported in the literature.

  8. Preparation and characterisation of gelatin-gum arabic aldehyde nanogels via inverse miniemulsion technique.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-05-01

    Gelatin-gum arabic aldehyde nanogels designed by a nanoreactor concept using inverse miniemulsion technique were reported. Stable separate miniemulsions were prepared from gelatin (Gel) and gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). These emulsions were intermixed under sonication to obtain cross-linked nanogels. During fusion, cross-linking occurred between aldehyde groups of GAA and amino groups of gelatin. The concentration of the surfactant and weight fraction of water in the inverse miniemulsion was optimised so as to yield nanogels with controlled particle size. Properties of the nanogels were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, particle size analysis and XRD. Surface morphology of the nanogels was established by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM and particle size analysis confirmed that nanogels possess spherical morphology with an average diameter of 151 ± 6 nm. Hemolysis property of the nanogels was examined and the results indicated that the nanogels were hemocompatible. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the nanogels towards MCF-7 cells was evaluated by MTT assay and the nanogels showed nontoxic behaviour towards the cells. All these studies confirm that these nanogels are potential candidates in applications such as drug and gene delivery. PMID:25748843

  9. The Yariv reagent: behaviour in different solvents and interaction with a gum arabic arabinogalactan-protein.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, B S; Craik, D J; Dunstan, D E; Stone, B A; Bacic, A

    2014-06-15

    The ?-D-Glc Yariv reagent is frequently used to isolate and to study the structure of arabinogalactan-proteins with the arabinogalactan type II structure. The present paper describes the aggregation features of the Yariv reagent in water, salt solutions and in organic solvents as determined by NMR, absorption spectroscopy and light scattering experiments. The results indicate that in water the Yariv reagent forms aggregates of up to 300 units and in 1% aqueous NaCl the degree of aggregation is approx. 150. The aggregates are formed both by H-bonds and hydrophobic interactions, the former appearing to be of most importance in water. The interaction between the Yariv reagent and an AGP fraction from gum arabic, showed a degree of aggregation of the Yariv reagent when using 1% NaCl to be of approx. 150 units, whereas disruption of the aggregate took place in 10% NaCl with an aggregation number of approx. 100. Partial acid hydrolysis of an AGP from gum Arabic (Acacia Senegal) and analyses of the linkage types remaining indicated that a certain length of (1?3)-?-linked galactose units was necessary for binding between the Yariv reagent and the AGP. This is in accordance to what also was recently observed by Kitazawa et al. (2013). PMID:24721102

  10. Interactions between fluorinated cationic guar gum and surfactants in the dilute and semi-dilute solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Li, Xiaorui; Li, Peizhi; Niu, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between the fluorinated cationic guar gum (FCGG) and ionic surfactants including cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS) were studied by light scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-spectrophotometer, (19)F NMR and dynamic rheometer, respectively. The FCGG is prepared with cationic guar gum, isophorone diisocyanate and 2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluoro-1-butanol. The results show that, with the addition of the surfactants, the stretching degree of the FCGG chains is increased in the FCGG/CTAB solutions, while the dramatical shrinking of FCGG chain, the phase separation and the re-stretched macromolecules appear successively because of the electricity neutralization reaction in the FCGG/SDS system. The mixed hydrophobic domains in all solutions will be reinforced and then dismantled. The solution elasticity shows up the maximum value accordingly. The surfactants can be embedded in the micro-domains and then hinder the fluorinated segmental motions. The interactions between FCGG and SDS are much stronger than those between FCGG and CTAB. PMID:24274554

  11. A green approach to prepare silver nanoparticles loaded gum acacia/poly(acrylate) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, S K; Kumari, Mamta

    2015-09-01

    In this work, gum acacia (GA)/poly(sodium acrylate) semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (Semi-IPN) have been fabricated via free radical initiated aqueous polymerization of monomer sodium acrylate (SA) in the presence of dissolved Gum acacia (GA), using N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MB) as cross-linker and potassium persulphate (KPS) as initiator. The semi-IPNs, synthesized, were characterized by various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The dynamic water uptake behavior of semi-IPNs was investigated and the data were interpreted by various kinetic models. The equilibrium swelling data were used to evaluate various network parameters. The semi-IPNs were used as template for the in situ preparation of silver nanoparticles using extract of Syzygium aromaticum (clove). The formation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Finally, the antibacterial activity of GA/poly(SA)/silver nanocomposites was tested against E. coli. PMID:26123815

  12. GumPack: a personal health assistant with reconfigurable surface components.

    PubMed

    Li, Kejia; Warren, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Wearable and everyday-carry medical devices can improve quality of life for individuals that need frequent health monitoring. Such tools can supplement ubiquitous home care environments populated with medical sensors, extending the reach of these environments and increasing the freedom of their occupants. This paper presents the concept design for an everyday-carry medical device called a 'GumPack': a small cuboid-shaped device that offers wireless connectivity and plug-and-play surface components, where a component can be a biomedical sensor or a wireless network coordinator that manages a body area network. This geometrical layout optimizes access to surface-based medical hardware mounted on a small form factor. The device offers substantive computing power, supports local component reconfigurability, and promotes interoperability with medical device coordination environments. The GumPack is envisioned to be a personal health assistant carried in a pocket or handbag that can operate alone or interface to, e.g., a cell phone. PMID:23502254

  13. Development of pH sensitive microparticles of Karaya gum: By response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Raizaday, Abhay; Yadav, Hemant K S; Kumar, S Hemanth; Kasina, Susmitha; Navya, M; Tashi, C

    2015-12-10

    The objective of the proposed work was to prepare pH sensitive microparticles (MP) of Karaya gum using distilled water as a solvent by spray drying technique. Different formulations were designed, prepared and evaluated by employing response surface methodology and optimal design of experiment technique using Design Expert(®) ver 8.0.1 software. SEM photographs showed that MP were roughly spherical in shape and free from cracks. The particle size and encapsulation efficiency for optimized MP was found to be between 3.89 and 6.5 ?m and 81-94% respectively with good flow properties. At the end of the 12th hour the in vitro drug release was found to be 96.9% for the optimized formulation in pH 5.6 phosphate buffer. Low prediction errors were observed for Cmax and AUC0-? which demonstrated that the Frusemide IVIVC model was valid. Hence it can be concluded that pH sensitive MP of Karaya gum were effectively prepared by spray drying technique using aqueous solvents and can be used for treating various diseases like chronic hypertension, Ulcerative Colitis and Diverticulitis. PMID:26428135

  14. Evaluation and Comparison of Changes in Microhardness of Primary and Permanent Enamel on Exposure to Acidic Center-filled Chewing Gum: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Muppa, Radhika; Srinivas, NCH; Kumar, Duddu Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The study is to evaluate changes in microhardness of enamel after exposure to acidic center filled chewing gum on primary and permanent teeth. Methods: Thirty primary and 30 permanent molar extracted teeth were painted with acid resistant varnish except a small window over buccal surface. Teeth were divided into four groups according to type of teeth and type of chewing gum (Center fresh and Bubbaloo) (D1, P1, D2 and P2); each tooth was exposed to whole chewing gum mashed with 5 ml of artificial saliva for five minutes at room temperature twice a day for 5 days. After the exposure, teeth were stored in deionized water and submitted for microhardness tests. Results: Paired t-test and independent sample t-test were used for statistical analysis. A significant reduction in microhardness was found between exposed and unexposed areas in all groups. There was no statistically significant difference in reduction of microhardness to chewing gums, and between primary and permanent enamel. Conclusion: There is a definite reduction in microhardness in all groups exposed to chewing gums. Both the chewing gums are equally erosive; both permanent and primary teeth were affected. How to cite this article: Mudumba VL, Muppa R, Srinivas NCH, Kumar DM. Evaluation and Comparison of Changes in Microhardness of Primary and Permanent Enamel on Exposure to Acidic Center-filled Chewing Gum: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):24-29. PMID:25206233

  15. Protection against the Metabolic Syndrome by Guar Gum-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids Depends on Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor ? and Glucagon-Like Peptide-1

    PubMed Central

    den Besten, Gijs; Gerding, Albert; van Dijk, Theo H.; Ciapaite, Jolita; Bleeker, Aycha; van Eunen, Karen; Havinga, Rick; Groen, Albert K.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The dietary fiber guar gum has beneficial effects on obesity, hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia in both humans and rodents. The major products of colonic fermentation of dietary fiber, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), have been suggested to play an important role. Recently, we showed that SCFAs protect against the metabolic syndrome via a signaling cascade that involves peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) ? repression and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanism via which the dietary fiber guar gum protects against the metabolic syndrome. C57Bl/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with 0% or 10% of the fiber guar gum for 12 weeks and effects on lipid and glucose metabolism were studied. We demonstrate that, like SCFAs, also guar gum protects against high-fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities by PPAR? repression, subsequently increasing mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 expression and AMP/ATP ratio, leading to the activation of AMPK and culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism in both liver and adipose tissue. Moreover, guar gum markedly increased peripheral glucose clearance, possibly mediated by the SCFA-induced colonic hormone glucagon-like peptide-1. Overall, this study provides novel molecular insights into the beneficial effects of guar gum on the metabolic syndrome and strengthens the potential role of guar gum as a dietary-fiber intervention. PMID:26292284

  16. Gum arabic and Fe²? synergistically improve the heat and acid stability of norbixin at pH 3.0-5.0.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yongguang; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-12-31

    Thermal and acid stabilities of norbixin are challenges for its application as a food colorant. In this work, gum arabic and Fe(2+) were studied for the possibility to improve the thermal and acid stabilities of norbixin. Norbixin was dissolved at 0.004% w/v in deionized water with and without 0.2% w/v gum arabic and/or 0.15 mM ferrous chloride, adjusted to pH 3.0-5.0, and heated at 90 or 126 °C for 30 min. Before heating, norbixin precipitated at pH 3.0-4.0, which was prevented by gum arabic. The thermal stability of norbixin was improved by the combination of gum arabic and Fe(2+). Fluorescence analyses indicated the complex formation between norbixin and gum arabic with and without Fe(2+). Particle size and atomic force microscopy results suggested Fe(2+) and gum arabic synergistically prevented the aggregation of norbixin at acidic pH and during heating. It was hypothesized that the core of gum arabic-norbixin complexes was strengthened by Fe(2+) to enable the synergy. PMID:25479179

  17. Xanthan gum as a fat replacer in goshtaba-a traditional meat product of India: effects on quality and oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Rather, Sajad A; Masoodi, F A; Akhter, Rehana; Gani, Adil; Wani, S M; Malik, A H

    2015-12-01

    Goshtaba is a restructured meat product of Kashmiri wazwan prepared from meat emulsion with added fat (20 %), salt, spices and condiments and cooked in the curd. The present study was undertaken for the development of low fat goshtaba with the addition of xanthan gum as a fat replacer and was evaluated for proximate composition, pH, colour, lipid and protein oxidation, texture, microstructure and sensory properties. Low fat goshtaba formulations containing xanthan gum were higher in protein and moisture contents but, lower in fat content and pH value than the high fat control (p < 0.05). Colour evaluation revealed that high fat goshtaba had significantly higher L* value, but lower a* value than its low fat counterparts (p < 0.05). The significant decrease of TBARS values, protein carbonyls and loss of protein sulphydryl groups in low fat goshtaba formulations reflects the potential antioxidant activity of xanthan gum (p < 0.05). Hardness was significantly higher in high fat control but, cohesiveness, gumminess, and chewiness did not show any significant difference. Springiness increased with the increasing concentration of xanthan gum (0.5-1.5 %) and was higher in low fat product containing 1.5 % xanthan gum. SEM results indicate that xanthan gum lead to formation of an additional gel network which holds more water. Sensory evaluation revealed that goshtaba product with 0.5 % xanthan gum had quality characteristics that were similar to the control product containing 20 % fat. PMID:26604383

  18. Development and in vitro evaluation of diclofenac sodium loaded mucoadhesive microsphere with natural gum for sustained delivery.

    PubMed

    Amin, Md Lutful; Jesmeen, Tasbira; Sutradhar, Kumar Bishwajit; Mannan, Md Abdul

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate mucoadhesive microsphere of diclofenac sodium with natural gums for sustained delivery. Guar gum and tragacanth were used along with sodium alginate as mucoadhesive polymers. Microspheres were formulated using orifice-ionic gelation method. Particle size, surface morphology, swelling study and drug entrapment efficiency of the prepared microspheres were determined. In vitro evaluation was carried out comprising of mucoadhesion and drug release study. The prepared microspheres were discrete and free flowing. Sodium alginate and natural gum, at a ratio of 1:0.25, showed good mucoadhesive property and they had high drug entrapment efficiencies. They also exhibited the best rate retarding effect among all the formulations. Drug entrapment efficiency of all the microspheres ranged from 80.42% to 91.67%. An inverse relationship was found between extent of crosslinking and drug release rate. Release rate was slow and extended in case of the formulations of 1:0.25 ratio (F1 and F3), releasing 68.36% and 70.56% drug respectively after 8 hours. Tragacanth-containing microspheres of F1 showed superiority over other formulations, with best mucoadhesive and rate retarding profile. The correlation value (r(2)) indicated that the drug release of all the formulations followed Higuchi's model. Overall, the results indicated that mucoadhesive microspheres containing natural gum can be promising in terms of prolonged delivery with good mucoadhesive action, targeting the absorption site to thrive oral drug delivery. PMID:23937160

  19. 78 FR 43143 - Xanthan Gum From the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Determination of Sales at Less...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Less Than Fair Value, 78 FR 33351 (June 4, 2013) (``Final Determination''). \\2\\ See Xanthan Gum from... provided, below. \\5\\ See Final Determination, 78 FR at 33353. Antidumping Duty Order In accordance with... Value and Postponement of Final Determination, 77 FR 2252 (January 10, 2013)...

  20. Characterization of corn fiber gums from coarse and fine fiber and a study of their emulsifying properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stabilities of orange oil emulsions stabilized with various concentrations of two different types of corn fiber gum (CFG-1 and 2) isolated from coarse (pericarp) and fine (endosperm) fiber from corn wet milling have been studied. CFG-1 and 2 were isolated from coarse and fine corn fiber by (a) ...

  1. The effects of chewing-gum stick size and duration of chewing on salivary flow rate and sucrose and bicarbonate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rosenhek, M; Macpherson, L M; Dawes, C

    1993-10-01

    The objectives were to determine (1) the relations between salivary flow rate and the sample weights of chewing-gum and gum base, (2) whether any reduction in salivary flow rate with duration of chewing is due to a reduction in hardness of gum base with chewing, and (3) the sucrose and bicarbonate concentrations in saliva elicited by different weights of chewing-gum containing sucrose. Ten subjects chewed, for 20 min, samples of 1, 2, 3, 6 and 9 g of gum base and of a sucrose-containing chewing-gum. With each sample, salivary flow rates peaked initially and then fell to a relatively constant value. Flow rates during the periods of 1-2 and 15-20 min were linearly related to the logarithm of sample weight. With the chewing-gum samples, virtually all the sucrose was released into the saliva during the 20 min of chewing, with peak concentrations (201-666 mM) at 1-2 min, and bicarbonate concentrations were higher with the 9-g than the 3-g samples. Six subjects chewed 3 g of gum base and within 45 min the weight of base had increased to 122% of the original, presumably due to the uptake of saliva. The hardness of gum base was determined at 21 and 36 degrees C, 21 and 36 degrees C after it had been chewed, and 21 degrees C after it had been chewed without exposure to saliva, and gave Brinell values of 0.277, 0.038, 0.022, 0.002 and 0.061, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8279993

  2. Psyllium, not pectin or guar gum, alters lipoprotein and biliary bile acid composition and fecal sterol excretion in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Trautwein, E A; Rieckhoff, D; Kunath-Rau, A; Erbersdobler, H F

    1998-06-01

    Different soluble dietary fibers known to alter cholesterol metabolism were fed to golden Syrian hamsters, and their specific impact on lipoproteins, biliary bile acid profile, and fecal sterol excretion was evaluated. Semipurified diets containing 20% fat; 0.12% cholesterol; and 8% of psyllium (PSY); high (hePE) and low (lePE) esterified pectin; or high (hvGG) and low (lvGG) viscous guar gum were fed for 5 wk. Compared to control, PSY caused a significant reduction in plasma cholesterol (2.9 +/- 0.5 vs. 5.5 +/- 0.5 mmol/L), whereas hePE, lePE, hvGG, or lvGG had no apparent effect on plasma lipids. Hepatic total and esterified cholesterol were substantially decreased with PSY, pectin and guar gum, whereby PSY produced the most pronounced effect. Distinctive changes existed in the bile acid profile related to the different fibers. In contrast to pectin and guar gum, PSY caused a significant increase in the cholate:chenodeoxycholate and the glycine:taurine conjugation ratio. Pectin and guar gum did not alter daily fecal neutral sterol excretion while PSY caused a 90% increase due to a higher fecal output. Daily fecal bile acid excretion and total fecal bile acid concentration were significantly increased by PSY, whereas hePE, lePE, hvGG, and lvGG revealed no or only minor effects. Taken together, the disparate hypocholesterolemic effects of PSY, pectin, and guar gum on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism in the hamster are possibly related to different physicochemical properties, e.g., viscosity and susceptibility to fermentation, affecting the fiber-mediated action in the intestine. PMID:9655372

  3. Rheology of Rice Flour Dough with Gum Arabic: Small and Large-Deformation Studies, Sensory Assessment and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Shanthilal, J; Bhattacharya, Suvendu

    2015-08-01

    The absence of gluten protein makes the rice flour doughs difficult to handle when flattened/sheeted products are to be prepared. The rheological, sensory and microstructural changes in rice flour doughs having gum Arabic (0% to 5%, w/w) and moisture contents (44% to 50%) were studied for improving the dough handling characteristics. Rheological parameters like storage modulus (G') and complex viscosity (?*) decreased with an increase in moisture content while loss angle (?) increased. A power-law type equation was suitable to relate angular frequency (?) with G', G", and ?* (0.814 ? r ? 0.999, P ? 0.01). An increase in gum and moisture contents increased ? from 6.9° to 15.5° but decreased the energy required for compression/flattening. The 6-element spring-dashpot model was suitable (r ? 0.991, P ? 0.01) for creep curves. The sensory panel had the opinion that dough with a low to moderate hardness between 3 and 4, and stickiness of ? 3.5 was suitable for the purpose of flattening in relation to the preparation of sheeted/flattened products; the appropriate condition for dough formulation was with the moisture and gum contents of 47.0% to 47.9% and 1.55% to 2.25%, respectively to offer the desirability index between 0.50 and 0.52. The microstructure of the rice flour dough in the absence of gum Arabic appeared to possess loosely bound flour particles. The presence of gum provided a coating on flour particles to yield dough having good cohesive microstructure. PMID:26248962

  4. Land use and land cover classification, changes and analysis in gum Arabic belt in North Kordofan, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Hassan E.; Csaplovics, Elmar; Elhaja, Mohamed E.; El Abbas, Mustafa M.

    2013-10-01

    The gum arabic belt in Sudan plays a significant role in environmental, social and economical aspects. This research was conducted in North Kordofan State, which is affected by modifications in conditions and composition of vegetation cover trends in the gum arabic belt as in the rest of the Sahelian Sudan zone. The objective of the paper is to study the classification, changes and analysis of the land use and land cover in the gum arabic belt in North Kordofan State in Sudan. The study used imageries from different satellites (Landsat and ASTER) and multi-temporal dates (MSS 1972, TM 1985, ETM+ 1999 and ASTER 2007) acquired in dry season. The imageries were geo-referenced and radiometrically corrected by using ENVI-FLAASH software. Image classification (pixel-based) and accuracy assessment were applied. Application of multi-temporal remote sensing data demonstrated successfully the identification and mapping of land use and land cover into five main classes. Forest dominated by Acacia senegal class was separated covering an area of 21% in the year 2007. The obvious changes and reciprocal conversions in the land use and land cover structure indicate the trends and conditions caused by the human interventions as well as ecological impacts on Acacia senegal trees. Also the study revealed that a drastic loss of forest resources occurred in the gum arabic belt in North Kordofan during 1972 to 2007 (25% for Acacia senegal trees). The study concluded that, using of traditional Acacia senegal-based agro-forestry as one of the most successful form in the gum belt.

  5. Compressed mints and chewing gum containing magnolia bark extract are effective against bacteria responsible for oral malodor.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael; Urnezis, Philip; Tian, Minmin

    2007-11-14

    Flavors and natural botanic extracts are often used in chewing gum and compressed mints for breath freshening and relief of oral malodor. The oral malodor is a result of bacterial putrification of proteinaceous materials from food or saliva. In this study, magnolia bark extract (MBE) and its two main components, magnolol and honokiol, were evaluated by the minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) test. The inhibitory effect of MBE mint was further evaluated by a kill-time assay study. In addition, an in vivo study was performed on nine healthy volunteers postlunch. Saliva samples were taken before and after subjects consumed mints and gum, with and without MBE. Listerine mouthwash was included as a positive control. The testing results indicated that MBE and its two main constituents demonstrated a strong germ-kill effect against bacteria responsible for halitosis and also Streptococcus mutans, bacteria involved in dental caries formation. The MIC of magnolol, honokiol, and MBE on Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and S. mutans ranged from 8 to 31 microg/mL. Kill-time assay results indicated that mints containing 0.2% MBE reduced more than 99.9% of three oral bacteria within 5 min of treatment. The in vivo study demonstrated that MBE containing mints reduced total salivary bacteria by 61.6% at 30 min and 33.8% at 60 min postconsumption. In comparison, the flavorless mint reduced total salivary bacteria by 3.6% at 30 min and increased total bacteria by 47.9% at 60 min. The MBE containing chewing gum reduced total salivary bacteria by 43.0% at 40 min, while placebo gum reduced total salivary bacteria by 18.0%. In conclusion, MBE demonstrated a significant antibacterial activity against organisms responsible for oral malodor and can be incorporated in compressed mints and chewing gum for improved breath-freshening benefits. PMID:17949053

  6. Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... usually caused by a buildup of plaque , an invisible sticky layer of germs that forms naturally on ... Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  7. 'Healthy gums do matter': A case study of clinical leadership within primary dental care.

    PubMed

    Moore, D; Saleem, S; Hawthorn, E; Pealing, R; Ashley, M; Bridgman, C

    2015-09-25

    The Health and Social Care Act 2012 heralded wide reaching reforms intended to place clinicians at the heart of the health service. For NHS general dental practice, the conduits for this clinical leadership are the NHS England local professional networks. In Greater Manchester, the local professional network has developed and piloted a clinician led quality improvement project: 'Healthy Gums DO Matter, a Practitioner's Toolkit'. Used as a case study, the project highlighted the following facilitators to clinical leadership in dentistry: supportive environment; mentoring and transformational leadership; alignment of project goals with national policy; funding allowance; cross-boundary collaboration; determination; altruism; and support from wider academic and specialist colleagues. Barriers to clinical leadership identified were: the hierarchical nature of healthcare, territorialism and competing clinical commitments. PMID:26404983

  8. Structure-property relationships of carboxymethyl hydroxypropyl guar gum in water and a hyperentanglement parameter.

    PubMed

    Szopinski, Daniel; Kulicke, Werner-Michael; Luinstra, Gerrit A

    2015-03-30

    The viscoelastic properties of carboxymethyl hydroxypropyl guar gum (CMHPG) in aqueous solution were determined as function of concentration and of molecular weight, using SEC/MALLS/dRI and viscometry. The chain is more rigid as in native guar as was deduced from the molecular parameter in dilute solution. Superstructures are formed in moderately concentrated solutions as is shown from the comparison of steady state shear and small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS) experiments. The shear rate dependent viscosity of CMHPG can satisfactorily be described by the Carreau-Yasuda model with the rheological parameters (?0, ?0, n, b) obtained from the evaluation of viscosity data. A quantitative hyperentanglement parameter is introduced to account for the differences in responses in shear and SAOS experiments. PMID:25563956

  9. Cationic guar gum orchestrated environmental synthesis for silver nano-bio-composite films.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Md Farooque; Ghosh, Sumanta Kumar; Basu, Sreyasree; Mukherjee, Arup

    2015-12-10

    This work is meant for environmentally friendly synthesis and functional evaluation of silver nanoparticles in a newer cationic guar biopolymer (GGAA). Assembly of molecules in lower size range (? 10 nm) was attained in a biopolymer entrapped bottom-up synthesis. Guar gum is a filming biopolymer. Nanoparticles encaged in cationic guar (GGAgnC) were preserved as films for months without any significant effect on particle size, distribution or plasmonic intensity. The new nano-bio-composite and films were characterized fully in FTIR, XRD, SEM and TEM studies. Silver nanoparticles induced surface water repellency remarkably and lowered moisture permeability. GGAgnC film water contact angle was recorded as 115° while, that in case of GGAA was 59°. GGAgnC expressed intense antimicrobial activity when tested against a range of microorganisms. Immobilized silver nanoparticles in GGAA can feasibly be used as filming microbicidals suitable for textiles, packaging and biomedical device applications. PMID:26428096

  10. In situ generation of silver nanoparticles within crosslinked 3D guar gum networks for catalytic reduction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yian; Zhu, Yongfeng; Tian, Guangyan; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-02-01

    The direct use of guar gum (GG) as a green reducing agent for the facile production of highly stable silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) within this biopolymer and subsequent crosslinking with borax to form crosslinked Ag@GG beads with a 3D-structured network are presented here. These crosslinked Ag@GG beads were characterized using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and then tested as a solid-phase heterogenerous catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of excess borohydride. The results indicate that these crosslinked Ag@GG beads show excellent catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-NP within 20 min and can be readily used for 10 successive cycles. PMID:25445685

  11. Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum: a new source of carbohydrate to make a biodegradable film.

    PubMed

    Seyedi, Samira; Koocheki, Arash; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Zahedi, Younes

    2014-01-30

    Microstructural, physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a novel biodegradable film based on Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum (LPSG) were investigated. LPSG films were successfully prepared by incorporation of four levels of glycerol (40%, 50%, 60% and 70%, w/w). As expected, increasing glycerol concentration from 40 to 70% (w/w), increased water vapor permeability (WVP), elongation at break (EB%), moisture content, moisture adsorption and water solubility of LPSG films; whilst, elastic modulus (EM), contact angle, melting point (Tm), enthalpy of melting (?Hm) and glass transition point (Tg) decreased significantly. LPSG films became slightly greenish and yellowish in color but still transparent in appearance. The images taken from electron scanning microscopy indicated uniform surface, compact sheets with no holes or fracture. This study demonstrates that LPSG based films with desired properties can be obtained by adjusting glycerol content. PMID:24299783

  12. Radiation dose dependent change in physiochemical, mechanical and barrier properties of guar gum based films.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Chaturbhuj K; Gupta, Sumit; Bahadur, Jitendra; Mazumder, S; Variyar, Prasad S; Sharma, Arun

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical and water vapor barrier properties of biodegradable films prepared from radiation processed guar gum were investigated. Films prepared from GG irradiated up to 500 Gy demonstrated significantly higher tensile strength as compared to non-irradiated control films. This improvement in tensile strength observed was demonstrated to be due to the ordering of polymer structures as confirmed by small angle X-ray scattering analysis. Exposure to doses higher than 500 Gy, however, resulted in a dose dependent decrease in tensile strength. A dose dependent decrease in puncture strength with no significant differences in the percent elongation was also observed at all the doses studied. Water vapor barrier properties of films improved up to 15% due to radiation processing. Radiation processing at lower doses for improving mechanical and barrier properties of guar based packaging films is demonstrated here for the first time. PMID:24053847

  13. Synthesis and flocculation properties of gum ghatti and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylonitrile) based biodegradable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Hemant; Jindal, Rajeev; Kaith, Balbir Singh; Maity, Arjun; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2014-12-19

    This article reports the development of biodegradable flocculants based on graft co-polymers of gum ghatti (Gg) and a mixture of acrylamide and acrylonitrile co-monomers (AAm-co-AN). The hydrogel polymer exhibited an excellent swelling capacity of 921% in neutral medium at 60°C. The polymer was used to remove saline water from various petroleum fraction-saline water emulsions. The flocculation characteristics of the hydrogel polymer were studied in turbid kaolin solution as a function of the amount of polymer and the solution temperature and pH. Biodegradation studies of hydrogel polymer were conducted using the soil composting method, and the degradation process was constantly monitored using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results demonstrated an 89.47% degradation of the polymer after 60 days. Finally, the hydrogel polymer adsorbed 98% of cationic dyes from the aqueous solutions. PMID:25263897

  14. Physicochemical and thermomechanical characterization of tara gum edible films: effect of polyols as plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, John; Liu, Fei; Majeed, Hamid; Qazi, Haroon Jamshaid; Zhong, Fang

    2014-10-13

    The aim of this study was to evaluate tara gum as edible film material as well as the influence of polyols as plasticizers on the properties of the films. Thermomechanical, physicochemical and barrier properties were determined as a function of plasticizer type and concentration. Glycerol, sorbitol and PEG 400 were used in the range of 0.075-0.3g/tarag. Glycerol was the best plasticizer in terms of mechanical properties with the highest elongation (16-44%) and resistance (45-90 MPa). Sorbitol presented the best barrier properties with the lowest hydrophilicity and water vapour permeability (0.24-0.34 g mm m(-2)h(-1) kPa(-1)). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no significant effect on the structure of the polysaccharide. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) revealed that incorporation of plasticizers increased the mobility of the polymer chains and reduced the glass transition and melting temperature by 30 and 100 °C respectively. PMID:25037362

  15. Recently Investigated Natural Gums and Mucilages as Pharmaceutical Excipients: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Pritam Dinesh; Pawar, Harshal Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Due to advances in drug delivery technology, currently, excipients are included in novel dosage forms to fulfil specific functions and in some cases they directly or indirectly influence the extent and/or rate of drug release and drug absorption. Recent trends towards use of plant based and natural products demand the replacement of synthetic additives with natural ones. Today, the whole world is increasingly interested in natural drugs and excipients. These natural materials have many advantages over synthetic ones as they are chemically inert, nontoxic, less expensive, biodegradable, and widely available. This review discusses majority of the plant-derived polymeric compounds (gums and mucilage's), their sources, chemical constituents, uses, and some recent investigations as excipients in novel drug delivery systems. PMID:26556189

  16. Semi-dilute galactomannan solutions: observations on viscosity scaling behavior of guar gum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Michael A.; Fischer, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Based on experimental work involving evaluation of viscosity enhancement of aqueous solutions by high molecular weight guar gum, we have observed that the shear viscosity scaling exponent b for semi-dilute solutions, ?sp ˜ (c[?])b, is sensitive to molecular weight, being approximately 4.7 for native samples and decreasing progressively as Mw is lowered. The critical overlap parameter demarcating the dilute and semi-dilute regimes also depends on the molecular weight as {{?ft(c[? ]\\right)}*} ˜ Mw-0.82 . Consequently, viscosity-concentration plots fail to achieve overlap using only specific viscosity and overlap concentration as reducing variables, a commonly accepted empiricism for random-coil polysaccharides. To bridge the gap, we propose to account for water solubility, its temperature dependence and the resulting chain flexibility as additional factors to fully describe the solution behavior of these highly-important raw materials.

  17. Phase separation induced molecular fractionation of gum arabic--sugar beet pectin systems.

    PubMed

    Mao, Peng; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Fan; Fang, Yapeng; Phillips, Glyn O; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Jiang, Fatang

    2013-10-15

    This paper investigates the phase separation and phase separation-induced fractionation of gum arabic (GA)/sugar beet pectin (SBP) mixed solutions. A phase diagram, including cloud and binodal curves, was established by visual observation and phase composition analysis. The deviation of the binodal curve from the cloud curve was a result of phase separation-induced fractionation of polydisperse GA and SBP molecules. Fractionation of GA increased the content of arabinogalactan-protein complex (AGP) from ca. 13% to 27%. The fractionated GA (FGA) showed improved emulsifying functionality, whereas the fractionated SBP (FSBP) had a reduced emulsifying functionality. The changes in emulsifying efficiency can be explained by interfacial adsorption behaviors at the oil-water interface as indicated by interfacial tension measurements. PMID:23987401

  18. Tests for mutagenic effects of ammoniated glycyrrhizin, butylated hydroxytoluene, and gum arabic in roden germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, C.W.; Cain, K.T.; Rushbrook, C.J.; Jorgenson, T.A.; Generoso, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Ammoniated glycyrrhizin, butylated hydroxytoluene, and gum Arabic are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) substances that are used primarily as additives in foods. These substances were incorporated into rodent diets and fed to male rats and mice for 10 and 8 wk, respectively. The treated male mice and rats were then tested for dominant lethal effects. The mice were also tested for induced heritable translocation. Results of the rat studies indicated a statistically significant dominant lethal effect of each of the compounds tested; however, the biological significance of this response is not known. Results of the mouse dominant lethal and heritable translocation studies, on the other hand, indicated no adverse effects of the compounds tested.

  19. A stimuli-responsive and bioactive film based on blended polyvinyl alcohol and cashew gum polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fábio E F; Batista, Karla A; Di-Medeiros, Maria C B; Silva, Cassio N S; Moreira, Bruna R; Fernandes, Kátia F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a stimuli-responsive, biodegradable and bioactive film was produced by blending cashew gum polysaccharide (CGP) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The film presented malleability and mechanical properties enabling an easy handling. Wetting the film changed the optical property from opacity to levels of transparency higher than 70% and resulted in up to 2-fold increase in its superficial area. Different swelling indexes were obtained varying the pH of solvent, which allows classifying the CGP/PVA film as pH sensitive stimuli-responsive material. The bioactivity was achieved through covalent immobilization of papain, which remained active after storage of CGP/PVA-papain film for 24h in the presence of buffer or in a dry form. These results evidenced that CGP/PVA-papain film is a very promising material for biomedical applications. PMID:26478388

  20. Processing of waxy starch/xanthan gum mixtures within the gelatinization temperature range.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Bart; Depypere, Frédéric; Van der Meeren, Paul; Dewettinck, Koen

    2013-07-25

    Pasting experiments of waxy potato and waxy maize starch systems were set up in which temperatures close to the gelatinization temperature were selected (67.5, 70 and 72.5°C). DSC measurements showed that under these conditions small fractions of the starches remained ungelatinized. During the pasting process two different shear rates were imposed (50s(-1) and 150s(-1)) to investigate the shear stability of the different starch containing systems. Swelling of the granules occurred in a more controlled manner and granule breakdown during pasting could be limited. As a result of these heating conditions more swollen granules are present, as confirmed by laser light diffraction. This positive effect was clearly noticeable in the flow curves of the cooled pastes. Xanthan gum addition could further reduce breakdown either by restricting the swelling or by stabilizing the granules. At higher starch contents the former is most likely dominating. PMID:23768601

  1. [Effect of sucrose-containing gum and fluoridated dentifrice on in situ remineralization of artificial caries].

    PubMed

    de Freitas, R R; de Oliveira, J A; Taga, E M; Buzalaf, M A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the remineralization of incipient carious lesions in bovine enamel in situ. Artificial carious lesions were produced and fixed in removable lower appliances in the region of the lingual surfaces of first molars, in six volunteers with ages between 18 and 22 years, who were subjected to 3 distinct experimental periods of 1 week each. In the first period (control group), patients brushed their teeth with a non-fluoridated dentifrice 4 times a day (after meals), and, in the second period (group I), patients used a dentifrice containing 1,500 ppm of fluorine (in the form of MFP). In the third period (group II) volunteers brushed their teeth with non-fluoridated dentifrice and used chewing gum containing 60% of sucrose during 20 minutes, 4 times a day (after meals). Before and after each treatment, the specimens underwent Vicker's hardness test (200 g of load), and the remineralization percentage (alpha) was calculated. The control group showed 2.78% of demineralization, and groups I and II showed 3.36 and 5.21% of remineralization, respectively. Statistical analysis (with Kruskal-Wallis and Miller's tests) showed significant difference (p < 0.05) between the control and experimental groups (I and II). Group II showed greater alpha than group I, but this difference was not significant. These results suggest that the use of sucrose-containing chewing gum and fluoridated dentifrice has a considerable effect on the remineralization of incipient carious lesions and may be a valuable alternative for their prevention. PMID:11705205

  2. Evaluation of Prosopis africana Seed Gum as an Extended Release Polymer for Tablet Formulation.

    PubMed

    Nadaf, Sameer; Nnamani, Petra; Jadhav, Namdeo

    2015-06-01

    In the present work, an attempt has been made to screen Prosopis africana seed gum (PG), anionic polymer for extended release tablet formulation. Different categories of drugs (charge basis) like diclofenac sodium (DS), chlorpheniramine maleate (CPM), and ibuprofen (IB) were compacted with PG and compared with different polymers (charge basis) like xanthan gum (XG), hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC-K100M), and chitosan (CP). For each drug, 12 batches of tablets were prepared by wet granulation technique, and granules were evaluated for flow properties, compressibility, and compactibility by Heckel and Leuenberger analysis, swelling index, in vitro dissolution studies, etc. It has been observed that granules of all batches showed acceptable flowability. According to Heckel and Leuenberger analysis, granules of PG-containing compacts showed similar and satisfactory compressibility and compactibility compared to granules of other polymers. PG showed significant swelling (P?

  3. Improved functional properties of glycosylated soy protein isolate using D-glucose and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruiqi; Hettiarachchy, Navam; Rayaprolu, Srinivas; Davis, Mike; Eswaranandam, Satchithanandam; Jha, Alok; Chen, Pengyin

    2015-09-01

    Functional properties of the soy protein need to improve to have better applications in food industry. Alkali extracted and acid precipitated soy protein isolate (SPI) was glycosylated using D-glucose (G) and Xanthan gum (X) via Maillard reaction to improve solubility. The effects of SPI to G and SPI to X ratios (SPI:G = 2:1, 1:1, and 1:2; SPI:X = 100:1 and 10:1) and incubation time (0, 6, 12, and 24 h) on the solubility and functional properties of glycosylated SPI were evaluated. The SPI:G ratio of 1:2 yielded a maximum degree of glycosylation of 71.1 %. The solubility of SPI after glycosylation significantly increased (P??0.05), the emulsifying activity improved significantly (P?gum at the ratio of 100:1 and 10:1, respectively. Glycosylated SPI with enhanced emulsifying and foaming properties has potential to improve the functional quality of the food products. PMID:26345030

  4. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of products from on-line pyrolysis/silylation of plant gums used as binding media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiantore, Oscar; Riedo, Chiara; Scalarone, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    Plant gums are complex polysaccharides used in the field of cultural heritage especially as binding media. Classification of polysaccharides may be achieved on the basis of monosaccharides composition after cleavage of glycosidic bond. Characterization of plant gums in works of art is complicated by the necessity of to use a method minimally invasive and requiring a small mount of sample. Pyrolisys is an useful method to obtain polysaccharides decomposition and generally pyrolysis products can be identified by the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This paper describes a method where two plant gums, arabic and tragacanth, were pyrolized in presence of silylating agents (HMDS e BSTFA alone and with TMCS as catalyst) using an on-line Py-GC/MS apparatus. Some characteristic trimethylsilyl derivatives of monosaccharides were identified on the basis of mass spectra. The presence of characteristic pyrolysis products of sugars allows to distinguish the two gums.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of GumK, a membrane-associated glucuronosyltransferase from Xanthomonas campestris required for xanthan polysaccharide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barreras, Máximo; Bianchet, Mario A.; Ielpi, Luis

    2006-09-01

    Crystallization of a membrane-associated glucuronosyltransferase. GumK is a membrane-associated inverting glucuronosyltransferase that is part of the biosynthetic route of xanthan, an industrially important exopolysaccharide produced by Xanthomonas campestris. The enzyme catalyzes the fourth glycosylation step in the pentasaccharide-P-P-polyisoprenyl assembly, an oligosaccharide diphosphate lipid intermediate in xanthan biosynthesis. GumK has marginal homology to other glycosyltransferases (GTs). It belongs to the CAZy family GT 70, for which no structure is currently available, and indirect biochemical evidence suggests that it also belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Crystals of recombinant GumK from X. campestris have been grown that diffract to 1.9 Å resolution. Knowledge of the crystal structure of GumK will help in understanding xanthan biosynthesis and its regulation and will also allow a subsequent rational approach to enzyme design and engineering. The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction approach will be used to solve the phase problem.

  6. Crystallization and Preliminary Crystallographic Characterization of GumK, A Membrane-Associated Gluocuronosyltransferase from Xanthomonas campestris Required for Xanthan Polysaccharide Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barreras,M.; Bianchet, M.; Ielpi, L.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    GumK is a membrane-associated inverting glucuronosyltransferase that is part of the biosynthetic route of xanthan, an industrially important exopolysaccharide produced by Xanthomonas campestris. The enzyme catalyzes the fourth glycosylation step in the pentasaccharide-P-P-polyisoprenyl assembly, an oligosaccharide diphosphate lipid intermediate in xanthan biosynthesis. GumK has marginal homology to other glycosyltransferases (GTs). It belongs to the CAZy family GT 70, for which no structure is currently available, and indirect biochemical evidence suggests that it also belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Crystals of recombinant GumK from X. campestris have been grown that diffract to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. Knowledge of the crystal structure of GumK will help in understanding xanthan biosynthesis and its regulation and will also allow a subsequent rational approach to enzyme design and engineering. The multiwavelength anomalous diffraction approach will be used to solve the phase problem.

  7. Distribution of major xanthones in the pericarp, aril, and yellow gum of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana linn.) fruit and their contribution to antioxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Sukatta, Udomlak; Takenaka, Makiko; Ono, Hiroshi; Okadome, Hiroshi; Sotome, Itaru; Nanayama, Kazuko; Thanapase, Warunee; Isobe, Seiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Xanthone compounds in mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn.) fruit have been reported to have biological activities including antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, and the major xanthone compounds in mangosteen are ?-mangostin and ?-mangostin. The objectives of this research were to quantify and qualify the major xanthones in each part of the mangosteen fruit with and without yellow gum from the point of view of effective utilization of agricultural product. Quantitative evaluation revealed that yellow gum had extremely high amounts of ?-mangostin and ?-mangostin (382.2 and 144.9 mg/g on a wet basis, respectively) followed by pericarp and aril. In mangosteen fruit with yellow gum inside, xanthones seemed to have shifted from the pericarp and to have concentrated in a gum on the surface of aril, and there was almost no difference between the amounts of ?-mangostin and ?-mangostin in whole fruits with and without yellow gum. Pericarp and yellow gum showed much higher radical-scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant potential than the aril. PMID:23649258

  8. Effect of different drying techniques on flowability characteristics and chemical properties of natural carbohydrate-protein Gum from durian fruit seed

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A natural carbohydrate biopolymer was extracted from the agricultural biomass waste (durian seed). Subsequently, the crude biopolymer was purified by using the saturated barium hydroxide to minimize the impurities. Finally, the effect of different drying techniques on the flow characteristics and functional properties of the purified biopolymer was investigated. The present study elucidated the main functional characteristics such as flow characteristics, water- and oil-holding capacity, solubility, and foaming capacity. Results In most cases except for oven drying, the bulk density decreased, thus increasing the porosity. This might be attributed to the increase in the inter-particle voids of smaller sized particles with larger contact surface areas per unit volume. The current study revealed that oven-dried gum and freeze-dried gum had the highest and lowest compressibility index, thus indicating the weakest and strongest flowability among all samples. In the present work, the freeze-dried gum showed the lowest angle of repose, bulk, tapped and true density. This indicates the highest porosity degree of freeze dried gum among dried seed gums. It also exhibited the highest solubility, and foaming capacity thus providing the most desirable functional properties and flow characteristics among all drying techniques. Conclusion The present study revealed that freeze drying among all drying techniques provided the most desirable functional properties and flow characteristics for durian seed gum. PMID:23289739

  9. Catalytic reduction of methylene blue and Congo red dyes using green synthesized gold nanoparticles capped by salmalia malabarica gum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapuram, Bhagavanth Reddy; Alle, Madhusudhan; Dadigala, Ramakrishna; Dasari, Ayodhya; Maragoni, Venkatesham; Guttena, Veerabhadram

    2015-08-01

    Stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized using salmalia malabarica gum as both reducing and capping agent. It is a simple and eco-friendly green synthesis. The successful formation of AuNPs was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The synthesized AuNPs were characterized by a peak at 520-535 nm in the UV-Vis spectrum. The X-ray diffraction studies indicated that the resulting AuNPs were highly crystalline with face-centred cubic geometry. TEM studies showed that the average particle size of the synthesized AuNPs was 12 ± 2 nm. FTIR analysis revealed that -OH groups present in the gum matrix might be responsible for the reduction of Au+3 into AuNPs. The synthesized AuNPs exhibited good catalytic properties in the reduction of methylene blue and Congo red.

  10. Process development for spray drying of sticky pharmaceuticals; case study of bioadhesive nicotine microparticles for compressed medicated chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Sander, Camilla; Nielsen, Henrik Stillhof; Søgaard, Susanne Roslev; Støving, Celina; Yang, Mingshi; Jacobsen, Jette; Rantanen, Jukka

    2013-08-16

    Spray drying of pharmaceutical compounds with sticky properties is a challenging task and may require substantial time and resources. By including small-scale studies of single droplet drying kinetics a relatively high number of experiments with less material is allowed. This means one can construct a more robust design space according to Quality by Design (QbD) formulation development principles. In the current study we present a case study on the development of spray dried microparticles comprising nicotine bitartrate and hypromellose or alginate polymer, for incorporation into medicated chewing gum. By illustration of initial studies on single droplet drying kinetics, subsequent characterization of microparticles, and final characterization of compressed chewing gum this paper summarizes the entire development process. PMID:23684657

  11. Study of complex coacervation of gelatin with sodium carboxymethyl guar gum: microencapsulation of clove oil and sulphamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Thimma, R T; Tammishetti, S

    2003-01-01

    Complex coacervation of gelatin with sodium carboxymethyl guar gum was studied. The coacervation was studied as a function of pH, colloid composition and concentration. The efficiency of coacervation was followed by measuring viscosity, coacervate yield and turbidity of test solutions. All the measurements suggest that, as the amount of sodium carboxymethyl guar gum (CMGG) in the colloids increases, the pH at which maximum coacervation happens decreases. Effective coacervation could be realized over the pH range of 2.5-4.0 using different compositions. The efficiency of the CMGG/gelatin system to encapsulate oils and solid particles is demonstrated by successful encapsulation of oil of cloves and sulphmethoxazole. PMID:12554375

  12. Effect of hydrophilic natural gums in formulation of oral-controlled release matrix tablets of propranolol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, K S; Venkataraju, M P; Gowda, D V

    2009-04-01

    In order to develop a controlled delivery of highly water-soluble propranolol hydrochloride (PPHCl) using hydrophilic natural gums (xanthan gum [X] and locust bean gum [LBG]) as cost-effective, nontoxic, easily available. The granules of PPHCl were prepared by wet granulation method using a different ratios drug: gum ratios of X, LBG and XLBG(X and LBG in 1:1 ratios). To increase the flowability and compressibility of the granules, and to prevent its adhesion to punch and die, magnesium stearate and talc were added to the granules in 1:2 ratios before punching. The tablet was analysed to determine hardness, friability, % assay and invitro release study was carried out. The release of PPHCl from a gelatinous swollen mass, which controls the diffusion of drug molecules through the polymeric material into aqueous medium. The XLBG matrice shows precise controlled release than the X and LBG matrice because of burst effect and fast release in case of X and LBG matrice respectively and there was no chemical interaction between drug and polymer in XLBG formulation as confirmed by FTIR studies. First pass effect of PPHCl can be avoided by these formulations. Matrices with XLBG show zero-order release via swelling, diffusion and relaxation mechanism. The XLBG matrice leads to more precise result than X and LBG alone by the utilization of synergistic interaction between two biopolymers and uniformity in the hydration layer in dissolution media. However, according to the similarity factor (f(2)) XLBG3 were the most similar formulations to Lol-SR as the reference standard. PMID:19339235

  13. Effect of Boswellia Thurifera Gum Methanol Extract on Cytotoxicity and P53 Gene Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanahi, Nasrin; Behbahani, Mandana; Yektaeian, Afsaneh

    2014-01-01

    Boswellia has been widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of different diseases such as cancer in Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the gum methanol extract of Boswellia thurifera on the viability and P53 gene expression of cultured breast cancer cells. The gum methanol extract was obtained in various concentrations using the maceration method. Normal (HEK-293) and cancer (MDA-MB-231) human cells were cultured and treated with various concentrations of the extract. Then MTT assay was used for the study of cytotoxic effect of the extract and real time PCR method was also applied for the investigation of P53 gene expression in cancer cells. The IC50 of the extract against cancer cells was 80 µg/mL and had less cytotoxic effect in normal cells. The effect of the extract was dose dependent. Induction of P53 expression by extract was also significantly more in treated cancer cells than untreated cells. This inductive effect in cells was higher after 12 h treatment than it was after 6 h. The results of the current study show that gum methanol extract of Boswellia thurifera has probably anti-cancer effects and could induce P53 gene transcription and toxicity in the cultured breast cancer cell line. The increase of P53 gene specific mRNA may be a mechanism of gum methanol extract induced cytotoxicity. However, for a definitive conclusion, further studies on other cell lines as well as animal models and subsequent clinical studies are warranted. PMID:25237368

  14. The effect of acacia gum and a water-soluble dietary fiber mixture on blood lipids in humans.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C D; Spiller, G A; Gates, J E; Miller, A F; Whittam, J H

    1993-04-01

    Water-soluble dietary fibers (WSDF) are generally thought to lower cholesterol. This study compared the cholesterol-lowering effects of a medium viscosity WSDF mixture (psyllium, pectin, guar gum and locust bean gum) with an equal amount of WSDF from acacia gum, which has a lower viscosity. Hypercholesterolemic males (n = 13) and females (n = 16) were randomly assigned to one of two WSDF treatments provided in a low-calorie powder form for mixing into beverages (< 4 kcal/serving). Subjects were instructed to mix powders into their usual beverages and to consume them three times daily (5 g WSDF/serving) for 4 weeks while consuming their typical fat-modified diets. Exercise and body weights were also held constant. The WSDF mixture yielded a 10% decrease in plasma total cholesterol (from 251 +/- 20 to 225 +/- 19 mg/dL; p < 0.01), and a 14% reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (from 167 +/- 14 to 144 +/- 14 mg/dL; p < 0.001). No significant changes in plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides were observed. In contrast, the acacia gum-treated group showed no change in any plasma lipid parameters. The WSDF treatments did not produce significant changes in mean dietary intakes within or between treatment groups. These data support previous findings that a diet rich in select WSDF can be a useful cholesterol-lowering adjunct to a fat-modified diet, but that caution should be exercised in ascribing cholesterol-lowering efficacy to dietary fibers based solely on their WSDF classification. Finally, WSDF viscosity is a potential cholesterol-lowering factor to be explored further. PMID:8385164

  15. Novel extraction and application of okra gum as a film coating agent using theophylline as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Ogaji, Ikoni J; Hoag, Stephen W

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extraction and application of okra gum as an aqueous film coating agent. Powdered okra pods dispersed in demineralized water was heated at 80 ± 2(o)C for 30 minutes in the presence of sodium chloride. The filtrate was successively centrifuged at 4000 rpm for 30, 60, or 120 minutes and freeze dried. The samples were used as film former at different concentrations in aqueous film coating operations. Near infrared (nIR) absorption spectra, photomicrographs, and some physicochemical properties of the coated tablets were evaluated. The okra gum samples had different nIR spectra and possessed good processing and application quality due to relatively low viscosity. A six-fold concentration of this gum from the novel extraction yielded glossy theophylline tablets within a short time. A t (18) = 2.895, P < 0.005, t critical = 1.734 were obtained for the independent analysis of the hardness of core and coated theophylline tablets. A 3.0% concentration of the okra samples at a flow rate of 3 ml/min for 100 minutes showed that F = 3.798, DF = 29, P < 0.035, F critical = 3.354 in tablet hardness among samples and F = 15.632, DF = 29, P < 0.0001, F critical = 2.152 were obtained on film thickness among tablet samples during the coating and drying operation. Novel extraction process enhanced the film coating potential of okra gum by delivering more solids on the substrate at a shorter time with improved operation efficiency. PMID:24959415

  16. Mechanical properties of double networks of gum and black-filled cis-1,4-polyisoprene vulcanizates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetsu, Kiyonori

    Double networks of gum and black-filled cis-1.4-polyisoprene vulcanizates have been prepared by crosslinking partly in the unstrained state (first cure), then completing cure in simple tension at an extension ratio lambda o (second cure). Tensile strengths, tear strengths, low strain dynamic properties, and rates of thermal crystallization of these double networks were determined. Different lambdao and various apportioning of crosslinks between first cure and second cure were used to control residual extension ratio lambdar. Filled double networks thermally crystallized faster than the corresponding conventional single network, while the rate of crystallization of gum double networks was similar to that of the single network. There was no significant difference of low strain dynamic properties for sample cut parallel or perpendicular to the stretch direction. Filled double networks showed less Payne effect. Parallel specimens of double networks showed enhanced stiffness, while the perpendicular specimens had nearly the same stress-stain response as the single network. The tensile strength of parallel specimens was higher than that of the perpendicular specimens for filled double networks. However, for gum double networks, parallel specimens were weaker than perpendicular ones. The residual extension ratio was the primary factor influencing tear strengths of gum double networks. As lambda r increased, tear strength decreased. Tear strengths of filled double networks depended upon network chain density, crosslink type, and lambda o. Tear strength was higher, when network chain density increased, crosslinks were less stable, and lambdao was smaller. These phenomena are proposed to result from inhomogeneous structure of black-filled double networks. This is expected to enhance both local stress concentration and strain-crystallizability.

  17. Identification of sesquiterpene coumarins of oleo-gum resin of Ferula assa-foetida L. from the Yasuj region.

    PubMed

    Asghari, J; Atabaki, V; Baher, E; Mazaheritehrani, M

    2016-02-01

    Chemical investigation of the oleo-gum resin of Ferula assa-foetida L. from Yasuj region led to the identification of five sesquiterpene coumarins namely, conferone (1), badrakemin (2), feslol (3), isosamarcandin (4) and samarcandin (5). The compounds were characterised by detailed 1D ((1)H and (13)C) and 2D NMR (HMBC, HSQC and NOESY) experiments. Among these compounds, conferone (1) and isosamarcandin (4) are being newly reported in F. assa-foetida L. PMID:26134757

  18. Effect of spray drying on the sensory and physical properties of hydrolysed casein using gum arabic as the carrier.

    PubMed

    Subtil, S F; Rocha-Selmi, G A; Thomazini, M; Trindade, M A; Netto, F M; Favaro-Trindade, C S

    2014-09-01

    This study was aimed at spray drying hydrolysed casein using gum Arabic as the carrier agent, in order to decrease the bitter taste. Three formulations with differing proportions of hydrolysed casein: gum Arabic (10:90, 20:80 and 30:70) were prepared and characterized. They were evaluated for their moisture content, water activity, hygroscopicity, dispersibility in water and in oil, particle size and distribution, particle morphology, thermal behaviour (DSC) and bitter taste by a trained sensory panel using a paired-comparison test (free samples vs. spray dried samples). The proportion of hydrolysed casein did not affect the morphology of the microspheres. The spray drying process increased product stability and modified the dissolution time, but had no effect on the ability of the material to dissolve in either water or oil. The sensory tests showed that the spray drying process using gum Arabic as the carrier was efficient in attenuating or masking the bitter taste of the hydrolysed casein. PMID:25190858

  19. Effect of the native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate on murine peritoneal macrophage modulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Yamassaki, F T; Lenzi, R M; Campestrini, L H; Bovo, F; Seyfried, M; Soldera-Silva, A; Stevan-Hancke, F R; Zawadzki-Baggio, S F; Pettolino, F A; Bacic, A; Maurer, J B B

    2015-07-10

    The native polysaccharide of cashew-nut tree gum exudate (CNTG) and its arabinogalactan-protein component (CNTG-AGP) were tested by using immuno-stimulant and anti-inflammatory in vitro assays of murine peritoneal macrophage activities. In the assay for immuno-stimulant activity (without previous treatment with lipopolysaccharide; LPS), CNTG increased the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and both CNTG and CNTG-AGP decreased the concentrations of IL6. When the macrophages were incubated in the presence of LPS and CNTG a decrease in the levels of nitric oxide (NO(·)) and IFN-? was observed. The results could explain the popular use of CNTG as an anti-inflammatory. In addition, CNTG is the main component of the cashew-nut tree gum exudate, which has been considered a versatile polymer with potential pharmaceutical and food industry applications. These data may contribute to the study of the immunomodulation activity of plant polysaccharides, as well as encourage future experiments in the field of cashew-nut tree gum exudate applications. PMID:25857980

  20. Rheological characteristics of cold thickened beverages containing xanthan gum-based food thickeners used for dysphagia diets.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun M; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2015-01-01

    Cold beverages are commonly thickened with commercial gum-based food thickeners for consumption by patients with dysphagia. In this study, the rheological properties of a thickened water and five thickened beverages (orange juice, apple juice, grape juice, whole milk, and a sport drink) that were prepared with four commercial instant xanthan gum-based thickeners (coded A-D) were investigated at a 3% thickener concentration. All thickened samples showed high shear-thinning behavior with yield stress at the serving temperature of 8°C. The magnitudes of apparent viscosity (?a,50), consistency index (K), storage modulus (G'), and loss modulus (G'') of the thickened beverages, except for water, with food thickener A were significantly higher compared with other thickeners (B, C, and D) (P<0.05). The largest increases in K values for thickened beverages were observed at 1-hour storage, and at longer times their K values, except for milk, remained approximately constant. Rheological parameters demonstrated statistically significant differences in flow and dynamic behaviors between the cold thickened beverages prepared with the xanthan gum-based food thickeners (P<0.05), indicating that their rheological properties are strongly influenced by the dispersing medium, the type of food thickener, and storage time. In particular, appropriately selecting a commercial food thickener for preparing thickened beverages seems to be of importance for managing dysphagia. PMID:25441963

  1. Use of gum arabic to improve the fabrication of chitosan-gelatin-based nanofibers for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ruei-Yi; Kuo, Ting-Yun; Hung, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Che-Min; Hsien, Tzu-Yang; Wang, Da-Ming; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen

    2015-01-22

    Current techniques for fabricating chitosan-gelatin-based nanofibers require the use of corrosive and expensive solvents. Our novel method, however, using gum arabic and a mild (20 wt%) aqueous acetic acid solution as solvent can produce a solution with much higher chitosan-gelatin content (16 wt%). Without gum arabic, which greatly decreases the viscosity of the solution, such an outcome was unachievable. The solution was utilized to prepare electrospun chitosan-gelatin-polyvinyl alcohol-gum arabic nanofibers with a weight ratio of 8:8:2:0.5 (C8G8P2A0.5 nanofibers), in which polyvinyl alcohol could stabilize the electrospinning process. The stability and tensile strength (2.53 MPa) of C8G8P2A0.5 nanofibers (mats) were enhanced by glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Furthermore, mesenchymal stem cells attached and proliferated well on the mat. The strength-enhanced and cytocompatible C8G8P2A0.5 mats are thereby suitable for tissue engineering applications. More importantly, we have created a less expensive and safer method (one not using hazardous solvents) to fabricate chitosan-gelatin-based nanofibers. PMID:25439928

  2. Natural gum as mucoadhesive controlled release carriers: evaluation of cefpodoxime proxetil by D-optimal design technique.

    PubMed

    Patil, Satish H; Talele, Gokul S

    2014-03-01

    The present study deals with the development of mucoadhesive controlled release tablets of Cefpodoxime Proxetil to increase the gastric residence time and thus prolong drug release, reduce dosing frequency and improve oral bioavailability. Tablets were prepared using sodium alginate and karaya gum, a natural polymer, with a synthetic polymer hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (K100LV) and Karaya gum with HPMC K100LV in various ratios to optimize the drug release profile using D-Optimal technique. Pre- and post-compression parameters of tablets prepared with various formulations (S1-S9, C1-C9) were evaluated. The FTIR and DSC studies revealed that no physiochemical interaction between excipients and drug. The formulation S7 showed prolonged drug release, and the mechanism of drug release from the optimized formulation was confirmed using the Korsmeyer-Peppas model to be non-Fickian release transport and n value was found 0.605 indicating both diffusion and erosion mechanism from these natural gums. The optimized formulation showed mucoadhesive strength >35?g. An in vivo study was performed on rabbits using an X-ray imaging technique. The radiological evidence suggests that the tablets adheres (more than 10 hours) to a rabbit's stomach. No significant changes were found in the physical appearance, drug content, mucoadhesive study and in vitro dissolution pattern after storage at 40?°C/75% relative humidity for 3 months. PMID:24032629

  3. Rheological and kinetic study of the ultrasonic degradation of xanthan gum in aqueous solution: effects of pyruvate group.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruoshi; Feke, Donald L

    2015-06-25

    The influence of the pyruvate group on the efficiency of ultrasonic degradation of xanthan gum in aqueous solution has been studied. Blends of natural and pyruvate-free xanthan gums were ultrasonicated at 20°C for up to 30min and evaluated for molecular-weight degradation by viscometry. Solutions of pure pyruvate-free xanthan exhibited the highest stability to degradation among all blend ratios studied. Removing the pyruvate group is believed to enable the molecular chains to adopt a more compact conformation, which renders the polymer less susceptible to ultrasonication. In addition, the effects of salt on ultrasonic degradation efficiency were studied by using 0.1, 10(-2), or 10(-4)M of NaCl or Na2SO4 in solution prior to ultrasonication. A degradation kinetics model was developed to quantify the degradation behavior. The absence of pyruvate groups renders the xanthan gum less sensitive to the influence of salt, and hence decreases the ultrasonic degradation efficiency. PMID:25839814

  4. Comparative bio-safety and in vivo evaluation of native or modified locust bean gum-PVA IPN microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kaity, Santanu; Ghosh, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    Strategically developed natural polymer-based controlled release multiparticulate drug delivery systems have gained special interest for “spatial placement” and “temporal delivery” of drug molecules. In our earlier study, locust bean gum-poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (LBG-PVA IPN), carboxymethylated locust bean gum-poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (CMLBG-PVA IPN) and acrylamide grafted locust bean gum-poly(vinyl alcohol) interpenetrating polymer network (Am-g-LBG-PVA IPN) were prepared and characterized. The present study deals with accelerating stability testing, comparative bio-safety and single dose in vivo pharmacokinetic study of all three IPN microspheres for controlled oral delivery of buflomedil hydrochloride (BH). From the stability study, it was observed that the particles were stable throughout the study period. From toxicity and biodegradability study it was proved that the microspheres were safe for internal use and complied with bio-safety criterion. From the in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rabbits, it was observed that the CMLBG-PVA IPN microspheres possessed almost similar Tmax value with BH oral suspension. However, in comparison between the LBG-PVA and Am-g-LBG-PVA IPN microspheres, the later showed well controlled release property than the first in biological condition. Thus, this type of delivery system might be useful to achieve the lofty goals of the controlled release drug delivery. PMID:25307127

  5. Green synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles using gum karaya as a biotemplate and their antibacterial application

    PubMed Central

    Padil, Vinod Vellora Thekkae; ?erník, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Background Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles have attracted huge attention due to catalytic, electric, optical, photonic, textile, nanofluid, and antibacterial activity depending on the size, shape, and neighboring medium. In the present paper, we synthesized CuO nanoparticles using gum karaya, a natural nontoxic hydrocolloid, by green technology and explored its potential antibacterial application. Methods The CuO nanoparticles were synthesized by a colloid-thermal synthesis process. The mixture contained various concentrations of CuCl2 • 2H2O (1 mM, 2 mM, and 3 mM) and gum karaya (10 mg/mL) and was kept at 75°C at 250 rpm for 1 hour in an orbital shaker. The synthesized CuO was purified and dried to obtain different sizes of the CuO nanoparticles. The well diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of the synthesized CuO nanoparticles. The zone of inhibition, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined by the broth microdilution method recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Results Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed CuO nanoparticles evenly distributed on the surface of the gum matrix. X-ray diffraction of the synthesized nanoparticles indicates the formation of single-phase CuO with a monoclinic structure. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy peak at 525 cm?1 should be a stretching of CuO, which matches up to the B2u mode. The peaks at 525 cm?1 and 580 cm?1 indicated the formation of CuO nanostructure. Transmission electron microscope analyses revealed CuO nanoparticles of 4.8 ± 1.6 nm, 5.5 ± 2.5 nm, and 7.8 ± 2.3 nm sizes were synthesized with various concentrations of CuCl2 • 2H2O (1 mM, 2 mM, and 3 mM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiles indicated that the O 1s and Cu 2p peak corresponding to the CuO nanoparticles were observed. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized nanoparticles was tested against Gram-negative and positive cultures. Conclusion The formed CuO nanoparticles are small in size (4.8 ± 1.6 nm), highly stable, and have significant antibacterial action on both the Gram classes of bacteria compared to larger sizes of synthesized CuO (7.8 ± 2.3 nm) nanoparticles. The smaller size of the CuO nanoparticles (4.8 ± 1.6 nm) was found to be yielding a maximum zone of inhibition compared to the larger size of synthesized CuO nanoparticles (7.8 ± 2.3 nm). The results also indicate that increase in precursor concentration enhances an increase in particle size, as well as the morphology of synthesized CuO nanoparticles. PMID:23467397

  6. Improving the stability of coal slurries: Final report. [Polygalacturonic acid and gum tragacanth

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, H.S.

    1988-12-01

    Polysaccharides were found to stabilize colloidal dispersions (such as coal particles and polystyrene latex particles) even at high ionic strengths. The stability studies with various kinds of polysaccharides showed that rod-like molecules (such as poly (galacturonic acid) and gum tragacanth) are much more effective stabilizers than highly-branched molecules such as arabinogalactan. This effective stabilization with the rod-like molecules was found to result from the adsorption of polysaccharides on the particles, i.e., the steric stabilization mechanism. The stability depends significantly on the solution pH, the molecular weight and the surface charge of particles. Adsorption isotherms, the zeta potential and the conformation of adsorbed molecules (the steric layer thicknesses) were measured as a function of the solution pH, the molecular weight and the surface charge. Photon correlation spectroscopy studies showed that the conformation of adsorbed molecules is strongly dependent on the solution pH, the molecular weight and the surface charge, suggesting that the dependence of stability on these parameters is due to the change of the conformation of the molecules adsorbed on the surface. In addition, the solution pH has a significant effect on the flocculation behavior of particles and can be modulated to bring about peptization of particles. This type of stabilization is referred to as electrosteric stabilization whereby steric stabilization is induced by changing the electrical properties of the system (the solution pH in this case). 41 refs., 43 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Gum arabic microcapsules as protectors of the photoinduced degradation of riboflavin in whole milk.

    PubMed

    Boiero, María L; Mandrioli, Mara; Vanden Braber, Noelia; Rodriguez-Estrada, María T; García, Norman A; Borsarelli, Claudio D; Montenegro, Mariana A

    2014-09-01

    Microcapsules (MC) made with gum arabic (GA) as shell material without and with ?-carotene (?c) as core material were prepared by the spray-drying technique. The effect of these MC on the photodegradation of riboflavin (Rf) in whole milk by fluorescent daylight lamp irradiation was evaluated at a storage temperature of 4°C. The additions of 1.37mg/mL of MC without ?c (MC-GA) and with 0.54?g/mL of ?c (MC-?c-GA) decreased the apparent first-order rate constant of Rf photodegradation by approximately 26 and 30%, respectively. A systematic kinetic and mechanistic analysis of the results indicates that the global protective effect of the MC is mainly due to the combination of quenching of the electronically excited triplet state of Rf and scavenging of the photogenerated reactive oxygen species, such as singlet molecular oxygen, superoxide radical anion and hydroxyl radical. A minor contribution to the photoprotective effect can be also associated with the inner-filter effect exerted by the MC, which partially blocks the direct excitation of Rf. These results allow us to conclude that photodegradation of Rf in milk can be considerably reduced by the addition of small amounts of MC, avoiding large losses in the nutritional value of milk. PMID:24952775

  8. Synthesis of nanohydrogels based on tragacanth gum biopolymer and investigation of swelling and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sadat Hosseini, Masoomeh; Hemmati, Khadijeh; Ghaemy, Mousa

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with preparation of pH responsive nanohydrogels based on tragacanth gum (TG) biopolymer for drug delivery. The nanohydrogels were prepared using different chemical reagents such as 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modifier and glyceroldiglycidylether (GDE), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and glutaraldehyde (GA) as cross-linkers. The obtained nanohydrogels were characterized using different techniques such as scanning electron microscope (SEM), elemental analysis, FT-IR, zeta sizer and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The gel content increased with increasing the cross-linkers contents and reached to a maximum of 90%. The swelling behavior of nanohydrogels was investigated in terms of the effect of pH (2.2, 7.4 and 9), temperature (27, 37 and 60°C), and reaction time (2-24h). Loading of Indomethacin (IND) as a model drug showed dependence on the network structure of nanohydrogels. The total in vitro IND release showed dependence on the network structure of nanohydrogels and was in the range of 50-80% at pH 9 after 24h. PMID:26434524

  9. Production of xanthan gum by free and immobilized cells of Xanthomonas campestris and Xanthomonas pelargonii.

    PubMed

    Niknezhad, Seyyed Vahid; Asadollahi, Mohammad Ali; Zamani, Akram; Biria, Davoud

    2016-01-01

    Production of xanthan gum using immobilized cells of Xanthomonas campestris and Xanthomonas pelargonii grown on glucose or hydrolyzed starch as carbon sources was investigated. Calcium alginate (CA) and calcium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol-boric acid (CA-PVA) beads were used for the immobilization of cells. Xanthan titers of 8.2 and 9.2g/L were obtained for X. campestris cells immobilized in CA-PVA beads using glucose and hydrolyzed starch, respectively, whereas those for X. pelargonii were 8 and 7.9g/L, respectively. Immobilized cells in CA-PVA beads were successfully employed in three consecutive cycles for xanthan production without any noticeable degradation of the beads whereas the CA beads were broken after the first cycle. The results of this study suggested that immobilized cells are advantageous over the free cells for xanthan production. Also it was shown that the cells immobilized in CA-PVA beads are more efficient than cells immobilized in CA beads for xanthan production. PMID:26526173

  10. Extraction, characterization and application of malva nut gum in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ho, Y C; Norli, I; Alkarkhi, Abbas F M; Morad, N

    2015-06-01

    In view of green developments in water treatment, plant-based flocculants have become the focus due to their safety, degradation and renewable properties. In addition, cost and energy-saving processes are preferable. In this study, malva nut gum (MNG), a new plant-based flocculant, and its composite with Fe in water treatment using single mode mixing are demonstrated. The result presents a simplified extraction of the MNG process. MNG has a high molecular weight of 2.3 × 10? kDa and a high negative charge of -58.7 mV. From the results, it is a strong anionic flocculant. Moreover, it is observed to have a branch-like surface structure. Therefore, it conforms to the surface of particles well and exhibits good performance in water treatment. In water treatment, the Fe-MNG composite treats water at pH 3.01 and requires a low concentration of Fe and MNG of 0.08 and 0.06 mg/L, respectively, when added to the system. It is concluded that for a single-stage flocculation process, physico-chemical properties such as molecular weight, charge of polymer, surface morphology, pH, concentration of cation and concentration of biopolymeric flocculant affect the flocculating performance. PMID:26042980

  11. Steady shear flow properties of Cordia myxa leaf gum as a function of concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Chaharlang, Mahmood; Samavati, Vahid

    2015-08-01

    The steady shear flow properties of dispersions of Cordia myxa leaf gum (CMLG) were determined as a function of concentration (0.5-2.5%, w/w), and temperature (10-50 °C). The CMLG dispersions exhibited strong shear-thinning behavior at all concentrations and temperatures. The Power-law (Ostwald-Waele's) and Herschel-Bulkley models were employed to characterize flow behavior of CMLG solutions at 0.1-100 s(-1) shear rate. Non-Newtonian shear-thinning behavior was observed at all temperatures and concentrations. While increase in temperature decreased the viscosity and increased the flow behavior indices, adverse effect was obtained by increasing the concentration. The Power-law model was found the best model to describe steady shear flow behavior of CMLG. The pseudoplasticity of CMLG increased markedly with concentration. An Arrhenius-type model was also used to describe the effect of temperature. The activation energy (Ea) appeared in the range of 5.972-18.104 kJ/mol, as concentration increased from 0.5% to 2.5%, at a shear rate of 10 s(-1). PMID:25936501

  12. The lowering effect of Gum Arabic on hyperlipidemia in Sudanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Rima E.; Gadour, Mohammed O.; Adam, Ishag

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia especially low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for developing ischemic heart disease. Soluble dietary fiber has lipid lowering characteristics. Gum Arabic (GA) is 95% soluble fiber calculated on dry bases. The beneficial effect of GA on lipid profile needs further verification. A case–control study was conducted at Omdurman Hospital, Sudan to assess the effect of G A on serum lipids in patients with hyperlipidemia. Cases received a 20 mg tablet of atorvastatin /day plus 30 mg of GA for 4 weeks while the controls received atorvastatin only. Levels of lipids in serum were assessed according to conventional methods before and 1 month after the trial. There is no significant difference in the basic characteristics between the study and the control groups (55 patients in each arm of the study). While there was no significant difference in the levels of HDL, there was a significant reduction of the total cholesterol (25.9 vs. 7.8%, P < 0.001), triglyceride (38.2 vs. 2.9%, P < 0.001), and LDL (30.8 vs. 8.1%, P < 0.001) before and after the intervention in the study compared to the controls groups. PMID:26042049

  13. Okra (Hibiscus esculentus) gum-alginate blend mucoadhesive beads for controlled glibenclamide release.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Priyanka; Ubaidulla, U; Nayak, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The utility of isolated okra (Hibiscus esculentus) gum (OG) was evaluated as a potential sustained drug release polymer-blends with sodium alginate in the development of controlled glibenclamide release ionically-gelled beads for oral use. OG was isolated from okra fruits and its solubility, pH, viscosity and moisture content were studied. Glibenclamide-loaded OG-alginate blend beads were prepared using CaCl2 as cross-linking agent through ionic-gelation technique. These ionically gelled beads showed drug entrapment efficiency of 64.19 ± 2.02 to 91.86 ± 3.24%. The bead sizes were within 1.12 ± 0.11 to 1.28 ± 0.15 mm. These glibenclamide-loaded OG-alginate blend beads exhibited sustained in vitro drug release over a prolonged period of 8 h. The in vitro drug release from these OG-alginate beads were followed controlled-release (zero-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR. The swelling and degradation of these beads was influenced by the pH of the test medium. These beads also exhibited good mucoadhesivity with goat intestinal mucosa. PMID:25312603

  14. Characterization of new biodegradable edible film made from basil seed (Ocimum basilicum L.) gum.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Naimeh; Esmaiili, Mohsen; Djomeh, Zahra Emam; Ghasemlou, Mehran; Jouki, Mohammad

    2014-02-15

    It is well known that the market for edible films is experiencing remarkable growth and expected to continue. This study investigated the using of basil seed gum (BSG) as a new film-forming material under the influence of addition of glycerol (GLY) as plasticizer. Edible films based on BSG and three different concentrations of GLY (25%, 35%, and 50% w/w BSG) were developed, and their water vapor permeability (WVP), as well as physical, thermal and mechanical properties were measured. The addition of glycerol significantly increased water vapor permeability and solubility of the film (p<0.05). As expected, the increase in GLY concentration from 25% to 50% (w/w) increased the extensibility, but decreased tensile strength. This suggests weaker mechanical strength and higher mobility of polymer chains by plasticizing effect of GLY. The color measurement values showed that increasing the glycerol concentration in polymer matrix caused the b and L values increased while ?E value decreased. The electron scanning micrograph showed plasticized films as smooth, and uniform which lacked pores or cracks compared with those were not plasticized. This study revealed that the BSG had a good potential to be used in producing edible films for various food applications. PMID:24507273

  15. Psyllium husk gum: an attractive carbohydrate biopolymer for the production of stable canthaxanthin emulsions.

    PubMed

    Gharibzahedi, Seyed Mohammad Taghi; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2013-02-15

    The physical stability of the ultrasonically prepared emulsions containing canthaxanthin (CX) produced by Dietzia natronolimnaea HS-1 strain was maximized using a face central composite design (FCCD) of response surface methodology (RSM). The linear and interaction effects of main emulsion components (whey protein isolate (WPI, 0.4-1.2 wt%), psyllium husk gum (PHG, 1.5-4.5 wt%) and coconut oil (CO, 5-10 wt%)) on the stability were studied. The density, turbidity and droplet size of emulsions were also characterized to interpret the stability data. A significant second-order polynomial model was established (p<0.0001). Maximum stability of 98.8% was predicted at the optimum levels of formulation variables (WPI concentration 1.20 wt%, PHG content 3.30 wt%, CO concentration 5.43 wt%). The results also demonstrated that CO and WPI concentration had greater effect on the droplet size and density values, whereas the PHG:WPI ratio had a rather greater effect on the turbidity values. PMID:23399251

  16. Structural data and biological properties of almond gum oligosaccharide: application to beef meat preservation.

    PubMed

    Bouaziz, Fatma; Helbert, Claire Boisset; Romdhane, Molka Ben; Koubaa, Mohamed; Bhiri, Fatma; Kallel, Fatma; Chaari, Fatma; Driss, Dorra; Buon, Laurine; Chaabouni, Semia Ellouz

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of almond gum generates low molecular weight oligosaccharides (OAG) with a yield of 33.5%. The generated oligosaccharides were purified and identified. OAG analyses show that the most prominent residues were galactose and arabinose with traces of xylose, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. The glycosyl linkage positions were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showing a main chain composed of galactose units [ ? 3)-Gal-(1 ? ] branched mainly with arabinose residues [Ara-(1 ? ]. The antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of OAG were investigated. As regards the in vitro antioxidant activities, the OAG showed a high total antioxidant activity (347 ?g ascorbic acid equivalent/mL), an important DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.64 mg/mL) and a high reducing capacity (RP0.5AU = 3.6 mg/mL). Furthermore, OAG had a high antimicrobial activity against Salmonella thyphimirium, Bacillus cereus, Actinomycetes sp, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Alternaria alternate and Candidat albicans. Finally, OAG efficiency was tested using 0.5%; 0.75% and 1% concentrations in beef meat preservation. Microbial growth and lipid oxidation were monitored during 9 days at 4 °C. The results showed significant inhibitions (p < 0.05) of lipid oxidation and microbial growth in ground beef meat containing OAG. PMID:25195541

  17. Glucuronoarabinoxylan from coconut palm gum exudate: chemical structure and gastroprotective effect.

    PubMed

    Simas-Tosin, Fernanda F; Barraza, Ruth R; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; Werner, Maria Fernanda de P; Baggio, Cristiane H; Wagner, Ricardo; Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Carbonero, Elaine R; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Iacomini, Marcello; Gorin, Philip A J

    2014-07-17

    A glucuronoarabinoxylan (CNAL) was extracted with 1% aq. KOH (25°C) from Cocos nucifera gum exudate. It had a homogeneous profile on HPSEC-MALLS-RI (Mw 4.6 × 10(4)g/mol) and was composed of Fuc, Ara, Xyl, GlcpA (and 4-O-GlcpA) in a 7:28:62:3 molar ratio. Methylation data showed a branched structure with 39% of non-reducing end units, 3-O-substituted Araf (8%), 3,4-di-O- (15%), 2,4-di-O- (5%) and 2,3,4-tri-O-substituted Xylp units (17%). The anomeric region of CNAL (13)C NMR spectrum contained 9 signals, indicating a complex structure. The main chain of CNAL was characterized by analysis of a Smith-degraded polysaccharide. Its (13)C NMR spectrum showed 5 main signals at ? 101.6, ? 75.5, ? 73.9, ? 72.5, and ? 63.1 that were attributed to C-1, C-4, C-3, C-2 and C-5 of (1?4)-linked ?-Xylp-main chain units, respectively. CNAL exhibited gastroprotective effect, by reducing gastric hemorrhagic lesions, when orally administered (1 and 3mg/kg) to rats prior to ethanol administration. PMID:24702919

  18. A comparison of the sensory and rheological properties of molecular and particulate forms of xanthan gum?

    PubMed Central

    Abson, Rachael; Gaddipati, Sanyasi R.; Hort, Joanne; Mitchell, John R.; Wolf, Bettina; Hill, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    A particulate form of xanthan gum was prepared by extrusion cooking. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of this form shows similarities to starch with an increase in viscosity to a maximum with increasing temperature as a result of the swelling of the particles. The rheology and mixing behaviour with water of the particulate and conventional molecular forms of xanthan were compared with a modified starch. The particulate xanthan products mixed rapidly with water in a similar way to ungelatinised starch, whereas conventional molecular xanthan systems mixed poorly. Using an experienced sensory panel, model tomato products thickened with the three systems were compared at equal shear viscosities. The panel could not discriminate between the tomato flavour of the three products, but found that the xanthan products were perceived as being significantly thicker. These observations were consistent with previous work. Salt perception for both xanthan products was poorer than for the starch thickened systems. A hypothesis to explain why xanthan does not fit into the previously postulated link between mixing and perception is presented. PMID:24591753

  19. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of xanthan gum facilitated superabsorbent polymeric microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mazahir, Farhan; Banerjee, Subham; Verma, Anurag; Ghosh, Amitava

    2013-10-15

    Interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydrogel microspheres of xanthan gum (XG) based superabsorbent polymer (SAP) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were prepared by water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion crosslinking method for sustained release of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CIPRO). The microspheres were prepared with various ratios of hydrolyzed SAP to PVA and extent of crosslinking density. The prepared microspheres with loose and rigid surfaces were evidenced by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the IPN formation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study was performed to understand the dispersion nature of drug after encapsulation. The in vitro drug release study was extensively evaluated depending on the process variables in both acidic and alkaline media. All the formulations exhibited satisfactory physicochemical and in vitro release characteristics. Release data indicated a non-Fickian trend of drug release from the formulations. Based on the results, this study suggest that CIPRO loaded IPN microspheres were suitable for sustained release application. PMID:23987317

  20. Characterisation of Adaptive Genetic Diversity in Environmentally Contrasted Populations of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. (River Red Gum)

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Shannon; McEvoy, Rachel; Baldwin, Darren S.; Rees, Gavin N.; Parsons, Yvonne; Southerton, Simon

    2014-01-01

    As an increasing number of ecosystems face departures from long standing environmental conditions under climate change, our understanding of the capacity of species to adapt will become important for directing conservation and management of biodiversity. Insights into the potential for genetic adaptation might be gained by assessing genomic signatures of adaptation to historic or prevailing environmental conditions. The river red gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh.) is a widespread Australian eucalypt inhabiting riverine and floodplain habitats which spans strong environmental gradients. We investigated the effects of adaptation to environment on population level genetic diversity of E. camaldulensis, examining SNP variation in candidate gene loci sampled across 20 climatically diverse populations approximating the species natural distribution. Genetic differentiation among populations was high (FST?=?17%), exceeding previous estimates based on neutral markers. Complementary statistical approaches identified 6 SNP loci in four genes (COMT, Dehydrin, ERECTA and PIP2) which, after accounting for demographic effects, exhibited higher than expected levels of genetic differentiation among populations and whose allelic variation was associated with local environment. While this study employs but a small proportion of available diversity in the eucalyptus genome, it draws our attention to the potential for application of wide spread eucalypt species to test adaptive hypotheses. PMID:25093589

  1. Xanthan Gum as an Adjuvant in a Subunit Vaccine Preparation against Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Bacelo, Katia L.; Hartwig, Daiane D.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Schuch, Rodrigo; Moreira, Angelita da S.; Amaral, Marta; Collares, Tiago; Vendrusculo, Claire T.; McBride, Alan J. A.; Dellagostin, Odir A.

    2014-01-01

    Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins are of great interest due to their ability to act as mediators of pathogenesis, serodiagnostic antigens, and immunogens. Purified recombinant LigA protein is the most promising subunit vaccine candidate against leptospirosis reported to date, however, as purified proteins are weak immunogens the use of a potent adjuvant is essential for the success of LigA as a subunit vaccine. In the present study, we compared xanthan pv. pruni (strain 106), aluminium hydroxide (alhydrogel), and CpG ODN as adjuvants in a LigA subunit vaccine preparation. Xanthan gum is a high molecular weight extracellular polysaccharide produced by fermentation of Xanthomonas spp., a plant-pathogenic bacterium genus. Preparations containing xanthan induced a strong antibody response comparable to that observed when alhydrogel was used. Upon challenge with a virulent strain of L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni, significant protection (Fisher test, P < 0.05) was observed in 100%, 100%, and 67% of hamsters immunized with rLigANI-xanthan, LigA-CpG-xanthan, and rLigANI-alhydrogel, respectively. Furthermore, xanthan did not cause cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in vitro. The use of xanthan as an adjuvant is a novel alternative for enhancing the immunogenicity of vaccines against leptospirosis and possibly against other pathogens. PMID:24895594

  2. Electrospinning of PLGA/gum tragacanth nanofibers containing tetracycline hydrochloride for periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar-Mohammadi, Marziyeh; Zamani, M; Prabhakaran, M P; Bahrami, S Hajir; Ramakrishna, S

    2016-01-01

    Controlled drug release is a process in which a predetermined amount of drug is released for longer period of time, ranging from days to months, in a controlled manner. In this study, novel drug delivery devices were fabricated via blend electrospinning and coaxial electrospinning using poly lactic glycolic acid (PLGA), gum tragacanth (GT) and tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) as a hydrophilic model drug in different compositions and their performance as a drug carrier scaffold was evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that fabricated PLGA, blend PLGA/GT and core shell PLGA/GT nanofibers had a smooth and bead-less morphology with the diameter ranging from 180 to 460nm. Drug release studies showed that both the fraction of GT within blend nanofibers and the core-shell structure can effectively control TCH release rate from the nanofibrous membranes. By incorporation of TCH into core-shell nanofibers, drug release was sustained for 75days with only 19% of burst release within the first 2h. The prolonged drug release, together with proven biocompatibility, antibacterial and mechanical properties of drug loaded core shell nanofibers make them a promising candidate to be used as drug delivery system for periodontal diseases. PMID:26478340

  3. Influence of temperature, mono- and divalent cations on dilute solution properties of sage seed gum.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, A R; Razavi, Seyed M A; Khodabakhsh Aghdam, S H

    2014-06-01

    The functional properties of food hydrocolloids are remarkably affected by the quality of solvent/cosolutes and temperature in a food system. In this paper, dilute solution properties of sage seed gum (SSG) as a function of salt type (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2), salt concentration (10, 50, 100 and 200mM) and temperature (25, 45 and 65°C) were investigated. Among various models, Higiro model showed a higher performance to determine intrinsic viscosity of SSG at all temperatures and cosolutes. From 25 to 65°C for every 20°C rise in temperature, intrinsic viscosity decreased about 18.99 and 63.86%, respectively. The divalent cations had more reduction effect on intrinsic viscosity than monovalet cations. More flexibility of SSG in monovalent salts solutions compared with divalent ones was observed. A high value for activation energy (2.53×10(7)J/kgmol) and chain flexibility (3046.45) of SSG was obtained, which was higher than many hydrocolloids. The shape factor of SSG macromolecules at 25-65°C was an oblate or prolate and for all used cosolutes, the shape was roughly found to be ellipsoidal. PMID:24680900

  4. Transcriptome analysis of a subtropical deciduous tree: autumn leaf senescence gene expression profile of formosan gum.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Shih-Shun; Chu, Fang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Autumn leaf senescence is a spectacular natural phenomenon; however, the regulation networks controlling autumnal colors and the leaf senescence program remain largely unelucidated. Whether regulation of leaf senescence is similar in subtropical deciduous plants and temperate deciduous plants is also unknown. In this study, the gene expression of a subtropical deciduous tree, Formosan gum (Liquidambar formosana Hance), was profiled. The transcriptomes of April leaves (green leaves, 'G') and December leaves (red leaves, 'R') were investigated by next-generation gene sequencing. Out of 58,402 de novo assembled contigs, 32,637 were annotated as putative genes. Furthermore, the L. formosana-specific microarray designed based on total contigs was used to extend the observation period throughout the growing seasons of 2011-2013. Network analysis from the gene expression profile focused on the genes up-regulated when autumn leaf senescence occurred. LfWRKY70, LfWRKY75, LfWRKY65, LfNAC1, LfSPL14, LfNAC100 and LfMYB113 were shown to be key regulators of leaf senescnece, and the genes regulated by LfWRKY75, LfNAC1 and LfMYB113 are candidates to link chlorophyll degradation and anthocyanin biosynthesis to senescence. In summary, the gene expression profiles over the entire year of the developing leaf from subtropical deciduous trees were used for in silico analysis and the putative gene regulation in autumn coloration and leaf senescence is discussed in this study. PMID:25392065

  5. The lowering effect of Gum Arabic on hyperlipidemia in Sudanese patients.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Rima E; Gadour, Mohammed O; Adam, Ishag

    2015-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia especially low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for developing ischemic heart disease. Soluble dietary fiber has lipid lowering characteristics. Gum Arabic (GA) is 95% soluble fiber calculated on dry bases. The beneficial effect of GA on lipid profile needs further verification. A case-control study was conducted at Omdurman Hospital, Sudan to assess the effect of G A on serum lipids in patients with hyperlipidemia. Cases received a 20 mg tablet of atorvastatin /day plus 30 mg of GA for 4 weeks while the controls received atorvastatin only. Levels of lipids in serum were assessed according to conventional methods before and 1 month after the trial. There is no significant difference in the basic characteristics between the study and the control groups (55 patients in each arm of the study). While there was no significant difference in the levels of HDL, there was a significant reduction of the total cholesterol (25.9 vs. 7.8%, P < 0.001), triglyceride (38.2 vs. 2.9%, P < 0.001), and LDL (30.8 vs. 8.1%, P < 0.001) before and after the intervention in the study compared to the controls groups. PMID:26042049

  6. Effect of Gum arabic on distribution behavior of nanocellulose fillers in starch film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneshwaran, Nadanathangam; Ammayappan, L.; Huang, Qingrong

    2011-09-01

    Uniform distribution of nanofillers in polymer matrix is posing a major challenge in exploiting the full potential of nanomaterials. Various fillers are being evaluated to improve the performance of biopolymer films like starch. In this work, nanocellulose is used as fillers to increase the performance characteristics of starch film. Due to high surface energy and hydrophilic nature of nanocellulose, they tend to aggregate during the film forming process. To circumvent this problem, Gum arabic (GA) was added to distribute the nanocellulose uniformly. GA helps in reduction of surface energy (as analyzed by contact angle) and thus facilitates the uniform distribution of nanocellulose (as demonstrated through polarized light microscopy). Nanocellulose as filler improved the tensile strength of starch film by 2.5 times while that of uniformly distributed nanocellulose by 3.5 times. Moreover, while nanocellulose as such could reduce the water vapor permeability of starch film by 1.4 times, uniformly distributed nanocellulose reduced it by 2 times proving the importance of GA. Starch film filled with nanocellulose and GA will be a 100% biopolymer-based system having potential demand in eco-friendly applications.

  7. Alginate/gum acacia bipolymeric nanohydrogels--promising carrier for zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Meenu; Bernela, Manju; Kaur, Pawan; Manuja, Anju; Kumar, Balvinder; Thakur, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO nps) are known to be effective against a wide array of microorganisms. At nanoscale, they have higher toxicity and they need to be rendered less toxic and more biocompatible. To achieve this, ZnO nps were incorporated in nanohydrogel particles made out of sodium alginate/gum acacia and cross-linker glutaraldehyde in order to ensure their gradual and sustained release instead of burst release, and hence lowering their toxicity. The particles synthesized were in the nano-range, i.e., 70-100 nm size and their in vitro release studies indicated that release of upto 68% of ZnO nps was prolonged to over 2 weeks following the Higuchi model. Cytotoxicity studies on vero cell line (African green monkey kidney cell line) revealed that toxicity of ZnO nps-loaded nanohydrogels was substantially lower as compared to ZnO nps. At the same time, it demonstrated desired level of antibiotic activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an antibiotic resistant microbial model. In conclusion, this work led to successful preparation of novel formulation of ZnO incorporated in nanohydrogels that are not only safer but also retain adequate antibacterial activity due to their ability for gradual and sustained release of the active constituent. PMID:25304751

  8. Characterization of fish gelatin-gum arabic complex coacervates as influenced by phase separation temperature.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Mohammad; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Yoon, Won-Byong; Chung, Donghwa

    2015-08-01

    The rheological and structural characteristics of fish gelatin (FG)-gum arabic (GA) complex coacervate phase, separated from an aqueous mixture of 1% FG and 1% GA at pH 3.5, were investigated as influenced by phase separation temperature. Decreasing the phase separation temperature from 40 to 10 °C lead to: (1) the formation of a coacervate phase with a larger volume fraction and higher biopolymer concentrations, which is more viscous, more structural resistant at low shear rates, more shear-thinning at high shear rates, and more condensed in microstructure, (2) a solid-like elastic behavior of the phase separated at 10 °C at a high oscillatory frequency, (3) the increase in gelling and melting temperatures of the coacervate phase (3.7-3.9 °C and 6.2-6.9 °C, respectively), (4) the formation of a more rigid and thermo-stable coacervate gel. The coacervate phase is regarded as a homogeneously networked biopolymer matrix dispersed with water vacuoles and its gel as a weak physical gel reinforced by FG-GA attractive electrostatic interactions. PMID:26054661

  9. Acacia gum as modifier of thermal stability, solubility and emulsifying properties of ?-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Fabíola Cristina; Dos Reis Coimbra, Jane Sélia; de Oliveira, Eduardo Basílio; Rodrigues, Marina Quadrio Raposo Branco; Sabioni, Rachel Campos; de Souza, Bartolomeu Warlene Silva; Santos, Igor José Boggione

    2015-03-30

    Protein-polysaccharide conjugates often display improved techno-functional properties when compared to their individual involved biomolecules. ?-Lactalbumin:acacia gum (?-la:AG) conjugates were prepared via Maillard reaction by the dry-heating method. Conjugate formation was confirmed using results of absorbance, o-phthalaldehyde test, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and size exclusion chromatography. Techno-functional properties (emulsifying characteristics, solubility, and thermal stability) were evaluated for ?-la, ?-la/AG mixtures and ?-la:AG conjugates. Conjugate thermal stability was improved compared to pure ?-la treated at the same conditions of conjugate formation. Response surface methodology was used to establish models to predict solubility and emulsifying activity as functions of the salt concentration, pH and reaction time. ?-la:AG conjugate solubility is affected in a complex manner by the three factors analyzed. Emulsifying activity index (EAI) of ?-la is significantly affected by pH, while the ?-la:AG EAI is affected by the three analyzed factors. Both solubility and EAI are maximized with pH 8.0, NaCl concentration of 0.3 mol L(-1) and two days of Maillard reaction. PMID:25563962

  10. Alginate-sterculia gum gel-coated oil-entrapped alginate beads for gastroretentive risperidone delivery.

    PubMed

    Bera, Hriday; Kandukuri, Saisharan Goud; Nayak, Amit Kumar; Boddupalli, Shashank

    2015-04-20

    Novel floating-mucoadhesive oil-entrapped alginate beads coated with crossslinked alginate-sterculia gum gel membrane was developed for gastroretentive risperidone delivery. Oil-entrapped alginate beads containing risperidone as core were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique. Effects of polymer to drug ratio and oil to water ratio on drug entrapment efficiency (%) and cumulative drug release after 8h (%) were studied to optimize the core beads by a 3(2) factorial design. The optimized beads (F-O) demonstrated drug entrapment efficiency of 83.73±0.81% and cumulative drug release of 70.84±0.27% after 8h. The biopolymeric-coated optimized beads exhibited excellent buoyancy, better ex vivo mucoadhesion and slower drug release rate. The drug release profiles of risperidone-loaded uncoated and coated beads were best fitted in Korsmeyer-Peppas model with Fickian diffusion mechanism. The beads were also examined for the drug-excipients compatibility, drug crystallinity and surface morphology by FTIR, P-XRD and SEM analyses, respectively. PMID:25662690

  11. 870 micron continuum observations of the bubble-shaped nebula Gum 31

    E-print Network

    Duronea, N U; Gómez, L; Cappa, C E; Firpo, V; López-Carballo, C H; Rubio, M

    2015-01-01

    We are presenting here a study of the cold dust in the infrared ring nebula Gum 31. We aim at deriving the physical properties of the molecular gas and dust associated with the nebula, and investigating its correlation with the star formation in the region, that was probably triggered by the expansion of the ionization front. We use 870 micron data obtained with LABOCA to map the dust emission. The obtained LABOCA image was compared to archival IR,radio continuum, and optical images. The 870 micron emission follows the 8 micron (Spitzer), 250 micron, and 500 micron (Herschel) emission distributions showing the classical morphology of a spherical shell. We use the 870 micron and 250 micron images to identify 60 dust clumps in the collected layers of molecular gas using the Gaussclumps algorithm. The clumps have effective deconvolved radii between 0.16 pc and 1.35 pc, masses between 70 Mo and 2800 Mo, and volume densities between 1.1x10^3 cm^-3 and 2.04x10^5 cm^-3. The total mass of the clumps is 37600 Mo. The ...

  12. Effective removal of humic acid using xanthan gum incorporated polyethersulfone membranes.

    PubMed

    Sathish Kumar, R; Arthanareeswaran, G; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2015-11-01

    In this study, xanthan gum (XA) was used as a hydrophilic biopolymer additive for the modification of polyethersulfone (PES) membrane to removal of humic acid (HA). The membranes are prepared using phase inversion technique and the concentration of XA was varied from 0.5 to 1.5wt%. The prepared membranes are characterized as a function of hydrophilicity, equilibrium water content (EWC), porosity studies and functional group analysis. Membrane surface and cross-sectional morphology was studied using scanning electron microscope. The lower contact angle value 64.2° was exhibited, when 1.5wt% of XA incorporated in PES membrane and this ensures that increase of hydrophilicity in pristine PES membrane. Further, higher water permeability (PWP) of 68.9(-9)m/skPa was observed for 1.5wt% of XA/PES membrane. The effect of pH on HA removal was studied for neat PES and XA/PES membranes. The rejection performance of XA incorporated in PES membranes were compared with commercial available PES membrane. PMID:25857244

  13. Incorporation of calcium salts into xanthan gum matrices: hydration, erosion and drug release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Groves, Emma; Chaw, Cheng Shu

    2015-01-01

    Xanthan gum (XG), a hydrophilic biopolymer with modified release properties, was used to produce directly compressed matrix tablets containing a model drug, sodium p-aminosalicylate. Three formulations were prepared, each containing a different calcium dihydrate salt: calcium chloride, calcium sulfate or dibasic calcium phosphate. The aim of the investigation was to relate the calcium ion content and solubility of the calcium salt to the in vitro drug release profile of the xanthan matrices. Tablet hydration, erosion and drug release were determined in distilled water using the British Pharmacopoeia (BP) paddle method. The data showed that the overall drug release was the greatest with addition of calcium sulfate, followed by calcium chloride and dibasic calcium phosphate. The chloride salt formulation displayed the greatest percentage erosion due to rapid mass loss during the initial phase, followed by those with sulfate or phosphate salts. As xanthan gel viscosity increased and drug release was also found to be lower, it can be concluded that drug release is influenced by the solubility of the salt present in the formulation, since these parameters determine the viscosity and structure of the gel layer. PMID:25371230

  14. Xanthan gum protects rabbit articular chondrocytes against sodium nitroprusside-induced apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qixin; Mei, Xifan; Han, Guanying; Ling, Peixue; Guo, Bin; Guo, Yuewei; Shao, Huarong; Wang, Guan; Cui, Zan; Bai, Yuxin; Xu, Fang

    2015-10-20

    We have previously reported that intra-articular injection of xanthan gum (XG) could significantly ameliorate the degree of joint cartilage degradation and pain in experimental osteoarthritis (OA) model in vivo. In this present study, we evaluated the protective effect of XG against Sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced rabbit articular chondrocytes apoptosis in vitro. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were incubated with various concentrations of XG for 24h prior to 0.5mmol/L SNP co-treatment for 24h. The proliferation of chondrocytes was analyzed using MTT assay. The chondrocytes early apoptosis rates were evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/PI flow cytometry. The morphology of apoptosis chondrocytes were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The loss/disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential was detected using rhodamin 123 by confocal microscope. The concentration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in cell culture supernatants was evaluated using ELISA assay. The results showed that XG could significantly reverse SNP-reduced cell proliferation and inhibited cell early apoptosis rate in a dose-dependent manner. XG alleviated loss/disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased the PGE2 level of chondrocytes cell culture supernatants in SNP-induced chondrocytes. These results of the present research strongly suggest that XG can protect rabbit articular chondrocytes against SNP-induced apoptosis in vitro. PMID:26256195

  15. Gum Arabic extracts protect against hepatic oxidative stress in alloxan induced diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdelkareem A; Fedail, Jaafar S; Musa, Hassan H; Kamboh, Asghar Ali; Sifaldin, Amal Z; Musa, Taha H

    2015-12-01

    Gum Arabic (GA) from Acacia seyal and Acacia senegal is a branched-chain polysaccharide which has strong antioxidant properties, and has been used to reduce the experimental toxicity. Yet, the effects of GA on oxidative stress in type I diabetic rats have not been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of GA on oxidative stress in Alloxan induced diabetes in rats. The rats were divided into 3 groups (n=20 of each): control group, diabetic group injected with allaoxan, and diabetic group given 15% GA in drinking water for 8 weeks. Oxidative damage to liver tissue was evaluated by measurement of key hepatic enzymes, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes and expression of oxidative stress genes. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were significantly (P<0.05) increased in GA group compared to diabetic and control groups. Treatment of GA decreased liver malondialdehyde (MDA), and increased glutathione (GSH). In addition, GA was significantly (P<0.05) reduced the activities of key liver enzymes, including alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). SOD, GPx and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) mRNA were significantly increased in GA group compared to control and diabetic groups. Liver of all diabetic rats showed marked degeneration whereas slight degeneration was observed in GA treated rats compared to control. The results suggest that GA may protect liver by modulating the expression of oxidative stress genes, and thus can improve antioxidant status. PMID:26321624

  16. Locust bean gum in the development of sustained release mucoadhesive macromolecules of aceclofenac.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Moradiya, Naresh G; Randeria, Narayan P; Maheriya, Pankaj M; Nagar, Bhanu J

    2014-11-26

    The study shows the development and optimization of locust bean gum (LBG)-alginate mucoadhesive macromolecules containing aceclofenac through ionotropic-gelation using 3(2) factorial design. The effect of amount of LBG and sodium alginate on drug entrapment efficiency (%DEE), % mucoadhesion at 8h (M8) and % in vitro drug release at 10h (%Q10h) were optimized. The percentage yield, average size and DEE of macromolecules were found within the range of 93.19 to 96.65%, 1.328 ± 0.11 to 1.428 ± 0.13 ?m, and 56.37 to 68.54%, respectively. The macromolecules were also characterized by SEM, FTIR and DSC. The in vitro drug release from these macromolecules (84.95 ± 2.02 to 95.33 ± 1.56% at 10h) exhibited sustained release (first-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The swelling and mucoadhesivity of these macromolecules were affected by pH of the medium. The design established the role of derived polynomial equations and plots in predicting the values of dependent variables for the preparation and optimization. PMID:25256468

  17. Controlled release of Lactobacillus rhamnosus biofilm probiotics from alginate-locust bean gum microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Kiew, Tie Yi; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2014-03-15

    Chitosan-coated alginate microcapsules containing high-density biofilm Lactobacillus rhamnosus have been previously shown to exhibit higher freeze drying- and thermal-tolerance than their planktonic counterparts. However, their cell release profile remains poor due to the capsules' susceptibility to the gastric environment. Herein the effects of adding locust bean (LB) and xanthan (XT) gums to alginate (AGN) capsules on the stress tolerance and cell release profiles in simulated gastrointestinal fluids are investigated. Compared to the AGN-only capsules, the AGN-LB capsules exhibit improved stress tolerance (i.e. ? 6x for freeze drying, 100x for thermotolerance, 10x for acid), whereas the AGN-XT capsules only improve the acid tolerance. Importantly, the AGN-LB capsules possess the optimal cell release profile with a majority of cells released in the simulated intestinal juice than in the gastric juice. The AGN-LB capsules' superiority is attributed to their stronger interaction with the chitosan coating and high swelling capacity, thus delaying their bulk dissolution. PMID:24528770

  18. Optimization of reaction conditions by RSM and structure characterization of sulfated locust bean gum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Ting; Tian, Jia; Liu, Wenxi; Jing, Fan; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-12-19

    Sulfated derivatives of galactomannan from locust bean gum (LBG) with the degree of substitution (DS) of 0.34-1.07 were synthesized using chlorosulfonic acid/pyridine (CSA/Py) method. Box-Behnken design (BBD) of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the reaction conditions. Results of FT-IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that SO3H groups were widely present in sulfated LBG (SLBG). (13)C NMR result revealed that sulfation had occurred and C-6 substitution was predominant in SLBG. All sulfated samples showed a decrease in Mw and more broad molar mass distribution in size exclusion chromatography combined with laser light scattering (SEC-LLS) analysis. Results of MW - [Formula: see text] showed a decrease in fractal dimension (df) value. Laser light scattering results also showed a conformation transition from a compact chain conformation of branched clusters to a random coil conformation of SLBG. Compared to LBG and SLBG with low DS and molecular weight, SLBG2 exhibited an internal structure of random coil with a DS of 1.07. DS and molecular weight had great influence on its conformation in aqueous solution. Our results confirmed that the degradation of polysaccharide and SO3H groups improved significantly the stiffness of the chains due to the electrostatic effect. PMID:25263904

  19. Elucidation of hydration dynamics of locust bean gum-collagen composites by impedance and thermoporometry.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, Ivy; Fathima, Nishter Nishad; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2014-03-15

    The intricacy of the different parameters involved in the hydration dynamics of collagen influences its performance as biomaterials. This work presents the molecular motions of collagen originating from the solvents and locust bean gum (LBG), which reveal the changes in solvation dynamics of the biopolymers affecting the surface as well as interfacial properties. Water, as a probe liquid bound in collagen has been investigated using a combination of thermoporometry, ATR-FTIR, circular dichroic spectroscopy, dielectric spectroscopy and SEM to explore the influence of LBG on collagen with respect to static and dynamic behaviour. The relaxation process of collagen in the frequency range of 0.01 Hz to 10(5)Hz and thermoporometry results indicate that the interfacial hydration dynamics are dependent on the applied concentration of LBG. This investigation explicitly reflects the rearrangements of the structural water clusters around the charged amino acids of collagen. These results can be employed to redesign the approach towards the development of collagen based biomaterials. PMID:24528727

  20. 870 ?m continuum observations of the bubble-shaped nebula Gum 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duronea, N. U.; Vasquez, J.; Gómez, L.; Cappa, C. E.; Firpo, V.; López-Caraballo, C. H.; Rubio, M.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We present here a study of the cold dust in the close environs of the ring nebula Gum 31. We aim at deriving the physical properties of the molecular gas and dust associated with the nebula, and investigating its correlation with the star formation in the region, which was probably triggered by the expansion of the ionization front against its environment. Methods: We make use of 870 ?m emission data obtained with the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (LABOCA) to map the dust emission. The 870 ?m emission provides an excellent probe of mass and density of dense molecular clouds. The obtained LABOCA image was compared to archival infrared, radio continuum, and optical images. Results: The 870 ?m emission follows the 8 ?m (Spitzer), 250 ?m, and 500 ?m (Herschel) emission distributions showing the classical morphology of a two-dimensional projection of a spherical shell. We use the 870 ?m and 250 ?m images to identify 60 dust clumps in the collected layers of molecular gas using the Gaussclumps algorithm. The clumps have effective deconvolved radii between 0.16 pc and 1.35 pc, masses between 70 M? and 2800 M?, and volume densities between 1.1 × 103 cm-3 and ~2.04 × 105 cm-3. The total mass of the clumps is ~37 600 M?. The dust temperature of the clumps is in the range from 21 K to 32 K, while inside the Hii region it reaches ~40 K. The clump mass distribution for the sample is fitted by a power law dN/dlog (M/M?) ? M- ?, with ? = 0.93 ± 0.28. The slope differs from those obtained for the stellar IMF in the solar neighborhood, suggesting that the clumps are not direct progenitors of single stars/protostars. The mass-radius relationship for the 41 clumps detected in the 870 ?m emission shows that only 37% of them lie in or above the high-mass star formation threshold. Most of this 37% have candidate YSOs projected inside their limits. A comparison of the dynamical age of the Hii region with the fragmentation time, allowed us to conclude that the collect-and-collapse mechanism may be important for the star formation at the edge of Gum 31, although other processes may be acting simultaneously. The position of the identified young stellar objects in the region is also a strong indicator that the collect-and-collapse process is acting. The LABOCA map (data corresponding to Fig. 1; in FITS format) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A2

  1. Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the biocorrosion of copper by Gum Arabic, BCS and Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, J.G.; Geesey, G.G.; Hankins, M.R.; Wright, R.B.; Wichlacz, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thin films (3.4 nm) of copper on germanium substrates were exposed to 10% Gum Arabic aqueous solution, 1% BCS (aqueous and simulated sea water solutions) and 0.5% Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer (aqueous and simulated sea water solutions). Pre- and post-exposure characterization were done by Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ancillary graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the removal process of the copper thin film from the germanium substrate. Results indicate that the copper was oxidized by the Gum Arabic and BCS, and some was removed from the Cu/Ge interface by all three polymers and incorporated into the polymer matrix. Thus biocorrosion of copper was exhibited by the Gum Arabic, BCS and Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Resins and Gums in Historical Iatrosophia Texts from Cyprus – A Botanical and Medico-pharmacological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lardos, Andreas; Prieto-Garcia, José; Heinrich, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This study explores historical iatrosophia texts from Cyprus from a botanical and medico-pharmacological point of view focusing on remedies containing resins and gums. The iatrosophia are a genre of Greek medical literature of Byzantine origin and can be described as medicine handbooks which serve as therapeutic repositories containing recipes or advice. To extract and analyze information on plant usage in such sources – which are largely unedited texts and so far have not been translated – we investigate (i) the relationship of the iatrosophia to Dioscorides’ De Materia Medica as well as historic pharmaceutical books or standard texts on modern phytotherapy and (ii) the validity of the remedies by comparing them to modern scientific data on reported biological activities. In the six texts investigated 27 substances incorporating plant exudates are mentioned. They are obtained from over 43 taxa of higher plants and in particular are used to treat dermatological, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tract conditions. The comparison to historic pharmaceutical books and phytotherapy texts reflects the gradual decline of the use of plant exudates in Western medicine. While remarkable parallels to Dioscorides’ text exist, the non-Dioscoridean influence suggests a complex pattern of knowledge exchange. Overall, this resulted in an integration of knowledge from so far poorly understood sources. The comparison with bioscientific data reveals a fragmentary picture and highlights the potential of these unexplored substances and their uses. Where relevant bioscientific data are available, we generally found a confirmation. This points to a largely rational use of the associated remedies. Taken together, the iatrosophia are a valuable resource for ethnopharmacological and natural product research. Most importantly they contribute to the understanding of the development of herbal medicines in the (Eastern) Mediterranean and Europe. PMID:21772820

  3. Novel etherified locust bean gum-alginate hydrogels for controlled release of glipizide.

    PubMed

    Dey, Paramita; Maiti, Sabyasachi; Sa, Biswanath

    2013-01-01

    On many occasions, homopolysaccharide hydrogel networks alone are not suitable for controlled drug delivery. In this study, interpenetrating networks (IPNs) of sodium alginate (ALG) and etherified locust bean gum (ELBG) were developed through ionotropic gelation with Al(3+) ions, tested for glipizide release, and were compared with homopolymer hydrogel networks. The degree of reticulation in IPNs was explained by the neutralization equivalent, tensile strength measurement, and drying kinetics of drug-free hydrogels. IPNs afforded a maximum of 94.40 ± 0.35% drug entrapment efficiency and exhibited slower drug release profiles up to 8 h. Al(3+)-ALG network almost completed the release of embedded drug in 3.5 h; however, the homopolymer Al(3+)-ELBG network discharged their content at a slow, uniform rate up to 8 h like the IPNs. All the networks appeared spherical under scanning electron microscope. In all cases, a faster drug release rate was assumed in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) than in KCl/HCl buffer (pH 1.2) solution. The pH-responsive swelling of the beads was responsible for the variable drug release rate in different media. NonFickian diffusion mechanism was operative for the transport of drug from the IPNs. Moreover, IPNs gained appreciation for their better mechanical strength (63.79 ± 1.59 MPa) than Al(3+)-ELBG network. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction analyses indicated a compatible environment for drug encapsualtion and release from the IPNs. The drug release curves of Al(3+)-ELBG and IPNs were found similar to a reference product. Hence, Al(3+)-ELBG and IPNs could be useful in controlling diabetes over longer periods. PMID:23565908

  4. Nanostructured SnO2 encapsulated guar-gum hybrid nanocomposites for electrocatalytic determination of hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Malik, Priya; Srivastava, Manish; Verma, Ranjana; Kumar, Manish; Kumar, D; Singh, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with synthesis of sol-gel derived tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles encapsulated in to guar gum (GG) biopolymer as the organic-inorganic hybrid materials for the determination of hydrazine. The organic-inorganic hybrid combines the perfunctory strength offered by the inorganic SnO2 nanoparticles with flexible binding sites provided by the organic biopolymer (GG) solution by the ultrasonication. The phase identification, crystalline size, surface morphology and optical properties of prepared SnO2 and SnO2-GG nanocomposites has been investigated through FT-IR, XRD, SEM, AFM, TEM, UV-Vis, and PL techniques. The colloidal solution of SnO2 and GG is electrophoretically deposited (EPD) onto the indium tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate and studied for the electrooxidation of hydrazine. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the linearity between the current response and the hydrazine concentration has been obtained in the range of 2-22mM, with a low detection limit of 2.76mM and a high sensitivity of 5.72?Acm(-2). Based on the linear increase in amperometric current, a sensitive hydrazine electrochemical sensor is constructed. The proposed SnO2-GG/ITO electrode shows a good response time (35s), reproducibility, and long-term stability. The obtained results suggest that SnO2-GG nanocomposites electrode provides a favorable sensing platform for the electrochemical studies. In addition, the cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies are used to evaluate the kinetic parameters. PMID:26478330

  5. Cyclodextrin complexes of reduced bromonoscapine in guar gum microspheres enhance colonic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Madan, Jitender; Gundala, Sushma R; Baruah, Bharat; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Yates, Clayton; Turner, Timothy; Rangari, Vijay; Hamelberg, Donald; Reid, Michelle D; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-12-01

    Here, we report improved solubility and enhanced colonic delivery of reduced bromonoscapine (Red-Br-Nos), a cyclic ether brominated analogue of noscapine, upon encapsulation of its cyclodextrin (CD) complexes in bioresponsive guar gum microspheres (GGM). Phase-solubility analysis suggested that Red-Br-Nos complexed with ?-CD and methyl-?-CD in a 1:1 stoichiometry, with a stability constant (Kc) of 2.29 × 10(3) M(-1) and 4.27 × 10(3) M(-1). Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy indicated entrance of an O-CH? or OCH?-C?H?-OCH? moiety of Red-Br-Nos in the ?-CD or methyl-?-CD cavity. Furthermore, the cage complex of Red-Br-Nos with ?-CD and methyl-?-CD was validated by several spectral techniques. Rotating frame Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy revealed that the Ha proton of the OCH?-C?H?-OCH? moiety was closer to the H? proton of ?-CD and the H? proton of the methyl-?-CD cavity. The solubility of Red-Br-Nos in phosphate buffer saline (PBS, pH ? 7.4) was improved by ?10.7-fold and ?21.2-fold when mixed with ?-CD and methyl-?-CD, respectively. This increase in solubility led to a favorable decline in the IC?? by ?2-fold and ?3-fold for Red-Br-Nos-?-CD-GGM and Red-Br-Nos-methyl-?-CD-GGM formulations respectively, compared to free Red-Br-Nos-?-CD and Red-Br-Nos-methyl-?-CD in human colon HT-29 cells. GGM-bearing drug complex formulations were found to be highly cytotoxic to the HT-29 cell line and further effective with simultaneous continuous release of Red-Br-Nos from microspheres. This is the first study to showing the preparation of drug-complex loaded GGMS for colon delivery of Red-Br-Nos that warrants preclinical assessment for the effective management of colon cancer. PMID:25350222

  6. Does swimming exercise affect experimental chronic kidney disease in rats treated with gum acacia?

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine-induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  7. Does Swimming Exercise Affect Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats Treated with Gum Acacia?

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A.; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine –induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  8. Effect of deacetylation on the synergistic interaction of acetan with locust bean gum or konjac mannan.

    PubMed

    Ojinnaka, C; Brownsey, G J; Morris, E R; Morris, V J

    1997-12-01

    It has been discovered that deacetylation of the bacterial polysaccharide acetan promotes synergistic interactions with either locust bean gum (LBG) or konjac mannan (KM). Acetan is similar in structure to xanthan, and adopts a similar 5-fold conformation in the solid state. Like xanthan, it shows a thermally reversible order (helix)-disorder (coil) transition in solution. Both polymers have a cellulosic backbone with charged (anionic) sidechains attached at O-3 of alternate glucosyl residues, but the sidechains in acetan are longer (pentasaccharide rather than trisaccharide) and do not contain pyruvic substituents. Acetan has two sites of acetylation, one at O-6 of the inner mannosyl residue of the carbohydrate sidechains (as in xanthan) and the other on the polymer backbone (believed to be at O-6 of the branched glucosyl residues). Solutions of acetan or deacetylated acetan were equilibrated against 10 mM potassium chloride (to stabilise the ordered conformation) and were mixed (at 25 degrees C) with solutions of LBG or KM, also equilibrated against 10 mM potassium chloride. Unlike xanthan, native acetan showed no evidence of synergistic interaction with either LBG or KM. After deacetylation, however, large enhancements were observed in dilute-solution viscosity, and thermoreversible gels were formed at higher concentrations. With KM as co-synergist, gel melting was accompanied by an intense endotherm in differential scanning calorimetry. The magnitude of this endotherm increased with storage time at 25 degrees C, reaching a final value of delta H approximately 15.9 J/g (in comparison with delta H approximately 5.0 J/g for the order-disorder transition of deacetylated acetan alone). It is suggested that interaction occurs by formation of heterotypic junctions between the acetan backbone and unsubstituted regions of the plant polysaccharide, and that the acetate groups on native acetan promote solubility and hence inhibit association. PMID:9534230

  9. Post-meal perceivable satiety and subsequent energy intake with intake of partially hydrolysed guar gum.

    PubMed

    Rao, Theertham Pradyumna; Hayakawa, Mariko; Minami, Tadayasu; Ishihara, Noriyuki; Kapoor, Mahendra Parkash; Ohkubo, Tsutomu; Juneja, Lekh Raj; Wakabayashi, Kazuo

    2015-05-14

    Partially hydrolysed guar gum (PHGG), a soluble dietary fibre, has been shown to provide many health benefits. Previous studies had suggested that the combination of PHGG with protein provided a significant satiation effect on visual analogue scales (VAS). What was lacking was only the effect of administration of small doses of PHGG on post-meal satiation and subsequent energy intake. The objectives of the present investigations were to find the subjective perception of post-meal satiety with acute and long term administration of small amounts of PHGG alone with food, its effects on subsequent energy intake and the comparative effects among different types of soluble fibres. The following three separate studies were conducted: in study 1, healthy subjects (n 12) consumed PHGG along with breakfast, lunch and an evening snack; in study 2, healthy subjects (n 24) consumed 2 g of PHGG or dextrin along with yogurt as breakfast for 2 weeks; in study 3, healthy subjects (n 6) took 6 g each of either PHGG or indigestible dextrin or inulin along with lunch. In all the studies, various satiety parameters were measured on VAS before and after consumption of PHGG. The addition of PHGG showed significant (P < 0.05) acute (studies 1 and 3) and long-term (studies 1 and 2) satiety effects compared to the control and/or an equal amount of carbohydrate or other types of soluble fibre. Study 2 also indicated that the prolonged consumption of PHGG may significantly (P < 0.05) reduce energy intake from whole-day snacking. PHGG could be an ideal natural soluble fibre for delivering acute and long term satiety effects for comfortable appetite control. PMID:25851425

  10. Combined eye gel containing sodium hyaluronate and xanthan gum for the treatment of the corneal epithelial defect after pterygium surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kocatürk, Tolga; Gençgönül, Ataman; Balica, Faruk; Özba?civan, Mehmet; Çakmak, Harun

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of the ophthalmic gels containing hyaluronate, xanthan gum, and netilmycine with fusidic acid in terms of recovery periods of corneal epithelium in the patients who underwent pterygium surgery. Methods Patients who underwent pterygium surgery were separated into two groups. Forty patients in group 1 were given eye gel containing sodium hyaluronate, xanthan gum, and netilmycine, and 40 patients in group 2 were given one drop of eye gel containing fusidic acid. The patients in both groups were examined at the 12th, 24th, and 48th hours in the postoperative period by using slit-lamp technique. The subjective complaints of the patients such as pain and stinging, and the recovery periods of the corneal epithelial defect were evaluated comparatively by fluorescein staining. Results The mean ages were 26±8 years (range: 18–35) and 24±6 years (range: 18–33) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The closure period of the corneal epithelial defect was observed as 24±8 hours (range: 16–42) and 36±12 hours (range: 18–48) in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The number of the patients suffering from subjective complaints such as pain and stinging in the first 12 hours was six and 29 in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The difference was significant both clinically and statistically (P=0.001). Conclusion Combined eye gel containing hyaluronate, xanthan gum, and netilmycine accelerates the recovery of corneal epithelial defect and reduces the complaints of the patients, when compared to the fusidic acid gel. Combined eye gel should be considered as an option for the treatment of the corneal epithelial defect related with pterygium surgery. PMID:26316686

  11. Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Efficacy of Simo Decoction and Acupuncture or Chewing Gum Alone on Postoperative Ileus in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    You, Xue-Mei; Mo, Xin-Shao; Ma, Liang; Zhong, Jian-Hong; Qin, Hong-Gui; Lu, Zhan; Xiang, Bang-De; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Zhao, Xin-Hua; Tang, Juan; Pang, Yong-Hui; Chen, Jie; Li, Le-Qun

    2015-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of simo decoction (SMD) combined with acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint or chewing gum alone for treating postoperative ileus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after hepatectomy.In postoperative ileus, a frequent complication following hepatectomy, bowel function recovery is delayed, which increases length of hospital stay. Studies suggest that chewing gum may reduce postoperative ileus; SMD and acupuncture at the tsusanli acupoint have long been used in China to promote bowel movement.Patients with primary HCC undergoing hepatectomy between January 2015 and August 2015 were randomized to receive SMD and acupuncture (n?=?55) or chewing gum (n?=?53) or no intervention (n?=?54) starting on postoperative day 1 and continuing for 6 consecutive days or until flatus. Primary endpoints were occurrence of postoperative ileus and length of hospital stay; secondary endpoints were surgical complications.Groups treated with SMD and acupuncture or with chewing gum experienced significantly shorter time to first peristalsis, flatus, and defecation than the no-intervention group (all P?gum group (mean 14.7, SD 6.2) and the no-intervention group (P?=?0.147). Incidence of grades I and II complications was slightly lower in both intervention groups than in the no-intervention group.The combination of SMD and acupuncture may reduce incidence of postoperative ileus and shorten hospital stay in HCC patients after hepatectomy. Chewing gum may also reduce incidence of ileus but does not appear to affect hospital stay. (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT02438436.). PMID:26559269

  12. A new approach for the synthesis of hyperbranched N-glycan core structures from locust bean gum.

    PubMed

    Ravi Kumar, H V; Naruchi, Kentaro; Miyoshi, Risho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2013-12-20

    A novel protocol for the synthesis of general N-glycan core structures was established by means of Man?(1?4)Man peracetate derived from a naturally abundant locust bean gum as a key starting material. Phenyl (2-O-benzyl-4,6-O-benzylidine-?-D-mannopyranosyl)-(1?4)-3,6-di-O-benzyl-2-azido-2-deoxy-1-thio-?-D-glucopyranoside facilitated the synthesis of key intermediates leading to hyperbranched N-glycan core structures. PMID:24261553

  13. Rheological and kinetic study of the ultrasonic degradation of locust bean gum in aqueous saline and salt-free solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruoshi; Feke, Donald L

    2015-11-01

    The ultrasonic degradation of locust bean gum (LBG) in aqueous solutions has been studied at 25°C for ultrasonication times up to 120 min. Although LBG is not a polyelectrolyte, the degradation extent and kinetics were found to be somewhat sensitive to the ionic conditions in solution, and this is attributed to changes in molecular conformation that can occur in different salt environments. Ultrasonic degradation was tracked by rheological measurements that lead to the determination of intrinsic viscosity for the LBG molecules. A kinetic model was also developed and successfully applied to characterize and predict the degradation results. PMID:26186852

  14. Best evidence topic reports. BET 2: Are patients who have used chewing gum at an increased risk of aspiration during sedation?

    PubMed

    Jaconelli, Tom; Townend, Will

    2014-05-01

    A short-cut review was carried out to establish whether patients who have chewed gum are at increased risk of aspiration during sedation. Twenty-nine papers were found, of which six presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses of these best papers are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that patients who have chewed gum in the past 6?h may theoretically be at increased risk of aspiration. This should be considered when making a balanced decision about the use of procedural sedation. PMID:24846096

  15. Effects of antioxidants on the stability of ?-Carotene in O/W emulsions stabilized by Gum Arabic.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuwei; Hou, Zhanqun; Yang, Jia; Gao, Yanxiang

    2015-06-01

    The potential of oil-in-water emulsions as a ?-carotene delivery system was examined in this study. Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing ?-carotene were formed by gum arabic with ?-tocopherol, tertiary butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) and ascorbyl palmitate, respectively. The influence of antioxidants on the chemical degradation of ?-carotene in gum arabic stabilized emulsions was investigated at 4, 25, 45 and 65 °C in the dark, respectively. An accelerated photo-oxidation test was carried out at 45 °C (450 W/m(2)). Moreover, ?-carotene degradation rate constants (k 1-value), activation energy (E a ) and decimal reduction time (D-value) were estimated to interpret the degradation kinetics. The impact of antioxidants on the thermal stability of ?-carotene in diluted emulsions was generally in the following order: ?-tocopherol?>?TBHQ?>?ascorbyl palmitate. ?-Tocopherol was found to be the most effective to the antioxidation of ?-carotene at the concentration of 0.10 wt% under light exposure. It was concluded that the stability of ?-carotene in oil-in-water emulsions could be improved by the presence of different antioxidants. PMID:26028711

  16. Budesonide-Loaded Guar Gum Microspheres for Colon Delivery: Preparation, Characterization and in Vitro/in Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ye; Zhou, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A novel budesonide (BUD) colon delivery release system was developed by using a natural polysaccharide, guar gum. The rigidity of the microspheres was induced by a chemical cross-linking method utilizing glutaraldehyde as the cross-linker. The mean particle size of the microspheres prepared was found to be 15.21 ± 1.32 µm. The drug loading and entrapment efficiency of the formulation were 17.78% ± 2.31% and 81.6% ± 5.42%, respectively. The microspheres were spherical in shape with a smooth surface, and the size was uniform. The in vitro release profiles indicated that the release of BUD from the microspheres exhibited a sustained release behavior. The model that fitted best for BUD released from the microspheres was the Higuchi kinetic model with a correlation coefficient r = 0.9993. A similar phenomenon was also observed in a pharmacokinetic study. The prolongation of the half-life (t1/2), enhanced residence time (mean residence time, MRT) and decreased total clearance (CL) indicated that BUD microspheres could prolong the acting time of BUD in vivo. In addition, BUD guar gum microspheres are thought to have the potential to maintain BUD concentration within target ranges for a long time, decreasing the side effects caused by concentration fluctuation, ensuring the efficiency of treatment and improving patient compliance by reducing dosing frequency. None of the severe signs, like the appearance of epithelial necrosis and the sloughing of epithelial cells, were detected. PMID:25629228

  17. Improving the physical and moisture barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum biodegradable film with stearic and palmitic acids.

    PubMed

    Seyedi, Samira; Koocheki, Arash; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Zahedi, Younes

    2015-06-01

    Stearic and palmitic fatty acids (10%, 20% and 30%, W/W gum) were used to improve the barrier properties of Lepidium perfoliatum seed gum (LPSG) film. The impact of the incorporation of fatty acids into the film matrix was studied by investigating the physical, mechanical, and barrier properties of the films. Addition of stearic and palmitic fatty acids to LPSG films reduced their water vapor permeability (WVP), moisture content, water solubility and water adsorption. Increasing fatty acid concentration from 10% to 30%, reduced the elongation at break (EB). Lower values of tensile strength (TS) and elastic modulus (EM) were obtained in the presence of higher fatty acids concentrations. Incorporation of fatty acids led to production of opaque films and the opacity increased as function of fatty acids concentration. Results showed that moisture content, water solubility and WVP decreased as the chain length of fatty acid increased. Therefore, LPSG-fatty acids composite film could be used for packaging in which a low affinity toward water is needed. PMID:25795389

  18. Release kinetics of actives from chewing gums into saliva monitored by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Haefliger, Olivier P

    2010-04-30

    Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) was used to monitor the release kinetics of a taste-refreshing compound from chewing gums into the saliva of subjects. A new DART-MS sample probe was designed which was about four times more sensitive than the current benchmark probe. This decreased the impact of the dilution of the saliva samples that was required to minimize ion suppression effects and make quantitative analyses without an internal standard possible. The new probe was also about three times more reproducible, which allowed quantitative measurements to be conducted manually without requiring the enhanced precision provided by an automatic sample positioner. The accuracy of analyses performed by DART-MS was verified by comparing the results obtained from saliva samples analyzed both by DART-MS and by a more classical liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) method. This investigation showed good agreement between the two techniques. DART-MS could then be used to objectively demonstrate the efficiency of a granular carbohydrate-based delivery system to boost for a few minutes the release of a lipophilic flavor raw material with a high octanol/water partition coefficient, cyclohexanecarboxamide, N-ethyl-5-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl) (WS-3), from chewing gum into saliva. PMID:20301100

  19. Budesonide-loaded guar gum microspheres for colon delivery: preparation, characterization and in vitro/in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhou, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A novel budesonide (BUD) colon delivery release system was developed by using a natural polysaccharide, guar gum. The rigidity of the microspheres was induced by a chemical cross-linking method utilizing glutaraldehyde as the cross-linker. The mean particle size of the microspheres prepared was found to be 15.21 ± 1.32 µm. The drug loading and entrapment efficiency of the formulation were 17.78% ± 2.31% and 81.6% ± 5.42%, respectively. The microspheres were spherical in shape with a smooth surface, and the size was uniform. The in vitro release profiles indicated that the release of BUD from the microspheres exhibited a sustained release behavior. The model that fitted best for BUD released from the microspheres was the Higuchi kinetic model with a correlation coefficient r = 0.9993. A similar phenomenon was also observed in a pharmacokinetic study. The prolongation of the half-life (t1/2), enhanced residence time (mean residence time, MRT) and decreased total clearance (CL) indicated that BUD microspheres could prolong the acting time of BUD in vivo. In addition, BUD guar gum microspheres are thought to have the potential to maintain BUD concentration within target ranges for a long time, decreasing the side effects caused by concentration fluctuation, ensuring the efficiency of treatment and improving patient compliance by reducing dosing frequency. None of the severe signs, like the appearance of epithelial necrosis and the sloughing of epithelial cells, were detected. PMID:25629228

  20. Fighting Against Disuse of the Masticatory System in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Pilot Study Using Chewing Gum.

    PubMed

    van Bruggen, H Willemijn; van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Steenks, Michel H; van der Bilt, Andries; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Creugers, Nico H J; de Groot, Imelda J M; Kalaykova, Stanimira I

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients report masticatory problems. The aim was to determine the efficacy of mastication training in Duchenne muscular dystrophy using chewing gum for 4 weeks. In all, 17 patients and 17 healthy age-matched males participated. The masticatory performance was assessed using a mixing ability test and measuring anterior bite force before, shortly after and 1 month after the training. In the patient group the masticatory performance improved and remained after 1-month follow-up, no significant changes in anterior maximum bite force was observed after mastication training. In the healthy subject the bite force increased and remained at the 1-month follow-up; no significant differences in masticatory performance were observed. Mastication training by using sugar-free chewing gum in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients improved their masticatory performance. Since bite force did not improve, the working mechanism of the improvement in chewing may relate to changes of the neuromuscular function and coordination, resulting in improvement of skills in performing mastication. PMID:25792431

  1. Development of novel hydrogels by modification of sterculia gum through radiation cross-linking polymerization for use in drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Baljit; Vashishtha, Manu

    2008-05-01

    In order to modify the sterculia gum polysaccharide, to develop the hydrogels meant for the drug delivery, we have prepared sterculia gum, 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and acrylic acid (AAc) based hydrogels by radiation-induced crosslinking polymerization. Polymeric networks (hydrogels) thus formed were characterized with SEMs, FTIR,TGA and swelling studies which were carried out as a function monomers concentration, radiation dose, amount of sterculia contents in the polymer matrix and nature of the swelling medium. This paper discusses the swelling kinetics of the hydrogels and release dynamics of anti-diarrhea model drug ornidazole from the hydrogels to evaluation of swelling and drug release mechanism. Diffusion exponent 'n' have 0.73, 0.56 and 0.61 values and gel characteristic constant 'k' have 1.28 × 10-2, 2.95 × 10-2 and 2.14 × 10-2 values in distilled water, pH 2.2 buffer and pH 7.4 buffer. The release of drug from the polymer matrix occurred through non-Fickian diffusion mechanism. The values for the late time diffusion coefficients have been lower than the values of initial and average diffusion coefficients. It reflects that in the initial stages rate of release of drug from polymer matrix was higher as compared to the late stages, it means after certain time the drug release occurred in controlled manner.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and swelling properties of guar gum-g-poly(sodium acrylate-co-styrene)/muscovite superabsorbent composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Kang, Yuru; Wang, Aiqin

    2010-04-01

    A series of novel guar gum-g-poly(sodium acrylate-co-styrene)/muscovite (GG-g-P(NaA-co-St)/MVT) superabsorbent composites were prepared by free-radical grafting copolymerization of natural guar gum (GG), partially neutralized acrylic acid (NaA), styrene (St) and muscovite (MVT) using ammonium persulfate (APS) as the initiator and N,N-methylene-bis-acrylamide (MBA) as the crosslinker. Optical absorption spectra confirmed that NaA and St had been grafted onto the GG main chain and MVT participated in the polymerization reaction. The simultaneous introduction of St and MVT into the GG-g-PNaA matrix could clearly improve the surface morphologies of the composites, and MVT led to better dispersion in the polymeric matrix without agglomeration, as revealed by electron microscopy. The effects of St and MVT on the water absorption and swelling behavior in various saline solutions, aqueous solutions of hydrophilic organic solvents and surfactant solutions were investigated. Results indicated that the swelling rate and capabilities of the composites were markedly enhanced by the incorporation of the hydrophobic monomer St and inorganic MVT clay mineral. The superabsorbent composite showed a clearer deswelling characteristic in solutions of multivalent saline, acetone and ethanol, and cationic surfactant than that in the solutions of multivalent saline, methanol and anionic surfactant.

  3. Effect of NaCl Addition on Rheological Behaviors of Commercial Gum-Based Food Thickener Used for Dysphagia Diets

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Moon; Yoo, Whachun; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2015-01-01

    Rheological properties of thickened fluids used for consumption by people with dysphagia (swallowing difficulty) are very sensitive to several factors, such as thickener type, temperature, pH, sugar, protein, and NaCl. In this study, steady and dynamic rheological properties of thickened water samples mixed with five commercial xanthan gum-based food thickeners (A~E) were studied in the presence of NaCl at different concentrations (0.3%, 0.6%, 0.9%, and 1.2%). The magnitudes of apparent viscosity (?a,50), consistency index (K), yield stress (?oc), and dynamic moduli (G? and G?) showed significant differences in rheological behaviors between thickened samples with various NaCl concentrations. Dynamic moduli values of all thickened samples, except for samples with thickener C, were much higher than those of the control (0% NaCl). All rheological parameter values (K, G?, and G?) in a thickener A were much higher than those in other thickeners. These results suggest that rheological properties of thickened samples containing NaCl are strongly affected by xanthan gum-NaCl interaction and depended on the type of thickener. PMID:26176002

  4. Effect of NaCl Addition on Rheological Behaviors of Commercial Gum-Based Food Thickener Used for Dysphagia Diets.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Moon; Yoo, Whachun; Yoo, Byoungseung

    2015-06-01

    Rheological properties of thickened fluids used for consumption by people with dysphagia (swallowing difficulty) are very sensitive to several factors, such as thickener type, temperature, pH, sugar, protein, and NaCl. In this study, steady and dynamic rheological properties of thickened water samples mixed with five commercial xanthan gum-based food thickeners (A~E) were studied in the presence of NaCl at different concentrations (0.3%, 0.6%, 0.9%, and 1.2%). The magnitudes of apparent viscosity (?a,50), consistency index (K), yield stress (?oc), and dynamic moduli (G' and G?) showed significant differences in rheological behaviors between thickened samples with various NaCl concentrations. Dynamic moduli values of all thickened samples, except for samples with thickener C, were much higher than those of the control (0% NaCl). All rheological parameter values (K, G', and G?) in a thickener A were much higher than those in other thickeners. These results suggest that rheological properties of thickened samples containing NaCl are strongly affected by xanthan gum-NaCl interaction and depended on the type of thickener. PMID:26176002

  5. Chandra X-ray observation of the H ii region Gum 31 in the Carina nebula complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibisch, T.; Mehlhorn, M.; Townsley, L.; Broos, P.; Ratzka, T.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Gum 31 is a prominent, but still rather poorly studied H ii region around the stellar cluster NGC 3324 at the northwestern periphery of the Carina nebula complex. Aims: Our aim was to reveal and characterize the young stellar population in Gum 31. An X-ray survey is the only efficient way to identify young stars in this region with extremely high galactic field-star contamination that can avoid the strong biases of infrared excess selected samples of disk-bearing young stars. Methods: We used the Chandra observatory to perform a deep (70 ks) X-ray observation of the Gum 31 region and detected 679 X-ray point sources. This extends and complements the X-ray survey of the central Carina nebula regions performed in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP). Using deep near-infrared images from our recent VISTA survey of the Carina nebula complex, our comprehensive Spitzer point-source catalog, and optical archive data, we identify counterparts for 75% of these X-ray sources. Results: The spatial distribution of the X-ray selected young stars shows two major concentrations, the central cluster NGC 3324 and a partly embedded cluster in the southern rim of the H ii region. However, these two prominent clusters contain only about 30% of the X-ray selected population, whereas the majority (~70%) of X-ray sources constitute a rather homogeneously distributed population of young stars. Our color-magnitude diagram analysis suggests ages of ~1-2 Myr for the two clusters, whereas the distributed population shows a wider age range up to ~10 Myr. We also identify previously unknown companions to two of the three O-type members of NGC 3324 and detect diffuse X-ray emission in two parts of the region. Conclusions: An extrapolation based on the observed X-ray luminosity function suggests that the observed region contains about 4000 young stars in total (down to 0.1 M?). This shows that the Gum 31 area contains a substantial fraction of the total stellar population in the CNC. The distributed population of young stars in the Gum 31 region is probably a part or extension of the widely distributed population of ~1-10 Myr old stars, that was identified in the CCCP area. This implies that the global stellar configuration of the Carina nebula complex is a very extended stellar association, in which the (optically prominent) clusters contain only a minority of the stellar population. The Chandra data described in this paper have been obtained in the open time project with Sequence Number 200767 and ObsID 13613 (PI: T. Preibisch).Tables 1 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A120

  6. Cyclodextrin Complexes of Reduced Bromonoscapine in Guar Gum Microspheres Enhance Colonic Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report improved solubility and enhanced colonic delivery of reduced bromonoscapine (Red-Br-Nos), a cyclic ether brominated analogue of noscapine, upon encapsulation of its cyclodextrin (CD) complexes in bioresponsive guar gum microspheres (GGM). Phase–solubility analysis suggested that Red-Br-Nos complexed with ?-CD and methyl-?-CD in a 1:1 stoichiometry, with a stability constant (Kc) of 2.29 × 103 M–1 and 4.27 × 103 M–1. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy indicated entrance of an O–CH2 or OCH3–C6H4–OCH3 moiety of Red-Br-Nos in the ?-CD or methyl-?-CD cavity. Furthermore, the cage complex of Red-Br-Nos with ?-CD and methyl-?-CD was validated by several spectral techniques. Rotating frame Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy revealed that the Ha proton of the OCH3–C6H4–OCH3 moiety was closer to the H5 proton of ?-CD and the H3 proton of the methyl-?-CD cavity. The solubility of Red-Br-Nos in phosphate buffer saline (PBS, pH ? 7.4) was improved by ?10.7-fold and ?21.2-fold when mixed with ?-CD and methyl-?-CD, respectively. This increase in solubility led to a favorable decline in the IC50 by ?2-fold and ?3-fold for Red-Br-Nos??-CD-GGM and Red-Br-Nos–methyl-?-CD-GGM formulations respectively, compared to free Red-Br-Nos??-CD and Red-Br-Nos–methyl-?-CD in human colon HT-29 cells. GGM-bearing drug complex formulations were found to be highly cytotoxic to the HT-29 cell line and further effective with simultaneous continuous release of Red-Br-Nos from microspheres. This is the first study to showing the preparation of drug-complex loaded GGMS for colon delivery of Red-Br-Nos that warrants preclinical assessment for the effective management of colon cancer. PMID:25350222

  7. Locust bean gum as an alternative polymeric coating for embryonic stem cell culture.

    PubMed

    Perestrelo, Ana Rubina; Grenha, Ana; Rosa da Costa, Ana M; Belo, José António

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have self-renewal capacity and the potential to differentiate into any cellular type depending on specific cues (pluripotency) and, therefore, have become a vibrant research area in the biomedical field. ESCs are usually cultured in gelatin or on top of a monolayer of feeder cells such as mitotically inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFsi). The latter is the gold standard support to maintain the ESCs in the pluripotent state. Examples of versatile, non-animal derived and inexpensive materials that are able to support pluripotent ESCs are limited. Therefore, our aim was to find a biomaterial able to support ESC growth in a pluripotent state avoiding laborious and time consuming parallel culture of MEFsi and as simple to handle as gelatin. Many of the new biomaterials used to develop stem cell microenvironments are using natural polymers adsorbed or covalently attached to the surface to improve the biocompatibility of synthetic polymers. Locust beam gum (LBG) is a natural, edible polymer, which has a wide range of potential applications in different fields, such as food and pharmaceutical industry, due to its biocompatibility, adhesiveness and thickening properties. The present work brings a natural system based on the use of LBG as a coating for ESC culture. Undifferentiated mouse ESCs were cultured on commercially available LBG to evaluate its potential in maintaining pluripotent ESCs. In terms of morphology, ESC colonies in LBG presented the regular dome shape with bright borders, similar to the colonies obtained in co-cultures with MEFsi and characteristic of pluripotent ESC colonies. In short-term cultures, ESC proliferation in LBG coating was similar to ESC cultured in gelatin and the cells maintained their viability. The activity of alkaline phosphatase and Nanog, Sox2 and Oct4 expression of mouse ESCs cultured in LBG were comparable or in some cases higher than in ESCs cultured in gelatin. An in vitro differentiation assay revealed that mouse ESCs cultured in LBG preserve their tri-lineage differentiation capacity. In conclusion, our data indicate that LBG coating promotes mouse ESC growth in an undifferentiated state demonstrating to be a viable, non-animal derived alternative to gelatin to support pluripotent mouse ESCs in culture. PMID:24857501

  8. Rheology and synergy of ?-carrageenan/locust bean gum/konjac glucomannan gels.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Tom; Wang, Zheng; Achayuthakan, Piyada; Nakajima, Tetsuya; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2013-10-15

    The rheology and melting of mixed polysaccharide gels containing konjac glucomannan (KGM), locust bean gum (LBG) and ?-carrageenan (KC) were studied. Synergy-type peaks in the Young's modulus at optimal mixing ratios were found for both KC/LBG and KC/KGM binary gels at a fixed total polysaccharide content (1:5.5 for LBG:KC and 1:7 for KGM:KC). The Young's modulus peak for KC/KGM was higher than for KC/LBG gels. The same stoichiometric mixing ratios were found when either LBG or KGM was added to KC at a fixed KC concentration, where the Young's modulus increased up to additions at the stoichiometric ratio, but leveled off at higher LBG or KGM additions. Addition of KGM or LBG to the 2-component gels beyond the stoichiometric (optimal) mixing ratio at a fixed total polysaccharide content led to a decrease in the Young's modulus and an increase in the rupture strain and stress in extension, and both trends were stronger for KGM than for LBG. Differential scanning calorimetry of the gels revealed the development of a second melting peak for the KC/KGM gels that increased with KGM addition up to higher KGM contents than the stoichiometric ratio. For the KC/LBG gels, only a slight broadening and shift to a higher temperature were observed. When the three polysaccharides were mixed, the DSC endotherms reflected only the main features of the interaction between KC and KGM, and the same was true for the fracture in extension. The different trends led to higher Young's moduli at intermediate KC concentrations when a 1:1 addition of LBG:KGM was used than when either only KGM or LBG was added at a fixed total polysaccharide concentration. This suggests that no special interactions arise when the three polysaccharides are mixed and the binding mechanisms are simply a sum of the bindings observed for KC/KGM and KC/LBG two-component gels. PMID:23987409

  9. Dietary effect of guar gum and its partially hydrolyzed product on the lipid metabolism and immune function of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Tokunaga, Y; Ikeda, A; Ohkura, K; Mamiya, S; Kaku, S; Sugano, M; Tachibana, H

    1999-12-01

    The dietary effect of the water-soluble dietary fibers (WSDF), guar gum, partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG), glucomannan, highly methoxylated (HM) pectin, on the serum lipid level and immunoglobulin (Ig) production of Sprague-Dawley rats was compared with that of water-insoluble cellulose. Although serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly lower in the rats fed with WSDF than in those fed with cellulose, a decrease in the level of phospholipids was only observed in the rats that had been fed on guar gum or glucomannan. In addition, all WSDF feeding enhanced IgA productivity in the spleen and mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes, although the increase in serum IgA level was only observed in the rats fed on WSDF, and not on PHGG. When mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes were cultured in the presence of various concentrations of guar gum or glucomannan, no significant increase in Ig production was apparent. These data suggest that WSDF indirectly enhanced the Ig production of lymphocytes, and that serum lipid reduction and IgA production-enhancing activities of WSDF were dependent on their molecular sizes. PMID:10664849

  10. Gum arabic glycoprotein is a twisted hairy rope. A new model based on O-galactosylhydroxyproline as the polysaccharide attachment site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qi ); Fong, C. ); Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Separation of the wound exudate from Acacia senegal (L.) Willd., gum arabic, on a preparative Superose-6 column gave two major fractions: a high molecular weight gum arabic glyco-protein (GAGP) containing about 90% carbohydrate and a lower molecular weight heterogeneous gum arabic polysaccharide fraction. Hydrogen fluoride-deglycosylation of GAGP gave a large hydroxyproline-rich polypeptide backbone (dGAGP). Alkaline hydrolysis of GAGP showed that most of the carbohydrate was attached to the polypeptide backbone as small hydroxyproline (Hyp)-polysaccharide substituents. The data imply a rodlike molecule with numerous small polysaccharide substituents (attached to 24% of the Hyp residues), regularly arranged along a highly periodic polypeptide backbone based, hypothetically, on a 10 to 12 residue repetitive peptide motif. Thus, a simple statistical model of the gum arabic glycoprotein predicts a repeating polysaccharide substituents will maximize intramolecular hydrogen bonding if aligned along the long axis of the molecule, forming in effect a twisted hairy rope. Electron micrographs of rotary shadowed GAGP molecules support that prediction and may also explain show such apparently large molecules can exit the cell by endwise reptation through the small pores of the primary cell wall.

  11. Theory of the nonplanar splitting of screw dislocations in Gum Metal S. V. Bobylev,1 T. Ishizaki,2 S. Kuramoto,2 and I. A. Ovid'ko1

    E-print Network

    Ovid'ko Ilya A.

    Theory of the nonplanar splitting of screw dislocations in Gum Metal S. V. Bobylev,1 T. Ishizaki,2 , excellent cold workability, and low resistance to shear in certain crys- tallographic planes.29­33 Plastic and conducts very large local plastic strain of around thou- sands of percent or more. This special dislocation

  12. Two new species of sympatric Fergusonina flies (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) from bud galls on high elevation snow gums (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng. complex) in the Australian Alps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two species of Fergusonina Malloch fly, F. daviesae Nelson sp.n. and F. taylori Nelson sp.n. (Diptera: Fergusoninidae), are described from terminal leaf bud galls on high elevation snow gums (Eucalyptus pauciflora complex) in the Australian Alps. These species occur in sympatry at the six locations...

  13. Fuzzy Clustering-Based Modeling of Surface Interactions and Emulsions of Selected Whey Protein Concentrate Combined to i-Carrageenan and Gum Arabic Solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gums and proteins are valuable ingredients with a wide spectrum of applications. Surface properties (surface tension, interfacial tension, emulsion activity index “EAI” and emulsion stability index “ESI”) of 4% whey protein concentrate (WPC) in a combination with '- carrageenan (0.05%, 0.1%, and 0.5...

  14. Pathways to Health: A Cluster Randomized Trial of Nicotine Gum and Motivational Interviewing for Smoking Cessation in Low-Income Housing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okuyemi, Kolawole S.; James, Aimee S.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Nollen, Nicole; Catley, Delwyn; Choi, Won S.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2007-01-01

    Despite high smoking rates among those living in poverty, few cessation studies are conducted in these populations. This cluster-randomized trial tested nicotine gum plus motivational interviewing (MI) for smoking cessation in 20 low-income housing developments (HDs). Intervention participants (10 HDs, n = 66) received educational materials, 8…

  15. Mechanical and optical characterization of gelled matrices during storage.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Gabriel; Zaritzky, Noemí; Califano, Alicia

    2015-03-01

    The effect of composition and storage time on the rheological and optical attributes of multi-component gels containing locust bean gum (LBG), low acyl (LAG) and high acyl (HAG) gellan gums, was determined using three-component mixture design. The generalized Maxwell model was used to fit experimental rheological data. Mechanical and relaxation spectra of gelled systems were determined by the type of gellan gum used, except LBG alone which behaved as a diluted gum dispersion. Storage time dependence of the gels was analyzed using the rubber elasticity theory and to determine changes in network mesh size the equivalent network approach was applied. Destabilization kinetic was obtained from light scattering results; increasing LAG content improved the long-term stability of the matrices. Almost every formulation exhibited an increment in both moduli during the first 10 days remaining practically constant thereafter or until they broke (binary mixtures with LBG); gels with HAG/LBG mixtures were the least stable. PMID:25498706

  16. The Short-Chain Fatty Acid Uptake Fluxes by Mice on a Guar Gum Supplemented Diet Associate with Amelioration of Major Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    den Besten, Gijs; Havinga, Rick; Bleeker, Aycha; Rao, Shodhan; Gerding, Albert; van Eunen, Karen; Groen, Albert K.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2014-01-01

    Studies with dietary supplementation of various types of fibers have shown beneficial effects on symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), the main products of intestinal bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber, have been suggested to play a key role. Whether the concentration of SCFAs or their metabolism drives these beneficial effects is not yet clear. In this study we investigated the SCFA concentrations and in vivo host uptake fluxes in the absence or presence of the dietary fiber guar gum. C57Bl/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with 0%, 5%, 7.5% or 10% of the fiber guar gum. To determine the effect on SCFA metabolism, 13C-labeled acetate, propionate or butyrate were infused into the cecum of mice for 6 h and the isotopic enrichment of cecal SCFAs was measured. The in vivo production, uptake and bacterial interconversion of acetate, propionate and butyrate were calculated by combining the data from the three infusion experiments in a single steady-state isotope model. Guar gum treatment decreased markers of the metabolic syndrome (body weight, adipose weight, triglycerides, glucose and insulin levels and HOMA-IR) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, hepatic mRNA expression of genes involved in gluconeogenesis and fatty acid synthesis decreased dose-dependently by guar gum treatment. Cecal SCFA concentrations were increased compared to the control group, but no differences were observed between the different guar gum doses. Thus, no significant correlation was found between cecal SCFA concentrations and metabolic markers. In contrast, in vivo SCFA uptake fluxes by the host correlated linearly with metabolic markers. We argue that in vivo SCFA fluxes, and not concentrations, govern the protection from the metabolic syndrome by dietary fibers. PMID:25203112

  17. Formulation and in-vivo evaluation of L-cysteine chewing gums for binding carcinogenic acetaldehyde in the saliva during smoking.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Alma; Hietala, Jaana; Laakso, Into; Kaihovaara, Pertti; Salaspuro, Ville; Säkkinen, Mia; Salaspuro, Mikko; Marvola, Martti

    2007-10-01

    Cigarette smoke contains toxic amounts of acetaldehyde that dissolves in saliva, posing a significant risk of developing oral, laryngeal and pharyngeal carcinomas. L-cysteine, a non-essential amino acid, can react covalently with carcinogenic acetaldehyde to form a stable, non-toxic 2-methylthiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid. The main aim of this study was to find out whether it is possible to develop a chewing gum formulation that would contain cysteine in amounts sufficient to bind all the acetaldehyde dissolved in saliva during the smoking of one cigarette. The main variables in the development process were: (1) chemical form of cysteine (L-cysteine or L-cysteine hydrochloride), (2) the amount of the active ingredient in a gum and (3) manufacturing procedure (traditional or novel compression method). Saliva samples were taken over 2.5 minutes before smoking and since smoking was started for 2.5 minutes periods for 10 minutes. During a five minutes smoking period with a placebo chewing gum, acetaldehyde levels increased from 0 to 150-185 microM. Once smoking was stopped, the acetaldehyde levels quickly fell to levels clearly below the in-vitro mutagenic level of 50 microM. All chewing gums containing cysteine could bind almost the whole of the acetaldehyde in the saliva during smoking. However, elimination of saliva acetaldehyde during smoking does not make smoking completely harmless. Cysteine as a free base would be somewhat better than cysteine hydrochloride due to its slower dissolution rate. Both traditional and direct compression methods to prepare chewing gums can be utilized and the dose of L-cysteine required is very low (5 mg). PMID:17910809

  18. A Randomized Clinical Trial Study: Anti-Oxidant, Anti-hyperglycemic and Anti-Hyperlipidemic Effects of Olibanum Gum in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Azadmehr, Abbas; Ziaee, Amir; Ghanei, Laleh; Fallah Huseini, Hassan; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Tavakoli-Far, Bahareh; Kordafshari, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disease in the world that has many adverse effects. Olibanum gum resin (from trees of the genus Boswellia) has traditionally been used in the treatment of various diseases such as diabetes. The aim of this study was the comparison of Olibanum gum resin effect with placebo on the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Inclusion criteria was diabetic patients with fasting blood sugar (FBS) =140-200 mg/dL. This study has been designed as double-blined clinical trial on 71 patients with type 2 diabetes and the patients randomly were divided to interventional and placebo groups. The patients on standard anti-diabetic therapy (metformin) treated with Olibanum gum resin (400 mg caps) and placebo tow times per day for 12 weeks, respectively. At the end of the twelfth week, the FBS, HbA1c, Insulin, total Cholesterol (Chol), LDL, Triglyceride (TG), HDL and other parameters were measured. The Olibanum gum resin lowered the FBS, HbA1c, Insulin, Chol, LDL and TG levels significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p <0.001, p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively) without any significant effects on the other blood lipid levels and liver/kidney function tests (p > 0.05) compared with the placebo at the endpoint. Moreover, this plant showed anti-oxidant effect and also no adverse effects were reported. The results suggest that Olibanum gum resin could be used as a safe anti-oxidant, anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic agent for type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:25276202

  19. A Randomized Clinical Trial Study: Anti-Oxidant, Anti-hyperglycemic and Anti-Hyperlipidemic Effects of Olibanum Gum in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azadmehr, Abbas; Ziaee, Amir; Ghanei, Laleh; Fallah Huseini, Hassan; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Tavakoli-far, Bahareh; Kordafshari, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disease in the world that has many adverse effects. Olibanum gum resin (from trees of the genus Boswellia) has traditionally been used in the treatment of various diseases such as diabetes. The aim of this study was the comparison of Olibanum gum resin effect with placebo on the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Inclusion criteria was diabetic patients with fasting blood sugar (FBS) =140-200 mg/dL. This study has been designed as double-blined clinical trial on 71 patients with type 2 diabetes and the patients randomly were divided to interventional and placebo groups. The patients on standard anti-diabetic therapy (metformin) treated with Olibanum gum resin (400 mg caps) and placebo tow times per day for 12 weeks, respectively. At the end of the twelfth week, the FBS, HbA1c, Insulin, total Cholesterol (Chol), LDL, Triglyceride (TG), HDL and other parameters were measured. The Olibanum gum resin lowered the FBS, HbA1c, Insulin, Chol, LDL and TG levels significantly (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p <0.001, p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively) without any significant effects on the other blood lipid levels and liver/kidney function tests (p > 0.05) compared with the placebo at the endpoint. Moreover, this plant showed anti-oxidant effect and also no adverse effects were reported. The results suggest that Olibanum gum resin could be used as a safe anti-oxidant, anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic agent for type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:25276202

  20. Gel-carbon nanotube materials: the relationship between nanotube network connectivity and conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songmee, Naratip; Singjai, Pisith; in Het Panhuis, Marc

    2010-09-01

    The electrical resistance of carbon nanotube networks (NNs) prepared from combinations of gellan gum, xanthan gum, Triton X-100, SWNT and MWNT is reported. It is demonstrated that the NN conductivity can be obtained by analysing the resistance of two overlapping NN as a function of their overlap distance. Unexpectedly, the connectivity between two overlapping NN was found to scale with the electrical conductivity over 4 orders of magnitude. Insights into the dependence of inter-NN contact on applied pressure were obtained.

  1. Asparagus polysaccharide and gum with hepatic artery embolization induces tumor growth and inhibits angiogenesis in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ling-Ling; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Lin, Jin-Bo; Yi, Shang-Hui; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yi-Sheng; Zeng, Hao-Tao; Lin, Sheng-Ming; Xin, Dong-Wei; Zhao, Hai-Liang; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Min-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of leading digestive malignancies with high morbidity and mortality. There is an urgent need for the development of novel therapies for this deadly disease. It has been proven that asparagus polysaccharide, one of the most active derivates from the traditional medicine asparagus, possesses notable antitumor properties. However, little is known about the efficacy of asparagus polysaccharide as an adjuvant for liver cancer chemotherapy. Herein, we reported that asparagus polysaccharide and its embolic agent form, asparagus gum, significantly inhibited liver tumor growth with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) therapy in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor model, while significantly inhibiting angiogenesis and promoting tumor cell apoptosis. Moreover, asparagine gelatinous possessed immunomodulatory functions and showed little toxicity to the host. These results highlight the chemotherapeutic potential of asparagus polysaccharide and warrant a future focus on development as novel chemotherapeutic agent for liver cancer TACE therapy. PMID:25605207

  2. Effects of mesquite gum-candelilla wax based edible coatings on the quality of guava fruit (Psidium guajava L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás, S. A.; Bosquez-Molina, E.; Stolik, S.; Sánchez, F.

    2005-06-01

    The ability of composite edible coatings to preserve the quality of guava fruit (Psidium guajava L.) at 20ºC was studied for a period of 15 days. The edible coatings were formulated with candelilla wax blended with white mineral oil as the lipid phase and mesquite gum as the structural material. The use of edible coatings prolonged the shelf life of treated fruits by retarding ethylene emission and enhancing texture as compared to control samples. At the sixth day, the ethylene produced by the control samples was fivefold higher than the ethylene produced by the coated samples. In addition, the physiological weight loss of coated fruits was nearly 30% lower than the control samples.

  3. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 ?m, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 ?m, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems. PMID:26041190

  4. A non-adhesive hybrid scaffold from gelatin and gum Arabic as packed bed matrix for hepatocyte perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Sidhy Viha, C V; Sajin Raj, R G; Nirmala, Rachel James; Anil Kumar, P R

    2015-01-01

    Development of liver support systems has become one of the most investigated areas for the last 50 years because of the shortage of donor organs for orthotopic liver transplantations. Bioartificial liver (BAL) device is one of the alternatives for liver failure which provides a curing method and support patients to recover from certain liver failure diseases. The biological compartment of BAL is called the bioreactor where functionally active hepatocytes are maintained to support the liver specific functions. We have developed a packed bed bioreactor with a cytocompatible, polysaccharide-protein hybrid scaffold. The scaffold prepared from gelatin and gum Arabic acts as a packed bed matrix for hepatocyte culture. Quantitative evaluation of the hepatocytes cultured using packed bed bioreactor demonstrated that cells maintained liver specific functions like albumin and urea synthesis for seven days. These results indicated that the system can be scaled up to form the biological component of a bioartificial liver. PMID:25491996

  5. Optimization of Microencapsulation of Fish Oil with Gum Arabic/Casein/Beta-Cyclodextrin Mixtures by Spray Drying.

    PubMed

    Li, Junjie; Xiong, Shanbai; Wang, Fang; Regenstein, Joe M; Liu, Ru

    2015-07-01

    Fish oil was encapsulated with gum arabic/casein/beta-cyclodextrin mixtures using spray drying. The processing parameters (solids concentration of the barrier solutions, ratio of oil to barrier materials, emulsifying temperature, and air inlet temperature) were optimized based on emulsion viscosity, emulsion stability, encapsulation efficiency, and yield. A suitable viscosity and high emulsion stability could increase encapsulation efficiency and yield. Encapsulation efficiency and yield were significantly affected by all the 4 parameters. Based on the results of orthogonal experiments, encapsulation efficiency and yield reached a maximum of 79.6% and 55.6%, respectively, at the optimal condition: solids concentration of 35%, ratios of oil to barrier materials of 3:7, emulsifying temperature of 55 °C, and air inlet temperature of 220 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that fish oil microcapsules were nearly spherical with a smooth surface with droplet size ranging from 1 to 10 ?m. PMID:26087831

  6. Understanding the stability of silver nanoparticles bio-fabricated using Acacia arabica (Babool gum) and its hostile effect on microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Mukeshchand; Pandey, Sunil; Mewada, Ashmi; Shah, Ritu; Oza, Goldie; Sharon, Madhuri

    2013-05-01

    We report green synthesis of stable silver nanoparticles (SNPs) from Acacia arabica gum and its anti-bacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. UV-Vis spectral analysis of synthesized SNPs showed maximum peak at 462 nm initially and 435 nm after 24 h. Using Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM), the average size of synthesised SNPs was found to be ˜35 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Selective area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern confirmed the crystalline nature of SNPs. Percentage conversion of Ag+ ions into Ag° was calculated using ICP-AES and was found to be 94%. By calculating flocculation parameter, we could see that these SNPs are extremely stable under the influence of very high NaCl concentration up to 4.16 M. These stable SNPs can be used in various industrial and medical applications.

  7. Impact of purification and fractionation process on the chemical structure and physical properties of locust bean gum.

    PubMed

    Sébastien, Gillet; Christophe, Blecker; Mario, Aguedo; Pascal, Laurent; Michel, Paquot; Aurore, Richel

    2014-08-01

    Crude locust bean gum (CLBG) was purified and fractionated into two parts: the first was obtained by solubilization in water at 25°C (GM25) and the second consisted in a further extraction at 80°C on the residual impoverished fraction (GM80). The complete structural characterization has shown that GM80 possessed relatively longer chain lengths than GM25, a slightly lower degree of galactose substitution and a somewhat sharper galactosyl distribution in substituted and unsubstituted regions. A physical behavior analysis was carried out on solubilization kinetics, viscosity, viscoelasticity and formation of associated gels with xanthan or carrageenan. The average structure of GM80 generated larger intra-chain, inter-chain and inter-molecular interactions, resulting in the appearance of a stronger network. Small structural differences therefore generated very different physical behaviors. This study thus allowed to establish, in a precise and complete manner, fractionation-purification-structure-function relationships of galactomannans extracted from carob. PMID:24751260

  8. Physical, chemical, and histologic changes in dentin caries lesions of primary teeth induced by regular use of polyol chewing gums.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, K K; Chiego, D J; Allen, P; Bennett, C; Isotupa, K P; Tiekso, J; Mäkinen, P L

    1998-06-01

    A previous clinical trial showed that long-term use of saliva-stimulating polyol (xylitol and sorbitol) chewing gums was associated with arrest of dental caries in young subjects. After a 20-22-month intervention (when the subjects were 8 years old), a total of 23 primary teeth with extensive dentin caries lesions whose surface in clinical examination was found to be totally rehardened (remineralized) could be removed because the teeth were near their physiologic exfoliation time. These teeth were subjected to histologic, microhardness, and electron microscopic tests. The majority of the specimens had been remineralized from the surface by a non-cellular-mediated process within the remaining collapsed, organic extracellular matrix associated with the remaining dentinal surface. Many of the underlying dentinal tubules were filled with a matrix that had been subsequently mineralized. Dental microanalyses showed that the topmost (outer) 20-microm-thick rehardened layer of the lesions exhibited the highest Ca:P ratio, which leveled off at a depth of approximately 150 microm. The rehardened surface layer (normally <0.1 mm in thickness) was significantly (P < 0.001) harder than sound dentin and nearly as hard as sound enamel. Although the main source of the mineral present in the rehardened layer was most likely of salivary origin, some extracellular remineralization was probably mediated by odontoblasts. The results complete the dinical diagnoses of the original trial and suggest that regular use of polyol chewing gums may induce changes in dentin caries lesions, which in histologic and physiochemical studies show typical characteristics of rehardening and mineralization. PMID:9688223

  9. Analysis of plant gums and saccharide materials in paint samples: comparison of GC-MS analytical procedures and databases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Saccharide materials have been used for centuries as binding media, to paint, write and illuminate manuscripts and to apply metallic leaf decorations. Although the technical literature often reports on the use of plant gums as binders, actually several other saccharide materials can be encountered in paint samples, not only as major binders, but also as additives. In the literature, there are a variety of analytical procedures that utilize GC-MS to characterize saccharide materials in paint samples, however the chromatographic profiles are often extremely different and it is impossible to compare them and reliably identify the paint binder. Results This paper presents a comparison between two different analytical procedures based on GC-MS for the analysis of saccharide materials in works-of-art. The research presented here evaluates the influence of the analytical procedure used, and how it impacts the sugar profiles obtained from the analysis of paint samples that contain saccharide materials. The procedures have been developed, optimised and systematically used to characterise plant gums at the Getty Conservation Institute in Los Angeles, USA (GCI) and the Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry of the University of Pisa, Italy (DCCI). The main steps of the analytical procedures and their optimisation are discussed. Conclusions The results presented highlight that the two methods give comparable sugar profiles, whether the samples analysed are simple raw materials, pigmented and unpigmented paint replicas, or paint samples collected from hundreds of centuries old polychrome art objects. A common database of sugar profiles of reference materials commonly found in paint samples was thus compiled. The database presents data also from those materials that only contain a minor saccharide fraction. This database highlights how many sources of saccharides can be found in a paint sample, representing an important step forward in the problem of identifying polysaccharide binders in paint samples. PMID:23050842

  10. Enhancement of preneoplastic lesion yield by Chios Mastic Gum in a rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Kenichiro Wei, Min; Kitano, Mitsuaki; Uematsu, Naomi; Inoue, Masayo; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    The mastic (Pistacia lentiscus var. chia) tree is native throughout the Mediterranean region and has long proved a source of food additives and medical treatments. To investigate the modifying effects of Chios Mastic Gum on rat liver carcinogenesis, 6-week-old male F344 rats were subjected to the established rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay (Ito-test). At the commencement, rats (groups 1-4) were intraperitoneally injected with 200 mg/kg body weight of diethylnitrosamine (DEN). After two weeks, mastic was added to CRF (Charles River Formula)-1 powdered basal diet at doses of 0, 0.01, 0.1 and 1% in groups 1-4, respectively. At week 3, all rats were underwent two-thirds partial hepatectomy. The experiment was terminated at week 8. As results show, liver weights were significantly increased in a mastic dose-dependent manner among groups 1-4. The numbers (/cm{sup 2}) and the areas (mm{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}) of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive cell foci ({>=} 0.2 mm in diameter) were significantly increased in the DEN-1% group compared to the DEN-alone group, along with the average areas per foci and larger-sized foci ({>=} 0.4 mm). 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) + GST-P double-immunohistochemistry showed the highest BrdU-labeling indices within GST-P foci in the DEN-1% group. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in liver DNA did not vary, while real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of livers revealed many up- or down-regulated genes in the DEN-1% group. In conclusion, this is the first report to display a promotion potential of Chios Mastic Gum on the formation of preneoplastic lesions in the established rat liver medium-term carcinogenesis bioassay.

  11. In vitro-in vivo evaluation of xanthan gum and eudragit inter polyelectrolyte complex based sustained release tablets

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Tamal Krishna; Ramireddy, B.; Moin, Afrasim; Shivakumar, H.G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) are the association complexes formed between oppositely charged particles (e.g., polymer-polymer, polymer-drug and polymer-drug-polymer). These are formed due to electrostatic interaction between oppositely charged polyions. Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) advocated in use of painful and inflammatory rheumatic and certain non-rheumatic conditions. The drug has a relatively short elimination half-life, which limits the potential for drug accumulation. As an analgesic, it has a fast onset and long duration of action. Aim: invitro-invivo evaluation of Xanthan gum and Eudragit E100 inter polyelectrolyte complex based sustained release tablet. Materials and Method: Xanthan gum and Eudragit E100 were used as PEC and were prepared using different proportions i.e. in 1:1 to 1:6 ratio. The optimum ratio of E100 and XG was 1:6 used to characterize the IPC and the formulation of tablet. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation using PVP K30 as binder. Results and Discussion: FT-IR and DSC studies confirmed the formation of IPC. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies showed highly porous tablet surface. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, weight variation, and drug content, found to be within limits. In vitro and in vivo studies concluded that tablets showed sustained release profile. The short term stability study of the optimized formulation indicated that the formulation was stable. Conclusion: Since the Poly Electrolyte Complex delay the release of the drug, it can be employed in formulating sustained release matrix tablets. PMID:25599035

  12. Effects of pelleting, lactose level, polyethylene glycol 4000, and guar gum compared to pectin on growth performances, energy values, and losses of lactose, lactic acid, and water in chickens.

    PubMed

    Carré, B; Florès, M P; Gomez, J

    1995-11-01

    Five mash and two pelleted diets were tested in broiler chickens (7 to 19 d). Mash diets consisted of a basal fraction diluted with either .5% pectin or .5% guar gum. Mash pectin and guar gum diets contained either 3% lactose (PL3m and GL3m diets, respectively) or 6% lactose (PL6m and GL6m diets, respectively). Compositions of pelleted diets (PL3p and GL3p) were those of PL3m and GL3m diets, respectively. All diets contained .5% polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG) except the PL3m0 diet. The latter diet differed from PL3m diet by the PEG content, only. The real applied viscosities of pectin and guar gum diets were 1.48 and 4.94 mL/g, respectively, No effect of PEG was detected on growth performances, and excreta losses of lactose, lactic acid, and water. No negative effect of guar gum compared to pectin was observed on body weight (19 d), except with pelleted diets (P < .05). Feed:gain ratios for guar gum diets were 7% higher (P < or = .001) that those of pectin diets. The AMEn values of guar gum diets were 4% lower (P < or = .001) than those of pectin diets. For mash diets, lactose digestibilities were lower (P < .05) with guar gum than with pectin. Increasing lactose level from 3 to 6% did not affect (P > .05) AMEn values, feed: gain ratios, and body weights (19 d) but reduced (P > .001) lactose digestibilities from 78 to 64%. The positive effects of pelleting on body weights (19 d) were much less pronounced with guar gum than with pectin (P < .05). The AMEn values of pelleted diets (PL3p) and GL3p) were, on average, 2.5% lower (P = .005) than their mash counterparts (PL3m and GL3m). Water losses related to feed intake were greater with guar gum than with pectin (P < .001) and with 6% lactose than with 3% (P = .001) but were not affected (P > .05) by pelleting. Lactic acid losses related to feed intake were increased by guar gum compared with pectin (P < .001), with more pronounced effects induced by high lactose level (P < .05) and pelleting (P < .05). In many respects, the effects of guar gum seemed similar to those observed in an acid liquid diarrhea. PMID:8614690

  13. Magnetic Levitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hull, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the principles of magnetic levitation presented in the physics classroom and applied to transportation systems. Topics discussed include three classroom demonstrations to illustrate magnetic levitation, the concept of eddy currents, lift and drag forces on a moving magnet, magnetic levitation vehicles, levitation with permanent magnets

  14. Neodymium Magnets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wida, Sam

    1992-01-01

    Uses extremely strong neodymium magnets to demonstrate several principles of physics including electromagnetic induction, Lenz's Law, domain theory, demagnetization, the Curie point, and magnetic flux lines. (MDH)

  15. Physicochemical responses and quality changes of red sea bream (Pagrosomus major) to gum arabic coating enriched with ergothioneine treatment during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Luyun; Wu, Xiaosa; Dong, Zhijian; Li, Xuepeng; Yi, Shumin; Li, Jianrong

    2014-10-01

    The combined effects of gum arabic coating (GA) and ergothioneine (ER) treatment on the sensory and physicochemical characteristics of red sea bream (Pagrosomus major) stored at 4 ± 1 °C for 16 days were investigated. Fish proximate composition, pH value, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid (TBA), K-value, TCA-soluble peptides, colour, texture profile analyses (TPA), microbiological properties and sensory quality were measured. The results indicate that treatment with gum arabic and ergothioneine (GAER) retarded nucleotide breakdown, lipid oxidation, protein degradation, and reduced microbial growth compare with the control. The efficiency was better than that of GA or ER treatment. Sensory evaluation proved the efficacy of GAER coating by maintaining the overall quality of red sea bream during the storage period. Furthermore, GAER maintained better colour and textural characteristics. Our study suggests that GAER treatment has potential to improve the quality of red sea bream and extend its storage life. PMID:24799212

  16. Field assessment of guar gum stabilized microscale zerovalent iron particles for in-situ remediation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Tosco, Tiziana; Uyttebroek, Maarten; Luna, Michela; Gastone, Francesca; De Boer, Cjestmir; Klaas, Norbert; Sapion, Hans; Eisenmann, Heinrich; Larsson, Per-Olof; Braun, Juergen; Sethi, Rajandrea; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-08-01

    A pilot injection test with guar gum stabilized microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles was performed at test site V (Belgium) where different chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) were present as pollutants in the subsurface. One hundred kilograms of 56 ?m-diameter mZVI (~ 70 g L- 1) was suspended in 1.5 m3 of guar gum (~ 7 g L- 1) solution and injected into the test area. In order to deliver the guar gum stabilized mZVI slurry, one direct push bottom-up injection (Geoprobe) was performed with injections at 5 depths between 10.5 and 8.5 m bgs. The direct push technique was preferred above others (e.g. injection at low flow rate via screened wells) because of the limited hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer, and to the large size of the mZVI particles. A final heterogeneous distribution of the mZVI in the porous medium was observed explicable by preferential flow paths created during the high pressure injection. The maximum observed delivery distance was 2.5 m. A significant decrease in 1,1,1-TCA concentrations was observed in close vicinity of spots where the highest concentration of mZVI was observed. Carbon stable isotope analysis (CSIA) yielded information on the success of the abiotic degradation of 1,1,1-TCA and indicated a heterogeneous spatio-temporal pattern of degradation. Finally, the obtained results show that mZVI slurries stabilized by guar gum can be prepared at pilot scale and directly injected into low permeable aquifers, indicating a significant removal of 1,1,1-TCA.

  17. The acacia gum arabinogalactan fraction is a thin oblate ellipsoid: a new model based on small-angle neutron scattering and ab initio calculation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C; Schmitt, C; Kolodziejczyk, E; Lapp, A; Gaillard, C; Renard, D

    2008-01-15

    Acacia gum is a branched complex polysaccharide whose main chain consists of 1,3-linked beta-D-galactopyranosyl units. Acacia gum is defined as a heteropolysaccharide since it contains approximately 2% of a polypeptide. The major molecular fraction (F1) accounting for approximately 88% of the total acacia gum mass is an arabinogalactan peptide with a weight-average molecular weight of 2.86 x 10(5) g/mol. The molecular structure of F1 is actually unknown. From small angle neutron scattering experiments in charge screening conditions, F1 appeared to be a dispersion of two-dimensional structures with a radius of gyration of approximately 6.5 nm and an inner dense branched structure. Inverse Fourier transform of F1 scattering form factor revealed a disk-like morphology with a diameter of approximately 20 nm and a thickness below 2 nm. Ab initio calculations on the pair distance distribution function produced a porous oblate ellipsoid particle with a central intricated "network". Both transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirm the thin disk model and structural dimensions. The model proposed is a breakthrough in the field of arabinogalactan-protein-type macromolecules. In particular, concerning the site of biosynthesis of these macromolecules, the structural dimensions found in this study would be in agreement with a phloem-mediated long-distance transport. In addition, the structure of F1 could also explain the low viscosity of acacia gum solutions, and its ability to self-assemble and to interact with proteins. PMID:17526575

  18. Transient rheological behavior of natural polysaccharide xanthan gum solutions in start-up shear flow fields: An experimental study using a strain-controlled rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Seok; Kim, Yong-Seok; Song, Ki-Won

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally investigate the transient rheological behavior of concentrated xanthan gum solutions in start-up shear flow fields. Using a strain-controlled rheometer, a number of constant shear rates were suddenly imposed to aqueous xanthan gum solutions with different concentrations and the resultant shear stress responses were measured with time. The main findings obtained from this study can be summarized as follows: (1) For all shear rates imposed, however low it may be, the shear stress is rapidly increased with time (stress overshoot) upon inception of steady shear flow before passing through the maximum stress value and then gradually decreased with time (stress decay) until reaching a steady state flow. (2) As the imposed shear rate is increased, a more pronounced stress overshoot takes place and the maximum stress value becomes larger, whereas both times at which the maximum stress is observed and needed to reach a steady state flow are shortened. (3) The maximum shear stress is linearly increased with shear rate in a double logarithmic scale and becomes larger with increasing concentration at equal shear rates. In addition, the time at which the maximum stress occurs exhibits a linear relationship with the inverse of shear rate in a double logarithmic scale for all xanthan gum solutions, regardless of their concentrations. (4) The shear stress is sharply increased with an increase in strain until reaching the maximum stress at small range of deformations. The maximum stress is observed at similar strain values, irrespective of the imposed shear rates lower than 10 1/s. (5) The Bird-Leider model can be successfully used with regard to quantitatively predicting the transient behavior of concentrated xanthan gum solutions. However, this model has a fatal weakness in terms of describing a decrease in shear stress (stress decay).

  19. Effects of xanthan-locust bean gum mixtures on the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of whey protein stabilised oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khouryieh, Hanna; Puli, Goutham; Williams, Kevin; Aramouni, Fadi

    2015-01-15

    The effects of xanthan gum (XG)-locust bean gum (LBG) mixtures (0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5 wt%) on the physicochemical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) stabilised oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing 20% v/v menhaden oil was investigated. At higher concentrations, the apparent viscosity of the emulsions containing XG/LBG mixtures was significantly higher (p<0.05) than the emulsions containing either XG or LBG alone. Locust bean gum showed the greatest phase separation, followed by XG. Microstructure images showed depletion flocculation at lower biopolymer concentrations, and thus led to an increase in creaming instability and apparent viscosity of the emulsions. Addition of 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5 wt% XG/LBG mixtures greatly decreased the creaming of the emulsions. The rate of lipid oxidation for 8-week storage was significantly lower (p<0.05) in emulsions containing XG/LBG mixtures than in emulsions containing either of the biopolymer alone. PMID:25148996

  20. Magnetic Spinner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays…