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Sample records for magnetic gellan gum

  1. Degradation of Carbazole by Microbial Cells Immobilized in Magnetic Gellan Gum Gel Beads?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Gai, Zhonghui; Yu, Bo; Feng, Jinhui; Xu, Changyong; Yuan, Yong; Lin, Zhixin; Xu, Ping

    2007-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic heterocycles, such as carbazole, are environmental contaminants suspected of posing human health risks. In this study, we investigated the degradation of carbazole by immobilized Sphingomonas sp. strain XLDN2-5 cells. Four kinds of polymers were evaluated as immobilization supports for Sphingomonas sp. strain XLDN2-5. After comparison with agar, alginate, and ?-carrageenan, gellan gum was selected as the optimal immobilization support. Furthermore, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared by a coprecipitation method, and the average particle size was about 20 nm with 49.65-electromagnetic-unit (emu) g?1 saturation magnetization. When the mixture of gellan gel and the Fe3O4 nanoparticles served as an immobilization support, the magnetically immobilized cells were prepared by an ionotropic method. The biodegradation experiments were carried out by employing free cells, nonmagnetically immobilized cells, and magnetically immobilized cells in aqueous phase. The results showed that the magnetically immobilized cells presented higher carbazole biodegradation activity than nonmagnetically immobilized cells and free cells. The highest biodegradation activity was obtained when the concentration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was 9 mg ml?1 and the saturation magnetization of magnetically immobilized cells was 11.08 emu g?1. Additionally, the recycling experiments demonstrated that the degradation activity of magnetically immobilized cells increased gradually during the eight recycles. These results support developing efficient biocatalysts using magnetically immobilized cells and provide a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the biodegradation of not only carbazole, but also other hazardous organic compounds. PMID:17827304

  2. Enhanced gelation properties of purified gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Kirchmajer, Damian Martin; Steinhoff, Benedikt; Warren, Holly; Clark, Ross; in het Panhuis, Marc

    2014-03-31

    Gellan gum is a hydrogel-forming polysaccharide when combined with monovalent or divalent cations such as sodium, magnesium, potassium or calcium. Commercially, gellan gums are sold with trace amounts of these cations, which have been proven to affect the gelation and mechanical properties of the resultant hydrogels. A new method based on impedance analysis for determining the gel transition temperature of purified and un-purified gellan gum is presented. The sodium salt form of gellan gum is shown to have lower dissolution and gel transition temperatures. PMID:24637048

  3. Evaluation of carboxymethyl gellan gum as a mucoadhesive polymer.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Munish; Singh, Seema; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-02-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate carboxymethyl gellan gum as bioadhesive polymer for drug delivery applications. Gellan gum was carboxymethylated by reacting it with monochloroacetic acid. Degree of carboxymethyl substitution was found to be 1.18. Further, carboxymethylation of gellan gum was found to increase its degree of crystallinity, surface roughness and diminish the cation-induced gelation. On comparative evaluation carboxymethyl gellan gum showed 2.71-fold higher mucoadhesive strength than gellan gum. Evaluation of ex vivo ocular tolerance using chorioallantoic membrane of hen's egg and cytotoxicity screening on Vero cells using resazurin assay revealed that caroboxymethyl gellan gum is non-irritant and biocompatible. Ionotiropically gelled beads of carboxymethyl gellan gum formulated using metformin as the model drug and calcium chloride as the cross-linking agent showed ex vivo bioadhesion of 100% over 24h. Further, it was observed that carboxymethyl gellan gum beads released metformin at a rate faster than gellan gum. PMID:23178342

  4. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gellan gum. 172.665 Section 172.665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances...

  5. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gellan gum. 172.665 Section 172.665 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Gums, Chewing Gum Bases and Related Substances...

  6. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrating 1 gram of gellan gum in 99 milliliters of distilled water. The mixture is stirred for about 2... tough worm-like gel will form instantly. (ii) To the 1-percent distilled water solution prepared for... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from...

  7. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... hydrating 1 gram of gellan gum in 99 milliliters of distilled water. The mixture is stirred for about 2... tough worm-like gel will form instantly. (ii) To the 1-percent distilled water solution prepared for... incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from...

  8. Effect of environmental factors and carbohydrate on gellan gum production.

    PubMed

    Kanari, Basundhara; Banik, Ratindra Ram; Upadhyay, Siddha Nath

    2002-01-01

    Submerged culture fermentation studies were carried out in batch mode for optimizing the environmental parameters and carbon source requirement by Pseudomonas elodea for the production of gellan gum. The maximum production of gellan gum was obtained with 16-h-old culture and 8% inoculum at 30 degrees C and pH 7.0 after 52 h of incubation (6.0 g/L). Of the various carbon sources tested, 2% sucrose, glucose, and soluble starch yielded considerably high amounts of gellan. Studies on the concentration of various carbohydrates on gellan gum production indicated that the optimum concentration of glucose and starch was 3%, whereas for sucrose it was 4%. The addition of glucose in the medium above 3% had a detrimental effect on gellan yield. The investigation of intermediate two-step addition of glucose under identical conditions of fermentation showed an enhanced production of gellan (8.12 g/L) as compared with the control (6.0 g/L). To optimize the recovery of gellan from fermented broth, different solvents were tested for precipitation of gellan gum. Among the various solvents tested, tetrahydrofuran gave better recovery of gellan (82%) as compared with the conventional solvent isopropanol (49%). PMID:12396117

  9. Formulation of controlled release gellan gum macro beads of amoxicillin.

    PubMed

    Babu, R Jayachandra; Sathigari, Sateesh; Kumar, M Thilek; Pandit, J K

    2010-01-01

    Gellan gum has been reported to have wide pharmaceutical applications such as tablet binder, disintegrant, gelling agent and as a controlled release polymer. Multiparticulate delivery systems spread out more uniformly in the gastrointestinal tract and reduce the local irritation. The purpose of this study is to explore possible applicability of gellan macro beads as an oral controlled release system of a sparingly soluble drug, amoxicillin. Gellan gum beads were prepared by ionotropic gelation with calcium ions. The effect of drug loading, stirring time, polymer concentration, electrolyte (CaCl2) concentration, curing time etc. influencing the preparation of the gellan gum macro beads and the drug release from gellan gum beads were investigated in this study. Optimal preparation conditions allowed very high incorporation efficiency for amoxicillin (91%) The release kinetics of amoxicillin from gellan beads followed the diffusion model for an inert porous matrix in the order: 0.1 N HCl > phosphate buffer > distilled water. Change in curing time did not significantly affect the release rate constant, but drug concentration, polymer concentration and electrolyte concentration significantly affect the release rate of amoxicillin from the beads. The gellan macro beads may be suitable for gastro retentive controlled delivery of amoxicillin. PMID:19863487

  10. Bioremediation of coking wastewater containing carbazole, dibenzofuran and dibenzothiophene by immobilized naphthalene-cultivated Arthrobacter sp. W1 in magnetic gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shengnan; Qu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Fang; Zhou, Jiti

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the cometabolic degradation of carbazole (CA), dibenzofuran (DBF), and dibenzothiophene (DBT) by immobilized Arthrobacter sp. W1 cells pregrown with naphthalene was investigated. Four kinds of polymers were evaluated as immobilization supports for strain W1. After comparison with agar, alginate, and κ-carrageenan, gellan gum was selected as the optimal immobilization support. Furthermore, magnetic Fe₃O₄ nanoparticle was selected as most suitable nanoparticle for immobilization and the optimal concentration was 80 mg/L. The relationship between specific degradation rate and the initial concentration of CA, DBF and DBT was described well by Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The recycling experiments demonstrated that the magnetically immobilized cells coupling with activation zeolite showed highly bioremediation activity on the coking wastewater containing high concentration of phenol, naphthalene, CA, DBF and DBT during seven recycles. Toxicity assessment indicated the treatment of the coking wastewater by magnetically immobilized cells with activation zeolite led to less toxicity than untreated wastewater. PMID:24905045

  11. Modified Gellan Gum hydrogels with tunable physical and mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Daniela F.; Sant, Shilpa; Shin, Hyeongho; Oliveira, João T.; Gomes, Manuela E.; Neves, Nuno M.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Reis, Rui L.

    2010-01-01

    Gellan Gum (GG) has been recently proposed for tissue engineering applications. GG hydrogels are produced by physical crosslinking methods induced by temperature variation or by the presence of divalent cations. However, physical crosslinking methods may yield hydrogels that become weaker in physiological conditions due to the exchange of divalent cations by monovalent ones. Hence, this work presents a new class of GG hydrogels crosslinkable by both physical and chemical mechanisms. Methacrylate groups were incorporated in the GG chain, leading to the production of a methacrylated gellan gum (MeGG) hydrogel with highly tunable physical and mechanical properties. The chemical modification was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The mechanical properties of the developed hydrogel networks, with Young’s modulus values between 0.15 and 148 kPa, showed to be tuned by the different crosslinking mechanisms used. The in vitro swelling kinetics and hydrolytic degradation rate was dependent on the crosslinking mechanisms used to form the hydrogels. Three-dimensional (3D) encapsulation of NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells in MeGG networks demonstrated in vitro biocompatibility confirmed by high cell survival. Given the highly tunable mechanical and degradation properties of MeGG, it may be applicable for a wide range of tissue engineering approaches. PMID:20663552

  12. A Study of Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticle RF Heating in Gellan Gum Polymer Under Various Experimental Conditions for Potential Application in Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Gabriel E.

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have found use in a wide variety of biomedical applications including hyperthermia, imaging and drug delivery. Certain physical properties, such as the ability to generate heat in response to an alternating magnetic field, make these structures ideal for such purposes. This study's objective was to elucidate the mechanisms primarily responsible for RF MNP heating and determine how such processes affect polymer solutions that might be useful in drug delivery. 15-20 nm magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles at 0.2% and 0.5% concentrations were heated with RF fields of different strengths (200 Oe, 400 Oe and 600 Oe) in water and in 0.5% gellan gum solution. Mixing and fan cooling were used in an attempt to improve accuracy of data collection. Specific absorption rate (SAR) values were determined experimentally for each combination of solvent, concentration and field strength. Theoretical calculation of SAR was performed using a model based on linear response theory. Mixing yielded greater precision in experimental determination of SAR while the effects of cooling on this parameter were negligible. Solutions with gellan gum displayed smoother heating over time but no significant changes in SAR values. This was attributed to low polymer concentration and lack of structural phase transition. The LRT model was found to be adequate for calculating SAR at low polymer concentration and was useful in identifying Neel relaxation as the dominant heating process. Heating trials with MNPs in 2% agar confirmed Neel relaxation to be primarily responsible for heat generation in the particles studied.

  13. Biodegradation behavior of gellan gum in simulated colonic media.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brahma N; Trombetta, Louis D; Kim, Kwon H

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this investigation was to test the biodegradability of gellan gum in the presence of galactomannanase in order to explore its suitability for the development of colon-specific controlled delivery systems. Gellan beads containing azathioprine (AZA) were prepared by ionotropic gelation in the presence of Ca2+ ions and were coated with an enteric polymer, Eudragit S-100. The effects of the simulated colonic fluid (SCF, pH 7.4 phosphate buffer) containing 15 mg/mL of galactomannanase on the in vitro release profiles of uncoated and enteric-coated beads were investigated, and the morphological changes in the structure of uncoated beads were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, 1% solution of deacetylated gellan gum was prepared and several aliquots of the resulting solution were evaluated rheologically to determine the concentration- and time-dependent effects of galactomannanase. Based on the percent drug released at 2 h, approximately 10% greater amount of drug was released in the SCF containing galactomannanase when compared with the enzyme-free dissolution medium. Results of rheological studies demonstrated that effects of galactomannanase on the viscosity of gellan gum solution are concentration-dependent rather than time-dependent. A significant decrease in the viscosity was noted in the presence of galactomannanase at a concentration of 15 mg/ mL, indicating that the polysaccharide degraded in an enzymatic reaction. SEM micrographs showed a distinct disruption of the polymeric network in the SCF. Overall, the results suggest that gellan gum undergoes significant degradation in the presence of galactomannanase which in turn facilitates the drug release from beads in the SCF in a controlled manner, thus approving the suitability of gellan gum as a carrier for controlled colonic delivery. PMID:15581076

  14. Gellan gum: a new biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, J T; Martins, L; Picciochi, R; Malafaya, P B; Sousa, R A; Neves, N M; Mano, J F; Reis, R L

    2010-06-01

    Gellan gum is a polysaccharide manufactured by microbial fermentation of the Sphingomonas paucimobilis microorganism, being commonly used in the food and pharmaceutical industry. It can be dissolved in water, and when heated and mixed with mono or divalent cations, forms a gel upon lowering the temperature under mild conditions. In this work, gellan gum hydrogels were analyzed as cells supports in the context of cartilage regeneration. Gellan gum hydrogel discs were characterized in terms of mechanical and structural properties. Transmissionelectron microscopy revealed a quite homogeneous chain arrangement within the hydrogels matrix, and dynamic mechanical analysis allowed to characterize the hydrogels discs viscoelastic properties upon compression solicitation, being the compressive storage and loss modulus of approximately 40 kPa and 3 kPa, respectively, at a frequency of 1 Hz. Rheological measurements determined the sol-gel transition started to occur at approximately 36 degrees C, exhibiting a gelation time of approximately 11 s. Evaluation of the gellan gum hydrogels biological performance was performed using a standard MTS cytotoxicity test, which showed that the leachables released are not deleterious to the cells and hence were noncytotoxic. Gellan gum hydrogels were afterwards used to encapsulate human nasal chondrocytes (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) and culture them for total periods of 2 weeks. Cells viability was confirmed using confocal calcein AM staining. Histological observations revealed normal chondrocytes morphology and the obtained data supports the claim that this new biomaterial has the potential to serve as a cell support in the field of cartilage regeneration. PMID:19658177

  15. On the physicochemical properties of gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Milas, M; Shi, X; Rinaudo, M

    1990-01-01

    This paper concerns the behavior in dilute and demidilute solutions of deacetylated gellan. The conformational transition, controlled by temperature and ionic strength, is investigated. It corresponds to a double-helix single-chain transition. Large ionic selectivity is observed in the helical conformation th at controls the degree of aggregation upon gelation. Potentiometry and conductivity measurements are interpreted in terms of the Manning polyelectrolyte theory in the sol state. PMID:2279074

  16. Activated sludge encapsulation in gellan gum microbeads for gasoline biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Moslemy, Peyman; Guiot, Serge R; Neufeld, Ronald J

    2004-07-01

    A two-phase dispersion technique, termed emulsification-internal gelation, is proposed for encapsulation of activated sludge in gellan gum microbeads. The influence of emulsion parameters on size distribution of microbeads was investigated. Mean diameter of microbeads varied within a range of 34-265 microm as a descending function of emulsion stirring rate (1,000-5,000 rpm), emulsification time (10-40 min), and emulsifier concentration (0-0.1% w/w), and as an ascending function of disperse phase volume fraction (0.08-0.25). Encapsulated sludge expressed a high biodegradation activity compared with non-encapsulated sludge cultures even at 4.4 times lower level of overall biomass loading. Over 90% of gasoline at an initial concentration of 35 and 70 mg l(-1) was removed by both encapsulated and non-encapsulated sludge cultures in sealed serum bottles within 7 days. Encapsulation of activated sludge in gellan gum microbeads enhanced the biological activity of microbial populations in the removal of gasoline hydrocarbons. The results of this study demonstrated the feasibility of the production of size-controlled gellan gum-encapsulated sludge microbeads and their use in the biodegradation of gasoline. PMID:15133730

  17. 21 CFR 172.665 - Gellan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... gum in 99 milliliters of distilled water. The mixture is stirred for about 2 hours, using a motorized... form instantly. (ii) To the 1-percent distilled water solution prepared for identification test (i), 0... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United...

  18. In vitro and in vivo ocular safety and eye surface permanence determination by direct and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of ion-sensitive hydrogels based on gellan gum and kappa-carrageenan.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; González Barcia, Miguel; Gil-Martínez, María; Vieites-Prado, Alba; Lema, Isabel; Argibay, Barbara; Blanco Méndez, José; Lamas, Maria Jesus; Otero-Espinar, Francisco Javier

    2015-08-01

    Gellan gum, kappa-carrageenan and alginates are natural polysaccharides able to interact with different cations that can be used to elaborate ion-activated in situ gelling systems for different uses. The interaction between fluid solutions of these polysaccharides and cations presents into the tear made these biopolymers very interesting to elaborate ophthalmic drug delivery systems. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of mixtures of these polymers to obtain ion-activated ophthalmic in situ gelling systems with optimal properties for ocular use. To achieve this purpose different proportion of the biopolymers were analyzed using a mixture experimental design evaluating their transparency, mechanical properties and bioadhesion in the absence and presence of simulated tear fluid. Tear induces a rapid sol-to-gel phase transition in the mixtures forming a consistent hydrogel. The solution composed by 80% of gellan gum and 20% kappa-carrageenan showed the best mechanical and mucoadhesive properties. This mixture was evaluated for rheological behavior, microstructure, cytotoxicity, acute corneal irritancy, ex-vivo and in vivo ocular toxicity and in vivo corneal contact time using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) techniques. Result indicates that the system is safe at ophthalmic level and produces an extensive ocular permanence higher than 6h. PMID:26079831

  19. Bioremediation of Petrochemical Wastewater Containing BTEX Compounds by a New Immobilized Bacterium Comamonas sp. JB in Magnetic Gellan Gum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bei; Zhou, Zunchun; Dong, Ying; Wang, Bai; Jiang, Jingwei; Guan, Xiaoyan; Gao, Shan; Yang, Aifu; Chen, Zhong; Sun, Hongjuan

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the bioremediation of petrochemical wastewater containing BTEX compounds by immobilized Comamonas sp. JB cells. Three kinds of magnetic nanoparticles were evaluated as immobilization supports for strain JB. After comparison with Fe3O4 and a-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, r-Fe2O3 nanoparticle was selected as the optimal immobilization support. The highest biodegradation activity of r-Fe2O3-magnetically immobilized cells was obtained when the concentration of r-Fe2O3 nanoparticle was 120 mg L(-1). Additionally, the recycling experiments demonstrated that the degradation activity of r-Fe2O3-magnetically immobilized cells was still high and led to less toxicity than untreated wastewater during the eight recycles. qPCR suggested the concentration of strain JB in r-Fe2O3-magnetically immobilized cells was evidently increased after eight cycles of degradation experiments. These results supported developing efficient biocatalysts using r-Fe2O3-magnetically immobilized cells and provided a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the bioremediation of not only petrochemical wastewater but also other hazardous wastewater. PMID:25837023

  20. Optimization of culture medium compositions for gellan gum production by a halobacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Ya-chen; Fan, Lin-lin; Jiao, Zhi-hua; Chen, Qi-he

    2015-01-22

    The effect of culture medium compositions on gellan gum production produced by fermentation with a halobacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis QHZJUJW CGMCC2428 was studied. In this work, a fractional factorial design was applied to investigate the main factors that affected gellan gum production by S. paucimobilis QHZJUJW CGMCC2428. Sucrose was the best carbon source for gellan gum and peptone displayed better inducing effect. Central composite design and response surface methodology were adopted to derive a statistical model for optimizing submerged culture medium composition. These experimental results showed that the optimum culture medium for producing gellan gum was composed of 40.00 (w/v) sucrose, 3.00% peptone (w/v), MgSO4 (w/v), 9.20% KH2PO4 (w/v), 7.50% Na2HPO4 (w/v), 4.30% K2SO4 (w/v), pH 6.8-7.0. The maximal gellan gum was 19.89±0.68 g/L, which was agreed closely with the predicated value (20.12 g/L). After incubated for 72 h under the optimized culture medium in 5-L bioreactor, the gellan gum fermentation reached about 19.90±0.68 g/L, which was higher than that in the initial cultivation medium. PMID:25439950

  1. An initial evaluation of gellan gum as a material for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan M; Shelton, Richard M; Perrie, Yvonne; Harris, Jonathan J

    2007-11-01

    Alpha-modified minimum essential medium (alphaMEM) has been found to cross-link a 1% gellan gum solution, resulting in the formation of a self-supporting hydrogel in 1:1 and 5:1 ratios of polysaccharide: alphaMEM. Rheological data from temperature sweeps confirm that in addition to orders of magnitude differences in G' between 1% gellan and 1% gellan with alphaMEM, there is also a 20 degrees C increase in the temperature at which the onset of gelation takes place when alphaMEM is present. Frequency sweeps confirm the formation of a true gel; mechanical spectra for mixtures of gellan and alphaMEM clearly demonstrate G' to be independent of frequency. It is possible to immobilize cells within a three-dimensional (3D) gellan matrix that remain viable for up to 21 days in culture by adding a suspension of rat bone marrow cells (rBMC) in alphaMEM to 1% gellan solution. This extremely simple approach to cell immobilization within 3D constructs, made possible by the fact that gellan solutions cross-link in the presence of millimolar concentrations of cations, poses a very low risk to a cell population immobilized within a gellan matrix and thus indicates the potential of gellan for use as a tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:17494964

  2. Gellan gum-graft-polyaniline-An electrical conducting biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Karthika, J S; Vishalakshi, B; Naik, Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Grafting of polyaniline (PANI) on to gellan gum (GG) was carried out in the presence of catalytic amount of ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) as oxidant/initiator under mild acidic conditions by microwave irradiation technique. The grafting condition was optimized by varying the microwave power, exposure time and the composition of the reaction mixture. The graft copolymer GG-g-PANI was characterized by FTIR, TGA, UV/vis, (1)H NMR and SEM techniques. The characteristic peaks at 1506, 1462, 1070 and 830cm(-1) in the IR spectrum and signals at 7.3, 7.2, 7.1 and 4.0 δ in the (1)H NMR spectrum confirms the grafting process. The TGA data reveals GG-g-PANI to be thermally less stable than GG. The optimum grafting was observed when the reaction mixture containing 0.066mmol APS, 0.1M aniline, 1M hydrochloric acid and 0.1g/dL GG was exposed to 80W microwave power for 40s. The DC and AC conductivity of the GG-g-PANI were measured using the 'Two-point probe' method based on which the dielectric properties were evaluated. GG-g-PANI exhibited appreciable electrical conductivity, which increased with the extent of grafting. The results indicate threefold increase in DC conductivity of graft copolymer as compared to GG. PMID:26526174

  3. Multi-modality gellan gum-based tissue-mimicking phantom with targeted mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Roland K.; Shih, A. J.

    2013-08-01

    This study develops a new class of gellan gum-based tissue-mimicking phantom material and a model to predict and control the elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity by adjusting the mass fractions of gellan gum, propylene glycol, and sodium chloride, respectively. One of the advantages of gellan gum is its gelling efficiency allowing highly regulable mechanical properties (elastic modulus, toughness, etc). An experiment was performed on 16 gellan gum-based tissue-mimicking phantoms and a regression model was fit to quantitatively predict three material properties (elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity) based on the phantom material's composition. Based on these material properties and the regression model developed, tissue-mimicking phantoms of porcine spinal cord and liver were formulated. These gellan gum tissue-mimicking phantoms have the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties approximately equivalent to those of the spinal cord and the liver.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-acetamidyl gellan gum with potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Novac, O; Lisa, G; Barbu, E; Alhaique, F; Popa, M I

    2013-10-15

    N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-acetamidyl gellan gum (GCM-EDA) was prepared by carboxymethylation (via nucleophilic substitution of primary hydroxyl groups of the β-D-glucose unit of gellan gum, in the presence of alkali and chloroacetic acid) and reaction with tert-butyl N-(2-aminoethyl) carbamate (N-Boc-EDA) using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as an activator, followed by deprotection with trifluoroacetic acid. The structural confirmation and characterization of N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-acetamidyl gellan gum was performed by spectroscopic, rheological and thermogravimetric analysis, and in vitro tests showed a lack of cytotoxicity which is indicative of the potential of this material to be used in biomedical applications. PMID:23987332

  5. Gellan gum capped silver nanoparticle dispersions and hydrogels: cytotoxicity and in vitro diffusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, S.; Murawala, P.; Shiras, A.; Pokharkar, V.; Prasad, B. L. V.

    2012-01-01

    The preparation of highly stable water dispersions of silver nanoparticles using the naturally available gellan gum as a reducing and capping agent is reported. Further, exploiting the gel formation characteristic of gellan gum silver nanoparticle incorporated gels have also been prepared. The optical properties, morphology, zeta potential and long-term stability of the synthesized silver nanoparticles were investigated. The superior stability of the gellan gum-silver nanoparticle dispersions against pH variation and electrolyte addition is revealed. Finally, we studied the cytotoxicity of AgNP dispersions in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (NIH3T3) and also evaluated the in vitro diffusion of AgNP dispersions/gels across rat skin.The preparation of highly stable water dispersions of silver nanoparticles using the naturally available gellan gum as a reducing and capping agent is reported. Further, exploiting the gel formation characteristic of gellan gum silver nanoparticle incorporated gels have also been prepared. The optical properties, morphology, zeta potential and long-term stability of the synthesized silver nanoparticles were investigated. The superior stability of the gellan gum-silver nanoparticle dispersions against pH variation and electrolyte addition is revealed. Finally, we studied the cytotoxicity of AgNP dispersions in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (NIH3T3) and also evaluated the in vitro diffusion of AgNP dispersions/gels across rat skin. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Time dependent UV-Vis spectral studies revealing the stability of AgNP dispersions and agar plate images displaying the antibacterial activity of AgNPs. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10957j

  6. Development of mucoadhesive sprayable gellan gum fluid gels.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Mohammed H; Conway, Barbara R; Smith, Alan M

    2015-07-01

    The nasal mucosa provides a potentially good route for local and systemic drug delivery. However, the protective feature of the nasal cavity make intranasal delivery challenging. The application of mucoadhesive polymers in nasal drug delivery systems enhances the retention of the dosage form in the nasal cavity. Several groups have investigated using low acyl gellan as a drug delivery vehicle but only limited research however, has been performed on high acyl gellan for this purpose, despite its properties being more conducive to mucoadhesion. High acyl gellan produces highly elastic gels below 60°C which make it difficult to spray using a mechanical spray device. Therefore, in this study we have tried to address this problem by making fluid gels by introducing a shear force during gelation of the gellan polymer. These fluid gel systems contain gelled micro-particles suspended in a solution of un-gelled polymer. These systems can therefore behave as pourable viscoelastic fluids. In this study we have investigated the rheological behavior and mucoadhesion of fluid gels of two different types of gellan (high and low acyl) and fluid gels prepared from blends of high and low acyl gellan at a 50:50 ratio. The results demonstrated that by preparing fluid gels of high acyl gellan, the rheological properties were sufficient to spray through a standard nasal spray device. Moreover fluid gels also significantly enhance both high acyl and low acyl gellan mucoadhesion properties. PMID:25863119

  7. Antibacterial quaternized gellan gum based particles for controlled release of ciprofloxacin with potential dermal applications.

    PubMed

    Novac, O; Lisa, G; Profire, L; Tuchilus, C; Popa, M I

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of gellan gum derivatives containing quaternary ammonium groups, with the purpose of obtaining particulate controlled release systems for ciprofloxacin. Quaternized gellan derivatives were synthesized by grafting N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)-trimethyl ammonium chloride onto gellan primary hydroxyl groups by nucleophilic substitution, in the presence of alkali, under specific reaction conditions using various gellan/N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)-trimethyl ammonium chloride molar ratios. Degree of quaternization was determined by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and AgNO3 conductometric titration. Thermal behavior was investigated for all materials by thermogravimetric analysis. A study of the degree of quaternization and effect of the reaction conditions upon activation energy of quaternized gellan derivatives for the main degradation step by applying the Kissinger method at four heating rates is also reported. The novelty that this work brings refers to obtaining quaternized gellan and chitosan based particles with retention of quaternary ammonium moieties' antibacterial activity. In vitro transdermal release tests of ciprofloxacin from loaded particles were carried out on rat skin in isotonic phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.43). Ciprofloxacin was released up to 24 h, confirming quaternized gellan-chitosan particles' potential as controlled release systems for topical dermal applications. PMID:24411380

  8. Effects of divalent cations on drug encapsulation efficiency of deacylated gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brahma N; Kim, Kwon H

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of various divalent cations on the encapsulation efficiency of gellan gum and to probe the underlying mechanisms responsible for drug-loading efficiency. Spherical beads containing azathioprine were prepared from deacetylated gellan gum by ionotropic gelation method. One molar solution of various divalent chlorides (MgCl(2), BaCl(2), CaCl(2), CuCl(2) and ZnCl(2)) and two additional concentrations of CaCl(2) (2.5 M and 5.0 M) were used as ionotropic media. Drug solubility was also determined in these ionotropic media and statistically evaluated using ANOVA. Solubility in various divalent chloride solutions (1.0 M) suggests that azathioprine forms complex with Ca(2+), Zn(2+) and Cu(2+), while there might be a formation of poorly water-soluble chelates with Mg(2+) and Ba(2+) as solubility in these media were less than in deionized water. The encapsulation efficiency of gellan gum was much higher in the presence of transition elements (Cu(2+) and Zn(2+)) when compared to alkaline earth metal ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Ba(2+)). Higher concentrations of Ca(2+) decreased the encapsulation efficiency of gellan gum in a nearly proportional manner. The correlation between encapsulation efficiency and pH of the ionotropic media was negative and significant (r=-0.9574, p<0.05), although the solubility of azathioprine seems to be independent of the pH of the ionotropic medium. Overall, the results suggest that drug encapsulation efficiency of deacetylated gellan gum is largely affected by the concentration and nature of various divalent cations (e.g. atomic number, valency or electro-positivity, co-ordination property, etc.) and pH of the ionotropic medium. PMID:16421086

  9. Formulation, in vitro drug release study and anticancer activity of 5-fluorouracil loaded gellan gum microbeads.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Sahoo, S K; Behera, A; Patil, S V; Panda, S K

    2013-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil loaded calcium-zinc-gellan and calcium-zinc-gellan-ethyl cellulose microbeads were successfully prepared by simple ionotropic gelation and oil in water ionotropic gelation technique, respectively. Prepared microbeads were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and evaluated for particle size, drug content, encapsulation efficiency, drug release and cell cytotoxicity study. Microbeads formed were spherical with rough surface. As concentration of gellan and ethyl cellulose has increased encapsulation efficiency, particle size and sustained drug release effect also increased. The release of 5-fluorouracil from microbeads has followed Hixson Crowell model suggesting the mechanism of drug release as dissolution controlled. Cytotoxicity analysis on HT-29 human colon cancer cell lines indicated that 5-FU loaded gellan gum/gellan in combination with ethyl cellulose microbeads leads to sustained releases of drug and thus delayed apoptosis over a long period of time. The formulation with drug:gellan:ethyl cellulose ratio 2.5:7.5:1 was found to be more effectual in terms of sustained drug release activity in addition to anti-cancer activity. PMID:23610967

  10. Interactions of ordered water and cations in the gel-forming polysaccharide gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, R

    1991-01-01

    Gellan gum, useful to the food industry, is chosen as a model system for the investigation of the structural role of water molecules and cations in its gel-forming properties. X-ray fiber diffraction technique has been used to determine the crystal structure of potassium gellan. This gives the three-dimensional structure of the polysaccharide, the locations of ordered water molecules, and of potassium ions. The precise interactions among the three components at molecular level reveal that the water molecules are essential for the stability of the polysaccharide chains, for the binding of cations with the polymer molecules, and for the aggregation of the polymers, all of which are crucial for the gelation process. Computer modeling shows how the calcium ions can directly crosslink adjacent gellan molecules, but the potassium ions cannot, and this explains the stronger gelation properties of calcium gellan, even at very low ionic concentrations. L-glycerate, but not acetyl, groups interfere with the intermolecular association of native gellan molecules and are thus responsible for its weak and rubbery gels. PMID:1746363

  11. Nanoparticulate bioactive-glass-reinforced gellan-gum hydrogels for bone-tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Gantar, Ana; da Silva, Lucilia P; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Marques, Alexandra P; Correlo, Vitor M; Novak, Saša; Reis, Rui L

    2014-10-01

    This work presents bioactive-glass-reinforced gellan-gum spongy-like hydrogels (GG-BAG) as novel hydrophilic materials for use as the scaffolding in bone-tissue engineering. The reinforcement with bioactive-glass particles resulted in an improvement to the microstructure and to the mechanical properties of the material. These mechanical properties were found to be dependent on the composition and improved with the amount of bioactive glass; however, values necessary to accommodate biomechanical loading were not achieved in this study. Nevertheless, by incorporating the bioactive-glass particles, the composite material acquired the ability to form an apatite layer when soaked in simulated body fluid. Furthermore, human-adipose-derived stem cells were able to adhere and spread within the gellan-gum, spongy-like hydrogels reinforced with the bioactive glass, and remain viable, which is an important result when considering their use in bone-tissue engineering. Thus, hydrogels based on gellan gum and bioactive glass are promising biomaterials for use either alone or with cells, and with the potential for use in osteogenic differentiation. PMID:25175184

  12. Biological performance of cell-encapsulated methacrylated gellan gum-based hydrogels for nucleus pulposus regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tsaryk, Roman; Silva-Correia, Joana; Oliveira, Joaquim Miguel; Unger, Ronald E; Landes, Constantin; Brochhausen, Christoph; Ghanaati, Shahram; Reis, Rui L; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2014-11-01

    Limitations of current treatments for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration have promoted interest in the development of tissue-engineering approaches. Injectable hydrogels loaded with cells can be used as a substitute material for the inner IVD part, the nucleus pulposus (NP), and provide an opportunity for minimally invasive treatment of IVD degeneration. The NP is populated by chondrocyte-like cells; therefore, chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), stimulated to differentiate along the chondrogenic lineage, could be used to promote NP regeneration. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo response of human bone marrow-derived MSCs and nasal chondrocytes (NCs) to modified gellan gum-based hydrogels was investigated. Both ionic- (iGG-MA) and photo-crosslinked (phGG-MA) methacrylated gellan gum hydrogels show no cytotoxicity in extraction assays with MSCs and NCs. Furthermore, the materials do not induce pro-inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. Moreover, MSCs and NCs can be encapsulated into the hydrogels and remain viable for at least 2 weeks, although apoptosis is observed in phGG-MA. Importantly, encapsulated MSCs and NCs show signs of in vivo chondrogenesis in a subcutaneous implantation of iGG-MA. Altogether, the data endorse the potential use of modified gellan gum-based hydrogel as a suitable material in NP tissue engineering. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25370800

  13. Controlling the rheology of gellan gum hydrogels in cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Moxon, Samuel R; Smith, Alan M

    2016-03-01

    Successful culturing of tissues within polysaccharide hydrogels is reliant upon specific mechanical properties. Namely, the stiffness and elasticity of the gel have been shown to have a profound effect on cell behaviour in 3D cell cultures and correctly tuning these mechanical properties is critical to the success of culture. The usual way of tuning mechanical properties of a hydrogel to suit tissue engineering applications is to change the concentration of polymer or its cross-linking agents. In this study sonication applied at various amplitudes was used to control mechanical properties of gellan gum solutions and gels. This method enables the stiffness and elasticity of gellan gum hydrogels cross-linked with DMEM to be controlled without changing either polymer concentration or cross-linker concentration. Controlling the mechanical behaviour of gellan hydrogels impacted upon the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in encapsulated MC3T3 pre-osteoblasts. This shows the potential of applying a simple technique to generate hydrogels where tissue-specific mechanical properties can be produced that subsequently influence cell behaviour. PMID:26683878

  14. Cloning and knockout of phytoene desaturase gene in Sphingomonas elodea ATCC 31461 for economic recovery of gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Wu, Xuechang; Li, Ou; Chen, Yamin; Qian, Chaodong; Teng, Yi; Tao, Xianglin; Gao, Haichun

    2011-09-01

    A gene encoding phytoene desaturase (crtI) in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway of Sphingomonas elodea ATCC 31461, an industrial gellan gum-producing strain, was cloned and identified. This gene is predicted to encode a 492-amino acid protein with significant homology to the phytoene desaturase of other carotenogenic organisms. Knockout of crtI gene blocked yellow carotenoid pigment synthesis and resulted in the accumulation of colorless phytoene, confirming that it encodes phytoene desaturase. Further research indicates that the yield of gellan gum production by crtI gene knockout mutants is almost the same as that by the wild-type strain. In addition, a recovery method based on the colorless fermentation broth of the crtI gene knockout mutant was investigated. Compared to the volume of alcohol for the parent strain, much less alcohol (30%) is required in this recovery process; thus, the costs of downstream purification of gellan gum can be substantially reduced. PMID:21229377

  15. The effect of deacetylated gellan gum on aesculin distribution in the posterior segment of the eye after topical administration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuhong; Zheng, Yu; Li, Ye; Zeng, Ying; Kuang, Jianchao; Hou, Shixiang; Li, Xiaohui

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of deacetylated gellan gum on delivering hydrophilic drug to the posterior segment of the eye. An aesculin-containing in situ gel based on deacetylated gellan gum (AG) was prepared and characterized. In vitro corneal permeation across isolated rabbit cornea of aesculin between AG and aesculin solution (AS) was compared. The results showed that deacetylated gellan gum promotes corneal penetration of aesculin. Pharmacokinetics and ocular tissue distribution of aesculin after topical administration in rabbit eye showed that AG greatly improved aesculin accumulation in posterior segmentsrelative to AS, which was probably attributed to conjunctivital/sclera pathway. The area-under-the-curve (AUC) for AG in aqueous humor, choroid-retina, sclera and iris-ciliary body were significantly larger than those of AS. AG can be used as a potential carrier for broading the application of aesculin. PMID:22643053

  16. Gellan gum injectable hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering applications: in vitro studies and preliminary in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, João T; Santos, Tírcia C; Martins, Luís; Picciochi, Ricardo; Marques, Alexandra P; Castro, António G; Neves, Nuno M; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2010-01-01

    Gellan gum is a polysaccharide that we have previously proposed for applications in the cartilage tissue engineering field. In this work, gellan gum hydrogels were tested for their ability to be used as injectable systems using simple processing methods, able to deliver and maintain chondrocytes by in situ gelation, and support cell viability and production of extracellular matrix (ECM). Rheological measurements determined that the sol-gel transition occurred near the body temperature at 39 degrees C, upon temperature decrease, in approximately 20 s. Gellan gum discs shows a storage compression modulus of around 80 kPa at a frequency of 1 Hz by dynamic mechanical analysis. Human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the gels, cultured in vitro for total periods of 56 days, and analyzed for cell viability and ECM production. Calcein AM staining showed that cell kept viable after 14 days and the histological analysis and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that hyaline-like cartilage ECM was synthesized. Finally, the in vivo performance of the gellan gum hydrogels, in terms of induced inflammatory reaction and integration into the host tissue, was evaluated by subcutaneous implantation in Balb/c mice for 21 days. Histological analysis showed a residual fibrotic capsule at the end of the experiments. Dynamic mechanical analysis revealed that the gels were stable throughout the experiments while evidencing a tendency for decreasing mechanical properties, which was consistent with weight measurements. Altogether, the results demonstrate the adequacy of gellan gum hydrogels processed by simple methods for noninvasive injectable applications toward the formation of a functional cartilage tissue-engineered construct and originally report the preliminary response of a living organism to the subcutaneous implantation of the gellan gum hydrogels. These are the two novel features of this work. PMID:19702512

  17. Simvastatin loaded composite polyspheres of gellan gum and carrageenan: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra V; Nagathan, Vineeta V; Biradar, Prakash R; Naikawadi, Akram A

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the lipid lowering ability of simvastatin loaded gellan gum-carrageenan composite polyspheres, which were prepared by ionotropic gelation/covalent crosslinking method. The surface morphology revealed that the polyspheres have rough and dense surface. The drug entrapment efficiency of the polyspheres prepared by ionic crosslinking was higher than those prepared by dual crosslinking. The in vitro drug release study indicated that the ionically crosslinked polyspheres discharged the drug quickly whereas, dual crosslinked polyspheres extended the drug release for longer period. The hypolipidemic activity performed on Wistar rats indicated that the polyspheres have effectively reduced the elevated total serum cholesterol and triglycerides. PMID:23511060

  18. Optimisation of gellan gum edible coating for ready-to-eat mango (Mangifera indica L.) bars.

    PubMed

    Danalache, Florina; Carvalho, Claudia Y; Alves, Vitor D; Moldão-Martins, Margarida; Mata, Paulina

    2016-03-01

    The optimisation of an edible coating based on low acyl (L)/high acyl (H) gellan gum for ready-to-eat mango bars was performed through a central composite rotatable design (CCRD). The independent variables were the concentration of gellan (L/H90/10) and the concentration of Ca(2+) in the coating solution, as well as the storage time after coating application. The response variables studied were the coating thickness, mango bars firmness, syneresis, and colour alterations. Gellan concentration was the independent variable that most influenced the thickness of the coating. Syneresis was quite low for the conditions tested (<1.64%). Similarly, the colour alterations were low during the entire storage time (ΔE<5). Considering the model predictions, 1.0%wt L/H90/10 with addition of 6mM Ca(2+) could represent the optimal coating formulation for the mango bars. The release of eight volatile compounds from the uncoated and coated mango bars with the selected formulation was analysed by Headspace - Solid Phase Micro Extraction-Gas Chromatography during 9 days of refrigerated storage. This work showed that the coating can improve mango bars sensory characteristics (appearance and firmness) and stability in terms of syneresis, colour and volatiles content during storage increasing the commercial value of the final product. PMID:26657585

  19. Novel stimuli responsive gellan gum-graft-poly(DMAEMA) hydrogel as adsorbent for anionic dye.

    PubMed

    Karthika, J S; Vishalakshi, B

    2015-11-01

    In this study, gellan gum-grafted-poly((2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (GG-g-poly(DMAEMA)) hydrogel was made by free radical polymerization in aqueous media employing microwave irradiation technique. Ammonium persulfate (APS)/N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) were used as initiator-accelerator pair. N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) has been used as crosslinker. The gel was characterized by FTIR, XRD, TGA, DSC and SEM techniques. The characteristic peaks at 1724, 2630, 1147, 1650 and 1535cm(-1) in the IR spectrum confirms grafting and gel formation. The TGA data reveals that synthesized gels were thermally more stable than gellan gum. The XRD studies confirm the crystalline nature of the synthesized material. Swelling behaviour of the hydrogel under different temperatures and pH conditions was investigated. The results indicated drastic changes in swelling around pH 7.0 and 50°C. The gels were evaluated as an adsorbent to remove an anionic dye, methyl orange (MO), from aqueous solution. The pH conditions for maximum adsorption were optimized, the adsorption data is observed to fit best to the Freundlich isotherm model and the maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 25.8mgg(-1). The kinetic analysis revealed a second-order adsorption process. The thermodynamic parameters showed the adsorption to be exothermic and non-spontaneous at high temperatures. PMID:26325677

  20. Gellan gum-g-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone: synthesis, swelling, metal ion uptake and flocculation behavior.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shiv Kumar; Pandey, Vijay Shankar; Behari, Mithilesh Yadav Kunj

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of graft copolymer (gellan gum-g-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) is carried out in nitrogen atmosphere using potassium bromate and silver as redox system. The reaction conditions for maximum grafting have been optimized by varying the reaction variables, including the concentration of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (12.0 × 10(--2) to 28 × 10(--2) mol dm(-3)), potassium bromate (6 × 10(-3) to 22 × 10(-3) mol dm(-3)), silver (2.4 × 10(-3)to 5.6 × 10(-3) mol dm(-3)), sulphuric acid (2.0 × 10(-3) to 10 × 10(-3) mol dm(-3)), gellan gum (0.6-1.4 g dm(-3)) along with time duration (60 to 180 min) and temperature (30-50 °C).Water swelling capacity, metal ion sorption and flocculation studies of synthesized graft copolymer have been performed with respect to the parent polymer. The graft copolymer has been characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. PMID:25450548

  1. Gelation of gellan gum aqueous solutions studied by polarization modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Horinaka, Jun-ichi; Kani, Kohei; Itokawa, Yoshimi; Ogawa, Etsuyo; Shindo, Yohji

    2004-12-01

    Circular birefringence (CB, or optical rotation) and linear birefringence (LB) were measured for gellan gum aqueous solutions with and without salt to examine the gelling system in the helical structure as well as in the orientation. It was found that gelling samples with salt show nonzero LB values, whereas LB is zero for the samples without salt even in the gel state. This difference can be explained by the thermal deformation of the system containing anisotropic aggregations of helices formed with the shielding effect of the added salt on the intramolecular and intermolecular electrostatic repulsions. Considering that the presence of LB in the system affects the estimation of CB, we developed an original procedure of the CB measurement to eliminate the contribution of LB. It was shown that our methods for eliminating the contribution of LB can improve the CB measurement for the gellan gum gel. The temperature dependence of [alpha] for the samples with salt in the gel state is quite different from that for the samples without salt, suggesting that the aggregates of helices in the samples containing a high concentration of salt form a supramolecular structure that contributes to CB. PMID:15457436

  2. Biological evaluation of intervertebral disc cells in different formulations of gellan gum-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Khang, G; Lee, S K; Kim, H N; Silva-Correia, J; Gomes, M E; Viegas, C A A; Dias, I R; Oliveira, J M; Reis, R L

    2015-03-01

    Gellan gum (GG)-based hydrogels are advantageous in tissue engineering not only due to their ability to retain large quantities of water and provide a similar environment to that of natural extracellular matrix (ECM), but also because they can gelify in situ in seconds. Their mechanical properties can be fine-tuned to mimic natural tissues such as the nucleus pulposus (NP). This study produced different formulations of GG hydrogels by mixing varying amounts of methacrylated (GG-MA) and high-acyl gellan gums (HA-GG) for applications as acellular and cellular NP substitutes. The hydrogels were physicochemically characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis. Degradation and swelling abilities were assessed by soaking in a phosphate buffered saline solution for up to 170 h. Results showed that as HA-GG content increased, the modulus of the hydrogels decreased. Moreover, increases in HA-GG content induced greater weight loss in the GG-MA/HA-GG formulation compared to GG-MA hydrogel. Potential cytotoxicity of the hydrogel was assessed by culturing rabbit NP cells up to 7 days. An MTS assay was performed by seeding rabbit NP cells onto the surface of 3D hydrogel disc formulations. Viability of rabbit NP cells encapsulated within the different hydrogel formulations was also evaluated by Calcein-AM and ATP assays. Results showed that tunable GG-MA/HA-GG hydrogels were non-cytotoxic and supported viability of rabbit NP cells. PMID:23225767

  3. Studies on graft copolymerization of gellan gum with N,N-dimethylacrylamide by the redox system.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vijay Shankar; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Yadav, Mithilesh; Behari, Kunj

    2014-09-01

    The present paper reports the graft copolymerization of N,N-dimethylacrylamide onto gellan gumby free radical polymerization using potassium peroxymonosulphate/sarbose redox system in an inert atmosphere. The reaction conditions for maximum grafting have been optimized by varying the reaction variables, including the concentration of N,N-dimethylacrylamide(4.0×10(-2)-20×10(-2) mol dm(-3)), potassium peroxymonosulphate (0.6×10(-2)-1.4×10(-2)mol dm(-3)), sarbose (0.4×10(-3)-3.6×10(-3) mol dm(-3)), sulphuric acid (2.0×10(-3)-10×10(-3) mol dm(-3)), gellan gum (0.6-1.4 g dm(-3)) along with time duration (60-180 min) and temperature (25-45°C).Water-swelling capacity, metal ion sorption and flocculation studies of synthesized graft copolymer have been performed with respect to the parent polymer. The graft copolymer has been characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. PMID:24984020

  4. Physicochemical studies of glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose--inhibition of cast iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose were studied against the acid corrosion of cast iron by means of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and AC impedance spectroscopy techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of immersion time and temperature were also studied. The addition of potassium iodide to the corrosion-inhibition system showed both antagonism and synergism toward inhibition efficiency. Polarization studies revealed the mixed-type inhibiting nature of the carbohydrates. The adsorption of inhibitors on the cast iron surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, both in presence and absence of KI. Physical interaction between the inhibitor molecules and the iron surface was suggested by the thermochemical parameters, rather than chemical interaction. PMID:23618271

  5. 3D printing of layered brain-like structures using peptide modified gellan gum substrates.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Stevens, Leo; Thompson, Brianna C; Gilmore, Kerry J; Gorkin, Robert; Stewart, Elise M; in het Panhuis, Marc; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Wallace, Gordon G

    2015-10-01

    The brain is an enormously complex organ structured into various regions of layered tissue. Researchers have attempted to study the brain by modeling the architecture using two dimensional (2D) in vitro cell culturing methods. While those platforms attempt to mimic the in vivo environment, they do not truly resemble the three dimensional (3D) microstructure of neuronal tissues. Development of an accurate in vitro model of the brain remains a significant obstacle to our understanding of the functioning of the brain at the tissue or organ level. To address these obstacles, we demonstrate a new method to bioprint 3D brain-like structures consisting of discrete layers of primary neural cells encapsulated in hydrogels. Brain-like structures were constructed using a bio-ink consisting of a novel peptide-modified biopolymer, gellan gum-RGD (RGD-GG), combined with primary cortical neurons. The ink was optimized for a modified reactive printing process and developed for use in traditional cell culturing facilities without the need for extensive bioprinting equipment. Furthermore the peptide modification of the gellan gum hydrogel was found to have a profound positive effect on primary cell proliferation and network formation. The neural cell viability combined with the support of neural network formation demonstrated the cell supportive nature of the matrix. The facile ability to form discrete cell-containing layers validates the application of this novel printing technique to form complex, layered and viable 3D cell structures. These brain-like structures offer the opportunity to reproduce more accurate 3D in vitro microstructures with applications ranging from cell behavior studies to improving our understanding of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26231917

  6. A semi-fluid gellan gum medium improves nematode toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Brinke, Marvin; Heininger, Peter; Traunspurger, Walter

    2011-10-01

    This study examined an alternative test medium for nematodes that use gellan gum as the gelling agent instead of agar. The semi-fluid consistency of the gel-like component nematode growth gellan gum (CNGG) supports three-dimensional distribution of the nematodes and food bacteria, but still allows free movement of the former. Moreover, flexible preparation of the medium and easy recovery of the test organisms are possible. Here, the effects of the nematicides ivermectin (pharmaceutical) and aldicarb (pesticide) and of the metal cadmium on the growth and reproduction of the free-living nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Panagrolaimus cf. thienemanni were studied in CNGG media. Results were compared to those obtained with the standard liquid test media in order to evaluate the applicability of CNGG for nematode toxicity testing. The sensitivity of P. cf. thienemanni to all three substances was found to be higher than that of C. elegans, but both nematodes showed the highest sensitivity to ivermectin exposure. This raises concerns about the risk posed by the pharmaceutical to non-target nematodes. In contrast to ivermectin bioassays carried out in CNGG medium, those conducted in liquid medium resulted in wide-ranging variability between and within replicates. Thus, CNGG seems to be particularly valuable for testing hydrophobic substances with a high sorption affinity as it favors their sorption to food bacteria and minimizes contact with the surfaces of the test vessels. However, the medium was less suitable for deriving toxicity thresholds for cadmium and may likewise not be an appropriate choice for testing other metals. The medium introduced herein was shown to be appropriate for sublethal nematode toxicity testing and likely provides a convenient environment for testing other nematode species. Besides improved testing of hydrophobic substances, CNGG also offers advantages for long-term studies, such as full life-cycle experiments, in which fresh medium is regularly needed. Moreover it may be beneficial for testing other poorly soluble or insoluble substances, such as nanoparticles. PMID:21784524

  7. Cytotoxicity of sophorolipid-gellan gum-gold nanoparticle conjugates and their doxorubicin loaded derivatives towards human glioma and human glioma stem cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Sheetal; Reddy, E. Maheswara; Prabhune, Asmita; Pokharkar, Varsha; Shiras, Anjali; Prasad, B. L. V.

    2011-02-01

    Biocompatible gold nanoparticles were synthesized by using a naturally occurring gum-Gellan Gum-as a capping and reducing agent. These were further conjugated with sophorolipids which again were accessed through a biochemical transformation of a fatty acid. The cellular uptake of sophorolipid-conjugated gellan gum reduced gold nanoparticles and their cytotoxicity on human glioma cell line LN-229 and human glioma stem cell line HNGC-2 were investigated. Quite surprisingly even the simple sophorolipid-conjugated gellan gum reduced/capped gold nanoparticles showed greater efficacy in killing the glioma cell lines and, gratifyingly, the glioma stem cell lines also. The cytotoxic effects became more prominent once the anti cancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride was also conjugated to these gold nanoparticles.Biocompatible gold nanoparticles were synthesized by using a naturally occurring gum-Gellan Gum-as a capping and reducing agent. These were further conjugated with sophorolipids which again were accessed through a biochemical transformation of a fatty acid. The cellular uptake of sophorolipid-conjugated gellan gum reduced gold nanoparticles and their cytotoxicity on human glioma cell line LN-229 and human glioma stem cell line HNGC-2 were investigated. Quite surprisingly even the simple sophorolipid-conjugated gellan gum reduced/capped gold nanoparticles showed greater efficacy in killing the glioma cell lines and, gratifyingly, the glioma stem cell lines also. The cytotoxic effects became more prominent once the anti cancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride was also conjugated to these gold nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Confocal Z-stacking images of Texas Red Conjugated SL-GG-Au NPs, thermogravimetic analysis of DOX-SL-GG-Au-NPs and SL-GG-AuNPs, and time-dependent fluorescence spectra of DOX-SL-GG-Au NPs. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00598c

  8. Artocarpus heterophyllus L. seed starch-blended gellan gum mucoadhesive beads of metformin HCl.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2014-04-01

    Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam., family: Moraceae) seed starch (JFSS)-gellan gum (GG) mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl were developed through ionotropic gelation technique. The effect of GG to JFSS ratio and CaCl2 concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release at 10h (R10h, %) was optimized and analyzed using response surface methodology based on 3(2) factorial design. The optimized JFSS-GG beads containing metformin HCl showed DEE of 92.67±4.46%, R10h of 61.30±2.37%, and mean diameter of 1.67±0.27 mm. The optimized beads showed pH-dependent swelling and mucoadhesivity with the goat intestinal mucosa. The in vitro drug release from all these JFSS-GG beads containing metformin HCl was followed zero-order pattern (R(2)=0.9907-0.9975) with super case-II transport mechanism over a period of 10 h. The beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR. The optimized JFSS-GG beads containing metformin HCl exhibited significant hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration. PMID:24447799

  9. Engineering cell-adhesive gellan gum spongy-like hydrogels for regenerative medicine purposes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Lucília P; Cerqueira, Mariana T; Sousa, Rui A; Reis, Rui L; Correlo, Vitor M; Marques, Alexandra P

    2014-11-01

    The similarity between the extracellular matrix of soft tissue and hydrogels, characterized by high-water-content viscoelastic polymeric networks, has been sustaining the advancement of hydrogels for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) purposes. Current research on hydrogels has focused on introducing cell-adhesive peptides to promote cell adhesion and spreading, a critical applicability limitation. Here we report the development of gellan gum (GG) spongy-like hydrogels with ameliorated mechanical performance and flexibility in relation to hydrogels, using a simple and cost-effective method. Most importantly, these materials allow the entrapment of different cell types representing mesenchymal, epidermal and osteoblastic phenotypes that spread within the three-dimensional microstructure. This effect was associated with microstructural rearrangements characterized by pore wall thickening and pore size augmentation, and lower water content than precursor hydrogels. These properties significantly affected protein adsorption once cell adhesion was inhibited in the absence of serum. Spongy-like hydrogels are not adhesive for endothelial cells; however, this issue was surpassed by a pre-incubation with a cell-adhesive protein, as demonstrated for other substrates but not for traditional hydrogels. The proposed cell-compatible GG-based structures avoid time-consuming and expensive strategies that have been used to include cell-adhesive features in traditional hydrogels. This, associated with their off-the-shelf availability in an intermediary dried state, represents unique and highly relevant features for diverse TERM applications. PMID:25048775

  10. Mucoadhesive beads of gellan gum/pectin intended to controlled delivery of drugs.

    PubMed

    Prezotti, Fabíola Garavello; Cury, Beatriz Stringhetti Ferreira; Evangelista, Raul Cesar

    2014-11-26

    Gellan gum/pectin beads were prepared by ionotropic gelation, using Al(3+) as crosslinker. High yield (92.76%) and entrapment efficiency (52.22-88.78%) were reached. Beads exhibited high circularity (0.730-0.849) and size between 728.95 and 924.56 μm. Particle size and circularity was increased by raising polymer and crosslinker concentrations. Polymers ratio did not influence beads properties. The materials stability and the absence of drug-polymers interactions were evidenced by thermal analysis and FTIR. The high beads mucoadhesiveness was evidenced by in vitro and ex vivo tests. The erosion of beads was greater in acid media while swelling was more pronounced in pH 7.4. Drug release was dependent on pH in which samples 11H1-3, 11H1-5 and 41H1-3 released only 34%, 20% and 22% of ketoprofen in pH 1.2, while in pH 7.4 the drug release was sustained up to 360 min. Korsmeyer-Peppas model demonstrated that drug release occurred according to super case-II transport. PMID:25256487

  11. Gastroretentive extended release of metformin from methacrylamide-g-gellan and tamarind seed gum composite matrix.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, Rosy; Nandi, Gouranga; Changder, Abhijit; Chowdhury, Sailee; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Ghosh, Lakshmi Kanta

    2016-02-10

    Formulation of a gastroretentive extended release tablet of metformin based on polymethacrylamide-g-gellan (Pmaa-g-GG)-tamarind seed gum (TSG) composite matrix is the main purpose of this study. Tablets were prepared employing wet granulation method taking amount of Pmaa-g-GG, TSG and NaHCO3 (SBC, buoyancy contributor) as independent formulation variables. The tablets were then evaluated for in vitro drug release, buoyancy, ex vivo mucoadhesion, swelling and surface morphology. Compatibility between drug and excipients was checked by DSC, FTIR and XRD analysis. Buoyancy-lag-time, mucoadhesive strength, % drug release and release-rate constant were statistically analyzed using Design-Expert software (version 9.0.4.1) and the formulation was then numerically optimized to obtain USP-reference release profile. The optimized formulation showed excellent buoyancy over a 10h period with buoyancy lag time of 2.76min, significant mucoadhesion and drug release over a period of 10h with f2=71.58. Kinetic modeling unveiled anomalous non-Fickian transport based drug release mechanism. PMID:26686110

  12. Rheological studies of the gelation of deacetylated gellan gum (Gelrite) in physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Paulsson, M; Hägerström, H; Edsman, K

    1999-10-01

    Gels have been successfully used to increase the mucosal contact time and hence the bioavailability of nasal and ophthalmic formulations. The use of in situ gelling polymers requires a rapid sol-gel transition that produces a strong gel for an optimal contact time. In this study, the rheological behaviour of deacetylated gellan gum (Gelrite) was analysed in order to better understand the reasons for the good performance in humans. Thermal scans were used to study gel formation and other changes in the structure of the samples when the macromolecular and ionic contents were altered. The effect the different ions in tear fluid (Na+, K+, Ca2+) had on the gel strength and the consequences of dilution due to the ocular protective mechanisms were examined. Na+ was found to be the most important gel-promoting ion in vivo. It was also found that gels are formed in tear fluid even when the concentration of Gelrite) is only 0.1%. Samples with concentrations of Gelrite of 0.5-1% do not require more ions than 10-25% of those in tear fluid to form gels. These two findings can partly explain the good performance of Gelrite in vivo. Gels with a high elastic modulus can thus be formed even though dilution of instilled drops takes place. PMID:10494003

  13. Preparation of polymer gel dosimeters based on less toxic monomers and gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Hiroki, A; Sato, Y; Nagasawa, N; Ohta, A; Seito, H; Yamabayashi, H; Yamamoto, T; Taguchi, M; Tamada, M; Kojima, T

    2013-10-21

    New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), triethylene glycol monoethyl ether monomethacrylate (TGMEMA), polyethylene glycol 400 dimethacrylate (9G), tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride as an antioxidant, and gellan gum as a gel matrix were prepared. They were optically analyzed by measuring absorbance to evaluate a dose response. The absorbance of the polymer gel dosimeters that were exposed to (60)Co γ-rays increased with increasing dose. The dosimeters comprising HEMA and 9G showed a linear increase in absorbance in the dose range from 0 to 10 Gy. The dose response depended on the 9G concentration. For others comprising HEMA, 9G and TGMEMA, the absorbance of the polymer gel dosimeters drastically increased above a certain dose, and then leveled off up to 10 Gy. The optical variations in these polymer gel dosimeters were also induced by x-irradiation from Cyberknife radiotherapy equipment. Furthermore, the exposed region of the latter polymer gel dosimeter exhibited a thermo-responsive behavior. PMID:24052135

  14. Preparation of polymer gel dosimeters based on less toxic monomers and gellan gum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, A.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, N.; Ohta, A.; Seito, H.; Yamabayashi, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Taguchi, M.; Tamada, M.; Kojima, T.

    2013-10-01

    New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), triethylene glycol monoethyl ether monomethacrylate (TGMEMA), polyethylene glycol 400 dimethacrylate (9G), tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride as an antioxidant, and gellan gum as a gel matrix were prepared. They were optically analyzed by measuring absorbance to evaluate a dose response. The absorbance of the polymer gel dosimeters that were exposed to 60Co γ-rays increased with increasing dose. The dosimeters comprising HEMA and 9G showed a linear increase in absorbance in the dose range from 0 to 10 Gy. The dose response depended on the 9G concentration. For others comprising HEMA, 9G and TGMEMA, the absorbance of the polymer gel dosimeters drastically increased above a certain dose, and then leveled off up to 10 Gy. The optical variations in these polymer gel dosimeters were also induced by x-irradiation from Cyberknife radiotherapy equipment. Furthermore, the exposed region of the latter polymer gel dosimeter exhibited a thermo-responsive behavior.

  15. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii using alginate and gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Flores, Walfred; Ramos-Ramírez, Emma Gloria; Salazar-Montoya, Juan Alfredo

    2013-10-15

    Sodium alginate (SA) at 2% (w/v) and low acylated gellan gum (LAG) at 0.2% (w/v) were used to microencapsulate Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii spp lactis by employing the internal ionic gelation technique through water-oil emulsions at three different stirring rates: 480, 800 and 1200 rpm. The flow behavior of the biopolymer dispersions, the activation energy of the emulsion, the microencapsulation efficiency, the size distribution, the microcapsules morphology and the effect of the stirring rate on the culture viability were analyzed. All of the dispersions exhibited a non-Newtonian shear-thinning flow behavior because the apparent viscosity decreased in value when the shear rate was increased. The activation energy was calculated using the Arrhenius-like equation; the value obtained for the emulsion was 32.59 kJ/mol. It was observed that at 400 rpm, the microencapsulation efficiency was 92.83%, whereas at 800 and 1200 rpm, the stirring rates reduced the efficiency to 15.83% and 4.56%, respectively, evidencing the sensitivity of the microorganisms to the shear rate (13.36 and 20.05 s(-1)). Both optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed spherical microcapsules with irregular topography due to the presence of holes on its surface. The obtained size distribution range was modified when the stirring rate was increased. At 400 rpm, bimodal behavior was observed in the range of 20-420 μm; at 800 and 1200 rpm, the behavior became unimodal and the range was from 20 to 200 μm and 20 to 160 μm, respectively. PMID:23987441

  16. Baclofen novel gastroretentive extended release gellan gum superporous hydrogel hybrid system: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    El-Said, Ibrahim A; Aboelwafa, Ahmed A; Khalil, Rawia M; ElGazayerly, Omaima N

    2016-01-01

    Baclofen is a centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant with a short elimination half-life, which results in frequent daily dosing and subsequent poor patient compliance. The narrow absorption window of baclofen in the upper gastrointestinal tract limits its formulation as extended release dosage forms. In this study, baclofen extended release superporous hydrogel (SPH) systems, including conventional SPH, SPH composite and SPH hybrid (SPHH), were prepared aiming to increase the residence of baclofen at its absorption window. The applicability of different polymers, namely, gellan gum, guar gum, polyvinyl alcohol and gelatin, was investigated in preparation of SPHH systems. The prepared SPH systems were evaluated regarding weight and volume swelling ratio, porosity, mechanical properties, incorporation efficiency, degree of erosion and drug release. In vivo assessment was performed in dogs to evaluate gastric residence time by X-ray studies. In addition, the oral bioavailability of baclofen relative to commercially available Lioresal® immediate release tablets was also investigated. The novel baclofen gellan SPHH cross linked with calcium chloride was characterized by optimum mechanical properties, acceptable swelling properties as well as extended drug release. It also exhibited a prolonged plasma profile when compared to twice daily administered Lioresal®. PMID:24786486

  17. Gellan gum microspheres containing a novel α-amylase from marine Nocardiopsis sp. strain B2 for immobilization.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Samrat; Jana, Sougata; Gandhi, Arijit; Sen, Kalyan Kumar; Zhiang, Wang; Kokare, Chandrakant

    2014-09-01

    A Nocardiopsis sp. stain B2 with an ability to produce stable α-amylase was isolated from marine sediments. The characterization of microorganism was done by biochemical tests and 16S rDNA sequencing. The α-amylase was purified by gel filtration chromatography by using sephadex G-75. The molecular mass of the amylase was found to be 45 kDa by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography. The isolated α-amylase was immobilized by ionotropic gelation technique using gellan gum (GG). These microspheres were spherical with average particle size of 375.62±21.76 to 492.54±32.18 μm. The entrapment efficiency of these α-amylase loaded GG microspheres was found 74.76±1.32 to 87.64±1.52%. Characterization of α-amylase-gellan gum microspheres was confirmed using FTIR and SEM analysis. The in vitro amylase release kinetic have been studied by various mathematical models that follow the Korsmeyer-Peppas model (R2=0.9804-0.9831) with anomalous (non-Fickian) diffusion release mechanism. PMID:25014636

  18. Evaluation of the ability of xanthan gum/gellan gum/hyaluronan hydrogel membranes to prevent the adhesion of postrepaired tendons.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shyh Ming; Chang, Shwu Jen; Wang, Hung-Yi; Tang, Shu Ching; Yang, Shan-Wei

    2014-12-19

    After tendon-repair surgery, adhesion between the surgical tendon and the synovial sheath is often presented resulting in poor functional repair of the tendon. This may be prevented using a commercially available mechanical barrier implant, Seprafilm, which is composed of hyaluronan (HA) and carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogels. In a rat model, prepared membranes of various compositions of gellan gum (GG), xanthan gum (XG) and HA as well as Seprafilm were wrapped around repaired tendons and the adhesion of the tendons was examined grossly and histologically after 3 weeks of healing. Certain formulations of the XG/GG/HA hydrogel membranes reduced tendon adhesion with equal efficacy but without reducing the tendon strength compared to Seprafilm. The designed membranes swelled rapidly and blanketed onto the tendon tissue more readily and closely than Seprafilm. Also they degraded slowly, which allowed the membranes to function as barriers for extended periods. PMID:25263886

  19. Strain-rate and temperature dependent material properties of Agar and Gellan Gum used in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Schiavi, Alessandro; Cuccaro, Rugiada; Troia, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Agar and Gellan Gum are biocompatible polymers extensively used in several fields of tissue engineering research (e.g. tissue replacement, tissue support, tissue mimicking), due to their mechanical behaviour effectively representative of actual biological tissues. Since mechanical properties of artificial tissues are related to biocompatibility and functionality of medical implants and significantly influence adhesion, growth and differentiation of cells in tissue-engineering scaffolds, an accurate characterization of Young׳s modulus and relaxation time processes is needed. In this study, the strain-rate and temperature dependent material properties of Agarose and one among the numerous kind of Gellan Gum commercially available, known as Phytagel(®), have been investigated. Nine hydrogel samples have been realized with different mechanical properties: the first one Agar-based as a reference material, the further eight samples Gellan Gum based in which the effect of dispersed solid particles like kieselguhr and SiC, as enhancing mechanical properties factors, have been investigated as a function of concentration. Stress-strain has been investigated in compression and relaxation time has been evaluated by means of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts time decay function. Mechanical properties have been measured as a function of temperature between 20 °C and 35 °C and at different strain rates, from ~10(-3)s(-1) and ~10(-2)s(-1) (or deformation rate from ~0.01 mms(-1) to ~0.1 mms(-1)). From experimental data, the combined temperature and strain-rate dependence of hydrogels Young׳s modulus is determined on the basis of a constitutive model. In addition to a dependence of Young׳s modulus on temperature, a remarkable influence of strain-rate has been observed, especially in the sample containing solid particles; in same ranges of temperature and strain-rate, also relaxation time variations have been monitored in order to identify a possible dependence of damping properties on temperature and strain-rate. The result is the impossibility to determine univocally mechanical properties of studied biomaterials without a proper definition of boundary conditions at which they have been obtained. PMID:26318572

  20. Optimization of a chromatographic stationary phase based on gellan gum using central composite design.

    PubMed

    Gonalves, A I C; Rocha, L A; Dias, J M L; Passarinha, L A; Sousa, A

    2014-04-15

    To develop a new stationary phase of easy production, low cost, biocompatible, biodegradable and low unspecific adsorption, a three-dimensional network was prepared by combining the natural polysaccharide of gellan with divalent cations. The stability of this cation exchange chromatographic matrix was optimized by using an experimental design tool. The optimal conditions proposed for the gellan gel formulation were 48mM ZnSO4, 0% DMF, 25C, 0.75% gellan and 0.5h. The applicability of gellan matrix was tested by chromatographic assays with three model proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA), ?-chymotripsin and lysozyme). The results showed that the retention occurred in function of the net charge of each protein in MES buffer pH 6.2 and the elution was performed by increase of ionic strength to 750mM NaCl in MES buffer pH 6.2. Lysozyme was the more retained protein due to its positive charge more effective than ?-chymotripsin, while BSA did not interact with the matrix due to its negative charge at these conditions. Dynamic binding capacity assays were accomplished to characterize this matrix and to compare with commercial resins. The values of dynamic binding capacity from gellan gel were 3.9mg/mL and 17.4mg/mL, at 10% and 50% of breakthrough, respectively. In this way, gellan gel might be a promising chromatographic matrix to explore ionic interactions and to be applied in different purification strategies, getting the best benefit from its use at low cost. PMID:24657410

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the Gelrite gellan gum-based ocular delivery system for indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Jagdish; Kant, Shri; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2003-12-01

    The poor bioavailability and therapeutic response exhibited by the conventional ophthalmic solutions due to pre-corneal elimination of the drug may be overcome by the use of in situ gel forming systems, which upon instillation as drops into the eye undergo a sol-gel transition in the cul-de-sac. This may result in better ocular availability of the drug. The purpose of this work was to develop an ophthalmic delivery system of the NSAID indomethacin, based on the concept of ion activated in situ gelation. Gelrite gellan gum, a novel ophthalmic vehicle, which gels in the presence of mono or divalent cations present in the lacrimal fluid, was used as the gelling agent. The developed formulations were therapeutically efficacious (in a uveitis induced rabbit eye model) and provided sustained release of the drug over an 8-hour period in vitro. PMID:14769232

  2. Gellan gum nanohydrogel containing anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs: a multi-drug delivery system for a combination therapy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Giorgia; Navarro, Gemma; Di Meo, Chiara; Matricardi, Pietro; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    During the last decades, it has become evident that inflammation plays a critical role in tumorigenesis: tumor microenvironment is largely orchestrated by inflammatory cells. In the present work, a novel gellan gum nanohydrogel system (NH) able to carry and deliver simultaneously anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs was developed. Prednisolone was chemically linked to the carboxylic groups of gellan gum to serve as a hydrophobic moiety promoting nanohydrogel formation, whereas paclitaxel was then physically entrapped in it. NH improved drug performances, acting as paclitaxel and prednisolone solubility enhancer and favoring the drug uptake in the cells. Moreover, NH allowed an increased cytotoxic effect in vitro on several types of cancer cells due to the synergistic effect of the combination of anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs. Thus, NH can be useful in a combination therapy that attacks both, malignant cells and tumor inflammatory components. PMID:24215783

  3. A novel in situ gel base of deacetylase gellan gum for sustained ophthalmic drug delivery of ketotifen: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lina; Ao, Junping; Li, Peiling

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an ion-activated ketotifen ophthalmic delivery system was developed by using a natural polysaccharide, deacetylase gellan gum. Its rheological characteristics, stability, in vitro gelation, release in vitro, and pharmacodynamic activity in vivo were investigated. The formulation had an optimum viscosity that will allow easy drop as a liquid, which then underwent a rapid sol-gel transition due to ionic interaction. There were negligible alterations in the initial values of viscosity of the formulations over a storage period of 180 days. The in vitro release profiles indicated that the release of ketotifen from in situ gels exhibited a sustained feature. Scintigraphic studies indicated that deacetylase gellan gum could increase the residence time of the formulation. At the same dose, in situ gels demonstrated a typical sustained and prolonged drug-effects behavior compared with the common drops. PMID:26251573

  4. A novel in situ gel base of deacetylase gellan gum for sustained ophthalmic drug delivery of ketotifen: in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lina; Ao, Junping; Li, Peiling

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an ion-activated ketotifen ophthalmic delivery system was developed by using a natural polysaccharide, deacetylase gellan gum. Its rheological characteristics, stability, in vitro gelation, release in vitro, and pharmacodynamic activity in vivo were investigated. The formulation had an optimum viscosity that will allow easy drop as a liquid, which then underwent a rapid sol–gel transition due to ionic interaction. There were negligible alterations in the initial values of viscosity of the formulations over a storage period of 180 days. The in vitro release profiles indicated that the release of ketotifen from in situ gels exhibited a sustained feature. Scintigraphic studies indicated that deacetylase gellan gum could increase the residence time of the formulation. At the same dose, in situ gels demonstrated a typical sustained and prolonged drug-effects behavior compared with the common drops. PMID:26251573

  5. Injectable and photocross-linkable gels based on gellan gum methacrylate: a new tool for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Pacelli, Settimio; Paolicelli, Patrizia; Dreesen, Inge; Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Vitalone, Annabella; Casadei, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a natural polysaccharide gellan gum (GG) has been modified with methacrylic groups (GG-MA) and combined with polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate (PEG-DMA) in order to create novel injectable hydrogels that can be easily delivered through a needle and photocross-linked in the injection site. A novel synthetic procedure for methacrylation of GG has been proposed to better control its derivatization. Different degrees of functionalization have been achieved and their effects on the solubility and mechanical properties of GG-MA were investigated. A good balance in terms of hydrophilicity and elasticity of the corresponding hydrogels was identified, although not suitable enough as injectable material for the treatment of damaged soft tissues. For this reason, several concentrations and different molecular weights of PEG-DMA were investigated to modulate the composition of GG-MA hydrogels and overcome their extreme fragility. Swelling abilities of the hydrogels in different media were studied as a key parameter able to affect the release profile of loaded therapeutic agents. Model molecules having different spherical hindrance (sulindac and vitamin B12) were then chosen to study how the hydrogels were able to modulate their diffusion profiles over time. Finally, the hydrogel's safety was evaluated trough an MTT cytotoxicity test on human fibroblasts. PMID:25450552

  6. Injectable self-gelling composites for bone tissue engineering based on gellan gum hydrogel enriched with different bioglasses.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Timothy E L; Piwowarczyk, Wojciech; Pamula, Elzbieta; Liskova, Jana; Schaubroeck, David; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Brackman, Gilles; Balcaen, Lieve; Detsch, Rainer; Declercq, Heidi; Cholewa-Kowalska, Katarzyna; Dokupil, Agnieszka; Cuijpers, Vincent M J I; Vanhaecke, Frank; Cornelissen, Ria; Coenye, Tom; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Dubruel, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogels of biocompatible calcium-crosslinkable polysaccharide gellan gum (GG) were enriched with bioglass particles to enhance (i) mineralization with calcium phosphate (CaP); (ii) antibacterial properties and (iii) growth of bone-forming cells for future bone regeneration applications. Three bioglasses were compared, namely one calcium-rich and one calcium-poor preparation both produced by a sol-gel technique (hereafter referred to as A2 and S2, respectively) and one preparation of composition close to that of the commonly used 45S5 type (hereafter referred to as NBG). Incubation in SBF for 7 d, 14 d and 21 d caused apatite formation in bioglass-containing but not in bioglass-free samples, as confirmed by FTIR, XRD, SEM, ICP-OES, and measurements of dry mass, i.e. mass attributable to polymer and mineral and not water. Mechanical testing revealed an increase in compressive modulus in samples containing S2 and NBG but not A2. Antibacterial testing using biofilm-forming meticillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) showed markedly higher antibacterial activity of samples containing A2 and S2 than samples containing NBG and bioglass-free samples. Cell biological characterization using rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) revealed a stimulatory effect of NBG on rMSC differentiation. The addition of bioglass thus promotes GG mineralizability and, depending on bioglass type, antibacterial properties and rMSC differentiation. PMID:25065649

  7. Enzymatic mineralization of gellan gum hydrogel for bone tissue-engineering applications and its enhancement by polydopamine.

    PubMed

    Douglas, T E L; Wlodarczyk, M; Pamula, E; Declercq, H A; de Mulder, E L W; Bucko, M M; Balcaen, L; Vanhaecke, F; Cornelissen, R; Dubruel, P; Jansen, J A; Leeuwenburgh, S C G

    2014-11-01

    Interest is growing in the use of hydrogels as bone tissue-engineering (TE) scaffolds due to advantages such as injectability and ease of incorporation of active substances such as enzymes. Hydrogels consisting of gellan gum (GG), an inexpensive calcium-crosslinkable polysaccharide, have been applied in cartilage TE. To improve GG suitability as a material for bone TE, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme involved in mineralization of bone by cleaving phosphate from organic phosphate, was incorporated into GG hydrogels to induce mineralization with calcium phosphate (CaP). Incorporated ALP induced formation of apatite-like material on the submicron scale within GG gels, as shown by FTIR, SEM, EDS, XRD, ICP-OES, TGA and von Kossa staining. Increasing ALP concentration increased amounts of CaP as well as stiffness. Mineralized GG was able to withstand sterilization by autoclaving, although stiffness decreased. In addition, mineralizability and stiffness of GG was enhanced by the incorporation of polydopamine (PDA). Furthermore, mineralization of GG led to enhanced attachment and vitality of cells in vitro while cytocompatibility of the mineralized gels was comparable to one of the most commonly used bone substitute materials. The results proved that ALP-mediated enzymatic mineralization of GG could be enhanced by functionalization with PDA. PMID:23038649

  8. Binding effect of Cu(2+) as a trigger on the sol-to-gel and the coil-to-helix transition processes of polysaccharide, gellan gum.

    PubMed

    Kanesaka, Sho; Watanabe, Tokuko; Matsukawa, Shingo

    2004-01-01

    The binding effect of divalent cation Cu(2+) on the gelation process with a coil-helix transition in Cu(2+)/gellan aqueous solutions has been successfully elucidated by EPR, CD, and viscoelasticity measurements. Generally, Na-type gellan gum in aqueous solution can make gel when accompanied by an intrinsic coil-helix formation induced by hydrogen bonding between chains without any additional cations at T(ch)(-)(in) ( approximately 29 degrees C) with cooling temperature. An extrinsic coil-helix transition, induced by additional divalent cations in advance of the intrinsic sol-gel transition of gellan gum, is separately detected by CD measurement. The extrinsic coil-helix transition temperatures T(ch)(-)(ex) (>47 degrees C), which increased with the Cu(2+) concentration added, were nearly identical to the sol-gel transition temperature, T(sg), determined by the viscoelasticity measurement. Judging from the molar ellipticity by CD measurement and quantitative analysis of EPR spectra, it was elucidated that the helix forming process via divalent cations is composed of two steps ascribed to the different origins, i.e., a chemical binding effect via Cu(2+) ions in the initial stage and hydrogen bonds subsequently. Finally, we propose the coil-helix and the sol-gel transition mechanism initiated by the binding effect with the divalent cation, in which the partial chelate formation can cause local formation of helices and junction zones in the vicinity of the chelates at the initial stage of the process and stabilize the helices and the junction zones. On the other hand, the stabilized helices and junction zones can induce further formation and further stabilization of the Cu(2+)-gellan chelates. The mutual stabilization promotes the formation of three-dimensional network structure at the higher temperature than the intrinsic temperature for network formation. PMID:15132674

  9. Angiogenic potential of gellan-gum-based hydrogels for application in nucleus pulposus regeneration: in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Silva-Correia, Joana; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Salgado, António J; Sousa, Nuno; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Reis, Rui M; Reis, Rui L

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogels for nucleus pulposus (NP) regeneration should be able to comprise a nonangiogenic or even antiangiogenic feature. Gellan gum (GG)-based hydrogels have been reported to possess adequate properties for being used as NP substitutes in acellular and cellular strategies, due to its ability to support cell encapsulation, adequate mechanical properties, and noncytotoxicity. In this study, the angiogenic response of GG-based hydrogels was investigated by performing the chorioallantoic membrane assay. The convergence of macroscopic blood vessels toward the GG, ionic-crosslinked methacrylated GG (iGG-MA), and photo-crosslinked methacrylated GG (phGG-MA) hydrogel discs was quantified. Gelatin sponge (GSp) and filter paper (FP) alone and with vascular endothelial growth factor were used as controls of angiogenesis. The images obtained were digitally processed and analyzed by three independent observers. The macroscopic blood vessel quantification demonstrated that the GG-based hydrogels are not angiogenic as compared with FP controls. No statistical differences between the GG-based hydrogels tested in respect to its angiogenic ability were observed. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and SNA-lectin immunohistochemistry assay indicated that the iGG-MA and phGG-MA hydrogels do not allow the ingrowth of chick endothelial cells, following 4 days of implantation. On the contrary, GG, GSp, and FP controls allowed cell infiltration. The histological data also indicated that the GG-based hydrogels do not elicit any acute inflammatory response. The results showed that the GG, iGG-MA, and phGG-MA hydrogels present different permeability to cells but functioned as a physical barrier for vascular invasion. These hydrogels present promising and tunable properties for being used as NP substitutes in the treatment of degenerative intervertebral disc. PMID:22439824

  10. Gellan gum-hyaluronic acid spongy-like hydrogels and cells from adipose tissue synergize promoting neoskin vascularization.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; da Silva, Lucília Pereira; Santos, Tírcia Carlos; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Correlo, Vítor Manuel; Reis, Rui Luís; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2014-11-26

    Currently available substitutes for skin wound healing often result in the formation of nonfunctional neotissue. Thus, urgent care is still needed to promote an effective and complete regeneration. To meet this need, we proposed the assembling of a construct that takes advantage of cell-adhesive gellan gum-hyaluronic acid (GG-HA) spongy-like hydrogels and a powerful cell-machinery obtained from adipose tissue, human adipose stem cells (hASCs), and microvascular endothelial cells (hAMECs). In addition to a cell-adhesive character, GG-HA spongy-like hydrogels overpass limitations of traditional hydrogels, such as reduced physical stability and limited manipulation, due to improved microstructural arrangement characterized by pore wall thickening and increased mean pore size. The proposed constructs combining cellular mediators of the healing process within the spongy-like hydrogels that intend to recapitulate skin matrix aim to promote neoskin vascularization. Stable and off-the-shelf dried GG-HA polymeric networks, rapidly rehydrated at the time of cell seeding then depicting features of both sponges and hydrogels, enabled the natural cell entrapment/encapsulation and attachment supported by cell-polymer interactions. Upon transplantation into mice full-thickness excisional wounds, GG-HA spongy-like hydrogels absorbed the early inflammatory cell infiltrate and led to the formation of a dense granulation tissue. Consequently, spongy-like hydrogel degradation was observed, and progressive wound closure, re-epithelialization, and matrix remodelling was improved in relation to the control condition. More importantly, GG-HA spongy-like hydrogels promoted a superior neovascularization, which was enhanced in the presence of human hAMECs, also found in the formed neovessels. These observations highlight the successful integration of a valuable matrix and prevascularization cues to target angiogenesis/neovascularization in skin full-thickness excisional wounds. PMID:25361388

  11. Novel in situ gel systems based on P123/TPGS mixed micelles and gellan gum for ophthalmic delivery of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuwei; Cai, Xiaoqing; Du, Hongliang; Zhai, Guangxi

    2015-04-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenol compound, has been widely reported for diverse pharmacological effects and already been investigated for eye diseases. However, the water-insolubility of curcumin and the inherent penetration barriers in cornea make it difficult for curcumin to enter eye. This work aimed to develop ion-sensitive curcumin-loaded Pluronic P123 (P123)/D-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycolsuccinate (TPGS) mixed micelle in situ gels (CUR-MM-ISGs) to prolong ocular retention time and improve cornea permeability. Central composite design-response surface methodology was applied for the optimization of curcumin-loaded P123/TPGS mixed micelles (CUR-MMs). Characterization tests showed that CUR-MMs were in spherical shape with small size and low critical micelle concentration. After dispersing the micelles in gellan gum solution (0.2%, w/w) at the ratio of 3:1 and 1:1 (v/v), respectively, CUR-MM-ISGs were formed and presented transparent appearance. Sustained release profile was obtained in vitro for both CUR-MM-ISGs (3:1 or 1:1, v/v). The irritation test proved that CUR-MM-ISGs as ophthalmic formulations were gentle and biocompatible towards ocular tissues. In addition, the ex vivo corneal penetration study indicated that the cumulative drug permeation amount of CUR-MM-ISGs (3:1, v/v) was respectively 1.16-fold and 1.32-fold higher than CUR-MM-ISGs (1:1, v/v) and curcumin solution. It can be concluded from these results that the developed ion-sensitive mixed micelle in situ gel system is a potential ophthalmic delivery carrier for curcumin as a poorly soluble drug. PMID:25707750

  12. Injectable gellan gum-based nanoparticles-loaded system for the local delivery of vancomycin in osteomyelitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Posadowska, Urszula; Brzychczy-Wloch, Monika; Pamula, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Infection spreading in the skeletal system leading to osteomyelitis can be prevented by the prolonged administration of antibiotics in high doses. However systemic antibiotherapy, besides its inconvenience and often low efficacy, provokes numerous side effects. Thus, we formulated a new injectable nanoparticle-loaded system for the local delivery of vancomycin (Vanc) applied in a minimally-invasive way. Vanc was encapsulated in poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (NPs) by double-emulsification. The size (258 ± 11 nm), polydispersity index (0.240 ± 0.003) and surface potential (-25.9 ± 0.2 mV) of NPs were determined by dynamic light scattering and capillary electrophoresis measurements. They have a spherical morphology and a smooth topography as observed using atomic force microscopy. Vanc loading and encapsulation efficiencies were 8.8 ± 0.1 and 55.2 ± 0.5 %, respectively, based on fluorescence spectroscopy assays. In order to ensure injectability, NPs were suspended in gellan gum and cross-linked with Ca(2+); also a portion of dissolved antibiotic was added to the system. The resulting system was found to be injectable (extrusion force 11.3 ± 1.1 N), reassembled its structure after breaking as shown by rheology tests and ensured required burst release followed by sustained Vanc delivery. The system was cytocompatible with osteoblast-like MG-63 cells (no significant impact on cells' viability was detected). Growth of Staphylococcus spp. reference strains and also those isolated from osteomyelitic joints was inhibited in contact with the injectable system. As a result we obtained a biocompatible system displaying ease of application (low extrusion force), self-healing ability after disruption, adjustable drug release and antimicrobial properties. PMID:26621310

  13. Identification of the pgmG Gene, Encoding a Bifunctional Protein with Phosphoglucomutase and Phosphomannomutase Activities, in the Gellan Gum-Producing Strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461

    PubMed Central

    Videira, Paula A.; Cortes, Lusa L.; Fialho, Arsnio M.; S-Correia, Isabel

    2000-01-01

    The pgmG gene of Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461, the industrial gellan gum-producing strain, was cloned and sequenced. It encodes a 50,059-Da polypeptide that has phosphoglucomutase (PGM) and phosphomannomutase (PMM) activities and is 37 to 59% identical to other bifunctional proteins with PGM and PMM activities from gram-negative species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgC. Purified PgmG protein showed a marked preference for glucose-1-phosphate (G1P); the catalytic efficiency was about 50-fold higher for G1P than it was for mannose-1-phosphate (M1P). The estimated apparent Km values for G1P and M1P were high, 0.33 and 1.27 mM, respectively. The pgmG gene allowed the recovery of alginate biosynthetic ability in a P. aeruginosa mutant with a defective algC gene. This result indicates that PgmG protein can convert mannose-6-phosphate into M1P in the initial steps of alginate biosynthesis and, together with other results, suggests that PgmG may convert glucose-6-phosphate into G1P in the gellan pathway. PMID:10788412

  14. Development of Re-Usable Yeast-Gellan Gum Micro-Bioreactors for Potential Application in Continuous Fermentation to Produce Bio-Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sook Mun; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating yeast cells using gellan gum by an emulsification method and to evaluate the fermentation efficiency and the reusability of the micro-bioreactors produced. It was found that yeast cells could be successfully encapsulated to form relatively spherical micro-bioreactors with high specific surface area for mass transfer. Cell viability was found to be reduced by one log reduction after the emulsification process. The ethanol yield of the micro-bioreactors was comparable to that of free yeast in the first fermentation cycle. The micro-bioreactors remained intact and could be re-used up to 10 cycles of fermentation. Despite cell breakthrough, relatively high ethanol yields were obtained, indicating that the micro-bioreactors also functioned as regenerative reservoirs of yeast. PMID:24309306

  15. Influence of the ratio of amphiphilic copolymers used as emulsifiers on the microstructure, physical stability and rheology of α-pinene emulsions stabilized with gellan gum.

    PubMed

    García, M Carmen; Alfaro, M Carmen; Muñoz, José

    2015-11-01

    α-Pinene is a terpenic solvent whose use in the formulation of emulsions entails a double benefit from the environmental point of view since it is a green solvent, easily biodegradable, which also has certain antimicrobial properties. In this work a combination of Atlas™ G-5000 and Atlox™ 4913 amphiphilic copolymers was used to obtain O/W emulsions formulated with α-pinene and gellan gum. These emulsions may find applications related to the design of complex biotechnological systems with different uses. In order to investigate the microstructure and the physical stability of these emulsions, a combination of different techniques such as rheology, microscopy, laser diffraction and multiple light scattering turn out to be a useful methodology. The results demonstrated the need to include a minimum amount of Atlas™ G-5000 copolymer in the formulation of these emulsions to improve their stability. These results were supported by the information revealed by optical micrographs, according to which Atlas™ G-5000 is directed to the continuous medium to structure water (this surfactant is particularly effective at forming hydrogen bonds with water). On the other hand Atlox™ 4913 is preferentially adsorbed at the α-pinene-water interface, such that a high Atlox™ 4913/Atlas™ G-5000 mass ratio slows down the kinetics of coalescence as shown by multiple light scattering. However, a very low relative concentration of Atlas™ G-5000 causes creaming to become the dominant destabilization mechanism. Increasing the Atlas™ G-5000/Atlox™ 4913 mass ratio yields emulsions with enhanced viscosity and viscoelasticity. PMID:26283495

  16. Free radical grafting of gallic acid (GA) on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCS) and evaluation of antioxidant reinforced gellan gum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado, P.; Fraschini, C.; Salmieri, S.; Becher, D.; Safrany, A.; Lacroix, M.

    2016-01-01

    Antiradical properties were introduced on cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by redox pair (RP) initiator and γ-radiation treatments. Different procedures were tested on CNC, first a 2 h reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/ascorbic acid (AA) was performed on CNC solution. γ-Radiation treatment at 20 kGy dose was then applied and immediately after GA was reacted during 24 h with the pretreated CNCs, giving CNC-H2O2-AA-γ-GA. The formation of new carboxylic acids and carbonyl groups were characterized by FT-IR at 1650 and 1730 cm-1 respectively. Carboxylic acid functionalities were also analyzed by conductometric titration where an increase from 49 to 134 mmol COOH kg-1 was found from native to irradiated CNCs. A similar increase in the carboxylic acid content (132 mmol kg-1) was observed for CNC-H2O2-AA-γ-GA, showing the highest radical scavenging properties (8 mM Trolox eq/mg CNC). Thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the structural changes onto CNC. Film packaging containing 20% of CNC-H2O2-AA-γ-GA was then added to a gellan-based film packaging. A significant improvement (p<0.05) of the tensile strength (TS), the tensile modulus (TM) and the elongation at break (EB) and water vapor permeability reduction was observed when CNC-H2O2-AA-γ-GA was added to the film packaging formulation.

  17. The mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of cell-laden double-network hydrogels based on photocrosslinkable gelatin and gellan gum biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeongho; Olsen, Bradley D; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-04-01

    A major goal in the application of hydrogels for tissue engineering scaffolds, especially for load-bearing tissues such as cartilage, is to develop hydrogels with high mechanical strength. In this study, a double-network (DN) strategy was used to engineer strong hydrogels that can encapsulate cells. We improved upon previously studied double-network (DN) hydrogels by using a processing condition compatible with cell survival. The DN hydrogels were created by a two-step photocrosslinking using gellan gum methacrylate (GGMA) for the rigid and brittle first network, and gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) for the soft and ductile second network. We controlled the degree of methacrylation of each polymer so that they obtain relevant mechanical properties as each network. The DN was formed by photocrosslinking the GGMA, diffusing GelMA into the first network, and photocrosslinking the GelMA to form the second network. The formation of the DN was examined by diffusion tests of the large GelMA molecules into the GGMA network, the resulting enhancement in the mechanical properties, and the difference in mechanical properties between GGMA/GelMA single networks (SN) and DNs. The resulting DN hydrogels exhibited the compressive failure stress of up to 6.9MPa, which approaches the strength of cartilage. It was found that there is an optimal range of the crosslink density of the second network for high strength of DN hydrogels. DN hydrogels with a higher mass ratio of GelMA to GGMA exhibited higher strength, which shows promise in developing even stronger DN hydrogels in the future. Three dimensional (3D) encapsulation of NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and the following viability test showed the cell-compatibility of the DN formation process. Given the high strength and the ability to encapsulate cells, the DN hydrogels made from photocrosslinkable macromolecules could be useful for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues. PMID:22265786

  18. Gellan gum-based mucoadhesive microspheres of almotriptan for nasal administration: Formulation optimization using factorial design, characterization, and in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Zaheer; Marihal, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Almotriptan malate (ALM), indicated for the treatment of migraine in adults is not a drug candidate feasible to be administered through the oral route during the attack due to its associated symptoms such as nausea and vomiting. This obviates an alternative dosage form and nasal drug delivery is a good substitute to oral and parenteral administration. Materials and Methods: Gellan gum (GG) microspheres of ALM, for intranasal administration were prepared by water-in-oil emulsification cross-linking technique employing a 23 factorial design. Drug to polymer ratio, calcium chloride concentration and cross-linking time were selected as independent variables, while particle size and in vitro mucoadhesion of the microspheres were investigated as dependent variables. Regression analysis was performed to identify the best formulation conditions. The microspheres were evaluated for characteristics such as practical percentage yield, particle size, percentage incorporation efficiency, swellability, zeta potential, in vitro mucoadhesion, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction study, and in vitro drug diffusion studies. Results: The shape and surface characteristics of the microspheres were determined by scanning electron microscopy, which revealed spherical nature and nearly smooth surface with drug incorporation efficiency in the range of 71.65 ± 1.09% – 91.65 ± 1.13%. In vitro mucoadhesion was observed the range of 79.45 ± 1.69% – 95.48 ± 1.27%. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results indicated a molecular level dispersion of drug in the microspheres. In vitro drug diffusion was Higuchi matrix controlled and the release mechanism was found to be non-Fickian. Stability studies indicated that there were no significant deviations in the drug content, in vitro mucoadhesion and in vitro drug diffusion characteristics. Conclusion: The investigation revealed promising potential of GG microspheres for delivering ALM intranasally for the treatment of migraine. PMID:25400410

  19. The mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of cell-laden double-network hydrogels based on photocrosslinkable gelatin and gellan gum biomacromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeongho; Olsen, Bradley D.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in the application of hydrogels for tissue engineering scaffolds, especially for load-bearing tissues such as cartilage, is to develop hydrogels with high mechanical strength. In this study, a double-network (DN) strategy was used to engineer strong hydrogels that can encapsulate cells. We improved upon previously studied double-network (DN) hydrogels by using a processing condition compatible with cell survival. The DN hydrogels were created by a two-step photocrosslinking using gellan gum methacrylate (GGMA) for the rigid and brittle first network, and gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) for the soft and ductile second network. We controlled the degree of methacrylation of each polymer so that they obtain relevant mechanical properties as each network. The DN was formed by photocrosslinking the GGMA, diffusing GelMA into the first network, and photocrosslinking the GelMA to form the second network. The formation of the DN was examined by diffusion tests of the large GelMA molecules into the GGMA network, the resulting enhancement in the mechanical properties, and the difference in mechanical properties between GGMA/GelMA single networks (SN) and DNs. The resulting DN hydrogels exhibited the compressive failure stress of up to 6.9 MPa, which approaches the strength of cartilage. It was found that there is an optimal range of the crosslink density of the second network for high strength of DN hydrogels. DN hydrogels with a higher mass ratio of GelMA to GGMA exhibited higher strength, which shows promise in developing even stronger DN hydrogels in the future. Three dimensional (3D) encapsulation of NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and the following viability test showed the cell-compatibility of the DN formation process. Given the high strength and the ability to encapsulate cells, the DN hydrogels made from photocrosslinkable macromolecules could be useful for the regeneration of load-bearing tissues. PMID:22265786

  20. Preparation, characterization and in vitro digestibility of gellan and chitosan-gellan microgels.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; Perrechil, Fabiana de Assis; Picone, Carolina Siqueira Franco; Sato, Ana Carla Kawazoe; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2015-03-01

    Gellan microgels with potential application in delivery systems were obtained by physically cross-linked gellan gum. The microgels were produced by atomization followed by ionotropic gelation using CaCl2 (gellan/Ca) or KCl (gellan/K) as hardening agent and part of them were coated with chitosan in order to improve their resistance to gastric digestion. Size distribution, morphology and zeta potential of microgels were evaluated before and after in vitro digestion process. The long term stability was also evaluated. Spherical microparticles were obtained at gellan concentration above 0.6% w/w, showing average size among 70-120 μm. Most of the coated and uncoated microgels showed stability in aqueous media, except the uncoated gellan/K microgel. The in vitro digestion evaluation showed that all particles maintained their size and shape after the gastric digestion step. However, the enteric digestion caused disintegration of microgels indicating their potential application for enteric delivery systems. The chitosan-coated microgels showed lower degree of fragmentation when compared to the uncoated microgels, indicating that the coating process enable a better control of microgels releasing properties during the enteric digestion. PMID:25498608

  1. Gellan-thioglycolic acid conjugate: synthesis, characterization and evaluation as mucoadhesive polymer.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shikha; Ahuja, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Kaur, Harmanmeet

    2014-01-01

    Gellan-thioglycollic acid conjugate was synthesized with the objective to improve its mucoadhesive properties. Synthesis of conjugate was confirmed by -SH stretch in the Fourier-transform infrared spectra at 2571 cm(-1). It was found to contain 13.92 mM of thiol groups/g of the conjugate. Thiolation of gellan gum was found to slightly increase its degree of crystallinity and decrease its sensitivity to Ca(2+)-induced gelation. On screening of gellan-thioglycollic acid conjugate for ex-vivo ocular tolerance using hen's egg chorio-allantoic membrane test and for biocompatibility by resazurin assay on Vero-cells, it was found to be non-irritant and biocompatible. Metronidazole gels formulated using gellan thioglycollic acid conjugate as bioadhesive agent showed 1.82-fold higher mucoadhesive strength than the gels formulated using gellan gum. Further, the metronidazole gels containing gellan and gellan-thioglycollic conjugate released the drug following first-order and Higuchi's square-root release kinetics. In conclusion, gellan-thioglycollic acid conjugate is a promising bioadhesive excipient. PMID:24274549

  2. In situ-gelling gellan formulations as vehicles for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, S; Aoyama, H; Kawasaki, N; Kubo, W; Attwood, D

    1999-08-01

    Gels formed in situ following oral administration of 1% (w/v) aqueous solutions of gellan to rats and rabbits were evaluated as sustained-release vehicles. The formulation contained calcium ions in complexed form, the release of which in the acidic environment of the stomach caused gelation of the gellan gum. The in vitro release of theophylline from the rigid gellan gels followed root-time kinetics over a period of 6 h. Plasma levels of theophylline after oral administration of gellan solutions and a commercial oral sustained-release liquid dosage form containing an identical drug concentration were compared in both rats and rabbits. Bioavailability of theophylline from gellan gels formed by in situ gelation in the animal stomach was increased by four-fivefold in rats and threefold in rabbits compared with that from the commercial oral formulation. There was no significant difference in the mean residence times of theophylline when administered by these two vehicles. PMID:10425334

  3. Gellan sulfate inhibits Plasmodium falciparum growth and invasion of red blood cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Recuenco, Frances Cagayat; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Ishiwa, Akiko; Enomoto-Rogers, Yukiko; Fundador, Noreen Grace V.; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Murakoshi, Fumi; Gong, Haiyan; Inomata, Atsuko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Iwata, Tadahisa; Kato, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we assessed the sulfated derivative of the microbial polysaccharide gellan gum and derivatives of λ and κ-carrageenans for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 and Dd2 growth and invasion of red blood cells in vitro. Growth inhibition was assessed by means of flow cytometry after a 96-h exposure to the inhibitors and invasion inhibition was assessed by counting ring parasites after a 20-h exposure to them. Gellan sulfate strongly inhibited invasion and modestly inhibited growth for both P. falciparum 3D7 and Dd2; both inhibitory effects exceeded those achieved with native gellan gum. The hydrolyzed λ-carrageenan and oversulfated κ-carrageenan were less inhibitory than their native forms. In vitro cytotoxicity and anticoagulation assays performed to determine the suitability of the modified polysaccharides for in vivo studies showed that our synthesized gellan sulfate had low cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activity. PMID:24740150

  4. Effect of the formulation on the in-vitro release of propranolol from gellan beads.

    PubMed

    Kedzierewicz, F; Lombry, C; Rios, R; Hoffman, M; Maincent, P

    1999-02-01

    Gellan gum beads of propranolol hydrochloride, a hydrophilic model drug, were prepared by solubilising the drug in a dispersion of gellan gum and then dropping the dispersion into calcium chloride solution. The droplets formed gelled beads instantaneously by ionotropic gelation. Major formulation and process variables which might influence the preparation of the beads and the drug release from gellan gum beads were studied. Very high entrapment efficiencies were obtained (92%) after modifying the pH of both the gellan gum dispersion and the calcium chloride solution. The beads could be stored for 3 weeks in a wet or dried state without modification of the drug release. Oven-dried beads released the drug somewhat more slowly than the wet or freeze-dried beads. The drug release from oven-dried beads was slightly affected by the pH of the dissolution medium. Gellan gum could be a useful carrier for the encapsulation of fragile drugs and provides new opportunities in the field of bioencapsulation. PMID:10205633

  5. Effect of chelatants on gellan gel rheological properties and setting temperature for immobilization of living bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Camelin, I; Lacroix, C; Paquin, C; Prévost, H; Cachon, R; Divies, C

    1993-01-01

    The effect of various concentrations of sequestrants (sodium citrate, sodium metaphosphate, and EDTA) was studied on gellan gel (1.5-2.5% (w/v)) setting temperature and rheological properties. Addition of EDTA between 0 and 0.8% (w/v) led to a progressive decrease of setting temperature. Citrate and metaphosphate decreased this parameter when added up to 0.4 or 0.6%, depending on gellan gum concentration, eventually resulting in the absence of gel formation at room temperature for the 1.5% gellan solution containing 0.4% citrate. This effect was accompanied by a significant decrease of gel strength and stiffness and might be attributed to the binding of the divalent cations required for chain association during gelation by chelatants. With the aim of lowering the gel setting temperature during the cell entrapment process while maintaining high mechanical properties, a gel made of 2.5% gellan gum and 0.2% sodium citrate was used to entrap Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707. Ions and pH of the inoculum during the immobilization step influenced the long-term mechanical stability of the gel beads during continuous fermentation in a stirred tank reactor. High stability as well as high biocatalyst activity was obtained when a washed cell suspension was used as the inoculum. Gellan gel produced by dissolving gellan gum in a sodium citrate solution may be a promising entrapment matrix for temperature-sensitive cells such as mesophilic lactic acid bacteria and eukaryotic cells. PMID:7763698

  6. Gum arabic-coated magnetic nanoparticles for potential application in simultaneous magnetic targeting and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yu, Faquan; Cole, Adam J; Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E; Wang, Jingkang; Yang, Victor C

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP) coated with gum arabic (GA), a biocompatible phytochemical glycoprotein widely used in the food industry, were successfully synthesized and characterized. GA-coated MNP (GA-MNP) displayed a narrow hydrodynamic particle size distribution averaging about 100 nm; a GA content of 15.6% by dry weight; a saturation magnetization of 93.1 emu/g Fe; and a superparamagnetic behavior essential for most magnetic-mediated applications. The GA coating offers two major benefits: it both enhances colloidal stability and provides reactive functional groups suitable for coupling of bioactive compounds. In vitro results showed that GA-MNP possessed a superior stability upon storage in aqueous media when compared to commercial MNP products currently used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition, significant cellular uptake of GA-MNP was evaluated in 9L glioma cells by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and MRI analyses. Based on these findings, it was hypothesized that GA-MNP might be utilized as a MRI-visible drug carrier in achieving both magnetic tumor targeting and intracellular drug delivery. Indeed, preliminary in vivo investigations validate this clinical potential. MRI visually confirmed the accumulation of GA-MNP at the tumor site following intravenous administration to rats harboring 9L glioma tumors under the application of an external magnetic field. ESR spectroscopy quantitatively revealed a 12-fold increase in GA-MNP accumulation in excised tumors when compared to contralateral normal brain. Overall, the results presented show promise that GA-MNP could potentially be employed to achieve simultaneous tumor imaging and targeted intra-tumoral drug delivery. PMID:19842043

  7. Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Gum Disease KidsHealth > Teens > Diseases & Conditions > Mouth & Teeth > Gum ... which is both embarrassing and serious!). What Is Gum Disease? Gum disease is also known as periodontal ( ...

  8. Magnetorheology of xanthan-gum-coated soft magnetic carbonyl iron microspheres and their polishing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Seung Hyuk; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Lee, Jung Won; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Cho, Myeong Woo

    2013-06-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are colloidal suspensions of soft magnetic particles dispersed in a non-magnetic liquid. Among their applications, MR polishing has attracted considerable attention owing to its smart control of the polishing characteristics for dedicated microelectromechanical system applications. To improve the polishing characteristics of MR fluids, we fabricated carbonyl iron (CI) microspheres coated with xanthan gum (XG) by using a solvent casting method. The morphologies and densities of both pure CI and CI/XG particles were characterized using a scanning electron microscope and a pycnometer, respectively. In addition, the rheological characteristics of the MR fluids under various applied magnetic field strengths were examined using a rotational rheometer. The MR polishing characteristics were conducted using an MR polishing machine to examine the surface roughness and the material removal by MR polishing with added nano-ceria slurry abrasives.

  9. Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is a constant battle. That's why brushing and flossing every day and regular trips to the dentist ... the gums that occurs regularly when brushing or flossing discoloration of gums (healthy gums should look pink ...

  10. Spontaneous synthesis of gold nanoparticles on gum arabic-modified iron oxide nanoparticles as a magnetically recoverable nanocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chien-Chen; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2012-06-01

    A novel magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst was fabricated by spontaneous green synthesis of Au nanoparticles on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A layer of Au nanoparticles with thickness of about 2 nm was deposited on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles, because gum arabic acted as a reducing agent and a stabilizing agent simultaneously. The resultant magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst exhibited good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride. The rate constants evaluated in terms of pseudo-first-order kinetic model increased with increase in the amount of Au nanocatalyst or decrease in the initial concentration of 4-nitrophenol. The kinetic data suggested that this catalytic reaction was diffusion-controlled, owing to the presence of gum arabic layer. In addition, this nanocatalyst exhibited good stability. Its activity had no significant decrease after five recycles. This work is useful for the development and application of magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst on the basis of green chemistry principles.

  11. Spontaneous synthesis of gold nanoparticles on gum arabic-modified iron oxide nanoparticles as a magnetically recoverable nanocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A novel magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst was fabricated by spontaneous green synthesis of Au nanoparticles on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A layer of Au nanoparticles with thickness of about 2?nm was deposited on the surface of gum arabic-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles, because gum arabic acted as a reducing agent and a stabilizing agent simultaneously. The resultant magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst exhibited good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride. The rate constants evaluated in terms of pseudo-first-order kinetic model increased with increase in the amount of Au nanocatalyst or decrease in the initial concentration of 4-nitrophenol. The kinetic data suggested that this catalytic reaction was diffusion-controlled, owing to the presence of gum arabic layer. In addition, this nanocatalyst exhibited good stability. Its activity had no significant decrease after five recycles. This work is useful for the development and application of magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst on the basis of green chemistry principles. PMID:22713480

  12. Self-structuring foods based on acid-sensitive low and high acyl mixed gellan systems to impact on satiety

    PubMed Central

    Bradbeer, Jennifer F.; Hancocks, Robin; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Norton, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the in vitro acid-induced gelation of mixed systems of two biopolymers; low acyl and high acyl gellan gum. Rheological and texture analysis showed that these mixed gels displayed textures that lay between the material properties exhibited for the low and high acyl variants. DSC analysis showed that mixtures of the low acyl and high acyl forms exhibit two separate conformational transitions at temperatures coincident with each of the individual biopolymers. Various metabolically relevant pH environments and hydrocolloid concentrations were investigated. These resulted in very different acid gelled structures, which were characterised by texture analysis. The structures of the acid gels were shown to depend upon the pH, hydrocolloid concentration and proportion of each biopolymer used during their production. A selection of these mixed gellan structures were assessed post-production in terms of their response to prolonged exposure to an acidic (pH 1), stomach-like, environment. This resulted in a significant increase in the gel strength, regardless of the biopolymer proportions. The high acyl gellan was less acid-sensitive, and subsequently no evidence of acid gelation was observed with high acyl gellan at a proportion greater than 60% of the total biopolymer. The findings presented here demonstrate that structuring as well as de-structuring of mixed gellan acid gels can be controlled in acidic environments similar to those that are present in the stomach after food consumption. PMID:24882914

  13. Self-structuring foods based on acid-sensitive low and high acyl mixed gellan systems to impact on satiety.

    PubMed

    Bradbeer, Jennifer F; Hancocks, Robin; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Norton, Ian T

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the in vitro acid-induced gelation of mixed systems of two biopolymers; low acyl and high acyl gellan gum. Rheological and texture analysis showed that these mixed gels displayed textures that lay between the material properties exhibited for the low and high acyl variants. DSC analysis showed that mixtures of the low acyl and high acyl forms exhibit two separate conformational transitions at temperatures coincident with each of the individual biopolymers. Various metabolically relevant pH environments and hydrocolloid concentrations were investigated. These resulted in very different acid gelled structures, which were characterised by texture analysis. The structures of the acid gels were shown to depend upon the pH, hydrocolloid concentration and proportion of each biopolymer used during their production. A selection of these mixed gellan structures were assessed post-production in terms of their response to prolonged exposure to an acidic (pH 1), stomach-like, environment. This resulted in a significant increase in the gel strength, regardless of the biopolymer proportions. The high acyl gellan was less acid-sensitive, and subsequently no evidence of acid gelation was observed with high acyl gellan at a proportion greater than 60% of the total biopolymer. The findings presented here demonstrate that structuring as well as de-structuring of mixed gellan acid gels can be controlled in acidic environments similar to those that are present in the stomach after food consumption. PMID:24882914

  14. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of methacrylamide grafted gellan as sustained release tablet matrix.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Gouranga; Patra, Poushali; Priyadarshini, Rosy; Kaity, Santanu; Ghosh, Lakshmi Kanta

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the microwave induced synthesis of polymethacrylamide-grafted-gellan gum (PMaa-g-GG) was carried out by free radical initiation using cerric (IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) as redox initiator. Concentrations of methacrylamide (Maa), CAN and microwave irradiation time were taken as variable synthetic parameters. The modified polysaccharide obtained from different synthetic conditions was then characterized by FTIR, CHN analysis, DSC and powder X-ray diffraction. The yield and extent of grafting were assessed by determining percentage grafting, percentage grafting efficiency, percentage conversion and these were correlated with elemental analysis. The acute oral toxicity study of modified polysaccharide was performed as per OECD guideline. Histological comparison of different organs between control and test animal showed no significant difference. Sustained release tablets of diclofenac sodium (DS) were prepared with modified gellan. In vitro dissolution study showed the tablets were capable of releasing the drug over a period of 8 h. PMID:25316428

  15. Structures and Properties of Gellan Polymers Produced by Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 from Lactose Compared with Those Produced from Glucose and from Cheese Whey

    PubMed Central

    Fialho, Arsnio M.; Martins, Lgia O.; Donval, Marie-Lucie; Leito, Jorge H.; Ridout, Michael J.; Jay, Andrew J.; Morris, Victor J.; S-Correia, Isabel

    1999-01-01

    The dairy industry produces large quantities of whey as a by-product of cheese production and is increasingly looking for new ways to utilize this waste product. Gellan gum is reliably produced by Sphingomonas paucimobilis in growth media containing lactose, a significant component of cheese whey, as a carbon source. We studied and compared polysaccharide biosynthesis by S. paucimobilis ATCC 31461 in media containing glucose, lactose (5 to 30 g/liter), and sweet cheese whey. We found that altering the growth medium can markedly affect the polysaccharide yield, acyl substitution level, polymer rheological properties, and susceptibility to degradation. Depression of gellan production from lactose compared with gellan production from glucose (approximately 30%) did not appear to occur at the level of synthesis of sugar nucleotides, which are the donors of monomers used for biosynthesis of the repetitive tetrasaccharide unit of gellan. The lactose-derived biopolymer had the highest total acyl content; the glucose- and whey-derived gellans had similar total acyl contents but differed markedly in their acetate and glycerate levels. Rheological studies revealed how the functionality of a gellan polysaccharide is affected by changes in the acyl substitution. PMID:10347031

  16. Light scattering studies of tetramethyl ammonium gellan.

    PubMed

    Gunning, A P; Morris, V J

    1990-12-01

    Tetramethyl ammonium (TMA) gellan does not gel. Light scattering studies suggest that in solutions of TMA gellan, in tetramethyl ammonium chloride (TMACI), the gellan molecules assemble end to end to produce elongated fibrous structures. Such fibrils are envisaged as resulting from double-helix formation between the ends of neighbouring gellan molecules. Fibrils with molecular weights ranging from (1.06 +/- 0.06) x 10(5) to (4.5 +/- 0.1) x 10(6) have been observed. The molecular weights obtained depended upon the pore size of the filters used to clarify the solutions. The formation of strong gels, in the presence of gel promoting cations, is attributed to a localized ordered lateral association, or crystallization of regions of these fibrils. It is suggested that such a model for gelation may be of general applicability to a number of polysaccharide systems. PMID:2088489

  17. High acyl gellan as an emulsion stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Joice Aline Pires; Cunha, Rosiane Lopes da

    2016-03-30

    High acyl gellan (0.01-0.2% w/w) was used as stabilizer in oil in water emulsions containing 30% (w/w) of sunflower oil and prepared under different process conditions. Stable emulsions to phase separation could be obtained using high acyl gellan (HA) content above 0.05% (w/w), while low acyl gellan (LA) prepared at the same conditions could not stabilize emulsions. Emulsions properties depended on the process used to mix the oil and gellan dispersion since high pressure homogenization favored stabilization while very high energy density applied by ultrasound led to systems destabilization. Emulsions prepared using high pressure homogenization showed zeta potential values ranging from -50 up to -59mV, suggesting that electrostatic repulsion could be contributing to the systems stability. Rheological properties of continuous phase were also responsible for emulsions stabilization, since HA gellan dispersions showed high viscosity and gel-like behavior. The high viscosity of the continuous phase could be associated to the presence of high acyl gellan microgels/aggregates. Disentanglement of these aggregates performed by ultrasound strongly decreased the viscosity and consequently affected the emulsions behavior, reducing the stability to phase separation. PMID:26794954

  18. Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease. It ranges from simple gum inflammation, called gingivitis, to serious damage to the tissue and bone ... the worst cases, you can lose teeth. In gingivitis, the gums become red and swollen. They can ...

  19. Nicotine Gum

    MedlinePLUS

    ... smoking cessation program, which may include support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine gum is ... are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using nicotine gum, ...

  20. Large deformation analysis of gellan gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Nitta, Yoko; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2007-08-01

    Gellan gel, a typical polysaccharide gel, is ruptured with different deformation behaviors from gelatin gel or rubber. It exhibits both strain hardening and softening; hardening is observed for moderate strain and softening occurs for larger strain. From the analyses of stress-strain curves of gellan gels, we propose forms of strain energy function. The fit with the proposed equation was excellent, while the existing models fail because they consider only one of hardening or softening effect. Furthermore, these equations are shown to be capable of extracting the hardening and softening effects separately from the observed stress-strain curves. By using these fitting equations, the concentration dependences of hardening and softening are investigated. It is shown that the degrees of hardening and softening both increase with increasing gellan concentration.

  1. Nanometric organisation in blends of gellan/xyloglucan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Clayton F; Riegel-Vidotti, Izabel C; Cardoso, Mateus B; Ono, Lucy; Lucyszyn, Neoli; Lubambo, Adriana F; Sens, Camila V; Grein-Iankovski, Aline; Sierakowski, Maria Rita

    2014-12-19

    Mixtures of gellan gum (GL) and a xyloglucan (XGJ) extracted from Hymenaea courbaril seeds were prepared in a solution of 0.15 mol L(-1) NaCl. Rheology measurements revealed that 2.4 g L(-1) pure GL formed a brittle hydrogel, and GL-XGJ blends showed improved pseudoplastic character with higher XGJ contents. SAXS analyses showed that the Rg dimensions ranged from 1.3 to 4.9 nm, with larger values occurring as the amount of XGJ increased, and diffusion tests indicated that better diffusion of methylene blue dye was obtained in the network with a higher XGJ content. AFM topographic images of the films deposited onto mica revealed fewer heterogeneous surfaces with increased XGJ contents. The water contact angle revealed more hydrophobic character on all of the films, and the wettability decreased with increasing amounts of XGJ. Therefore, the demonstrated benefit of using XGJ blends is the production of a soft material with improved interface properties. PMID:25263863

  2. Process optimization for fabrication of gellan based electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Priya; Pruthi, Parul A; Singh, Rajesh P; Pruthi, Vikas

    2014-08-30

    In this investigation, the nanofiber formation ability of gellan, a FDA approved low cost natural polysaccharide, has been achieved for the first time using electrospinning technique. The gellan based ultrafine nanofibers were fabricated by using a blend mixture of gellan with another biodegradable polymer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The morphology of resulting gellan-PVA nanofibers was analyzed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The mass ratio of 50:50 for gellan:PVA was recorded as an optimum solution ratio to obtain uniform bead free nanofibers with an average diameter of 40 ± 15.8 nm. Data depicted that among different parameters evaluated, viscosity and the mass ratio of gellan:PVA were the key parameters that influence the nanofiber morphology and diameter. PMID:24815395

  3. Injectable in situ physically and chemically crosslinkable gellan hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongwei; Hamilton, Paul; Reilly, Mattew; Ravi, Nathan

    2012-07-01

    An injectable, in situ physically and chemically crosslinkable gellan hydrogel is synthesized via gellan thiolation. The thiolation does not alter the gellan's unique 3-D conformation, but leads to a lower phase transition temperature under physiological conditions and stable chemical crosslinking. The synthesis and hydrogels are characterized by (1)H NMR, FT-IR, CD, or rheology measurements. The injectability and the tissue culture cell viability is also tested. The thiolated gellan hydrogel exhibits merits, such as ease for injection, quick gelation, lower gelling temperature, stable structure, and nontoxicity, which make it promising in biomedicine and bioengineering as an injectable hydrogel. PMID:22707249

  4. Gum biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    A painkiller is sprayed into the mouth in the area of the abnormal gum tissue. You may also have ... The painkiller put in your mouth should numb the area during the procedure. You may feel some tugging or ...

  5. X-ray and computer modeling studies on gellan-related polymers: molecular structures of welan, S-657, and rhamsan.

    PubMed

    Lee, E J; Chandrasekaran, R

    1991-07-18

    The primary structures of the four bacterial polysaccharides gellan, welan, S-657, and rhamsan are the same with respect to their backbones, but have different side-chains. This difference has a profound influence on their behavior in aqueous media. Solutions of gellan gum form stable aqueous gels under appropriate ionic conditions. By contrast, welan, S-657, and rhamsan do not gel but give very viscous solutions over a wide range of thermal, pH, and salt conditions. X-Ray fiber diffraction analysis and computer modeling of these branched polysaccharides demonstrate that they all have the same half-staggered, double-helical conformations as in the unbranched gellan, suggesting, therefore, that the side chains are responsible for diminishing gelling behavior. Depending on the size and location, the side chains shield the carboxylate groups to varying degrees; this shielding is substantial in welan and S-657, but less in rhamsan. In all cases, side-chain-main-chain interactions within the double helix prevent the carboxylate-mediated aggregation of double helices that is necessary for the gelation. PMID:1954625

  6. Chewing-side preference is involved in differential cortical activation patterns during tongue movements after bilateral gum-chewing: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, H; Ono, T; Honda, E; Sasaki, T; Taira, M; Iriki, A; Kuroda, T; Ohyama, K

    2004-10-01

    Contralateral dominance in the activation of the primary sensorimotor cortex (S1/M1) during tongue movements (TMs) has been shown to be associated with a chewing-side preference (CSP). However, little is known about its interaction with chewing-related cortical activation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and after gum-chewing in six subjects who exhibited a left CSP to determine the relationship between the CSP and activation patterns in the S1/M1 during TMs. Before the subjects chewed the gum, activation foci were found in the bilateral S1/M1. In the left hemisphere, both signal intensity and the area of activation significantly increased during TMs within 10 min after subjects chewed gum. Moreover, this augmented activation significantly decreased within 20 min during tongue protrusion and leftward movement. In the right hemisphere, there were no marked changes during TMs. These results suggest that bilateral gum-chewing enhances activation of the S1/M1 ipsilateral to the CSP during TMs. PMID:15381715

  7. Flow behaviour of gellan sol with selected cations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shipra; Bhattacharya, Suvendu

    2015-02-01

    An understanding of the flow behaviour of the sols before gel formation is important for developing nutrient enriched gels. The influence of cations like CaCl2 (0.05 and 0.1 %, w/w) and FeSO4 (0.05 and 0.1 %, w/w) on the rheological properties of 1 % gellan sol (w/w) prior to gelling was investigated. The apparent viscosity, reported at a shear-rate of 100 s(-1), indicated that the gellan dispersion without any cation possessed lower values compared to other samples containing different cations. The Cross model provided the best fit (0.97 ≤ r ≤ 0.99, p ≤ 0.01) compared to moderate fitting to power law model (0.94 ≤ r ≤ 0.98). Among the different Cross model parameters, the zero-shear viscosity (ηo) increased with the addition of CaCl2 and FeSO4, and with an increase in their concentrations. Zero-shear viscosity values were 0.46 Pas for gellan sol, 0.79 Pas for gellan with 0.05 % (w/w) CaCl2, 1.41 Pas for gellan with 0.1 % CaCl2, 3.85 Pas for gellan with 0.05 % FeSO4 and 4.33 Pas for gellan with 0.1 % FeSO4. An increase in cation concentration from 0.05 to 0.10 % (w/w) marginally increased the relaxation time (λ) values indicating the development of more solid characteristics in the sol. PMID:25694746

  8. Stomach-specific controlled release gellan beads of acid-soluble drug prepared by ionotropic gelation method.

    PubMed

    Narkar, Mrunalini; Sher, Praveen; Pawar, Atmaram

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the present work was the development and evaluation of stomach-specific controlled release mucoadhesive drug delivery system prepared by ionotropic gelation of gellan beads, containing acid-soluble drug amoxicillin trihydrate, using 3(2) factorial design with concentration of gellan gum and quantity of drug as variables. The study showed that beads prepared in alkaline cross-linking medium have higher entrapment efficiency than the acidic cross-linking medium. The entrapment efficiency was in the range of 32% to 46% w/w in acidic medium, which increased up to 60% to 90% w/w in alkaline medium. Batches with lowest, medium, and highest drug entrapment were subjected to chitosan coating to form a polyelectrolyte complex film. As polymer concentration increases, entrapment efficiency and particle size increases. Scanning electron microscopy revealed spherical but rough surface due to leaching of drug in acidic cross-linking solution, dense spherical structure in alkaline cross-linking solution, and rough surface of chitosan-coated beads with minor wrinkles. The in vitro drug release up to 7 h in a controlled manner following the Peppas model (r = 0.9998). In vitro and in vivo mucoadhesivity study showed that beads have good mucoadhesivity and more than 85% beads remained adhered to stomach mucosa of albino rat even after 7 h. In vitro growth inhibition study showed complete eradication of Helicobacter pylori. These results indicate that stomach-specific controlled release mucoadhesive system of amoxicillin gellan beads may be useful in H. pylori treatment. PMID:20180053

  9. What Happens to Swallowed Gum?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is harmless. What Exactly Happens to the Gum? Chewing gum is made of either natural or synthetic materials ( ... Too much of anything can be a problem. Chewing gum is hard on dental work and most gums ...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1349 - Karaya gum (sterculia gum).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Karaya gum (sterculia gum). 184.1349 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1349 Karaya gum (sterculia gum). (a) Karaya gum (sterculia gum) is the dried gummy exudate from the trunk of trees of various species of the genus...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1349 - Karaya gum (sterculia gum).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Karaya gum (sterculia gum). 184.1349 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1349 Karaya gum (sterculia gum). (a) Karaya gum (sterculia gum) is the dried gummy exudate from the trunk of trees of various species of the genus...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1349 - Karaya gum (sterculia gum).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Karaya gum (sterculia gum). 184.1349 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1349 Karaya gum (sterculia gum). (a) Karaya gum (sterculia gum) is the dried gummy exudate from the trunk of trees of various species of the genus...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1349 - Karaya gum (sterculia gum).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Karaya gum (sterculia gum). 184.1349 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1349 Karaya gum (sterculia gum). (a) Karaya gum (sterculia gum) is the dried gummy exudate from the trunk of trees of various species of the genus...

  14. Ispaghula mucilage-gellan mucoadhesive beads of metformin HCl: development by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2014-07-17

    Response surface methodology based on 3(2) factorial design was used to develop ispaghula (Plantago ovata F.) husk mucilage (IHM)-gellan gum (GG) mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl through Ca(2+)-ion cross-linked ionotropic-gelation technique for the use in oral drug delivery. GG to IHM ratio and cross-linker (CaCl2) concentration were investigated as independent variables. Drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release after 10h (R10h, %) were analyzed as dependent variables. The optimized mucoadhesive beads (F-O) showed DEE of 94.24 ± 4.18%, R10h of 59.13 ± 2.27%. These beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR analyses. The in vitro drug release from these beads showed controlled-release (zero-order) pattern with super case-II transport mechanism over 10h. The optimized beads showed pH-dependent swelling and good mucoadhesivity with the goat intestinal mucosa. The optimized IHM-GG mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl exhibited significant antidiabetic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over 10h. PMID:24702916

  15. Tamarind seed polysaccharide-gellan mucoadhesive beads for controlled release of metformin HCl.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Santra, Kousik

    2014-03-15

    The paper describes the development, optimization and evaluation of tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP)-blended gellan gum (GG) mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl through Ca(2+)-ion cross-linked ionic gelation for oral drug delivery. Effects of GG to TSP ratio and cross-linker (CaCl2) concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %), and cumulative drug release after 10h (R10h, %) of TSP-GG mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl were optimized by 32 factorial design. The optimized mucoadhesive beads (F-O) showed DEE of 95.73 ± 4.02%, R10h of 61.22 ± 3.44% and mean diameter of 1.70 ± 0.24 mm.These beads were characterized by SEM and FTIR analyses. The in vitro drug release from these beads showed controlled-release (zero-order) pattern over a period of 10h.The optimized TSP-GG mucoadhesive beads also exhibited pH-dependent swelling, good mucoadhesivity with biological mucosal membrane and significant hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration. PMID:24528714

  16. Alkaline phosphatase encapsulated in gellan-chitosan hybrid capsules.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Ogiwara, Daisuke; Ohkawa, Kousaku; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki

    2005-05-23

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was encapsulated in gellan-chitosan polyion complex (PIC) capsules using a convenient procedure. The recovery of ALP was about 50% when the capsules were prepared by dropping a solution of ALP and gellan mixture (ALP/gellan) into a chitosan solution. When p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate (BCIP) were incubated with ALP/gellan-chitosan capsules as substrates for ALP, the transparent colorless capsules changed to yellow and blue, respectively. The encapsulation of ALP into the PIC capsules was also confirmed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses. The ALP and polypeptides of more than 30 kDa remained without release even after incubation at 4 degrees C for 14 d. The biochemical properties of the encapsulated ALP activity were similar to those of the intact enzyme. When the solution containing p-NPP was loaded on a column packed with ALP/gellan-chitosan capsules at 27 degrees C, approximately 75% of p-NPP was hydrolyzed by passing through the column. No significant leakage of ALP was observed during the procedure, indicating that the capsules were resistant to pressure in the chromatographic operation. Furthermore, 70% of the hydrolytic activity of the packed capsules remained after storage at 4 degrees C for one month. These results suggest that the polyion complex capsules could be useful materials for protein fixation without chemical modification. [Diagram: see text] Encapsulation of ALP into PIC capsules and the morphological changes seen in the absence of the ALP substrate and in the presence of p-NPP and BICP. PMID:15895474

  17. Microencapsulation of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 spores in gellan gum microspheres for the production of biobutanol.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Sweta; Wan Sia Heng, Paul; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to provide further insights on the applicability of microencapsulation using emulsification method, to immobilise Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 spores, for biobutanol production. The encapsulated spores were revived using heat shock treatment and the fermentation efficiency of the resultant encapsulated cells was compared with that of the free (non-encapsulated) cells. The microspheres were easily recovered from the fermentation medium by filtration and reused up to five cycles of fermentation. In contrast, the free (non-encapsulated) cells could be reused for two cycles only. The microspheres remained intact throughout repeated use. Although significant cell leakage was observed during the course of fermentation, the microspheres could be reused with relatively high butanol yield, demonstrating their role as microbial cell nurseries. Both encapsulated and liberated cells contributed to butanol production. PMID:25761520

  18. Evaluation of gellan gum fluid gels as modified release oral liquids.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Mohammed H; Conway, Barbara R; Smith, Alan M

    2014-11-20

    Oral liquids are often preferred for drug administration to patients for whom swallowing is difficult, however, formulating modified release versions can be challenging. A potential route to achieve modified release in oral liquids is by using fluid (sheared) gels formed by introducing a shear field during gelation in gel-forming biopolymers. These fluid gels can act as pourable viscoelastic fluids but retain true gel micro/nano structure. Here, we have demonstrated that fluid gels have potential as paediatric oral liquids preventing release of ibuprofen in simulated gastric fluid. Subsequent release at pH 7.4 was affected by the duration of exposure and magnitude of acid pH with a linear relationship between onset of release and the preceding acidic exposure duration. Delayed release was a result of increasing gel stiffness, a consequence of the acidity of the initial release media and exposure time. A much faster release rate was measured when exposure time in acid was 10 min compared with 60 min. This study highlights the potential to design fluid gels that are tuned to have a specified stiffness at a particular pH and exposure time. This could enable the preparation oral liquids with modified release behaviour. PMID:25169076

  19. Gums and Related Polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    In the context of carbohydrates, gums are usually considered to be non-starch, water-soluble polysaccharides with commercial importance. When used as ingredients in processed foods, they may be called hydrocolloids . Gums are used because of the functionalities they impart to whatever system or product into which they are incorporated. As with other polymers, their chemical structures, together with the nature of the aqueous environment surrounding the molecules (pH, types and concentrations of salts or other solutes, temperature, shear, etc.) determines the shapes of the molecules; the chemical nature and shapes of the molecules determines the gum's physiochemical properties, and their physicochemical properties determines their functionalities. All gums have one similar property, i. e., the ability to thicken water and aqueous systems, but they may impart different rheological properties to the systems they thicken. Certain gums provide certain functionalities better than do other gums.

  20. Oscillatory and steady shear rheology of gellan/dextran blends.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nurul Hawa; Ahmed, Jasim; Hashim, Dzulkifly M; Manap, Yazid Abdul; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2015-05-01

    Oscillatory and steady shear rheology of gellan (G) and dextran (D) solution individually, and in blends (G/D ratio 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 w/v) with a total hydrocolloid concentration of 3 % (w/v) were studied at 25 °C. Individually, 1.5 % dextran and 1.5 % gellan in solution exhibited Newtonian and non-Newtonian behavior, respectively. A blend of equal proportion of dextran and gellan (G/D = 1:1) exhibits a distinct gel point (G' = G″), and further addition of dextran in the blend (G/D = 1:2 and 1:3) resulted predominating liquid-like (G″ > G') behavior. A plot of G' vs G″ distinctly showed the gradual transition of the blend. Shear stress (τ)-shear rate ([Formula: see text]) data fitted well the Herschel-Bulkley model. The G/D blend exhibited shear thinning behavior with flow behavior index less than unity. The Cox-Merz rule did not fit well for the complex shear viscosity (η*) and apparent viscosity (η) of the blend. PMID:25892789

  1. What Happens to Swallowed Gum?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Body Works Main Page What Happens to Swallowed Gum? KidsHealth > Kids > Q&A > Icky Q&A > What ... have a bowel movement (poop). When Is Swallowed Gum a Problem? Swallowing a large mass of gum, ...

  2. Direct visualization of changes in deacylated Na(+) gellan polymer morphology during the sol-gel transition.

    PubMed

    Atkin, N; Abeysekera, R M; Kronestedt-Robards, E C; Robards, A W

    2000-09-01

    Changes in gellan polymer morphology during the sol-gel transition were directly visualized by transmission electron microscopy and a model incorporating these changes and existing physical data is proposed. Our observations suggest that the most thermodynamically stable conformations of gellan polymers in solution, in the absence of added cations, are the double helix and double-helical duplexes. We have demonstrated two forms of lateral aggregation of gellan helices in the presence of Ca(2+) and K(+) ions. One type forms junction zones that lead to network formation and gelation, while the second type leads to the formation of isolated fibers of aggregated helices and inhibition of gelation. The proposed model of gellan gelation is based on these observations where thermoreversibility, gel strength, and endothermic transitions of gellan gels can be explained. PMID:10861381

  3. Viscoelasticity and phase separation of aqueous Na-type gellan solution.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yoko; Takahashi, Rheo; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2010-01-11

    Viscoelastic and phase behaviors of Na-type gellan were investigated. The complex shear modulus of aqueous gellan solutions was monitored as a function of concentration, temperature, and molar mass. At relatively low concentrations, the loss shear modulus, G'', increased steeply at a certain temperature upon cooling, which was attributed to helix formation. Above a certain concentration, a steep increase and then gradual decrease of G'' was observed. The decrease of G'' was significant and is considered to be due to anisotropic phase formation, judging from the macroscopic phase separation into upper isotropic and lower anisotropic phases of a gellan solution kept quiescently in a vial. Polarized light microscopy produced an image showing a nematic liquid crystalline phase. Although gel formation was not observed when gellan alone was used in the present study, the gellan formed a gel in the presence of an appropriate amount of salt. PMID:19817431

  4. The effect of thermal history on the elasticity of K-type gellan gels.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yoko; Yoshimura, Miki; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    2014-11-26

    Elasticity of potassium type gellan gels prepared at different thermal histories was examined using dynamic viscoelastic measurements. The storage Young's modulus E' decreased with increasing cooling rate during gelation. Once gel formation occurred, thermal history at lower temperature did not influence the elastic modulus and thermal stability of the gellan gels. On the other hand, thermal history around gelation temperature influenced strongly the elastic modulus and thermal stability of resulting gels. When the gellan solution was kept for a certain time before cooling at a temperature near the gelation temperature, it was found that gels with higher elastic modulus and thermal stability were formed. PMID:25256474

  5. Gum (Periodontal) Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a mild form that is reversible with good oral hygiene, and periodontitis, a more severe form that can ... treated for gum disease, sticking to a proper oral hygiene routine and visiting your dentist for regular cleanings ...

  6. Gum Graft Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Often They Floss Their Teeth Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Study: Alcohol Consumption ... Gum Disease Tuesday, July 28, 2015 Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Tuesday, June 23, ...

  7. Gum Disease Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Often They Floss Their Teeth Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Study: Alcohol Consumption ... Gum Disease Tuesday, July 28, 2015 Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Tuesday, June 23, ...

  8. Gum Disease and Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Often They Floss Their Teeth Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Study: Alcohol Consumption ... Gum Disease Tuesday, July 28, 2015 Study: Poor Oral Hygiene Habits May Increase Hypertension Risk Tuesday, June 23, ...

  9. Gum Disease in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... patients generally form very little dental plaque or calculus. Generalized aggressive periodontitis may begin around puberty and ... the gums and heavy accumulations of plaque and calculus. Eventually it can cause the teeth to become ...

  10. Gum Disease and Men

    MedlinePLUS

    ... re With Find a Periodontist Gum Disease and Men Periodontal health for men is extremely important as it may impact a ... has found that periodontal disease is higher in men (56.4 percent) than in women (38.4 ...

  11. Trigonella foenum-graecum L. seed mucilage-gellan mucoadhesive beads for controlled release of metformin HCl.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar

    2014-07-17

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) seed mucilage (FSM)-gellan gum (GG) mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl for oral use were developed through ionotropic-gelation technique. Effects of GG to FSM ratio and cross-linker (CaCl2) concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %), and cumulative drug release after 10h (R10h, %) of ionotropically-gelled FSM-GG mucoadhesive beads containing metformin HCl were optimized by 3(2) factorial design. The optimized mucoadhesive beads showed DEE of 92.53 ± 3.85% and R10h of 55.28 ± 1.58% and mean diameter of 1.62 ± 0.22 mm. The in vitro metformin HCl release from these ionotropically-gelled FSM-GG beads was prolonged over 10h and followed zero-order model with super case-II transport mechanism. The optimized mucoadhesive beads also exhibited pH-dependent swelling, good mucoadhesivity with biological mucosal membrane and significant hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration. PMID:24702915

  12. The Effect of Three Gums on the Retrogradation of Indica Rice Starch

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rukun; Huang, Min; Li, Bin; Zhou, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Retrograded starch (RS3) was produced from indica rice starch with three kinds of gums (konjac glucomannan, KGM; carrageenan, CA, USA; and gellan, GA, USA) by autoclaving, respectively, and the effect of the gums on the retrogradation behavior of starch was estimated. The influences of polysaccharide concentration, sodium chloride concentration, autoclaving time, refrigerated time, and pH value on RS3 formation were discussed. Except for sodium chloride’s persistent restraint on RS3, the others all forced RS3 yields higher at first, but lowered it after the peak value. The influencing sequence of these impact factors was: sodium chloride concentration > polysaccharide concentration > autoclaving time > refrigerated time > pH value. The results also proved that in the three gums, KGM plays the most significant role in RS3 changing. It was concluded that the incorporation of each of these three gums into starch, especially KGM, results in an increase or decrease of RS3 under different conditions. This phenomenon could be taken into consideration when developing starchy food with appropriate amount of RS3. PMID:22822444

  13. Modification of palm kernel oil esters nanoemulsions with hydrocolloid gum for enhanced topical delivery of ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Norazlinaliza; Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Mohd BA; Abdullah, Dzulkefly K; Basri, Hamidon

    2012-01-01

    Introduction During recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of nanoemulsion as a drug-carrier system for topical delivery. A nanoemulsion is a transparent mixture of oil, surfactant and water with a very low viscosity, usually the product of its high water content. The present study investigated the modification of nanoemulsions with different hydrocolloid gums, to enhanced drug delivery of ibuprofen. The in vitro characterization of the initial and modified nanoemulsions was also studied. Methods A palm kernel oil esters nanoemulsion was modified with different hydrocolloid gums for the topical delivery of ibuprofen. Three different hydrocolloids (gellan gum, xanthan gum, and carrageenan) were selected for use. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed using palm kernel oil esters as the oil, Tween 80 as the surfactant, and water. Nanoemulsions were prepared by phase inversion composition, and were gradually mixed with the freshly prepared hydrocolloids. The initial nanoemulsion and modified nanoemulsions were characterized. The abilities of the nanoemulsions to deliver ibuprofen were assessed in vitro, using a Franz diffusion cell fitted with rat skin. Results No significant changes were observed in droplet size (~1620 nm) but a significant difference in polydispersity indexes were observed before and after the modification of nanoemulsions using gellan gum, carrageenan, and xanthan gum. The zeta potentials of the initial nanoemulsions (?11.0 mV) increased to ?19.6 mV, ?13.9 mV, and ?41.9 mV, respectively. The abilities of both the initial nanoemulsion (T802) and the modified nanoemulsion to deliver ibuprofen through the skin were evaluated in vitro, using Franz diffusion cells fitted with rat skin. The in vitro permeation data showed that the modified nanoemulsion (Kp value of 55.4 10?3 cm h?1) increased the permeability of ibuprofen 4.40 times over T802 (Kp value of 12.6 10?3 cm h?1) (P < 0.05). Conclusion The modified nanoemulsion may be a promising vehicle to enhance the permeation of ibuprofen for topical delivery. PMID:22973096

  14. Chewing gum and concentration performance.

    PubMed

    Tänzer, U; von Fintel, A; Eikermann, T

    2009-10-01

    The effect of chewing gum on performance was examined. Four Grade 3 (8- to 9-year-olds) classes in a German primary school participated; 2 class-es chewed gum during a 16-min. concentration test. Chewing gum had a significant and positive effect on concentration performance. PMID:19928596

  15. The Gum nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The distance from the sun to the center of the star, Gamma Velorium, is determined in an effort to draw a physical model and identify the ionized energy source of the Gum nebula. The distance is calculated from the local hydrogen density of radio astronomy studies and the hydrogen measure.

  16. A novel gellan-PVA nanofibrous scaffold for skin tissue regeneration: Fabrication and characterization.

    PubMed

    Vashisth, Priya; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha; Pruthi, Parul A; Singh, Rajesh P; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-01-20

    In this investigation, we have introduced novel electrospun gellan based nanofibers as a hydrophilic scaffolding material for skin tissue regeneration. These nanofibers were fabricated using a blend mixture of gellan with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). PVA reduced the repulsive force of resulting solution and lead to formation of uniform fibers with improved nanostructure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) confirmed the average diameter of nanofibers down to 50 nm. The infrared spectra (IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis evaluated the crosslinking, thermal stability and highly crystalline nature of gellan-PVA nanofibers, respectively. Furthermore, the cell culture studies using human dermal fibroblast (3T3L1) cells established that these gellan based nanofibrous scaffold could induce improved cell adhesion and enhanced cell growth than conventionally proposed gellan based hydrogels and dry films. Importantly, the nanofibrous scaffold are biodegradable and could be potentially used as a temporary substrate/or biomedical graft to induce skin tissue regeneration. PMID:26572421

  17. On the solution properties of bacterial polysaccharides of the gellan family.

    PubMed

    Campana, S; Ganter, J; Milas, M; Rinaudo, M

    1992-07-01

    The influence of side chains and substituents on the polyelectrolyte behaviour of aqueous solutions of polysaccharides of the gellan family has been studied. The results of conductimetric and potentiometric titrations suggest that each of these polysaccharides adopts a double-helix conformation. Deacetylation destabilises the helix of rhamsan and gellan, and optical rotation data confirm these results. The side chain in rhamsan is more flexible and is remote from the carboxylate groups, and the behavior of this polysaccharide is similar to that of gellan. Gelation of deacetylated rhamsan occurs in the presence of calcium ions. The intrinsic viscosity as a function of ionic strength depends on the structure of the polysaccharide and on the presence of acetyl groups. PMID:1394322

  18. Gellan in sustained release formulations: preparation of gel capsules and release studies.

    PubMed

    Alhaique, F; Santucci, E; Carafa, M; Coviello, T; Murtas, E; Riccieri, F M

    1996-10-01

    The ability of gellan to form gels in the presence of calcium ions enabled us to prepare capsules by gelation of this polysaccharide around a core containing starch, calcium chloride and a model drug. Release from the dried capsules was studied in vitro by means of the rotating basket technique (USP) in different environmental conditions (distilled water, pH = 2.0, pH = 6.8) and the effects of the presence of increasing amounts of drug in the formulation were also investigated. The behaviour of the gellan capsules was compared with that of beads prepared with the same polysaccharide but containing different additives. Results obtained indicate that gellan is suitable for the formulation of sustained release capsules and that solvent uptake by the dried capsules is most likely the main factor capable of affecting the rate of delivery from the tested preparations. PMID:8894092

  19. Tips for Removing Gum without Cutting Hair

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a jar of creamy style peanut butter or vegetable oil, such as olive oil. Cover the gum completely ... to work. Remove the gum from the hair. Vegetable oil is especially useful when removing gum from eyebrows ...

  20. Enzymatically-treated guar gums

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.H.; Srivastava, V.K.

    1987-07-28

    A method is described of recovering oil from an oil bearing formation by fracturing the step of inserting into the formation, at high pressure, an aqueous composition comprising guar gum in water. The guar gum is first coated and impregnated, while in the solid particulate state, with an aqueous solution of a hydrolytic enzyme.

  1. [Smoking cessation using nicotine gum].

    PubMed

    Schioldborg, P

    1990-04-10

    Smoking cessation in matched groups with (n = 54) versus without (n = 63) nicotine gum took place in order to test the gum with regard to abstinence rate and experienced value. In all, 71% quit smoking, 23% reduced consumption to half, while in 6% there was no change. The frequency was approximately even in the two groups. One month later, 79% of the quitters in the nicotine gum group still remained abstinent, compared with 54% in the control group (p less than 0.05). Six months later these frequencies were reduced to 34% and 20% respectively. Side effects were reported among one third of the users (aching of the jaw, sore throat), while two thirds found the gum useful. These persons found it hard to be without the gum, and that it reduced the craving for tobacco. In other words, it renders smoking cessation more certain. PMID:2333643

  2. The Gum Nebula.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.

    1971-01-01

    A historical review of observations on the Gum Nebula is given together with a survey of knowledge on its size, emission features, and dynamics of expansion. The ultraviolet spectrum of Zeta Puppis is examined in terms of features caused by various absorption lines, and radio emission from Vela X is analyzed, together with the effects of nebular plasma on the propagation of radio pulses from pulsars in the Nebula. The density distribution and the possibility of being produced by the Vela X supernova are discussed.

  3. Cetyl gellan copolymer micelles and hydrogels: in vitro and pharmacodynamic assessment for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Payel; Maiti, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, gellan polymer was conferred amphiphilic character by conjugating alkyl carbon chain (C16) to its backbone via etherification reaction. The amphiphilic copolymer self-assembled into water and formed spherical micellar structures with a mean diameter of 832 nm. Copolymer micellization caused a considerable rise in solubility of simvastatin in water. Later on, the micelle-incorporated drug and pure drug were loaded into aluminium gellan hydrogel beads and characterized. Scanning electron microscopy revealed spherical shape of the beads. The drug entrapment efficiency of the beads (917-927 μm) was found to be 90-94%. Higher dissolution efficiency and consequently, higher rate of drug dissolution was evident in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) than in HCl solution (pH 1.2). The changes in drug release rate as a function of pH correlated with the swelling behaviour of beads. The release of drug was controlled by anomalous diffusion mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses suggested compatibility of drug in the beads. The gellan beads, loaded with micellar drug, reduced 83.45% LDL-cholesterol level in rabbit model following 18 h of oral administration. Thus, the gellan beads containing micellar drug showed their potential in controlling drug release rate and improving pharmacodynamic activity. PMID:25316420

  4. 21 CFR 582.7349 - Sterculia gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sterculia gum. 582.7349 Section 582.7349 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7349 Sterculia gum. (a) Product. Sterculia gum (karaya gum). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.7349 - Sterculia gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sterculia gum. 582.7349 Section 582.7349 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7349 Sterculia gum. (a) Product. Sterculia gum (karaya gum). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 582.7349 - Sterculia gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sterculia gum. 582.7349 Section 582.7349 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7349 Sterculia gum. (a) Product. Sterculia gum (karaya gum). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  7. 21 CFR 582.7349 - Sterculia gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sterculia gum. 582.7349 Section 582.7349 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7349 Sterculia gum. (a) Product. Sterculia gum (karaya gum). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.7349 - Sterculia gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sterculia gum. 582.7349 Section 582.7349 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7349 Sterculia gum. (a) Product. Sterculia gum (karaya gum). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333 Gum ghatti. (a) Gum ghatti (Indian gum)...

  10. Roles of potassium ions, acetyl and L-glyceryl groups in native gellan double helix: an X-ray study.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, R; Radha, A; Thailambal, V G

    1992-02-01

    Native gellan, the natural form of the polysaccharide excreted by the bacterium Pseudomonas elodea, has a tetrasaccharide repeating unit that contains L-glycerol and acetate ester groups, and forms only weak and elastic gels. Based on X-ray diffraction data from well oriented and polycrystalline fibers of its potassium salt, the crystal structure of native gellan, including ions and water, has been determined and refined to a final R-value of 0.17. The molecule forms of a half-staggered, parallel, double helix of pitch 5.68 nm which is stabilized by hydrogen bonds involving the hydroxymethyl groups in one chain and both carboxylate and glyceryl groups in other. Two molecules are packed in an antiparallel fashion in a trigonal unit cell of side a = 1.65 nm. Although the gross molecular morphology and packing arrangements are isomorphous with those observed in the crystal structure of potassium gellan, which is devoid of any substitutions, native gellan exhibits exceptional changes in its ion binding characteristics with respect to gellan. In particular, the L-glyceryl groups do not allow the gellan-like coordinated interactions of the ions and the carbohydrate groups, within and between double helices, which are necessary for strong gelation. These results at the molecular level explain, for the first time, the differences in the behavior of the polymer with and without substitutions. PMID:1591755

  11. Microwave assisted synthesis of acrylamide grafted locust bean gum and its application in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kaity, Santanu; Isaac, Jinu; Kumar, P Mahesh; Bose, Anirbandeep; Wong, Tin Wui; Ghosh, Animesh

    2013-10-15

    Acrylamide grafted copolymer of locust bean gum was prepared by microwave irradiation using ceric ammonium nitrate as redox initiator. The grafting process was optimized in terms of irradiation time, amount of initiator and acrylamide by using constant amount of native locust bean gum. The grafted gum was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction study (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), elemental analysis, contact angle, viscosity, molecular weight, swelling and biodegradability studies. The grafted gum was found to be biodegradable and non-toxic. It was further used to prepare controlled-release matrix tablet of buflomedil hydrochloride. The in vitro release profile of the tablet showed the rate controlling property of acrylamide grafted locust bean gum was similar to that of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC-K15M). PMID:23987450

  12. Grewia gum as a potential aqueous film coating agent. I: Some physicochemical characteristics of fractions of grewia gum

    PubMed Central

    Ogaji, Ikoni J.; Okafor, Ignatius S.; Hoag, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Grewia gum has received attention as a polymeric pharmaceutical excipient in the recent times, being employed as a suspending, film coating, mucoadhesive, and binding agent. The low aqueous solubility, however, has limited its characterization and application. Objective: The purpose of this study was to fractionate and evaluate some physicochemical properties of the gum. Materials and Methods: Aqueous dispersion of the gum was treated at 80C for 30 min in the presence of sodium chloride and was subsequently fractionated by successively centrifuging it at 3445 rpm for 30 min. Skeletal density, solubility, particle size, and rheological as well as thermal characteristics of the fractions were evaluated. The 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and near infrared (NIR) profiles of the fractions were also investigated. The solubility of the gum increased up to fourfold while the viscosity decreased from 244 to as low as70 cP at 40 rpm with some fractions. Results: Grewia gum and the fractions showed good thermal stability exhibiting no thermal events, but charred irreversibly at 297C irrespective of the fraction. The molecular weight averages by weight and by number of the fractions were between 233,100 and 235,000. The 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra showed broad peaks. The NMR and NIR spectra suggested the presence of OH and OCH3 functional groups in this gum. Conclusion: The fractionation improved solubility and facilitated further investigations on its characteristics that may have implication on its processing, application, and optimization as a potential pharmaceutical excipient. PMID:23559825

  13. Rheological evidence of the gelation behavior of hyaluronan-gellan mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mo, Y; Kubota, K; Nishinari, K

    2000-01-01

    It was found that solutions of calcium hyaluronate (CaHA) (0.1 to approximately 0.5 wt%) could form a gel by mixing with solutions of sodium type gellan (0.1 to approximately 0.5 wt%), although neither polymer by itself forms a gel at low concentrations (0.1 to approximately 0.5 wt% in this experiment). The rheological properties of CaHA-gellan mixtures were investigated by dynamic and steady shear measurements. Both storage shear modulus G' and loss shear modulus G'' for CaHA-gellan mixtures increased with increasing time, and tended to an equilibrium value after 1 h. After reaching steady values of G' and G", the frequency dependence of G' and G'' was observed. G' was always larger than G'' in the accessible frequency range from 10(-2) to 10(2) rad/s. The effects of pH and calcium ions were examined. Gel formation of the mixtures was promoted by decreasing pH and adding from 0.01 to 0.1 M calcium ions, but excessive calcium ions weakened the gel. PMID:11204545

  14. Evaluation of antioxidant capacity of ulvan-like polymer obtained by regioselective oxidation of gellan exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Redouan, Elboutachfaiti; Emmanuel, Petit; Michelle, Pillon; Bernard, Courtois; Josiane, Courtois; Cdric, Delattre

    2011-08-01

    Gellan is an exopolysaccharide produced in high yield by the non-pathogenic bacterium Sphingomonas elodea ATCC 31461. In this study, four carboxylated derivatives of gellan (OG-1, OG-2, OG-3 and OG-4) with different uronics acid content were prepared using the TEMPO (nitroxyl radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) mediated oxidation and their antioxidant activities were investigated including scavenging activity of hydroxyl, superoxide anion and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radicals. The results of chemical analysis and (13)C NMR spectrums indicated that the modification was successful. In addition, certain derivative exhibited stronger antioxidant activity compared to that of native ones. The high uronic acids derivative (OG-4) showed the most excellent antioxidant activity in three assays. These results suggested the potential of TEMPO-mediated oxidation in developing water-soluble antioxidative polysaccharides from gellan still taking advantage of its low-cost production. The original carbohydrate structure of OG-4 derivative might find use as surrogates of ulvan, a cell-wall polysaccharides extracted from green seaweeds Ulva sp. PMID:25214086

  15. Herbal-caffeinated chewing gum, but not bubble gum, improves aspects of memory.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Matthew G

    2011-08-01

    Research has shown that standard chewing gum can affect aspects of both attention and memory. The present study examined the effects of Think Gum®, a caffeinated-herbal chewing gum, on both concentration and memory using a series of paper-based and online testing. Compared to standard chewing gum and a no-gum control, chewing caffeinated-herbal gum during testing improved aspects of memory, but did not affect concentration. The findings suggest that caffeinated-herbal chewing gum is an effective memory aid. PMID:21570431

  16. 21 CFR 573.1010 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Xanthan gum. 573.1010 Section 573.1010 Food and... Listing 573.1010 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be safely used in animal feed as follows: (a) The food additive is xanthan gum as defined in 172.695 of this chapter and meets all of...

  17. 21 CFR 573.1010 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Xanthan gum. 573.1010 Section 573.1010 Food and... Listing 573.1010 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be safely used in animal feed as follows: (a) The food additive is xanthan gum as defined in 172.695 of this chapter and meets all of...

  18. 21 CFR 573.1010 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Xanthan gum. 573.1010 Section 573.1010 Food and... Listing 573.1010 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be safely used in animal feed as follows: (a) The food additive is xanthan gum as defined in 172.695 of this chapter and meets all of...

  19. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gum arabic. 582.7330 Section 582.7330 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  20. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gum arabic. 582.7330 Section 582.7330 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  1. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gum arabic. 582.7330 Section 582.7330 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  2. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum arabic. 582.7330 Section 582.7330 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  3. 21 CFR 582.7330 - Gum arabic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gum arabic. 582.7330 Section 582.7330 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7330 Gum arabic. (a) Product. Acacia (gum arabic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  4. 21 CFR 582.7351 - Gum tragacanth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gum tragacanth. 582.7351 Section 582.7351 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7351 Gum tragacanth. (a) Product. Tragacanth (gum tragacanth). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.7339 - Guar gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Guar gum. 582.7339 Section 582.7339 Food and Drugs..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7339 Guar gum. (a) Product. Guar gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  6. 21 CFR 582.7333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 582.7333 Section 582.7333 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7333 Gum ghatti. (a) Product. Gum ghatti. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  7. 21 CFR 582.7351 - Gum tragacanth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gum tragacanth. 582.7351 Section 582.7351 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7351 Gum tragacanth. (a) Product. Tragacanth (gum tragacanth). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 582.7339 - Guar gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guar gum. 582.7339 Section 582.7339 Food and Drugs..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7339 Guar gum. (a) Product. Guar gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  9. 21 CFR 582.7339 - Guar gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Guar gum. 582.7339 Section 582.7339 Food and Drugs..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7339 Guar gum. (a) Product. Guar gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  10. 21 CFR 582.7333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 582.7333 Section 582.7333 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7333 Gum ghatti. (a) Product. Gum ghatti. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  11. 21 CFR 582.7339 - Guar gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Guar gum. 582.7339 Section 582.7339 Food and Drugs..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7339 Guar gum. (a) Product. Guar gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  12. 21 CFR 582.7339 - Guar gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Guar gum. 582.7339 Section 582.7339 Food and Drugs..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7339 Guar gum. (a) Product. Guar gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  13. 21 CFR 582.7333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 582.7333 Section 582.7333 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7333 Gum ghatti. (a) Product. Gum ghatti. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  14. 21 CFR 582.7333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 582.7333 Section 582.7333 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7333 Gum ghatti. (a) Product. Gum ghatti. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  15. 21 CFR 582.7351 - Gum tragacanth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gum tragacanth. 582.7351 Section 582.7351 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7351 Gum tragacanth. (a) Product. Tragacanth (gum tragacanth). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.7333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 582.7333 Section 582.7333 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7333 Gum ghatti. (a) Product. Gum ghatti. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe...

  17. 21 CFR 582.7351 - Gum tragacanth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gum tragacanth. 582.7351 Section 582.7351 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7351 Gum tragacanth. (a) Product. Tragacanth (gum tragacanth). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. 21 CFR 582.7351 - Gum tragacanth.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum tragacanth. 582.7351 Section 582.7351 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers 582.7351 Gum tragacanth. (a) Product. Tragacanth (gum tragacanth). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  19. 21 CFR 573.1010 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing 573.1010 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be safely used in animal feed as follows: (a) The food additive is xanthan gum as defined in 172.695 of this chapter and meets all of...

  20. 21 CFR 573.1010 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing 573.1010 Xanthan gum. The food additive xanthan gum may be safely used in animal feed as follows: (a) The food additive is xanthan gum as defined in 172.695 of this chapter and meets all of...

  1. Alginate beads of Captopril using galactomannan containing Senna tora gum, guar gum and locust bean gum.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Harshal A; Lalitha, K G; Ruckmani, K

    2015-05-01

    Gastro-retentive Captopril loaded alginate beads were prepared by an ionotropic gelation method using sodium alginate in combination with natural gums containing galactomannans (Senna tora seed gum, guar gum and locust bean gum) in the presence of calcium chloride. The process variables such as concentration of sodium alginate/natural polymer, concentration of calcium chloride, curing time, stirring speed and drying condition were optimized. Prepared beads were evaluated for various parameters such as flow property, drug content and entrapment efficiency, size and shape, and swelling index. Surface morphology of the beads was studied using scanning electron microscopy. In vitro mucoadhesion and in vitro drug release studies were carried out on the prepared beads. From the entrapment efficiency and dissolution study, it was concluded that galactomannans in combination with sodium alginate show sustained release property. The bead formulation F4 prepared using combination of sodium alginate and guar gums in the ratio 2:1 showed satisfactory sustained release for 12h. The release of Captopril from the prepared beads was found to be controlled by the swelling of the polymer followed by drug diffusion through the swelled polymer and slow erosion of the beads. PMID:25720832

  2. GumTree: Data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Hugh; Hathaway, Paul; Hauser, Nick; Fei, Yang; Franceschini, Ferdi; Lam, Tony

    2006-11-01

    Access to software tools for interactive data reduction, visualisation and analysis during a neutron scattering experiment enables instrument users to make informed decisions regarding the direction and success of their experiment. ANSTO aims to enhance the experiment experience of its facility's users by integrating these data reduction tools with the instrument control interface for immediate feedback. GumTree is a software framework and application designed to support an Integrated Scientific Experimental Environment, for concurrent access to instrument control, data acquisition, visualisation and analysis software. The Data Reduction and Analysis (DRA) module is a component of the GumTree framework that allows users to perform data reduction, correction and basic analysis within GumTree while an experiment is running. It is highly integrated with GumTree, able to pull experiment data and metadata directly from the instrument control and data acquisition components. The DRA itself uses components common to all instruments at the facility, providing a consistent interface. It features familiar ISAW-based 1D and 2D plotting, an OpenGL-based 3D plotter and peak fitting performed by fityk. This paper covers the benefits of integration, the flexibility of the DRA module, ease of use for the interface and audit trail generation.

  3. Brief Report: Gum Chewing Affects Standardized Math Scores in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Craig A.; Tyler, Chermaine; Stansberry, Sandra A.; Moreno, Jennette P.; Foreyt, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Gum chewing has been shown to improve cognitive performance in adults; however, gum chewing has not been evaluated in children. This study examined the effects of gum chewing on standardized test scores and class grades of eighth grade math students. Math classes were randomized to a gum chewing (GC) condition that provided students with gum

  4. Structural, thermal and rheological characterization of modified Dalbergia sissoo gum-A medicinal gum.

    PubMed

    Munir, Hira; Shahid, Muhammad; Anjum, Fozia; Mudgil, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    Dalbergia sissoo gum was purified by ethanol precipitation. The purified gum was modified and hydrolyzed. Gum was modified by performing polyacrylamide grafting and carboxymethylation methods. The hydrolysis was carried out by using mannanase, barium hydroxide and trifluoroacetic acid. The modified and hydrolyzed gums were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The decrease in viscosity was studied by performing the flow test. The modified and hydrolyzed gums were thermally stable as compared to crude gum. There was increase in crystallinity after modification and hydrolysis, determined through XRD. FTIR analysis exhibits no major transformation of functional group, only there was change in the intensity of transmittance. It is concluded that the modified and hydrolyzed gum can be used for pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:26709145

  5. Gum chewing affects academic performance in adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chewing gum may have an impact on improved memory during specific tasks of recognition and sustained attention. Research objective was to determine the effect of gum chewing on standardized test scores and math class grades of eighth grade students. Four math classes, 108 students, were randomized i...

  6. One-step formation and sterilization of gellan and hyaluronan nanohydrogels using autoclave.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Elita; De Rugeriis, Maria Cristina; Di Meo, Chiara; Censi, Roberta; Coviello, Tommasina; Alhaique, Franco; Matricardi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    The sterilization of nanoparticles for biomedical applications is one of the challenges that must be faced in the development of nanoparticulate systems. Usually, autoclave sterilization cannot be applied because of stability concerns when polymeric nanoparticles are involved. This paper describes an innovative method which allows to obtain, using a single step autoclave procedure, the preparation and, at the same time, the sterilization of self-assembling nanohydrogels (NHs) obtained with cholesterol-derivatized gellan and hyaluronic acid. Moreover, by using this approach, NHs, while formed in the autoclave, can be easily loaded with drugs. The obtained NHs dispersion can be lyophilized in the presence of a cryoprotectant, leading to the original NHs after re-dispersion in water. PMID:25578710

  7. Preparation and characterization of antimicrobial wound dressings based on silver, gellan, PVA and borax.

    PubMed

    Cencetti, C; Bellini, D; Pavesio, A; Senigaglia, D; Passariello, C; Virga, A; Matricardi, P

    2012-10-15

    Silver-loaded dressings are designed to provide the same antimicrobial activity of topical silver, with the advantages of a sustained silver release and a reduced number of dressing changes. Moreover, such type of dressing must provide a moist environment, avoiding fiber shedding, dehydration and adherence to the wound site. Here we describe the preparation of a novel silver-loaded dressing based on a Gellan/Hyaff() (Ge-H) non woven, treated with a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/borax system capable to enhance the entrapment of silver in the dressing and to modulate its release. The new hydrophilic non woven dressings show enhanced water uptake capability and slow dehydration rates. A sustained silver release is also achieved. The antibacterial activity was confirmed on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22939352

  8. Nicotine Gum and Behavioral Treatment: A Placebo Controlled Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Assigned 139 subjects to intensive behavioral or to low-contact smoking treatment and to 2-milligram nicotine gum or to placebo gum in a 2x2 factorial design. Nicotine gum produced higher abstinence rates than did placebo. Subjects receiving low-contact condition plus nicotine gum had excellent abstinence rates at both 26 weeks and 52 weeks.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1330 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...)(28) of this chapter. Chewing gum, § 170.3(n)(6) of this chapter 5.6 Flavoring agent and adjuvant... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 184.1330 Section 184.1330... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1330 Acacia (gum arabic). (a) Acacia (gum arabic)...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1330 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...)(28) of this chapter. Chewing gum, § 170.3(n)(6) of this chapter 5.6 Flavoring agent and adjuvant... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 184.1330 Section 184.1330... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1330 Acacia (gum arabic). (a) Acacia (gum arabic)...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1330 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...)(28) of this chapter. Chewing gum, § 170.3(n)(6) of this chapter 5.6 Flavoring agent and adjuvant... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 184.1330 Section 184.1330... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1330 Acacia (gum arabic). (a) Acacia (gum arabic)...

  12. Brief Report: Gum Chewing Affects Standardized Math Scores in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Craig A.; Tyler, Chermaine; Stansberry, Sandra A.; Moreno, Jennette P.; Foreyt, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Gum chewing has been shown to improve cognitive performance in adults; however, gum chewing has not been evaluated in children. This study examined the effects of gum chewing on standardized test scores and class grades of eighth grade math students. Math classes were randomized to a gum chewing (GC) condition that provided students with gum…

  13. Preparation and in vitro antibacterial evaluation of gatifloxacin mucoadhesive gellan system

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, K.; Nath, G.; Pandit, JK.

    2010-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study The poor bioavailability and therapeutic response exhibited by the conventional ophthalmic solutions due to precorneal elimination of the drug may be overcome by the use of mucoadhesive in situ gel forming systems that are instilled as drops into the eye and undergo a sol-gel transition in the cul-de-sac and have good mucoadhesion with ocular mucus layers. The objective of this study was to formulate ophthalmic mucoadhesive system of gatifloxacin (GTN) and to evaluate its in vitro antibacterial potential against, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Methods : Mucoadhesive systems were prepared using gellan combined with sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) or sodium alginate to enhance the gel bioadhesion properties. The prepared formulations were evaluated for their gelation, and rheological behaviors, mucoadhesion force, in vitro drug release, and antibacterial activity. Results All formulations in non-physiological or physiological conditions showed pseudoplastic behaviors. Increase in the concentration of mucoadhesive agent enhanced the mucoadhesive force significantly. In vitro release of gatifloxacin from the mucoadhesive system in simulated tear fluid (STF, pH of 7.4) was influenced significantly by the properties and concentration of gellan, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium alginate. Significant reduction in the total bacterial count was observed between drug solution (control) and mucoadhesive batches against both tested organisms. Major conclusion The developed mucoadhesive system is a viable alternative to conventional eye drops of GTN due to its ability to enhance bioavailability through its longer precorneal residence time and ability to sustain the release of the drug. PMID:22615622

  14. 21 CFR 201.319 - Water-soluble gums, hydrophilic gums, and hydrophilic mucilloids (including, but not limited to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., carboxymethylcellulose sodium, carrageenan, chondrus, glucomannan ((B-1,4 linked) polymannose acetate), guar gum, karaya..., carboxymethylcellulose sodium, carrageenan, chondrus, glucomannan ((B-1,4 linked) polymannose acetate), guar gum, karaya..., carrageenan, chondrus, glucomannan ((B-1,4 linked) polymannose acetate), guar gum, karaya gum,...

  15. Chewing gum moderates the vigilance decrement.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kate; Johnson, Andrew J; Miles, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    We examine the impact of chewing gum on a Bakan-type vigilance task that requires the continual updating of short-term order memory. Forty participants completed a 30-min auditory Bakan-task either with, or without, the requirement to chew gum. Self-rated measures of mood were taken both pre- and post-task. As expected, the vigilance task produced a time-dependent performance decrement indexed via decreases in target detections and lengthened correct reaction times (RTs), and a reduction in post-task self-rated alertness scores. The declines in both performance and subjective alertness were attenuated in the chewing-gum group. In particular, correct RTs were significantly shorter following the chewing of gum in the latter stages of the task. Additionally, the gradients of decline for target detection and incline for correct RTs were both attenuated for the chewing-gum group. These findings are consistent with the data of Tucha and Simpson (2011), Appetite, 56, 299-301, who showed beneficial effects of chewing gum in the latter stages of a 30 min visual attention task, and extend their data to a task that necessitates the continuous updating of order memory. It is noteworthy that our data contradict the claim (Kozlov, Hughes, & Jones, 2012, Q. J. Exp. Psychology, 65, 501-513) that chewing gum negatively impacts short-term memory task performance. PMID:24754809

  16. Interstellar gas in the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, G.; Jenkins, E. B.; Silk, J.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the interstellar gas near the Gum Nebula by optical observation of 67 stars at Ca II, 42 stars at Na I, and 14 stars in the UV with the Copernicus satellite provided radial velocities and column densities for all resolved absorption components. Velocity dispersions for gas in the Gum Nebula are not significantly larger than in the general interstellar medium; the ionization structure is predominantly that of an H II region with moderately high ionization. Denser, more highly ionized clouds are concentrated toward the Gum Nebula; these clouds do not show the anomalously high ionization observed in the Vela remnant clouds.

  17. Mind Your Mouth: Preventing Gum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Features Can We Prevent Alzheimer's Disease? Mind Your Mouth Wise Choices Links To Prevent Gum Disease Brush your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste. Floss every day. Visit the dentist routinely ...

  18. Modification of hydroxypropyl guar gum with ethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongchao; He, Jianping; Han, Xiaoxiao; Tian, Xiulin; Deng, Mingyu; Chen, Weiping; Jiang, Bo

    2012-10-01

    A new guar gum derivative containing amino group was synthesized through nucleophilic substitution of p-toluenesulfonate activated hydroxypropyl guar gum with ethanolamine. For the preparation of p-toluenesulfonate esters hydroxypropyl guar gum, the results showed that the reaction rate was optimal at 25 C and the reaction could reach equilibrium state when it was carried out for 10h at 25 C. For the nucleophilic substitution of tosyl group with ethanolamine, the reaction was completed after 10h reaction at 50 C. The structures of products were characterized by NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results showed that the p-toluenesulfonate esters can be effectively substituted by ethanolamine to form the hydroxyethyl amino hydroxypropyl guar gum (EAHPG). The content of nitrogen of EAHPG was determined by acid-base titration and element analysis. PMID:22840030

  19. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... following prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is a polysaccharide gum derived from Xanthomonas... the sodium, potassium, or calcium salt. (b) The strain of Xanthomonas campestris is nonpathogenic and... cells of Xanthomonas campestris. (d) The additive meets the following specifications: (1)...

  20. Locust bean gum: a versatile biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Moradiya, Naresh G; Randeria, Narayan P; Nagar, Bhanu J

    2013-05-15

    Biopolymers or natural polymers are an attractive class of biodegradable polymers since they are derived from natural sources, easily available, relatively cheap and can be modified by suitable reagent. Locust bean gum is one of them that have a wide potentiality in drug formulations due to its extensive application as food additive and its recognized lack of toxicity. It can be tailored to suit its demands of applicants in both the pharmaceutical and biomedical areas. Locust bean gum has a wide application either in the field of novel drug delivery system as rate controlling excipients or in tissue engineering as scaffold formation. Through keen references of reported literature on locust bean gum, in this review, we have described critical aspects of locust bean gum, its manufacturing process, physicochemical properties and applications in various drug delivery systems. PMID:23544637

  1. The effect of sugars on the retention of ethyl butyrate by gellan gels.

    PubMed

    Evageliou, Vasiliki; Patsiakou, Anna

    2014-08-15

    The effect of sucrose, glucose and fructose on the retention of ethyl butyrate by low acyl gellan gels was investigated by static headspace gas chromatography. The air/biopolymer partition coefficient (K) and percentage of retention (R%) were determined. When 5 g of sample were left to equilibrate at 37 °C for 24 h, the obtained results were explained in terms of gel rigidity, as increased rigidity resulted in increased aroma retention. Glucose showed the greatest aroma release among the sugars and resulted in either the same or increased aroma release with increasing concentration. Increasing concentrations of fructose and sucrose did not alter aroma release significantly. For 15 g of sample mass, sucrose exhibited the lowest partition coefficient values among the sugars. The two higher sucrose concentrations resulted in decreased coefficient values. For fructose and glucose, aroma retention decreased with increasing concentration. The percentage of retention values were positive for all sugars, throughout their concentration range and for both experiments. PMID:24679778

  2. Synergistic gel formation of xyloglucan/gellan mixtures as sudied by rheology, DSC, and circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yoko; Kim, Bo S; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Shirakawa, Mayumi; Yamatoya, Kazuhiko; Oomoto, Toshio; Asai, Iwao

    2003-01-01

    The gelation behavior of mixtures of tamarind seed xyloglucan (TSX) and sodium form gellan (Na-G) was investigated. The storage and loss shear moduli, G' and G'', of the mixtures showed that a thermoreversible gel was obtained although each polysaccharide alone did not form a gel at experimental conditions. The viscoelastic behavior of the mixtures showed a gel formation of TSX and Na-G induced by synergistic interaction. This synergistic interaction was also revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism. Although TSX alone did not show any peak in DSC curves, mixtures with only a small amount of Na-G, which by itself did not show any peak, showed a single peak. With increasing Na-G content, another peak began to appear at the same temperature at which a peak of Na-G alone appeared. Thermally induced changes in circular dichroism of the mixtures were different from those expected from the individual behavior of TSX and Na-G. PMID:14606892

  3. Manilkara zapota (Linn.) Seeds: A Potential Source of Natural Gum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudarshan; Bothara, Sunil B.

    2014-01-01

    Mucilage isolated from seeds of Manilkara zapota (Linn.) P. Royen syn. is a plant growing naturally in the forests of India. This mucilage is yet to be commercially exploited, and characterized as polymer. Various physicochemical methods like particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been employed to characterize this gum in the present study. Particle size analyses suggest that mucilage has particle size in nanometer. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the mucilage has irregular particle size. The glass transition temperature of the gum was observed to be 138°C and 136°C by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis, respectively. The thermogravimetric analysis suggested that mucilage had good thermal stability. The average molecular weight of mucilage was determined to be 379180, by gel permeation chromatography, while the viscosity of mucilage was observed to be 219.1 cP. The X-ray diffraction spectrometry pattern of the mucilage indicates a completely amorphous structure. Elemental analysis of the gum revealed the contents of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and sulfur to be 80.9 (%), 10.1 (%), 1.58 (%), and 512 (mg/kg), respectively. Mucilage had specific content of calcium, magnesium, potassium, lower concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, lead, and nickel. The major functional groups identified from FT-IR spectrum include 3441 cm−1 (–OH), 1660 cm−1 (Alkenyl C–H & C=C Stretch), 1632 cm−1 (–COO–), 1414 cm−1 (–COO–), and 1219 cm−1 (–CH3CO). Analysis of mucilage by paper chromatography and 1D NMR, indicated the presence of rhamnose, xylose, arabinose, mannose, and fructose. PMID:24729907

  4. Manilkara zapota (Linn.) Seeds: A Potential Source of Natural Gum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudarshan; Bothara, Sunil B

    2014-01-01

    Mucilage isolated from seeds of Manilkara zapota (Linn.) P. Royen syn. is a plant growing naturally in the forests of India. This mucilage is yet to be commercially exploited, and characterized as polymer. Various physicochemical methods like particle size analysis, scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, gel permeation chromatography, X-ray diffraction spectrometry, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been employed to characterize this gum in the present study. Particle size analyses suggest that mucilage has particle size in nanometer. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that the mucilage has irregular particle size. The glass transition temperature of the gum was observed to be 138°C and 136°C by differential scanning calorimetry and differential thermal analysis, respectively. The thermogravimetric analysis suggested that mucilage had good thermal stability. The average molecular weight of mucilage was determined to be 379180, by gel permeation chromatography, while the viscosity of mucilage was observed to be 219.1 cP. The X-ray diffraction spectrometry pattern of the mucilage indicates a completely amorphous structure. Elemental analysis of the gum revealed the contents of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and sulfur to be 80.9 (%), 10.1 (%), 1.58 (%), and 512 (mg/kg), respectively. Mucilage had specific content of calcium, magnesium, potassium, lower concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, cobalt, lead, and nickel. The major functional groups identified from FT-IR spectrum include 3441 cm(-1) (-OH), 1660 cm(-1) (Alkenyl C-H & C=C Stretch), 1632 cm(-1) (-COO-), 1414 cm(-1) (-COO-), and 1219 cm(-1) (-CH3CO). Analysis of mucilage by paper chromatography and 1D NMR, indicated the presence of rhamnose, xylose, arabinose, mannose, and fructose. PMID:24729907

  5. Study Suggests Link Between Gum Disease, Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePLUS

    ... between gum disease and an increased risk of breast cancer, this study does not prove a direct link." More study needs to be done to see if inflammatory factors such as gum disease contribute to the ...

  6. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rostami, Farnaz

    2015-01-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems’ researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We’ve reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmented through years. The advantages and therapeutic benefits of chewing gum support its development as we can see new formulations with new drugs contained have been produced from past and are going to find a place in market by formulation of new medicated chewing gums. Potential applications of medicated chewing gums are highly widespread as they will be recognized in future. Nowadays standards for qualifying chewing gums are the same as tablets. Patient-centered studies include medicated chewing gums as a delivery system too which creates compliance for patients. PMID:26109999

  7. Medicated chewing gum, a novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rostami, Farnaz

    2015-04-01

    New formulations and technologies have been developed through oral drug delivery systems' researches. Such researches display significance of oral route amongst patients. We've reviewed all the features associated with medicated chewing gum as a modern drug delivery by introducing the history, advantages and disadvantages, methods of manufacturing, composition differences, evaluation tests and examples of varieties of medicated chewing gums. Acceptance of medicated chewing gum has been augmented through years. The advantages and therapeutic benefits of chewing gum support its development as we can see new formulations with new drugs contained have been produced from past and are going to find a place in market by formulation of new medicated chewing gums. Potential applications of medicated chewing gums are highly widespread as they will be recognized in future. Nowadays standards for qualifying chewing gums are the same as tablets. Patient-centered studies include medicated chewing gums as a delivery system too which creates compliance for patients. PMID:26109999

  8. Interstellar gas in the Gum Nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Wallerstein, G.; Silk, J.; Jenkins, E.B.

    1980-09-15

    We have surveyed the interstellar gas in and around the Gum Nebula by optically observing 67 stars at Ca II, 42 stars at Na I, and 14 stars in the ultraviolet with the Copernicus satellite. Velocity dispersions for gas in the Gum Nebula, excluding the region of Vela remnant filaments, are not significantly larger than in the general interstellar medium. The ionization structure is predominantly that of an H II region with moderately high ionization, i.e., strong Si III and S III, in clouds with Vertical BarV/sub LSR/Vertical Bar> or approx. =10 km s/sup -1/. Furthermore, we find an increase in fine-structure excitation with increasing component LSR velocity, suggestive of ram-pressure confinement for the intermediate-velocity clouds. These denser, more highly ionized clouds appear to be concentrated toward the inner Gum Nebula, where a somewhat higher velocity dispersion is found than in the outer regions. Clouds in the Gum Nebula do not show the anomalously high ionization seen in the Vela remnant clouds. The observational data are generally consistent with a model of the Gum Nebula as an H II region ionized by OB stars and stirred up by multiple stellar winds.

  9. Effect on electroencephalogram of chewing flavored gum.

    PubMed

    Morinushi, T; Masumoto, Y; Kawasaki, H; Takigawa, M

    2000-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect on the electroencephalogram (EEG) of a chewing gum with and without our prepared new flavor. Electroencephalograms were obtained after the following three tests: chewing pure gumbase with sucrose (standard gumbase), chewing flavored standard gum and the inhalation of flavored aromatic oil. As the control, we used the pre-stimulus control EEG record without a stimulus. We examined the relationship between the pre-stimulus control record and the post-stimulus record using the changes of power in four bands. Chewing the standard gumbase led to an increase in the alpha wave and a decrease in the beta wave. Chewing the flavored standard gum and inhaling the flavored aromatic oil each increased the alpha and beta waves. In addition, chewing the flavored standard gum led to a change in the ratio of theta wave in the frontal area. The difference in the theta, alpha and beta bands in chewing gum with and without the added flavor suggested that the flavor as well as chewing could induce concentration with a harmonious high arousal state in brain function. PMID:11145462

  10. 21 CFR 184.1330 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Chewing gum, § 170.3(n)(6) of this chapter 5.6 Flavoring agent and adjuvant, § 170.3(o)(12) of this... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acacia (gum arabic). 184.1330 Section 184.1330 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1330 Acacia (gum arabic). (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1330 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chapter; stabilizer and thickener, § 170.3(o)(28) of this chapter. Chewing gum, § 170.3(n)(6) of this... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acacia (gum arabic). 184.1330 Section 184.1330... GRAS § 184.1330 Acacia (gum arabic). (a) Acacia (gum arabic) is the dried gummy exudate from stems...

  12. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Gum spirits of turpentine. 160.7 Section 160.7... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation gum spirits of turpentine shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin...

  13. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Gum spirits of turpentine. 160.7 Section 160.7... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation gum spirits of turpentine shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin...

  14. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Gum spirits of turpentine. 160.7 Section 160.7... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation gum spirits of turpentine shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree,...

  16. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree,...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree, Ceratonia siliqua (Linne), a leguminous...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree,...

  20. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  1. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Locust (carob) bean gum. 184.1343 Section 184.1343... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1343 Locust (carob) bean gum. (a) Locust (carob) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree,...

  3. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  4. 21 CFR 582.7343 - Locust bean gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... bean gum. (a) Product. Locust (carob) bean gum. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Locust bean gum. 582.7343 Section 582.7343 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  5. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gum spirits of turpentine. 160.7 Section 160.7... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation gum spirits of turpentine shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin...

  6. 7 CFR 160.7 - Gum spirits of turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Gum spirits of turpentine. 160.7 Section 160.7... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General 160.7 Gum spirits of turpentine. The designation gum spirits of turpentine shall refer to the kind of spirits of turpentine obtained by distillation of the oleoresin...

  7. Biobased alternatives to guar gum as tackifiers for hydromulch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guar gum, obtained from guar [Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.] seeds, is currently the principal gum used as a tackifier (binder) for hydraulically-applied mulches (hydromulches) used in erosion control. The oil industry’s increased use of guar gum in hydraulic fracturing together with lower glo...

  8. The Gum Nebula and Related Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Proceedings of a symposium concerning the Gum Nebula (GN) and related topics are reported. Papers presented include: Colin Gum and the discovery of the GN; identification of the GN as the fossil Stromgren sphere of Vela X Supernova; size and shape of GN; formation of giant H-2 regions following supernova explosions; radio astronomy Explorer 1 observations of GN; cosmic ray effects in the GN; low intensity H beta emission from the interstellar medium; and how to recognize and analyze GN. Astronomical charts and diagrams are included.

  9. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Jalilian, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caffeine which exists in drinks such as coffee as well as in drug dosage forms in the global market is among the materials that increase alertness and decrease fatigue. Compared to other forms of caffeine, caffeine gum can create faster and more prominent effects. In this study, the main goal is to design a new formulation of caffeine gum with desirable taste and assess its physicochemical properties. Materials and Methods: Caffeine gum was prepared by softening of gum bases and then mixing with other formulation ingredients. To decrease the bitterness of caffeine, sugar, aspartame, liquid glucose, sorbitol, manitol, xylitol, and various flavors were used. Caffeine release from gum base was investigated by mechanical chewing set. Content uniformity test was also performed on the gums. The gums were evaluated in terms of organoleptic properties by the Latin-Square design at different stages. Results: After making 22 formulations of caffeine gums, F11 from 20 mg caffeine gums and F22 from 50 mg caffeine gums were chosen as the best formulation in organoleptic properties. Both types of gum released about 90% of their own drug content after 30 min. Drug content of 20 and 50 mg caffeine gum was about 18.2-21.3 mg and 45.7-53.6 mg respectively. Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release) were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test. PMID:24223387

  10. Nitrogen conversion factors for the proteinaceous content of gums permitted as food additives.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D M

    1986-01-01

    Nitrogen conversion factors for gum arabic (Acacia senegal (L.) Willd.), gum tragacanth (Asiatic Astragalus spp.), gum karaya (Sterculia spp.), guar gum (Cyamopsis spp.), locust bean (carob) gum (Ceratonia spp.), tara gum (Caesalpinia spp.), and xanthan gum (Xanthomonas campestris) have been calculated from data for the amino acid compositions of their proteinaceous components. The factors derived differ from the arbitrary values (5.7 or 6.25) at present specified by international regulatory authorities for some emulsifiers, stabilizers and thickeners. PMID:3743832

  11. Addiction to the nicotine gum in never smokers

    PubMed Central

    Etter, Jean-Franois

    2007-01-01

    Background Addiction to nicotine gum has never been described in never smokers or in never users of tobacco. Methods Internet questionnaire in 20042006 in a self-selected sample of 434 daily users of nicotine gum. To assess dependence on nicotine gum, we used modified versions of the Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale (NDSS), the Fagerstrm Test for Nicotine Dependence and the Cigarette Dependence Scale. Results Five never smokers used the nicotine gum daily. They had been using the nicotine gum for longer than the 429 ever smokers (median = 6 years vs 0.8 years, p = 0.004), and they had higher NDSS-gum Tolerance scores (median = 0.73 vs = -1.0, p = 0.03), a difference of 1.5 standard deviation units. Two never smokers had never used smokeless tobacco, both answered "extremely true" to: "I use nicotine gums because I am addicted to them", both "fully agreed" with: "after a few hours without chewing a nicotine gum, I feel an irresistible urge to chew one" and: "I am a prisoner of nicotine gum". Conclusion This is to our knowledge the first report of addiction to nicotine gum in never users of tobacco. However, this phenomenon is rare, and although the long-term effect of nicotine gum is unknown, this product is significantly less harmful than tobacco. PMID:17640334

  12. Residual gastric fluid volume and chewing gum before surgery.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Renate C; Ponnamma, Chandra M; Freyle, David; Wang, Shu-Ming; Kain, Zeev N

    2006-02-01

    In this study we sought to determine if chewing gum preoperatively increases gastric fluid volume (GFV) and changes gastric acidity. Children, 5-17 yr old, were randomized to one of three groups: a control group that was not given any gum, a group that was given sugarless bubble gum, and a group that was given sugared bubble gum. Patients in the two gum groups were instructed to chew their gum for a period of 30 min. After induction of anesthesia and tracheal intubation, the stomach was suctioned with a salem sump orogastric tube. We found that children who did not chew gum had significantly smaller GFV as compared with children who chewed sugared and sugarless gum (0.35 [0.2-0.5] mL/kg versus 0.88 [0.6-1.4] mL/kg versus 0.69 [0.4-1.6] mL/kg; P = 0.0001). Children who did not chew gum also had a significantly lower gastric fluid pH as compared with children chewing sugared and sugarless gum (geometric mean, 1.91 versus 2.25 versus 2.19; P = 0.007). We conclude that children who present for surgery while chewing gum have significantly larger GFV and higher pH. PMID:16428535

  13. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS 184.1333...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1333 - Gum ghatti.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gum ghatti. 184.1333 Section 184.1333 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1333...

  17. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gum guaiac. 582.3336 Section 582.3336 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives ...

  18. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gum guaiac. 582.3336 Section 582.3336 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives ...

  19. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gum guaiac. 582.3336 Section 582.3336 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives ...

  20. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gum guaiac. 582.3336 Section 582.3336 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives ...

  1. ESR spectroscopic properties of irradiated gum Arabic.

    PubMed

    Leonor, S J; Gómez, J A; Kinoshita, A; Calandreli, I; Tfouni, E; Baffa, O

    2013-12-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of irradiated gum Arabic with doses between 0.5 and 5 kGy were studied. A linear relationship between the absorbed dose and the intensities of the ESR spectra was observed. ESR spectra of irradiated gum Arabic showed a decay of relative concentrations of free radicals originated by radiation and the production of at least two species of free radicals with half-times: 3.3 and 125.4 h. The results of spectral simulations for these radical groups were giso=2.0046; A=1.2 mT and gx=gy=2.0062, gz=2.0025. Hydration and dehydration of irradiated gum Arabic returns the ESR spectrum to its initial state before irradiation. The results show that ESR can be used as simple and reliable method to detect irradiated gum Arabic up to 60 days after initial radiation with doses on the order of 5 kGy. PMID:23870902

  2. Karaya gum electrocardiographic electrodes for preterm infants.

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, P H; Rutter, N

    1987-01-01

    Changes in transepidermal water loss were used to measure skin damage caused by removal of electrocardiograph electrodes in 20 preterm infants. Electrodes secured by conventional adhesive damaged the skin, leading to a potentially dangerous increase in skin permeability. In contrast, those secured by karaya gum caused no skin damage. PMID:3435167

  3. 21 CFR 582.3336 - Gum guaiac.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gum guaiac. 582.3336 Section 582.3336 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives ...

  4. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... polysaccharide gum derived from Xanthomonas campestris by a pure-culture fermentation process and purified by... hexose units and is manufactured as the sodium, potassium, or calcium salt. (b) The strain of Xanthomonas... that renders it free of viable cells of Xanthomonas campestris. (d) The additive meets the...

  5. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... polysaccharide gum derived from Xanthomonas campestris by a pure-culture fermentation process and purified by... hexose units and is manufactured as the sodium, potassium, or calcium salt. (b) The strain of Xanthomonas... that renders it free of viable cells of Xanthomonas campestris. (d) The additive meets the...

  6. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... polysaccharide gum derived from Xanthomonas campestris by a pure-culture fermentation process and purified by... hexose units and is manufactured as the sodium, potassium, or calcium salt. (b) The strain of Xanthomonas... that renders it free of viable cells of Xanthomonas campestris. (d) The additive meets the...

  7. 21 CFR 172.695 - Xanthan gum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... polysaccharide gum derived from Xanthomonas campestris by a pure-culture fermentation process and purified by... hexose units and is manufactured as the sodium, potassium, or calcium salt. (b) The strain of Xanthomonas... that renders it free of viable cells of Xanthomonas campestris. (d) The additive meets the...

  8. Gum Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... List of All Topics All Gum Disease - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) ...

  9. Relationships Between Gum-Chewing and Stress.

    PubMed

    Konno, Michiyo; Takeda, Tomotaka; Kawakami, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Kazunori; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Takemura, Naohiro; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that chewing is thought to affect stress modification in humans. Also, studies in animals have demonstrated that active chewing of a wooden stick during immobilization stress ameliorates the stress-impaired synaptic plasticity and prevents stress-induced noradrenaline release in the amygdala. On the other hand, studies have suggested that the right prefrontal cortex (PFC) dominates the regulation of the stress response system, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The International Affective Digitized Sounds-2 (IADS) is widely used in the study of emotions and neuropsychological research. Therefore, in this study, the effects of gum-chewing on physiological and psychological (including PFC activity measured by NIRS) responses to a negative stimulus selected from the IADS were measured and analyzed. The study design was approved by the Ethics Committee of Tokyo Dental College (No. 436).We studied 11 normal adults using: cerebral blood oxygenation in the right medial PFC by multi-channel NIRS; alpha wave intensity by EEG; autonomic nervous function by heart rate; and emotional conditions by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) test and the 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Auditory stimuli selected were fewer than 3.00 in Pleasure value. Sounds were recorded in 3 s and reproduced at random using software. Every task session was designed in a block manner; seven rests: Brown Noise (30 s) and six task blocks: auditory stimuli or auditory stimuli with gum-chewing (30 s). During the test, the participants' eyes were closed. Paired Student's t-test was used for the comparison (P < 0.05). Gum-chewing showed a significantly greater activation in the PFC, alpha wave appearance rate and HR. Gum-chewing also showed a significantly higher VAS score and a smaller STAI level indicating 'pleasant'. Gum-chewing affected physiological and psychological responses including PFC activity. This PFC activation change might influence the HPA axis and ANS activities. In summary, within the limitations of this study, the findings suggest that gum-chewing reduced stress-related responses. Gum-chewing might have a possible effect on stress coping. PMID:26782231

  10. Effect of GutsyGum(tm), A Novel Gum, on Subjective Ratings of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Following A Refluxogenic Meal.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel; Sam, Cecilia H Y; Green, Tim; Wood, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Chewing gum alleviates symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) following a refluxogenic meal. GutsyGum(tm), a chewing gum developed to alleviate the symptoms of GER contains calcium carbonate, with a proprietary blend of licorice extract, papain, and apple cider vinegar (GiGs®). The efficacy of GutsyGum(tm) was determined in alleviating the symptoms of GER after a refluxogenic meal compared to placebo gum. This double-blind, placebo-controlled-crossover trial with a one-week washout between treatments had 24 participants with a history of GER consume a refluxogenic meal and then chew GutsyGum(tm) or placebo gum. Participants completed GER symptom questionnaires, consisting of symptom based 10 cm Visual Analogue Scales, immediately following the meal and then at regular intervals out to four hours postmeal. Adjusted mean ± SEM heartburn score (15-min postmeal to 240 min) was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo gum treatment (0.81 ± 0.20 vs. 1.45 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.034). Mean acid reflux score was significantly lower in GutsyGum(tm) than in placebo treatment (0.72 ± 0.19 vs. 1.46 ± 0.19 cm; p = 0.013). There were no significant differences for any of the secondary outcomes. However, pain approached significance with less pain reported in GutsyGum(tm) versus placebo treatment (0.4 ± 0.2 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.081). Although nausea (p = 0.114) and belching (p = 0.154) were lower following GutsyGum(tm), the difference was not statistically significant. GutsyGum(tm) is more effective than a placebo gum in alleviating primary symptoms of heartburn and acid reflux (Clinical Trial Registration: ACTRN12612000973819). PMID:25144853

  11. An association between temporomandibular disorder and gum chewing.

    PubMed

    Correia, Diana; Real Dias, Maria Carlos; Castanho Moacho, Antonio; Crispim, Pedro; Luis, Henrique; Oliveira, Miguel; Carames, Joao

    2014-01-01

    This single center, randomized, small study sought to investigate the prevalence and frequency of chewing gum consumption, and whether there is a relationship between these factors and the presence of symptoms associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Subjects were divided into 7 groups based on their parafunctional oral habits. Of these, subjects who chewed gum were divided into 5 subgroups (A-E) based on their gum chewing habits. Group A chewed gum <1 hour/day (n = 12), Group B chewed gum 1-2 hours/day (n = 11), Group C chewed gum 3 hours/day (n = 6), and Group D chewed gum >3 hours at a time (n = 8); the frequency of gum chewing in Groups A-D was once a week. Group E subjects chewed gum 1-3 times/week for at least 1 hour each occurrence (n = 2). Sixty-three percent of the subjects in Group D reported TMD symptoms of arthralgia and myofascial pain. Thirty-three percent of the subjects in Group C showed symptoms of arthralgia. Eighty-three percent of the subjects in Group A and 27% in Group B reported myofascial pain. All subjects in Group E reported masseter hypertrophy. The remaining 2 groups were Group F, subjects that didn't chew gum but had other parafunctional oral habits (n = 2), and Group G, subjects who didn't have parafunctional oral habits (n = 12). PMID:25369399

  12. Antibacterial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized with gum ghatti and gum olibanum: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Sashidhar, Rao Beedu

    2015-02-01

    Presently, silver nanoparticles produced by biological methods have received considerable significance owing to the natural abundance of renewable, cost-effective and biodegradable materials, thus implementing the green chemistry principles. Compared with the nanoparticles synthesized using chemical methods, most biogenic silver nanoparticles are protein capped, which imparts stability and biocompatibility, and enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, we compared the antibacterial effect of two biogenic silver nanoparticles produced with natural plant gums: gum ghatti and gum olibanum against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Bacterial interaction with nanoparticles was probed both in planktonic and biofilm modes of growth; employing solid agar and liquid broth assays for inhibition zone, antibiofilm activity, inhibition of growth kinetics, leakage of intracellular contents, membrane permeabilization and reactive oxygen species production. In addition, cytotoxicity of the biogenic nanoparticles was evaluated in HeLa cells, a human carcinoma cell line. Antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of the silver nanoparticles synthesized with gum ghatti (Ag NP-GT) was greater than that produced with gum olibanum (Ag NP-OB). This could be attributed to the smaller size (5.7?nm), monodispersity and zeta potential of the Ag NP-GT. The study suggests that Ag NP-GT can be employed as a cytotoxic bactericidal agent, whereas Ag NP-OB (7.5?nm) as a biocompatible bactericidal agent. PMID:25138141

  13. Direct photography of the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Roosen, R. G.; Thompson, J.; Ludden, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses a series of wide-angle photographs taken of the Gum Nebula in the traditional region including H-alpha with the aid of a 40-cm and an 80-cm lens in both the red and the green. The photographs support the large dimensions (75 deg in galactic longitude by 40 deg in galactic latitude) of the Gum Nebula suggested earlier, and the appearance is consistent with an origin due to photons from a supernova outburst. The relatively high-density gas has cooled and is visible on the red plates. The low-density gas has remained at a high temperature and may be visible as diffuse emission on the green plates.

  14. Biodegradation of Xanthan Gum by Bacillus sp

    PubMed Central

    Cadmus, Martin C.; Jackson, Linda K.; Burton, Kermit A.; Plattner, Ronald D.; Slodki, Morey E.

    1982-01-01

    Strains tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. were isolated from sewage sludge and soil and shown to elaborate extracellular enzymes that degrade the extracellular polysaccharide (xanthan gum, polysaccharide B-1459) of Xanthomonas campestris NRRL B-1459. Enzyme production by one strain was greatly enhanced when the strain was incubated in a mixed culture. Products of degradation were identified as d-glucuronic acid, d-mannose, pyruvylated mannose, 6-O-acetyl d-mannose, and a (1?4)-linked glucan. These products correlate with the known structure of the gum. The complexity of the product mixture indicated that the xanthanase was a mixture of carbohydrases. The xanthanase complexes were similar to one another in temperature stability, pH and temperature optima, degree of substrate degradation, and enzymolysis products. Differences in pH stability, salt tolerance, recoverability, and yields of enzyme were observed. PMID:16346068

  15. The Gum nebula and related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.; Brandt, J. C.; Stecher, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Papers were presented in conference sessions on the Gum nebula, the Vela X remnant, the hot stars gamma Velorum and zeta Puppis, the B associations in the Vela-Puppis complex, and pulsars. Ground-based optical and radio astronomy; rocket and satellite observations in the radio, visible, ultraviolet, and X-ray regions; and theoretical problems in the physical state of the interstellar medium, stellar evolution, and runaway star dynamics were considered.

  16. Validating the applicability of the GUM procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Maurice G.; Harris, Peter M.

    2014-08-01

    This paper is directed at practitioners seeking a degree of assurance in the quality of the results of an uncertainty evaluation when using the procedure in the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) (JCGM 100?:?2008). Such assurance is required in adhering to general standards such as International Standard ISO/IEC 17025 or other sector-specific standards. We investigate the extent to which such assurance can be given. For many practical cases, a measurement result incorporating an evaluated uncertainty that is correct to one significant decimal digit would be acceptable. Any quantification of the numerical precision of an uncertainty statement is naturally relative to the adequacy of the measurement model and the knowledge used of the quantities in that model. For general univariate and multivariate measurement models, we emphasize the use of a Monte Carlo method, as recommended in GUM Supplements 1 and 2. One use of this method is as a benchmark in terms of which measurement results provided by the GUM can be assessed in any particular instance. We mainly consider measurement models that are linear in the input quantities, or have been linearized and the linearization process is deemed to be adequate. When the probability distributions for those quantities are independent, we indicate the use of other approaches such as convolution methods based on the fast Fourier transform and, particularly, Chebyshev polynomials as benchmarks.

  17. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 108 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity. PMID:25602256

  18. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Stefan W; van der Mei, Henny C; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8) bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity. PMID:25602256

  19. Guar gum: processing, properties and food applications-A Review.

    PubMed

    Mudgil, Deepak; Barak, Sheweta; Khatkar, Bhupendar Singh

    2014-03-01

    Guar gum is a novel agrochemical processed from endosperm of cluster bean. It is largely used in the form of guar gum powder as an additive in food, pharmaceuticals, paper, textile, explosive, oil well drilling and cosmetics industry. Industrial applications of guar gum are possible because of its ability to form hydrogen bonding with water molecule. Thus, it is chiefly used as thickener and stabilizer. It is also beneficial in the control of many health problems like diabetes, bowel movements, heart disease and colon cancer. This article focuses on production, processing, composition, properties, food applications and health benefits of guar gum. PMID:24587515

  20. Tragacanth gum as a natural polymeric wall for producing antimicrobial nanocapsules loaded with plant extract.

    PubMed

    Ghayempour, Soraya; Montazer, Majid; Mahmoudi Rad, Mahnaz

    2015-11-01

    Tragacanth gum as a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer with good properties including emulsifying, viscosity and cross-linking ability can be used as the wall material in encapsulation of different compounds, specifically plant extracts. In this paper, for the first time, Tragacanth gum was used to produce nanocapsules containing plant extract through microemulsion method. The effect of different parameters on the average size of prepared nanocapsules in presence of aluminum and calcium chloride through ultrasonic and magnetic stirrer was investigated. The high efficient nanocapsules were prepared with spherical shape and smooth surface. The average size of nanocapsules prepared through ultrasonic using aluminum chloride (22nm) was smaller than other products. The structure of prepared nanocapsules was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. Antimicrobial activity of different nanocapsules against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans was investigated by shake flask method during their release showed 100% microbial reduction after 12h stirring. PMID:26311653

  1. Gum Sensor: A Stretchable, Wearable, and Foldable Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotube/Chewing Gum Membrane.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Mohammad Ali; Khosrozadeh, Ali; Wang, Quan; Xing, Malcolm

    2015-12-01

    Presented in this work is a novel and facile approach to fabricate an elastic, attachable, and cost-efficient carbon nanotube (CNT)-based strain gauge which can be efficiently used as bodily motion sensors. An innovative and unique method is introduced to align CNTs without external excitations or any complicated procedure. In this design, CNTs are aligned and distributed uniformly on the entire chewing gum by multiple stretching and folding technique. The current sensor is demonstrated to be a linear strain sensor for at least strains up to 200% and can detect strains as high as 530% with a high sensitivity ranging from 12 to 25 and high durability. The gum sensor has been used as bodily motion sensors, and outstanding results are achieved; the sensitivity is quite high, capable of tracing slow breathing. Since the gum sensor can be patterned into various forms, it has wide applications in miniaturized sensors and biochips. Interestingly, we revealed that our gum sensor has the ability to monitor humidity changes with high sensitivity and fast resistance response capable of monitoring human breathing. PMID:26524110

  2. Current evidence on the anticancer potential of Chios mastic gum.

    PubMed

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2011-11-01

    Chios mastic gum derived from the plant Pistacia lentiscus L. variation chia has been shown to exert beneficial effects on a wide range of human disorders. The most comprehensive data so far have indicated that mastic gum provides protection against gastrointestinal malfunctions and bacterial infections. Substantial evidence has also suggested that mastic gum exhibits hepatoprotective and cardioprotective, antiinflammatory/antioxidant, and antiatherogenic properties. In the last decade, an increasing number of studies further evaluated the potential antiproliferative properties of mastic gum against several types of human neoplasia. The present review aims to summarize the current data concerning the anticancer activities of mastic gum and their major constituents, highlighting also the molecular mechanisms through which they exert anticancer function. Mastic gum constituents that belong to the chemical class of triterpenoids appear to be mainly responsible for its anticancer potential. Thus, a brief discussion is dedicated to the anticancer activity of synthetic and naturally occurring triterpenoid analogues with similar chemical structure to mastic gum constituents. Taking into consideration the available data so far, Chios mastic gum could be considered as a conglomeration of effective anticancer drugs. PMID:22044444

  3. Impact of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Lei Zhao Qinglin Yao Chukang; Zhou Mingkai

    2012-02-15

    The retarding effect of welan gum on tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration, as a partial system of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) hydration, was investigated with several methods. The tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration behavior in the presence or absence of welan gum was researched by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential analysis. Meanwhile, we studied the surface electrochemical properties and adsorption characteristics of welan gum by utilizing a zeta potential analyzer and UV-VIS absorption spectrophotometer. By adding welan gum, the morphology change of ettringite and retardation of hydration stages in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system was observed. Moreover, we detected the adsorption behavior and zeta potential inversion of tricalcium aluminate and ettringite, as well as a rapid decrease in the zeta potential of tricalcium aluminate-gypsum system. The reduction on nucleation rate of ettringite and hydration activity of C{sub 3}A was also demonstrated. Thus, through the adsorption effect, welan gum induces a retarding behavior in tricalcium aluminate-gypsum hydration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption characteristics of welan gum on C{sub 3}A and ettringite have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration behavior and the hydration products are examined in L/S = 3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welan gum retards the process of C{sub 3}A-gypsum hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of welan gum changes the nucleation growth of ettringite.

  4. 78 FR 43226 - Xanthan Gum From Austria and China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Register of February 27, 2013 (78 FR 13379). The hearing was held in Washington, DC, on May 23, 2013, and... COMMISSION Xanthan Gum From Austria and China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... with material injury by reason of imports from China of xanthan gum provided for in subheading...

  5. Gum Arabic as a Cause of Occupational Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Viinanen, Arja; Salokannel, Maija; Lammintausta, Kaija

    2011-01-01

    Background. Gum arabic is a potential sensitizer in food industry. Methods. We examined 11 candy factory workers referred to examinations due to respiratory and skin symptoms paying attention to exposure and sensitization to gum arabic. Skin tests, pulmonary function tests, and respiratory provocation tests were carried out as indicated by the symptoms and findings. Results. Occupational asthma, caused by gum arabic was diagnosed in 4/11 candy factory workers and two of them had also occupational contact urticaria and one had occupational rhinitis. One of them had oral symptoms associated with ingestion of products containing gum arabic. Conclusions. Airborne exposure to gum arabic may cause sensitization leading to allergic rhinitis, asthma, and urticaria. PMID:21747872

  6. Mechanical Characteristics of Spectacle Frames Made of Gum Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Hiroshi; Kakunai, Satoshi; Higa, Masaru; Nishimura, Jun

    Most spectacle frames are now made of titanium alloy. Recently, however, frames made of gum metal have become available. Gum metal is a new material having a low Young's modulus, high strength and high elastic deformation. The effectiveness of these spectacle frames, however, has not yet been mechanically evaluated. In this study, by using the recently proposed optical 3D shape measurement method, the deformation behavior of full-rim and rimless spectacle frames, made of gum metal and available on the market, were compared with that of conventional titanium frames. In addition, CAD models of these frames were created and their mechanical characteristics were evaluated in detail by the finite element method. Consequently, the gum metal frames were found more comfortable to wear than titanium ones. However, the rimless type of gum metal frames allowed more load to reach the front than did the titanium frames, causing lens damage due to stress concentration at the screws.

  7. Gum and deposit formation from jet turbine and diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.; Lan, B.Y.

    1983-09-01

    The present paper describes measurements of rates of oxidation and soluble gum formation in both pure hydrocarbons and in mixed hydrocarbon fuels. Some patterns which appear can be explained on the basis of what is known about co-oxidation of hydrocarbon mixtures. The oxidations were conducted in an oil bath at 130/sup 0/C. Gum formation is closely associated with oxidation. The compounds that copolymerize with oxygen to produce polyperoxides require the least amount of oxygen to yield a mg of gum; among other pure hydrocarbons and fuels, the rates of gum formation and oxygen absorption decrease together. The most useful approach to understanding and reducing gum and deposit formation will come through understanding the effects of condensed aromatic and heterocyclic compounds on the oxidation rates of fuels. 4 figures. 4 tables.

  8. Seed gum of Stryphnodendron barbatiman (Barbatimao)

    SciTech Connect

    Reicher, F.; Leitner, S.C.S.; Fontana, J.D.; Correa, J.B.C.; Sierakowski, M.R.

    1991-12-31

    Stryphnodendron barbatiman (barbatimao) is a native tree that is found throughout the {open_quotes}Cerrados,{close_quotes} a region of Central Brazil. Plant seeds, on water extraction, furnished 28 g% galactomannan (dry-weight basis), the monosaccharide composition of which (galactose to mannose ratio, 1.0:1.5) fits in the legume heteromannan group. This seed gum, after Sevag deproteinization, still retained 6 g% of associated protein and had a molecular weight of about 1.8 MD on gel filtration. A high intrinsic viscosity (1300 cP) was observed for the polysaccharide sample obtained after reflux of the crushed seeds in 80% aqueous methanol.

  9. Deformation Mechanisms of Gum Metals Under Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Rohini Priya

    Gum Metal is a set of multi-component beta-Ti alloys designed and developed by Toyota Central R&D Labs in 2003 to have a nearly zero shear modulus in the direction. After significant amounts of cold-work (>90%), these alloys were found to have yield strengths at a significant fraction of the predicted ideal strengths and exhibited very little work hardening. It has been speculated that this mechanical behavior may be realized through an ideal shear mechanism as opposed to conventional plastic deformation mechanisms, such as slip, and that such a mechanism may be realized through a defect structure termed "nanodisturbance". It is furthermore theorized that for near ideal strength to be attained, dislocations need to be pinned at sufficiently high stresses. It is the search for these defects and pinning points that motivates the present study. However, the mechanism of plastic deformation and the true origin of specific defect structures unique to gum metals is still controversial, mainly due to the complexity of the beta-Ti alloy system and the heavily distorted lattice exhibited in cold worked gum metals, rendering interpretation of images difficult. Accordingly, the first aim of this study is to clarify the starting as-received microstructures of gum metal alloys through conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and aberration-corrected high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy with high-angle annular dark field detector (HAADF-HRSTEM) imaging. To elucidate the effects of beta-stability and starting microstructure on the deformation behavior of gum metals and thus to provide adequate context for potentially novel deformation structures, we investigate three alloy conditions: gum metal that has undergone solution heat treatment (STGM), gum metal that has been heavily cold worked (CWGM), and a solution treated alloy of nominal gum metal composition, but leaner in beta-stabilizing content (ST Ref-1). In order to directly relate observed defect structures to applied loading, we perform ex-situ nanoindentation. Nanoindentation is a convenient method as the plastic deformation is localized and probes a nominally defect free volume of the material. We subsequently characterize the defect structures in these alloys with both conventional TEM and advanced techniques such as HAADF HRSTEM and nanoprobe diffraction. These advanced techniques allow for a more thorough understanding of the observed deformation features. The main findings from this investigation are as follows. As expected we observe that a non-equilibrium phase, o, is present in the leaner beta-stabilized alloy, ST Ref-1. We do not find any direct evidence of secondary phases in STGM, and we find the beta phase in CWGM, along with lath microstructure with subgrain structure consisting of dislocation cell networks. Upon nanoindentation, we find twinning accompanied by beta nucleation on the twin boundary in ST Ref-1 samples. This result is consistent with previous findings and is reasonable considering the alloy is unstable with respect to beta transformation. We find deformation nanotwinning in cold worked gum metals under nanoindentation, which is initially surprising. We argue that when viewed as a nanocrystalline material, such a deformation mechanism is consistent with previous work, and furthermore, a deformation nanotwinned structure does not preclude an ideal shear mechanism from operating in the alloy. Lastly, we observe continuous lattice rotations in STGM under nanoindentation via nanoprobe diffraction. With this technique, for the first time we can demonstrate that the lattice rotations are truly continuous at the nanoscale. We can quantify this lattice rotation, and find that even though the rotation is large, it may be mediated by a reasonable geometrically necessary dislocation density, and note that similar rotations are typically observed in other materials under nanoindentation. HRSTEM and conventional TEM data confirm the presence of dislocations in regions that have sustained large lattice rotations. Finally, we report on the nature of indirectly observed "pinning points" in STGM under nanoindentation that was reported in a previous study. We find through ADF/HAADF STEM that the "pinning points" which cause dislocation bowing in STGM under nanoindentation are actually other dislocations with the line direction normal to the TEM foil, and, in support of this finding, we also observe other in-plane dislocation-dislocation interactions that is responsible for resultant bowing. We observe no direct evidence of any secondary phases, twinning, or nanodisturbances in the STGM case, and the majority of deformation features can be explained by conventional slip mechanism. However, it remains a possibility that an ideal shear mechanism may be accompanying conventional slip in STGMs that may account for the truly continuous nature of the lattice rotations.

  10. Design, formulation and evaluation of nicotine chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Rafiei, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) can help smokers to quit smoking. Nicotine chewing gum has attracted the attention from pharmaceutical industries to offer it to consumers as an easily accessible NRT product. However, the bitter taste of such gums may compromise their acceptability by patients. This study was, therefore, designed to develop 2 and 4 mg nicotine chewing gums of pleasant taste, which satisfy the consumers the most. Materials and Methods: Nicotine, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, different sweetening and taste-masking agents, and a flavoring agent were added to the gum bases at appropriate temperature. The medicated gums were cut into pieces of suitable size and coated by acacia aqueous solution (2% w/v), sugar dusting, followed by acaciasugarcalcium carbonate until a smooth surface was produced. The gums weight variation and content uniformity were determined. The release of nicotine was studied in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer using a mastication device which simulated the mastication of chewing gum in human. The Latin Square design was used for the evaluation of organoleptic characteristics of the formulations at different stages of development. Results: Most formulations released 7983% of their nicotine content within 20 min. Nicotine-containing sugar-coated gums in which aspartame as sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as flavoring agents were incorporated (i.e. formulations F19-SC and F20-SC, respectively) had optimal chewing hardness, adhering to teeth, and plumpness characteristics, as well as the most pleasant taste and highest acceptability to smokers. Conclusion: Taste enhancement of nicotine gums was achieved where formulations comprised aspartame as the sweetener and cherry and eucalyptus as the flavoring agents. Nicotine gums of pleasant taste may, therefore, be used as NRT to assist smokers quit smoking. PMID:23326788

  11. Microbead design for sustained drug release using four natural gums.

    PubMed

    Odeku, Oluwatoyin A; Okunlola, Adenike; Lamprecht, Alf

    2013-07-01

    Four natural gums, namely albizia, cissus, irvingia and khaya gums have been characterized and evaluated as polymers for the formulation of microbeads for controlled delivery of diclofenac sodium. The natural gums were characterized for their material properties using standard methods. Diclofenac microbeads were prepared by ionotropic gelation using gel blends of the natural gums and sodium alginate at different ratios and zinc chloride solution (10%w/v) as the crosslinking agent. The microbeads were assessed using SEM, swelling characteristics, drug entrapment efficiencies and release properties. Data obtained from in vitro dissolution studies were fitted to various kinetic equations to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of drug release, and the similarity factor, f2, was used to compare the different formulations. The results showed that the natural gum polymers varied considerably in their material properties. Spherical and discrete microbeads with particle size of 1.48-2.41 ?m were obtained with entrapment efficiencies of 44.0-71.3%w/w. Drug release was found to depend on the type and concentration of polymer gum used with formulations containing gum:alginate ratio of 3:1 showing the highest dissolution times. Controlled release of diclofenac was obtained over for 5h. Drug release from the beads containing the polymer blends of the four gums and sodium alginate fitted the Korsmeyer-Peppas model which appeared to be dependent on the nature of natural gum in the polymer blend while the beads containing alginate alone fitted the Hopfenberg model. Beads containing albizia and cissus had comparable release profiles to those containing khaya (f2>50). The results suggest that the natural gums could be potentially useful for the formulation controlled release microbeads. PMID:23541556

  12. Determination of locust bean gum and guar gum by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K; Rosa, C; Hischenhuber, C; Meyer, R

    2001-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to differentiate the thickening agents locust bean gum (LBG) and the cheaper guar gum in finished food products. Universal primers for amplification of the intergenic spacer region between trnL 3' (UAA) exon and trnF (GAA) gene in the chloroplast (cp) genome and subsequent restriction analysis were applied to differentiate guar gum and LBG. The presence of <5% (w/w) guar gum powder added to LBG powder was detectable. Based on data obtained from sequencing this intergenic spacer region, a second PCR method for the specific detection of guar gum DNA was also developed. This assay detected guar gum powder in LBG in amounts as low as 1% (w/w). Both methods successfully detected guar gum and/or LBG in ice cream stabilizers and in foodstuffs, such as dairy products, ice cream, dry seasoning mixes, a finished roasting sauce, and a fruit jelly product, but not in products with highly degraded DNA, such as tomato ketchup and sterilized chocolate cream. Both methods detected guar gum and LBG in ice cream and fresh cheese at levels <0.1%. PMID:11234856

  13. Dodecenylsuccinic anhydride derivatives of gum karaya (Sterculia urens): preparation, characterization, and their antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Padil, Vinod Vellora Thekkae; Senan, Chandra; Černík, Miroslav

    2015-04-15

    Esterifications of the tree-based gum, gum karaya (GK), using dodecenylsuccinic anhydride (DDSA) were carried out in aqueous solutions. GK was deacetylated using alkali treatment to obtain deacetylated gum karaya (DGK). The DGK and its DDSA derivative were characterized using gel permeation chromatography/multiangle laser light scattering (GPC/MALLS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, and rheological studies. The degree of substitution was found to be 10.25% for DGK using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The critical aggregation concentration of DDSA-DGK was determined using dye solubilization and surface tension methods. The antibacterial activity of the DDSA-DGK derivative was then investigated against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. The DDSA-DGK derivative has the potential for use as a stabilizing agent in food and nonfood applications. It can also be developed as an antibacterial agent. PMID:25797306

  14. The rheological properties of tara gum (Caesalpinia spinosa).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanbei; Ding, Wei; Jia, Lirong; He, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    The rheological properties of tara gum, as affected by concentration, temperature, pH and the presence of salts and sucrose, were investigated by using steady and dynamic shear measurements and atomic force microscope observation. Tara gum exhibited non-Newtonian, pseudoplastic behaviour without thixotropy at tested concentrations (0.2-1.0%, w/v). Salts (CaCl2 and NaCl) led to a viscosity reduction, which was more sensitive to Ca(2+) than to Na(+). The gum had stable viscosity over a wide pH range (pH 3-11), and the influence of sucrose was concentration dependent. Increasing temperature from 20°C to 80°C decreased the gum viscosity. Frequency sweeps indicated that tara gum (1.0% w/v) behaved as a liquid at low frequency, and acted more like a gel at high frequency. With the decrease of concentration, tara gum may show a viscous property rather than an elastic one. These results are potentially useful for the application of tara gum in food processing. PMID:25172722

  15. Electroencephalographic effects of nicotine chewing gum in humans.

    PubMed

    Pickworth, W B; Herning, R I; Henningfield, J E

    1986-10-01

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) and subjective effects of nicotine chewing gum (0, 2 and 4 mg) were compared in three tobacco deprived (12 hr) heavy smokers. EEG responses were recorded from F7, F8, T5, and T6 positions before and after the subjects chewed nicotine gum (chew rate = 1 per 2 sec) for 10 min and subsequently analyzed by a computer-based data acquisition and analysis system. Analysis of the chewed gum indicated that the subjects extracted approximately 50 percent of the available nicotine. The nicotine gum increased EEG frequencies in the alpha (7.25-14 Hz) and beta (14.25-25 Hz) bands and decreased theta (4-7) Hz) power. The EEG effects were most evident in the resting subject; the effects of the gum were similar but weaker when the EEG was aroused by a mental arithmetic task. Nicotine gum had EEG stimulant effects like those of inhaled tobacco smoke which were most apparent in the relaxed subject. In spite of this similarity, the subjects did not identify the effects of the gum as being identical to those of cigarettes. PMID:3786346

  16. Production of xanthan gum from a chemically defined medium introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Weisrock, W.P.; Klein, H.S.

    1983-02-22

    Heteropolysaccharides produced by the action of Xanthomonas bacteria on carbohydrate media have a potential application as film forming agents, as thickeners in oil field drilling fluids and fracturing liquids and as emulsifying, stabilizing, and sizing agents. Heteropolysaccharides, particularly, xanthan gum, have a significant potential as mobility control agents in micellar polymer flooding. Xanthan gum has excellent viscosifying properties at low concentration, is resistant to shear degradation and exhibits only minimal losses in viscosity as a function of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. For these reasons, xanthan gum is an attractive alternative to synthetic polyacrylamides for enhanced oil recovery operations. 15 claims.

  17. Evaluation of a Treatment Approach Combining Nicotine Gum with Self-Guided Behavioral Treatments for Smoking Relapse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killen, Joel D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Randomly assigned 1,218 smokers to cells in 4 (nicotine gum delivered ad lib, fixed regimen nicotine gum, placebo gum, no gum) x 3 (self-selected relapse prevention modules, randomly administered modules, no modules) design. Subjects receiving nicotine gum were more likely to be abstinent at 2- and 6-month followups. Fixed regimen accounted for

  18. Gellan co-polysaccharide micellar solution of budesonide for allergic anti-rhinitis: an in vitro appraisal.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sabyasachi; Chakravorty, Amrita; Chowdhury, Moumita

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to design a novel amphiphilic co-polysaccharide for the development of anti-rhinitis micellar solution of budesonide. Herein, a long alkyl chain (C18) was successfully grafted onto gellan polysaccharide by etherification reaction. The dispersion of co-polysaccharide in water led to formation of spherical, nanomicellar structures. Depending upon the co-polysaccharide:drug weight ratio (1:1, 1:2 and 1:3), a maximum drug loading (>95%) was noted at the lowest level. The nanomicelles were in the range of 371-750nm and showed negative zeta potential (-48.3 to -67.2mV) values indicating their stability in aqueous system. They exhibited a longer dissolution profile in simulated nasal fluid (pH 5.5). The dissolution efficiency (39.79±0.93%) was maximal at the lowest polymer: drug ratio in 6h. The drug release was found to follow first order kinetic model. Korsmeyer-peppas modeling of in vitro drug release data indicated that besides simple diffusion, no other physical phenomenon was involved in the event of drug release from the nanostructures. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis suggested some degree of physical incompatibility; however Infrared spectroscopy revealed chemical compatibility between drug and co-polysaccharide. Thus, the co-polysaccharide micellar system offers a splendid outlook in controlled intranasal delivery of budesonide for the symptomatic relief of anti-rhinitis. PMID:24820153

  19. Evaluation of CDs and chewing gum in teaching dental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kenneth L; Galvis, Diana; Katz, Ralph V

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this pilot study were: 1. to compare two methods of teaching dental anatomy-CD + lab vs. standard lecture + lab; and 2. to determine whether actively chewing gum during lecture, lab and studying would have an effect on learning. Only the written examination average scores for the gum vs. no gum chewing groups showed differences that appear to be educationally meaningful, though not statistically significant because of the limited number of subjects in this pilot study. This pilot study suggests that: 1. the cost-effective method of using a self-study CD is as educationally effective as a standard lecture; 2. gum chewing resulted in higher scores in the written examination; and 3. future, full-sized studies should be conducted to confirm these findings. PMID:16925010

  20. Design, formulation and evaluation of green tea chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Khalafi, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study is to design, formulate and evaluate the green tea gums with a suitable taste and quality in order to produce an anti-oxidant chewing gum. Materials and Methods: Fresh green tea leaves obtained from Northern Iran for extraction. Maceration is the extraction method that is used in this study. The contents of caffeine, catechin and flavonoids of the hydro alcoholic extract were measured. Various formulations of the 120 mg green tea extract chewing gums with different sweeteners, flavoring agents and various gum bases were prepared afterward release pattern, content uniformity, organoleptic results and other properties were characterized. Results: The contents of caffeine, catechin and flavonoid of the hydro alcoholic extraction were 207.32 mg/g, 130.00 mg/g and 200.82 mg/g, respectively. Release pattern of green tea chewing gum with different gum base ratios and various sweeteners in phosphate buffer were prepared. A total of 60 persons who were 20-30 years of age, participated in our panel test for organoleptic properties such as taste, stiffness, stickiness, etc., Acceptable gum was the one with the same ratio of the used rubber bases. Cinnamon selected as the preferred taste by volunteers. Combination of aspartame, sugar and maltitol has appropriate taste. The effect of various sweetener on release pattern was negligible, on the other hand rubber bases ratio variation, changed the release pattern obviously. Conclusion: The green tea chewing gum with sugar, maltitol and aspartame sweeteners and cinnamon flavor, using the same rubber bases ratio may be a desirable antioxidant product. PMID:25161989

  1. GUM Analysis for TIMS and SIMS Isotopic Ratios in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, Patrick G.; Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Steven L.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  2. Mechanisms of flavor release in chewing gum: cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Potineni, Rajesh V; Peterson, Devin G

    2008-05-14

    Recently we reported that the release profile of cinnamaldehyde from a sugar-free chewing gum was correlated to the release of the sugar alcohol phase or was not in agreement with the log P model. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate mechanisms of cinnamaldehyde release from a sugar-free chewing gum; p-cresol (similar log P value) was also analyzed for comparison. Breath analysis of the chewing gum samples over an 8 min consumption period reported that the maximum concentration of cinnamaldehyde was 2- to 3-fold higher during the initial phase of mastication in comparison to the later phase, whereas the concentration of p-cresol was relatively constant over these two time periods. By contrast the release profile of cinnamaldehyde from a flavored gum base (no sugar alcohol phase) was constant over the 8 min consumption period and similar to the release of cresol from the flavored gum base. On the basis of tandem mass spectrometry, cinnamaldehyde was reported to react with sorbitol and generate hemiacetal reaction products that were not stable under slight alkaline conditions; it was suggested to revert back to free cinnamaldehyde and sugar alcohol in the oral cavity. The increased polarity of these transient cinnamaldehyde-sorbitol hemiacetal reaction products would result in a more rapid release rate of cinnamaldehyde than would be typically predicted based on the affinity of cinnamaldehyde for the gum base. PMID:18426214

  3. The role of time on task performance in modifying the effects of gum chewing on attention.

    PubMed

    Tucha, Lara; Simpson, William

    2011-04-01

    Recent research examined the effects of chewing gum on attention and reported a significant interaction of gum chewing with time. Using a crossover within-subject design, the present study examined the effect of gum chewing on sustained attention in healthy adults over a period of 30 min. The results revealed a significant main effect of time and a significant interaction between gum chewing and time. The findings suggest that gum chewing differentially affects attention performance. While gum chewing has detrimental effects on sustained attention in earlier stages of the task, beneficial effects on sustained attention were observed at later stages. PMID:21192998

  4. Macromolecular dimensions and mechanical properties of monolayer films of Sonorean mesquite gum.

    PubMed

    Lpez-Franco, Yolanda L; Valdez, Miguel A; Hernndez, Javier; Caldern de la Barca, Ana M; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Goycoolea, Francisco M

    2004-09-16

    Mesquite gum sourced from Prosopis velutina trees and gum arabic (Acacia spp.) were characterized using light scattering and Langmuir isotherms. Both gum materials were fractionated by hydrophobic interaction chromatography, yielding four fractions for both gums: FI, FIIa, FIIb and FIII in mesquite gum and FI, FII, FIIIa and FIIIb in gum arabic. In mesquite gum, the obtained fractions had different protein content (7.18-38.60 wt.-%) and macromolecular dimensions (M approximately 3.89 x 10(5)-8.06 x 10(5) g.mol(-1), RG approximately 48.83-71.11 nm, RH approximately 9.61-24.06 nm) and architecture given by the structure factor (RG/RH ratio approximately 2.96-5.27). The mechanical properties of Langmuir monolayers at the air-water interface were very different on each gum and their fractions. For mesquite gum, the most active species at the interface were those comprised in Fractions IIa and IIb and III, while Fraction I the pi/A isotherm lied below that of the whole gum. In gum arabic only Fraction III developed greater surface pressure at the same surface per milligram of material than whole gum. This is rationalized in terms of structural differences in both materials. Mesquite gum tertiary structure seems to fit best with an elongated polydisperse macrocoil in agreement with the "twisted hairy rope" proposal for arabinogalactan proteoglycans. PMID:15468295

  5. Smell and taste of chewing gum affect frequency domain EEG source localizations.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, T; Kondakor, I; Kochi, K; Koenig, T; Lehmann, D; Kinoshita, T; Hirota, T; Yagyu, T

    1998-04-01

    We investigated brain electric field signatures of subjective feelings after chewing regular gum or gum base without flavor. 19-channel eyes-closed EEG from 20 healthy males before and after 5 minutes of chewing the two gum types in random sequence was source modeled in the frequency domain using the FFT-Dipole-Approximation. 3-dimensional brain locations and strengths (Global Field Power, GFP) of the equivalent sources of five frequency bands were computed as changes from pre-chewing baseline. Gum types differed (ANOVA) in pre-post changes of source locations for the alpha-2 band (to anterior and right after regular gum, opposite after gum base) and beta-2 band (to anterior and inferior after regular gum, opposite after gum base), and of GFP for delta-theta, alpha-2 and beta-1 (regular gum: increase. gum base: decrease). Subjective feeling changed to more positive values after regular gum than gum base (ANOVA).--Thus, chewing gum with and without taste-smell activates different brain neuronal populations. PMID:9639238

  6. Ultrasound assisted enzymatic depolymerization of aqueous guar gum solution.

    PubMed

    Prajapat, Amrutlal L; Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of application of low intensity ultrasonic irradiation for the intensification of enzymatic depolymerization of aqueous guar gum solution. The extent of depolymerization of guar gum has been analyzed in terms of intrinsic viscosity reduction. The effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters related to the enzyme activity as well as the intrinsic viscosity reduction of guar gum using enzymatic approach has been evaluated. The kinetic rate constant has been found to increase with an increase in the temperature and cellulase loading. It has been observed that application of ultrasound not only enhances the extent of depolymerization but also reduces the time of depolymerization as compared to conventional enzymatic degradation technique. In the presence of cellulase enzyme, the maximum extent of depolymerization of guar gum has been observed at 60 W of ultrasonic rated power and ultrasonic treatment time of 30 min. The effect of ultrasound on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as well as the molecular structure of cellulase enzyme was evaluated with the help of the chemical reaction kinetics model and fluorescence spectroscopy. Application of ultrasound resulted in a reduction in the thermodynamic parameters of activation energy (Ea), enthalpy (?H), entropy (?S) and free energy (?G) by 47%, 50%, 65% and 1.97%, respectively. The changes in the chemical structure of guar gum treated using ultrasound assisted enzymatic approach in comparison to the native guar gum were also characterized by FTIR. The results revealed that enzymatic depolymerization of guar gum resulted in a polysaccharide with low degree of polymerization, viscosity and consistency index without any change in the core chemical structure which could make it useful for incorporation in food products. PMID:26584988

  7. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  8. The origin of the Gum nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Kafatos, M.; Brandt, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Obsrvations and theoretical investigations of the Gum nebula (GN) since about 1971 are reviewed. Direct observations of the GN, the Vela X supernova remnant (SNR), the Vela pulsar, and other stars in or near the GN are discussed with those of related phenomena such as the radio loops and known SNRs; the emphasis is on studies of the interstellar absorption lines, the evidence for hot gas in the GN, and the extended diffuse emission. The four basic models proposed for the GN are considered: a fossil Stromgren sphere, an old SNR, an H II region, or a superbubble. The GN physical parameters predicted by each model are listed in a table and compared. A minimum explanation which attributes the 36 x 36-deg filamentary structure and the 125-pc radius structure to the action of the stellar winds from Zeta Pup and Gamma-2 Vel (and perhaps the effect of a Vel X supernova explosion 20,000 years ago) is found most appropriate, at least until the questions of the net expansion rate of the GN (about 20 km/sec or about zero?) and the existence of the diffuse emission beyond the filamentary structure are resolved by observations.

  9. Investigations on interpolymer complexes of cationic guar gum and xanthan gum for formulation of bioadhesive films

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M.; Tiwary, A.K.; Kaur, G.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the possible use of inter polymer complexed (IPC) films of xanthan gum (XG) and cationic guar gum (CGG) for formulating domperidone bioadhesive films. Formation of bonds between –COO¯ groups of XG and –N+(CH3)3 groups of CGG was evident in the FTIR spectra of IPC films. Bioadhesive strength of the films was evaluated employing texture analyser. Water uptake studies indicated swelling to be a function of XG concentration in the interpolymer complexes. The bioadhesive films were found to possess neutral pH. In vitro drug release studies and residence time studies indicated that the film comprising CGG:XG (80:20) released 98% of domperidone in 8 h and exhibited a residence time of approximately 8 h. Enhanced bioavailability of domperidone was observed from bioadhesive films as compared to orally administered conventional tablets. Overall, the findings suggest that IPC films of XG and CGG, exhibiting desired bioadhesive strength and enhanced bioavailability of domperidone, can be prepared. PMID:21589796

  10. Microencapsulation of saffron petal anthocyanins with cress seed gum compared with Arabic gum through freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Mahdavi-Khazaei, Katayoun; Hemmati-Kakhki, Abbas

    2016-04-20

    In this research, encapsulation efficiency of cress seed gum (CSG) as a native hydrocolloid was compared with Arabic gum (AG) and maltodextrin (dextrose equivalent of 20 (M20), and 7 (M7)) for saffron (Crocus sativus) petal's extract by freeze drying method. Combinations of CSG-M20, AG-M20, and M7-M20 with ratios of 50:50 and M20 alone (100%) were used as wall materials. A mixture of 1:5 (based on dry matter) between core (concentrated anthocyanin extract of saffron petal) and wall materials were freeze dried and stability of encapsulated anthocyanins along with color parameters (a*, b*, L*, C, H° and TCD) of final powders were measured during 10 weeks of storage (at 35°C as an accelerated method). Total anthocyanins were determined through pH differential method every week. Four prepared formulations of encapsulated powders didn't show any significant differences (P>0.01) in terms of total anthocyanin content measured immediately after production and after 10 weeks storage. AG-M20 mixture and M20 alone showed the highest and lowest TCD, respectively. The mixture of CSG-M20 in comparison with AG-M20 and M20 had the same protecting effect (P<0.01) but showed a relatively high TCD (9.33). PMID:26876823

  11. Severe Gum Disease May Boost Death Rate of Kidney Disease Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_157344.html Severe Gum Disease May Boost Death Rate of Kidney Disease Patients Study documents connection ... News) -- Severe gum disease increases the risk of death in chronic kidney disease patients, a new study ...

  12. Circulatory response and autonomic nervous activity during gum chewing.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Sakagami, Joe; Ono, Takahiro; Hori, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Min; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2009-08-01

    Mastication has been proven to enhance the systemic circulation, with circulatory responses seeming to be largely regulated by autonomic nervous activity via a more complex regulatory system than those of other activities. However, few studies have examined the relationships between changes in autonomic nervous activity and the systemic circulation that are induced by masticatory movement. We investigated changes in the systemic circulation and autonomic nervous activity during gum chewing to clarify the influence of mastication. Electrocardiograms, arterial blood pressure, and masseter electromyograms were taken while chewing gum continuously as indicators of systemic circulation in 10 healthy subjects with normal dentition. Cardiac sympathetic activity and vagus nervous activity, as well as vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity, were evaluated by fluctuation analysis of heart rate and blood pressure. Repeated analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were performed to determine chronological changes in each indicator during gum chewing. Gum chewing increased the heart rate and the mean arterial pressure. Although cardiac sympathetic activity and vagus nervous activity showed significant changes, vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity did not. These results suggest that changes in the autonomic nervous activity of the heart are mainly involved in the enhancement of systemic circulation with gum chewing. This explains some characteristics of autonomic nervous regulation in masticatory movement. PMID:19627361

  13. Studies on gum of Moringa oleifera for its emulsifying properties

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Dibya Sundar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emulsion has been a form of presenting water insoluble substances for a long period of time. Now a day, it has been a way of presenting various intravenous additives and diagnostic agents in X-ray examinations. Various substances can be used as emulsifying agent, which can be operationally defined as a stabilizer of the droplets formed of the internal phase. Materials and Methods: Gum from Moringa oleifera was evaluated for its emulsifying properties. Castor oil emulsions 30 percent (o/w), containing 2 to 4% Moringa oleifera gum was prepared. Emulsions containing equivalent concentration of acacia were also prepared for comparison. All the emulsions prepared were stored at room temperature and studied for stability at various time intervals for 8 weeks. The prepared emulsions were evaluated for creaming rate, globule size and rate of coalescence. 23 factorial design was chosen to investigate the effects of centrifugation, pH, temperature changes and electrolytes on the creaming rate and globule size. Results: The results of the investigations show that the gum of Moringa oleifera possesses better emulsifying properties as compared to gum acacia. Conclusion: Gum of Moringa oleifera could be used in pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical preparation. PMID:24741276

  14. Delivery of active agents from chewing gum for improved remineralization.

    PubMed

    Dodds, M W J; Chidichimo, D; Haas, M S

    2012-09-01

    Most surrogate measures of caries were developed to test products containing fluoride, typically at relatively high and closely controlled oral concentrations. However, since the primary mechanism for the remineralization of early enamel caries lesions by chewing gum is through stimulation of saliva, delivering Ca and Pi to the demineralized enamel lesion, established methods may lack the sensitivity to detect the additional benefit of an active agent without the strong remineralizing potential of fluoride. Issues related to the release of active agents from the gum matrix, dilution in the saliva, and limited oral retention time, along with taste, safety, regulatory, and cost concerns, impose further limitations. This paper reviews the efficacy of some active agents used in chewing gum for improved remineralization and includes results from in situ testing of calcium-containing gums, including calcium lactate, tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous, calcium citrate/encapsulated phosphate, and a calcium lactate/sodium phosphate blend. Despite promising in vitro data from these agents, they did not provide consistently superior results from in situ testing. There is a need to develop better predictive in vitro models for chewing gum, as well as improved sensitivity of in situ models to discriminate relatively small amounts of remineralization against a background of high biological variability. PMID:22899681

  15. Effects of xanthan, guar, carrageenan and locust bean gum addition on physical, chemical and sensory properties of meatballs.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Zeynep Ozben; Y?lmaz, Ismail; Demirci, Ahmet ?ukru

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of xanthan gum, guar gum, carrageenan and locust bean gum on physical, chemical and sensory properties of meatballs. Meatball samples were produced with three different formulations including of 0.5, 1, and 1.5% each gum addition and gum added samples were compared with the control meatballs. Physical and chemical analyses were carried out on raw and cooked samples separately. Moisture contents of raw samples decreased by addition of gums. There were significant decreases (p?gum when compared with control. Ash contents and texture values increased with gum addition to meatballs. Meatball redness decreased with more gum addition in raw and cooked meatball samples, which means that addition of gums resulted in a lighter-coloured product. According to sensory analysis results, locust bean gum added (1%) samples were much preferred by the panelists. PMID:24803701

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. WG, a Welan Gum-Producing Strain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Feng, Zhi-mei; Sun, Ya-jie; Zhou, Wan-long; Jiao, Xue

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Sphingomonas sp. WG, a high welan gum-producing strain with a yield of 33 g/L. The core of wel cluster for welan gum biosynthesis contained 24 coding sequences in the genome, which will provide the genetic information on welan gum production. PMID:26868397

  17. 40 CFR 454.20 - Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory. 454.20 Section 454.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GUM AND WOOD CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gum Rosin and Turpentine Subcategory 454.20 Applicability; description...

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingomonas sp. WG, a Welan Gum-Producing Strain.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Feng, Zhi-Mei; Sun, Ya-Jie; Zhou, Wan-Long; Jiao, Xue; Zhu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Sphingomonas sp. WG, a high welan gum-producing strain with a yield of 33g/L. The core of wel cluster for welan gum biosynthesis contained 24 coding sequences in the genome, which will provide the genetic information on welan gum production. PMID:26868397

  19. 40 CFR 454.20 - Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory. 454.20 Section 454.20 Protection of Environment... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gum Rosin and Turpentine Subcategory 454.20 Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  20. 40 CFR 454.20 - Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory. 454.20 Section 454.20 Protection of Environment... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Gum Rosin and Turpentine Subcategory 454.20 Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  1. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH

    PubMed Central

    Karami Nogourani, Maryam; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Kowsari Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2012-01-01

    Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women) healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6?min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for 6 consecutive days. After unstimulated saliva was collected, stimulated saliva was collected at interval of 0-1, 13, and 36 minutes after the start of different flavored chewing gums. The SFR and salivary pH were measured. The SFR increased in all five flavored gums at 1, 3, and 6 minutes after start of chewing gums (P < 0.001). The flow rate of all products reached peak in the 1st minute of stimulation, except spearmint-flavored gums which reached peak in the 6th minute. In the 1st minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest SFR. During 13 minutes, strawberry- and apple-flavored gums showed higher SFR, respectively. Only the spearmint- and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased salivary pH. Gum flavored can affect the SFR and pH and special flavors can be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions. PMID:22505903

  2. Metabolic Effects of Nicotine Gum and Cigarette Smoking: Potential Implications for Postcessation Weight Gain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klesges, Robert C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Twenty smoking women participated in nicotine gum and smoking administration, after which resting energy expenditures (REEs) were measured. Results indicated acute increase in REE for both nicotine gum and cigarettes. Metabolic rates for nicotine gum slowly returned to baseline; rates for cigarettes quickly fell significantly below baseline.

  3. Effects of Chewing Different Flavored Gums on Salivary Flow Rate and pH.

    PubMed

    Karami Nogourani, Maryam; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Kowsari Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2012-01-01

    Chewing gum increases salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH, but differences in preferences of gum flavor may influence SFR and pH. The aim of this paper was to assess the effect of five different flavors of sucrose-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate and pH in healthy dental students in Isfahan, Iran. Fifteen (7 men and 8 women) healthy dental student volunteers collected unstimulated saliva and then chewed one of five flavored gums for 6?min. The whole saliva was collected and assessed for 6 consecutive days. After unstimulated saliva was collected, stimulated saliva was collected at interval of 0-1, 1-3, and 3-6 minutes after the start of different flavored chewing gums. The SFR and salivary pH were measured. The SFR increased in all five flavored gums at 1, 3, and 6 minutes after start of chewing gums (P < 0.001). The flow rate of all products reached peak in the 1st minute of stimulation, except spearmint-flavored gums which reached peak in the 6th minute. In the 1st minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest SFR. During 1-3 minutes, strawberry- and apple-flavored gums showed higher SFR, respectively. Only the spearmint- and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased salivary pH. Gum flavored can affect the SFR and pH and special flavors can be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions. PMID:22505903

  4. Origin of substantial plastic deformation in Gum Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, H.; Sun, J.; Yao, Q.; Guo, W. Y.; Chen, R.

    2008-04-01

    The elastic property and structure of dislocation in Gum Metal are investigated by anisotropic elastic theory and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results show that the elastic energy coefficients for the 1/2?111? perfect dislocations nearly equal to zero as the shear modulus along ?111?{110}, {112}, {123} when the valence electron number e/a reaches 4.2, which implies a low intrinsic critical resolved shear stress for dislocation glide. HRTEM observations further revealed 70.53 dislocations in Gum Metal after severe cold working. The substantial plastic deformation is considered to originate from the conventional dislocation mechanism, rather than from the dislocation-free mechanism in Gum Metals.

  5. Iodine derivatives of chemically modified gum Arabic microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ganie, Showkat A; Ali, Akbar; Mazumdar, Nasreen

    2015-09-20

    Acetylated gum Arabic (AGA) derivatives with different degrees of substitution (DS 0.97-2.74) were synthesized using acetyl chloride and a base under varying reaction conditions. The AGA derivatives were obtained in the form of microspheres and thereafter stable iodine products were prepared by doping the microspheres with an iodinating agent, iodine monochloride (ICl). The reaction between electrophilic iodine and polar carbonyl groups was studied by FT-IR, (1)H-NMR, and UV-VIS spectroscopies. The products were also characterized by DSC, TGA and SEM studies. The incorporated iodine was released in aqueous medium as iodide ions (I(-)). A reaction scheme has been proposed for the iodination and de-iodination of the gum derivatives. This work suggests that the iodine derivatives of modified gum Arabic could be used as a source of iodide ions which is the nutritional form of iodine. PMID:26050909

  6. Design, formulation and evaluation of Aloe vera chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Abolfazl; Ghannadi, Alireza; Raddanipour, Razieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aloe vera has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, healing, antiseptic, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. The aim of the present study was to design and evaluate the formulation of Aloe vera chewing gum with an appropriate taste and quality with the indications for healing oral wounds, such as lichen planus, mouth sores caused by cancer chemotherapy and mouth abscesses as well as reducing mouth dryness caused by chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In Aloe vera powder, the carbohydrate content was determined according to mannose and phenolic compounds in terms of gallic acid. Aloe vera powder, sugar, liquid glucose, glycerin, sweeteners and different flavors were added to the soft gum bases. In Aloe vera chewing gum formulation, 10% of dried Aloe vera extract entered the gum base. Then the chewing gum was cut into pieces of suitable sizes. Weight uniformity, content uniformity, the organoleptic properties evaluation, releasing the active ingredient in the phosphate buffer (pH, 6.8) and taste evaluation were examined by Latin square method. Results: One gram of Aloe vera powder contained 5.16 ± 0.25 mg/g of phenolic compounds and 104.63 ± 4.72 mg/g of carbohydrates. After making 16 Aloe vera chewing gum formulations, the F16 formulation was selected as the best formulation according to its physicochemical and organoleptic properties. In fact F16 formulation has suitable hardness, lack of adhesion to the tooth and appropriate size and taste; and after 30 min, it released more than 90% of its drug content. Conclusion: After assessments made, the F16 formulation with maltitol, aspartame and sugar sweeteners was selected as the best formulation. Among various flavors used, peppermint flavor which had the most acceptance between consumers was selected. PMID:26605214

  7. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure and chemical reduction on the emulsification properties of gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fanyi; Bell, Alan E; Davis, Fred J; Chai, Yunxi

    2015-04-15

    Gum arabic is widely used in the food industry as an additive, both as a thickener and an emulsifier. This study has compared the emulsification properties of two types of gums, KLTA (Acacia senegal) and GCA (Acacia seyal), both in their native/untreated forms and after exposure to high pressure (800 MPa). Further studies were undertaken to chemically modify the disulphide linkages present and to investigate the effects of their reduction on the diffusion of the carbohydrate materials. The emulsification properties of the gum samples were examined by determining the droplet size distribution in a "model" oil-in-water system. Results showed that high pressure treatment and chemical reduction of gums changed the emulsification properties of both gums. The high molecular weight component in arabinogalactan-proteins (AGP/GP), and more "branched" carbohydrates present in gum arabic, may be responsible for the emulsification properties of GCA gum, indicating that the emulsification mechanisms for KLTA and GCA were different. PMID:25466061

  8. Rheological properties and thickening mechanism of aqueous diutan gum solution: Effects of temperature and salts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Gong, Houjian; Dong, Mingzhe; Li, Yajun

    2015-11-01

    Rheological properties of a new microbial polysaccharide, diutan gum in aqueous solution have been systematically investigated. It is found that molecular aggregates of diutan gum can be formed at a very low concentration (0.12 g/L), and the mechanism of thickening by diutan gum is proposed. The viscosity retention rate of diutan gum changes little when increasing the temperature from 298 K to 348 K or in a high salinity solution (55.5 g L(-1)). Gel structure can be formed in the diutan gum solution, owing to the finding that the dynamic modulus has an exponential relationship with the concentration. The gel properties of diutan gum are not sensitive to temperature, and are virtually independent of cationic environment (Na(+) and Ca(2+)). The temperature/salt tolerance of the diutan gum solution is mainly attributed to its perfect double helix molecular conformation, the location of the side chains of its molecules, and its water retention capacity. PMID:26256389

  9. Effects and after-effects of chewing gum on vigilance, heart rate, EEG and mood.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew P; Jacob, Tim J C; Smith, Andrew P

    2014-06-22

    Research has shown that chewing gum improves attention, although the mechanism for this effect remains unclear. This study investigated the effects and after-effects of chewing gum on vigilance, mood, heart rate and EEG. Participants completed a vigilance task four times; at baseline, with or without chewing gum, and twice post-chewing. EEG alpha and beta power at left frontal and temporal lobes, subjective mood and heart rate were assessed. Chewing gum shortened reaction time and increased the rate of hits, although hits fell during the second post-chewing task. Chewing gum heightened heart rate, but only during chewing. Gum also increased beta power at F7 and T3 immediately post-chewing, but not following the post-chewing tasks. The findings show that chewing gum affects several different indicators of alertness. PMID:24857722

  10. Components responsible for the emulsification properties of corn fibre gum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An emulsion was prepared using corn fibre gum (CFG) and the resulting oil and aqueous phases were separated by centrifugation. The material adsorbed onto the surface of the oil droplets in the oil phase was desorbed using surfactant. The desorbed CFG and the non adsorbed CFG that remained present in...

  11. Nicotine Gum and Behavioral Treatment in Smoking Cessation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Assigned 120 smoking cessation subjects to either intensive behavioral treatment, nicotine gum in low-contact treatment, or to combined treatment. Combined treatment produced higher abstinence rates than other conditions at all assessments. Differences were significant at 3, 12, and 26 weeks, but not at 52 weeks. (NRB)

  12. Method for inhibiting gum formation in liquid hydrocarbon mediums

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.K.

    1990-07-17

    This patent describes a method of inhibiting the formation of gum and sediment in a liquid hydrocarbonaceous medium. It comprises: adding to the medium an inhibiting amount of an alkyl 1,2-dihydroquinoline or polymerized alkyl 1,2-dihydroquinoline.

  13. Gum and deposit formation from jet turbine and diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.; Lan, B.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The rates of oxidation and soluble gum formation in both pure hydrocarbons and mixed hydrocarbon fuels are investigated. A rate equation in terms of rate constants for initiation, propagation, and termination is discussed. A theory based on the coupling of fuels and their primary oxidation products to form products of higher molecular weight is presented.

  14. Improved emulsification performance of corn fiber gum following maturation treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) in the solid state (milled powder form) was subjected to a maturation treatment by heating under atmospheric pressure at 110 degrees C for 5 (CFG5) and 24 hours (CFG24). The treatment reduced the solubility and aggregation of the proteinaceous component with increased heating t...

  15. Viscofying properties of corn fiber gum with various polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of corn fiber gum (CFG) on the aqueous solutions of a series of widely-used commercial polysaccharides has been studied by rheological techniques using stress synergism index to evaluate its viscosifying action. Though CFG solution exhibited Newtonian fluid behaviour with a very low vis...

  16. Identification from a bitemark in a wad of chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, P; Carson, G; Taylor, J A; Brown, K A

    2001-06-01

    A wad of used chewing gum recovered from the scene of a burglary contained impressions of human teeth. Casts of these impressions displayed unique morphological characteristics which were found to show concordance with corresponding features present on casts of the posterior teeth of a suspect. PMID:11494677

  17. 21 CFR 172.780 - Acacia (gum arabic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain copies from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention, 12601.../federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html. (c) The ingredient is used in food in accordance with good....780 Acacia (gum arabic). The food additive may be safely used in food in accordance with the...

  18. Investigation of Transport Properties of a New Biomaterials - GUM Mangosteen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sourav S.; Sarkar, A.

    2006-06-01

    Biomaterial has occupied leading position in material science for various scientific and technological applications. This present work is carried out over a natural gum extracted from raw fruit of Mangosteen, an east Indian tree (Gercinia Mangostana) following extraction and purification process. Solid specimen of the said gum is developed following sol-gel like process. AC and DC electrical analysis on the dried solid specimen of the gum were carried out and showed high electrical conduction with ? ~ 1 E-03 S/cm, of which ionic and electronic contributions are 70% and 30% respectively. Analysis shows that origin of high electrical conductivity is due to presence of substantial amount of organic acid unit in its polysaccharide background. In fact the observed ? is about 1000 times of that observed in gum Arabica. Optical absorption of this new bio- materials are also studied using UV-VIS analysis. The results show its high absorption co-efficient in UV and blue part of analysed range. A complete electrical characterization of the material have been made. It has also been observed that the electronic conduction can be enhanced to 70% of the total electrical conductivity by forming complex with Iodine and organic (Citric) acid from Lemon fruit. This high potential material is being studied for development of electronic device application.

  19. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... (Ducke) Chevalier. Massaranduba chocolate Manilkara solimoesensis Gilly. Nispero Manilkara...

  20. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... (Ducke) Chevalier. Massaranduba chocolate Manilkara solimoesensis Gilly. Nispero Manilkara...

  1. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES... resin extract of Massaranduba balata) Manilkara huberi (Ducke) Chevalier. Massaranduba...

  2. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... (Ducke) Chevalier. Massaranduba chocolate Manilkara solimoesensis Gilly. Nispero Manilkara...

  3. 21 CFR 172.615 - Chewing gum base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chewing gum base. 172.615 Section 172.615 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... (Ducke) Chevalier. Massaranduba chocolate Manilkara solimoesensis Gilly. Nispero Manilkara...

  4. Gum chewing and jaw muscle fatigue and pains.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Tran, K T; Mohamed, S E

    1996-06-01

    To study possible associations between gum chewing and fatigue and pains in the jaw muscles, eight healthy adults performed prolonged idling, prolonged unilateral chewing of gum, and brief vigorous clenching of the teeth (MVC). Through surface electromyography (EMG), the authors monitored the cumulative (microV.s) as well as the average rates (microV.s-1) of contractile activities in the right and left masseter muscles. During 10 min of idling there was an absence of muscle fatigue and muscle pains when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 2% and 3%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric muscle pains through MVC. During 10 min of right-sided gum chewing at a rate of 1.2 Hz, the majority of subjects (75%) experienced weak jaw muscle fatigue-not jaw muscle pains-when the EMG rates of the right and left masseter muscles were 38% and 19%, respectively, of those required to elicit isometric pains through MVC. In comparison with 10 min of idling, the weak muscle fatigue of 10 min of unilateral gum chewing appeared when the total contractile activities of the right and left masseter muscles were increased by 1664% and 519%, respectively. It seemed as if prolonged unilateral gum chewing and previous pain-releasing MVC caused some sensitization of muscle nociceptors which, in turn, aggravated subsequent isometric jaw muscle pains elicited through MVC. Even though the right masseter muscle was the most frequent site of clinical fatigue and pains, the authors found no evidence supporting the theoretical foundation of the myofascial pain/dysfunction syndrome. PMID:8809698

  5. Chewing gum increases energy expenditure before and after controlled breakfasts.

    PubMed

    Kresge, Daniel L; Melanson, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    Chewing has been associated with improved satiation and satiety, but little is known about the metabolic impact of gum chewing. We tested the hypothesis that gum chewing would increase energy expenditure (EE) and reduce respiratory exchange ratio (RER) before and after a controlled test meal. Seventeen males and 13 females (age 21.5 ± 6.6 years, body mass index 23.9 ± 2.8 kg/m(2)) participated in a randomized crossover study in which subjects chewed sugar-free gum for a total of 1 h (3 sessions of 20 min) on the test day (GC) and did not chew gum on a control day (NG). EE and RER were measured by indirect calorimetry after an overnight fast. Subjects consumed a breakfast shake containing 30% of their measured energy needs, and then postprandial EE and RER were measured for 3 h. Blood glucose (GLC) was measured in the fasting and postprandial states at regular intervals. Fasting EE was higher during GC (1.23 ± 0.04 kcal/min; 1 kcal = 4.2 kJ) than during NG (1.17 ± 0.04 kcal/min; p = 0.016). Postprandial EE was also higher during GC (1.46 ± 0.05 kcal/min) than during NG (1.42 ± 0.05 kcal/min; p = 0.037). Fasting and postprandial RER and GLC did not differ between GC and NG. The findings demonstrate that GC is associated with higher fasting and postprandial EE without altering blood glucose or substrate oxidation as measured by RER. These data suggest that gum chewing potentially could influence short-term energy balance in this population; however, longer-term research is needed. PMID:25794237

  6. Evaluation of accelerated stability test conditions for medicated chewing gums.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Lauretta; Conte, Ubaldo; Nhamias, Alain; Grenier, Pascal; Vergnault, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The overall stability of medicated chewing gums is investigated under different storage conditions. Active substances with different chemical stabilities in solid state are chosen as model drugs. The dosage form is a three layer tablet obtained by direct compression. The gum core contains the active ingredient while the external layers are formulated to prevent gum adhesion to the punches of the tableting machine. Two accelerated test conditions (40°C/75% RH and 30°C/65% RH) are performed for 6 months. Furthermore, a long-term stability test at room conditions is conducted to verify the predictability of the results obtained from the stress tests. Some drugs are stable in all the conditions tested, but other drugs, generally considered stable in solid dosage forms, have shown relevant stability problems particularly when stress test conditions are applied to this particular semi-solid dosage forms. For less stable drugs, the stress conditions of 40°C/75% RH are not always predictable of chewing gum stability at room temperature and may produce false negative; intermediate conditions, 30°C/65% RH, are more predictive for this purpose, the results of drug content found after 6 months at intermediate stress conditions and 12 months at room conditions are generally comparable. But the results obtained show that only long-term conditions stability tests gave consistent results. During aging, the semi solid nature of the gum base itself, may also influence the drug delivery rate during chewing and great attention should be given also to the dissolution stability. PMID:22794248

  7. Gum Arabic Glycoprotein Is a Twisted Hairy Rope 12

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wu; Fong, Cynthia; Lamport, Derek T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Separation of the wound exudate from Acacia senegal (L.) Willd., “gum arabic,” on a preparative Superose-6 column gave two major fractions: a high molecular weight gum arabic glycoprotein (GAGP) containing about 90% carbohydrate and a lower molecular weight heterogenous gum arabic polysaccharide fraction. Hydrogen fluoride-deglycosylation of GAGP gave a large (∼400 residue) hydroxyproline-rich polypeptide backbone (dGAGP). Alkaline hydrolysis of GAGP showed that most of the carbohydrate was attached to the polypeptide backbone as small (∼30 residue) hydroxyproline (Hyp)-polysaccharide substituents. After partial acid hydrolysis of the Hyp-polysaccharide fraction we identified O-galactosylhydroxyproline as the glycopeptide linkage, identical with that of hydroxyproline-rich arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs). However, unlike the acidic alanine-rich AGPs, GAGP is basic and notably deficient in alanine. Thus, while the GAGP polypeptide backbone more closely resembles that of the Hyp-rich cell wall protein extensin, the GAGP polysaccharide sidechains resemble AGPs. Possibly all three proteins comprise a phylogenetically related extensin superfamily of extended rod-like macromolecules. The “wattle-blossom” model for AGP and gum arabic predicts a few large polysaccharide substituents along the polypeptide backbone of a spheroidal macromolecule. On the contrary, our data imply a rodlike molecule with numerous small polysaccharide substituents (attached to 24% of the Hyp residues), regularly arranged along a highly periodic polypeptide backbone based, hypothetically, on a 10 to 12 residue repetitive peptide motif. Thus, a simple statistical model of the gum arabic glycoprotein predicts a repeating polysaccharide-peptide subunit of about 7 kilodaltons. The small polysaccharide substituents will maximize intramolecular hydrogen bonding if aligned along the long axis of the molecule, forming in effect a twisted hairy rope. Electron micrographs of rotary shadowed GAGP molecules support that prediction and may also explain how such apparently large molecules can exit the cell by endwise reptation through the small pores of the primary cell wall. ImagesFigure 8 PMID:16668264

  8. Contribution of lipids, phenolic acids, and protein rich components to emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum and acacia gum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn fiber gum (CFG) is an arabinoxylan enriched fraction obtained by the extraction of corn bran/fiber using a proprietary alkaline hydrogen peroxide process. When purified CFG prepared by this process was hydrolyzed with concentrated base (1.5 N methanolic KOH at 70 °C for one hour) considerable ...

  9. Saffron and beetroot extracts encapsulated in maltodextrin, gum Arabic, modified starch and chitosan: Incorporation in a chewing gum system.

    PubMed

    Chranioti, Charikleia; Nikoloudaki, Aspasia; Tzia, Constantina

    2015-08-20

    Maltodextrin (MD-21DE), gum Arabic (GA), gum Arabic-modified starch (GA-MS), modified starch-chitosan (MS-CH) and modified starch-maltodextrin-chitosan (MS-MD-CH) were used as agents for beetroot and saffron coloring-extracts microencapsulation by freeze drying. The produced powders were evaluated in terms of coloring strength (E) during storage at 40°C for 10 weeks and a first-order kinetic was applied. Color parameters (L(*), a(*), b(*), C(*) and ΔE(*)) and water sorption behavior was also studied. Moreover, incorporation of the powders in a chewing gum model system was conducted. The type of encapsulating agent significantly (P<0.05) affected the studied parameters with the order of protection in both extracts being as follows: MD>GA>GA-MS>MS-CH>MS-MD-CH. The water sorption study revealed that MD and GA kept their structural integrity up to water activities of 0.66 and 0.82, respectively. The chewing gum samples produced with coloring extracts encapsulated in GA-MS showed the greatest a(*)(for beetroot) and b(*) (for saffron) values indicating a better protection. PMID:25965482

  10. Socio-economic aspects of Gum Arabic production in Dalanj area, South Korodofan, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Koli, A O; Eltayeb, A M; Sanjak, E M; Mohammed, M H

    2013-11-01

    Acacia senegal (locally: Hashab tree) is one of the most important tree species in Sudan as it considers the main Gum Arabic producing tree. The objective of this study is to investigate the socio-economic aspects of gum Arabic production and to assess contribution of gum Arabic to sustainable livelihood of local people in Dalanj Locality, South Kordofan State-Sudan. Social survey was carried out by using structured questionnaire for 80 respondents (gum producers) on random sample basis in eight villages, 10 respondents from each village. Issues pertaining to socio-economic factors affecting gum Arabic production and contribution of gum Arabic to sustainable livelihood of local people, in Dalanj Locality, were assessed. Results of the study revealed that expansion of agriculture lands at the expense of hashab trees, fires and illegal felling are the most important factors constraining gum production in the area. The results also indicated that agriculture is the main source of income and gum Arabic is a supplementary source of income. The importance of gum Arabic becomes apparent during (off farm season) the period between crops harvest and the preparation of the next agricultural season. Establishment of producers' associations and provision of loans to producers are highly recommended to ensure sustainability of gum production. PMID:24511757

  11. The effect of chewing gum's flavor on salivary flow rate and pH

    PubMed Central

    Karami-Nogourani, Maryam; Kowsari-Isfahan, Raha; Hosseini-Beheshti, Mozhgan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chewing sugar-free gums is a convenient way to increase salivary flow. Salivary flow increases in response to both gustatory (taste) and mechanical (chewing) stimuli, and chewing gum can provide both of these stimuli. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of five different flavors of sugar-free chewing gum on the salivary flow rate (SFR) and pH. Materials and Methods: Fifteen dental students volunteered at the same time on six consecutive days, to collect one minute unstimulated saliva. After five minutes, while some volunteers continued to collect only unstimulated saliva, the others asked to start chewing one of the five flavored gums randomly. The flavors were spearmint, cinnamon, watermelon, strawberry, and apple. The whole saliva was collected over time periods of 0 1, 1 3, and 3 6 minutes, and the SFR and pH were also measured. The data were subjected to pair t-test, repeated-measures analysis of variance, and Duncan tests. Results: Compared to the unstimulated rate, all five different flavored gums significantly increased the SFR within six minutes. Although the flow rate peaked during the first minute of stimulation with all five products, it reduced gradually, but still remained above the unstimulated saliva, after six minutes. In the first minute, the strawberry-flavored gums showed the highest weight, yet, it only induced a significantly higher SFR compared to the cinnamon-flavored gums. During one to three minutes, strawberry and apple-flavored gums showed significantly higher SFR, respectively, compared to cinnamon-flavored gums. There were no significant differences in the flow rates elicited by each flavored gum through the three-to-six minute interval, although the spearmint-flavored gums induced slightly higher SFR. Only the spearmint and cinnamon-flavored gum significantly increased the salivary pH. Conclusion: Gum flavor can affect the SFR and special flavors may be advised for different individuals according to their oral conditions. PMID:23372599

  12. Effect of guar gum and xanthan gum on pasting and noodle-making properties of potato, corn and mung bean starches.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amritpal; Shevkani, Khetan; Singh, Narpinder; Sharma, Parul; Kaur, Seeratpreet

    2015-12-01

    The effect of xanthan and guar-gum on pasting and noodle-making properties of potato, corn and mung bean starches was studied. Mung bean starch showed the highest amylose content (43.4 %) followed by potato (23.2 %) and corn starch (15.5 %). Potato starch showed the highest swelling power (19.0 g/g) and solubility index (17.5 %) and exhibited the highest paste viscosities. Addition of both gums improved peak viscosity, hot paste viscosity and final viscosity for mung and corn starches; while for potato starch, guar gum increased peak and final viscosities and decreased hot paste viscosity while xanthan gum increased hot paste and final viscosities and decreased peak viscosity. The noodles made from mung bean starch showed the most desirable characteristics in terms of the lowest-cooking loss and adhesiveness. The gums increased noodle cooking time and decreased cooking loss, firmness and cohesiveness. PMID:26604384

  13. Preparation and characterization of tragacanth-locust bean gum edible blend films.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Fatemeh Sadat; Kadkhodaee, Rassoul; Emadzadeh, Bahareh; Koocheki, Arash

    2016-03-30

    The present work introduces the structure and physicomechanical properties of a novel blend film made from binary solutions of gum tragacanth (GT) and locust bean gum (LBG) at different mixing ratios. Apparent viscosities and surface tensions of individual and blend gum solutions were also investigated. The viscosity data indicated that there was a distinct synergism between the two gums at all mixing ratios. FTIR spectra showed the existence of noncovalent intermolecular interactions between gums. The surface tensions of binary solutions were significantly lower than those of individual gums which is advantageous for coating applications. All films had homogenous and smooth surface morphology and their transparency, water vapour barrier and mechanical properties were improved by incorporating LBG in blend. The results of this study suggest that GT-LBG blend film, owing to its desirable properties, has the potential to be used as a new degradable food packaging material. PMID:26794942

  14. Functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Maphalla, Thabelang Gladys; Emmambux, Mohammad Naushad

    2016-01-20

    Consumer concerns to synthetic chemicals have led to strong preference for 'clean' label starches. Lipid and hydrocolloids are food friendly chemicals. This study determines the effects of stearic acid and xanthan gum alone and in combination on the functionality of maize, wheat, teff and cassava starches. An increase in viscosity was observed for all starches with stearic acid and xanthan gum compared to the controls with cassava having the least increase. A further increase in viscosity was observed for the cereal starches with combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum. Stearic acid reduced retrogradation, resulting in soft textured pastes. Combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum reduced the formation of type IIb amylose-lipid complexes, syneresis, and hysteresis in cereal starches compared to stearic acid alone. A combination of stearic acid and xanthan gum produce higher viscosity non-gelling starches and xanthan gum addition increases physical stability to freezing and better structural recovery after shear. PMID:26572436

  15. In situ remineralization of subsurface enamel lesion after the use of a fluoride chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Lamb, W J; Corpron, R E; More, F G; Beltran, E D; Strachan, D S; Kowalski, C J

    1993-01-01

    In situ remineralization of early enamel lesions by a fluoride chewing gum was studied. Human enamel specimens with subsurface lesions were mounted in removable lower appliances for 6 adults. Subjects used a F-free dentifrice 3x/day and chewed five sticks/day for the F gum group (0.1 mg F/stick) or five sticks of sugarless gum. No gum was chewed for controls. Surface microhardness was performed on: (1) sound enamel; (2) lesions; (3) after intraoral exposure, and (4) after acid-resistance testing (ART). Separate specimens were etched and measured for F uptake and image analyses on microradiographs were performed for all regimens. delta Z values were calculated and converted to percent of mineralization. Values for F gum were significantly higher (p > 0.05) than non-F gum and controls for ART, percent remineralization, and F uptake up to 70 microns depth. PMID:8319253

  16. Strategy to identify and quantify polysaccharide gums in gelled food concentrates.

    PubMed

    Grn, Christian H; Sanders, Peter; van der Burg, Monique; Schuurbiers, Eric; van Adrichem, Linda; van Velzen, Ewoud J J; de Roo, Niels; Brunt, Kommer; Westphal, Yvonne; Schols, Henk A

    2015-01-01

    A strategy for the unambiguous identification and selective quantification of xanthan gum and locust bean gum (LBG) in gelled food concentrates is presented. DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed to be a fast, sensitive, and selective method that can be used as a first screening tool in intact gelled food concentrates. An efficient isolation procedure is described removing components that may interfere with subsequent analyses. NMR spectroscopy enabled the direct identification of xanthan gum and the discrimination between different galactomannans in the isolated polysaccharide fraction. An enzymatic fingerprinting method using endo-?-mannanase, in addition to being used to differentiate between galactomannans, was developed into a selective, quantitative method for LBG, whereas monosaccharide analysis was used to quantify xanthan gum. Recoveries for xanthan gum and LBG were 87% and 70%, respectively, with in-between day relative standard deviations below 20% for xanthan gum and below 10% for LBG. PMID:25053026

  17. Locust bean gum: Exploring its potential for biopharmaceutical applications

    PubMed Central

    Dionísio, Marita; Grenha, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Polysaccharides have been finding, in the last decades, very interesting and useful applications in the biomedical and, specifically, in the biopharmaceutical field. Locust bean gum is a polysaccharide belonging to the group of galactomannans, being extracted from the seeds of the carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua). This polymer displays a number of appealing characteristics for biopharmaceutical applications, among which its high gelling capacity should be highlighted. In this review, we describe critical aspects of locust bean gum, contributing for its role in biopharmaceutical applications. Physicochemical properties, as well as strong and effective synergies with other biomaterials are described. The potential for in vivo biodegradation is explored and the specific biopharmaceutical applications are discussed. PMID:22923958

  18. Xanthan gum biosynthesis and application: a biochemical/genetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Becker, A; Katzen, F; Pühler, A; Ielpi, L

    1998-08-01

    Xanthan gum is a complex exopolysaccharide produced by the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. It consists of D-glucosyl, D-mannosyl, and D-glucuronyl acid residues in a molar ratio of 2:2:1 and variable proportions of O-acetyl and pyruvyl residues. Because of its physical properties, it is widely used as a thickener or viscosifier in both food and non-food industries. Xanthan gum is also used as a stabilizer for a wide variety of suspensions, emulsions, and foams. This article outlines aspects of the biochemical assembly and genetic loci involved in its biosynthesis, including the synthesis of the sugar nucleotide substrates, the building and decoration of the pentasaccharide subunit, and the polymerization and secretion of the polymer. An overview of the applications and industrial production of xanthan is also covered. PMID:9763683

  19. Evaluation of the flow properties of xanthan gum solution

    SciTech Connect

    Duda, J.L.; Klaus, E.E.; Leung, W.C.

    1981-02-01

    In this study, the solution properties of two forms of xanthan gum, a powder and a broth, which are commercially available were evaluated. As previous studies have shown, the solutions prepared from the broth do exhibit better injectivity properties. However, this investigation also shows that other properties of these solutions are not equivalent. In its natural state, xanthane gum exists as a multistranded helix. This ordered confirmation can be destroyed and in a denatured state, the xanthan gum exhibits a more random configuration and consequently higher viscosity. One of the major conclusions of this study is that the xanthan powder is partially denatured when compared to the xanthan molecules which exist in the broth. This denaturing may occur during the drying process in which the xanthan solids are removed from the broth. Solutions prepared from the broth in the absence of the added salt show a transition in the viscosity-temperature relationship at approximately 40 to 50/sup 0/C. This is consistent with the behavior of native xanthan gum solutions. At approximately 50/sup 0/C, the molecules in solution go into a more random state and consequently, an abrupt rise in the viscosity is observed. However, solutions prepared from the polymer powder do not show any evidence of such a transition. The solutions prepared from the broth can be thermally denatured, and this denaturing results in viscosities which are equivalent to the viscosities realized with the powdered polymer. Before denaturing, the broth solution showed a lower viscosity. Further, intrinsic viscosity measurements indicate that the hydrodynamic volume of the polymer solutions prepared from the borth are smaller than the hydrodynamic volumes of solutions prepared from the powder.

  20. Cryoextraction: A novel approach to remove aspirated chewing gum

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Edmundo; Gupta, Prag; Ie, Susanti; Boyd, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The extraction of aspirated foreign bodies can prove challenging at times, requiring even rigid bronchoscopy. Cryotherapy probes have been reported to help with extraction of foreign bodies. We present a case where successful cryoextraction was performed on an aspirated chewing gum. The case highlights the fact that this technique is useful to extract all materials that have water content. This technique can be performed through flexible bronchoscopy and can save patients from more aggressive approaches. PMID:23440914

  1. Effect of salt on turbulent drag reduction of xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheng Hai; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Zhang, Ke; Renou, Frederic; Grisel, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The turbulent flow of an aqueous KCl solution driven by a rotating disc in a closed chamber showed significant drag reduction (DR) when a small amount of xanthan gum (XG) was added. The effects of the experimental parameters (XG and KCl concentrations, and time) on the drag reduction efficiency were examined. While the DR efficiency of XG decreased with increasing salt (KCl) concentration, the time-dependent DR efficiency was found to be fitted well using Brostow model equation. PMID:25659708

  2. CHEWING GUM AS A TREATMENT FOR RUMINATION IN A CHILD WITH AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Rhine, Denise; Tarbox, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Rumination involves regurgitation of previously ingested food, rechewing the food, and reswallowing it. In the current study, a child with autism displayed chronic rumination, resulting in the decay and subsequent removal of several teeth. After several treatments failed, including thickened liquids and starch satiation, the participant was taught to chew gum. His rumination decreased significantly when gum was made available. Results suggest that access to chewing gum may be an effective treatment for rumination in some individuals. PMID:19949528

  3. The cortical effect of chewing gum during hand movements: A functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyuk Cheol; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu; Jang, Woo Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Nine right-handed normal subjects were recruited for this study. We compared the cortical activation during execution of hand movements (right finger flexion-extension) with that during execution of hand movements while chewing gum (right side chewing). We found that execution of hand movements while chewing gum induced less activation in the contralateral SM1 than hand movements alone. Based on our findings, it appears chewing gum during execution of hand movements enhanced the efficiency of hand movements. PMID:26241164

  4. Xanthan gum stabilized gold nanoparticles: characterization, biocompatibility, stability and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pooja, Deep; Panyaram, Sravani; Kulhari, Hitesh; Rachamalla, Shyam S; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2014-09-22

    Xanthan gum (XG) has been widely used in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In the present study, we explored the potential of XG in the synthesis of gold nanoparticle. XG was used as both reducing and stabilizing agent. The effect of various formulation and process variables such as temperature, reaction time, gum concentration, gum volume and gold concentration, in GNP preparation was determined. The XG stabilized, rubey-red XGNP were obtained with 5 ml of XG aqueous solution (1.5 mg/ml). The optimum temperature was 80C whereas the reaction time was 3 h. The optimized nanoparticles were also investigated as drug delivery carrier for doxorubicin hydrochloride. DOX loaded gold nanoparticles (DXGP) were characterized by dynamic light scattering, TEM, FTIR, and DSC analysis. The synthesized nanoparticle showed mean particle size of 15-20 nm and zeta potential -29.1 mV. The colloidal stability of DXGP was studied under different conditions of pH, electrolytes and serum. Nanoparticles were found to be stable at pH range between pH 5-9 and NaCl concentration up to 0.5 M. In serum, nanoparticles showed significant stability up to 24h. During toxicity studies, nanoparticles were found biocompatible and non-toxic. Compared with free DOX, DXGP displayed 3 times more cytotoxicity in A549 cells. In conclusion, this study provided an insight to synthesize GNP without using harsh chemicals. PMID:24906721

  5. Bilateral masseteric contractile activity in unilateral gum chewing: differential calculus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Mohamed, S E

    1996-09-01

    Twelve healthy subjects performed 10 s, 15 s, 20 s, and 25 s of right-sided and, subsequently, left-sided gum chewing. The contractile activities of the ipsilateral (chewing side) and contralateral (non-chewing side) masseter muscles, mainly the concentric contractions of the phase of jaw closing and the isometric contractions of the phase of dental occlusion, were recorded through cumulative surface electromyography (EMG). A linear function (y = ax + b) described the association between an increase in the duration (x) of unilateral gum chewing and the cumulative EMG (y) of both the ipsilateral and the contralateral masseter muscle, and because of different slopes (a) of the two straight lines a geometric function (y = aqx) described the progressively larger differences between the paired and straight lines. When differential calculus was applied to the exponential functions, it became evident that the chewing forces generated by the ipsilateral masseter muscle continually exceeded those generated by the contralateral masseter muscle, and that the positive work (force x distance) produced by the concentric contractions of the ipsilateral masseter muscle continually exceeded that produced by the concentric contractions of the contralateral masseter muscle. It was inferred that mechano-physical work plays a major role if clinical muscle fatigue develops during prolonged unilateral gum chewing. PMID:8890066

  6. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse copper nanoparticles using gum acacia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chunfa; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Xianglin; Cao, Chuanliang

    2014-03-01

    A simple method was put forward in this paper for preparing colloidal copper nanoparticles in aqueous solutions using copper sulfate, gum acacia and hydrazine hydrate as copper precursor, capping agents and reducing agents, respectively, without any inert gas. The formation of nanosized copper was confirmed by its characteristic surface plasmon absorption peak at 604 nm in UV-vis spectra. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that the as-synthesized copper fine spherical particles are distributed uniformly with a narrow distribution from 3 nm to 9 nm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) demonstrated that the obtained metallic nanoparticles are single crystalline copper nanoparticles. Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopic data suggested that the copper nanoparticles are coated with gum acacia. The effects of the quantity of gum acacia on the particle size were investigated by the UV-vis spectra and TEM images. The growth process of the nanoparticles was monitored by the UV-vis spectra. The mechanism of the formation copper nanoparticles was discussed. The process raised in this study can be served as an excellent candidate for the preparation of copper nanoparticles in a large scale production.

  7. Safety assessment of a novel ingredient for removable chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Farber, T M; Clewell, A E; Endres, J R; Hauswirth, J; Van Gemert, M; Schauss, A G; Sheane, C A

    2010-03-01

    Rev7 is an indigestible gum polymer used for the manufacturing of chewing gum. It allows for the formulation of chewing gum with low adhesion; thus can be readily removed from surfaces such as sidewalks, clothing, carpets and furniture. In a toxicological safety assessment, Rev7 was found to be non-mutagenic in the AMES assay. The highest concentration tested in a mouse lymphoma thymidine kinase locus gene mutation assay induced a slight but biologically relevant increase in mutations under non-metabolic activation conditions after 24h. Because of this finding, a mouse micronucleus assay was performed, and the test article was found to be negative for inducing chromosomal damage. A 28-day repeated oral toxicity study resulted in a NOAEL of 80,000 ppm; the highest concentration tested. Rev7 was found to be free from contaminants such as heavy metals, monomers, and solvents. Lastly, Rev7 did not demonstrate skin-sensitizing properties in the murine local lymph node assay. PMID:20035819

  8. Insulin chewing gum: Need of the day for diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mateti, Uday Venkat; Adla, Nagesh; Rajakannan, Thiyagu; Valakkathala, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Chewing gum is an excellent drug delivery system for self medication as it is convenient, can be administered discreetly without water and offers the removal of ‘needle fear’ for the patients. As it releases insulin orally, it helps in tackling of the deprivation of insulin by digestive enzyme without adding digestive enzyme inhibitor. This can be done by binding of vitamin B12 and insulin. The vitamin B12 is protected with haptocorrin which is a salivary protein. Another chemical pathway takes over to help vitamin B12 pass into the bloodstream as haptocorrin reaches the intestines. The binding of vitamin B12 and insulin molecules makes the insulin to be protected on this supply chain. The insulin could ride all the way into the bloodstream, where it is released to do its work. By stimulating the brain, chewing gum also increases the releases of insulin. Finding simpler ways to deliver insulin into the blood stream is one important avenue for tackling the diabetes epidemic that is sweeping the developed world. The conditions in gastrointestinal tract may damage the body's protecting and absorbing mechanisms for the valuable molecules. Chewing gum would be a better delivery method in humans. PMID:23071934

  9. Cardiovascular, electrocortical, and behavioral effects of nicotine chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Michel, C; Hasenfratz, M; Nil, R; Bättig, K

    1988-01-01

    The cardiovascular, electrocortical, and behavioral effects of orally administered nicotine during rapid information processing were assessed in deprived female smokers. In a pre-post treatment design, 10 subjects received a 4-mg nicotine chewing gum and 10 subjects a placebo. The mental task required the subjects to watch single digits presented in a pseudorandom order on a screen and to press a button whenever the last three digits were either odd or even. The presentation rate decreased after each error and increased after each correct response and was used as the index of performance. Event-related brain potentials (ERP) to each of the three digits of the correctly answered triads were analyzed. The ERPs showed a distinct CNV potential for the second digit only (expectancy) and a P300 response for the third digit only (response decision). The mean EEG power spectrum was computed for each 5-min resting period, set before each trial and at the end of the session. A single administration of 4-mg nicotine chewing gum was followed by heart rate increase, acrodermal vasoconstriction, increase in theta and alpha frequency, decrease in delta power, and increase in the CNV magnitude. However, the chewing gum neither increased performance or reaction time nor decreased any ERP latencies or amplitudes, as has been reported after cigarette smoking. PMID:3184782

  10. Recovery, chemical and rheological characterization of gum from Assyrian pulm.

    PubMed

    Samavati, Vahid; Skandari, Farshid

    2014-06-01

    The extraction of gum from Assyrian pulm fruit (APH) was performed by microwave-assisted extraction technique. A Box-Behnken design (BBD) was applied to evaluate the effects of three independent variables (power of microwave (X1: 50-350W), extraction time (X2: 20-90min), and extraction temperature (X3: 50-90C)) on the extraction yield of APH. The effect of temperature and concentration on flow behavior of gum solution was studied. The viscosity of 2% APH solution was 0.55Pas at a shear rate of 10s(-1) at 20C. The viscosity of fully hydrated gum solutions decreased as temperature increase. It was found that increasing the temperature from 10 to 60C causing the viscosity to decrease about 87% at shear rate 0.1s(-1) and 98% at shear rate 500s(-1). The correlation analysis of the mathematical-regression model indicated that quadratic polynomial model could be employed to optimize the microwave extraction of APH. The optimal conditions to obtain the highest extraction of APH (18.190.26%) were as follows: microwave power, 330W; extraction time, 80.67min and extraction temperature, 82C. PMID:24661886

  11. Synergistic gelation of xanthan gum with locust bean gum: a rheological investigation.

    PubMed

    Copetti, G; Grassi, M; Lapasin, R; Pricl, S

    1997-12-01

    Many industrial products often include in their formulation more than one polysaccharide to achieve the desired properties during and after processing. Many such mixed systems behave as would be expected from the known properties of the individual polymers. In others, however, their properties are superior to those of either component alone, or may be qualitatively different. In many polysaccharide systems, the combination of a gelling polymer with a nongelling one gives rise to strong synergistic effects, as a consequence of interaction among different chain polymers and formation of mixed junction zones. Probably, the most exploited mixed gels, especially by the food industry, are those involving the microbial polysaccharide xanthan gum (XG) and the plant galactomannans, like locust bean gum (LBG). Concentrated aqueous systems of LBG and XG display quite different rheological properties: the former show the behaviour typical of hyperentangled macromolecular solutions, whereas the flow and viscoelastic properties of XG systems correspond to those of tenuous, weak-gel networks. Interestingly, when mixed together these macromolecules interact to form a firm, thermoreversible gel with synergistic effects. In the present paper we report the results of a thorough investigation of both polymer concentration and temperature effects on the rheological properties of mixed LBG-XG systems in 20 mM KCl under continuous and oscillatory flow conditions. Under continuous shear at 25 degrees C, pure LBG shows the flow properties of a macromolecular solution, with a shear-thinning behaviour and a Newtonian region at low shear rates, whereas the rheological behaviour of XG and all LX mixed systems is that typical of weak-gels. Furthermore, in the mixed systems the viscosity values do not increase monotonically with increasing xanthan concentration, but the synergistic effect has a maximum in accordance with the XG:LBG ratio 1:1. As the temperature is increased from 25 degrees C to 85 degrees C, whilst the LBG system do not show any qualitative change but there is only a parallel, downward shift of viscosity values, in the case of xanthan there is a dramatic change in the corresponding curve profiles, due to the thermally induced helix-coil conformational transition. The differences in the rheological behaviour of the systems examined can be better shown through dynamic tests at 25 degrees C. The strain sweeps performed at constant frequency of oscillation reveal that the mixed systems show higher sensitivity to strain amplitude, and lower strain values must be attained to ensure linear viscoelastic properties. The mechanical spectra clearly show the influence of composition on the viscoelastic properties of these biopolymer systems. All LX systems show the mechanical spectra typical of polysaccharide gels: G' is always much greater than G" and is nearly independent of the applied frequency over a wide frequency range. In addition, the marked gap between the elastic responses of the pure LBG and the LX 1:3 systems demonstrates the strong effect of the initial addition of xanthan to the pure LBG, especially in the low frequency range, whereas the highest synergistic effect is attained for the LX 1:1 system. A comprehensive description of the frequency dependence of both moduli can be suitably obtained through the four-parameter Friedrich model, which belongs to the class of fractional derivative approaches viscoelasticity. The same thermal effect is observed for the XG and all LX mixed systems considered, indicating a progressive change from the behaviour of a typical gel to that of a quasi-solution state, when temperature is increased from 25 degrees C to 85 degrees C. Among all mixed systems, the LX 1:1 has the highest values of the moduli at any temperature considered, and is characterized by the highest gel-sol transition temperature. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9486428

  12. Synergistic gelation of xanthan gum with locust bean gum: a rheological investigation.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Copetti G; Grassi M; Lapasin R; Pricl S

    1997-12-01

    Many industrial products often include in their formulation more than one polysaccharide to achieve the desired properties during and after processing. Many such mixed systems behave as would be expected from the known properties of the individual polymers. In others, however, their properties are superior to those of either component alone, or may be qualitatively different. In many polysaccharide systems, the combination of a gelling polymer with a nongelling one gives rise to strong synergistic effects, as a consequence of interaction among different chain polymers and formation of mixed junction zones. Probably, the most exploited mixed gels, especially by the food industry, are those involving the microbial polysaccharide xanthan gum (XG) and the plant galactomannans, like locust bean gum (LBG). Concentrated aqueous systems of LBG and XG display quite different rheological properties: the former show the behaviour typical of hyperentangled macromolecular solutions, whereas the flow and viscoelastic properties of XG systems correspond to those of tenuous, weak-gel networks. Interestingly, when mixed together these macromolecules interact to form a firm, thermoreversible gel with synergistic effects. In the present paper we report the results of a thorough investigation of both polymer concentration and temperature effects on the rheological properties of mixed LBG-XG systems in 20 mM KCl under continuous and oscillatory flow conditions. Under continuous shear at 25 degrees C, pure LBG shows the flow properties of a macromolecular solution, with a shear-thinning behaviour and a Newtonian region at low shear rates, whereas the rheological behaviour of XG and all LX mixed systems is that typical of weak-gels. Furthermore, in the mixed systems the viscosity values do not increase monotonically with increasing xanthan concentration, but the synergistic effect has a maximum in accordance with the XG:LBG ratio 1:1. As the temperature is increased from 25 degrees C to 85 degrees C, whilst the LBG system do not show any qualitative change but there is only a parallel, downward shift of viscosity values, in the case of xanthan there is a dramatic change in the corresponding curve profiles, due to the thermally induced helix-coil conformational transition. The differences in the rheological behaviour of the systems examined can be better shown through dynamic tests at 25 degrees C. The strain sweeps performed at constant frequency of oscillation reveal that the mixed systems show higher sensitivity to strain amplitude, and lower strain values must be attained to ensure linear viscoelastic properties. The mechanical spectra clearly show the influence of composition on the viscoelastic properties of these biopolymer systems. All LX systems show the mechanical spectra typical of polysaccharide gels: G' is always much greater than G" and is nearly independent of the applied frequency over a wide frequency range. In addition, the marked gap between the elastic responses of the pure LBG and the LX 1:3 systems demonstrates the strong effect of the initial addition of xanthan to the pure LBG, especially in the low frequency range, whereas the highest synergistic effect is attained for the LX 1:1 system. A comprehensive description of the frequency dependence of both moduli can be suitably obtained through the four-parameter Friedrich model, which belongs to the class of fractional derivative approaches viscoelasticity. The same thermal effect is observed for the XG and all LX mixed systems considered, indicating a progressive change from the behaviour of a typical gel to that of a quasi-solution state, when temperature is increased from 25 degrees C to 85 degrees C. Among all mixed systems, the LX 1:1 has the highest values of the moduli at any temperature considered, and is characterized by the highest gel-sol transition temperature. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  13. Locust bean gum: processing, properties and food applications--a review.

    PubMed

    Barak, Sheweta; Mudgil, Deepak

    2014-05-01

    Locust bean gum or carob gum is a galactomannan obtained from seed endosperm of carob tree i.e. Ceratonia siliqua. It is widely utilized as an additive in various industries such as food, pharmaceuticals, paper, textile, oil well drilling and cosmetics. Industrial applications of locust bean gum are due to its ability to form hydrogen bonding with water molecule. It is also beneficial in the control of many health problems like diabetes, bowel movements, heart disease and colon cancer due to its dietary fiber action. This article focuses on production, processing, composition, properties, food applications and health benefits of locust bean gum. PMID:24548746

  14. Synthesis and devolatilization of M-97 NVB silicone gum compounded into silica reinforced silicone base

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    Silica reinforced silicon bases having 0.31 weight percent vinyl content were prepared by using a blend of low and high vinyl content devolatilized M-97 NVB silicone gum. The M-97 NVB is a custom dimethyl-, diphenyl-, methylvinylsiloxane gum. The silicon gum was devolatilized to evaluate the anticipated improved handling characteristics. Previous procured batches of M-97 NVB had not been devolatilized and difficult handling problems were encountered. The synthesis, devolatilization, and compound processes for the M-97 NVB silicone gum are discussed.

  15. Rapid screening of guar gum using portable Raman spectral identification methods.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Hirsch K; Wolfgang, Steven; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2016-01-25

    Guar gum is a well-known inactive ingredient (excipient) used in a variety of oral pharmaceutical dosage forms as a thickener and stabilizer of suspensions and as a binder of powders. It is also widely used as a food ingredient in which case alternatives with similar properties, including chemically similar gums, are readily available. Recent supply shortages and price fluctuations have caused guar gum to come under increasing scrutiny for possible adulteration by substitution of cheaper alternatives. One way that the U.S. FDA is attempting to screen pharmaceutical ingredients at risk for adulteration or substitution is through field-deployable spectroscopic screening. Here we report a comprehensive approach to evaluate two field-deployable Raman methods-spectral correlation and principal component analysis-to differentiate guar gum from other gums. We report a comparison of the sensitivity of the spectroscopic screening methods with current compendial identification tests. The ability of the spectroscopic methods to perform unambiguous identification of guar gum compared to other gums makes them an enhanced surveillance alternative to the current compendial identification tests, which are largely subjective in nature. Our findings indicate that Raman spectral identification methods perform better than compendial identification methods and are able to distinguish guar gum from other gums with 100% accuracy for samples tested by spectral correlation and principal component analysis. PMID:26609678

  16. Gum chewing reduces the time to first defaecation after pelvic surgery: A randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Tazegül Pekin, A; Kerimoğlu, O Seçilmiş; Doğan, N U; Yılmaz, S A; Kebapcılar, A G; Gençoğlu Bakbak, B B; Çelik, Ç

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative ileus is a major complication that increases the morbidity in patients who had abdominal surgery. Several different procedures have been used to manage bowel function, including adequate pain control, prokinetic drugs and supportive strategies. The present study aimed to assess the effect of chewing gum on bowel recovery in patients undergoing gynaecologic abdominal surgeries. A total of 137 patients were randomised into gum-chewing and control groups. Patients in the gum-chewing group began chewing gum at post-operative 3rd h and chewed gum thereafter every 4 h daily, for 30 min each time. All patients received the same post-operative treatment. Primary outcome measures were the time to first passage of flatus and time to first passage of stool. The secondary outcome measures included the first hearing of normal bowel sounds, nausea and the time until discharge from the hospital. Compared with the control group, the time interval between operation and first flatus was shorter in the gum-chewing group (median, 33 h vs 30 h). However, the difference was not significant (p = 0.381). The first defaecation time was significantly shorter in the gum-chewing group. The median time to first defaecation was 67 (20-105) h in the control group and 45 (12-97) h in the gum-chewing group (p < 0.01). Gum chewing is safe, well tolerated and it allows early defaecation after gynaecologic abdominal surgery. PMID:25325342

  17. Chewing-gum flavor affects measures of global complexity of multichannel EEG.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, T; Wackermann, J; Kinoshita, T; Hirota, T; Kochi, K; Kondakor, I; Koenig, T; Lehmann, D

    1997-01-01

    Global complexity of spontaneous brain electric activity was studied before and after chewing gum without flavor and with 2 different flavors. One-minute, 19-channel, eyes-closed electroencephalograms (EEG) were recorded from 20 healthy males before and after using 3 types of chewing gum: regular gum containing sugar and aromatic additives, gum containing 200 mg theanine (a constituent of Japanese green tea), and gum base (no sugar, no aromatic additives); each was chewed for 5 min in randomized sequence. Brain electric activity was assessed through Global Omega (Omega)-Complexity and Global Dimensional Complexity (GDC), quantitative measures of complexity of the trajectory of EEG map series in state space; their differences from pre-chewing data were compared across gum-chewing conditions. Friedman Anova (p < 0.043) showed that effects on Omega-Complexity differed significantly between conditions and differences were maximal between gum base and theanine gum. No differences were found using GDC. Global Omega-Complexity appears to be a sensitive measure for subtle, central effects of chewing gum with and without flavor. PMID:9018023

  18. Effect of masticating chewing gum on postural stability during upright standing.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, Keisuke; Goto, Fumiyuki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of masticating chewing gum on postural stability during upright standing. To address this issue, 12 healthy subjects performed quiet standing on a force platform for the posturography study. The subjects were instructed to stand as stable as possible on the force platform in order to record the trajectory of the center-of-pressure (COP). After measuring the postural sway in the initial condition (pre-condition), the subjects were asked to stand while masticating chewing gum (gum-condition). Following the gum-condition, quiet standing without mastication was evaluated (post-condition) to ensure the effect of masticating chewing gum on postural stability. The trajectory and velocity of the COP were analyzed for each condition. We found that the postural stability tended to enhance during mastication of chewing gum. The rectangle area of the COP trajectory significantly diminished in the gum-condition and significantly enlarged in the post-condition. A similar effect was observed in the maximum velocity and standard deviation (SD) of the fore-aft amplitude of the COP trajectory. The values were significantly smaller in the gum-condition compared to those in the post-condition. These findings suggest that mastication of chewing gum affects the postural control by enhancing the postural stability during upright standing. PMID:20959136

  19. Pressure-controlled injection of guar gum stabilized microscale zerovalent iron for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Luna, M; Gastone, F; Tosco, T; Sethi, R; Velimirovic, M; Gemoets, J; Muyshondt, R; Sapion, H; Klaas, N; Bastiaens, L

    2015-10-01

    The paper reports a pilot injection test of microsized zerovalent iron (mZVI) dispersed in a guar gum shear thinning solution. The test was performed in the framework of the EU research project AQUAREHAB in a site in Belgium contaminated by chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The field application was aimed to overcome those critical aspects which hinder mZVI field injection, mainly due to the colloidal instability of ZVI-based suspensions. The iron slurry properties (iron particles size and concentration, polymeric stabilizer type and concentration, slurry viscosity) were designed in the laboratory based on several tests (reactivity tests towards contaminants, sedimentation tests and rheological measurements). The particles were delivered into the aquifer through an injection well specifically designed for controlled-pressure delivery (approximately 10 bars). The well characteristics and the critical pressure of the aquifer (i.e. the injection pressure above which fracturing occurs) were assessed via two innovative injection step rate tests, one performed with water and the other one with guar gum. Based on laboratory and field preliminary tests, a flow regime at the threshold between permeation and preferential flow was selected for mZVI delivery, as a compromise between the desired homogeneous distribution of the mZVI around the injection point (ensured by permeation flow) and the fast and effective injection of the slurry (guaranteed by high discharge rates and injection pressure, resulting in the generation of preferential flow paths). A monitoring setup was designed and installed for the real-time monitoring of relevant parameters during injection, and for a fast determination of the spatial mZVI distribution after injection via non-invasive magnetic susceptibility measurements. PMID:25971233

  20. Subchronic (90-day) toxicity study in rats fed gum kondagogu (Cochlospermumgossypium).

    PubMed

    Janaki, B; Sashidhar, R B

    2000-06-01

    Although gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium) is grouped under gum karaya (Sterculia sp.), it differs significantly in terms of physicochemical properties and chemical composition and does not conform to the confirmatory tests prescribed for gum karaya ([Janaki]). Gum karaya has wide applications in the pharmaceutical and food industries, whereas the use of gum kondagogu is yet to be explored. In this context, a short-term toxicity study on gum kondagogu was undertaken in rats. The gum was fed to rats at 0, 0.2%, 1% and 5% (w/w) in feed, for 90 days. Biochemical parameters were measured to assess the toxicity at the end of the study period. The results indicated no significant changes in growth pattern, haematological indices (RBC, WBC, Hb, PCV, MCV, MCH, MCHC, differential leucocyte counts), biochemical analytes (glucose, urea nitrogen, total protein, albumin, bilirubin, creatinine, sodium and potassium ions), activities of plasma and liver enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, alanine amino-transaminase, aspartate aminotransaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, glutathione S-transferase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidases and organ to body mass ratio (brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys and spleen). Histopathology of the liver and kidney also did not reveal any abnormality. An increased faecal bulk was observed in rats fed with 5% gum kondagogu. However, faecal moisture content of female rats only was significantly different (P=<0.05) as compared to controls. Thus, it can be inferred, based on the present investigations, that gum kondagogu has a potential application as a food additive, similar to gum karaya. Feeding it at a much higher level (5%) than expected for consumption as a food additive also did not result in any toxic effect. Being non-toxic, gum kondagogu has a potential as a food additive with excellent physicochemical properties and a unique chemical composition. PMID:10828504

  1. Process for the selective hydrogenation of gasolines comprising both gum-generating compounds and undesirable sulfur compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cosyns, J.; Derrien, M.

    1980-06-17

    Unsaturated gasolines of both high mercaptan or hydrogen sulfide content and high gum-generator content are hydrogenated first over a palladium catalyst and then over a nickel catalyst. Resultant unsaturated gasolines are sweet and have low gum generator content.

  2. Physical and chemical stability of gum arabic-stabilized conjugated linoleic acid oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaolin; Xu, Qiong; Tian, Dazhi; Wang, Nana; Fang, Yapeng; Deng, Zhongyang; Phillips, Glyn O; Lu, Jiang

    2013-05-15

    Oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions have been used as a delivery system to protect conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid, from oxidation. Conventional gum arabic (GA) and two matured gum arabic samples (EM2 and EM10) were used as emulsifiers to prepare CLA-in-water emulsions. The emulsions have optimal physical and chemical stability at gum concentrations of 5% for all three gums. Emulsions with higher gum concentrations are more susceptible to lipid oxidation. This is attributed to reduced physical stability at higher gum concentrations because of the coalescence and depletion-induced flocculation of the emulsion droplets. The prooxidants iron and copper intrinsically contained in the gums could also contribute to this instability. Among the three gums, EM10 provides the most effective protection for CLA both physically and chemically, because of its superior interfacial properties over GA and EM2. PMID:23614832

  3. Gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants: effects on lipid oxidation of peanuts.

    PubMed

    Haq, Muhammad Abdul; Azam, Mahmood; Hasnain, Abid

    2015-04-01

    Performance of antioxidants is improved by incorporating them into polymer matrix such as polysaccharides based edible coatings. Gum cordia, an anionic polysaccharide extracted from the fruits of Cordia.myxa could be used as carrier of antioxidants by virtue of its strong adhering and emulsifying properties. This study aimed to explore the potential of gum cordia as carrier of antioxidants when applied as edible coating on peanuts. Gum Cordia was compared with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) in delivering of antioxidants: butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and ascorbic acid (AA). Coated and uncoated peanuts were stored at 35 °C for 126 days and coating carrier effectiveness was measured by following lipid oxidation using chemical parameters (peroxide value and thiobarbituric acid reactive species) and sensory evaluation (oxidized flavor). Significant differences (p < 0.05) between coated and uncoated samples were observed. Gum cordia was found better than CMC to deliver the antioxidants. Gum cordia based coating in combination with BHA/BHT exhibited highest protection (290 % higher shelf life than control) based on peroxide value (40 meq.O2 kg(-1)) followed by gum codia plus BHT (244 %), gum cordia plus BHA (232 %), CMC plus BHA/BHT (184 %), CMC plus BHA (139 %), CMC plus BHT (119 %), gum cordia plus AA (96 %) and CMC plus AA (46 %). PMID:25829621

  4. CORN FIBER: A POTENTIAL GUM ARABIC REPLACER FOR BEVERAGE FLAVOR EMULSIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. food industry needs a domestically produced food gum with a dependable supply and consistent quality, which can be used for preparing oil-in-water emulsions, such as citrus oil emulsions for beverages. Corn Fiber Gum (CFG) is an arabinoxylan (hemicellulose) extracted from the corn kernel p...

  5. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric characterisation of plant gums in samples from painted works of art.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Brecoulaki, Hariclia; Colombini, Maria Perla; Lluveras, Anna; Restivo, Vincenzo; Ribechini, Erika

    2007-12-21

    This paper presents an analytical GC-MS procedure to study the chemical composition of plant gums, determining aldoses and uronic acids in one step. The procedure is based on the silylation of aldoses and uronic acids, released from plant gums by microwave assisted hydrolysis, and previously converted into the corresponding diethyl-dithioacetals and diethyl-dithioacetal lactones. Using this method only one peak for each compound is obtained, thus providing simple and highly reproducible chromatograms. The analytical procedure was optimised using reference samples of raw plant gums (arabic, karaya, ghatti, guar, locust bean and tragacanth, cherry, plum and peach gums), commercial watercolours and paint layers prepared according to ancient recipes at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure of Florence (Italy). To identify gum media in samples of unknown composition, a decisional schema for the gum identification and the principal component analysis of the relative sugar percentage contents were employed. The procedure was used to study samples collected from wall paintings from Macedonian tombs (4th-3rd centuries bc) and from the Mycenaean "Palace of Nestor" (13th century bc) in Pylos, Greece. The presence of carbohydrates was ascertained and plant gum binders (fruit and a mixture of tragacanth and fruit tree gums) were identified in some of the samples. PMID:18023451

  6. Gum chewing improves adolescents’ math performance in an SAT preparatory course

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of gum chewing on students’ performance in a preparatory course for the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). A total of 182 adolescents enrolled in an SAT preparatory class were randomized into one of two treatments: 1) gum chewing condition (G...

  7. Laser-induced-fluorescence detection of gums in jet fuels. Final report, Jul 90-May 92

    SciTech Connect

    Naegeli, D.W.; Hill, R.H.

    1992-05-01

    The current method (ASTM D381) of determining the concentration of gums in jet fuels is a lengthy procedure requiring a large sample size. Because gum formation is believed to be an important step in the formation of deposits in fuel systems used in jet aircraft, a non-intrusive method of performing spatially resolved measurements of gum concentration in high temperature flow systems is a desired research tool. The present study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to monitor gum concentration in jet fuel. The study revealed several effects, such as aging and the interference of other fluoroshores with gum fluorescence, which require further investigation before LIF is to be considered a quantitative technique for measuring gums in jet fuels. However, this study showed that the formation of gums in jet fuels is detectable by LIF. The results show that gum formation in some fuels correlates strongly with LIF while for other fuels the results are ambiguous.

  8. Rheological and Quality Characteristics of Taftoon Bread as Affected by Salep and Persian Gums

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, R.; Hamidi Esfehani, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of salep gum at concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, 3%, and 5% (w/w flour basis) and the Persian gum at concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, and 3% (w/w flour basis) and combination of the two gums at concentrations of 0.5% + 0.5%, 0.75% + 0.25%, and 0.25% + 0.75% on rheological properties of the wheat flour dough and quality of Taftoon bread were studied with regard to retardation of staling. Rheological (farinograph and extensograph) characteristics, staling, and organoleptic evaluations were performed on the dough and the resulting Taftoon bread. Statistical results showed that the salep gum at 5% and Persian gum at 3% (w/w flour basis) had a significant effect on the dough properties. Salep and Persian gums when each separately added increased and decreased dough water absorption, respectively. Both hydrocolloids increased the dough resistance to extension and decreased its extensibility. Persian gum shows dual nature in water absorption and some other baking properties. Textural studies revealed that addition of 5% salep gum (w/w flour basis) reduced the bread crumb firmness and delayed the staling process of the Taftoon bread. X-ray diffraction study also confirmed this result. PMID:26904649

  9. 40 CFR 454.20 - Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory. 454.20 Section 454.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GUM AND WOOD...

  10. Terminological aspects of the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Charles

    2014-08-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) provided for the first time an international consensus on how to approach the widespread difficulties associated with conveying information about how reliable the value resulting from a measurement is thought to be. This paper examines the evolution in thinking and its impact on the terminology that accompanied the development of the GUM. Particular emphasis is put on the very clear distinction in the GUM between measurement uncertainty and measurement error, and on the reasons that even though true value and error are considered in the GUM to be unknowable and, sometimes by implication, of little (or even no) use in measurement analysis, they remain as key concepts, especially when considering the objective of measurement. While probability theory in measurement analysis from a frequentist perspective was in widespread use prior to the publication of the GUM, a key underpinning principle of the GUM was to instead consider probability as a degree of belief. The terminological changes necessary to make this transition are also covered. Even twenty years after the publication of the GUM, the scientific and metrology literatures sometimes contain uncertainty analyses, or discussions of measurement uncertainty, that are not terminologically consistent with the GUM, leading to the inability of readers to fully understand what has been done and what is intended in the associated measurements. This paper concludes with a discussion of the importance of using proper methodology and terminology for reporting measurement results.

  11. Characterisation and molecular association of Nigerian and Sudanese Acacia gum exudates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemical and physicochemical characteristics of gum exudate samples harvested from mature trees of Acacia senegal at two specific locations in Nigeria have been investigated together with gum samples harvested from Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal originating from Sudan. The monosaccharide sugar ...

  12. Small scale production and characterization of xanthan gum synthesized by local isolates of Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Barua, Rajesh; Alam, Md Jahangir; Salim, Mohammad; Ashrafee, Tamzida Shamim

    2016-02-01

    Xanthan gum is a commercially important microbial exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by Xanthomonas campestris. X. campestris is a plant pathogen causing various plant diseases such as black rot of crucifers, bacterial leaf blight and citrus canker disease resulting in crop damage. In this study, we isolated efficient local bacterial isolates which are capable to produce xanthan gum utilizing different sources of carbon (maltose, sucrose and glucose). Bacterial isolates from different plant leaves and fruits were identified as Xanthomonas campestris based on their morphological and biochemical characteristics. Among the 23 isolates, 70% were capable of producing gum. Taro plant, considered as new bacterial host, also have the capability to produce xanthan gum. Production conditions of xanthan gum and their relative viscosity by these bacterial isolates were optimized using basal medium containing commercial carbon and nitrogen sources and various temperature and rotation. Highest level of xanthan gum (18.286 g/l) with relative viscosity (7.2) was produced (Host, Citrus macroptera) at 28 degrees C, pH 7.0, 150 rpm using sucrose as a carbon source at orbital shaker. Whereas, in lab fermenter, same conditions gave best result (19.587 g/l gum) with 7.8 relative viscosity. Chilled alcohol (96%) was used to recover the xanthan gum. FTIR studies also carried out for further confirmation of compatibility by detecting the chemical groups. PMID:26934783

  13. 40 CFR 454.20 - Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the manufacture of gum rosin and turpentine subcategory. 454.20 Section 454.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) GUM AND WOOD...

  14. Adverse Reaction to Nicotine Gum in Malay Female Smoker: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noorzurani, Md Haris Robson; Bond, Alyson; Wolff, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) are prescribed in smoking cessation programmes to help smokers stop smoking. The ideal dosage of NRT should control cravings and withdrawal symptoms but avoid adverse reactions. This report describes a case of adverse reaction to nicotine gum in a female Malay smoker. Assays taken 2 h after the gum, showed that…

  15. Effect of thermal and freezing treatments on rheological, textural and color properties of basil seed gum.

    PubMed

    Zameni, Akefe; Kashaninejad, Mahdi; Aalami, Mehran; Salehi, Fakhreddin

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocolloids are macromolecular carbohydrates that are added to many foodstuffs to achieve the appropriate rheological and textural properties and to prevent synersis or to increase the viscosity and stability of foodstuffs. In this study the effect of different thermal treatments (25, 50, 75, 100 and 121Cfor 20min) and freezing treatments (-18 and -25C for 24h) on rheological, textural and color change of basil seed gum as a new source of hydrocolloids was investigated. The results demonstrated that basil seed gum solutions had desirable rheological and textural properties. Power law model well described non-newtonian pseudoplastic behavior of basil seed gum in all conditions. When the hydrocolloid samples were heated or frozen, increase in viscosity of basil seed gum solutions was observed. Hardness, adhesiveness and consistency of basil seed gel for control sample were 13.5g, 16.79, 52.59g.s, respectively and all increased after thermal treatments. The results revealed that basil seed gum has the excellent ability to stand against heat treatment and the highest hardness, adhesiveness and consistency value of gum gels were observed in sample treated at 121C for 20min. In addition this gum gel has the good ability to stand against freeze-thaw treatment and its textural properties improved after freezing. Therefore, basil seed gum can be employed as a textural and rheological modifier in formulation of foods exposed to thermal and freezing temperatures. PMID:26345008

  16. Adverse Reaction to Nicotine Gum in Malay Female Smoker: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noorzurani, Md Haris Robson; Bond, Alyson; Wolff, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Nicotine replacement therapies (NRT) are prescribed in smoking cessation programmes to help smokers stop smoking. The ideal dosage of NRT should control cravings and withdrawal symptoms but avoid adverse reactions. This report describes a case of adverse reaction to nicotine gum in a female Malay smoker. Assays taken 2 h after the gum, showed that

  17. Recent advances in Rosaceae gum exudates: From synthesis to food and non-food applications.

    PubMed

    Bouaziz, Fatma; Koubaa, Mohamed; Ellouz Ghorbel, Raoudha; Ellouz Chaabouni, Semia

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, great interest has been devoted to the development of new applications for natural gums. These molecules were used for a variety of purposes since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. They represent one of the most abundant raw materials used not only in commercial food products, but also in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. Plant gums take their advantages compared to other gums (e.g., from animal and microbial sources) mainly because of their acceptance by consumers. Despite of the well description given in literature for the features of plant gum exudates, there is a lack distinguishing the different families that are producing gums, and their potential applications. Among these gums, the ones produced by Rosaceae family (e.g., almond, apricot, cherry, peach, and plum plants) have been taking special attention. Thus, the aim of this review is to report the recent advances in Rosaceae gum exudates. An emphasis is given for the formation mechanisms of these gums, their chemical composition, functional properties and structures, beneficial properties, as well as their food/non-food applications. PMID:26836615

  18. Reduction of lipid oxidation by formation of caseinate-oil-oat gum emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration of oat gum, though important for formation of stable emulsion, has no effect on oxidation of Omega 3 oil; this is most prominent in fish-oil based Omega 3 oil. The optimal concentration of oat gum is about 0.2% wt for emulsion stability and visual appearance. We found that concentr...

  19. The effect of chewing gum flavor on the negative affect associated with tobacco abstinence among dependent cigarette smokers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lee M; Collins, Frank L; Vanderveen, Joseph W; Weaver, Cameron C

    2010-11-01

    Many smokers relapse during cessation attempts due to increases in negative affect. Previous research has shown that chewing confectionary chewing gum appears to lessen the severity of acute nicotine withdrawal symptoms and help individuals who are trying to reduce smoking in part due to the flavor of the gum chewed. The current study compared the effects of three flavored gums to a No Gum Control during 48-hour cessation periods for young dependent smokers. Forty-nine smokers participated in three experimental conditions (peppermint, vanilla, and baked apple cardamom flavored gum) as well as a No Gum Control across four weeks while abstaining from smoking for 48-hours each week. Compared to the No Gum Control, participants in the Gum conditions reported lower levels of anxiety, dysphoria, and tension. Vanilla and baked apple cardamom flavored gum resulted in lower levels of negative affect while peppermint flavored gum was not different from the No Gum Control. These findings indicate that some flavors of gum are effective in reducing the negative affect associated with nicotine withdrawal and may serve as a valuable tool in helping smokers quit. PMID:20598808

  20. Psychological and Pharmacological Influences in Cigarette Smoking Withdrawal: Effects of Nicotine Gum and Expectancy on Smoking Withdrawal Symptoms and Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Andrew M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined effects of expectancy and nicotine depletion on withdrawal symptoms by giving 109 smokers nicotine gum or placebo. Subjects who believed they had nicotine gum reported fewer physical symptoms of withdrawal, showed less arousal, and smoked fewer cigarettes than did those who thought they had placebo. Actual nicotine content of gum had no

  1. Evaluation of alternatives to guar gum as tackifiers for hydromulch and as clumping agents for biodegradable cat litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guar gum is currently the principal gum used as a tackifier for hydromulch used in erosion control, and as a clumping agent in biodegradable cat litters. Due to recent severe price increases for guar gum, cheaper alternatives are being investigated. We examined several alternatives, including xanth...

  2. Pressure production in oral vestibule during gum chewing.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, M; Ono, T; Yoshinaka, M; Fujiwara, S; Yoshinaka, M; Maeda, Y

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to record oral vestibule pressure (OVP) by the lip and cheek contraction during gum chewing, to examine the characteristics of these pressures and coordination between the OVP and jaw movement. The subjects were eight healthy adult men (mean age of 29·3 ± 3·3 years). An experimental plate that incorporated four pressure sensors on the midline of the upper jaw (Ch. 1), upper right canine (Ch. 2), upper right first molar (Ch. 3) and upper left first molar (Ch. 4) was used for measuring OVP. The right masseter electromyogram (EMG) was recorded simultaneously. Subjects chewed gum on the right side 20 times, and eight consecutive strokes were used for the analysis of the sequential order, maximal magnitude and duration of each OVP. Onset of OVP was observed at the molar on the non-chewing side (Ch. 4) before chewing side (Ch. 3), and offset was largely simultaneous at each site. On the chewing side (Chs. 1-3), OVP onset during the interval of EMG activity reached to the peak around the end of interval and offset in the duration of EMG activity. The maximal pressure was significantly larger at Chs. 1-3 than at Ch. 4, but no significant differences were observed in duration of pressure among each site. These results suggest that OVP is coordinated with jaw movement during gum chewing, and larger pressure is produced on the chewing side than on the non-chewing side. Our findings are quantitative indices for the evaluation of lip and cheek function during mastication. PMID:26147313

  3. Gum and deposit formation from jet-turbine and diesel fuels at 130C

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.; Lan, Bosco Y.

    1986-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this work is to devise an accelerated test to compare rates of soluble gum and deposit formation from jet-turbine and diesel fuels in storage and of hard deposits in engines. This paper describes rates of oxygen absorption and gum formation in air at 130 C. For a single fuel or hydrocarbon, the rate of gum formation is closely proportional to the oxygen absorbed, even when this rate varies with purification and additives. In general, pure hydrocarbons absorb oxygen much faster than the fuels, but the fuels and 2-ethylnaphthalene give more gum for the oxygen absorbed than the other pure hydrocarbons. Gum has two main sources; one appears to be associated with the chain termination mechanism in oxidation, the other coupling of fuel molecules in the absence of oxygen. Other possibilities are discussed.

  4. Influence of gamma radiation on the physicochemical and rheological properties of sterculia gum polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Baljit; Sharma, Vikrant

    2013-11-01

    Keeping in view the influence of gamma radiation on the physiochemical properties of the polysaccharides and their importance in the food and pharmaceutical industry, in the present study attempt has been made to investigate the effects of absorbed dose on FTIR, XRD, SEMs, absorbance, pH, solubility, water absorption capacity, emulsion stability and rheology of sterculia gum. Increase in solubility and decrease in swellability of gum has been observed on increasing the absorbed dose. The emulsion stability has improved for the gum sample irradiated with total dose of 8.10.2 kGy. Apparent viscosity of gum solution first increased with increase in dose from 0 to 8.10.2 kGy than decreased with regular trends with further increase in total absorbed dose. Flow behavior of gum solution shifted to Newtonian from non-Newtonian with increasing the dose.

  5. Sulfation of Aegle marmelos gum: synthesis, physico-chemical and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Manish; Rana, Vikas; Kumar, Vineet; Singh, Ram S; Kennedy, John F; Tiwary, Ashok K

    2013-02-15

    The present investigation was aimed at optimizing the conditions for preparing sulfated derivative of gum obtained from partially ripe fruits of Aegle marmelos. Elemental analysis, FTIR-ATR and NMR studies confirmed successful sulfation. The ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to pyridine exerted maximum influence on the degree of substitution followed by reaction temperature and reaction time. The sulfated derivative showed higher swelling in both acidic and alkaline pH as compared to unmodified gum. It also possessed higher negative zeta potential, higher viscosity, work of shear, firmness, consistency, cohesiveness and index of viscosity as compared to both unmodified gum as well as sodium alginate. Sulfated derivative was superior to unmodified gum and sodium alginate in terms of antimicrobial and anticoagulant activity. The sulfated sample appears to be a potential substitute over the unmodified gum sample and sodium alginate for modulating physicochemical properties of food and drug release dosage forms. PMID:23399204

  6. Gum and deposit formation in diesel fuels. Final report, 1984-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.; Mill, T.

    1988-05-15

    The authors examined two aspects of the stability of diesel fuels in storage: the formation of sediments in suspension, which subsequently clog filters, and the formation of soluble gum, which passes the filters but then forms hard deposits on hot engine parts. Research on fuel stability at SRI during the last 6 years has shown that soluble gum appears first on storage, and then part of it grows into sediment. If the oxidation mixture is agitated gently, the precipitating gum grows on the surface gum, and no loose sediment is formed. Three mechanisms of gum formation were distinguished: (1) a process intimately associated with chain propagation and termination during oxidation, (2) a coupling of fuel molecules by decomposing peroxides in the absence of oxygen, and (3) a condensation of naphthols and aldehydes from the oxidation of alkylnaphthalenes. The polymeric oxidation products from a JP-8 fuel are shown to be largely responsible for deposits in the Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester (JFTOT).

  7. Nicotine gum chewing: a novel strategy to shorten duration of postoperative ileus via vagus nerve activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z; Boersema, G S A; Jeekel, J; Lange, J F

    2014-09-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is a transit cessation of bowel motility after surgery. Substantial evidences suggest that gum chewing accelerate the recovery of bowel motility after surgery. Perioperative nicotine administration reduces postoperative opioid use and prevents postoperative nausea and vomiting. Nicotine gum chewing combines stimulation of the cephalic-vagal reflex by gum chewing, and activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway by nicotine administration. We therefore hypothesized that nicotine gum chewing reduces POI and improves patient outcomes such as shortening the length of hospitalization as well as saving medical costs. As nicotine gum is commercially available, inexpensive, and has been in use for many years without any severe side effects, it may have a wide clinical application in POI prevention. PMID:24998667

  8. Chewing of xylitol gum--a well adopted practice among finnish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Honkala, E; Rimpel, A; Karvonen, S; Rimpel, M

    1996-01-01

    The adoption of xylitol chewing gum in Finland was studied using data from two comparable postal surveys for national samples of 12- to 18-year-olds in 1977 (response rate 79%, n = 2,528) and 1991 (77%, n = 7,672). In 1977 only 12% of this age group used xylitol chewing gum but, by 1991 it had become common (64% of boys, 81% of girls). Daily use increased from 1 to 15% among boys and from 1 to 32% among girls. Use of sucrose chewing gum decreased; in 1991 only 2% used it daily. Daily use of xylitol chewing gum did not vary according to socioeconomic status or level of urbanization. The increase in use of xylitol chewing gum is an example of the positive effect of health education given by a comprehensive, preventively oriented system of dental health care in association with commercial interests. PMID:8850581

  9. [Analysis of constituents of ester-type gum bases used as natural food additives].

    PubMed

    Tada, Atsuko; Masuda, Aino; Sugimoto, Naoki; Yamagata, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2007-12-01

    The differences in the constituents of ten ester-type gum bases used as natural food additives in Japan (urushi wax, carnauba wax, candelilla wax, rice bran wax, shellac wax, jojoba wax, bees wax, Japan wax, montan wax, and lanolin) were investigated. Several kinds of gum bases showed characteristic TLC patterns of lipids. In addition, compositions of fatty acid and alcohol moieties of esters in the gum bases were analyzed by GC/MS after methanolysis and hydrolysis, respectively. The results indicated that the varieties of fatty acids and alcohols and their compositions were characteristic for each gum base. These results will be useful for identification and discrimination of the ester-type gum bases. PMID:18203503

  10. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (part 1): porous medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging.

    PubMed

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in porous media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in porous media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative impact on the permeability of the porous medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a porous medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in porous media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries. PMID:25065767

  11. Enterocutaneous Fistula: Different Surgical Intervention Techniques for Closure along with Comparative Evaluation of Aluminum Paint, Karaya Gum (Hollister) and Gum Acacia for Peristomal Skin Care

    PubMed Central

    Namrata; Ahmad, Shabi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal fistulas are serious complications and are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. In majority of the patients, fistulas are treatable. However, the treatment is very complex and often multiple therapies are required. These highly beneficial treatment options which could shorten fistula closure time also result in considerable hospital cost savings. Aim This study was planned to study aetiology, clinical presentation, morbidity and mortality of enterocutaneous fistula and to evaluate the different surgical intervention techniques for closure of enterocutaneous fistula along with a comparative evaluation of different techniques for management of peristomal skin with special emphasis on aluminum paint, Karaya gum (Hollister) and Gum Acacia. Materials and Methods This prospective observational study was conducted in the Department of Surgery, M.L.N. Medical College, Allahabad and its associated hospital (S.R.N. Hospital, Allahabad) for a period of five years. Results Majority of enterocutaneous fistula were of small bowel and medium output fistulas (500-1000 ml/24hours). Most of the patients were treated with conservative treatment as compared to surgical intervention. Large bowel fistula has maximum spontaneous closure rate compare to small bowel and duodenum. Number of orifice whether single or multiple does not appear to play statistically significant role in spontaneous closure of fistula. Serum Albumin is a significantly important predictor of spontaneous fistula closure and mortality. Surgical management appeared to be the treatment of choice in distal bowel fistula. The application of karaya gum (Hollister kit), Gum Acacia and Aluminum Paint gave similar outcome. Conclusion Postoperative fistulas are the most common aetiology of enterocutaneous fistula and various factors do play role in management. Peristomal skin care done with Karaya Gum, Gum Acacia and Aluminum Paint has almost equal efficiency in management of skin excoriation. However, role of Gum Acacia was found to be good with inflamed, excoriated and ulcerative skin in comparison to Aluminum Paint and as efficacious as Karaya Gum but at much lower cost. PMID:26816943

  12. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (Part 1): Porous medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in porous media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in porous media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative impact on the permeability of the porous medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60 °C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4 g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a porous medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in porous media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries.

  13. Young stars of low mass in the Gum nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.; Heyer, Mark H.

    1989-01-01

    Observations are presented for four recently formed stars in the vicinity of the Gum nebula which are heavily obscured by surrounding dust and are associated with small reflection nebulae. HH46 is the only currently active star of the sample, and it is found to have a spectral type in the range of late G-early K, with superimposed emission lines of H-alpha, Ca II, Fe I, Fe II, and weak He I at near zero velocities. It is suggested that the observed scenario of low-mass stars in an older massive star environment may be analogous to the circumstances surrounding the birth of the sun.

  14. Antinociceptive activity of Astragalus gummifer gum (gum tragacanth) through the adrenergic system: A in vivo study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Keyhani, Leila; Heydari, Mehrangiz; Dashti-R, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: In Iranian traditional medicine, gum obtained from Astragalus gummifer and some other species of Astragalus was used as analgesic agent. Objective: In this study, we investigated the antinociceptive effect of several concentrations (125, 250, and 500 ?g/kg body weight) of Astragalus gummifer gum (AGG) on thermal and acetic acid induced pain in mice. Materials and Methods: AGG was dissolved in distillated water and injected i.p to male mice 15 minute before the onset of experiment. Writhing and hot-plate tests were applied to study the analgesic effect of AGG and compared with that of diclofenac sodium (30 mg/kg, i.p.) or morphine (8 mg/kg, i.p). To investigate the mechanisms involved in antinociception, yohimbine, naloxone, glibenclamide, and theophylline were used in writhing test. These drugs were injected intraperitoneally 15 min before the administration of AGG. The number of writhes were counted in 30 minutes and analyzed. Results: AGG exhibited a significant antinociceptive effect and the most effective dose of AGG was 500 ?g/kg. The most maximum possible effect (%MPE) was observed (117.4%) 15 min after drug administration. The %inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing in AGG 125, 250 and 500 was 47%, 50% and 54% vs %15 of control and 66.3% of diclofenac sodium group. The antinociceptive effect induced by this gum in the writhing test was reversed by the systemic administration of yohimbine (?2-adrenergic antagonist), but naloxone, glibenclamide, and theophylline did not reverse this effect. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicated that AGG induced its antinociceptive through the adrenergic system. PMID:25878459

  15. Guar gum based biodegradable, antibacterial and electrically conductive hydrogels.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Kaith BS; Sharma R; Kalia S

    2015-04-01

    Guar gum-polyacrylic acid-polyaniline based biodegradable electrically conductive interpenetrating network (IPN) structures were prepared through a two-step aqueous polymerization. Hexamine and ammonium persulfate (APS) were used as a cross linker-initiator system to crosslink the poly(AA) chains on Guar gum (Ggum) backbone. Optimum reaction conditions for maximum percentage swelling (7470.23%) were time (min) = 60; vacuum (mmHg) = 450; pH = 7.0; solvent (mL) = 27.5; [APS] (mol L(-1)) = 0.306 × 10(-1); [AA] (mol L(-1)) = 0.291 × 10(-3) and [hexamine] (mol L(-1))=0.356 × 10(-1). The semi-interpenetrating networks (semi-IPNs) were converted into IPNs through impregnation of polyaniline chains under acidic and neutral conditions. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were used to characterize the semi-IPNs and IPNs. Synthesized semi-IPNs and IPNs were further evaluated for moisture retention in different soils, antibacterial and biodegradation behavior.

  16. Guar gum based biodegradable, antibacterial and electrically conductive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kaith, Balbir S; Sharma, Reena; Kalia, Susheel

    2015-04-01

    Guar gum-polyacrylic acid-polyaniline based biodegradable electrically conductive interpenetrating network (IPN) structures were prepared through a two-step aqueous polymerization. Hexamine and ammonium persulfate (APS) were used as a cross linker-initiator system to crosslink the poly(AA) chains on Guar gum (Ggum) backbone. Optimum reaction conditions for maximum percentage swelling (7470.23%) were time (min) = 60; vacuum (mmHg) = 450; pH = 7.0; solvent (mL) = 27.5; [APS] (mol L(-1)) = 0.306 × 10(-1); [AA] (mol L(-1)) = 0.291 × 10(-3) and [hexamine] (mol L(-1))=0.356 × 10(-1). The semi-interpenetrating networks (semi-IPNs) were converted into IPNs through impregnation of polyaniline chains under acidic and neutral conditions. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were used to characterize the semi-IPNs and IPNs. Synthesized semi-IPNs and IPNs were further evaluated for moisture retention in different soils, antibacterial and biodegradation behavior. PMID:25660656

  17. Gum and deposit formation from jet turbine and diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.; Lan, B.Y.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the chemistry of deposit formation in hot parts of jet turbine and diesel engines and, thus, to predict and prevent deposit formation. Previous work in the field has been extensive, but a real understanding of deposit formation has been elusive. Work at SRI started on the basis that deposit formation from fuels must take place stepwise and is associated with autoxidation and the hydroperoxide produced. More recent work showed that in the absence of dissolved oxygen, higher temperatures are required for deposit formation. A recent report indicated that gum and deposit formation proceed mainly through oxidation products of the parent hydrocarbon, coupling of these products to dimeric, trimeric and higher condensation products (partly or wholly by radicals from hydroperoxides) and precipitation of insoluble products. The authors know of no information on how these first precipitates are converted to the ultimate, very insoluble, carbonaceous materials that cause engine problems. The present paper describes measurements of rates of oxidation and soluble gum formation in both pure hydrocarbons and mixed hydrocarbon fuels. Some patterns appear that can be largely explained on the basis of what is known about co-oxidations of hydrocarbon mixtures.

  18. New structural features of Acacia tortuosa gum exudate.

    PubMed

    Martnez, Maritza; Beltrn, Olga; Rincn, Fernando; Len de Pinto, Gladys; Igartuburu, Jos Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Acacia tortuosa produces a clear gum, very soluble in water. Previous reports showed that it was constituted by four fractions, one of them an arabinogalactan-protein complex. The elucidation of the A. tortuosa gum structure by the combination of classical chemical methods, size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy, was the objective of this investigation. The data obtained show that the heteropolysaccharide is an arabinogalactan type II, highly ramified, with lateral chains at C-2 as well as at C-6 of the galactose 3-O residues; mono-O-substituted galactoses were not detected. There are residues of mannose, the arabinose, pyranose predominantly, is terminal and 2-O-linked. The abundance of the 4-O-methyl-?-d-glucuronic acid was not previously reported. The proteic fraction is probably represented by an arabinogalactan-protein complex that binds poorly with ?-glucosyl Yariv reagent, and two glycoproteins. The NMR spectra suggest that the carbohydrate links to hydroxyproline through the galactose (galactosylation). PMID:25842315

  19. Optimizing microencapsulation of nisin with sodium alginate and guar gum.

    PubMed

    Narsaiah, Kairam; Jha, Shyam N; Wilson, Robin A; Mandge, Harshad M; Manikantan, Musuvadi R

    2014-12-01

    Nisin is a widely used bacteriocin active against gram positive bacteria and is also reported to be active against some gram negative bacteria. Incorporation of nisin into food systems is another challenge as directly added nisin is prone to inactivation by food constituents. Encapsulation of nisin has been done so far in liposomes which is rather an expensive technology involving multiple processes. Other cost effective alternatives with good encapsulation efficiency and better control release properties are sought. Alginate is useful as a matrix for entrapment of bioactive compounds. Present study was aimed at optimizing conditions for microencapsulation of nisin using calcium alginate as primary wall material and guar gum as filler at different air pressures using response surface methodology. The optimum conditions were: sodium alginate concentration (2%?w/v), guar gum concentration (0.4%?w/v), and air pressure (0.5bar gauge). The encapsulation efficiency of nisin in microcapsules produced under optimal conditions was 36.65%. PMID:25477680

  20. Gum containing calcium fluoride reinforces enamel subsurface lesions in situ.

    PubMed

    Kitasako, Y; Sadr, A; Hamba, H; Ikeda, M; Tagami, J

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing gum containing phosphoryl oligosaccharides of calcium (POs-Ca) and a low concentration of fluoride (F) on the hardness of enamel subsurface lesions, utilizing a double-blind, randomized, and controlled in situ model. Fifteen individuals wore removable lingual appliances with 3 bovine-enamel insets containing subsurface demineralized lesions. Three times a day for 14 days, they chewed one of the 3 chewing gums (placebo, POs-Ca, POs-Ca+F). After the treatment period, cross-sectional mineral content, nanoindentation hardness, and fluoride ion mapping by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) were evaluated. Although there were no statistical differences in overall mineral content and hardness recovery rates between POs-Ca and POs-Ca+F subsurface lesions (p > 0.05), nanoindentation at 1-μm distance increments from the surface showed statistical differences in hardness recovery rate between POs-Ca and POs-Ca+F in the superficial 20-μm region (p < 0.05). Fluoride mapping revealed distribution of the ion up to 20 μm from the surface in the POs-Ca+F group. Nanoindentation and TOF-SIMS results highlighted the benefits of bioavailability of fluoride ion on reinforcement of the superficial zone of subsurface lesions in situ (NCT01377493). PMID:22337700

  1. Mechanically modified xanthan gum: Rheology and polydispersity aspects.

    PubMed

    Eren, Necla Mine; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo

    2015-12-10

    Xanthan gum solutions were treated with high-pressure homogenization (HPH) in order to provide alternative treatments to enzymatic and chemical modification of this carbohydrate. Rheological properties of the treated and control samples were investigated in detail to gain an understanding of functional consequences of physical modification. The molecular structural properties were investigated via Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with Multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and Circular dichroism (CD). Structured network of xanthan gum solutions was lost gradually depending on the severity of the HPH treatment as evidenced by the observed changes in the viscosity and viscoelasticity of the treated solutions. Reduction in molecular weight and a significant increase in polydispersity of the polymer were the expected causes of these rheological changes. Observed increase in hydrodynamic volume upon HPH treatment was not surprising and attributed to the loss of structured networks. Changes in the rheological and structural characteristics of biopolymer were irreversible and significant recovery was not detected over a period of 11 weeks. PMID:26428149

  2. Study of antimicrobial activity and atomic force microscopy imaging of the action mechanism of cashew tree gum.

    PubMed

    Campos, Dbora A; Ribeiro, Alexandra C; Costa, Eduardo M; Fernandes, Joo C; Tavaria, Freni K; Araruna, Felipe Bastos; Eiras, Carla; Eaton, Peter; Leite, Jos Roberto S A; Manuela Pintado, M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of two grades of cashew tree gum (crude and purified) against eight microorganisms and to analyze the mechanism of cashew tree gum antimicrobial action via atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The results indicated strong antimicrobial properties of pure cashew tree gum against all tested microorganisms, except for Candida albicans and Lactobacillus acidophilus. On the other hand crude cashew gum showed antimicrobial activity only against Gram-positive bacteria (MRSA, MSSA, Listeria innocua and Enterococcus faecium). Atomic force microscopy imaging showed that pure cashew tree gum lead to bacterial cell collapse. In conclusion cashew tree gum presented relevant antimicrobial activity against most of the studied bacteria, and the purification of the cashew gum affected its antimicrobial spectrum. PMID:24751040

  3. Improved welan gum production by Alcaligenes sp. ATCC31555 from pretreated cane molasses.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongxia; Liu, Min; Yu, Pingru; Zhang, Shaozhi; Suo, Yukai; Luo, Ping; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jufang

    2015-09-20

    Welan gum production by Alcaligenes sp. ATCC31555 from cane molasses was studied in batch fermentation to reduce production costs and enhance gum production. The pretreatment of cane molasses, agitation speed and the addition of supplements were investigated to optimize the process. Sulfuric acid hydrolysis was found to be the optimal pretreatment, resulting in a maximum gum concentration of 33.5 g/L, which is 50.0% higher than those obtained from the molasses' mother liquor. Agitation at 600 rpm at 30°C and addition of 10% n-dodecane following fermentation for 36 h increased the maximum gum production up to 41.0 ± 1.41 g/L, which is 49.1% higher than the greatest welan gum concentration in the literature so far. The welan gum product showed an acceptable molecular weight, similar rheological properties and better thermal stability to that obtained from glucose. These results indicate that cane molasses may be a suitable and inexpensive substrate for cost-effective industrial-scale welan gum production. PMID:26050885

  4. Evaluation of khaya gum as a directly compressible matrix system for controlled release.

    PubMed

    Odeku, Oluwatoyin A; Fell, John T

    2004-11-01

    Khaya gum has been evaluated as a controlled release agent in modified release matrices in comparison with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) using paracetamol (water soluble) and indometacin (water insoluble) as model drugs. Tablets were produced by direct compression and the in-vitro drug release was assessed in conditions mimicking the gastrointestinal system. Khaya gum matrices provided a controlled release of paracetamol for up to 5 h. The release of paracetamol from khaya gum matrices followed time-independent kinetics (n = 1.042) and release rates were dependent on the concentration of the drug present in the matrix. The addition of tablet excipients not only improved the mechanical properties of the tablet, but also altered the dissolution profile, except for dicalcium phosphate where the profile remained unchanged. HPMC could be used to control the drug release rates from khaya gum matrices and a combination of khaya gum and HPMC gave zero-order time-independent release kinetics. Indometacin exhibited a lag time in excess of 2 h, due to its insolubility at low pH, before the zero-order release was observed. Thus khaya gum matrices could be useful in the formulation of sustained release tablets for up to 5 h and the appropriate combination of khaya gum and HPMC could be used to provide a time-independent release for longer periods. PMID:15525442

  5. Guar gum coupled microscale ZVI for in situ treatment of CAHs: continuous-flow column study.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-01-30

    A column study was performed under in situ conditions to evaluate to which extend the inactivation of the microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) by guar gum occurs under continuous flow conditions. Five aquifer containing columns were set up under different conditions. Efficient removal of trichloroethene was observed for the column amended by mZVI. Stabilization of the mZVI with guar gum led to slightly reduced activity. More reduced reactivity was observed in the poisoned column containing guar gum stabilized mZVI. This confirms that soil microorganisms can degrade guar gum and that subsequent removal of the oligosaccharides by the groundwater flow (flushing effect) can reactivate the mZVI. After more than six months of continuous operation the columns were dismantled. DNA-based qPCR analysis revealed that mZVI does not significantly affect the bacterial community, while guar gum stabilized mZVI particles can even induce bacterial growth. Overall, this study suggests that the temporarily decreased mZVI reactivity due to guar gum, has a rather limited impact on the performance of in situ reactive zones. The presence of guar gum slightly reduced the reactivity of iron, but also slowed down the iron corrosion rate which prolongs the life time of reactive zone. PMID:24333711

  6. Rheological Behavior of Xanthan Gum Solution Related to Shear Thinning Fluid Delivery for Subsurface Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Szecsody, James E.

    2013-01-15

    Xanthan gum, a biopolymer, forms shear thinning fluids which can be used as delivery media to improve the distribution of remedial amendments injected into heterogeneous subsurface environments. The rheological behavior of the shear thinning solution needs to be known to develop an appropriate design for field injection. In this study, the rheological properties of xanthan gum solutions were obtained under various chemical and environmental conditions relevant to delivery of remedial amendments to groundwater. Higher xanthan concentration raised the absolute solution viscosity and increased the degree of shear thinning. Addition of remedial amendments (e.g., phosphate, sodium lactate, ethyl lactate) caused the dynamic viscosity of xanthan gum to decrease, but the solutions maintained shear-thinning properties. Use of simple salt (e.g. Na+, Ca2+) to increase the solution ionic strength also decreased the dynamic viscosity of xanthan and the degree of shear thinning, although the effect is a function of xanthan gum concentration and diminished as the xanthan gum concentration was increased. At high xanthan concentration, addition of salt to the solution increased dynamic viscosity. In the absence of sediments, xanthan gum solutions maintain their viscosity properties for months. However, xanthan gum solutions were shown to lose dynamic viscosity over a period of days to weeks when contacted with saturated site sediment. Loss of viscosity is attributed to physical and biodegradation processes.

  7. Chemical and Functional Properties of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Gum

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Campos, Maira Rubi; Ciau-Sols, Norma; Rosado-Rubio, Gabriel; Chel-Guerrero, Luis; Betancur-Ancona, David

    2014-01-01

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) constitutes a potential alternative raw material and ingredient in food industry applications due to its dietary fiber content. Gum can be extracted from its dietary fiber fractions for use as an additive to control viscosity, stability, texture, and consistency in food systems. The gum extracted from chia seeds was characterized to determine their quality and potential as functional food additives. The extracted chia gum contained 26.2% fat and a portion was submitted to fat extraction, producing two fractions: gum with fat (FCG) and gum partly defatted (PDCG). Proximal composition and physicochemical characterization showed these fractions to be different (P < 0.05). The PDCG had higher protein, ash, and carbohydrates content than the FCG, in addition to higher water-holding (110.5?g water/g fiber) and water-binding capacities (0.84?g water/g fiber). The FCG had greater oil-holding capacity (25.7?g oil/g fiber) and water absorption capacity (44?g water/g fiber). In dispersion trials, the gums exhibited a non-Newtonian fluid behavior, specifically shear thinning or pseudoplastic type. PDCG had more viscosity than FCG. Chia seed is an excellent natural source of gum with good physicochemical and functional qualities, and is very promising for use in food industry. PMID:26904622

  8. Formulation development and evaluation of metformin chewing gum with bitter taste masking

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Sayed Abolfazl; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Arabian, Saber

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medicated gums are intended to be chewed and act either locally, absorbed via the buccal mucosa or swallowed with saliva. We prepared the metformin gum to overcome its side effects including vomiting, diarrhea, and abdomen discomfort. Furthermore, it could be useful for those who have swallowing problems. Materials and Methods: Metformin hydrochloride (250 mg) with suitable sweeteners was mixed manually for 5 min. This mixture was spray dried, freeze dried, or directly mixed with chewing gum base. Glycerin, xylitol, and menthol were added and the produced paste was kept in the freezer for 2 h to be stable. As the metformin shows bitter taste, we tried to mask this unpleasant taste with using different methods explained. The releasing pattern was evaluated by using a mechanical chewing machine. The best formulation with the optimized releasing pattern, suitable physicochemical properties and pleasant taste were selected. Content uniformity, releasing percent, and other physicochemical properties were identified as well. Taste, flavor, and appearance characteristics were evaluated by using a self-made questionnaire based on the hedonic test method. Results: The chewing gum dosage content was about 86.2%. The release rate of metformin chewing gum was about 70% after 5 min of mastication. Masking the bitter taste of drug was achieved by using acesulfame-isomalt as sweeteners and prepared it by freeze drying equipment. Conclusion: Metfornin chewing gum had suitable appearance and appropriate invitro characteristics that fallow the pharmacopeia suggestions. This chewable gum showed bitterness suppression with a suitable release rate. PMID:24800181

  9. Purification of cress seed (Lepidium sativum) gum: Physicochemical characterization and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Razmkhah, Somayeh; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Ale, Marcel Tutor

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of different purification methods (ethanol, isopropanol and ethanol-isopropanol) on the physicochemical and functional characteristics of cress seed gum. Sugar composition and molecular weight of the samples varied significantly. All the purification methods reduced ash and protein content and molecular weight of cress seed gum. The main decomposition of the purified samples started above 200°C and initial decomposition temperature of the crude gum was 190.21°C. DSC thermograms of the purified gums showed two exothermic events at 257.81-261.95°C and 302.46-311.57°C. Crude gum displayed an exothermic peak at 259.42°C. Sample I (purified using isopropanol) imparted the best surface activity among the purified samples as it had the highest protein and uronic acid contents and the lowest Mw. All the purification methods could improve emulsifying properties of cress seed gum and there was no significant difference among the purified samples. Crude gum showed the lowest foaming properties, while samples I and E (purified using ethanol) showed the highest foaming capacity and foam stability, respectively. PMID:26877009

  10. Effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain and fatigue in human jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Farella, M; Bakke, M; Michelotti, A; Martina, R

    2001-04-01

    Gum chewing has been accepted as an adjunct to oral hygiene, as salivary stimulant and vehicle for various agents, as well as for jaw muscle training. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of prolonged gum chewing on pain, fatigue and pressure tenderness of the masticatory muscles. Fifteen women without temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were requested to perform one of the following chewing tasks in three separate sessions: chewing a very hard gum, chewing a soft gum, and empty-chewing with no bolus. Unilateral chewing of gum or empty chewing was performed for 40 min at a constant rate of 80 cycles/min. In each session, perceived muscle pain and masticatory fatigue were rated on visual analog scales (VAS) before, throughout, and after the chewing task. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) of masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were assessed before and immediately after the chewing tasks, and again after 24 h. The VAS scores for pain and fatigue significantly increased only during the hard gum chewing, and after 10 min of recovery VAS scores had decreased again, almost to their baseline values. No significant changes were found for PPTs either after hard or soft gum chewing. The findings indicate that the jaw muscles recover quickly from prolonged chewing activity in subjects without TMD. PMID:11347660

  11. Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew P.; Smith, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies) examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on well-being and performance, as well as postwork mood and cognitive performance. In Study 4, performance and well-being were reported throughout the workday and at the end of the day, and heart rate and cortisol were measured. Under experimental conditions, gum was associated with higher alertness regardless of whether performance tasks were completed and altered sustained attention. Rate of chewing and subjective force of chewing did not alter mood but had some limited effects on attention. Chewing gum during the workday was associated with higher productivity and fewer cognitive problems, raised cortisol levels in the morning, and did not affect heart rate. The results emphasise that chewing gum can attenuate reductions in alertness, suggesting that chewing gum enhances worker performance. PMID:26075253

  12. Chewing gum: cognitive performance, mood, well-being, and associated physiology.

    PubMed

    Allen, Andrew P; Smith, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies) examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on well-being and performance, as well as postwork mood and cognitive performance. In Study 4, performance and well-being were reported throughout the workday and at the end of the day, and heart rate and cortisol were measured. Under experimental conditions, gum was associated with higher alertness regardless of whether performance tasks were completed and altered sustained attention. Rate of chewing and subjective force of chewing did not alter mood but had some limited effects on attention. Chewing gum during the workday was associated with higher productivity and fewer cognitive problems, raised cortisol levels in the morning, and did not affect heart rate. The results emphasise that chewing gum can attenuate reductions in alertness, suggesting that chewing gum enhances worker performance. PMID:26075253

  13. Detrimental effects of gum chewing on vigilance in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Tucha, Lara; Simpson, William; Evans, Lynsay; Birrel, Laura; Sontag, Thomas A; Lange, Klaus W; Tucha, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    Impairments of attention are cardinal features of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and can seriously affect the daily life of children with ADHD. Despite effective treatment strategies, there is a need of further treatment options that can be added to available and well established treatments. Further treatment options are needed since available treatments are often time consuming, expensive and limited regarding their external validity. Recent research demonstrated that gum chewing has beneficial effects on cognition including certain aspects of attention. Therefore, gum chewing may benefit children with ADHD in situations requiring particular cognitive efforts. In a crossover study, attentional functioning of 32 children with ADHD and 32 children without the condition was examined. All participants were assessed with chewing gum and without chewing gum. A computerized test was used for the assessment of vigilance and sustained attention. The findings of the present study suggest that gum chewing during task execution has detrimental effects on vigilance of both healthy children and children with ADHD. Sustained attention was not affected by gum chewing. Chewing gum, therefore, appears not to improve attentional performance in children with ADHD. PMID:20933558

  14. [Sugar of substitute stevioside in chewing gum: comparative double blind controllable study].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, V A; Beliaev, V V; Zubtsov, V A; Esaian, L K; Namestnikova, I V

    2011-01-01

    In double blind controllable study on 126 volunteers - students of medical academy - influence on рН the mixed saliva of 5 kinds of chewing gums with the different contents of substitute of sugar as xylitol and sorbitol, and also the chewing sweets R.O.C.S., two kinds of chewing gums containing a basis with substitute of sugar stevioside (1.25 and 2.5%) and placebo (a basis without additives) were investigated. Products chewed within 10 minutes. In one of groups surveyed such chewing was preceded with rinsing a mouth by a test solution of saccharose. рН determined within 30 minutes. At chewing gums with substitute of sugar displacement рН the mixed saliva in the alkaline side was revealed a different degree. Thus gums with stevioside did not concede and even surpassed in this action of chewing gums with other substitutes of sugar. In comparison with placebo chewing gums and sweets restored acid-alkaline balance of oral cavities faster. Hence, use of stevioside in structure of chewing gum allows at preservation of its positive actions in oral cavity essentially to reduce concentration substitute of sugar and, hence, its collateral action by an organism. PMID:21378715

  15. Thiol derivatization of Xanthan gum and its evaluation as a mucoadhesive polymer.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Meenakshi; Ahuja, Munish; Mehta, Heena

    2015-10-20

    Thiol-derivatization of xanthan gum polysaccharide was carried out by esterification with mercaptopropionic acid and thioglycolic acid. Thiol-derivatization was confirmed by Fourier-transformed infra-red spectroscopy. Xanthan-mercaptopropionic acid conjugate and xanthan-thioglycolic acid conjugate were found to possess 432.68mM and 465.02mM of thiol groups as determined by Ellman's method respectively. Comparative evaluation of mucoadhesive property of metronidazole loaded buccal pellets of xanthan and thiolated xanthan gum using chicken buccal pouch membrane revealed higher ex vivo bioadhesion time of thiolated xanthan gum as compared to xanthan gum. Improved mucoadhesive property of thiolated xanthan gum over the xanthan gum can be attributed to the formation of disulfide bond between mucus and thiolated xanthan gum. In vitro release study conducted using phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) revealed a sustained release profile of metronidazole from thiolated xanthan pellets as compared to xanthan pellets. In conclusion, thiolation of xanthan improves its mucoadhesive property and sustained the release of metronidazole over a prolonged period. PMID:26256167

  16. Native and structurally modified gum arabic: exploring the effect of the gum's microstructure in obtaining electroactive nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cornelsen, Patricia A; Quintanilha, Ronaldo C; Vidotti, Marcio; Gorin, Philip A J; Simas-Tosin, Fernanda F; Riegel-Vidotti, Izabel C

    2015-03-30

    Electroactive nanoparticles combining gum arabic (GA) and polyaniline (PANI) were prepared by chemical synthesis. The gum consists of highly branched anionic polysaccharides with some protein content. GA was structurally modified by Smith controlled degradation, in order to reduce its degree of branching (GAD), aiming the elucidation of the relationship between the structure and the properties of complex polysaccharides. The modification was studied by SEC, GC-MS, (13)C NMR and colorimetric methods. GAD has lower molecular mass, lower degree of branching and lower uronic acid content. Besides it is enriched in galactose and protein when compared with GA. The obtained composites (GA-PANI and GAD-PANI) were thoroughly characterized. Although the use of both polysaccharides (GA and GAD) produced highly stable electroactive nanoparticles, the best combination of properties was achieved for GA-PANI. The sample GAD was not able to prevent the occurrence of crosslinking between PANI chains, possibly due to its lower microstructural complexity which diminishes the occurrence of hydrogen bonds between the polymers. PMID:25563942

  17. Rheology of dispersions of xanthan gum, locust bean gum and mixed biopolymer gel with silicon dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jordan R M; Kent, Katherine E; Brown, Jennifer R

    2015-03-01

    Mixed xanthan gum (XG) and locust bean gum (LBG) biopolymers form thermally reversible gels of interest in tissue engineering and drug delivery. 1% solutions of XG, LBG and 1:1 ratio XG/LBG mixed gels (LX) containing silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles were rheologically characterized with respect to nanoparticle concentration and temperature. 10% nanoparticles in XG created larger domains of associated polymer, resulting in enhanced viscosity and viscoelastic moduli. In LBG with 10% particles, transient viscosity and a gel-sol transition occurred due to particle bridging and aggregation. In the LX gel, 10% SiO2 particles caused an increase in elasticity. When ramping temperature from 25C to 85C, the complex modulus for all solutions containing 10% SiO2 was relatively constant, indicating that nanoparticles counteracted the effect of temperature on the material properties. Understanding the influence of nanoparticle loading on material properties is necessary for biopolymer material development where property prediction and control are critical. PMID:25579932

  18. Study of algal biomass harvesting using cationic guar gum from the natural plant source as flocculant.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Sandipta; Sen, Gautam; Mishra, Sumit; Shukla, Pratyoosh; Bandopadhyay, Rajib

    2013-01-30

    Microalgae are small in size with negatively charged surface. They are usually stable in suspension culture and hard to flocculate. The present work emphasizes on the synthesis of cationic guar gum (CGG) by the introduction of quaternary amine groups onto the backbone of guar gum (GG) from N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) trimethyl ammonium chloride (CHPTAC). The optimal dosage of the synthesized cationic guar gum is used to flocculate two different green algae viz. Chlorella sp. CB4 and Chlamydomonas sp. CRP7. PMID:23218353

  19. Chios gum mastic: A review of its biological activities.

    PubMed

    Paraschos, S; Mitakou, S; Skaltsounis, A-L

    2012-01-01

    The resin of Pistacia lentiscus (L.) var. chia (Duham), an evergreen shrub belonging to the family Anacardiaceae and uniquely cultivated in southern Chios, is known as mastic. It has been used for more than 2500 years in traditional Greek medicine for treating several diseases such as gastralgia and peptic ulcers, while the actions of the gum are mentioned in the works of Herodotus, Dioscorides and Galen. Several Roman, Byzantine, Arab and European authors make extensive references to mastic's healing properties. Modern scientific research has justified the beneficial action of mastic to gastric diseases, by revealing its in vivo and in vitro activity against Helicobacter pylori, which is considered as the main cause for gastric ulcers. Furthermore, studies of the antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory, anti-Crohn and anticancer activities of mastic have characterized it as a wide-range therapeutic agent and a potential source of nature-originated treatments. PMID:22414110

  20. Microencapsulation of oils using whey protein/gum Arabic coacervates.

    PubMed

    Weinbreck, F; Minor, M; de Kruif, C G

    2004-09-01

    Microencapsulating sunflower oil, lemon and orange oil flavour was investigated using complex coacervation of whey protein/gum arabic (WP/GA). At pH 3.0-4.5, WP and GA formed electrostatic complexes that could be successfully used for microencapsulation purposes. The formation of a smooth biopolymer shell around the oil droplets was achieved at a specific pH (close to 4.0) and the payload of oil (i.e. amount of oil in the capsule) was higher than 80%. Small droplets were easier to encapsulate within a coacervate matrix than large ones, which were present in a typical shell/core structure. The stability of the emulsion made of oil droplets covered with coacervates was strongly pH-dependent. At pH 4.0, the creaming rate of the emulsion was much higher than at other pH values. This phenomenon was investigated by carrying out zeta potential measurements on the mixtures. It seemed that, at this specific pH, the zeta potential was close to zero, highlighting the presence of neutral coacervate at the oil/water interface. The influence of pH on the capsule formation was in accordance with previous results on coacervation of whey proteins and gum arabic, i.e. WP/GA coacervates were formed in the same pH window with and without oil and the pH where the encapsulation seemed to be optimum corresponded to the pH at which the coacervate was the most viscous. Finally, to illustrate the applicability of these new coacervates, the release of flavoured capsules incorporated within Gouda cheese showed that large capsules gave stronger release and the covalently cross-linked capsules showed the lowest release, probably because of a tough dense biopolymer wall which was difficult to break by chewing. PMID:15762323

  1. ISO/GUM UNCERTAINTIES AND CIAAW (UNCERTAINTY TREATMENT FOR RECOMMENDED ATOMIC WEIGHTS AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCES)

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2007-07-23

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published a Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). The IUPAC Commission on Isotopic Abundance and Atomic Weight (CIAAW) began attaching uncertainty limits to their recommended values about forty years ago. CIAAW's method for determining and assigning uncertainties has evolved over time. We trace this evolution to their present method and their effort to incorporate the basic ISO/GUM procedures into evaluations of these uncertainties. We discuss some dilemma the CIAAW faces in their present method and whether it is consistent with the application of the ISO/GUM rules. We discuss the attempt to incorporate variations in measured isotope ratios, due to natural fractionation, into the ISO/GUM system. We make some observations about the inconsistent treatment in the incorporation of natural variations into recommended data and uncertainties. A recommendation for expressing atomic weight values using a tabulated range of values for various chemical elements is discussed.

  2. Application and Characterization of Gum from Bombax buonopozense Calyxesas an Excipient in Tablet Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Ngwuluka, Ndidi C.; Kyari, Jehu; Taplong, John; Uwaezuoke, Onyinye J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore gum from Bombax buonopozense calyxes as a binding agent in formulation of immediate release dosage forms using wet granulation method. The granules were characterized to assess the flow and compression properties and when compressed, non-compendial and compendial tests were undertaken to assess the tablet properties for tablets prepared with bombax gum in comparison with those prepared with tragacanth and acacia gums. Granules prepared with bombax exhibited good flow and compressible properties with angle of repose 28.60°, Carr’s compressibility of 21.30% and Hausner’s quotient of 1.27. The tablets were hard, but did not disintegrate after one hour. Furthermore, only 52.5% of paracetamol was released after one hour. The drug release profile followed zero order kinetics. Tablets prepared with bombax gum have the potential to deliver drugs in a controlled manner over a prolonged period at a constant rate. PMID:24300296

  3. Ethephon-Induced Gummosis in Sour Cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) : II. Flow Characteristics of Gum Solutions.

    PubMed

    Olien, W C; Bukovac, M J

    1982-08-01

    Flow of sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L. cv. Montmorency) gum solutions through a glass capillary was Newtonian for pressure gradients from 0 to 1.8 megapascals per meter, and hydraulic conductance was inversely proportional to solution viscosity in this range. However, flow became plastic at pressure gradients above 1.8 megapascals per meter, resulting in a decrease in solution viscosity. The magnitude of this effect diminished as gum concentration increased. Flow of water, a solution of the component sugar monomers of sour cherry gum, and sucrose solutions remained Newtonian over the entire pressure gradient range examined (0-4 megapascals per meter). Plastic flow of gum solutions in the vessels of intact sour cherry shoots is possible under pressure gradients induced by transpiration when high resistance to flow occurs over short distances. PMID:16662533

  4. CHEMICAL STANDARDIZATION OF 'KUNDUR' (Oleo-Gum-Resin of Boswellia serrata Roxb).

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, M M; Afaq, S H; Asif, M

    1984-07-01

    A comparative study of the original and market samples of the KUNDUR (Oleo-Gum-Resin of Boswellia serrata Roxb.) with special reference to its chemical standardization and the qualitative and quantitative studies have been discussed here. PMID:22557448

  5. CHEMICAL STANDARDIZATION OF KUNDUR (Oleo-Gum-Resin of Boswellia serrata Roxb)

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. M. H.; Afaq, S. H.; Asif, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative study of the original and market samples of the KUNDUR (Oleo-Gum-Resin of Boswellia serrata Roxb.) with special reference to its chemical standardization and the qualitative and quantitative studies have been discussed here. PMID:22557448

  6. Xanthan gum and its derivatives as a potential bio-polymeric carrier for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Badwaik, Hemant R; Giri, Tapan Kumar; Nakhate, Kartik T; Kashyap, Pranita; Tripathi, Dulal Krishna

    2013-10-01

    Xanthan gum is a high molecular weight natural polysaccharide produced by fermentation process. It consists of 1, 4-linked β-D-glucose residues, having a trisaccharide side chain attached to alternate D-glucosyl residues. Although the gum has many properties desirable for drug delivery, its practical use is mainly confined to the unmodified forms due to slow dissolution and substantial swelling in biological fluids. Xanthan gum has been chemically modified by conventional chemical methods like carboxymethylation, and grafting such as free radical, microwave-assisted, chemoenzymatic and plasma assisted chemical grafting to alter physicochemical properties for a wide spectrum of biological applications. This article reviews various techniques utilized for modification of xanthan gum and its applications in a range of drug delivery systems. PMID:23607638

  7. Effect of chewing gum on the postoperative recovery of gastrointestinal function.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Chen, Gang; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction remains a source of morbidity and the major determinant of length of stay after abdominal operation. There are many different reasons for postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction such as stress response, perioperative interventions, bowel manipulation and so on. The mechanism of enhanced recovery from postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction with the help of chewing gum is believed to be the cephalic-vagal stimulation of digestion which increases the promotability of neural and humoral factors that act on different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, there were a series of randomized controlled trials to confirm the role of chewing gum in the recovery of gastrointestinal function. The results suggested that chewing gum enhanced early recovery of bowel function following abdominal surgery expect the gastrointestinal surgery. However, the effect of chewing gum in gastrointestinal surgery was controversial. PMID:26550107

  8. The Quantitative Determination of Butylated Hydroxytoluene in Chewing Gum Using GC--MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witter, A. E.

    2005-01-01

    The experiment to measure concentration of Photophysical Characterization(BHT) and determine percent recovery in chewing gum is described. The results demonstrated that over time, the concentration of BHT in the extract decreased owing to aerial oxidation.

  9. Effect of chewing gum on the postoperative recovery of gastrointestinal function

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Wei; Chen, Gang; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction remains a source of morbidity and the major determinant of length of stay after abdominal operation. There are many different reasons for postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction such as stress response, perioperative interventions, bowel manipulation and so on. The mechanism of enhanced recovery from postoperative gastrointestinal dysfunction with the help of chewing gum is believed to be the cephalic-vagal stimulation of digestion which increases the promotability of neural and humoral factors that act on different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, there were a series of randomized controlled trials to confirm the role of chewing gum in the recovery of gastrointestinal function. The results suggested that chewing gum enhanced early recovery of bowel function following abdominal surgery expect the gastrointestinal surgery. However, the effect of chewing gum in gastrointestinal surgery was controversial. PMID:26550107

  10. GUM Analysis for SIMS Isotopic Ratios in BEP0 Graphite Qualification Samples, Round 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Reid, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

  11. Injectivity improvement of xanthan gums by enzymes: Process design and performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, N.; Lonchamp, D.; Thery, M.

    1987-07-01

    Injectability and filterability of xanthan gum dispersions, especially in hard brines, can be considerably improved by successive use of cellulase and alkaline protease enzyme treatments. A thorough optimization of the different parameters controlling enzymatic activity has led to an original clarification process. Improvements observed in flow behavior of treated xanthan gum solutions through reservoir rocks is the result of almost complete elimination of both insoluble bacterial cells and microgels.

  12. Evaluation of the uncertainty of electrical impedance measurements: the GUM and its Supplement 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Pedro M.; Janeiro, Fernando M.; Giro, Pedro S.

    2015-02-01

    Electrical impedance is not a scalar but a complex quantity. Thus, evaluation of the uncertainty of its value involves a model whose output is a complex. In this paper the comparison of the evaluation of the uncertainty of the measurement of the electrical impedance of a simple electric circuit using the GUM and using a Monte Carlo method according to the Supplement 2 of the GUM is presented.

  13. Gum arabic modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles cross linked with collagen for isolation of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles are important class of materials in the field of nanobiotechnology, as it is an emerging area of research for material science and molecular biology researchers. One of the various methods to obtain multifunctional nanomaterials, molecular functionalization by attaching organic functional groups to nanomagnetic materials is an important technique. Recently, functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be useful in isolation/detection of dangerous pathogens (bacteria/viruses) for human life. Iron (Fe) based material especially FePt is used in the isolation of ultralow concentrations (< 102 cfu/ml) of bacteria in less time and it has been demonstrated that van-FePt may be used as an alternative fast detection technique with respect to conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. However, still further improved demonstrations are necessary with interest to biocompatibility and green chemistry. Herein, we report the synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles by template medication and its application for the detection/isolation of S. aureus bacteria. Results The reduction of anhydrous Iron chloride (FeCl3) in presence of sodium borohydride and water soluble polyelectrolyte (polydiallyldimethyl ammonium chloride, PDADMAC) produces black precipitates. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), XPS and TEM analysis of the precipitates dried at 373 K demonstrated the formation of nanocrystalline Fe3O4. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed isolated staphylococcous aureus (S. aureus) bacteria at ultralow concentrations using collagen coated gum arabic modified iron oxide nanoparticles (CCGAMION). Conclusion We are able to synthesize nanocrystalline Fe3O4 and CCGAMION was able to isolate S. aureus bacteria at 8-10 cfu (colony forming units)/ml within ~3 minutes. PMID:21159158

  14. Pasting properties of Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) kernel powder in the presence of Xanthan, Carboxymethylcellulose and Locust bean gum in comparison to Rice and Potato flour.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Maninder; Sandhu, Kawaljit Singh; Kaur, Jasmeen

    2013-08-01

    Effects of addition of different levels of gums (xanthan, carboxymethylcellulose and locust bean gum) on the pasting properties of tamarind kernel, potato and rice flour were studied by using Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA). Tamarind kernel powder (TKP) varied significantly (P?gum mixtures were dependent upon the concentration and type of the gums. Peak, breakdown and final viscosity increased with increase in gum concentration in the flour/gum mixture, but the effect was more pronounced for rice and potato flour than for TKP which showed much lower viscosity responses to all of the gums. Among the three gums studied, the increase in viscosity was significantly higher with addition of locust bean gum followed by xanthan while the lowest was observed with carboxymethylcellulose. PMID:24425986

  15. Glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism after guar gum ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes Nunes, C.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six non-anaesthetized Large White pigs (mean body weight 59 +/- 1.7 kg) were fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein and with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery. The animals were provided a basal none-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 6% guar gum (diet B) or 15% purified cellulose (diet C). The diets were given for 1 week and according to a replicated 3 x 3 latin-square design. On the last day of each adaptation period test meals of 800 g were given prior to blood sampling. The sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced the glucose absorption as well as the insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production. However, the reduction in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum was not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly produced by the gut. The liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion also appeared to decrease pancreatic glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very little effect on the parameters considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the latter internal metabolic effects.

  16. Gum and deposit formation from jet-turbine and diesel fuels at 100 C

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.; Lan, B.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Rates of oxidation and gum formation for six hydrocarbons, three jet-turbine fuels and three diesel fuels have been measured at 100 C in the presence of t-Bu2O2 tert-butyl-peroxide as initiator. Four of six fuels oxidize faster at 100 C than in previous work at 130 C with initiator. Four any single substrate, the amount of gum produced for the oxygen absorbed is similar at 100 and 130 C even with large changes in rates and t-Bu2O2 concentrations. Thus, one mechanism of gum formation is intimately associated with oxidation. The effects of t-Bu2O2 concentration on the rates of oxygen absorption and gum formation show that gum formation is associated with chain termination by two peroxy radicals. In general, the pure hydrocarbons have long kinetic chains and give good yields of hydroperoxides. The fuels give short kinetic chains and produce little hydroperoxide but but much more gum formation is the coupling of substrates by peroxides in the absence of oxygen. The mechanism, condensation of oxidation products from alkylnaphthalenes, is also proposed.

  17. Antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of guar gum on streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Samarghandian; Mosa-Al-Reza, Hadjzadeh; Fatemeh, Amin Nya; Saeideh, Davoodi

    2012-01-01

    Background: Herbal medicine is widely used in the treatment of diseases like diabetes mellitus. We investigated the effects of guar gum in diabetic rats for the reduction of the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Dietary pattern emphasizing foods high in complex carbohydrates and fiber are associated with low blood glucose and cholesterol levels. Materials and Methods: Diet containing 0%, 5%, 10% and 20% (w/w) guar gum was fed to diabetic rats for 28 days. Blood serum glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, atherogenic index levels, body weights and food intake were monitored at 0, 7.14 and 28 days after induction of diabetes. Results: In spite of the fact that diabetes elevated blood lipids in all rats after 14 days, the guar gum diet significantly decreased the serum concentration of cholesterol, triacylglicerols and LDL-C and atherogenic index. The most significant result in this study was the reduction of blood glucose in diabetic rats treated with the guar gum diet after 28 days versus non- and glibenclamide-treated rats. The gum promoted a general improvement in the condition of the diabetic rats in body weight and food intake in comparison with nontreated rats. Conclusion: The results of this research suggest that guar gum was significantly effective in comparison with glibenclamide in the treatment of hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia in diabetes rats. Therefore, it may be suggested as a reliable fiber in diabetic regimes in diabetic patients. PMID:22438666

  18. Effects of caffeinated chewing gum on muscle pain during submaximal isometric exercise in individuals with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Kempka, Laura; Weatherby, Amy; Greenlee, Brennan; Mansion, Kimberly

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity is important to manage symptom of fibromyalgia (FM); however, individuals with FM typically experience augmented muscle pain during exercise. This study examined the effects of caffeinated chewing gum on exercise-induced muscle pain in individuals with FM. This study was conducted with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Twenty-three patients with FM completed a caffeine condition where they consumed a caffeinated chewing gum that contains 100mg of caffeine, and a placebo condition where they consumed a non-caffeinated chewing gum. They completed isometric handgrip exercise at 25% of their maximal strength for 3min, and muscle pain rating (MPR) was recorded every 30s during exercise. Clinical pain severity was assessed in each condition using a pain questionnaire. The order of the two conditions was randomly determined. MPR increased during exercise, but caffeinated chewing gum did not attenuate the increase in MPR compared to placebo gum. Clinical pain severity was generally associated with the average MPR and the caffeine effects on MPR, calculated as difference in the average MPR between the two conditions. The results suggest that more symptomatic individuals with FM may experience greater exercise-induced muscle pain, but benefit more from caffeinated chewing gum to reduce exercise-induced muscle pain. PMID:26855267

  19. Efficacy of baking soda-containing chewing gum in removing natural tooth stain.

    PubMed

    Mankodi, S M; Conforti, N; Berkowitz, H

    2001-07-01

    A 14-week, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 126 healthy volunteers to compare the efficacy of twice-daily use of 3 baking soda-containing chewing gums in removing natural tooth stain when used in conjunction with a program of regular oral hygiene. All 3 chewing gums significantly reduced extrinsic stain (P < .0001) and improved the whitened appearance of teeth (P < .0001) at both the 2-week interim and the final 4-week evaluations. ARM & HAMMER DENTAL CARE The Baking Soda Gum (AHDC) reduced dental stain by 70.8%, compared to reductions of 71.9% and 65.3%, after use of 2 experimental gum formulations. Whitened appearance improved by 1.73 shade tabs using AHDC gum, and up to 2.49 shade tabs with the experimental formulations. These results suggest that the use of baking soda-containing gum after meals, in conjunction with good oral hygiene, can improve both extrinsic dental staining and the whitened appearance of teeth. PMID:11913307

  20. Effects of nicotine-containing chewing gum on oral soft and hard tissues: A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Christen, A G; Beiswanger, B B; Mallatt, M E; Tomich, C E; Drook, C A; McDonald, J L; Olson, B L; Stookey, G K

    1985-01-01

    A double-blind clinical trial was conducted to determine whether the use of a chewing gum containing 2.0 mg nicotine (as an adjunct to a stop-smoking program) had any effects upon oral health. A total of 193 adults who smoked cigarettes volunteered with informed consent, were given routine dental prophylaxes, and were examined for the presence of plaque, stained pellicle, gingivitis, calculus, and general oral pathosis. The subjects were then randomly assigned to use either a nicotine-containing or a placebo chewing gum. After 15 weeks the subjects were recalled and re-examined. Smoking cessation was determined through questionnaire and analysis of the carbon monoxide content of alveolar air. At the completion of the study, 79 subjects had used the placebo gum and 78 had used the nicotine gum. Data analysis indicated that the nicotine chewing gum had no significant influence on any of the oral health parameters graded, as compared to the placebo gum. The continuation of smoking, however, was associated with significant increases in gingivitis and calculus rates. PMID:3919352

  1. Prosopis alba exudate gum as excipient for improving fish oil stability in alginate-chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Vasile, Franco Emanuel; Romero, Ana María; Judis, María Alicia; Mazzobre, María Florencia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to employ an exudate gum obtained from a South American wild tree (Prosopis alba), as wall material component to enhance the oxidative stability of fish oil encapsulated in alginate-chitosan beads. For this purpose, beads were vacuum-dried and stored under controlled conditions. Oxidation products, fatty acid profiles and lipid health indices were measured during storage. Alginate-chitosan interactions and the effect of gum were manifested in the FT-IR spectra. The inclusion of the gum in the gelation media allowed decreasing the oxidative damage during storage in comparison to the free oil and alginate-chitosan beads. The gum also improved wall material properties, providing higher oil retention during the drying step and subsequent storage. Fatty acids quality and lipid health indices were widely preserved in beads containing the gum. Present results showed a positive influence of the gum on oil encapsulation and stability, being the main mechanism attributed to a physical barrier effect. PMID:26213081

  2. Gum-Chewing and Headache: An Underestimated Trigger of Headache Pain in Migraineurs?

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Tension-type headache and migraine are currently considered the second and third most frequent human diseases. Since a variety of conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint and chewing muscles are frequent causes of orofacial pain, the aim of this article was to review current published evidence about the potential relationship between gum-chewing and headache. A systematic electronic search performed on Medline, Scopus and Web of Science using the keywords "headache" or "migraine" and "chewing" allowed to finally identify 1 cross-sectional, 1 observational and 3 randomized studies, along with 3 case reports about the potential association between gum-chewing and headache. Despite the limited evidence, it seems reasonable to suggest that headache attacks may be triggered by gum-chewing in migraineurs and in patients with tension-type headache. Opposite results were obtained in non-migraineurs, since in none of these studies an increased prevalence of headache pain was reported after gum-chewing. Although larger randomized studies will be necessary to definitely establish the relationship between gum-chewing and headache across different populations, it seems cautionary to suggest that subjects with migraine or tension-type headache should avoid or limit gum-chewing in their lifestyle. PMID:25714969

  3. Effect of guar gum on glucose and lipid metabolism in white sea bream Diplodus sargus.

    PubMed

    Enes, P; Pouso-Ferreira, P; Salmern, C; Capilla, E; Navarro, I; Gutirrez, J; Oliva-Teles, A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of soluble non-starch polysaccharide (guar gum) on white sea bream Diplodus sargus, glucose and lipid metabolism. A control diet was formulated to contain 40 % crude protein, 14 % crude lipids and 35 % pregelatinized maize starch, and three other diets were formulated similar to the control diet except for guar gum, which was included at 4 % (diet GG4), 8 % (diet GG8) or 12 % (diet GG12). Diets were fed to the fish for 9 weeks on a pair-feeding scheme. Guar gum had no effect on growth performance, feed efficiency, glycaemia, cholesterolaemia and plasma triacylglyceride levels. Hepatic glucokinase and pyruvate kinase activities, liver glycogen content and liver insulin-like growth factor-I gene expression were not affected by dietary guar gum, while fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity was lower in fish fed guar gum-supplemented diets. Hepatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was higher in fish fed diets GG4 and GG8 than in the control group. Overall, data suggest that in contrast to mammals guar gum had no effect on white sea bream glucose utilization and in lowering plasma cholesterol and triacylglyceride levels. However, it seems to contribute to lower endogenous glucose production. PMID:22763699

  4. Role of glucose in chewing gum-related facilitation of cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Tunney, Richard J

    2004-10-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that chewing gum leads to cognitive benefits through improved delivery of glucose to the brain, by comparing the cognitive performance effects of gum and glucose administered separately and together. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests in a fully related 2 x 2 design, where one factor was Chewing Gum (gum vs. mint sweet) and the other factor was Glucose Co-administration (consuming a 25 g glucose drink vs. consuming water). For four tests (AVLT Immediate Recall, Digit Span, Spatial Span and Grammatical Transformation), beneficial effects of chewing and glucose were found, supporting the study hypothesis. However, on AVLT Delayed Recall, enhancement due to chewing gum was not paralleled by glucose enhancement, suggesting an alternative mechanism. The glucose delivery model is supported with respect to the cognitive domains: working memory, immediate episodic long-term memory and language-based attention and processing speed. However, some other mechanism is more likely to underlie the facilitatory effect of chewing gum on delayed episodic long-term memory. PMID:15458808

  5. Effect of Chewing Xylitol Containing and Herbal Chewing Gums on Salivary Mutans Streptococcus Count among School Children

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Sangeeta; Lakashminarayan, Nagesh; Kemparaj, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study aims to assess and compare the reduction in salivary Mutans Streptococci counts after chewing Xylitol, herbal and placebo gums among high school children. Methods: The study was conducted among 72 school children (1215 years) from 3 randomly selected schools (blocks). Xylitol, herbal and placebo gums were randomly allocated to 3 blocks. Subjects were instructed to chew one pellet four times a day for 21 days. The mean reduction in salivary Streptococcus mutans count was assessed. Results: The 100% Xylitol sweetened chewing gum Xylitolhas shown statistically significant reduction in salivary Mutans Streptococci colony forming units at the end of 21 days (P < 0.01). The reduction was not statistically significant in herbal and placebo chewing gum. Conclusions: Hundred percentage Xylitol sweetened chewing gum was found to be more effective in reducing salivary Mutans Streptococci count when compared to herbal and placebo chewing gums. PMID:26097673

  6. Effects of a Baking Soda Gum on extrinsic dental stain: results of a longitudinal 4-week assessment.

    PubMed

    Soparkar, P; Newman, M B

    2001-07-01

    An evaluation of the effects of ARM & HAMMER DENTAL CARE The Baking Soda Gum (AHDC) on extrinsic dental stain was made in 48 subjects presenting with measurable extrinsic stain. The subjects were randomized to use either the baking soda gum or a non-baking soda placebo gum for 20 minutes twice daily after lunch and dinner while brushing once daily. The procedure of limited brushing was chosen to simulate the level of hygiene normally practiced by participants entering a clinical study. After 4 weeks, the reduction in measurable extrinsic stain in the baking soda gum group was statistically significant (P = .0044) relative to baseline. Statistical analysis of the placebo gum group revealed no significant change in extrinsic stain from baseline. The magnitude of the unadjusted longitudinal reduction in extrinsic stain in the baking soda gum group was 29.7% at 4 weeks. PMID:11913306

  7. Effects of chewing menthol gum on the alertness of healthy volunteers and those with an upper respiratory tract illness.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew P; Boden, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Recent research has shown that chewing gum increases subjective alertness. Upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs) lead to reduced alertness, and it has been shown that stimulants such as caffeine can reverse this effect. It is now important to determine whether menthol chewing gum can produce a similar effect. Young adults with an URTI (N = 16) and a healthy control group (N = 12) rated their mood and symptoms on two occasions (the first when those with a URTI were ill and the second when both groups were healthy). During each session, volunteers provided a rating while chewing gum and when they were not chewing. Those with a URTI reported reduced alertness, which persisted into convalescence. Chewing gum was associated with greater alertness in both those with URTIs and the healthy group. Chewing gum reduced the severity of nasal symptoms in those with a cold. The effects of the URTI and menthol gum may reflect changes in trigeminal stimulation. PMID:22674677

  8. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  9. Changes in electrical energy requirements to operate an ice cream freezer as a function of sweeteners and gums

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.E.; Bakshi, A.S.; Gay, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in electrical energy required to operate a continuous freezer were monitored for various ice cream formulae. Ice cream formulae consisted of nine different combinations of sucrose, 36 DE corn syrup, and 42 high fructose corn syrup as well as two ratios of guar gum to locust bean gum. Within the same sweetening system, a mix high in locust bean gum tended to have a lower energy demand than mix with large amounts of guar gum. This was especially pronounced in mixes with 50% 42 high fructose corn syrup and/or 50% 36 DE corn syrup solids.

  10. Study of water vapour permeability of protein and gum-based edible films by a photothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toms, S. A.; Saavedra, R.; Cruz, A.; Pedroza-Islas, R.; San Martn, E.

    2005-06-01

    The water vapour permeability of protein and gum-based edible films was studied by means of a photothermal method. The films were prepared with two basic ingredients, whey protein concentrate and mesquite gum, according to the proportions 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100 (weight:weight). The water vapour diffusion coefficient of the analyzed films was found within the interval 0.37 10-6 to 2.04 10-6 cm^2/s, increasing linearly by increasing the mesquite gum composition in the films. The incorporation of mesquite gum in films produces less effective moisture barriers due to its highly hydrophilic property.

  11. Compounds from Gum Ammoniacum with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhami, Hamid-Reza; Lutz, Johannes; Kählig, Hanspeter; Zehl, Martin; Krenn, Liselotte

    2013-01-01

    The use of herbal medicinal preparations in dementia therapy has been studied based on experience from traditional medicine. A dichloromethane extract of gum ammoniacum, the gum-resin from Dorema ammoniacum D. Don had shown acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in a previous study. The aim of this study was the isolation and characterization of the active compounds from this resin. The extract was investigated by a respective colorimetric microplate assay and the active zones were identified via TLC bioautography and isolated using several chromatographic techniques. The structures of the active components were characterized by one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as (2′S,5′S)-2′-ethenyl-5′-(3-hy-droxy-6-methyl-4-oxohept-5-en-2-yl)-7-methoxy-2′-methyl-4H-spiro[chromene-3,1′-cyclopentane]-2,4-dione (1), which is an analogue of doremone A and a new natural compound, and as (2′S,5′R)-2′-ethenyl-5′-[(2R,4R)-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-oxohept-5-en-2-yl]-7-methoxy-2′-methyl-4H-spiro[chromene-3,1′-cyclo-pentane]-2,4-dione (2 = doremone A), (4E,8E)-1-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5,9,13-trimethyltetradeca-4,8,12-trien-1-one (3 = dshamirone), and 4,7-dihydroxy-3-[(2E,6E)-3,7,11-trimethyldodeca-2,6,10-trien-1-yl]-2H-chromen-2-one (4 = am-moresinol). Dshamirone turned out to be the most active compound with an IC50 value for AChE inhibitory activity of 23.5 μM, whereas the other substances showed weak activity. The concentrations of the analytes in the resin were determined by HPLC as 3.1%, 4.6%, 1.9%, and 9.9%, respectively. PMID:24106674

  12. Jumping mechanisms in gum treehopper insects (Hemiptera, Eurymelinae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2013-07-15

    Jumping in a species of Australian gum treehopper was analysed from high-speed images. Pauroeurymela amplicincta adults and nymphs lived together in groups that were tended by ants, but only adults jumped. The winged adults with a body mass of 23 mg and a body length of 7 mm had some morphological characteristics intermediate between those of their close relatives the leafhoppers (Cicadellidae) and the treehoppers (Membracidae). They, like leafhoppers, lacked the prominent prothoracic helmets of membracid treehoppers, and their large hind coxae were linked by press studs (poppers), that are present in leafhoppers but not treehoppers. The hindlegs were only 30-40% longer than the other legs and 67% of body length. They are thus of similar proportion to the hindlegs of treehoppers but much shorter than those of most leafhoppers. Jumping was propelled by the hindlegs, which moved in the same plane as each other beneath and almost parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body. A jump was preceded by full levation of the coxo-trochanteral joints of the hindlegs. In its best jumps, the rapid depression of these joints then accelerated the insect in 1.4 ms to a take-off velocity of 3.8 m s(-1) so that it experienced a force of almost 280 g. In 22% of jumps, the wings opened before take-off but did not flap until the gum treehopper was airborne, when the body rotated little in any plane. The energy expended was 170 ?J, the power output was 122 mW and the force exerted was 64 mN. Such jumps are predicted to propel the insect forwards 1450 mm (200 times body length) and to a height of 430 mm if there is no effect of wind resistance. The power output per mass of jumping muscle far exceeded the maximum active contractile limit of muscle and indicates that a catapult-like action must be used. This eurymelid therefore out-performs both leafhoppers and treehoppers in i ts faster acceleration and in its higher take-off velocity. PMID:23619401

  13. Influence of xanthan gum on the structural characteristics of myofibrillar proteins treated by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Villamonte, Gina; Jury, Vanessa; Jung, Stphanie; de Lamballerie, Marie

    2015-03-01

    The effects of xanthan gum on the structural modifications of myofibrillar proteins (0.3 M NaCl, pH 6) induced by high pressure (200, 400, and 600 MPa, 6 min) were investigated. The changes in the secondary and tertiary structures of myofibrillar proteins were analyzed by circular dichroism. The protein denaturation was also evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry. Likewise, the protein surface hydrophobicity and the solubility of myofibrillar proteins were measured. High pressure (600 MPa) induced the loss of ?-helix structures and an increase of ?-sheet structures. However, the presence of xanthan gum hindered the former mechanism of protein denaturation by high pressure. In fact, changes in the secondary (600 MPa) and the tertiary structure fingerprint of high-pressure-treated myofibrillar proteins (400 to 600 MPa) were observed in the presence of xanthan gum. These modifications were confirmed by the thermal analysis, the thermal transitions of high-pressure (400 to 600 MPa)-treated myofibrillar proteins were modified in systems containing xanthan gum. As consequence, the high-pressure-treated myofibrillar proteins with xanthan gum showed increased solubility from 400 MPa, in contrast to high-pressure treatment (600 MPa) without xanthan gum. Moreover, the surface hydrophobicity of high-pressure-treated myofibrillar proteins was enhanced in the presence of xanthan gum. These effects could be due to the unfolding of myofibrillar proteins at high-pressure levels, which exposed sites that most likely interacted with the anionic polysaccharide. This study suggests that the role of food additives could be considered for the development of meat products produced by high-pressure processing. PMID:25656483

  14. Sustained-release from layered matrix system comprising chitosan and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Ritthidej, Garnpimol C

    2007-06-01

    Sustained-release tablets of propranolol HCl were prepared by direct compression using chitosan and xanthan gum as matrix materials. The effective prolongation of drug release in acidic environment was achieved for matrix containing chitosan together with xanthan gum which prolonged the drug release more extensive than that containing single polymer. Increasing lactose into matrix could adjust the drug release characteristic by enhancing the drug released. Component containing chitosan and xanthan gum at ratio 1:1 and lactose 75% w/w was selected for preparing the layered matrix by tabletting. Increasing the amount of matrix in barrier or in middle layer resulted in prolongation of drug release. From the investigation of drug release from one planar surface, the lag time for drug release through barrier layer was apparently longer as the amount of barrier was enhanced. Least square fitting the experimental dissolution data to the mathematical expressions (power law, first order, Higuchi's and zero order) was performed to study the drug release mechanism. Layering with polymeric matrix could prolong the drug release and could shift the release pattern approach to zero order. The drug release from chitosan-xanthan gum three-layer tablet was pH dependent due to the difference in charge density in different environmental pH. FT-IR and DSC studies exhibited the charge interaction between of NH3+ of chitosan molecule and COO- of acetate or pyruvate groups of xanthan gum molecule. The SEM images revealed the formation of the loose membranous but porous film that was due to the gel layer formed by the polymer relaxation upon absorption of dissolution medium. The decreased rate of polymer dissolution resulting from the decreased rate of solvent penetration was accompanied by a decrease in drug diffusion due to ionic interaction between chitosan and xanthan gum. This was suggested that the utilization of chitosan and xanthan gum could give rise to layered matrix tablet exhibiting sustained drug release. PMID:17613024

  15. Antiglycating potential of gum arabic capped-silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M; Ansari, Mohammad Azam; Choi, Inho; Khan, Haris M; Alzohairy, Mohammad A

    2014-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products are major contributors to the pathology of diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and atherosclerosis; accordingly, identification of antiglycation compounds is attracting considerable interest. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of gum arabic capped-silver nanoparticles on advanced glycation end products formation was monitored by several biophysical techniques. Silver nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet-visible, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Bovine serum albumin and methylglyoxal mixtures incubated with increasing concentrations of silver nanoparticles showed significant reductions in advanced glycation end product formation that were confirmed by ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques. High-performance liquid chromatography showed decreased adduct formation of glycated protein in the presence of silver nanoparticles. The structural changes induced by silver nanoparticles were further confirmed by circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Strong inhibition of advanced glycation end product formation was observed in the presence of elevated silver nanoparticles. The results of this study suggest that silver nanoparticles are a potent antiglycating agent. PMID:25080376

  16. Effect of molecular configuration of Xanthan gum drage reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochefort, Skip; Middleman, Stanley

    1986-01-01

    Drag reduction in turbulent pipe flow has been studied using dilute xanthan gum solutions. The primary goal of the studies was torelate the molecular configuration of xanthan in solutions of varying ionic strength to its effectiveness as a drag reducer. Xanthan solutions of various concentrations (10-250 wppm) in glycerine/water (12.5/87.5) and with 0.5%NaCl, added were studied over a wide Reynolds number range (1000< Re<2104). A Rheometrics Fluids Rheometer was used to characterize the solutions in steady shear and to perform transient start-up experiments. The steady shear viscosity and transient shear stress overshoot are both significantly reduced with the addition of salt to the solution, indicating that the xanthan configuration is altered. The form of the drag reduction is similar to that which is expected for an extended molecule in dilute solution. For a given xanthan concentration, the drag reduction at high Reynolds numbers is also much lower in salt solution. Combining a knowledge of the molecular structure of xanthan and the results of recent analytical studies by several research groups, with the rheological data of this study, it is possible to speculate as to the configuration change which occurs with the addition of salt and to relate that to its effect on drag reduction. With this information, some insight into the mechanisms for drag reduction in semi-rigid polymer systems is obtained.

  17. An evaluation of sodium bicarbonate chewing gum as a supplement to toothbrushing for removal of dental plaque from children's teeth.

    PubMed

    Kleber, C J; Davidson, K R; Rhoades, M L

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this human clinical study was to determine whether a commercial chewing gum containing 5% sodium bicarbonate (ARM & HAMMER DENTAL CARE The Baking Soda Gum [AHDC]) was effective in removing dental plaque when used as a supplement to regular toothbrushing by children. Healthy children (N = 28, average age = 11 years) were randomly distributed into 2 groups. One group was instructed to chew 2 tablets of AHDC chewing gum for 20 minutes 2 times each day (after lunch and dinner) in addition to their normal toothbrushing regimen. The other group used a sugarless mint tablet twice daily during the same period in addition to toothbrushing. After 1 week of using their assigned product, all participants were again examined for oral health and plaque. After a 1-week washout period, subjects were crossed over to the opposite group. Among the 21 participants completing the study, the AHDC chewing gum significantly (P < .0001) reduced plaque by 15% after 1 week compared to the mint tablet control, as measured by the Modified Quigley-Hein Plaque Index. When longitudinally compared to the baseline plaque scores, the gum resulted in a significant (P < .01) 10% reduction of plaque on the teeth. Subanalysis of the data showed that the AHDC chewing gum was particularly effective on the lingual surfaces and the posterior teeth and least effective on the facial surfaces of the anterior teeth, which do not readily come into direct contact with the gum during mastication. The bicarbonate gum demonstrated significant plaque reduction in all other areas of the mouth, even on tooth surfaces not directly contacted during chewing. Compliance with the chewing gum regimen was excellent, and oral health exams did not indicate any adverse events among children using either the chewing gum or mint tablets. In this study, regular use of AHDC chewing gum was safe and effective in removing dental plaque and served as a significant complement to the daily toothbrushing regimen of children. PMID:11913309

  18. Final report of the safety assessment of Acacia catechu gum, Acacia concinna fruit extract, Acacia dealbata leaf extract, Acacia dealbata leaf wax, Acacia decurrens extract, Acacia farnesiana extract, Acacia farnesiana flower wax, Acacia farnesiana gum, Acacia senegal extract, Acacia senegal gum, and Acacia senegal gum extract.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    These ingredients are derived from various species of the acacia plant. Only material derived from Acacia senegal are in current use according to industry data. The concentration at which these ingredients are reported to be used ranges from 9% in mascara to 0.0001% in tonics, dressings, and other hair-grooming aids. Gum arabic is a technical name for Acacia Senegal Gum. Gum arabic is comprised of various sugars and glucuronic acid residues in a long chain of galactosyl units with branched oligosaccharides. Gum arabic is generally recognized as safe as a direct food additive. Little information is available to characterize the extracts of other Acacia plant parts or material from other species. Acacia Concinna Fruit Extract was generally described as containing saponins, alkaloids, and malic acid with parabens and potassium sorbate added as preservatives. Cosmetic ingredient functions have been reported for Acacia Decurrens Extract (astringent; skin-conditioning agent--occlusive) and Acacia Farnesiana Extract (astringent), but not for the other Acacias included in this review. Toxicity data on gum arabic indicates little or no acute, short-term, or subchronic toxicity. Gum arabic is negative in several genotoxicity assays, is not a reproductive or developmental toxin, and is not carcinogenic when given intraperitoneally or orally. Clinical testing indicated some evidence of skin sensitization with gum arabic. The extensive safety test data on gum arabic supports the safety of Acacia Senegal Gum and Acacia Senegal Gum Extract, and it was concluded that these two ingredients are safe as used in cosmetic formulations. It was not possible, however, to relate the data on gum arabic to the crude Acacias and their extracts from species other than Acacia senegal. Therefore, the available data were considered insufficient to support the safety of Acacia Catechu Gum, Acacia Concinna Fruit Extract, Acacia Dealbata Leaf Extract, Acacia Dealbata Leaf Wax, Acacia Decurrens Extract, Acacia Farnesiana Extract, Acacia Farnesiana Flower Wax, Acacia Farnesiana Gum, and Acacia Senegal Extract in cosmetic products. The additional data needed to complete the safety assessment for these ingredients include (1) concentration of use; (2) identify the specific chemical constituents, and clarify the relationship between crude Acacias and their extracts and the Acacias and their extracts that are used as cosmetic ingredients; (3) data on contaminants, particularly relating to the presence of pesticide residues, and a determination of whether Acacia melanoxylon is used in cosmetics and whether acamelin (a quinone) and melacacidin (a flavin) are present in the Acacias that are being used; (4) skin sensitization study (i.e., dose response to be determined); (5) contact urticaria study at use concentration; and (6) ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectrum; if there is significant absorbance in the UVA or UVB range, then a photosensitization study may be needed. It was also noted that other data may be needed after clarification of the chemical constituents of the Acacia-derived ingredients. PMID:16422266

  19. Green stabilization of microscale iron particles using guar gum: bulk rheology, sedimentation rate and enzymatic degradation.

    PubMed

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-05-01

    Guar gum can be used to effectively improve stability and mobility of microscale zerovalent iron particles (MZVI) used in groundwater remediation. Guar gum is a food-grade, environment friendly natural polysaccharide, which is often used as thickening agent in a broad range of food, pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Guar gum solutions are non-Newtonian, shear thinning fluids, characterized by high viscosity in static conditions and low viscosity in dynamic conditions. In particular, the high zero shear viscosity guarantees the MZVI dispersion stability, reducing the sedimentation rate of the particles thus enabling its storage and field operations. In this work, a comprehensive rheological characterization of guar gum-based slurries of MZVI particles is provided. First, we derived a model to link the bulk shear viscosity to the concentration of guar gum and then we applied it for the derivation of a modified Stokes law for the prediction of the sedimentation rate of the iron particles. The influence of the preparation procedure (cold or hot dissolution and high shear processing) on the viscosity and on the stability of the suspensions was then assessed. Finally, the dosage and concentration of enzymes - an environment friendly breaker--were studied for enhancing and controlling the degradation kinetics of the suspensions. The derived empirical relationships can be used for the implementation of an iron slurry flow and transport model and for the design of full scale injection interventions. PMID:24594029

  20. Matrix properties of a new plant gum in controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kalu, V D; Odeniyi, M A; Jaiyeoba, K T

    2007-07-01

    A new plant gum, Okra (extracted from the pods of Hibiscus esculentus), has been evaluated as a controlled-release agent in modified release matrices, in comparison with sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), using Paracetamol as a model drug. Tablets were produced by direct compression and the in-vitro drug release was assessed in conditions mimicking the gastro intestinal system, for 6 h. Okra gum matrices provided a controlled-release of Paracetamol for more than 6 h and the release rates followed time-independent kinetics. The release rates were dependent on the concentration of the drug present in the matrix. The addition of tablet excipients, lactose and Avicel, altered the dissolution profile and the release kinetics. Okra gum compared favourably with NaCMC, and a combination of Okra gum and NaCMC, or on further addition of HPMC resulted in near zeroorder release of paracetamol from the matrix tablet. The results indicate that Okra gum matrices could be useful in the formulation of sustained-release tablets for up to 6 h. PMID:17703742

  1. First-principles Calculations of Ideal Tensile and Shear Strengths for Gum-Metal Approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasako, Naoyuki; Jahnatek, Michal; Asahi, Ryoji; Hafner, Jrgen

    2010-03-01

    A newly developed bcc-type Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-O (mol%) alloy named Gum-Metal showed unusual properties including ultralow elastic modulus, ultrahigh strength, super-elastic-like behavior, and super-plastic-like behavior, in particular, accompanied by dislocation-free plastic deformation. [1]. As proposed in first-principles calculations, one of the requirements for the Gum-Metal is dramatic softening of the elastic shear modulus C'=(C11-C12)/2 0, which happens at a valence electron concentration around 4.24. We also study ideal tensile and shear strengths for Gum-Metal approximants to understand microscopic origin of such unique mechanical properties. The most stable Gum-metal approximant among all the possible 1820 atomic configurations of Ti12Nb4 has been determined, and showed good agreement with the experimental elastic constants of Gum-Metal.[4pt] [1] T. Saito et al., Science 300, 464 (2003).

  2. Electrically conducting silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2014-08-01

    This article describes the synthesis of an electrically conducting silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite hydrogel. The synthesis process started with grafting acrylic acid monomers onto the natural polymer guar gum by the use of ammonium persulphate as a free radical initiator in acid medium. Guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) graft copolymer was separated from the polymerization medium, purified and subjected to crosslinking treatment, using alkaline epichlorohydrin as a crosslinking agent. Silver nitrate solution was added during the crosslinking treatment in varying concentrations, that the reaction conditions affect crosslinking of guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) graft copolymer to a hydrogel, as well as reduction of silver nitrate to silver nanoparticles, giving rise to the formation of silver/guar gum/poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposite. Factors affecting the grafting reaction as well as those affecting the crosslinking/reduction treatment were optimized. The so synthesized nanocomposite hydrogel samples were fully characterized, regarding their contents of silver nanoparticles and swelling ratio. The electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite hydrogel was studied and it was found to be affected by the swelling ratio of the hydrogel as well as its content of silver nanoparticles. PMID:24928058

  3. Development of eco-friendly submicron emulsions stabilized by a bio-derived gum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mosqueda, Luis María; Ramírez, Pablo; Trujillo-Cayado, Luis Alfonso; Santos, Jenifer; Muñoz, José

    2014-11-01

    Many traditional organic solvents are being gradually replaced by ecofriendly alternatives. D-Limonene is a terpenic (bio)-solvent that fulfils the requirements to be considered a green solvent. D-Limonene sub-micron emulsions suffer from Ostwald ripening destabilization. In this study, we examined the influence of the addition of a natural gum (rosin gum) to D-limonene in order to prevent Ostwald ripening. This contribution deals with the study of emulsions formulated with a mixture of D-limonene and rosin gum as dispersed phase and Pluronic PE9400 as emulsifier. The procedure followed for the development of these formulations was based on the application of product design principles. This led to the optimum ratio rosin gum/D-limonene and subsequently to the optimum surfactant concentration. The combination of different techniques (rheology, laser diffraction and multiple light scattering) was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to assist in the prediction of the emulsions destabilization process. Not only did the addition of rosin gum highly increase the stability of these emulsions by inhibiting the Ostwald ripening, but it also reduced the emulsions droplet size. Thus, we found that stable sub-micron D-limonene-in-water emulsions have been obtained in the range 3-6 wt% Pluronic PE-9400 by means of a single-step rotor/stator homogenizing process. PMID:25454661

  4. Bayesian uncertainty analysis compared with the application of the GUM and its supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elster, Clemens

    2014-08-01

    The Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) has proven to be a major step towards the harmonization of uncertainty evaluation in metrology. Its procedures contain elements from both classical and Bayesian statistics. The recent supplements 1 and 2 to the GUM appear to move the guidelines towards the Bayesian point of view, and they produce a probability distribution that shall encode one's state of knowledge about the measurand. In contrast to a Bayesian uncertainty analysis, however, Bayes' theorem is not applied explicitly. Instead, a distribution is assigned for the input quantities which is then propagated through a model that relates the input quantities to the measurand. The resulting distribution for the measurand may coincide with a distribution obtained by the application of Bayes' theorem, but this is not true in general. The relation between a Bayesian uncertainty analysis and the application of the GUM and its supplements is investigated. In terms of a simple example, similarities and differences in the approaches are illustrated. Then a general class of models is considered and conditions are specified for which the distribution obtained by supplement 1 to the GUM is equivalent to a posterior distribution resulting from the application of Bayes' theorem. The corresponding prior distribution is identified and assessed. Finally, we briefly compare the GUM approach with a Bayesian uncertainty analysis in the context of regression problems.

  5. Comparative studies of binding potential of Prunus armeniaca and Prunus domestica gums in tablets formulations.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Haroon; Khan, Mir Azam; Sadiq, Abdul; Khan, Shahzeb; Chishti, Kamran Ahmad; Rahman, Inayat U

    2015-05-01

    The current study was undertaken to compare the binding potential of Prunus armeniaca L. and Prunus domestica L. gums in tablets' formulations. Tablet batches (F-1 to F-9) were prepared Diclofenac sodium as model drug using 5%, 7.5% and 10% of each Prunus armeniaca L., Prunus domestica L. gums as binder. PVP K30 was used as a standard binder. Magnesium stearate was used as lubricant. Flow properties of granules (like bulk density, tapped density, Carr's index, Hausner's ratio, angle of repose) as well as the physical parameters of compressed tablets including hardness, friability, thickness and disintegration time were determined. Flow parameters of granules of all the batches were found good. Physical parameters (drug content, weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, disintegration time) of formulated tablets were found within limit when tested. The dissolution studies showed that tablets formulations containing each Prunus domestica showed better binding capacity compared to Prunus armeniaca gum. The binding potential increased as the concentration of gums increased. The FTIR spectroscopic investigation showed that the formulations containing plant gum are compatible with the drug and other excipients used. PMID:26004724

  6. Effect of alkali metal cations on adsorption of guar gum onto quartz.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaodong; Pawlik, Marek

    2005-09-01

    The effect of cesium, potassium, sodium, and lithium cations on the adsorption of natural guar gum onto quartz was investigated. The role of these ions was analyzed in terms of their water structure-making or -breaking capabilities. In the presence of structure makers (Na+, Li+) the polymer adsorption density did not change compared to the adsorption levels observed in distilled water. However, in dilute solutions (0.01 N) of structure-breaking cations (Cs+, K+) the adsorption density of guar gum significantly increased, with potassium and cesium producing the same adsorption densities of the polymer. The resulting colloidal aggregation/dispersion equilibria in the quartz-guar gum system were discussed and mechanisms of guar gum-quartz interactions were also suggested. Assuming hydrogen bonding to be the driving adsorption mechanism, it was proposed that guar gum molecules compete with water for silanol surface sites. Structure-breaking cations disturb the interfacial water structure around the quartz particles thus allowing the polymer to more closely approach the quartz surface and interact with the surface groups. PMID:16009216

  7. Surface analysis characterisation of gum binders used in modern watercolour paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Naoko; Cumpson, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    Conducting this study has demonstrated that not only SEM-EDX but also XPS can be an efficient tool for characterising watercolour paint surfaces. We find that surface effects are mediated by water. Once the powdered components in the watercolour come into contact with water they dramatically transform their chemical structures at the surface and show the presence of pigment components with a random dispersion within the gum layer. Hence the topmost surface of the paint is confirmed as being composed of the gum binder components. This result is difficult to confirm using just one analytical technique (either XPS or SEM-EDX). In addition, peak fitting of C1s XPS spectra suggests that the gum binder in the commercial watercolour paints is probably gum arabic (by comparison with the reference materials). This identification is not conclusive, but the combination techniques of XPS and SEM shows the surface structure with material distribution of the gum binder and the other ingredients of the watercolour paints. Therefore as a unique technique, XPS combined with SEM-EDX may prove a useful method in the study of surface structure for not only watercolour objects but also other art objects; which may in future help in the conservation for art.

  8. Chemical and Physical Properties, Safety and Application of Partially Hydrolized Guar Gum as Dietary Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seon-Joo; Chu, Djong-Chi; Raj Juneja, Lekh

    2008-01-01

    The ideal water-soluble dietary fiber for the fiber-enrichment of foods must be very low in viscosity, tasteless, odorless, and should produce clear solutions in beverages. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) produced from guar gum by enzymatic process has the same chemical structure with intact guar gum but less than one-tenth the original molecular length of guar gum, which make available to be used as film former, foam stabilizer and swelling agent. The viscosity of PHGG is about 10 mPa·s in 5% aqueous solution, whereas 1% solution of guar gum shows range from 2,000 to 3,000 mPa·s. In addition, PHGG is greatly stable against low pH, heat, acid and digestive enzyme. For these reasons, PHGG seems to be one of the most beneficial dietary fiber materials. It also showed that interesting physiological functions still fully exert the nutritional function of a dietary fiber. PHGG has, therefore, been used primarily for a nutritional purpose and became fully integrated food material without altering the rheology, taste, texture and color of final products. PHGG named as Benefiber® in USA has self-affirmation on GRAS status of standard grade PHGG. PHGG named as Sunfiber® is now being used in various beverages, food products and medicinal foods as a safe, natural and functional dietary fiber in all over the world. PMID:18231623

  9. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress.

    PubMed

    de Mello Luvielmo, Márcia; Borges, Caroline Dellinghausen; de Oliveira Toyama, Daniela; Vendruscolo, Claire Tondo; Scamparini, Adilma Regina Pippa

    2016-01-01

    The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on gum purification are required to remove excess sodium, verify the efficiency loss and the consequent increase in the polymer viscosity. Alkali stress altered the structure of xanthan gum from a polygon-like shape to a star-like form. At the end of the fermentation, early structural changes in the bacterium were observed. After alkali stress, marked structural differences were observed in the cells. A more vacuolated cytoplasm and discontinuities in the membrane cells evidenced the cell lysis. Xanthan was observed in the form of concentric circles instead of agglomerates as observed prior to the alkali stress. PMID:26887232

  10. Structure and Mechanism of GumK, a Membrane-Associated Glucuronosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Barreras, M.; Salinas, S; Abdian, P; Kampel, M; Lelpi, L

    2008-01-01

    Xanthomonas campestris GumK (?-1,2-glucuronosyltransferase) is a 44-kDa membrane-associated protein that is involved in the biosynthesis of xanthan, an exopolysaccharide crucial for this bacterium's phytopathogenicity. Xanthan also has many important industrial applications. The GumK enzyme is the founding member of the glycosyltransferase family 70 of carbohydrate-active enzymes, which is composed of bacterial glycosyltransferases involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis. No x-ray structures have been reported for this family. To better understand the mechanism of action of the bacterial glycosyltransferases in this family, the x-ray crystal structure of apo-GumK was solved at 1.9A resolution. The enzyme has two well defined Rossmann domains with a catalytic cleft between them, which is a typical feature of the glycosyltransferase B superfamily. Additionally, the crystal structure of GumK complexed with UDP was solved at 2.28A resolution. We identified a number of catalytically important residues, including Asp157, which serves as the general base in the transfer reaction. Residues Met231, Met273, Glu272, Tyr292, Met306, Lys307, and Gln310 interact with UDP, and mutation of these residues affected protein activity both in vitro and in vivo. The biological and structural data reported here shed light on the molecular basis for donor and acceptor selectivity in this glycosyltransferase family. These results also provide a rationale to obtain new polysaccharides by varying residues in the conserved ?/?/? structural motif of GumK.

  11. Effect of flaxseed gum on reduction of blood glucose and cholesterol in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Goutam; Mitra, Analava; Pal, Kunal; Rousseau, Dérick

    2009-01-01

    The effects of ingestion of flaxseed gum on blood glucose and cholesterol, particularly low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, in type 2 diabetes were evaluated. Flaxseed gum was incorporated in wheat flour chapattis. Sixty patients of type 2 diabetes were fed a daily diet for 3 months, along with six wheat flour chapattis containing flaxseed gum (5 g), as per the recommendations of the American Diabetic Association. The control group (60 individuals) consumed an identical diet but the chapattis were without gum. The blood biochemistry profiles monitored before starting the study and at monthly intervals showed fasting blood sugar in the experimental group decreased from 154 ± 8 mg/dl to 136 ± 7 mg/dl (P=0.03) while the total cholesterol reduced from 182 ± 11 mg/dl to 163 ± 9 mg/dl (P=0.03). Results showed a decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol from 110 ± 8 mg/dl to 92 ± 9 mg/dl (P=0.02). The study demonstrated the efficacy of flax gum in the blood biochemistry profiles of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19548163

  12. Hormonal regulation of gummosis and composition of gums from bulbs of hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis).

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kensuke; Kotake, Toshihisa; Boncela, Anna Jarecka; Saniewski, Marian; Ueda, Junichi

    2015-02-01

    Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis) bulbs infected by Fusarium oxysporum showed the symptoms of gummosis. The purpose of this study was to clarify the hormonal regulation of gummosis and composition of gums from hyacinth bulbs. The application of ethephon (2-chloroethylphosphonic acid), an ethylene-releasing compound, at 2% (w/w, in lanolin) induced gummosis in hyacinth bulbs. Methyl jasmonate (JA-Me) at 1.5% (w/w, in lanolin) induced gummosis as well. Simultaneous application of JA-Me and ethephon further enhanced gummosis. Molecular mass distribution of hyacinth gums analyzed by gel permeation chromatography indicated that the gums were mainly homogenous polysaccharides with an average molecular weight of ca. 30kDa. Analysis of the sugar composition of the gums after hydrolysis revealed that the majority were arabinose (ca. 35%) and galactose (ca. 40%) together with small amounts of fucose, rhamnose and uronic acids (ca. 5%, respectively), suggesting that the gums are pectic arabinogalactans. These results indicate that jasmonates (JAs) interact with ethylene to stimulate sugar metabolism, producing pectic arabinogalactans, and vice versa, leading to gummosis. These findings, together with those from our previous studies in tulips (Tulipa gesneriana) and grape hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum), revealed that sugar metabolism and hormonal regulation relating to gummosis are different among species of bulbous plants. PMID:25462960

  13. Spectral analysis of changes in electroencephalographic activity after the chewing of gum.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Y; Morinushi, T; Kawasaki, H; Takigawa, M

    1998-12-01

    The present study aimed to examine the psychosomatic effect in the chewing of marketed gum using electroencephalogram (EEG) as an index. The EEG were taken in two sets: (i) a resting period before chewing (control recording) and a resting record (post-resting recording) for examining reproducibility; and (ii) a control recording and resting period after gum-chewing for 3 min (post-chewing recording). The ratio of each frequency band to the total frequency power, the mean frequency of the alpha band and laterality of the frequency power was calculated. In the examination of the reproducibility, no statistically significant differences were observed between control recording and post-resting recording in all indices. In the reflection of EEG after gum-chewing, there were no significant differences between control recording and the post-chewing recording. However, a significant interaction was observed among these indices by analysis of variance. In addition, the alpha power in the post-chewing recording was significantly higher than that in the control recording at almost all the positions. In conclusion, the intra-individual reproducibility of EEG was confirmed in the recording method. Furthermore, it was suggested that a significant interaction and a rising trend of the mean frequency of the alpha band after gum-chewing reflected 'arousal' psychosomatic responses by the chewing of marketed gum. PMID:9895206

  14. Nicotine Gum and Self-Help Behavioral Treatment for Smoking Relapse Prevention: Results from a Trial Using Population-Based Recruitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortmann, Stephen P.; Killen, Joel D.

    1995-01-01

    Smokers were randomized using a factorial design to compare nicotine gum use to no gum use, and self-help materials to no materials. Compared with the no-gum group, relapse occurred at a significantly lower rate in the gum group for the entire 12 months of follow-up. There was no significant main effect for the self-help materials and no

  15. Ex vivo skin permeation and retention studies on chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan ternary nanogel prepared by in situ ionic gelation technique--a tool for controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Abioye, Amos Olusegun; Issah, Sureya; Kola-Mustapha, Adeola Tawakalitu

    2015-07-25

    The chemical potentials of drug-polymer electrostatic interaction have been utilized to develop a novel ternary chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan nanogel as controlled transdermal delivery tool for ibuprofen. The ternary nanogels were prepared by a combination of electrostatic nanoassembly and ionic gelation techniques. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding between ibuprofen and chitosan were confirmed with FTIR, while DSC, TGA and SEM confirmed the physical state, thermal and morphological characteristics, respectively. The ex vivo delivery of ibuprofen onto and across the skin was evaluated based on system specific drug release parameters such as steady state permeation rate, permeability coefficient, permeability enhancement ratio, skin/gel partition coefficient, diffusion coefficient, lag time and release rate constant and mechanisms of release were determined using mathematical models. Interaction between ibuprofen and chitosan produced new spherical eutectic nanoconjugates with remarkable decrease in particle size of ibuprofen from 4580 (length-to-breadth aspect ratio) to a minimum of 14.15 nm (324-times), and thermally stable amorphous characteristics. The nanogels exhibited significant elastic and pseudoplastic characteristics dictated by the concentration of chitosan with maximum swelling capacity of 775% w/w at 6.55 mM chitosan compared with 281.16 and 506.50% for plain gellan and control ibuprofen hydrogel, respectively. Chitosan enhanced the skin penetration, permeability and the rate of transdermal release of ibuprofen by a factor of 4, dictated by the extent of ibuprofen-chitosan ionic interaction and its concentration. The major mechanism of ibuprofen release through the pig skin was drug diffusion however drug partition and matrix erosion also occurred. It was evident that ternary nanogels are novel formulations with potential application in controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen. PMID:25997660

  16. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of guar gum based triple-layer matrix tablet of diclofenac sodium

    PubMed Central

    Chavda, H.V.; Patel, M.S.; Patel, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to design an oral controlled drug delivery system for sparingly soluble diclofenac sodium (DCL) using guar gum as triple-layer matrix tablets. Matrix tablet granules containing 30% (D1), 40% (D2) or 50% (D3) of guar gum were prepared by the conventional wet granulation technique. Matrix tablets of diclofenac sodium were prepared by compressing three layers one by one. Centre layer of sandwich like structure was incorporated with matrix granules containing DCL which was covered on either side by guar gum granule layers containing either 70, 80 or 87% of guar gum as release retardant layers. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, thickness, drug content, and drug release studies. To ascertain the kinetics of drug release, the dissolution profiles were fitted to various mathematical models. The in vitro drug release from proposed system was best explained by the Hopfenberg model indicating that the release of drug from tablets displayed heterogeneous erosion. D3G3, containing 87% of guar gum in guar gum layers and 50% of guar gum in DCL matrix granule layer was found to provide the release rate for prolonged period of time. The results clearly indicate that guar gum could be a potential hydrophilic carrier in the development of oral controlled drug delivery systems. PMID:23181081

  17. Tragacanth gum-based nanogel as a superparamagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for quercetin recognition and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Khadijeh; Masoumi, Arameh; Ghaemy, Mousa

    2016-01-20

    A highly selective magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP) with core-shell structure has been synthesized by a sol-gel process composed of Tragacanth Gum (TG) crosslinker, Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles, and N-vinyl imidazole(VI) functional monomer in the presence of template Quercetin (QC). Different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to verify the successful synthesis of MIP on the surface of Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles. The swelling behavior of MMIP, its recognition and selectivity for QC and structural analog, Catechin (CT), were tested and compared with magnetic non imprinted polymer (MNIP). MMIP adsorbs the template drug quickly and equilibrium could be reached in 2h. The mechanism for adsorption was found to follow the Langmuir model with the maximum capacity of 175.43mgg(-1). The MMIP indicated excellent recognition and binding affinity toward QC, selectivity factor (?) relative to CT was 2.16. Finally, the MMIP was evaluated as a drug delivery device by performing in vitro release studies in PBS. PMID:26572395

  18. Gum arabic-curcumin conjugate micelles with enhanced loading for curcumin delivery to hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel; Kumar, P R Anil; Raj, Deepa K; Kumary, T V

    2015-12-10

    Curcumin is conjugated to gum arabic, a highly water soluble polysaccharide to enhance the solubility and stability of curcumin. Conjugation of curcumin to gum arabic is confirmed by (1)H NMR, fluorescence and UV spectroscopy studies. The conjugate self assembles to spherical nano-micelles (270 5 nm) spontaneously, when dispersed in aqueous medium. Spherical morphology of the self assembled conjugate is evidenced by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The self assembly of the amphiphilic conjugate into micelle in aqueous medium significantly enhances the solubility (900 fold of that of free curcumin) and stability of curcumin in physiological pH. The anticancer activity of the conjugate micelles is found to be higher in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells than in human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) cells. The conjugate exhibits enhanced accumulation and toxicity in HepG2 cells due to the targeting efficiency of the galactose groups present in gum arabic. PMID:26428113

  19. Peach gum polysaccharide polyelectrolyte: preparation, properties and application in layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiachang; Zhou, Li

    2014-11-26

    The hydrolyzed peach gum polysaccharide (HPGP) prepared at acidic condition is investigated as an anionic polyelectrolyte for the first time. A hydrolysis mechanism is proposed by monitoring the hydrolysis efficiency and morphological change of crude peach gum, and the intrinsic viscosity of resulted HPGP as a function of hydrolysis time. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and ?-potential measurements reveal that HPGP with multiple carboxylic groups is negatively charged in water in the pH range 3-11. The HPGP exhibits remarkable pH and ionic strength responsiveness, as proven by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Moreover, the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly experiments further confirmed that the HPGP can be utilized as an anionic polyelectrolyte. Considering the facile availability, favorable compatibility and intriguing functionality of HPGP, this study opens up enormous opportunities for the large-scale utilization of peach gum resource. PMID:25256497

  20. The GUM revision: the Bayesian view toward the expression of measurement uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, I.

    2016-03-01

    The ‘Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement’ (GUM) has been in use for more than 20 years, serving its purposes worldwide at all levels of metrology, from scientific to industrial and commercial applications. However, the GUM presents some inconsistencies, both internally and with respect to its two later Supplements. For this reason, the Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology, which is responsible for these documents, has decided that a major revision of the GUM is needed. This will be done by following the principles of Bayesian statistics, a concise summary of which is presented in this article. Those principles should be useful in physics and engineering laboratory courses that teach the fundamentals of data analysis and measurement uncertainty evaluation.

  1. Xanthan Gum-a lyotropic, liquid crystalline polymer and its properties as a suspending agent

    SciTech Connect

    Salamone, J.C.; Clough, S.B.; Jamison, D.E.; Reid, K.I.G.; Salamone, A.B.

    1982-08-01

    Studies a variety of xanthan solutions of various polymer concentrations in the presence and absence of various salts under a polarized light microscope (100X) in order to test xanthan gum for liquid crystalline order. Xanthan gum, a polysaccharide used in drilling fluids and in tertiary recovery, has relatively stable viscosity properties as a function of salt concentration, pH, temperature, and shear degradation. With solutions from 2 to 10% (wt/vol) xanthan gum in distilled water at room temperature, birefringent, ordered domains were observed at 10% concentration, with a decrease in birefringence as the polymer concentration decreased. When the xanthan solution is sheared between a glass slide and a cover slip, the optic axis (chain direction) aligns using the shear direction (as determined by the colors displayed using a first-order red plate). Examines liquid crystalline behavior of other naturally occurring polymers.

  2. Oxidation and gum formation in diesel fuels. Interim technical report, May-December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.

    1985-12-20

    This Report describes experiments on oxidation and gum formation from n-dodecane, tetralin, and several diesel fuels at 43, 60, and 100 C, with and without added initiators, t-butyl peroxide and 2,2'azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (ABN). Experiments on gum determination and a manuscript for publication, Gum and Deposit Formation from Jet Turbine and Diesel Fuels at 100 C, are included. One objective of work on this Contract is to relate oxidations of diesel fuels at 100 and 130 C, where experiments can be performed in hours or days, to standard tests for fuel stability at ambient temperatures and 43.3 C (110 F), which require many weeks. A second objective is to devise a fast test for fuel stability.

  3. Effects of Boswellia serrata gum resin in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, I; Parihar, A; Malhotra, P; Singh, G B; Ldtke, R; Safayhi, H; Ammon, H P

    1997-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon where leukotrienes are suggested to play an important role for keeping inflammation active. Boswellic acids, the biologically active ingredients of the gum resin of Boswellia serrata (Sallai guggal), have been shown to be specific, nonredox and noncompetitive inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase, the key enzyme of leukotriene biosynthesis. In patients suffering from ulcerative colitis grade II and III the effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin preparation (350 mg thrice daily for 6 weeks) on stool properties, histolopathology and scan microscopy of rectal biopsies, blood parameters including Hb, serum iron, calcium, phosphorus, proteins, total leukocytes and eosinophils was studied. Patients receiving sulfasalazine (1 g thrice daily) served as controls. All parameters tested improved after treatment with Boswellia serrata gum resin, the results being similar compared to controls: 82% out of treated patients went into remission; in case of sulfasalazine remission rate was 75%. PMID:9049593

  4. Xylitol Gum Chewing to Achieve Early Postoperative Restoration of Bowel Motility After Laparoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yunhui; Zhang, Qianwen; Qiao, Lin; Lv, Donghao; Ruan, Jiaying; Chen, Hongqin; Gong, Junming; Shi, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effects of postoperative xylitol gum chewing on gastrointestinal functional recovery after laparoscopy. Altogether, 120 patients undergoing elective gynecologic laparoscopy were randomly divided into 2 groups of 60 each (final numbers: 53 controls, 56 patients). Controls underwent a routine postoperative regimen. Starting 6 hour after surgery, study patients chewed mint-flavored, sugarless xylitol gum until flatus occurred thrice a day. Other postoperative management was routine. First bowel sounds, first flatus, first bowel movement, and discharge times were recorded. Symptoms included abdominal distension, nausea, and vomiting. First flatus and first bowel sounds occurred significantly (P<0.001) earlier in the study patients. No significant differences were found for first defecation time, hospitalization duration, or mild/severe intestinal obstruction (all P>0.05). Thus, xylitol gum chewing after laparoscopy can effectively shorten the time to first flatus and helps with postoperative gastrointestinal functional recovery. It is simple, convenient, and well tolerated. PMID:26121546

  5. Cigarette abstinence impairs memory and metacognition despite administration of 2 mg nicotine gum.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, William L; Fulton, Erika K

    2008-12-01

    The authors assessed the effects of cigarette abstinence (nonabstinent vs. minimum 8 hours abstinent) and nicotine gum (0 mg vs. 2 mg nicotine) on sustained attention, free recall, and metacognition using a within-subjects design. Moderate smokers (10 women and 22 men) received one training session followed by four test sessions on consecutive days. Nicotine gum improved sustained attention in both abstinent and nonabstinent states, but had no significant effect on predicted or actual recall levels. Cigarette abstinence significantly impaired free recall and reduced the magnitude of participants' predictions of their own performance. In addition, participants were significantly more overconfident about their future memory when abstinent. Thus, nicotine gum can improve smokers' performance in basic aspects of cognition (e.g., sustained attention) but may not alleviate the detrimental effects of cigarette abstinence on higher-level processes such memory and metacognition. PMID:19086773

  6. Effects of chewing gum on stress and health: a replication and investigation of dose-response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Research suggests that chewing gum may be associated with reduced stress, depression and a reduced likelihood of having high cholesterol and blood pressure. The present study aimed to replicate these findings and extend them by examining dose-response. A web-based survey was completed by a sample of 388 workers from public sector organisations (68.5% female; mean age: 42?years, range 17-64?years). The results showed that chewing gum was associated in a linear dose-response manner with lower levels of perceived stress (both at work and life in general), anxiety and depression. Occasional gum chewers also reported a reduced risk of high cholesterol and blood pressure. Intervention studies are now required to extend these findings, and the mechanisms underlying the effects reported here need further investigation. PMID:22496105

  7. Synthesis and characterisation of poly(acryalamide) grafted carboxymethyl xanthan gum copolymer.

    PubMed

    Badwaik, Hemant Ramchandra; Sakure, Kalyani; Alexander, Amit; Ajazuddin; Dhongade, Hemant; Tripathi, Dulal Krishna

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, an unreported graft copolymer of carboxymethyl xanthan gum and acrylamide has been synthesised by free radical polymerisation in a nitrogen atmosphere using ammonium persulphate as an initiator. The optimum reaction conditions adopted for affording maximum percentage of grafting including its grafting efficiency were obtained by varying the concentration of carboxymethyl xanthan gum from 4 to 24gdm(-3); ammonium persulphate from 5×10(-4) to 30×10(-4)moldm(-3); acrylamide from 0.4 to 1.2moldm(-3); reaction temperature from 55 to 75°C and reaction time from 30 to 90min. The synthesised graft copolymer has been characterised by (1)H NMR, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction measurement, thermal analysis, viscosity measurement and scanning electron microscopy. However, grafting of acrylamide onto carboxymethyl xanthan gum backbone enhanced its thermal stability. This graft copolymer might be well exploited globally as a potential carrier for drug delivery system. PMID:26772913

  8. Discovery of X-ray emission associated with the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Nousek, J.; Garmire, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Gum Nebula was observed by the A-2 LED proportional counters on the HEAO-1 satellite as part of the all-sky survey. The first detection of X-ray emission associated with the Gum Nebula is reported. Soft X-ray spectra were constructed from the A-2 LED PHA data. Single temperature Raymond-Smith models were fitted to the observed spectra to yield temperature, column density and emission measure. The temperature is 6 x 10 exp 5 K, the column density 4 x 10 exp 20/sq cm, and the emission measure 5 cm exp-6 pc. The X-ray and optical properties of the Gum Nebula are consistent with a supernova remnant in the shell stage of evolution, which was the product of an energetic (3 x 10 exp 51 ergs) supernova explosion which occurred about 2 x 10 exp 6 yr ago.

  9. Interactions between whey protein isolate and gum Arabic.

    PubMed

    Klein, Miri; Aserin, Abraham; Ben Ishai, Paul; Garti, Nissim

    2010-09-01

    In this study we have attempted to understand the nature of "charge interactions" between two negatively charged biopolymers (whey protein isolate, WPI and gum Arabic, GA) and, consequently, why their mixture exhibits better interfacial activity. Surface tension (gamma(0)) measurements indicated that at ca. 1 wt.% of the biopolymer mixture (3:1 wt. ratio) the air/water surface is saturated. At 5 wt.% the gamma(0) of the mixture is lower than the calculated co-operative value. The zeta-potential measurements revealed that the isoelectric point of the WPI:GA 3:1 wt. ratio mixture is 3.8. The zeta-potential values up to pH 6 are below those calculated. Similarly, the electrical conductivities of the mixture are lower than those calculated. All these measurements indicate: (1) partial charge neutralization in spite of the fact that both biopolymers are negative or (2) partial charge-charge interactions between the two biopolymers. The thermal heating behavior of the frozen water in the aqueous mixture studied by DSC (heating cycle of the frozen sample) clearly indicates that the two biopolymers are interacting. We calculated the enthalpy, the free energy and the chemical potential of the interactions. We found that the interactions of the biopolymers are rather weak. They are likely derived from some local positively charged domains (pH 7) on the protein that neutralize some of the negatively charged GA. These interactions form weak charge adducts. These charge adducts are sufficient to improve its adsorption into the oil-water interface and enhance the emulsion stability. PMID:20488681

  10. The Association of Gum Bleeding with Respiratory Health in a Population Based Study from Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Real, Francisco; Pérez Barrionuevo, Laura; Franklin, Karl; Lindberg, Eva; Bertelsen, Randi Jacobsen; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Forsberg, Bertil; Gislason, Thorarinn; Jögi, Rain; Johannessen, Ane; Omenaas, Ernst; Saure, Eirunn; Schlünssen, Vivi; Skorge, Trude Duelien; Torén, Kjell; Pérez Saavedra, Antonio; Svanes, Øistein; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little knowledge about how oral and respiratory health is interrelated even though the mucosa of the oral cavity and airways constitutes a continuum and the exposures to these are partly similar. Aims To investigate whether gum bleeding is related to asthma, respiratory symptoms and self-reported COPD. Methods A postal questionnaire including questions about respiratory and oral health was sent to general population samples in seven Northern European centres. In 13,409 responders, gum bleeding when brushing teeth was reported always/often by 4% and sometimes by 20%. Logistic regressions accounted for age, smoking, educational level, centre and gender. Effects of BMI, cardio-metabolic diseases, early life factors, gastro-oesophageal reflux, dental hygiene, nasal congestion, and asthma medication were addressed. Results Gum bleeding always/often was significantly associated with ≥3 asthma symptoms (OR 2.58, 95% CI 2.10–3.18), asthma (1.62 [1.23–2.14]) and self-reported COPD (2.02 [1.28–3.18]). There was a dose-response relationship between respiratory outcomes and gum bleeding frequency (≥3 symptoms: gum bleeding sometimes 1.42 [1.25–1.60], often/always 2.58 [2.10–3.18]), and there was no heterogeneity between centres (pheterogeneity = 0.49). None of the investigated risk factors explained the associations. The observed associations were significantly stronger among current smokers (pinteraction = 0.004). Conclusions A consistent link between gum bleeding and obstructive airways disease was observed, not explained by common risk factors or metabolic factors. We speculate that oral pathogens might have unfavourable impact on the airways, and that the direct continuity of the mucosa of the oral cavity and the airways reflects a pathway that might provide novel opportunities for interventions. PMID:26808490

  11. Development of a peptide-containing chewing gum as a sustained release antiplaque antimicrobial delivery system.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Jabar A; Dorati, Rossella; Schoubben, Aurlie; Worthen, David; Selmin, Francesca; Capan, Yilmaz; Leung, Kai; DeLuca, Patrick P

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the stability of KSL-W, an antimicrobial decapeptide shown to inhibit the growth of oral bacterial strains associated with caries development and plaque formation, and its potential as an antiplaque agent in a chewing gum formulation. KSL-W formulations with or without the commercial antibacterial agent cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) were prepared. The release of KSL-W from the gums was assessed in vitro using a chewing gum apparatus and in vivo by a chew-out method. A reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for assaying KSL-W. Raw material stability and temperature and pH effects on the stability of KSL-W solutions and interactions of KSL-W with tooth-like material, hydroxyapatite discs, were investigated. KSL-W was most stable in acidic aqueous solutions and underwent rapid hydrolysis in base. It was stable to enzymatic degradation in human saliva for 1 hour but was degraded by pancreatic serine proteases. KSL-W readily adsorbed to hydroxyapatite, suggesting that it will also adsorb to the teeth when delivered to the oral cavity. The inclusion of CPC caused a large increase in the rate and extent of KSL-W released from the gums. The gum formulations displayed promising in vitro/in vivo release profiles, wherein as much as 90% of the KSL-W was released in a sustained manner within 30 minutes in vivo. These results suggest that KSL-W possesses the stability, adsorption, and release characteristics necessary for local delivery to the oral cavity in a chewing gum formulation, thereby serving as a novel antiplaque agent. PMID:17408225

  12. Cardiovascular responses in humans to experimental chewing of gums of different consistencies.

    PubMed

    Farella, M; Bakke, M; Michelotti, A; Marotta, G; Martina, R

    1999-10-01

    Although the cardiovascular effects of exercise have been extensively investigated in man, little attention has been paid to such responses to jaw muscle activity. The aim here was to investigate the general cardiovascular effects of chewing activity in a single-blind, cross-over design. Ten healthy individuals performed one of the following chewing tasks in four separate sessions: chewing a very hard gum, chewing a moderately hard gum, chewing a soft gum, and "empty chewing" without a bolus. Unilateral chewing of gum or empty chewing was performed for 20 min on the participant's most convenient chewing side at a constant rate of 80 cycles/min. In each session, heart rate and arterial blood pressure were recorded together with electromyographic activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles on the chewing side. Ratings of perceived masticatory fatigue were recorded with visual analogue scales. The heart rate and blood pressure were significantly increased (ANOVA; p < or= 0.01) during the chewing tasks and the increases were, in parallel with the muscle activity, more pronounced the harder the gum. With the very hard gum, heart rate increased by up to 11 beats/min, the systolic blood pressure was 14 mmHg (1.9kPa) higher, and the diastolic blood pressure was 11 mmHg (1.5kPa) higher. The perceived fatigue was proportional to the level of muscle activity. After 10 min of recovery from exercise, heart rate and arterial blood pressures were slightly but still significantly elevated. The results demonstrate that chewing is associated with general circulatory effects proportional to the bolus resistance. PMID:10530916

  13. Covalent coupling of gum arabic onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI cell labeling: physicochemical and in vitro characterization.

    PubMed

    Palma, Susana I C J; Carvalho, Alexandra; Silva, Joana; Martins, Pedro; Marciello, Marzia; Fernandes, Alexandra R; del Puerto Morales, Maria; Roque, Ana C A

    2015-01-01

    Gum arabic (GA) is a hydrophilic composite polysaccharide derived from exudates of Acacia senegal and Acacia seyal trees. It is biocompatible, possesses emulsifying and stabilizing properties and has been explored as coating agent of nanomaterials for biomedical applications, namely magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Previous studies focused on the adsorption of GA onto MNPs produced by co-precipitation methods. In this work, MNPs produced by a thermal decomposition method, known to produce uniform particles with better crystalline properties, were used for the covalent coupling of GA through its free amine groups, which increases the stability of the coating layer. The MNPs were produced by thermal decomposition of Fe(acac)3 in organic solvent and, after ligand-exchange with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), GA coating was achieved by the establishment of a covalent bond between DMSA and GA moieties. Clusters of several magnetic cores entrapped in a shell of GA were obtained, with good colloidal stability and promising magnetic relaxation properties (r2 /r1 ratio of 350). HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cell line was used for in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation and cell-labeling efficiency studies. We show that, upon administration at the respective IC50 , GA coating enhances MNP cellular uptake by 19 times compared to particles bearing only DMSA moieties. Accordingly, in vitro MR images of cells incubated with increasing concentrations of GA-coated MNP present dose-dependent contrast enhancement. The obtained results suggest that the GA magnetic nanosystem could be used as a MRI contrast agent for cell-labeling applications. PMID:25766788

  14. Effects of Three Mastic Gums on the Number of Mutans Streptococci, Lactobacilli and PH of the Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Biria, Mina; Eslami, Gita; Taghipour, Elaheh; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the recent years, herbal oral hygiene products have gained increasing attention. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of three types of mastic gums on the level of Mutans streptococci, Lactobacilli and pH of the saliva. Materials and Methods: Forty-two students in the age range of 2030 years were divided into three parallel groups; each of them separately used pure mastic gum, xylitol mastic gum and probiotic mastic gum for three weeks. Number of microorganisms and pH of the saliva were assessed before and after the intervention. The data were analyzed using Wilcoxon Signed Rank, paired-sample-t, Kruskal-Wallis and Tukeys post-hoc tests and Oneway ANOVA. Results: Level of Mutans streptococci showed a significant reduction compared to its baseline value in all three groups (P<0001 for all). Salivary Lactobacillus count increased in the groups using pure and xylitol mastic gums but decreased in the group using probiotic type, albeit these changes were only significant in the group using probiotic mastic gum (P<0.001). Use of pure and xylitol mastic gums increased the pH of the saliva but not significantly. In the group using probiotic mastic gum, the pH of the saliva decreased significantly (P=0.029). Conclusion: Three weeks use of all mastic gums resulted in a significant drop in the number of Mutans streptococci in the saliva. However, the drop in the saliva pH due to the use of probiotic mastic gum is not in favor of dental health. PMID:25628697

  15. Gum rosin-acetone system as an analogue to the degassing behaviour of hydrated magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.; Lane, S. J.; Lejeune, A.-M.; Hilton, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solutions of gum rosin and acetone reproduce the volatile- and temperature-dependent viscosity, together with the phase behaviour, of hydrated magmas. A range of experimental exsolution conditions was investigated, including the variation of supersaturation, rate of decompression, solution temperature and volatile content. Degassing processese were controlled by the formation of an exsolution interface above a supersaturated liquid. The end-products ranged from a mildly degassed liquid to a solid foam, which preserved strained vesicles. Solutions of gum rosin and acetone are proposed as a suitable analogue system with which to study magma degassing processes.

  16. Theory of the nonplanar splitting of screw dislocations in Gum Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, S. V.; Ishizaki, T.; Kuramoto, S.; Ovid'Ko, I. A.

    2008-03-01

    A theoretical model is suggested that describes nonplanar splitting of perfect dislocations into partials in a newly discovered group of alloys called Gum Metal. Within the model, the partials have line cores located at a nanoscale circle and are connected by (generalized) stacking faults. Due to the complicated nonplanar structure of the split dislocation configuration and associated stacking faults, the split dislocation has a low mobility. Results of the model take into account experimental data on suppression of dislocation slip in Gum Metal reported in the literature.

  17. Development and antibacterial activity of cashew gum-based silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Quelemes, Patrick V; Araruna, Felipe B; de Faria, Bruna E F; Kuckelhaus, Selma A S; da Silva, Durcilene A; Mendona, Ronaldo Z; Eiras, Carla; Dos S Soares, Maria Jos; Leite, Jos Roberto S A

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the development of a green synthesis of silver nanoparticles reduced and stabilized by exuded gum from Anacardium occidentale L. and evaluates in vitro their antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Characterization of cashew gum-based silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was carried out based on UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis which revealed that the synthesized silver nanoparticles were spherical in shape, measuring about 4 nm in size with a uniform dispersal. AgNPs presented antibacterial activity, especially against Gram-negative bacteria, in concentrations where no significant cytotoxicity was observed. PMID:23455467

  18. Standard test method for existent gum in fuels by jet evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covers determination of the existent gum in motor gasoline and aircraft fuels at the time of test. Provisions are made for the determination of the unwashed gum content of motor gasoline. Summary of method: a measured quantity of fuel is evaporated under controlled conditions of temperature and flow of air or steam. For aviation gasoline and aircraft turbine fuel, the resulting residue is weighed and reported as milligrams per 100 mL. For motor gasoline, the residue is weighed before and after extracting with n-heptane and the results reported as milligrams per 100 mL.

  19. Development and Antibacterial Activity of Cashew Gum-Based Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Quelemes, Patrick V.; Araruna, Felipe B.; de Faria, Bruna E. F.; Kuckelhaus, Selma A. S.; da Silva, Durcilene A.; Mendona, Ronaldo Z.; Eiras, Carla; dos S. Soares, Maria Jos; Leite, Jos Roberto S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the development of a green synthesis of silver nanoparticles reduced and stabilized by exuded gum from Anacardium occidentale L. and evaluates in vitro their antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Characterization of cashew gum-based silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was carried out based on UVVis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis which revealed that the synthesized silver nanoparticles were spherical in shape, measuring about 4 nm in size with a uniform dispersal. AgNPs presented antibacterial activity, especially against Gram-negative bacteria, in concentrations where no significant cytotoxicity was observed. PMID:23455467

  20. The deformation of gum metal under nanoindentation and sub-micron pillar compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann

    Reaching ideal strength has proven to be difficult in most materials. Dislocation slip, phase transformations, twinning, and fracture all tend to occur at stresses well below the ideal strength of a material. Only on very small scales has it been possible to approach ideal strength. Thus, it was of great interest when a set of beta-Ti alloys, Gum Metal, were found to have a bulk yield strength close to half of its ideal strength. However, some recent studies have questioned the reliability of this claim. Several studies have suggested Gum Metal deforms by dislocation slip. Others have suggested the possibility of transformation-induced plasticity. The present study was undertaken in order to help clarify if and how Gum Metal can reach ideal strength. Two different experiments, ex situ nanoindentation and quantitative in situ nanopillar compression in a transmission electron microscope to correlate real-time deformation behavior, were performed on a single composition of Gum Metal, Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-1.20 at. %, obtained from Toyota Central R&D Laboratories. Nanoindented specimens were thinned from the bottom surface until the pits of multiple indentations became electron-transparent allowing for qualitative analysis of the deformation microstructure in both fully cold-worked and solution-treated specimens. Real-time load-displacement behavior from the nanopillar compression tests was correlated with real-time video recorded during each compression to determine both the compressive strength of each pillar and the timing and strengths of different deformation behaviors observed. Combining the results from both experiments provided several important conclusions. First, Gum Metal approaches and can attain ideal strength in nanopillars regardless of processing condition. While dislocations exist in Gum Metal, they can be tightly pinned by obstacles with spacing less than ˜20 nm, which should inhibit their motion at strengths below the ideal shear strength. The plastic deformation of Gum Metal is not controlled by giant faults or by stress-induced phase transformations. Both of these phenomena, while active, are not the source of plasticity in Gum Metal.