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Sample records for magnetic launch assist

  1. Magnetic Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, W. A.

    2000-01-01

    With the ever-increasing cost of getting to space and the need for safe, reliable, and inexpensive ways to access space, NASA is taking a look at technologies that will get us there. One of these technologies is Magnetic Launch Assist (MagLev). This is the concept of using both magnetic levitation and magnetic propulsion to provide an initial velocity by using electrical power from ground sources. The use of ground based power can significantly reduce operational costs over the consumables necessary to attain the same velocity. The technologies to accomplish this are both old and new. The concept of MagLev has been around for a long time and several MagLev Trains have already been made. Where NASA's MagLev diverges from the traditional train is in the immense power required to propel this vehicle to 600 feet per second in less than 10 seconds. New technologies or the upgrade of existing technologies will need to be investigated in areas of energy storage and power switching. Plus the separation of a very large mass (the space vehicle) and the aerodynamics of that vehicle while on the carrier are also of great concern and require considerable study and testing. NASA's plan is to mature these technologies in the next 10 years to achieve our goal of launching a full sized space vehicle off a MagLev rail.

  2. Magnetic Launch Assist System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie demonstrates the Magnetic Launch Assist system, previously referred to as the Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) system, for space launch using a 5 foot model of a reusable Bantam Class launch vehicle on a 50 foot track that provided 6-g acceleration and 6-g de-acceleration. Overcoming the grip of Earth's gravity is a supreme challenge for engineers who design rockets that leave the planet. Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies that could levitate and accelerate a launch vehicle along a track at high speeds before it leaves the ground. Using electricity and magnetic fields, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would drive a spacecraft along a horizontal track until it reaches desired speeds. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the takeoff, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  3. Magnetic Launch Assist Demonstration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows a 1/9 subscale model vehicle clearing the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly referred to as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev), test track during a demonstration test conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Engineers at MSFC have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies. To launch spacecraft into orbit, a Magnetic Launch Assist System would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at very high speeds. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a launch-assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide and about 1.5-feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  4. Magnetic Launch Assist Experimental Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this photograph, a futuristic spacecraft model sits atop a carrier on the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly known as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) System, experimental track at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Engineers at MSFC have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies that would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at very high speeds. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide, and about 1.5-feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  5. Magnetic Launch Assist System-Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This illustration is an artist's concept of a Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly referred as the Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) system, for space launch. Overcoming the grip of Earth's gravity is a supreme challenge for engineers who design rockets that leave the planet. Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist System technologies that could levitate and accelerate a launch vehicle along a track at high speeds before it leaves the ground. Using electricity and magnetic fields, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would drive a spacecraft along a horizontal track until it reaches desired speeds. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, landing gear and the wing size, as well as the elimination of propellant weight resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  6. Magnetic Launch Assist Vehicle-Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts a Magnetic Launch Assist vehicle clearing the track and shifting to rocket engines for launch into orbit. The system, formerly referred as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) system, is a launch system developed and tested by Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that could levitate and accelerate a launch vehicle along a track at high speeds before it leaves the ground. Using an off-board electric energy source and magnetic fields, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would drive a spacecraft along a horizontal track until it reaches desired speeds. The system is similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long, capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds, and the vehicle would then shift to rocket engines for launch into orbit. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  7. Tabletop Experimental Track for Magnetic Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Advanced Space Transportation Program has developed the Magnetic Launch Assist System, formerly known as the Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) technology that could give a space vehicle a running start to break free from Earth's gravity. A Magnetic Launch Assist system would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at speeds up to 600 mph. The vehicle would shift to rocket engines for launch into orbit. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would electromagnetically propel a space vehicle along the track. The tabletop experimental track for the system shown in this photograph is 44-feet long, with 22-feet of powered acceleration and 22-feet of passive braking. A 10-pound carrier with permanent magnets on its sides swiftly glides by copper coils, producing a levitation force. The track uses a linear synchronous motor, which means the track is synchronized to turn the coils on just before the carrier comes in contact with them, and off once the carrier passes. Sensors are positioned on the side of the track to determine the carrier's position so the appropriate drive coils can be energized. MSFC engineers have conducted tests on the indoor track and a 50-foot outdoor track. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  8. Magnetic Launch Assist System Demonstration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have been testing Magnetic Launch Assist Systems, formerly known as Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) technologies. To launch spacecraft into orbit, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would use magnetic fields to levitate and accelerate a vehicle along a track at a very high speed. Similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway, the launch-assist system would electromagnetically drive a space vehicle along the track. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. This photograph shows a subscale model of an airplane running on the experimental track at MSFC during the demonstration test. This track is an advanced linear induction motor. Induction motors are common in fans, power drills, and sewing machines. Instead of spinning in a circular motion to turn a shaft or gears, a linear induction motor produces thrust in a straight line. Mounted on concrete pedestals, the track is 100-feet long, about 2-feet wide, and about 1.5- feet high. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  9. Artist's Concept of Magnetic Launch Assisted Air-Breathing Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts a Magnetic Launch Assist vehicle in orbit. Formerly referred to as the Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) system, the Magnetic Launch Assist system is a launch system developed and tested by engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that could levitate and accelerate a launch vehicle along a track at high speeds before it leaves the ground. Using electricity and magnetic fields, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would drive a spacecraft along a horizontal track until it reaches desired speeds. The system is similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long, capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds, and the vehicle would then shift to rocket engines for launch into orbit. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  10. Magnetic Launch Assist: NASA's Vision for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, William A.; Montenegro, Justino (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    With the ever-increasing cost of getting to space and the need for safe, reliable, and inexpensive ways to access space. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is taking a look at technologies that will get us there. One of these technologies is Magnetic Launch Assist (MagLev). This is the concept of using both magnetic levitation and magnetic propulsion to provide an initial velocity by using electrical power from ground sources. The use of ground generated electricity can significantly reduce operational costs over the consumables necessary to attain the same velocity. The technologies to accomplish this are both old and new. The concept of MagLev has been around for a long time and several MagLev Trains have been developed. Where NASA's MagLev diverges from the traditional train is in the immense amount of power required to propel this vehicle to 183 meters per second in less than 10 seconds. New technologies or the upgrade of existing technologies will need to be investigated in the areas of energy storage and power switching. An added difficulty is the separation of a very large mass (the space vehicle) from the track and the aerodynamics of that vehicle while on the track. These are of great concern and require considerable study and testing. NASA's plan is to mature these technologies in the next 25 years to achieve our goal of launching a full sized space vehicle for under $300 a kilogram.

  11. Developments in Understanding Stability as Applied to Magnetic Levitated Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gering, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic levitation is a promising technology, with the potential of constituting the first stage of a third generation space transportation system. Today, the Space Shuttle burns on the order of one million pounds of solid rocket propellant to bring the orbiter and external tank to nearly Mach 1 (1,000 kph). Imagine the reductions in launch vehicle weight, complexity and risk if an aerospace vehicle could be accelerated to the same speed utilizing about $1,000 of off-board electrical energy stored in flywheels. After over two decades of development, maglev trains travel on full-scale demonstration tracks in Germany and Japan reaching speeds approaching 500 kph. Encouraging as this may appear, the energy and power required to accelerate a 1 million pound launch vehicle to 1,000 kph would radically redefine the state-of-the-art in electrical energy storage and delivery. Reaching such a goal will require levitation with sufficient stability to withstand an operating environment fundamentally different from that of a high-speed train. Recently NASA let contracts for the construction of three maglev demonstration tracks. This construction and several associated trade studies represent a first-order investigation into the feasibility of maglev launch assist. This report provides a review of these efforts, other government sponsored maglev projects and additional technical literature pertinent to maglev stability. This review brings to light details and dimensions of the maglev stability problem which are not found in previous NASA-sponsored trade studies and which must be addressed in order to realize magnetic levitation as a launch assist technology.

  12. 66. DETAIL OF LAUNCH CONDUCTOR AND ASSISTANT LAUNCH CONDUCTOR PANELS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. DETAIL OF LAUNCH CONDUCTOR AND ASSISTANT LAUNCH CONDUCTOR PANELS IN CONSOLE LOCATED CENTRALLY IN SLC-3E CONTROL ROOM. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT IN BACKGROUND: LAUNCH OPERATOR, LAUNCH ANALYST, AND FACILITIES PANELS. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. 65. DETAIL OF ASSISTANT LAUNCH CONTROLLER AND LAUNCH CONTROLLER PANELS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. DETAIL OF ASSISTANT LAUNCH CONTROLLER AND LAUNCH CONTROLLER PANELS LOCATED NEAR CENTER OF SLC-3E CONTROL ROOM. NOTE 30-CHANNEL COMMUNICATIONS PANELS. PAYLOAD ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL AND MONITORING PANELS (LEFT) AND LAUNCH OPERATORS PANEL (RIGHT) IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. The Feasibility of Railgun Horizontal-Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Cox, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Railguns typically operate for a few milliseconds, supplying thousands of G's of acceleration to a small projectile, resulting in exceptional speeds. This paper argues through analysis and experiment, that this "standard" technology can be modified to provide 2-3 G's acceleration to a relatively heavy launch vehicle for a time period exceeding several seconds, yielding a launch assist velocity in excess of Mach 1. The key insight here is that an efficient rail gun operates at a speed approximately given by the system resistance divided by the inductance gradient, which can be tailored because recent MOSFET and ultra-capacitor advances allow very low total power supply resistances with high capacitance and augmented railgun architectures provide a scalable inductance gradient. Consequently, it should now be possible to construct a horizontal launch assist system utilizing railgun based architecture.

  15. Aero-Assisted Pre-Stage for Ballistic and Aero-Assisted Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A concept of an aero-assisted pre-stage is proposed, which enables launch of both ballistic and aero-assisted launch vehicles from conventional runways. The pre-stage can be implemented as a delta-wing with a suitable undercarriage, which is mated with the launch vehicle, so that their flight directions are coaligned. The ample wing area of the pre-stage combined with the thrust of the launch vehicle ensure prompt roll-out and take-off of the stack at airspeeds typical for a conventional jet airliner. The launch vehicle is separated from the pre-stage as soon as safe altitude is achieved, and the desired ascent trajectory is reached. Nominally, the pre-stage is non-powered. As an option, to save the propellant of the launch vehicle, the pre-stage may have its own short-burn propulsion system, whereas the propulsion system of the launch vehicle is activated at the separation point. A general non-dimensional analysis of performance of the pre-stage from roll-out to separation is carried out and applications to existing ballistic launch vehicle and hypothetical aero-assisted vehicles (spaceplanes) are considered.

  16. Vehicle Dynamics due to Magnetic Launch Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galaboff, Zachary J.; Jacobs, William; West, Mark E.; Montenegro, Justino (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The field of Magnetic Levitation Lind Propulsion (MagLev) has been around for over 30 years, primarily in high-speed rail service. In recent years, however, NASA has been looking closely at MagLev as a possible first stage propulsion system for spacecraft. This approach creates a variety of new problems that don't currently exist with the present MagLev trains around the world. NASA requires that a spacecraft of approximately 120,000 lbs be accelerated at two times the acceleration of gravity (2g's). This produces a greater demand on power over the normal MagLev trains that accelerate at around 0.1g. To be able to store and distribute up to 3,000 Mega Joules of energy in less than 10 seconds is a technical challenge. Another problem never addressed by the train industry and, peculiar only to NASA, is the control of a lifting body through the acceleration of and separation from the MagLev track. Very little is understood about how a lifting body will react with external forces, Such as wind gusts and ground effects, while being propelled along on soft springs such as magnetic levitators. Much study needs to be done to determine spacecraft control requirements as well as what control mechanisms and aero-surfaces should be placed on the carrier. Once the spacecraft has been propelled down the track another significant event takes place, the separation of the spacecraft from the carrier. The dynamics involved for both the carrier and the spacecraft are complex and coupled. Analysis of the reaction of the carrier after losing, a majority of its mass must be performed to insure control of the carrier is maintained and a safe separation of the spacecraft is achieved. The spacecraft angle of attack required for lift and how it will affect the carriage just prior to separation, along with the impacts of around effect and aerodynamic forces at ground level must be modeled and analyzed to define requirements on the launch vehicle design. Mechanisms, which can withstand the

  17. Single-impulse magnetic focusing of launched cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Matthew J.; Arnold, Aidan S.; Smith, David A.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2004-11-01

    We have theoretically investigated the focusing of a launched cloud of cold atoms. Time-dependent spatially-varying magnetic fields are used to impart impulses leading to a three-dimensional focus of the launched cloud. We discuss possible coil arrangements for a new focusing regime: isotropic 3D focusing of atoms with a single-impulse magnetic lens. We investigate focusing aberrations and find that, for typical experimental parameters, the widely used assumption of a purely harmonic lens is often inaccurate. The baseball lens offers the best possibility for isotropically focusing a cloud of weak-field-seeking atoms in 3D.

  18. Preliminary Design of a Ramjet for Integration with Ground-Based Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayles, Emily L.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the preliminary design of a ramjet for integration with a ground based launch assist. The reasons for the use of ground-based launch assist and the proposed mechanism for a system are reviewed. The use of a Optimal Trajectory by Implicit Simulation (OTIS), to model the flight and comparison with an actual rocket trajectory is given. The OTIS system is reviewed, The benefits of a launch assist system are analyzed concluding that a launch assist can provide supersonic speeds thus allowing ignition of ramjet without an onboard compressor. This means a further reduction in total launch weight. The Ramjet study is reviewed next. This included a review of the ONX simulations, the verification of the ONX results with the use of Holloman Sled experiment data as derived from the Feasibility of Ramjet Engine Test Capability on The Holloman AFB Sled Track. The conclusion was that the ONX system was not sufficient to meet the needs for the modeling required. The GECAT (Graphical Engine Cycle Analysis Tool) is examined. The results of the GECAT simulations was verified with data from Stataltex and D21 flights. The Next steps are: to create a GECAT Model of a launch assist ramjet, to adjust the geometry to produce the desired thrust, and to survey the ramjet's performance over a range of Mach numbers. The assumptions and requirements of a launch assist ramjet are given, and the acceptable flight regimes are reviewed.

  19. Simulation Assisted Risk Assessment Applied to Launch Vehicle Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathias, Donovan L.; Go, Susie; Gee, Ken; Lawrence, Scott

    2008-01-01

    A simulation-based risk assessment approach is presented and is applied to the analysis of abort during the ascent phase of a space exploration mission. The approach utilizes groupings of launch vehicle failures, referred to as failure bins, which are mapped to corresponding failure environments. Physical models are used to characterize the failure environments in terms of the risk due to blast overpressure, resulting debris field, and the thermal radiation due to a fireball. The resulting risk to the crew is dynamically modeled by combining the likelihood of each failure, the severity of the failure environments as a function of initiator and time of the failure, the robustness of the crew module, and the warning time available due to early detection. The approach is shown to support the launch vehicle design process by characterizing the risk drivers and identifying regions where failure detection would significantly reduce the risk to the crew.

  20. Spatially Assisted Schwinger Mechanism and Magnetic Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Copinger, Patrick; Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-19

    Using the worldline formalism we compute an effective action for fermions under a temporally modulated electric field and a spatially modulated magnetic field. It is known that the former leads to an enhanced Schwinger mechanism, while we find that the latter can also result in enhanced particle production and even cause a reorganization of the vacuum to acquire a larger dynamical mass in equilibrium which spatially assists the magnetic catalysis. PMID:27588845

  1. Microwave assisted formation of magnetic carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerra, Narendranath

    Magnetic epoxy carbon nanostructures from microwave energy assisted- and conventional-pyrolysis processes are compared. Unlike graphitized carbon shell in the conventional heating, different carbon shell morphologies including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoflakes and amorphous carbon were observed. Crystalline metallic iron and cementite were observed in the magnetic core, different from a single cementite produced in the conventional process. Carbon coated magnetic nanostructures as well as dielectric semiconductors can be produced using this process. Microwave assisted pyrolysis process is also used to form the magnetic core-shell carbon nanostructure from polyaniline (PANI)-magnetite (Fe 3O4) nanocomposites. The amorphous combined with graphitized carbon shell is observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystalline metallic iron, cementite, Fe3O4 and iron oxide (Fe2O 3) are observed in the magnetic core in the Mossbauer spectra measurements. The increased magnetic properties are observed in the formed core-shell carbon nanostructure after microwave annealing compared with PANI-Fe3O 4 nanocomposites. The formed solid carbon nanostructure can protect the material from the acid dissolution and magnetic core favors the recycling of material. This magnetic carbon nanostructure has the potential application in the removal of heavy metals from waste water.

  2. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  3. Closed end launch tube (CELT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, Dale E.; Parrish, Clyde F.

    2001-02-01

    As an alternative to magnetic propulsion for launch assist, the authors propose a pneumatic launch assist system. Using off-the-shelf components, coupled with familiar steel and concrete construction, a launch assist system can be brought from the initial feasibility stage, through a flight capable 5000 kg demonstrator to a deployed full size launch assist system in 10 years. The final system would be capable of accelerating a 450,000 kg vehicle to 270 ms-1. The CELT system uses commercially available compressors and valves to build a fail-safe system in less than half the time of a full Mag-Lev (magnetic levitation) system, and at a small fraction of the development cost. The resulting system could be ready in time to support some Gen 2 (Generation 2) vehicles, as well as the proposed Gen 3 vehicle. .

  4. Closed End Launch Tube (CELT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.; Parrish, Clyde F.; Delgado, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    As an alternative to magnetic propulsion for launch assist, the authors propose a pneumatic launch assist system. Using off the shelf components, coupled with familiar steel and concrete construction, a launch assist system can be brought from the initial feasibility stage, through a flight capable 5000 kg. demonstrator to a deployed full size launch assist system in 10 years. The final system would be capable of accelerating a 450,000 kg. vehicle to 270 meters per second. The CELT system uses commercially available compressors and valves to build a fail-safe system in less than half the time of a full Mag-Lev (magnetic levitation) system, and at a small fraction of the development cost. The resulting system could be ready in time to support some Gen 2 (generation 2) vehicles, as well as the proposed Gen 3 vehicle.

  5. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM MAGNETICALLY DIFFUSIVE ACCRETION DISKS. I. EJECTION EFFICIENCY VERSUS FIELD STRENGTH AND DIFFUSIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikhnezami, Somayeh; Fendt, Christian; Porth, Oliver; Vaidya, Bhargav; Ghanbari, Jamshid E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the launching of jets and outflows from magnetically diffusive accretion disks. Using the PLUTO code, we solve the time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations taking into account the disk and jet evolution simultaneously. The main question we address is which kind of disks launch jets and which kind of disks do not? In particular, we study how the magnitude and distribution of the (turbulent) magnetic diffusivity affect mass loading and jet acceleration. We apply a turbulent magnetic diffusivity based on {alpha}-prescription, but also investigate examples where the scale height of diffusivity is larger than that of the disk gas pressure. We further investigate how the ejection efficiency is governed by the magnetic field strength. Our simulations last for up to 5000 dynamical timescales corresponding to 900 orbital periods of the inner disk. As a general result, we observe a continuous and robust outflow launched from the inner part of the disk, expanding into a collimated jet of superfast-magnetosonic speed. For long timescales, the disk's internal dynamics change, as due to outflow ejection and disk accretion the disk mass decreases. For magnetocentrifugally driven jets, we find that for (1) less diffusive disks, (2) a stronger magnetic field, (3) a low poloidal diffusivity, or (4) a lower numerical diffusivity (resolution), the mass loading of the outflow is increased-resulting in more powerful jets with high-mass flux. For weak magnetization, the (weak) outflow is driven by the magnetic pressure gradient. We consider in detail the advection and diffusion of magnetic flux within the disk and we find that the disk and outflow magnetization may substantially change in time. This may have severe impact on the launching and formation process-an initially highly magnetized disk may evolve into a disk of weak magnetization which cannot drive strong outflows. We further investigate the jet asymptotic velocity and the jet rotational velocity in

  6. Physical principles of microwave assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkin, Kirill; Benakli, Mourad; Yin, Huaqing; Tabat, Ned

    2014-06-07

    While the basic physics of Microwave Assisted Magnetization Reversal (MAMR) phenomenon is well established both theoretically and experimentally, its application in a practical magnetic recording environment was so far studied primarily with the help of micromagnetic recording models. In this work, we instead attempt to use analytical formulation and simple numerical models to understand the main challenges as well as benefits that are associated with such a system. It appears that the main difference between the previously introduced theory [G. Bertotti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 724 (2001); K. Rivkin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 153104 (2008); S. Okamoto et al., J. Appl. Phys. 107, 123914 (2010).] and recording environment is that both the RF and DC magnetic fields are applied at a substantial angle to the anisotropy axis. While the associated symmetry breaking prevents one from describing the reversal process explicitly, it is possible to approximate the solutions well enough to satisfactorily match numerical models both in the case of wire and Spin Torque Oscillator generated RF fields. This approach allows for physical explanation of various effects associated with MAMR such as high gradient of writeable anisotropy and reduction of track width, and offers a clear guidance regarding future optimization of MAMR recording.

  7. Feasibility study on linear-motor-assisted take-off (LMATO) of winged launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomo, Makoto; Kyotani, Yoshihiro

    1987-11-01

    Application of technology of magnetically levitated transportation to horizontal take-off of an experimental space vehicle has been studied. An experimental system of linear-motor-assisted take-off (LMATO) consists of the HIMES space vehicle and a magnetically levitated and propelled sled which is a modified MLU model developed by the JNR. The original MLU model is a train of three cars which weighs 30 tons and is driven by a thrust of 15 tons. The maximum speed is 400 km/h. The highest speed of 517 km/h has been obtained by the first JNR linear motor car. Since the take-off speed of the HIMES vehicle with the initial mass of 14 tons is 470 km/h, the existing technology can be used for the LMATO of the vehicle. The concept of the HIMES/LMATO is to use the MLU vehicles to accelerate the HIMES vehicle at 0.33 g on a 5 km guide track until the speed reaches 300 km/h, when the rocket engines of the space vehicle are started to increase the acceleration up to 1 g. The total system will take the final checkout for take-off during the acceleration phase and the speed exceeds 470 km/h which is large enough to aerodynamically lift the space vehicle, then the fastening mechanism is unlocked to separate the vehicles. The experimental system can be applied for initial acceleration of a vehicle with air-breathing propulsion.

  8. Field assisted spin switching in magnetic random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W. C.; Park, J. H.; Oh, J. H.; Koh, G. H.; Jeong, G. T.; Jeong, H. S.; Kim, Kinam

    2006-04-01

    A switching method called by field assisted spin switching has been investigated. A field assisted spin switching consists of a metal line induced magnetic field and a spin switching through a magnetic tunnel junction. It is a variation of a current induced switching and assisted by the magnetic field induced by the current-carrying metal line. Various current paths have been tested to investigate how and how much the spin switching contributes to the overall switching and the results will be explained. A computer simulation has been complemented to measure the degree of the thermal effect in the switching.

  9. Launching Cosmic-Ray-driven Outflows from the Magnetized Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girichidis, Philipp; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie; Hanasz, Michał; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Gatto, Andrea; Peters, Thomas; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Clark, Paul C.; Baczynski, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We present a hydrodynamical simulation of the turbulent, magnetized, supernova (SN)-driven interstellar medium (ISM) in a stratified box that dynamically couples the injection and evolution of cosmic rays (CRs) and a self-consistent evolution of the chemical composition. CRs are treated as a relativistic fluid in the advection-diffusion approximation. The thermodynamic evolution of the gas is computed using a chemical network that follows the abundances of H+, H, H2, CO, C+, and free electrons and includes (self-)shielding of the gas and dust. We find that CRs perceptibly thicken the disk with the heights of 90% (70%) enclosed mass reaching ≳ 1.5 {kpc} (≳ 0.2 {kpc}). The simulations indicate that CRs alone can launch and sustain strong outflows of atomic and ionized gas with mass loading factors of order unity, even in solar neighborhood conditions and with a CR energy injection per SN of {10}50 {erg}, 10% of the fiducial thermal energy of an SN. The CR-driven outflows have moderate launching velocities close to the midplane (≲ 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1) and are denser (ρ ˜ 10-24-10-26 g cm-3), smoother, and colder than the (thermal) SN-driven winds. The simulations support the importance of CRs for setting the vertical structure of the disk as well as the driving of winds.

  10. Renormalized anisotropic exchange for representing heat assisted magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yipeng; Liu, Zengyuan; Victora, R. H.

    2015-05-07

    Anisotropic exchange has been incorporated in a description of magnetic recording media near the Curie temperature, as would be found during heat assisted magnetic recording. The new parameters were found using a cost function that minimized the difference between atomistic properties and those of renormalized spin blocks. Interestingly, the anisotropic exchange description at 1.5 nm discretization yields very similar switching and magnetization behavior to that found at 1.2 nm (and below) discretization for the previous isotropic exchange. This suggests that the increased accuracy of anisotropic exchange may also reduce the computational cost during simulation.

  11. Strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles.

  12. Magnetic gold nanotriangles by microwave-assisted polyol synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Siming; Hachtel, Jordan A.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Laromaine, Anna; Roig, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Simple approaches to synthesize hybrid nanoparticles with magnetic and plasmonic functionalities, with high control of their shape and avoiding cytotoxic reactants, to target biomedical applications remain a huge challenge. Here, we report a facile, fast and bio-friendly microwave-assisted polyol route for the synthesis of a complex multi-material consisting of monodisperse gold nanotriangles around 280 nm in size uniformly decorated by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of 5 nm. These nanotriangles are readily dispersible in water, display a strong magnetic response (10 wt% magnetic fraction) and exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance band in the NIR region (800 nm). Moreover, these hybrid particles can be easily self-assembled at the liquid-air interfaces.Simple approaches to synthesize hybrid nanoparticles with magnetic and plasmonic functionalities, with high control of their shape and avoiding cytotoxic reactants, to target biomedical applications remain a huge challenge. Here, we report a facile, fast and bio-friendly microwave-assisted polyol route for the synthesis of a complex multi-material consisting of monodisperse gold nanotriangles around 280 nm in size uniformly decorated by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of 5 nm. These nanotriangles are readily dispersible in water, display a strong magnetic response (10 wt% magnetic fraction) and exhibit a localized surface plasmon resonance band in the NIR region (800 nm). Moreover, these hybrid particles can be easily self-assembled at the liquid-air interfaces. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03113c

  13. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Assembly of Anisotropic Superstructures by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Enhanced Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chengpeng; Leung, Chi Wah; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle superstructures with controlled magnetic alignment and desired structural anisotropy hold promise for applications in data storage and energy storage. Assembly of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles under a magnetic field could lead to highly ordered superstructures, providing distinctive magnetic properties. In this work, a low-cost fabrication technique was demonstrated to assemble sub-20-nm iron oxide nanoparticles into crystalline superstructures under an in-plane magnetic field. The gradient of the applied magnetic field contributes to the anisotropic formation of micron-sized superstructures. The magnitude of the applied magnetic field promotes the alignment of magnetic moments of the nanoparticles. The strong dipole-dipole interactions between the neighboring nanoparticles lead to a close-packed pattern as an energetically favorable configuration. Rod-shaped and spindle-shaped superstructures with uniform size and controlled spacing were obtained using spherical and polyhedral nanoparticles, respectively. The arrangement and alignment of the superstructures can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions. The two types of superstructures both show enhancement of coercivity and saturation magnetization along the applied field direction, which is presumably associated with the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic dipole interactions of the constituent nanoparticles and the increased shape anisotropy of the superstructures. Our results show that the magnetic-field-assisted assembly technique could be used for fabricating nanomaterial-based structures with controlled geometric dimensions and enhanced magnetic properties for magnetic and energy storage applications.

  14. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Assembly of Anisotropic Superstructures by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Enhanced Magnetism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengpeng; Leung, Chi Wah; Pong, Philip W T

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle superstructures with controlled magnetic alignment and desired structural anisotropy hold promise for applications in data storage and energy storage. Assembly of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles under a magnetic field could lead to highly ordered superstructures, providing distinctive magnetic properties. In this work, a low-cost fabrication technique was demonstrated to assemble sub-20-nm iron oxide nanoparticles into crystalline superstructures under an in-plane magnetic field. The gradient of the applied magnetic field contributes to the anisotropic formation of micron-sized superstructures. The magnitude of the applied magnetic field promotes the alignment of magnetic moments of the nanoparticles. The strong dipole-dipole interactions between the neighboring nanoparticles lead to a close-packed pattern as an energetically favorable configuration. Rod-shaped and spindle-shaped superstructures with uniform size and controlled spacing were obtained using spherical and polyhedral nanoparticles, respectively. The arrangement and alignment of the superstructures can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions. The two types of superstructures both show enhancement of coercivity and saturation magnetization along the applied field direction, which is presumably associated with the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic dipole interactions of the constituent nanoparticles and the increased shape anisotropy of the superstructures. Our results show that the magnetic-field-assisted assembly technique could be used for fabricating nanomaterial-based structures with controlled geometric dimensions and enhanced magnetic properties for magnetic and energy storage applications. PMID:27067737

  15. Analytical expression for critical frequency of microwave assisted magnetization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Hiroko; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The microwave-assisted switching (MAS) of magnetization in a perpendicularly magnetized circular disk is studied based on the macrospin model in a rotating frame. The analytical expression for the critical frequency of MAS is derived by analyzing the presence of a quasiperiodic mode. The critical frequency is expressed as a function of the radio frequency (rf) field Hrf and the effective anisotropy field H\\text{k}\\text{eff}. For a small rf field such that H\\text{rf} \\ll H\\text{k}\\text{eff}, the critical frequency is approximately equal to (γ /π )\\root 3 \\of{\\smash{H\\text{k}\\text{eff}H\\text{rf}2}\\mathstrut}.

  16. Laser-assisted H- charge exchange injection in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlov, T.; Danilov, V.; Shishlo, A.

    2010-05-01

    The use of stripping foils for charge exchange injection can cause a number of operational problems in high intensity hadron accelerators. A recently proposed three-step method of laser-assisted injection is capable of overcoming these problems. This paper presents advances in the physical model of laser-assisted charge exchange injection of H- beams and covers a wide field of atomic physics. The model allows the calculation of the evolution of an H0 beam taking into account spontaneous emission, field ionization, and external electromagnetic fields. Some new data on the hydrogen atom related to the problem are calculated. The numerical calculations in the model use realistic descriptions of laser field and injection beam. Generally, the model can be used for design and optimization of a laser-assisted injection cell within an accelerator lattice. Example calculations of laser-assisted injection for an intermediate experiment at SNS in Oak Ridge and for the PS2 accelerator at CERN are presented. Two different schemes, distinctively characterized by various magnetic fields at the excitation point, are discussed. It was shown that the emittance growth of an injected beam can be drastically decreased by moving the excitation point into a strong magnetic field.

  17. Prototype ventricular assist device supported on magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Maslen, E.H.; Kim, H.C.; Olsen, D.B.; Bearnson, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Mechanical artificial hearts are now expected to be used as assist or total replacements for failing human hearts, if a reliable, anatomically appropriate design is developed. Initially, ventricular assist or total replacement devices were pulsatile air driven units containing a flexing polymeric diaphragm and two valves for each ventricle. Many reliability problems were encountered. Recently, attention has been focused on axial or centrifugal continuous flow blood pumps. Magnetic bearings employed in such devices offer the advantages of no required lubrication and large operating clearances. This paper describes a prototype continuous flow pump supported in magnetic bearings. The pump performance was measured in a simulated adult human circulation system. It delivered 6 liters/min of flow at 100 mm Hg differential head operating at 2,400 rpm in water. The pump is totally magnetically supported in four magnetic bearings - two radial and two thrust. The geometry and other properties of the bearings are described. Bearing parameters such as load capacity, current gains, and open loop stiffness are discussed. Bearing coil currents were measured during operation in air and water. The rotor was operated in various orientations to determine the actuator current gains. These values were then used to estimate the radial and thrust forces acting on the rotor in both air and water.

  18. Multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing of composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinis, Dimitri; Schaffner, Manuel; Studart, André R.

    2015-01-01

    3D printing has become commonplace for the manufacturing of objects with unusual geometries. Recent developments that enabled printing of multiple materials indicate that the technology can potentially offer a much wider design space beyond unusual shaping. Here we show that a new dimension in this design space can be exploited through the control of the orientation of anisotropic particles used as building blocks during a direct ink-writing process. Particle orientation control is demonstrated by applying low magnetic fields on deposited inks pre-loaded with magnetized stiff platelets. Multimaterial dispensers and a two-component mixing unit provide additional control over the local composition of the printed material. The five-dimensional design space covered by the proposed multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing platform (MM-3D printing) opens the way towards the manufacturing of functional heterogeneous materials with exquisite microstructural features thus far only accessible by biological materials grown in nature. PMID:26494528

  19. Multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing of composite materials.

    PubMed

    Kokkinis, Dimitri; Schaffner, Manuel; Studart, André R

    2015-01-01

    3D printing has become commonplace for the manufacturing of objects with unusual geometries. Recent developments that enabled printing of multiple materials indicate that the technology can potentially offer a much wider design space beyond unusual shaping. Here we show that a new dimension in this design space can be exploited through the control of the orientation of anisotropic particles used as building blocks during a direct ink-writing process. Particle orientation control is demonstrated by applying low magnetic fields on deposited inks pre-loaded with magnetized stiff platelets. Multimaterial dispensers and a two-component mixing unit provide additional control over the local composition of the printed material. The five-dimensional design space covered by the proposed multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing platform (MM-3D printing) opens the way towards the manufacturing of functional heterogeneous materials with exquisite microstructural features thus far only accessible by biological materials grown in nature. PMID:26494528

  20. Multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinis, Dimitri; Schaffner, Manuel; Studart, André R.

    2015-10-01

    3D printing has become commonplace for the manufacturing of objects with unusual geometries. Recent developments that enabled printing of multiple materials indicate that the technology can potentially offer a much wider design space beyond unusual shaping. Here we show that a new dimension in this design space can be exploited through the control of the orientation of anisotropic particles used as building blocks during a direct ink-writing process. Particle orientation control is demonstrated by applying low magnetic fields on deposited inks pre-loaded with magnetized stiff platelets. Multimaterial dispensers and a two-component mixing unit provide additional control over the local composition of the printed material. The five-dimensional design space covered by the proposed multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing platform (MM-3D printing) opens the way towards the manufacturing of functional heterogeneous materials with exquisite microstructural features thus far only accessible by biological materials grown in nature.

  1. Ablation modeling of electro-magnetically launched projectile for access to space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosse, Ryan C.

    It has been proposed to study and identify the technical issues involved in the launch to space of micro-satellite payloads using an airborne electromagnetic launcher (AEML). A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code was developed to help characterize the aerothermal issues involved with the flight of the projectile as it exits the Earth's atmosphere. Conceptual geometries were chosen to evaluate the feasibility of launching to orbit from an aircraft. Due to expected high heating fluxes, carboncarbon material was selected for the thermal protection system (TPS). Results of the conceptual study are presented and used to evaluate the practicality of the AEML concept.

  2. [Experience of medical assistance in the hosital of Plesetsk Cosmodrome under conditions of large patient load after explosion of a launch vehicle].

    PubMed

    Plekhanov, V N; Mel'nikov, O N; Shut', A D

    2013-11-01

    Military hospital of Plesetsk Cosmodrome was founded on 20 December 1958. The aims of the hospital were always connected with medical support of the cosmodrome, including emergency situations. On 18 March 1980 a Vostok-2M rocket exploded on its launch pad during a fuelling operation. Experience of medical assistance under conditions of large patient load showed the necessity of constant readiness to medical assistance to patients with combined pathology (burn injury, orthopedic trauma and thermochemical injury of the upper respiratory tract), expediency of compact patient accommodation along with the modern anaesthetic machine and readiness to frequent suction bronchoscopy. PMID:24611312

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle and magnetic field assisted siRNA delivery in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mykhaylyk, Olga; Sanchez-Antequera, Yolanda; Vlaskou, Dialechti; Cerda, Maria Belen; Bokharaei, Mehrdad; Hammerschmid, Edelburga; Anton, Martina; Plank, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how to design and conduct experiments to deliver siRNA to adherent cell cultures in vitro by magnetic force-assisted transfection using self-assembled complexes of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and cationic lipids or polymers that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). These magnetic complexes are targeted to the cell surface by the application of a gradient magnetic field. A further development of the magnetic drug-targeting concept is combining it with an ultrasound-triggered delivery using magnetic microbubbles as a carrier for gene or drug delivery. For this purpose, selected MNPs, phospholipids, and siRNAs are assembled in the presence of perfluorocarbon gas into flexible formulations of magnetic lipospheres (microbubbles). Methods are described how to accomplish the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetofection and how to test the association of siRNA with the magnetic components of the transfection vector. A simple method is described to evaluate magnetic responsiveness of the magnetic siRNA transfection complexes and estimate the complex loading with magnetic nanoparticles. Procedures are provided for the preparation of magnetic lipoplexes and polyplexes of siRNA as well as magnetic microbubbles for magnetofection and downregulation of the target gene expression analysis with account for the toxicity determined using an MTT-based respiration activity test. A modification of the magnetic transfection triplexes with INF-7, fusogenic peptide, is described resulting in reporter gene silencing improvement in HeLa, Caco-2, and ARPE-19 cells. The methods described can also be useful for screening vector compositions and novel magnetic nanoparticle preparations for optimized siRNA transfection by magnetofection in any cell type. PMID:25319646

  4. Dynamic compact model of thermally assisted switching magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Baraji, M.; Javerliac, V.; Guo, W.; Prenat, G.; Dieny, B.

    2009-12-01

    The general purpose of spin electronics is to take advantage of the electron's spin in addition to its electrical charge to build innovative electronic devices. These devices combine magnetic materials which are used as spin polarizer or analyzer together with semiconductors or insulators, resulting in innovative hybrid CMOS/magnetic (Complementary MOS) architectures. In particular, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) can be used for the design of magnetic random access memories [S. Tehrani, Proc. IEEE 91, 703 (2003)], magnetic field programmable gate arrays [Y. Guillement, International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing, 2008], low-power application specific integrated circuits [S. Matsunaga, Appl. Phys. Express 1, 091301 (2008)], and rf oscillators. The thermally assisted switching (TAS) technology requires heating the MTJ before writing it by means of an external field. It reduces the overall power consumption, solves the data writing selectivity issues, and improves the thermal stability of the written information for high density applications. The design of hybrid architectures requires a MTJ compact model, which can be used in standard electrical simulators of the industry. As a result, complete simulations of CMOS/MTJ hybrid circuits can be performed before experimental realization and testing. This article presents a highly accurate model of the MTJ based on the TAS technology. It is compatible with the Spectre electrical simulator of Cadence design suite.

  5. Impurity-Assisted Tunneling Magnetoresistance under a Weak Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Txoperena, Oihana; Song, Yang; Qing, Lan; Gobbi, Marco; Hueso, Luis E.; Dery, Hanan; Casanova, Fèlix

    2014-10-01

    Injection of spins into semiconductors is essential for the integration of the spin functionality into conventional electronics. Insulating layers are often inserted between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors for obtaining an efficient spin injection, and it is therefore crucial to distinguish between signatures of electrical spin injection and impurity-driven effects in the tunnel barrier. Here we demonstrate an impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance effect in nonmagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic tunnel barriers. In both cases, the effect reflects on-off switching of the tunneling current through impurity channels by the external magnetic field. The reported effect is universal for any impurity-assisted tunneling process and provides an alternative interpretation to a widely used technique that employs the same ferromagnetic electrode to inject and detect spin accumulation.

  6. Impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance under a weak magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Txoperena, Oihana; Song, Yang; Qing, Lan; Gobbi, Marco; Hueso, Luis E; Dery, Hanan; Casanova, Fèlix

    2014-10-01

    Injection of spins into semiconductors is essential for the integration of the spin functionality into conventional electronics. Insulating layers are often inserted between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductors for obtaining an efficient spin injection, and it is therefore crucial to distinguish between signatures of electrical spin injection and impurity-driven effects in the tunnel barrier. Here we demonstrate an impurity-assisted tunneling magnetoresistance effect in nonmagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic-insulator-nonmagnetic tunnel barriers. In both cases, the effect reflects on-off switching of the tunneling current through impurity channels by the external magnetic field. The reported effect is universal for any impurity-assisted tunneling process and provides an alternative interpretation to a widely used technique that employs the same ferromagnetic electrode to inject and detect spin accumulation. PMID:25325651

  7. Current induced perpendicular-magnetic-anisotropy racetrack memory with magnetic field assistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Klein, J.-O.; Chappert, C.; Ravelosona, D.; Zhao, W. S.

    2014-01-20

    High current density is indispensable to shift domain walls (DWs) in magnetic nanowires, which limits the using of racetrack memory (RM) for low power and high density purposes. In this paper, we present perpendicular-magnetic-anisotropy (PMA) Co/Ni RM with global magnetic field assistance, which lowers the current density for DW motion. By using a compact model of PMA RM and 40 nm design kit, we perform mixed simulation to validate the functionality of this structure and analyze its density potential. Stochastic DW motion behavior has been taken into account and statistical Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out to evaluate its reliability performance.

  8. Magnetic Assisted Navigation in Electrophysiology and Cardiac Resynchronisation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, AS; Maximo Rivero-Ayerza, M; Jordaens, LJ

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic assisted navigation is a new innovation that may prove useful in catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac resynchronization therapy. The ability to steer extremely floppy catheters and guidewires may allow for these to be positioned safely in previously inaccessible areas of the heart. The integration of other new technology, such as image integration and electroanatomic mapping systems, should advance our abilities further. Although studies have shown the technology to be feasible, with the advantage to the physician of decreased radiation exposure, studies need to be performed to show additional benefit over standard techniques. PMID:17031421

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of implant assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles, Misael O.

    One way to achieve drug targeting in the body is to incorporate magnetic nanoparticles into drug carriers and then retain them at the site using an externally applied magnetic field. This process is referred to as magnetic drug targeting (MDT). However, the main limitation of MDT is that an externally applied magnetic field alone may not be able to retain a sufficient number of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) to justify its use. Such a limitation might not exist when high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) principles are applied to assist MDT by means of ferromagnetic implants. It was hypothesized that an Implant Assisted -- MDT (IA-MDT) system would increase the retention of the MDCPs at a target site where an implant had been previously located, since the magnetic forces are produced internally. With this in mind, the overall objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of an IA-MDT system through mathematical modeling and in vitro experimentation. The mathematical models were developed and used to demonstrate the behavior and limitations of IA-MDT, and the in vitro experiments were designed and used to validate the models and to further elucidate the important parameters that affect the performance of the system. IA-MDT was studied with three plausible implants, ferromagnetic stents, seed particles, and wires. All implants were studied theoretically and experimentally using flow through systems with polymer particles containing magnetite nanoparticles as MDCPs. In the stent studies, a wire coil or mesh was simply placed in a flow field and the capture of the MDCPs was studied. In the other cases, a porous polymer matrix was used as a surrogate capillary tissue scaffold to study the capture of the MDCPs using wires or particle seeds as the implant, with the seeds either fixed within the polymer matrix or captured prior to capturing the MDCPs. An in vitro heart tissue perfusion model was also used to study the use of stents. In general, all

  10. Radiolysis and hydrolysis of magnetically assisted chemical separation particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B.A.; Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-05-01

    The magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process is designed to separate transuranic (TRU) elements out of high-level waste (HLW) or TRU waste. Magnetic microparticles (1--25 {mu}m) were coated with octyl (phenyl)N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP) and tested for removing TRU elements from acidic nitrate solutions. The particles were contacted with nitric acid solutions and Hanford plutonium finishing plant (PFP) simulant, irradiated with a high intensity {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source, and evaluated for effectiveness in removing TRU elements from 2m HNO{sub 3} solutions. The resistance of the coatings and magnetic cores to radiolytic damage and hydrolytic degradation was investigated by irradiating samples of particles suspended in a variety of solutions with doses of up to 5 Mrad. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), magnetic susceptibility measurements, and physical observations of the particles and suspension solutions were used to assess physical changes to the particles. Processes that affect the surface of the particles dramatically alter the binding sites for TRU in solution. Hydrolysis played a larger role than radiolysis in the degradation of the extraction capacity of the particles.

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Ultimate limits to thermally assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, Terry W.

    2005-02-01

    The application of thermal energy to enable recording on extremely high anisotropy magnetic media appears to be a viable means of extending the density of stored information. The central physical issue facing the technology is what gain can be realized in writability along with long-term data stability using imaginable media materials. We reasonably expect the material properties M(T) and Hk(T) to determine this, since a stability metric for media with characteristic magnetization switching unit volume V is MV Hk/2kBT. This matter is controversial owing to still open questions related to thermomagnetic recording with temperature elevation above the Curie point and optimal cooling rates. There are indications that multi-component magnetic media may offer advantages in achieving performance goals. Beyond the physical issues lie engineering matters related to the correct system architecture to yield a practical storage device to meet future customer expectations. Here one must address a detailed means of delivering localized heating to the magnetic medium to perform efficient recording. To date, magnetic recording devices have been highly mechanical systems, so it is natural to inquire how a need for an aggressively heated head-medium interface could impact the evolution of future systems. Eventually elements of thermally assisted recording could be combined with patterned media approaches such as self-organized magnetic arrays to push toward ultimate limits where the thermal instability of bits overtakes engineered media materials. Finally, a practical recording system cannot be realized unless a means of finding, following, and reading the smallest bits with a usable signal-to-noise ratio exists—engineering issues separate from an ability to reliably record those bits. This paper is based on an invited presentation of the same title given at the meeting of the American Physical Society, 22-26 March 2004, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

  12. MATra - Magnet Assisted Transfection: combining nanotechnology and magnetic forces to improve intracellular delivery of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Bertram, J

    2006-08-01

    Recent efforts combining nanotechnology and magnetic properties resulted in the development and commercialization of magnetic nanoparticles that can be used as carriers for nucleic acids for in vitro transfection and for gene therapy approaches including DNA-based vaccination strategies. The efficiency of intracellular delivery is still a limiting factor for basic cell biological research and also for emerging technologies such as temporary gene silencing based on inhibitory RNA/siRNA. Nanotechnology has resulted in a variety of different nanostructures and especially nanoparticles as carriers in a wide range of new drug delivery systems for conventional drugs, recombinant proteins, vaccines and more recently nucleic acids. It is possible to combine superparamagnetic nanoparticles with magnetic forces to increase, direct and optimize intracellular delivery of biomolecules. This article discusses the main approaches in the field of magnet assisted transfection (MATra) focusing on the transfection or intracellular delivery of nucleic acids, although also suitable to improve the intracellular delivery of other biomolecules. PMID:16918404

  13. Launch Services Safety Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    NASA/KSC Launch Services Division Safety (SA-D) services include: (1) Assessing the safety of the launch vehicle (2) Assessing the safety of NASA ELV spacecraft (S/C) / launch vehicle (LV) interfaces (3) Assessing the safety of spacecraft processing to ensure resource protection of: - KSC facilities - KSC VAFB facilities - KSC controlled property - Other NASA assets (4) NASA personnel safety (5) Interfacing with payload organizations to review spacecraft for adequate safety implementation and compliance for integrated activities (6) Assisting in the integration of safety activities between the payload, launch vehicle, and processing facilities

  14. Polymer-assisted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle immobilized keratinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konwarh, Rocktotpal; Karak, Niranjan; Rai, Sudhir Kumar; Mukherjee, Ashis Kumar

    2009-06-01

    Nanotechnology holds the prospect for avant-garde changes to improve the performance of materials in various sectors. The domain of enzyme biotechnology is no exception. Immobilization of industrially important enzymes onto nanomaterials, with improved performance, would pave the way to myriad application-based commercialization. Keratinase produced by Bacillus subtilis was immobilized onto poly(ethylene glycol)-supported Fe3O4 superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The optimization process showed that the highest enzyme activity was noted when immobilized onto cyanamide-activated PEG-assisted MNP prepared under conditions of 25 °C and pH 7.2 of the reaction mixture before addition of H2O2 (3% w/w), 2% (w/v) PEG6000 and 0.062:1 molar ratio of PEG to FeCl2·4H2O. Further statistical optimization using response surface methodology yielded an R2 value that could explain more than 94% of the sample variations. Along with the magnetization studies, the immobilization of the enzyme onto the PEG-assisted MNP was characterized by UV, XRD, FTIR and TEM. The immobilization process had resulted in an almost fourfold increase in the enzyme activity over the free enzyme. Furthermore, the immobilized enzyme exhibited a significant thermostability, storage stability and recyclability. The leather-industry-oriented application of the immobilized enzyme was tested for the dehairing of goat-skin.

  15. Magnetically launched flyer plate technique for probing electrical conductivity of compressed copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, K. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Riford, Z.; Carpenter, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The electrical conductivity of materials under extremes of temperature and pressure is of crucial importance for a wide variety of phenomena, including planetary modeling, inertial confinement fusion, and pulsed power based dynamic materials experiments. There is a dearth of experimental techniques and data for highly compressed materials, even at known states such as along the principal isentrope and Hugoniot, where many pulsed power experiments occur. We present a method for developing, calibrating, and validating material conductivity models as used in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The difficulty in calibrating a conductivity model is in knowing where the model should be modified. Our method isolates those regions that will have an impact. It also quantitatively prioritizes which regions will have the most beneficial impact. Finally, it tracks the quantitative improvements to the conductivity model during each incremental adjustment. In this paper, we use an experiment on Sandia National Laboratories Z-machine to isentropically launch multiple flyer plates and, with the MHD code ALEGRA and the optimization code DAKOTA, calibrated the conductivity such that we matched an experimental figure of merit to +/-1%.

  16. Microwave assisted magnetization switching in Co/Pt multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, S.; Kikuchi, N.; Kitakami, O.; Shimatsu, T.; Aoi, H.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we have experimentally investigated the microwave assisted magnetization by switching (MAS) on the microstructured Co/Pt multilayer. The sample exhibits the typical magnetization curve peculiar to perpendicular anisotropy films, that is, a steep reversal initiated by nucleation of a reversed domain followed by its subsequent gradual expansion by the domain wall displacement. By applying microwaves with the frequency of GHz order, the nucleation field H{sub n} is significantly reduced at three frequencies. Taking into account the effective anisotropy field of our sample, the first dip of H{sub n} at the lowest frequency probably corresponds to the Kittel mode excitation, and the other two dips at higher frequencies correspond to unidentified excitation modes other than the Kittel mode. Among them, the last dip of H{sub n} at the highest frequency reaches about 1/3 of that without microwave application. These results suggest the existence of more effective excitation modes for MAS than the Kittel mode.

  17. Composite media for high density heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zengyuan; Jiao, Yipeng; Victora, R. H.

    2016-06-01

    A heat assisted magnetic recording composite media with a superparamagnetic writing layer is proposed. The recording process is initiated in the write layer that is magnetically softer than the long term storage layer. Upon cooling, the composite structure copies the information from the writing layer to the lower Curie temperature (Tc) storage layer, e.g., doped FePt. The advantages include insensitivity to Tc variance in the storage layer, and thus the opportunity to significantly lower the FePt Tc without the resulting Tc distribution adversely affecting the performance. The composite structure has a small jitter within 0.1 nm of the grain size limit owing to the sharp transition width of the optimized superparamagnetic writing layer. The user density of the composite structure can reach 4.7 Tb/in.2 for a Gaussian heat spot with a full-width-at-half-maximum of 30 nm, a 12 nm reader width, and an optimized bit length of 6 nm.

  18. In vitro study of magnetic particle seeding for implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, Misael O.; Ebner, Armin D.; Ritter, James A.

    The concept of using magnetic particles (seeds) as the implant for implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) was analyzed in vitro. Since this MDT system is being explored for use in capillaries, a highly porous ( ɛ˜70%), highly tortuous, cylindrical, polyethylene polymer was prepared to mimic capillary tissue, and the seeds (magnetite nanoparticles) were already fixed within. The well-dispersed seeds were used to enhance the capture of 0.87 μm diameter magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) (polydivinylbenzene embedded with 24.8 wt% magnetite) under flow conditions typically found in capillary networks. The effects of the fluid velocity (0.015-0.15 cm/s), magnetic field strength (0.0-250 mT), porous polymer magnetite content (0-7 wt%) and MDCP concentration ( C=5 and 50 mg/L) on the capture efficiency (CE) of the MDCPs were studied. In all cases, when the magnetic field was applied, compared to when it was not, large increases in CE resulted; the CE increased even further when the magnetite seeds were present. The CE increased with increases in the magnetic field strength, porous polymer magnetite content and MDCP concentration. It decreased only with increases in the fluid velocity. Large magnetic field strengths were not necessary to induce MDCP capture by the seeds. A few hundred mT was sufficient. Overall, this first in vitro study of the magnetic seeding concept for IA-MDT was very encouraging, because it proved that magnetic particle seeds could serve as an effective implant for MDT systems, especially under conditions found in capillaries.

  19. 34 CFR 280.1 - What is the Magnet Schools Assistance Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the Magnet Schools Assistance Program? 280.1 Section 280.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM General § 280.1 What is...

  20. 34 CFR 280.1 - What is the Magnet Schools Assistance Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Magnet Schools Assistance Program? 280.1 Section 280.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM General § 280.1 What is...

  1. 34 CFR 280.1 - What is the Magnet Schools Assistance Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Magnet Schools Assistance Program? 280.1 Section 280.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MAGNET SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM General § 280.1 What is...

  2. Spin-orbit torque-assisted switching in magnetic insulator thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Liu, Tao; Chang, Houchen; Kalitsov, Alan; Zhang, Wei; Csaba, Gyorgy; Li, Wei; Richardson, Daniel; DeMann, August; Rimal, Gaurab; Dey, Himadri; Jiang, J S; Porod, Wolfgang; Field, Stuart B; Tang, Jinke; Marconi, Mario C; Hoffmann, Axel; Mryasov, Oleg; Wu, Mingzhong

    2016-01-01

    As an in-plane charge current flows in a heavy metal film with spin-orbit coupling, it produces a torque on and thereby switches the magnetization in a neighbouring ferromagnetic metal film. Such spin-orbit torque (SOT)-induced switching has been studied extensively in recent years and has shown higher efficiency than switching using conventional spin-transfer torque. Here we report the SOT-assisted switching in heavy metal/magnetic insulator systems. The experiments used a Pt/BaFe12O19 bilayer where the BaFe12O19 layer exhibits perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. As a charge current is passed through the Pt film, it produces a SOT that can control the up and down states of the remnant magnetization in the BaFe12O19 film when the film is magnetized by an in-plane magnetic field. It can reduce or increase the switching field of the BaFe12O19 film by as much as about 500 Oe when the film is switched with an out-of-plane field. PMID:27581060

  3. Mixing of nanosize particles by magnetically assisted impaction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicolone, James V.

    approach based on use of small magnetic particles as mixing media is introduced that achieves a high-degree of mixing at scales of about a micron. The method is tested for binary mixture of alumina/silica and silica/titania. Various parameters such as processing time, size of the magnets, and magnetic particle to powder mixed ratio are considered. Experiments are carried out in batch containers in liquid and dry mediums, as well as a fluidized bed set-up. Homogeneity of Mixing (HoM), defined as the compliment of the Intensity of Segregation, was evaluated at the micron scale through field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Secondary electron images, along with elemental mappings, were used to visualize the change in agglomerate sizes. Compositional percent data of each element were obtained through an EDS spatial distribution point analysis and used to obtain quantitative analysis on the homogeneity of the mixture. The effect of magnet impaction on mixing quality was examined on the HoM of binary mixtures. The research shows that HoM improved with magnetically assisted impaction mixing techniques indicating that the HoM depends on the product of processing time with the number of magnets. In a fluidized bed set-up, MAIM not only improved dispersion, but it was also found that the magnetic particles served to break down the larger agglomerates, to reduce the minimum fluidization velocity, to delay the onset of bubbling, and to convert the fluidization behavior of ABF powder to APF. Thus MAIM techniques may be used to achieve mixing of nanopowders at a desired HoM through adjusting the number of magnets and processing time; and its inherent advantages are its simplicity, an environmentally benign operation, and reduced cost as compared with wet mixing techniques.

  4. Stable microwave-assisted magnetization switching for nanoscale exchange-coupled composite grain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetization mechanisms of nanoscale magnetic grains greatly differ from well-known magnetization mechanisms of micrometer- or millimeter-sized magnetic grains or particles. Magnetization switching mechanisms of nanoscale exchange-coupled composite (ECC) grain in a microwave field was studied using micromagnetic simulation. Magnetization switching involving a strongly damped or precessional oscillation was studied using various strengths of external direct current and microwave fields. These studies imply that the switching behavior of microwave-assisted magnetization switching of the ECC grain can be divided into two groups: stable and unstable regions, similar to the case of the Stoner-Wahlfarth grain. A significant reduction in the switching field was observed in the ECC grain when the magnetization switching involved precessional oscillations similar to the case of the Stoner-Wohlfarth grain. This switching behavior is preferred for the practical applications of microwave-assisted magnetization switching. PMID:24191895

  5. In vitro study of magnetic nanoparticles as the implant for implant assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangual, Jan O.; Avilés, Misael O.; Ebner, Armin D.; Ritter, James A.

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) seeds were studied in vitro for use as an implant in implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT). The magnetite seeds were captured in a porous polymer, mimicking capillary tissue, with an external magnetic field (70 mT) and then used subsequently to capture magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) (0.87 μm diameter) with the same magnetic field. The effects of the MNP seed diameter (10, 50 and 100 nm), MNP seed concentration (0.25-2.0 mg/mL), and fluid velocity (0.03-0.15 cm/s) on the capture efficiency (CE) of both the MNP seeds and the MDCPs were studied. The CE of the 10 nm MNP seeds was never more than 30%, while those of the 50 and 100 nm MNP seeds was always greater than 80% and in many cases exceeded 90%. Only the MNP seed concentration affected its CE. The 10 nm MNP seeds did not increase the MDCP CE over that obtained in the absence of the MNP seeds, while the 50 and 100 nm MNP seeds increased significantly, typically by more than a factor of two. The 50 and 100 nm MNP seeds also exhibited similar abilities to capture the MDCPs, with the MDCP CE always increasing with decreasing fluid velocity and generally increasing with increasing MNP seed concentration. The MNP seed size, magnetic properties, and capacity to self-agglomerate and form clusters were key properties that make them a viable implant in IA-MDT.

  6. Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. B.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, T. N.; Chen, L. Q.; Ma, X. Q.

    2014-09-22

    Effect of substrate misfit strain on current-induced in-plane magnetization reversal in CoFeB-MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions is investigated by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase-field microelasticity theory. It is found that the critical current density for in-plane magnetization reversal decreases dramatically with an increasing substrate strain, since the effective elastic field can drag the magnetization to one of the four in-plane diagonal directions. A potential strain-assisted multilevel bit spin transfer magnetization switching device using substrate misfit strain is also proposed.

  7. Alternative material study for heat assisted magnetic recording transducer application

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, B. X. Cen, Z. H.; Hu, J. F.; Tsai, J. W. H.

    2015-05-07

    In heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), optical near field transducer (NFT) is a key component. Au is currently used as NFT material because of its strong surface plasmon effect. Due to the soft property of Au material, reliability of Au NFT becomes a key issue for realizing HAMR production. In this paper, the possibility of alternative materials, including transition metal nitrides (TMNs) and transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) to replace Au is studied. The results show that all of the listed TMN and TCO materials can meet the mechanical requirements at room temperature in terms of hardness and thermal expansion. An optical model, which includes optical waveguide, NFT and FePt media, is used to simulate NFT performances. The results indicate that the resonant wavelengths for NFT with TCO materials are longer than 1500 nm, which is not suitable for HAMR application. TMN materials are suitable for NFT application at wavelength band of around 800 nm. But the NFT efficiency is very low. ZrN is the best material among TMN materials and the efficiency of ZrN NFT is only 13% of the Au NFT's efficiency. Reducing refractive index (n) and increasing extinction coefficient (k) will both lead to efficiency increase. Increasing k contributes more in the efficiency increase, while reducing n has a relatively low NFT absorption. For materials with the same figure of merit, the NFT with larger k material has higher efficiency. Doping materials to increase the material conduction electron density and growing film with larger size grain may be the way to increase k and reduce n.

  8. Alternative material study for heat assisted magnetic recording transducer application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B. X.; Cen, Z. H.; Hu, J. F.; Tsai, J. W. H.

    2015-05-01

    In heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), optical near field transducer (NFT) is a key component. Au is currently used as NFT material because of its strong surface plasmon effect. Due to the soft property of Au material, reliability of Au NFT becomes a key issue for realizing HAMR production. In this paper, the possibility of alternative materials, including transition metal nitrides (TMNs) and transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) to replace Au is studied. The results show that all of the listed TMN and TCO materials can meet the mechanical requirements at room temperature in terms of hardness and thermal expansion. An optical model, which includes optical waveguide, NFT and FePt media, is used to simulate NFT performances. The results indicate that the resonant wavelengths for NFT with TCO materials are longer than 1500 nm, which is not suitable for HAMR application. TMN materials are suitable for NFT application at wavelength band of around 800 nm. But the NFT efficiency is very low. ZrN is the best material among TMN materials and the efficiency of ZrN NFT is only 13% of the Au NFT's efficiency. Reducing refractive index (n) and increasing extinction coefficient (k) will both lead to efficiency increase. Increasing k contributes more in the efficiency increase, while reducing n has a relatively low NFT absorption. For materials with the same figure of merit, the NFT with larger k material has higher efficiency. Doping materials to increase the material conduction electron density and growing film with larger size grain may be the way to increase k and reduce n.

  9. Phase Dependence of Microwave-Assisted Switching of a Single Magnetic Nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquerel, R.; Gaier, O.; Bonet, E.; Thirion, C.; Wernsdorfer, W.

    2014-03-01

    Microwave-assisted switching of the magnetization is an efficient way to reduce the magnetic field required to reverse the magnetization of nanostructures. Here, the phase sensitivity of microwave-assisted switching of an individual cobalt nanoparticle is studied using a pump-probe technique. The pump microwave pulse prepares an initial state of the magnetization, and the probe pulse tests its stability against switching. Precession states are established, which are stable against switching. Their basin of attraction is measured and is in qualitative agreement with numerical macrospin calculations. The damping parameter is evaluated using the variable delay pump-probe technique.

  10. Phase dependence of microwave-assisted switching of a single magnetic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Piquerel, R; Gaier, O; Bonet, E; Thirion, C; Wernsdorfer, W

    2014-03-21

    Microwave-assisted switching of the magnetization is an efficient way to reduce the magnetic field required to reverse the magnetization of nanostructures. Here, the phase sensitivity of microwave-assisted switching of an individual cobalt nanoparticle is studied using a pump-probe technique. The pump microwave pulse prepares an initial state of the magnetization, and the probe pulse tests its stability against switching. Precession states are established, which are stable against switching. Their basin of attraction is measured and is in qualitative agreement with numerical macrospin calculations. The damping parameter is evaluated using the variable delay pump-probe technique. PMID:24702409

  11. Many particle magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions in magnetizable stent assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cregg, P. J.; Murphy, Kieran; Mardinoglu, Adil; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2010-08-01

    The implant assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system of Avilés, Ebner and Ritter is considered both experimentally ( in vitro) and theoretically. The results of a 2D mathematical model are compared with 3D experimental results for a magnetizable wire stent. In this experiment a ferromagnetic, coiled wire stent is implanted to aid collection of particles which consist of single domain magnetic nanoparticles (radius ≈10 nm). In order to model the agglomeration of particles known to occur in this system, the magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles are included. Simulations based on this mathematical model were performed using open source C++ code. Different initial positions are considered and the system performance is assessed in terms of collection efficiency. The results of this model show closer agreement with the measured in vitro experimental results and with the literature. The implications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine are based on the prediction of the particle efficiency, in conjunction with the magnetizable stent, for targeted drug delivery.

  12. Magnetic properties of Fe-Mn-Pt for heat assisted magnetic recording applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jihoon; Hong, Yang-Ki; Kim, Seong-Gon; Gao, Li; Thiele, Jan-Ulrich

    2015-02-01

    We calculate the electronic structures of FePt and Fe0.5Mn0.5Pt using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory within the local-spin-density approximation. The Curie temperature (Tc) was calculated by mean field approximation. Composition dependence of the Cure temperature (Tc(x)) of Fe1-xMnxPt was used to identify a composition to meet the desired Tc in the range of 600-650 K. The identified composition (0.0294 ≤ x ≤ 0.0713) gives saturation magnetization (Ms) in the range of 1041-919 emu/cm3 and magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K) in the range of 9.96-8.36 × 106 J/m3 at 0 K. Temperature dependent M(T) and K(T) of Fe1-xMnxPt (0.0294 ≤ x ≤ 0.0713) were calculated using the Brillouin function and Callen-Callen experimental relation, respectively. Fe1-xMnxPt (0.0294 ≤ x ≤ 0.0713) shows 930-800 emu/cm3 of Ms and 7.18-5.61 × 106 J/m3 of K at 300 K, thereby satisfying desired magnetic properties for heat-assisted magnetic recording media to achieve 4 Tb/in.2 areal density.

  13. Nanopatterning reconfigurable magnetic landscapes via thermally assisted scanning probe lithography.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, E; Petti, D; Pancaldi, M; Madami, M; Tacchi, S; Curtis, J; King, W P; Papp, A; Csaba, G; Porod, W; Vavassori, P; Riedo, E; Bertacco, R

    2016-06-01

    The search for novel tools to control magnetism at the nanoscale is crucial for the development of new paradigms in optics, electronics and spintronics. So far, the fabrication of magnetic nanostructures has been achieved mainly through irreversible structural or chemical modifications. Here, we propose a new concept for creating reconfigurable magnetic nanopatterns by crafting, at the nanoscale, the magnetic anisotropy landscape of a ferromagnetic layer exchange-coupled to an antiferromagnetic layer. By performing localized field cooling with the hot tip of a scanning probe microscope, magnetic structures, with arbitrarily oriented magnetization and tunable unidirectional anisotropy, are reversibly patterned without modifying the film chemistry and topography. This opens unforeseen possibilities for the development of novel metamaterials with finely tuned magnetic properties, such as reconfigurable magneto-plasmonic and magnonic crystals. In this context, we experimentally demonstrate spatially controlled spin wave excitation and propagation in magnetic structures patterned with the proposed method. PMID:26950242

  14. Nanopatterning reconfigurable magnetic landscapes via thermally assisted scanning probe lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albisetti, E.; Petti, D.; Pancaldi, M.; Madami, M.; Tacchi, S.; Curtis, J.; King, W. P.; Papp, A.; Csaba, G.; Porod, W.; Vavassori, P.; Riedo, E.; Bertacco, R.

    2016-06-01

    The search for novel tools to control magnetism at the nanoscale is crucial for the development of new paradigms in optics, electronics and spintronics. So far, the fabrication of magnetic nanostructures has been achieved mainly through irreversible structural or chemical modifications. Here, we propose a new concept for creating reconfigurable magnetic nanopatterns by crafting, at the nanoscale, the magnetic anisotropy landscape of a ferromagnetic layer exchange-coupled to an antiferromagnetic layer. By performing localized field cooling with the hot tip of a scanning probe microscope, magnetic structures, with arbitrarily oriented magnetization and tunable unidirectional anisotropy, are reversibly patterned without modifying the film chemistry and topography. This opens unforeseen possibilities for the development of novel metamaterials with finely tuned magnetic properties, such as reconfigurable magneto-plasmonic and magnonic crystals. In this context, we experimentally demonstrate spatially controlled spin wave excitation and propagation in magnetic structures patterned with the proposed method.

  15. Magnetic carbon nanostructures: microwave energy-assisted pyrolysis vs. conventional pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiahua; Pallavkar, Sameer; Chen, Minjiao; Yerra, Narendranath; Luo, Zhiping; Colorado, Henry A; Lin, Hongfei; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Khasanov, Airat; Ho, Thomas C; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-01-11

    Magnetic carbon nanostructures from microwave assisted- and conventional-pyrolysis processes are compared. Unlike graphitized carbon shells from conventional heating, different carbon shell morphologies including nanotubes, nanoflakes and amorphous carbon were observed. Crystalline iron and cementite were observed in the magnetic core, different from a single cementite phase from the conventional process. PMID:23172110

  16. Magnetic actuator intended for left ventricular assist system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saotome, H.; Okada, T.

    2006-04-01

    With the goal of developing an artificial heart, the authors fabricated a prototype pump employing a linear motion magnetic actuator, and carried out performance tests. The actuator is composed of two disk-shaped Nd-Fe-B magnets having a diameter of 80 mm and a thickness of 7 mm. The disks are magnetized in the direction normal to the circular surface, and are formed by semicircular pieces; one semicircle serves as a N pole and the other as a S pole. The magnets face each other in the actuator. One magnet is limited to spin around its axis while the second magnet is limited to move in linear motion along its axis. In this way, the circumferential rotation of one of the magnets produces reciprocating forces on the other magnet, causing it to move back and forth. This coupled action produces a pumping motion. Because the two magnets are magnetically coupled without any mechanical contact, the rotating magnet does not have to be implanted and should be placed outside the body. The rotating magnet is driven by a motor. The motor power is magnetically conveyed, via the rotating magnet, to the implanted linear motion magnet through the skin. The proposed system yields no problems with infection that would otherwise require careful treatment in a system employing a tube penetrating the skin for power transmission. Comparison of the proposed system with another system using a transcutaneous transformer shows that our system has good potential to occupy a smaller space in the body, because it obviates implantation of a secondary part of the transformer, a power supply, and armature windings. The dimensions of the trial pump are designed in accordance with the fluid mechanical specifications of a human left ventricle, by computing magnetic fields that provide the magnetic forces on the magnets. The output power of the trial pump, 1.0 W at 87 beats/min, is experimentally obtained under the pressure and flow conditions of water, 100 mm Hg and 4.5 l/min.

  17. Magnetic properties of Fe-Mn-Pt for heat assisted magnetic recording applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jihoon; Hong, Yang-Ki; Kim, Seong-Gon; Gao, Li; Thiele, Jan-Ulrich

    2015-02-07

    We calculate the electronic structures of FePt and Fe{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}Pt using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory within the local-spin-density approximation. The Curie temperature (T{sub c}) was calculated by mean field approximation. Composition dependence of the Cure temperature (T{sub c}(x)) of Fe{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Pt was used to identify a composition to meet the desired T{sub c} in the range of 600–650 K. The identified composition (0.0294 ≤ x ≤ 0.0713) gives saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) in the range of 1041–919 emu/cm{sup 3} and magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K) in the range of 9.96–8.36 × 10{sup 6 }J/m{sup 3} at 0 K. Temperature dependent M(T) and K(T) of Fe{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Pt (0.0294 ≤ x ≤ 0.0713) were calculated using the Brillouin function and Callen-Callen experimental relation, respectively. Fe{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Pt (0.0294 ≤ x ≤ 0.0713) shows 930–800 emu/cm{sup 3} of M{sub s} and 7.18–5.61 × 10{sup 6 }J/m{sup 3} of K at 300 K, thereby satisfying desired magnetic properties for heat-assisted magnetic recording media to achieve 4 Tb/in.{sup 2} areal density.

  18. Scout Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Scout Launch. James Hansen wrote: 'As this sequence of photos demonstrates, the launch of ST-5 on 30 June 1961 went well; however, a failure of the rocket's third stage doomed the payload, a scientific satellite known as S-55 designed for micrometeorite studies in orbit.'

  19. A study: Effect of Students Peer Assisted Learning on Magnetic Field Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueanploy, Wannapa

    2016-04-01

    This study is the case study of Physic II Course for students of Pathumwan Institute of Technology. The purpose of this study is: 1) to develop cooperative learning method of peer assisted learning (PAL), 2) to compare the learning achievement before and after studied magnetic field lesson by cooperative learning method of peer assisted learning. The population was engineering students of Pathumwan Institute of Technology (PIT’s students) who registered Physic II Course during year 2014. The sample used in this study was selected from the 72 students who passed in Physic I Course. The control groups learning magnetic fields by Traditional Method (TM) and experimental groups learning magnetic field by method of peers assisted learning. The students do pretest before the lesson and do post-test after the lesson by 20 items achievement tests of magnetic field. The post-test higher than pretest achievement significantly at 0.01 level.

  20. Jet rotation: Launching region, angular momentum balance and magnetic properties in the bipolar outflow from RW Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woitas, J.; Bacciotti, F.; Ray, T. P.; Marconi, A.; Coffey, D.; Eislöffel, J.

    2005-03-01

    Using STIS on board the HST we have obtained a spectroscopic map of the bipolar jet from RW Aur with the slit parallel to the jet axis and moved across the jet in steps of 0.07 arcsec. After applying a velocity correction due to uneven slit illumination we find signatures of rotation within the first 300 AU of the jet (1.5 arcsec at the distance of RW Aur). Both lobes rotate in the same direction (i.e. with different helicities), with toroidal velocities in the range 5-30 km s-1 at 20 and 30 AU from the symmetry axis in the blueshifted and redshifted lobes, respectively. The sense of rotation is anti-clockwise looking from the tip of the blue lobe (PA 130° north to east) down to the star. Rotation is more evident in the [OI] and [NII] lines and at the largest sampled distance from the axis. These results are consistent with other STIS observations carried out with the slit perpendicular to the jet axis, and with theoretical simulations. Using current magneto-hydrodynamic models for the launch of the jets, we find that the mass ejected in the observed part of the outflow is accelerated from a region in the disk within about 0.5 AU from the star for the blue lobe, and within 1.6 AU from the star for the red lobe. Using also previous results we estimate upper and lower limits for the angular momentum transport rate of the jet. We find that this can be a large fraction (two thirds or more) of the estimated rate transported through the relevant portion of the disk. The magnetic lever arm (defined as the ratio rA/r0 between the Alfvèn and footpoint radii) is in the range 3.5-4.6 (with an accuracy of 20-25%), or, alternatively, the ejection index ξ = dln (dot{M}acc ) / d r is in the range 0.025-0.046 (with similar uncertainties). The derived values are in the range predicted by the models, but they also suggest that some heating must be provided at the base of the flow. Finally, using the general disk wind theory we derive the ratio Bφ / Bp of the toroidal and

  1. Microbially assisted recording of the Earth's magnetic field in sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiangyu; Egli, Ramon; Gilder, Stuart A.; Müller, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    Sediments continuously record variations of the Earth's magnetic field and thus provide an important archive for studying the geodynamo. The recording process occurs as magnetic grains partially align with the geomagnetic field during and after sediment deposition, generating a depositional remanent magnetization (DRM) or post-DRM (PDRM). (P)DRM acquisition mechanisms have been investigated for over 50 years, yet many aspects remain unclear. A key issue concerns the controversial role of bioturbation, that is, the mechanical disturbance of sediment by benthic organisms, during PDRM acquisition. A recent theory on bioturbation-driven PDRM appears to solve many inconsistencies between laboratory experiments and palaeomagnetic records, yet it lacks experimental proof. Here we fill this gap by documenting the important role of bioturbation-induced rotational diffusion for (P)DRM acquisition, including the control exerted on the recorded inclination and intensity, as determined by the equilibrium between aligning and perturbing torques acting on magnetic particles.

  2. Microbially assisted recording of the Earth's magnetic field in sediment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangyu; Egli, Ramon; Gilder, Stuart A.; Müller, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Sediments continuously record variations of the Earth's magnetic field and thus provide an important archive for studying the geodynamo. The recording process occurs as magnetic grains partially align with the geomagnetic field during and after sediment deposition, generating a depositional remanent magnetization (DRM) or post-DRM (PDRM). (P)DRM acquisition mechanisms have been investigated for over 50 years, yet many aspects remain unclear. A key issue concerns the controversial role of bioturbation, that is, the mechanical disturbance of sediment by benthic organisms, during PDRM acquisition. A recent theory on bioturbation-driven PDRM appears to solve many inconsistencies between laboratory experiments and palaeomagnetic records, yet it lacks experimental proof. Here we fill this gap by documenting the important role of bioturbation-induced rotational diffusion for (P)DRM acquisition, including the control exerted on the recorded inclination and intensity, as determined by the equilibrium between aligning and perturbing torques acting on magnetic particles. PMID:26864428

  3. Microbially assisted recording of the Earth's magnetic field in sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangyu; Egli, Ramon; Gilder, Stuart A; Müller, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Sediments continuously record variations of the Earth's magnetic field and thus provide an important archive for studying the geodynamo. The recording process occurs as magnetic grains partially align with the geomagnetic field during and after sediment deposition, generating a depositional remanent magnetization (DRM) or post-DRM (PDRM). (P)DRM acquisition mechanisms have been investigated for over 50 years, yet many aspects remain unclear. A key issue concerns the controversial role of bioturbation, that is, the mechanical disturbance of sediment by benthic organisms, during PDRM acquisition. A recent theory on bioturbation-driven PDRM appears to solve many inconsistencies between laboratory experiments and palaeomagnetic records, yet it lacks experimental proof. Here we fill this gap by documenting the important role of bioturbation-induced rotational diffusion for (P)DRM acquisition, including the control exerted on the recorded inclination and intensity, as determined by the equilibrium between aligning and perturbing torques acting on magnetic particles. PMID:26864428

  4. Ferrimagnetic DyCo5 Nanostructures for Bits in Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, A. A.; Valencia, S.; Radu, F.; Marchenko, D.; Merazzo, K. J.; Vázquez, M.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.

    2016-06-01

    Increasing the magnetic data recording density requires reducing the size of the individual memory elements of a recording layer as well as employing magnetic materials with temperature-dependent functionalities. Therefore, we predict that the near future of magnetic data storage technology involves a combination of energy-assisted recording on nanometer-scale magnetic media. We present the potential of heat-assisted magnetic recording on a patterned sample; a ferrimagnetic alloy composed of a rare-earth and a transition metal DyCo5, which is grown on a hexagonal-ordered nanohole array membrane. The magnetization of the antidot array sample is out-of-plane oriented at room temperature and rotates towards in plane upon heating above its magnetic anisotropy reorientation temperature (TR) of 350 K, just above room temperature. Upon cooling back to room temperature (below TR), we observe a well-defined and unexpected in-plane magnetic domain configuration modulating with 45 nm. We discuss the underlying mechanisms giving rise to this behavior by comparing the magnetic properties of the patterned sample with the ones of its extended thin-film counterpart. Our results pave the way for future applications of ferrimagnetic antidot arrays of superior functionality in magnetic nanodevices near room temperature.

  5. Magnetic-field-assisted atomic polarization spectroscopy of 4 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Wang, Haidong; Wu, Teng; Peng, Xiang; Guo, Hong; Cream Team

    2016-05-01

    Atomic polarization spectroscopy (PS) is a high resolution sub-Doppler atomic spectroscopic technique with free modulation. It is always desirable to obtain a PS signal with zero background as it can provide a more preferable laser frequency stabilization performance. There are many factors that can affect the PS signal background, i.e., the laser power, the laser polarization and the magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate a method for observing and analyzing the effects on the PS signal of 4 He under different magnetic fields. At the beginning, under nearly zero magnetic field, the large asymmetrical PS signal background has been observed and cannot be eliminated by only optically adjusting. Then, we find that the PS signal profile can be changed and controlled by varying the magnetic field with transverse or longitudinal direction and different intensity. The optimized PS signal with symmetrical dispersive profile and zero background is obtained when the magnetic field is chosen and controlled in the transverse direction and more than 20000nT intensity. Similar phenomenon cannot be observed under the longitudinal magnetic field. A theoretical model is also presented, which explains and agrees well with our experimental results.

  6. NPP Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) spacecraft was launched aboard a Delta II rocket at 5:48 a.m. EDT today, on a mission to measure ...

  7. Ulysses Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Ulysses is a joint mission between the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA) to explore the heliosphere over the full range of solar latitudes, especially in the polar regions. The goal of the Ulysses mission is to provide an accurate assessment of our total solar environment. This collaborative ESA/NASA mission will, for the first time, explore the heliosphere -- the region of space that is dominated by the Sun-- within a few astronomical units of the Sun over the full range of heliographic latitudes. The path followed by the spacecraft, using a Jupiter gravity-assist to achieve a trajectory extending to high solar latitudes, will enable the highly sophisticated scientific instruments on board to make measurements in the uncharted third dimension of the heliosphere. The Ulysses spacecraft will carry nine scientific instruments to measure the properties of the solar corona, the solar wind, the Sun/wind interface, the heliospheric magnetic field, solar radio bursts, plasma waves, solar X-rays, solar and galactic cosmic rays, and the interplanetary/interstellar neutral gas and dust. Scientists will take advantage of the enormous distance between the spacecraft and the Earth to perform astrophysical measurements and to search for gravitational waves. In conjunction with instrumentation on Earth-orbiting spacecraft, Ulysses will help to precisely locate the mysterious sources of cosmic gamma bursts. The results obtained will help to solve outstanding problems in solar and heliospheric physics, while undoubtedly revealing new and unanticipated phenomena.

  8. Microscopic and magnetic properties of template assisted electrodeposited iron nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, M. I.; Ahmad, F.; Mohamed, N. M.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Yar, A.

    2015-07-01

    Nanowires of magnetic materials such as Iron, nickel, cobalt, and alloys of them are one of the most widely investigated structures because of their possible applications in high density magnetic recording media, sensor elements, and building blocks in biological transport systems. In this work, Iron nanowires have been prepared by electrodeposition technique using Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. The electrolyte used consisted of FeSO4.6H2O buffered with H3BO3 and acidized by dilute H2SO4. FESEM analysis shows that the asdeposited nanowires are parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. To fabricate the working electrode, a thin film of copper (˜ 220 nm thick) was coated on back side of AAO template by e-beam evaporation system to create electrical contact with the external circuit. The TEM results show that electrodeposited nanowires have diameter around 100 nm and are polycrystalline in structure. Magnetic properties show the existence of anisotropy for in and out of plane configuration. These nanowires have potential applications in magnetic data storage, catalysis and magnetic sensor applications.

  9. Microscopic and magnetic properties of template assisted electrodeposited iron nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Irshad, M. I. Mohamed, N. M. Yar, A.; Ahmad, F. Abdullah, M. Z.

    2015-07-22

    Nanowires of magnetic materials such as Iron, nickel, cobalt, and alloys of them are one of the most widely investigated structures because of their possible applications in high density magnetic recording media, sensor elements, and building blocks in biological transport systems. In this work, Iron nanowires have been prepared by electrodeposition technique using Anodized Aluminium Oxide (AAO) templates. The electrolyte used consisted of FeSO{sub 4.}6H{sub 2}O buffered with H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and acidized by dilute H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. FESEM analysis shows that the asdeposited nanowires are parallel to one another and have high aspect ratio with a reasonably high pore-filing factor. To fabricate the working electrode, a thin film of copper (∼ 220 nm thick) was coated on back side of AAO template by e-beam evaporation system to create electrical contact with the external circuit. The TEM results show that electrodeposited nanowires have diameter around 100 nm and are polycrystalline in structure. Magnetic properties show the existence of anisotropy for in and out of plane configuration. These nanowires have potential applications in magnetic data storage, catalysis and magnetic sensor applications.

  10. Microwave assistance effect on magnetization switching in Co-Cr-Pt granular film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Nobuaki; Hotta, Akira; Furuta, Masaki; Kitakami, Osamu; Shimatsu, Takehito

    2013-11-01

    Experimental verification of microwave assistance effect on a perpendicular magnetic CoCrPt based granular film is demonstrated. Significant reduction of coercivity under the assistance of a radio frequency (rf) field is clearly observed. But the coercivity strongly depends on the duration of rf field, indicating that the magnetic moments of constituent grains are severely perturbed by thermal agitation. Analysis based on the Néel-Arrhenius law has revealed that the dynamic coercivity in nanosecond region can be reduced by 50% only by applying a small rf field with the amplitude less than 2% of the anisotropy field.

  11. Development of a prototype magnetically suspended rotor ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Bearnson, G B; Maslen, E H; Olsen, D B; Allaire, P E; Khanwilkar, P S; Long, J W; Kim, H C

    1996-01-01

    A continuous flow centrifugal blood pump with magnetically suspended impeller has been designed, constructed, and tested. The system can be functionally divided into three subsystem designs: 1) centrifugal pump and flow paths, 2) magnetic bearings, and 3) brushless DC motor. The centrifugal pump is a Francis vane type design with a designed operating point of 6 L/min flow and 100 mmHg pressure rise at 2,300 RPM. Peak hydraulic efficiency is over 50%. The magnetic bearing system is an all active design with five axes of control. Rotor position sensors were developed as part of the system to provide feedback to a proportional-integral-derivative controller. The motor is a sensorless brushless DC motor. Back electromotive force voltage generated by the motor is used to provide commutation for the motor. No slots are employed in the motor design in order to reduce the radial force that the bearings must generate. Tests pumping blood in vitro were very encouraging; an index of hemolysis of 0.0086 +/- 0.0012 was measured. Further design refinement is needed to reduce power dissipation and size of the device. The concept of using magnetic bearings in a blood pump shows promise in a long-term implantable blood pump. PMID:8828784

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetically assisted patterned coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodi, Gianina; Hritcu, Doina; Draganescu, Dan; Popa, Marcel I.

    2015-08-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles able to magnetically assemble during the curing stage of a polymeric support to create micro-scale surface protuberances in a controlled manner were prepared and characterized. The bare Fe3O4 particles were obtained by two methods: co-precipitation from an aqueous solution containing Fe3+/Fe2+ ions with a molar ratio of 2:1 and partial oxidation of ferrous ions in alkaline conditions. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization measurement. They were subsequently functionalized using oleic acid, sodium oleate, or non-ionic surfactant mixtures with various hydrophilic to lipophilic balance (HLB) values. Composite nanoparticle-polymer films prepared by spraying were deposited and cured by drying on glass slides under a static magnetic field in the range of 1.5-5.5 mT. Magnetic field generated surface roughness was evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The optimum hierarchical patterning was obtained with the nanoparticles produced by partial oxidation and functionalized with hydrophobic surfactants. Possible applications may include ice-phobic composite coatings.

  13. In vitro characterization of a magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Kim, H C; Bearnson, G B; Khanwilkar, P S; Olsen, D B; Maslen, E H; Allaire, P E

    1995-01-01

    A magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device using magnetic bearings was developed aiming at an implantable ventricular assist device. The main advantage of this device includes no mechanical wear and minimal chance of blood trauma such, as thrombosis and hemolysis, because there is no mechanical contact between the stationary and rotating parts. The total system consists of two subsystems: the centrifugal pump and the magnetic bearing. The centrifugal pump is comprised of a 4 vane logarithmic spiral radial flow impeller and a brushless DC motor with slotless stator, driven by the back emf commutation scheme. Two radial and one thrust magnetic bearing that dynamically controls the position of the rotor in a radial and axial direction, respectively, contains magnetic coils, the rotor's position sensors, and feedback electronic control system. The magnetic bearing system was able to successfully suspend a 365.5g rotating part in space and sustain it for up to 5000 rpm of rotation. Average force-current square factor of the magnetic bearing was measured as 0.48 and 0.44 (kg-f/Amp2) for radial and thrust bearing, respectively. The integrated system demonstrated adequate performance in mock circulation tests by providing a 6 L/min flow rate against 100 mmHg differential pressure at 2300 rpm. Based on these in vitro performance test results, long-term clinical application of the magnetically suspended continuous flow ventricular assist device is very promising after system optimization with a hybrid system using both active (electromagnet) and passive (permanent magnets) magnet bearings. PMID:8573825

  14. Year 3 Magnet Schools Assistance Program Annual Progress Report, 2009-10. E&R Report No. 10.09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasfield, Jon; Cárdenas, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    The three Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) schools: East Garner International Baccalaureate Magnet Middle School (EGMMS), Garner International Baccalaureate Magnet High School (GMHS), and Southeast Raleigh Leadership and Technology Magnet High School (SRMHS) have shown progress on MSAP performance measures during the 3rd year of the grant.…

  15. Finite Larmor radius assisted velocity shear stabilization of the interchange instability in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Sheungwah; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-06-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, originally shown to stabilize magnetized plasma interchange modes at short wavelength, are shown to assist velocity shear stabilization of long wavelength interchanges. It is shown that the FLR effects result in stabilization with roughly the same efficacy as the stabilization from dissipative (resistive and viscous) effects found earlier.

  16. First Report on Accomplishments in Achieving Other Project Objectives. Magnet Assistance Program Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Schools, Charlotte, NC.

    The 1993-94 school year marked the first year of the federally-assisted magnet program implemented by Charlotte-Mecklenberg (North Carolina) Schools (CMS). This paper presents the program's goals, the measurable objectives developed to meet the goals, and first-year outcomes. The goals were to reduce, eliminate, or prevent minority group isolation…

  17. Magnet Schools Assistance Program. Final Regulations. Federal Register, Department of Education, 34 CFR Part 280

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Secretary amends the regulations governing the Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) in 34 CFR part 280. These amendments allow the MSAP to use an approach similar to that in section 75.200 for establishing selection criteria in grant competitions. Under this approach the MSAP has the flexibility to use selection criteria from its program…

  18. Magnet Schools Assistance Program. Final Regulations. Federal Register, Department of Education, 34 CFR Part 280

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Administration, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Secretary amends the Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) regulations to reflect changes made to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). These regulations are effective March 3, 2004. [These final regulations were prepared by the Office of Innovation and…

  19. In vitro study of ferromagnetic stents for implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, Misael O.; Chen, Haitao; Ebner, Armin D.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kaminski, Michael D.; Ritter, James A.

    2007-04-01

    Implant-assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) was studied in vitro using a coiled ferromagnetic wire stent made from stainless steel 430 or 304, and magnetic drug carrier particle (MDCP) surrogates composed of poly(styrene/divinylbenzene) embedded with 20 wt% magnetite. The fluid velocity, particle concentration, magnetic field strength, and stent material all proved to be important for capturing the MDCP surrogates. Overall, this in vitro study further confirmed the important role of the ferromagnetic implant for attracting and retaining MDCPs at the target zone.

  20. Theoretical study of thermally activated magnetization switching under microwave assistance: Switching paths and barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, H.; Kudo, K.; Nagasawa, T.; Kanao, T.; Mizushima, K.; Sato, R.; Okamoto, S.; Kikuchi, N.; Kitakami, O.

    2015-03-01

    Energy barrier height for magnetization switching is theoretically studied for a system with uniaxial anisotropy in a circularly polarized microwave magnetic field. A formulation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a rotating frame introduces an effective energy that includes the effects of both the microwave field and static field. This allows the effective-energy profiles to rigorously describe the switching paths and corresponding barrier height, which govern thermally activated magnetization switching under microwave assistance. We show that fixed points and limit cycles in the rotating frame lead to various switching paths and that under certain conditions, switching becomes a two-step process with an intermediate state.

  1. Far-field head-media optical interaction in heat-assisted magnetic recording.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruoxi; Jones, Paul; Klemmer, Timmothy; Olson, Heidi; Zhang, Deming; Perry, Tyler; Scholz, Werner; Yin, Huaqing; Hipwell, Roger; Thiele, Jan-Ulrich; Tang, Huan; Seigler, Mike

    2016-02-20

    We have used a plane wave expansion method to theoretically study the far-field head-media optical interaction in heat-assisted magnetic recording. For the Advanced Storage Technology Consortium media stack specifically, we notice the outstanding sensitivity related to the interlayer's optical thickness for media reflection and the magnetic layer's light absorption. With 10 nm interlayer thickness change, the recording layer absorption can be changed by more than 25%. The 2D results are found to correlate well with the full 3D model and magnetic recording tests on a flyable disc with different interlayer thickness. PMID:26906574

  2. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-07

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  3. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T.; Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-01

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  4. Effects of a spin-polarized current assisted Ørsted field in magnetization patterning

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, Oleksii M. Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri; Mertens, Franz G.

    2015-06-07

    A spin-polarized electrical current leads to a variety of periodical magnetic structures in nanostripes. In the presence of the Ørsted field, which always assists an electrical current, the basic types of magnetic structures, i.e., a vortex-antivortex crystal and cross-tie domain walls, survive. The Ørsted field prevents saturation of the nanostripe and a longitudinal domain wall appears instead. Possible magnetization structures in stripes with different geometrical and material properties are studied numerically and analytically.

  5. A strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, K.

    1987-01-30

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles. 4 figs.

  6. Giant thermal spin-torque-assisted magnetic tunnel junction switching.

    PubMed

    Pushp, Aakash; Phung, Timothy; Rettner, Charles; Hughes, Brian P; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2015-05-26

    Spin-polarized charge currents induce magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switching by virtue of spin-transfer torque (STT). Recently, by taking advantage of the spin-dependent thermoelectric properties of magnetic materials, novel means of generating spin currents from temperature gradients, and their associated thermal-spin torques (TSTs), have been proposed, but so far these TSTs have not been large enough to influence MTJ switching. Here we demonstrate significant TSTs in MTJs by generating large temperature gradients across ultrathin MgO tunnel barriers that considerably affect the switching fields of the MTJ. We attribute the origin of the TST to an asymmetry of the tunneling conductance across the zero-bias voltage of the MTJ. Remarkably, we estimate through magneto-Seebeck voltage measurements that the charge currents that would be generated due to the temperature gradient would give rise to STT that is a thousand times too small to account for the changes in switching fields that we observe. PMID:25971730

  7. Giant thermal spin-torque–assisted magnetic tunnel junction switching

    PubMed Central

    Pushp, Aakash; Phung, Timothy; Rettner, Charles; Hughes, Brian P.; Yang, See-Hun; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Spin-polarized charge currents induce magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switching by virtue of spin-transfer torque (STT). Recently, by taking advantage of the spin-dependent thermoelectric properties of magnetic materials, novel means of generating spin currents from temperature gradients, and their associated thermal-spin torques (TSTs), have been proposed, but so far these TSTs have not been large enough to influence MTJ switching. Here we demonstrate significant TSTs in MTJs by generating large temperature gradients across ultrathin MgO tunnel barriers that considerably affect the switching fields of the MTJ. We attribute the origin of the TST to an asymmetry of the tunneling conductance across the zero-bias voltage of the MTJ. Remarkably, we estimate through magneto-Seebeck voltage measurements that the charge currents that would be generated due to the temperature gradient would give rise to STT that is a thousand times too small to account for the changes in switching fields that we observe. PMID:25971730

  8. Magnetic-Assisted, Self-Healable, Yarn-Based Supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yang; Huang, Yan; Zhu, Minshen; Meng, Wenjun; Pei, Zengxia; Liu, Chang; Hu, Hong; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-06-23

    Yarn-based supercapacitors have received considerable attention recently, offering unprecedented opportunities for future wearable electronic devices (e.g., smart clothes). However, the reliability and lifespan of yarn-based supercapacitors can be seriously limited by accidental mechanical damage during practical applications. Therefore, a supercapacitor endowed with mechanically and electrically self-healing properties is a brilliant solution to the challenge. Compared with the conventional planar-like or large wire-like structure, the reconnection of the broken yarn electrode composed of multiple tiny fibers (diameter <20 μm) is much more difficult and challenging, which directly affects the restoration of electrical conductivity after damage. Herein, a self-healable yarn-based supercapacitor that ensures the reconnection of broken electrodes has been successfully developed by wrapping magnetic electrodes around a self-healing polymer shell. The strong force from magnetic attraction between the broken yarn electrodes benefits reconnection of fibers in the yarn electrodes during self-healing and thus offers an effective strategy for the restoration of electric conductivity, whereas the polymer shell recovers the configuration integrity and mechanical strength. With the design, the specific capacitance of our prototype can be restored up to 71.8% even after four breaking/healing cycles with great maintenance of the whole device's mechanical properties. This work may inspire the design and fabrication of other distinctive self-healable and wearable electronic devices. PMID:26029976

  9. Magnetically assisted slip casting of bioinspired heterogeneous composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Ferrand, Hortense; Bouville, Florian; Niebel, Tobias P.; Studart, André R.

    2015-11-01

    Natural composites are often heterogeneous to fulfil functional demands. Manufacturing analogous materials remains difficult, however, owing to the lack of adequate and easily accessible processing tools. Here, we report an additive manufacturing platform able to fabricate complex-shaped parts exhibiting bioinspired heterogeneous microstructures with locally tunable texture, composition and properties, as well as unprecedentedly high volume fractions of inorganic phase (up to 100%). The technology combines an aqueous-based slip-casting process with magnetically directed particle assembly to create programmed microstructural designs using anisotropic stiff platelets in a ceramic, metal or polymer functional matrix. Using quantitative tools to control the casting kinetics and the temporal pattern of the applied magnetic fields, we demonstrate that this approach is robust and can be exploited to design and fabricate heterogeneous composites with thus far inaccessible microstructures. Proof-of-concept examples include bulk composites with periodic patterns of microreinforcement orientation, and tooth-like bilayer parts with intricate shapes exhibiting site-specific composition and texture.

  10. Magnetically assisted slip casting of bioinspired heterogeneous composites.

    PubMed

    Le Ferrand, Hortense; Bouville, Florian; Niebel, Tobias P; Studart, André R

    2015-11-01

    Natural composites are often heterogeneous to fulfil functional demands. Manufacturing analogous materials remains difficult, however, owing to the lack of adequate and easily accessible processing tools. Here, we report an additive manufacturing platform able to fabricate complex-shaped parts exhibiting bioinspired heterogeneous microstructures with locally tunable texture, composition and properties, as well as unprecedentedly high volume fractions of inorganic phase (up to 100%). The technology combines an aqueous-based slip-casting process with magnetically directed particle assembly to create programmed microstructural designs using anisotropic stiff platelets in a ceramic, metal or polymer functional matrix. Using quantitative tools to control the casting kinetics and the temporal pattern of the applied magnetic fields, we demonstrate that this approach is robust and can be exploited to design and fabricate heterogeneous composites with thus far inaccessible microstructures. Proof-of-concept examples include bulk composites with periodic patterns of microreinforcement orientation, and tooth-like bilayer parts with intricate shapes exhibiting site-specific composition and texture. PMID:26390326

  11. New vibration-assisted magnetic abrasive polishing (VAMAP) method for microstructured surface finishing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiang; Kum, Chun Wai; Au, Ka Hing; Tan, Zhi'En Eddie; Wu, Hu; Liu, Kui

    2016-06-13

    In order to polish microstructured surface without deteriorating its profile, we propose a new vibration-assisted magnetic abrasive polishing (VAMAP) method. In this method, magnetic force guarantees that the magnetic abrasives can well contact the microstructured surface and access the corners of microstructures while vibration produces a relative movement between microstructures and magnetic abrasives. As the vibration direction is parallel to the microstructures, the profile of the microstructures will not be deteriorated. The relation between vibration and magnetic force was analyzed and the feasibility of this method was experimentally verified. The results show that after polishing, the surface finish around microstructures was significantly improved while the profile of microstructures was well maintained. PMID:27410370

  12. Modeling of Ultrafast Heat- and Field-Assisted Magnetization Dynamics in FePt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, P.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2016-01-01

    The switching of magnetization by ultrafast lasers alone in FePt could open a technological perspective for magnetic recording technology. Recent experimental results [D. Lambert et al., Science 345, 1337 (2014)] indicate a dynamical magnetization response in FePt under circularly polarized laser pulses. Using high-temperature micromagnetic modeling, based on the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation, we investigate the possibility of magnetization switching in FePt under the action of an ultrafast heat pulse assisted by either a constant or optomagnetic field. We evaluate the necessary magnitude and duration of the inverse Faraday field to produce a reliable switching. Our results also reproduce experimentally observed magnetization patterns originated from the nonhomogeneous temperature distribution.

  13. Spin-Hall-assisted magnetic random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, A. van den Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.; Cosemans, S.; Manfrini, M.; Van Roy, W.; Min, T.; Cornelissen, S.; Vaysset, A.; Departement elektrotechniek , KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Heverlee

    2014-01-06

    We propose a write scheme for perpendicular spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory that significantly reduces the required tunnel current density and write energy. A sub-nanosecond in-plane polarized spin current pulse is generated using the spin-Hall effect, disturbing the stable magnetic state. Subsequent switching using out-of-plane polarized spin current becomes highly efficient. Through evaluation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, we quantitatively assess the viability of this write scheme for a wide range of system parameters. A typical example shows an eight-fold reduction in tunnel current density, corresponding to a fifty-fold reduction in write energy, while maintaining a 1 ns write time.

  14. The Cassini spacecraft is mated to the launch vehicle adapter in the PHSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Flight mechanics from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., secure the Cassini spacecraft to its launch vehicle adapter in KSC's Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The adapter will later be mated to a Titan IV/Centaur expendable launch vehicle that will lift Cassini into space. The mechanic in the crane lift at right is assisting in exact positioning of the spacecraft for precise fitting. Scheduled for launch in October, the Cassini mission seeks insight into the origins and evolution of the early solar system. Scientific instruments carried aboard the spacecraft will study Saturn's atmosphere, magnetic field, rings, and several moons. JPL is managing the Cassini project for NASA.

  15. Strain-assisted magnetization reversal in Co/Ni multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Gopman, D B; Dennis, C L; Chen, P J; Iunin, Y L; Finkel, P; Staruch, M; Shull, R D

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional materials composed of ultrathin magnetic films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy combined with ferroelectric substrates represent a new approach toward low power, fast, high density spintronics. Here we demonstrate Co/Ni multilayered films with tunable saturation magnetization and perpendicular anisotropy grown directly on ferroelectric PZT [Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3] substrate plates. Electric fields up to ±2 MV/m expand the PZT by 0.1% and generate at least 0.02% in-plane compression in the Co/Ni multilayered film. Modifying the strain with a voltage can reduce the coercive field by over 30%. We also demonstrate that alternating in-plane tensile and compressive strains (less than 0.01%) can be used to propagate magnetic domain walls. This ability to manipulate high anisotropy magnetic thin films could prove useful for lowering the switching energy for magnetic elements in future voltage-controlled spintronic devices. PMID:27297638

  16. Strain-assisted magnetization reversal in Co/Ni multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Dennis, C. L.; Chen, P. J.; Iunin, Y. L.; Finkel, P.; Staruch, M.; Shull, R. D.

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional materials composed of ultrathin magnetic films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy combined with ferroelectric substrates represent a new approach toward low power, fast, high density spintronics. Here we demonstrate Co/Ni multilayered films with tunable saturation magnetization and perpendicular anisotropy grown directly on ferroelectric PZT [Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3] substrate plates. Electric fields up to ±2 MV/m expand the PZT by 0.1% and generate at least 0.02% in-plane compression in the Co/Ni multilayered film. Modifying the strain with a voltage can reduce the coercive field by over 30%. We also demonstrate that alternating in-plane tensile and compressive strains (less than 0.01%) can be used to propagate magnetic domain walls. This ability to manipulate high anisotropy magnetic thin films could prove useful for lowering the switching energy for magnetic elements in future voltage-controlled spintronic devices.

  17. Strain-assisted magnetization reversal in Co/Ni multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Gopman, D. B.; Dennis, C. L.; Chen, P. J.; Iunin, Y. L.; Finkel, P.; Staruch, M.; Shull, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional materials composed of ultrathin magnetic films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy combined with ferroelectric substrates represent a new approach toward low power, fast, high density spintronics. Here we demonstrate Co/Ni multilayered films with tunable saturation magnetization and perpendicular anisotropy grown directly on ferroelectric PZT [Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3] substrate plates. Electric fields up to ±2 MV/m expand the PZT by 0.1% and generate at least 0.02% in-plane compression in the Co/Ni multilayered film. Modifying the strain with a voltage can reduce the coercive field by over 30%. We also demonstrate that alternating in-plane tensile and compressive strains (less than 0.01%) can be used to propagate magnetic domain walls. This ability to manipulate high anisotropy magnetic thin films could prove useful for lowering the switching energy for magnetic elements in future voltage-controlled spintronic devices. PMID:27297638

  18. Bit patterned media with composite structure for microwave assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibagi, Nasim

    Patterned magnetic nano-structures are under extensive research due to their interesting emergent physics and promising applications in high-density magnetic data storage, through magnetic logic to bio-magnetic functionality. Bit-patterned media is an example of such structures which is a leading candidate to reach magnetic densities which cannot be achieved by conventional magnetic media. Patterned arrays of complex heterostructures such as exchange-coupled composites are studied in this thesis as a potential for next generation of magnetic recording media. Exchange-coupled composites have shown new functionality and performance advantages in magnetic recording and bit patterned media provide unique capability to implement such architectures. Due to unique resonant properties of such structures, their possible application in spin transfer torque memory and microwave assisted switching is also studied. This dissertation is divided into seven chapters. The first chapter covers the history of magnetic recording, the need to increase magnetic storage density, and the challenges in the field. The second chapter introduces basic concepts of magnetism. The third chapter explains the fabrication methods for thin films and various lithographic techniques that were used to pattern the devices under study for this thesis. The fourth chapter introduces the exchanged coupled system with the structure of [Co/Pd] / Fe / [Co/Pd], where the thickness of Fe is varied, and presents the magnetic properties of such structures using conventional magnetometers. The fifth chapter goes beyond what is learned in the fourth chapter and utilizes polarized neutron reflectometry to study the vertical exchange coupling and reversal mechanism in patterned structures with such structure. The sixth chapter explores the dynamic properties of the patterned samples, and their reversal mechanism under microwave field. The final chapter summarizes the results and describes the prospects for future

  19. Animal trials of a Magnetically Levitated Left-Ventricular Assist Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paden, Brad; Antaki, James; Groom, Nelson

    2000-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh/Magnetic Moments mag-lev left-ventricular assist devices (LVADs), the Streamliner HG3b and HG3c, have successfully been implanted in calves. The first was implanted for 4 hours on July 10, 1998 and the second for 34 days on August 24, 1999 respectively. The tests confirmed the feasibility of low power levitation (1.5 watts coil power) and very low blood damage in a mag-lev ventricular assist device. In this paper, we describe the unique geometry of this pump and its design. Key features of this LVAD concept are the passive radial suspension and active voice-coil thrust bearing.

  20. Biodegradable nanocomposite magnetite stent for implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangual, Jan O.; Li, Shigeng; Ploehn, Harry J.; Ebner, Armin D.; Ritter, James A.

    2010-10-01

    This study shows, for the first time, the fabrication of a biodegradable polymer nanocomposite magnetic stent and the feasibility of its use in implant-assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT). The nanocomposite magnetic stent was made from PLGA, a biodegradable copolymer, and iron oxide nanopowder via melt mixing and extrusion into fibers. Degradation and dynamic mechanical thermal analyses showed that the addition of the iron oxide nanopowder increased the polymer's glass transition temperature ( Tg) and its modulus but had no notable effect on its degradation rate in PBS buffer solution. IA-MDT in vitro experiments were carried out with the nanocomposite magnetic fiber molded into a stent coil. These stent prototypes were used in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field of 0.3 T to capture 100 nm magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) from an aqueous solution. Increasing the amount of magnetite in the stent nanocomposite (0, 10 and 40 w/w%) resulted in an increase in the MDCP capture efficiency (CE). Reducing the MDCP concentrations (0.75 and 1.5 mg/mL) in the flowing fluid and increasing the fluid velocities (20 and 40 mL/min) both resulted in decrease in the MDCP CE. These results show that the particle capture performance of PLGA-based, magnetic nanocomposite stents are similar to those exhibited by a variety of different non-polymeric magnetic stent materials studied previously.

  1. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Wu, B. L.; Ng, V.; Asbahi, M.; Yang, J. K. W.

    2014-10-20

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  2. Calibration and measurement of the thermal reflection coefficient of heat assisted magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. Z.; Chen, Y. J.; Leong, S. H.; An, C. W.; Ye, K. D.; Hu, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    With increased interest in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), the thermal reflection coefficient of HAMR media becomes more important, as it is related to the change of optical parameters of the media at different temperatures and can potentially be used for non-contact temperature measurement. In this report, we introduce a method to calibrate the thermal reflection coefficient of magnetic thin films by in situ measurement of the thermal reflectance as well as the magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) signal from the media. In the measurement, we use one beam to locally heat up the media, while using a second beam, whose diameter and intensity is much smaller, to measure in situ the MOKE and thermal reflectance signal of the heated media. We characterize the media temperature by heating up the magnetic media with prewritten magnetic patterns in an ultra-high vacuum system and the resulting magnetic remanence in the prewritten area is measured by magnetic force microscopy. Thus the thermal reflection coefficient is measured by performing a pump-probe experiment, with the temperature calibrated at the zero thermoremanence temperature of the HAMR media, at which temperature all grains under test have reached Curie temperature. This method can be extended to comparative studies of the thermo-optical properties of magnetic thin films, whose magnetic properties are sensitive to temperature.

  3. A machine vision assisted system for fluorescent magnetic particle inspection of railway wheelsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tao; Sun, Zhenguo; Zhang, Wenzeng; Chen, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent magnetic particle inspection is a conventional non-destructive evaluation process for detecting surface and slightly subsurface cracks of the wheelsets. Using machine vision instead of workers' direct observation could remarkably improve the working condition and repeatability of the inspection. This paper presents a machine vision assisted automatic fluorescent magnetic particle inspection system for surface defect inspection of railway wheelsets. The system setup of it is composed of a semiautomatic fluorescent magnetic particle inspection machine, a vision system and an industrial computer. The detection of magnetic particle indications of quantitative quality indicators and cracks is studied: the detection of quantitative quality indicators is achieved by mathematical morphology, Otsu's thresholding and a RANSAC based ellipse fitting algorithm; the crack detection algorithm is a multiscale algorithm using Gaussian blur, mathematical morphology and several shape and color descriptors. Tests show that the algorithms are able to detect the indications of the quantitative quality indicators and the cracks precisely.

  4. Interplay between magnetic anisotropy and vibron-assisted tunneling in a single-molecule magnet transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungwha; McCaskey, Alexander; Yamamoto, Yoh; Warnock, Michael; Burzuri, Enrique; van der Zant, Herre

    2015-03-01

    Molecules trapped in single-molecule devices vibrate with discrete frequencies characteristic to the molecules, and the molecular vibrations can couple to electronic charge and/or spin degrees of freedom. For a significant electron-vibron coupling, electrons may tunnel via the vibrational excitations unique to the molecules. Recently, electron transport via individual anisotropic magnetic molecules (referred to as single-molecule magnets) has been observed in single-molecule transistors. A single-molecule magnet has a large spin moment and a large magnetic anisotropy barrier. So far, studies of electron-vibron coupling effects in single-molecule devices, are mainly for isotropic molecules. Here we investigate how the electron-vibron coupling influences electron transport via a single-molecule magnet Fe4, by using a model Hamiltonian with parameter values obtained from density-functional theory (arXiv:1411.2677). We show that the magnetic anisotropy of the Fe4 induces new features in vibrational conductance peaks and creates vibrational satellite peaks. The main and satellite peak heights have a strong, unusual dependence on the direction and magnitude of applied magnetic field, because the magnetic anisotropy barrier is comparable to vibrational energies. Funding from NSF DMR-1206354, EU FP7 program project 618082 ACMOL, advanced ERC grant (Mols@Mols). Computer resources from SDSC Trestles under DMR060009N and VT ARC.

  5. Review and evaluation of extractants for strontium removal using magnetically assisted chemical separation

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, C.B.; Rogers, R.D.; Nunez, L.; Ziemer, M.D.; Pleune, T.T.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    A literature review on extractants for strontium removal was initially performed at Northern Illinois University to assess their potential in magnetically assisted chemical separation. A series of potential strontium extractants was systematically evaluated there using radioanalytical methods. Initial experiments were designed to test the uptake of strontium from nitric acid using several samples of magnetic extractant particles that were coated with various crown ether ligands. High partition coefficient (K{sub d}) values for stimulant tank waste were obtained. Further studies demonstrated that the large partitioning was due to uncoated particles.

  6. Modelling of heat assisted magnetic recording with the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation and Brillouin functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, Simon John; Muraoka, Hiroaki; Kanai, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Brillouin functions were used to model the temperature dependence of magnetisation in media for heat assisted magnetic recording. Although dHk/dT was higher when Brillouin functions with J = 0.5 or J = 1 were used, an earlier onset of the linear reversal mode led to a drop in dHc/dT near to Tc, resulting in wider written bits. Tracks written with a higher thermal gradient were also wider when J was small and had lower SNR.

  7. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered “solid-cored” CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  8. Thermally assisted electric field control of magnetism in flexible multiferroic heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhan, Qingfeng; Dai, Guohong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Baomin; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Zhenghu; Rong, Xin; Yang, Huali; Zhu, Xiaojian; Xie, Yali; Chen, Bin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Thermal and electrical control of magnetic anisotropy were investigated in flexible Fe81Ga19 (FeGa)/Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) multiferroic heterostructures. Due to the large anisotropic thermal deformation of PVDF (α1 = −13 × 10−6 K−1 and α2 = −145 × 10−6 K−1), the in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) of FeGa can be reoriented 90° by changing the temperature across 295 K where the films are magnetically isotropic. Thus, the magnetization of FeGa can be reversed by the thermal cycling between 280 and 320 K under a constant magnetic field lower than coercivity. Moreover, under the assistance of thermal deformation with slightly heating the samples to the critical temperature, the electric field of ± 267 kV cm−1 can well align the UMA along the two orthogonal directions. The new route of combining thermal and electrical control of magnetic properties realized in PVDF-based flexible multiferroic materials shows good prospects in application of flexible thermal spintronic devices and flexible microwave magnetic materials. PMID:25370605

  9. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered "solid-cored" CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process. PMID:25761381

  10. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered ``solid-cored'' CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process.

  11. Structural and magnetic studies of thin Fe57 films formed by ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyadov, N. M.; Bazarov, V. V.; Vagizov, F. G.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Dulov, E. N.; Kashapov, R. N.; Noskov, A. I.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Shustov, V. A.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Thin Fe57 films with the thickness of 120 nm have been prepared on glass substrates by using the ion-beam-assisted deposition technique. X-ray diffraction, electron microdiffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies have shown that as-deposited films are in a stressful nanostructured state containing the nanoscaled inclusions of α-phase iron with the size of ∼10 nm. Room temperature in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization measurements confirmed the presence of the magnetic α-phase in the iron film and indicated the strong effect of residual stresses on magnetic properties of the film as well. Subsequent thermal annealing of iron films in vacuum at the temperature of 450 °C stimulates the growth of α-phase Fe crystallites with the size of up to 20 nm. However, electron microdiffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopic data have shown the partial oxidation and carbonization of the iron film during annealing. The stress disappeared after annealing of the film. The magnetic behaviour of the annealed samples was characterized by the magnetic hysteresis loop with the coercive field of ∼10 mT and the saturation magnetization decreased slightly in comparison with the α-phase Fe magnetization due to small oxidation of the film.

  12. Penetration and screening of perpendicularly launched electromagnetic waves through bounded supercritical plasma confined in multicusp magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Indranuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2011-02-01

    The question of electromagnetic wave penetration and screening by a bounded supercritical (ωp>ω with ωp and ω being the electron-plasma and wave frequencies, respectively) plasma confined in a minimum B multicusp field, for waves launched in the k ⊥Bo mode, is addressed through experiments and numerical simulations. The scale length of radial plasma nonuniformity (|ne/(∂ne/∂r)|) and magnetostatic field (Bo) inhomogeneity (|Bo/(∂Bo/∂r)|) are much smaller than the free space (λo) and guided wavelengths (λg). Contrary to predictions of plane wave dispersion theory and the Clemow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) diagram, for a bounded plasma a finite propagation occurs through the central plasma regions where αp2=ωp2/ω2≥1 and βc2=ωce2/ω2≪1(˜10-4), with ωce being the electron cyclotron frequency. Wave screening, as predicted by the plane wave model, does not remain valid due to phase mixing and superposition of reflected waves from the conducting boundary, leading to the formation of electromagnetic standing wave modes. The waves are found to satisfy a modified upper hybrid resonance (UHR) relation in the minimum B field and are damped at the local electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) location.

  13. Current and future role of magnetically assisted gastric capsule endoscopy in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Hey-Long; Hale, Melissa Fay; McAlindon, Mark Edward

    2016-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy first captivated the medical world when it provided a means to visualize the small bowel, which was previously out of endoscopic reach. In the subsequent decade and a half we continue to learn of the true potential that capsule endoscopy has to offer. Of particular current interest is whether capsule endoscopy has any reliable investigative role in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Much research has already been dedicated to enhancing the diagnostic and indeed therapeutic properties of capsule endoscopy. Specific modifications to tackle the challenges of the gut have already been described in the current literature. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, the capacious anatomy of the stomach represents one of many challenges that capsule endoscopy must overcome. One solution to improving diagnostic yield is to utilize external magnetic steering of a magnetically receptive capsule endoscope. Notionally this would provide a navigation system to direct the capsule to different areas of the stomach and allow complete gastric mucosal examination. To date, several studies have presented promising data to support the feasibility of this endeavour. However the jury is still out as to whether this system will surpass conventional gastroscopy, which remains the gold standard diagnostic tool in the foregut. Nevertheless, a minimally invasive and patient-friendly alternative to gastroscopy remains irresistibly appealing, warranting further studies to test the potential of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy. In this article the authors would like to share the current state of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy and anticipate what is yet to come. PMID:27134661

  14. Current and future role of magnetically assisted gastric capsule endoscopy in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ching, Hey-Long; Hale, Melissa Fay; McAlindon, Mark Edward

    2016-05-01

    Capsule endoscopy first captivated the medical world when it provided a means to visualize the small bowel, which was previously out of endoscopic reach. In the subsequent decade and a half we continue to learn of the true potential that capsule endoscopy has to offer. Of particular current interest is whether capsule endoscopy has any reliable investigative role in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Much research has already been dedicated to enhancing the diagnostic and indeed therapeutic properties of capsule endoscopy. Specific modifications to tackle the challenges of the gut have already been described in the current literature. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, the capacious anatomy of the stomach represents one of many challenges that capsule endoscopy must overcome. One solution to improving diagnostic yield is to utilize external magnetic steering of a magnetically receptive capsule endoscope. Notionally this would provide a navigation system to direct the capsule to different areas of the stomach and allow complete gastric mucosal examination. To date, several studies have presented promising data to support the feasibility of this endeavour. However the jury is still out as to whether this system will surpass conventional gastroscopy, which remains the gold standard diagnostic tool in the foregut. Nevertheless, a minimally invasive and patient-friendly alternative to gastroscopy remains irresistibly appealing, warranting further studies to test the potential of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy. In this article the authors would like to share the current state of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy and anticipate what is yet to come. PMID:27134661

  15. Implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting: Comparison of in vitro experiments with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, Misael O.; Ebner, Armin D.; Ritter, James A.

    Implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) was studied both in vitro and theoretically, with extensive comparisons made between model and experiment. Magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) comprised of magnetite encased in a polymer were collected magnetically using a ferromagnetic, coiled, wire stent as the implant and a NdFeB permanent magnet for the applied magnetic field. A 2-D mathematical model with no adjustable parameters was developed and compared to the 3-D experimental results. The effects of the fluid velocity, stent and MDCP properties, and magnetic field strength on the performance of the system were evaluated in terms of the capture efficiency (CE) of the MDCPs. In nearly all cases, the parametric trends predicted by the model were in good agreement with the experimental results: the CE always increased with decreasing velocity, increasing magnetic field strength, increasing MDCP size or magnetite content, or increasing wire size. The only exception was when experiments showed an increase in the CE with an increase in the number of loops in the wire, while the model showed no dependence. The discrepancies between experiment and theory were attributed to phenomena not accounted for by the model, such as 3-D to 2-D geometric and magnetic field orientation differences, and interparticle interactions between the MDCPs that lead to magnetic agglomeration and shearing force effects. Overall, this work showed the effectiveness of a stent-based IA-MDT system through both in vitro experimentation and corroborated theory, with the designs of the ferromagnetic wire and the MDCPs both being paramount to the CE.

  16. Simulation of Magnetic Field Assisted Finishing (MFAF) Process Utilizing Smart MR Polishing Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Anwesa; Das, Manas

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field assisted finishing process is an advanced finishing process. This process is capable of producing nanometer level surface finish. In this process magnetic field is applied to control the finishing forces using magnetorheological polishing medium. In the current study, permanent magnet is used to provide the required magnetic field in the finishing zone. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with MR fluid which is used as the polishing brush to remove surface undulations from the top surface of the workpiece. In this paper, the distribution of magnetic flux density on the workpiece surface and behaviour of MR polishing medium during finishing are analyzed using commercial finite element packages (Ansys Maxwell® and Comsol®). The role of magnetic force in the indentation of abrasive particles on the workpiece surface is studied. A two-dimensional simulation study of the steady, laminar, and incompressible MR fluid flow behaviour during finishing process is carried out. The material removal and surface roughness modelling of the finishing process are also presented. The indentation force by a single active abrasive particle on the workpiece surface is modelled during simulation. The velocity profile of MR fluid with and without application of magnetic field is plotted. It shows non-Newtonian property without application of magnetic field. After that the total material displacement due to one abrasive particle is plotted. The simulated roughness profile is in a good agreement with the experimental results. The conducted study will help in understanding the fluid behavior and the mechanism of finishing during finishing process. Also, the modelling and simulation of the process will help in achieving better finishing performance.

  17. Theoretical modelling of physiologically stretched vessel in magnetisable stent assisted magnetic drug targetingapplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Cregg, P. J.; Murphy, Kieran; Curtin, Maurice; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2011-02-01

    The magnetisable stent assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system in a physiologically stretched vessel is considered theoretically. The changes in the mechanical behaviour of the vessel are analysed under the influence of mechanical forces generated by blood pressure. In this 2D mathematical model a ferromagnetic, coiled wire stent is implanted to aid collection of magnetic drug carrier particles in an elastic tube, which has similar mechanical properties to the blood vessel. A cyclic mechanical force is applied to the elastic tube to mimic the mechanical stress and strain of both the stent and vessel while in the body due to pulsatile blood circulation. The magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles are included and agglomeration of particles is also modelled. The resulting collection efficiency of the mathematical model shows that the system performance can decrease by as much as 10% due to the effects of the pulsatile blood circulation.

  18. High velocity flyer plates launched by magnetic pressure on pulsed power generator CQ-4 and applied in shock Hugoniot experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Guiji; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Luo, Binqiang; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    High velocity flyer plates with good flatness and some thickness have being widely used to the field of shock physics for characterizations of materials under dynamical loading. The techniques of magnetically driven high-velocity flyer plates are further researched based on our pulsed power generators CQ-4 and some good results got on Sandia's Z machine. With large current of several mega-amperes, the loading surface of electrode panel will suffer acute phase transitions caused from magnetic diffusion and Joule heating, and the thickness and flatness of the flyer plates will change with time. In order to obtain the flyer plates with high performances for shock physics, some researches on electrode panels were done by means of LS-DYNA980 software with electro-magnetic package. Two typical configurations for high velocity flyer plates were compared from distribution uniformity of magnetic field in simulation. The results show that the configuration with counter-bore with "notch" and "ear" is better than the other. Then, with the better configuration panels, some experiments were designed and done to validate the simulation results and obtain high velocity flyer plates with good flatness for one-dimensional strain shock experiments on CQ-4. The velocity profiles of the flyer plates were measured by displacement interferometer systems for any reflectors. And the planarity of flyer plates was measured by using the optical fiber pins array for recording the flyer arrival time. The peak velocities of 8.7 km/s with initial dimension of 10 × 7.2 × 0.62 mm for aluminum flyer plates have been achieved. And the flyer plate with initial size of 12 × 9.2 × 0.73 mm was accelerated to velocity of 6.5 km/s with the flatness of less than 11 ns in the central region of 6 mm in diameter and the effective thickness of about 0.220 mm. Based on these work, the symmetrical impact experiments were performed to obtain the high accuracy Hugoniot data of OFHC (oxygen free high conductance

  19. Monte Carlo simulation for thermal assisted reversal process of micro-magnetic torus ring with bistable closure domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Kenichi; Suzuki, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed for temperature dependences of closure domain parameter for a magnetic micro-torus ring cluster under magnetic field on limited temperature regions. Simulation results show that magnetic field on tiny limited temperature region can reverse magnetic closure domain structures when the magnetic field is applied at a threshold temperature corresponding to intensity of applied magnetic field. This is one of thermally assisted switching phenomena through a self-organization process. The results show the way to find non-wasteful pairs between intensity of magnetic field and temperature region for reversing closure domain structure by temperature dependence of the fluctuation of closure domain parameter. Monte Carlo method for this simulation is very valuable to optimize the design of thermally assisted switching devices.

  20. Loading of Launch Vehicle when Launching from Floating Launch Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarkov, A. V.; Pyrig, V. A.

    2002-01-01

    equator, which is a most effective way from payload capability standpoint. But mobility of the Launch Platform conditions an increase in LV loading as compared with onground launch. Therefore, to provide efficiency of lounching from LP requires solving certain issues to minimize LV loading at launch processing. The paper at hand describes ways to solve these issues while creating and operating the international space launch system Sea Launch, which provides commercial spacecraft launches onboard Zenit-3SL launch vehicle from the floating launch platform located at the equator in the Pacific. Methods to decrease these loads by selecting the optimum position of LP and by correcting LP trim and heel were described. In order to account for impact of weather changing (i.e. waves and winds) and launch support operations on the launch capability, a system of predicted load calculation was designed. By measuring LP roll and pitch parameters as well as wind speed and direction, the system defines loading at LV root section, compares it with the allowable value and, based on the compavision, forms a conclusion on launch capability. launches by Sea Launch.

  1. Magnetic levitation assisted aircraft take-off and landing (feasibility study - GABRIEL concept)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohacs, Daniel; Rohacs, Jozsef

    2016-08-01

    The Technology Roadmap 2013 developed by the International Air Transport Association envisions the option of flying without an undercarriage to be in operation by 2032. Preliminary investigations clearly indicate that magnetic levitation technology (MagLev) might be an appealing solution to assist the aircraft take-off and landing. The EU supported research project, abbreviated as GABRIEL, was dealing with (i) the concept development, (ii) the identification, evaluation and selection of the deployable magnetic levitation technology, (iii) the definition of the core system elements (including the required aircraft modifications, the ground-based system and airport elements, and the rendezvous control system), (iv) the analysis of the safety and security aspects, (v) the concept validation and (vi) the estimation of the proposed concept impact in terms of aircraft weight, noise, emission, cost-benefit). All results introduced here are compared to a medium size hypothetic passenger aircraft (identical with an Airbus A320). This paper gives a systematic overview of (i) the applied methods, (ii) the investigation of the possible use of magnetic levitation technology to assist the commercial aircraft take-off and landing processes and (iii) the demonstrations, validations showing the feasibility of the radically new concept. All major results are outlined.

  2. Perpendicular-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction switched by spin-Hall-assisted spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaohao; Zhao, Weisheng; Deng, Erya; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Chappert, Claude

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the magnetization switching induced by spin-Hall-assisted spin-transfer torque (STT) in a three-terminal device consisting of a perpendicular-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) and an β-W strip. Magnetization dynamics in free layer of MTJ is simulated by solving numerically a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The influences of spin-Hall write current (density, duration and direction) on the STT switching are evaluated. We find that the switching speed of a STT-MTJ can be significantly improved (reduced to <1 ns) by using a sufficiently large spin-Hall write current density (~25 MA cm-2) with an appropriate duration (~0.5 ns). Finally we develop an electrical model of three-terminal MTJ/β-W device with Verilog-A language and perform transient simulation of switching a 4 T/1MTJ/1β-W memory cell with Spectre simulator. Simulation results demonstrate that spin-Hall-assisted STT-MTJ has advantages over conventional STT-MTJ in write speed and energy.

  3. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Operating up to 225 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, A.; Fedorov, G.; Smirnov, D.; Kumar, S.; Williams, B. S.; Hu, Q.; Reno, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in semiconductor bandgap engineering have resulted in the recent development of the terahertz quantum cascade laser1. These compact optoelectronic devices now operate in the frequency range 1.2-5 THz, although cryogenic cooling is still required2.3. Further progress towards the realization of devices operating at higher temperatures and emitting at longer wavelengths (sub-terahertz quantum cascade lasers) is difficult because it requires maintaining a population inversion between closely spaced electronic sub-bands (1 THz approx. equals 4 meV). Here, we demonstrate a magnetic-field-assisted quantum cascade laser based on the resonant-phonon design. By applying appropriate electrical bias and strong magnetic fields above 16 T, it is possible to achieve laser emission from a single device over a wide range of frequencies (0.68-3.33 THz). Owing to the suppression of inter-landau-level non-radiative scattering, the device shows magnetic field assisted laser action at 1 THz at temperatures up to 215 K, and 3 THz lasing up to 225 K.

  4. Magnetic-assisted triboelectric nanogenerators as self-powered visualized omnidirectional tilt sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengdi; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Sun, Xuming; Meng, Bo; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-04-01

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a promising device in energy harvesting and self-powered sensing. In this work, we demonstrate a magnetic-assisted TENG, utilizing the magnetic force for electric generation. Maximum power density of 541.1 mW/m2 is obtained at 16.67 MΩ for the triboelectric part, while the electromagnetic part can provide power density of 649.4 mW/m2 at 16 Ω. Through theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, linear relationship between the tilt angle and output voltage at large angles is observed. On this basis, a self-powered omnidirectional tilt sensor is realized by two magnetic-assisted TENGs, which can measure the magnitude and direction of the tilt angle at the same time. For visualized sensing of the tilt angle, a sensing system is established, which is portable, intuitive, and self-powered. This visualized system greatly simplifies the measure process, and promotes the development of self-powered systems.

  5. Magnetic-assisted triboelectric nanogenerators as self-powered visualized omnidirectional tilt sensing system

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mengdi; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Sun, Xuming; Meng, Bo; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a promising device in energy harvesting and self-powered sensing. In this work, we demonstrate a magnetic-assisted TENG, utilizing the magnetic force for electric generation. Maximum power density of 541.1 mW/m2 is obtained at 16.67 MΩ for the triboelectric part, while the electromagnetic part can provide power density of 649.4 mW/m2 at 16 Ω. Through theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, linear relationship between the tilt angle and output voltage at large angles is observed. On this basis, a self-powered omnidirectional tilt sensor is realized by two magnetic-assisted TENGs, which can measure the magnitude and direction of the tilt angle at the same time. For visualized sensing of the tilt angle, a sensing system is established, which is portable, intuitive, and self-powered. This visualized system greatly simplifies the measure process, and promotes the development of self-powered systems. PMID:24770490

  6. A multi-functional testing instrument for heat assisted magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. Z. Chen, Y. J.; Leong, S. H.; An, C. W.; Ye, K. D.; Hu, J. F.; Yin, M. J.

    2014-05-07

    With recent developments in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), characterization of HAMR media is becoming very important. We present a multi-functional instrument for testing HAMR media, which integrates HAMR writing, reading, and a micro-magneto-optic Kerr effect (μ-MOKE) testing function. A potential application of the present instrument is to make temperature dependent magnetic property measurement using a pump-probe configuration. In the measurement, the media is heated up by a heating (intense) beam while a testing (weak) beam is overlapped with the heating beam for MOKE measurement. By heating the media with different heating beam power, magnetic measurements by MOKE at different temperatures can be performed. Compared to traditional existing tools such as the vibrating sample magnetometer, the present instrument provides localized and efficient heating at the measurement spot. The integration of HAMR writing and μ-MOKE system can also facilitate a localized full investigation of the magnetic media by potential correlation of HAMR head independent write/read performance to localized magnetic properties.

  7. A novel bubbling-assisted exfoliating method preparation of magnetically separable γ-Fe2O3/graphene recyclable photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Hu, Hongrui; Wu, Mingzai; Yu, Xinxin; Sun, Zhaoqi; Li, Guang; Liu, Xiansong; Zheng, Xiuwen

    2014-06-01

    A facile and novel bubbling-assisted exfoliating method was developed for the preparation of γ-Fe2O3/graphene composite, which showed desirable photocatalytic activity toward methyl orange with excellent cycling abilities and the possible growth mechanism was discussed. Photocatalytic and magnetic properties measurements show that the composite has excellent recyclable degradation efficiency and soft magnetic parameters, which makes the composite magnetically separable in a suspension system and can be recycled without significant loss of catalytic activity.

  8. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R.; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-02-20

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry.

  9. Porous cobalt spheres for high temperature gradient magnetically assisted fluidized beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Wheeler, Richard R Jr; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-01-01

    Porous metallic cobalt spheres have been prepared as high temperature capable media for employment in gradient magnetically assisted fluidization and filtration technologies. Cobalt impregnated alginate beads are first formed by extrusion of an aqueous suspension of Co3O4 into a Co(II) chloride solution. The organic polymer is thermally decomposed yielding cobalt oxide spheres, followed by reduction to the metallic state, and densification. Cobalt beads have been produced with porosities ranging between 10 and 50%, depending upon sintering conditions. The product media have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. c2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimizing the coating process of organic actinide extractants on magnetically assisted chemical separation particles.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B. A.; Tuazon, H. E.; Kaminski, M. D.; Aase, S. B.; Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Chemical Engineering; LLNL; California State Polytechnic Univ. at Pomona; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1997-01-01

    The coatings of ferromagnetic-charcoal-polymer microparticles (1-25 gm) with organic extractants specific for actinides were optimized for use in the magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process. The organic extractants, octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP), coated the particles when a carrier organic solvent was evaporated. Coated particles were heated in an oven overnight to drive off any remaining carrier solvent and fix the extractants on the particles. Partitioning coefficients for americium obtained with the coated particles routinely reached 3000-4000 ml g-1, approximately 10 times the separation efficiency observed with the conventional solvent extraction system using CMPO and TBP.

  11. Hysteresis analysis for the permanent magnet assisted synchronous reluctance motor by coupled FEM and Preisach modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Hyun, D.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1999-05-01

    In high speed applications of PMASynRM, hysteresis losses can become the major cause of power dissipation. Therefore, whereas in other kind of machines a rough estimation of hysteresis can be accepted, their importance in PMASynRM justifies a greater effort in calculating them more precisely. This study investigates the hysteresis phenomena of the Permanent Magnet Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Motor (PMASynRM) using coupled FEM and Preisach modelling. Preisach's model, which allows accurate prediction of hysteresis, is adopted in this procedure to provide a nonlinear solution. The computer simulation and experimental result for the i-[lambda] loci show the propriety of the proposed method.

  12. Characteristic analysis of permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance motor for high power application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Jang, Young-Jin; Hong, Jung-Pyo

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, finite element analysis for a permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance motor (PMASynRM) is presented and the inductance, torque characteristics analysis is performed under the effect of saturation. Comparisons are given with inductance and torque characteristics of normal synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM) and those according to quantity of residual flux density (0.1-0.4T) in PMASynRM, respectively. Comparisons are given with output characteristics of normal SynRM and those of PMASynRM, according to load, respectively. It is confirmed that the proposed model results in high output power performance.

  13. Magnetically-Assisted Remote Controlled Microcatheter Tip Deflection under Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hetts, Steven W; Saeed, Maythem; Martin, Alastair; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron; Yee, Erin Jeannie; Sincic, Ryan; Do, Loi; Evans, Lee; Malba, Vincent; Bernhardt, Anthony F; Wilson, Mark W; Patel, Anand; Arenson, Ronald L; Caton, Curtis; Cooke, Daniel L

    2013-01-01

    X-ray fluoroscopy-guided endovascular procedures have several significant limitations, including difficult catheter navigation and use of ionizing radiation, which can potentially be overcome using a magnetically steerable catheter under MR guidance. The main goal of this work is to develop a microcatheter whose tip can be remotely controlled using the magnetic field of the MR scanner. This protocol aims to describe the procedures for applying current to the microcoil-tipped microcatheter to produce consistent and controllable deflections. A microcoil was fabricated using laser lathe lithography onto a polyimide-tipped endovascular catheter. In vitro testing was performed in a waterbath and vessel phantom under the guidance of a 1.5-T MR system using steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequencing. Various amounts of current were applied to the coils of the microcatheter to produce measureable tip deflections and navigate in vascular phantoms. The development of this device provides a platform for future testing and opportunity to revolutionize the endovascular interventional MRI environment. PMID:23609143

  14. Heat-assisted magnetic recording of bit-patterned media beyond 10 Tb/in2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Christoph; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Suess, Dieter; Praetorius, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    The limits of areal storage density that is achievable with heat-assisted magnetic recording are unknown. We addressed this central question and investigated the areal density of bit-patterned media. We analyzed the detailed switching behavior of a recording bit under various external conditions, allowing us to compute the bit error rate of a write process (shingled and conventional) for various grain spacings, write head positions, and write temperatures. Hence, we were able to optimize the areal density yielding values beyond 10 Tb/in2. Our model is based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation and uses hard magnetic recording grains with a 5-nm diameter and 10-nm height. It assumes a realistic distribution of the Curie temperature of the underlying material, grain size, as well as grain and head position.

  15. Nanoscale heat transfer in the head-disk interface for heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haoyu; Xiong, Shaomin; Canchi, Sripathi; Schreck, Erhard; Bogy, David

    2016-02-01

    Laser heating has been introduced in heat-assisted magnetic recording in order to reduce the magnetic coercivity and enable data writing. However, the heat flow inside a couple of nanometers head-disk gap is still not well understood. An experimental stage was built for studying heat transfer in the head-disk interface (HDI) and the heat-induced instability of the HDI. A laser heating system is included to produce a heated spot on the disk at the position of the slider. A floating air bearing slider is implemented in the stage for sensing the temperature change of the slider due to the heat transfer from the disk by the use of an embedded contact sensor, and the gap between the two surfaces is controlled by the use of a thermal fly-height control actuator. By using this system, we explore the dependency of the heat transfer on the gap spacing as well as the disk temperature.

  16. Using hybrid magnetic bearings to completely suspend the impeller of a ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Khanwilkar, P; Olsen, D; Bearnson, G; Allaire, P; Maslen, E; Flack, R; Long, J

    1996-06-01

    Clinically available blood pumps and those under development suffer from poor mechanical reliability and poor biocompatibility related to anatomic fit, hemolysis, and thrombosis. To alleviate these problems concurrently in a long-term device is a substantial challenge. Based on testing the performance of a prototype, and on our judgment of desired characteristics, we have configured an innovative ventricular assist device, the CFVAD4, for long-term use. The design process and its outcome, the CFVAD4 system configuration, is described. To provide unprecedented reliability and biocompatibility, magnetic bearings completely suspend the rotating pump impeller. The CFVAD4 uses a combination of passive (permanent) and active (electric) magnetic bearings, a mixed flow impeller, and a slotless 3-phase brushless DC motor. These components are shaped, oriented, and integrated to provide a compact, implantable, pancake-shaped unit for placement in the left upper abdominal quadrant of adult humans. PMID:8817963

  17. Super-paramagnetic nanoparticles synthesis in a thermal plasma reactor assisted by magnetic bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartaya, R.; Puerta, J.; Martín, P.

    2015-03-01

    The present work is a study of the synthesis of super-paramagnetic particles. A preliminary study based on thermodynamic diagrams of Gibbs free energy minimization, was performed with the CSIRO Thermochemical System. In this way, the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles from precursor powder of ore iron in a thermal reactor, was performed. Then the process was simulated mathematically using magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic equations, in order to predict the synthesis process. A cylindrical reactor assisted by magnetic mirrors was used. The peak intensity of 0.1 tesla (1000 Gauss) was measured at the end of the solenoid. A PlazjetTM 105/15 thermal plasma torch was used. The precursor powder was iron oxide and the plasma gas, nitrogen. The magnetite powder was magnetized whit rare-earth super-magnets, alloy of neodymium-iron boron (NdFeB) grade N-42. The synthesized nanoparticles diameters was measured with a scanning electron microscope LECO and the permanent magnetization with a YOKOGAWA gauss meter, model 325i. Our experimental results show that it is possible the synthesis of super-paramagnetic nanoparticles in thermal plasma reactors.

  18. Development of a high magnetic field assisted pulsed laser deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kejun; Dai, Jianming; Wu, Wenbin; Zhang, Peng; Zuo, Xuzhong; Zhou, Shu; Zhu, Xuebin; Sheng, Zhigao; Liang, Changhao; Sun, Yuping

    2015-09-01

    A high magnetic field assisted pulsed laser deposition (HMF-PLD) system has been developed to in situ grow thin films in a high magnetic field up to 10 T. In this system, a specially designed PLD cylindrical vacuum chamber is horizontally located in the bore configuration of a superconducting magnet with a bore diameter of 200 mm. To adjust the focused pulsed laser into the target in such a narrow PLD vacuum chamber, an ingeniously built-in laser leading-in chamber is employed, including a laser mirror with a reflection angle of 65° and a damage threshold up to 3.4 J/cm2. A laser alignment system consisting of a built-in video-unit leading-in chamber and a low-energy alignment laser is applied to monitor and align the pulsed laser propagation in the PLD vacuum chamber. We have grown La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) thin films on (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 (001) [LSAT (001)] substrates by HMF-PLD. The results show that the nanostructures of the LSMO films can be tuned from an epitaxially continuous film structure without field to a vertically aligned nanorod structure with an applied high magnetic field above 5 T, and the dimension size of the nanorods can be tuned by the strength of the magnetic field. The associated magnetic anisotropy is found to be highly dependent on the nanorod structures. We show how the HMF-PLD provides an effective route toward tuning the nanostructures and the physical properties of functional thin films, giving it an important role in development of nanodevices and their application.

  19. Development of a high magnetic field assisted pulsed laser deposition system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kejun; Dai, Jianming; Wu, Wenbin; Zhang, Peng; Zuo, Xuzhong; Zhou, Shu; Zhu, Xuebin; Sheng, Zhigao; Liang, Changhao; Sun, Yuping

    2015-09-01

    A high magnetic field assisted pulsed laser deposition (HMF-PLD) system has been developed to in situ grow thin films in a high magnetic field up to 10 T. In this system, a specially designed PLD cylindrical vacuum chamber is horizontally located in the bore configuration of a superconducting magnet with a bore diameter of 200 mm. To adjust the focused pulsed laser into the target in such a narrow PLD vacuum chamber, an ingeniously built-in laser leading-in chamber is employed, including a laser mirror with a reflection angle of 65° and a damage threshold up to 3.4 J/cm(2). A laser alignment system consisting of a built-in video-unit leading-in chamber and a low-energy alignment laser is applied to monitor and align the pulsed laser propagation in the PLD vacuum chamber. We have grown La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) thin films on (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 (001) [LSAT (001)] substrates by HMF-PLD. The results show that the nanostructures of the LSMO films can be tuned from an epitaxially continuous film structure without field to a vertically aligned nanorod structure with an applied high magnetic field above 5 T, and the dimension size of the nanorods can be tuned by the strength of the magnetic field. The associated magnetic anisotropy is found to be highly dependent on the nanorod structures. We show how the HMF-PLD provides an effective route toward tuning the nanostructures and the physical properties of functional thin films, giving it an important role in development of nanodevices and their application. PMID:26429478

  20. Microgravity and Hypogravity Compatible Methods for the Destruction of Solid Wastes by Magnetically Assisted Gasification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Jovanovic, Goran N.; Pinto-Espinoza, Joaquin; Reed, Brian; Sornchamni, Thana

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes a three-year collaborative effort between researchers at UMPQUA Research Company (URC) and the Chemical Engineering Department at Oregon State University (OSU). The Magnetically Assisted Gasification (MAG) concept was originally conceived as a microgravity and hypogravity compatible means for the decomposition of solid waste materials generated aboard spacecraft, lunar and planetary habitations, and for the recovery of potentially valuable resources. While a number of methods such as supercritical water oxidation (SCW0), fluidized bed incineration, pyrolysis , composting and related biological processes have been demonstrated for the decomposition of solid wastes, none of these methods are particularly well- suited for employment under microgravity or hypogravity conditions. For example, fluidized bed incineration relies upon a balance between drag forces which the flowing gas stream exerts upon the fluidization particles and the opposing force of gravity. In the absence of gravity, conventional fluidization cannot take place. Hypogravity operation can also be problematic for conventional fluidized bed reactors, because the various factors which govern fluidization phenomena do not all scale linearly with gravity. For this reason it may be difficult to design and test fluidized bed reactors in lg, which are intended to operate under different gravitational conditions. However, fluidization can be achieved in microgravity (and hypogravity) if a suitable replacement force to counteract the forces between fluid and particles can be found. Possible alternatives include: centripetal force, electric fields, or magnetic fields. Of these, magnetic forces created by the action of magnetic fields and magnetic field gradients upon ferromagnetic media offer the most practical approach. The goal of this URC-OSU collaborative effort was to develop magnetic hardware and methods to control the degree of fluidization (or conversely consolidation) of granular

  1. Thermal effects on transducer material for heat assisted magnetic recording application

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Rong Xu, Baoxi; Cen, Zhanhong; Ying, Ji Feng; Toh, Yeow Teck

    2015-05-07

    Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) is a promising technology for next generation hard disk drives with significantly increased data recording capacities. In HAMR, an optical near-field transducer (NFT) is used to concentrate laser energy on a magnetic recording medium to fulfill the heat assist function. The key components of a NFT are transducer material, cladding material, and adhesion material between the cladding and the transducer materials. Since transducer materials and cladding materials have been widely reported, this paper focuses on the adhesion materials between the Au transducer and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cladding material. A comparative study for two kinds of adhesion material, Ta and Cr, has been conducted. We found that Ta provides better thermal stability to the whole transducer than Cr. This is because after thermal annealing, chromium forms oxide material at interfaces and chromium atoms diffuse remarkably into the Au layer and react with Au to form Au alloy. This study also provides insights on the selection of adhesion material for HAMR transducer.

  2. Ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor with resolved temperature cross-sensitivity employing microfiber-assisted modal interferometer integrated with magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haifeng; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Bo; Song, Binbin; Wu, Jixuan; Lin, Lie

    2016-07-01

    A compact and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensor has been proposed by exploiting a microfiber-assisted Mach-Zehnder interferometer functionalized by magnetic fluids. We have experimentally investigated the transmission spectral responses of the proposed sensor to the variation of applied magnetic field intensity and environmental temperature. The interference dips exhibit a magnetic field sensitivity as large as -1.193 nm/Oe for a low magnetic field intensity range of 3 Oe to 21 Oe. By using the sensing matrix containing the magnetic field as well as temperature sensitivities for different interference dips, the temperature cross-sensitivity issue could be effectively resolved. Our proposed sensor is anticipated to find potential applications in weak magnetic field detection, and moreover, the immunity to temperature cross-sensitivity effect ensures its applicability in temperature-fluctuated environments.

  3. Launch summary for 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Sounding rocket, satellite, and space probe launchings are presented. Time, date, and location of the launches are provided. The sponsoring countries and the institutions responsible for the launch are listed.

  4. Areal density optimizations for heat-assisted magnetic recording of high-density media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Christoph; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Suess, Dieter; Praetorius, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is hoped to be the future recording technique for high-density storage devices. Nevertheless, there exist several realization strategies. With a coarse-grained Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch model, we investigate in detail the benefits and disadvantages of a continuous and pulsed laser spot recording of shingled and conventional bit-patterned media. Additionally, we compare single-phase grains and bits having a bilayer structure with graded Curie temperature, consisting of a hard magnetic layer with high TC and a soft magnetic one with low TC, respectively. To describe the whole write process as realistically as possible, a distribution of the grain sizes and Curie temperatures, a displacement jitter of the head, and the bit positions are considered. For all these cases, we calculate bit error rates of various grain patterns, temperatures, and write head positions to optimize the achievable areal storage density. Within our analysis, shingled HAMR with a continuous laser pulse moving over the medium reaches the best results and thus has the highest potential to become the next-generation storage device.

  5. A novel permanently magnetised high gradient magnetic filter using assisted capture for fine particles

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.H.P.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes the structure and properties of a novel permanently magnetised magnetic filter for fine friable radioactive material. Previously a filter was described and tested. This filter was designed so that the holes in the filter are left open as capture proceeds which means the pressure drop builds up only slowly. This filter is not suitable for friable composite particles which can be broken by mechanical forces. The structure of magnetic part of the second filter has been changed so as to strongly capture particles composed of fine particles weakly bound together which tend to break when captured. This uses a principle of assisted-capture in which coarse particles aid the capture of the fine fragments. The technique has the unfortunate consequence that the pressure drop across the filter rises faster as capture capture proceeds than the filter described previously. These filters have the following characteristics: (1) No external magnet is required. (2) No external power is required. (3) Small is size and portable. (4) Easily interchangeable. (5) Can be cleaned without demagnetising.

  6. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Ferrite Nanoparticles: Effect of Reaction Temperature on Particle Size and Magnetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, S; Sangeetha, J; Philip, John

    2015-08-01

    The preparation of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles of different particle sizes by controlling the reaction temperature using microwave assisted synthesis is reported. The iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at two different temperatures viz., 45 and 85 °C were characterized using techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The average size of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C is found to be 10 and 13.8 nm, respectively, and the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagantic behavior at room temperature. The saturation magnetization values of nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C were found to be 67 and 72 emu/g, respectively. The increase in particle size and saturation magnetization values with increase in incubation temperature is attributed to a decrease in supersaturation at elevated temperature. The Curie temperature was found to be 561 and 566 0C for the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at 45 and 85 °C, respectively. The FTIR spectrum of the iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized at different temperatures exhibited the characteristic peaks that corresponded to the stretching of bonds between octahedral and tetrahedral metal ions to oxide ions. Our results showed that the ferrite nanoparticle size can be varied by controlling the reaction temperature inside a microwave reactor. PMID:26369150

  7. The Operation of Magnetically Assisted Fluidized Bed in Microgravity and Variable Gravity: Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornchamni, T.; Jovanovic, G.; Atwater, J.; Akse, J.; Wheeler, R.

    Typically, the operation of a conventional fluidized bed relies on the balance of gravitational, buoyancy, and drag forces. In the absence of normal gravity, or under microgravity and variable gravity conditions, the gravitational force must be replaced with an alternative force to restore fluidization. Our work has shown that, given a suitable variable magnetic field design, the resulting magnetic field gradient can create sufficient magnetic force acting upon the ferromagnetic particles to replace or supplement the gravitational force. Therefore, the ferromagnetic granular media can be fluidized in either microgravity or hypogravity. In this paper, we present our experimental and theoretical work leading to a) development of theoretical model based on fundamental principles for the design of the Gradient Magnetically Assisted Fluidized Bed (G-MAFB), and b) practical implementation of the G-MAFB in the filtration and destruction of solid biowaste particles from liquid streams. The G-MAFB system consists of a fluidization column and series of Helmholtz electromagnetic coils, with DC power supply. Each Helmholtz ring is powered and controlled separately. Experiments are performed in both 0g (on board NASA KC- 135) and 1g (laboratory) environments. The experiments in 0g are conducted in a two-dimensional, square cross-section, tapered fluidization column. The tapered shape is introduced to provide additional stability to the fluidization particles. The experiments in 0g prove that the magnetic force has a significant role in keeping the particles from extruding out of the bed. Without the magnetic force, it is impossible to have fluidization in space. Solid waste destruction technologies are needed to support long duration human habitation in space. The current technologies, including supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), microwave powered combustion and fluidized bed incineration, have been applied to the destruction of solid wastes, but none are compatible with

  8. Operation of magnetically assisted fluidized beds in microgravity and variable gravity: experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sornchamni, T.; Jovanovic, G. N.; Reed, B. P.; Atwater, J. E.; Akse, J. R.; Wheeler, R. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of solid waste into useful resources in support of long duration manned missions in space presents serious technological challenges. Several technologies, including supercritical water oxidation, microwave powered combustion and fluidized bed incineration, have been tested for the conversion of solid waste. However, none of these technologies are compatible with microgravity or hypogravity operating conditions. In this paper, we present the gradient magnetically assisted fluidized bed (G-MAFB) as a promising operating platform for fluidized bed operations in the space environment. Our experimental and theoretical work has resulted in both the development of a theoretical model based on fundamental principles for the design of the G-MAFB, and also the practical implementation of the G-MAFB in the filtration and destruction of solid biomass waste particles from liquid streams. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Photonic crystal membrane reflectors by magnetic field-guided metal-assisted chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Balasundaram, Karthik; Mohseni, Parsian K.; Li, Xiuling E-mail: xiuling@illinois.edu; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Zhao, Deyin; Zhou, Weidong E-mail: xiuling@illinois.edu

    2013-11-18

    Metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) is a simple etching method that uses metal as the catalyst for anisotropic etching of semiconductors. However, producing nano-structures using MacEtch from discrete metal patterns, in contrast to interconnected ones, has been challenging because of the difficulties in keeping the discrete metal features in close contact with the semiconductor. We report the use of magnetic field-guided MacEtch (h-MacEtch) to fabricate periodic nanohole arrays in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers for high reflectance photonic crystal membrane reflectors. This study demonstrates that h-MacEtch can be used in place of conventional dry etching to produce ordered nanohole arrays for photonic devices.

  10. Fabrication of a glucose biosensor based on citric acid assisted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rahul; Titus, Elby; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bardhan, Neel Kanth; Krishna, Rohit; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Gracio, José

    2012-08-01

    A novel and practical glucose biosensor was fabricated with immobilization of Glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme on the surface of citric acid (CA) assisted cobalt ferrite (CF) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This innovative sensor was constructed with glassy carbon electrode which is represented as (GOx)/CA-CF/(GCE). An explicit high negative zeta potential value (-22.4 mV at pH 7.0) was observed on the surface of CA-CF MNPs. Our sensor works on the principle of detection of H2O2 which is produced by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. This sensor has tremendous potential for application in glucose biosensing due to the higher sensitivity 2.5 microA/cm2-mM and substantial increment of the anodic peak current from 0.2 microA to 10.5 microA. PMID:22962799

  11. Preparation of magnetic Ni@graphene nanocomposites and efficient removal organic dye under assistance of ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuang; Guo, Jianhui; Yang, Qing; Tong, Lei; Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Jiwei; Gong, Chunhong; Zhou, Jingfang; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we report a facile one-step synthesis of Ni@graphene nanocomposite microspheres (NGs) in hydrazine hydrate solution under ultrasound conditions. During the ultrasonic process, graphene oxide (GO) was reduced effectively under mild conditions and Ni nanoparticles were simultaneously formed and anchored on graphene sheets, which act as spacers to keep the neighboring sheets separated. The target products exhibit excellent performance for fast and efficient removal of dye contaminants, rhodamine B (RhB) in aqueous solution, under assistance of ultrasound. Finally, the nanocomposites can be easily separated from solution by a magnet. Furthermore, higher content of graphene can be produced under sonication, which facilitates faster and more efficient removal of organic contaminates in the solution. The nanocomposites were also characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis.

  12. Operation of magnetically assisted fluidized beds in microgravity and variable gravity: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornchamni, T.; Jovanovic, G. N.; Reed, B. P.; Atwater, J. E.; Akse, J. R.; Wheeler, R. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of solid waste into useful resources in support of long duration manned missions in space presents serious technological challenges. Several technologies, including supercritical water oxidation, microwave powered combustion and fluidized bed incineration, have been tested for the conversion of solid waste. However, none of these technologies are compatible with microgravity or hypogravity operating conditions. In this paper, we present the gradient magnetically assisted fluidized bed (G-MAFB) as a promising operating platform for fluidized bed operations in the space environment. Our experimental and theoretical work has resulted in both the development of a theoretical model based on fundamental principles for the design of the G-MAFB, and also the practical implementation of the G-MAFB in the filtration and destruction of solid biomass waste particles from liquid streams.

  13. Magnetic field assisted assembly of highly ordered percolated nanostructures and their application for transparent conductive thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotsenko, Oleksandr; Tokarev, Alexander; Gruzd, Alexey; Enright, Timothy; Minko, Sergiy

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic field assisted assembly is used to fabricate aligned single nanowire mesh-like nanostructured films. Inhomogeneous magnetic field is applied to translocate high aspect ratio silver nanowires from suspensions to the surface of solid supports. The tangential component of the magnetic field vector is rotated in two consecutive steps to arrange the rectangular mesh-like structure of orthogonally oriented nanowires with minimal fractions of loops and bent structures. This work demonstrates highly ordered nanowire films with superior properties to randomly deposited structures- specifically one order of magnitude greater conductivity and more than ten percent higher transparency. This method is simple, scalable and can be used for the directed assembly of magnetic and nonmagnetic highly ordered, percolated structures.Magnetic field assisted assembly is used to fabricate aligned single nanowire mesh-like nanostructured films. Inhomogeneous magnetic field is applied to translocate high aspect ratio silver nanowires from suspensions to the surface of solid supports. The tangential component of the magnetic field vector is rotated in two consecutive steps to arrange the rectangular mesh-like structure of orthogonally oriented nanowires with minimal fractions of loops and bent structures. This work demonstrates highly ordered nanowire films with superior properties to randomly deposited structures- specifically one order of magnitude greater conductivity and more than ten percent higher transparency. This method is simple, scalable and can be used for the directed assembly of magnetic and nonmagnetic highly ordered, percolated structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00154d

  14. Synthesis of magnetic nickel spinel ferrite nanospheres by a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jilin; Shi Jianxin; Gong Menglian

    2009-08-15

    Nickel ferrite nanospheres were successfully synthesized by a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal method. The reverse emulsion was composed of water, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, polyoxyethylene(10)nonyl phenyl ether, iso-amyl alcohol and hexane. During the hydrothermal process, beta-FeO(OH) and Ni{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 0.25}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.125}(OH){sub 2}.0.38H{sub 2}O (INCHH) nanorods formed first and then transformed into nickel spinel ferrite nanospheres. The phase transformation mechanism is proposed based on the results of X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, etc. Nickel ferrite may form at the end of the INCHH nanorods or from the solution accompanied by the dissolution of beta-FeO(OH) and INCHH nanorods. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows that a few Fe{sup 3+} ions have been reduced to Fe{sup 2+} ions during the formation of nickel ferrite. The maximum magnetization of the nickel ferrite nanospheres obtained after hydrothermal reaction for 30 h is 55.01 emu/g, which is close to that of bulk NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: Nickel ferrite nanospheres were obtained through a reverse emulsion-assisted hydrothermal process. The phase transformation as a function of reaction time was studied based on the XRD, TEM and EDS analyses.

  15. Effect analysis of magnet on L[sub d] and L[sub q] inductance of permanent magnet assisted synchronous reluctance motor using finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Kim, J.C.; Hyun, D.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1999-05-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of Permanent Magnet Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Motor (PMASynRM) using coupled FEM and Preisach modelling. The focus of this paper is the characteristics analysis of d, q axis inductance according to magnetizing direction and quantity of interior permanent magnet for PMASynRM. Investigation on nonlinear characteristic of machine is performed by Preisach's theory application. Comparisons are given with characteristics of normal Synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM) and those according to the quantity of residual flux density (0.3T and 0.4T) in PMASynRM, respectively.

  16. Magnetic-field-assisted photothermal therapy of cancer cells using Fe-doped carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Vardarajan, Vijaylakshmi; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2012-01-01

    Photothermal therapy with assistance of nanoparticles offers a solution for the destruction of cancer cells without significant collateral damage to otherwise healthy cells. However, minimizing the required number of injected nanoparticles is a major challenge. Here, we introduce the use of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs), localizing them in a desired region by applying an external magnetic-field, and irradiating the targeted cancer cells with a near-infrared laser beam. The MCNPs were prepared in benzene, using an electric plasma discharge, generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. The CNPs were made ferromagnetic by use of Fe-electrodes to dope the CNPs, as confirmed by magnetometry. Transmission electron microscopy measurements showed the size distribution of these MCNPs to be in the range of 5 to 10 nm. For photothermal irradiation, a tunable continuous wave Ti: Sapphire laser beam was weakly focused on to the cell monolayer under an inverted fluorescence microscope. The response of different cell types to photothermal irradiation was investigated. Cell death in the presence of both MCNPs and laser beam was confirmed by morphological changes and propidium iodide fluorescence inclusion assay. The results of our study suggest that MCNP based photothermal therapy is a promising approach to remotely guide photothermal therapy.

  17. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Fabrication and Manipulation of Nonspherical Polymer Particles in Ferrofluid-Based Droplet Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Taotao; Cheng, Rui; Sheppard, Gareth R; Locklin, Jason; Mao, Leidong

    2015-08-11

    We report a novel magnetic-field-assisted method for the fabrication and manipulation of nonspherical polymer particles within a ferrofluid-based droplet microfluidic device. Shape control and chain assembly of droplets with tunable lengths have been achieved. PMID:26212067

  18. Characterization of heat-assisted magnetic probe recording on cobalt nickel/platinum multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li

    In this PhD project, a method of heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) potentially suitable for probe-based storage systems is characterized. Field emission current from a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip is used as the heating source. Pulse voltages of 2--7 V were applied to a CoNi/Pt multilayered film. Identical films fabricated on a bare silicon substrate and an oxidized silicon substrate were applied as the recording medium. Different types of Ir/Pt and W STM tips were used in the experiment. Without the external magnetic field, results show that thermally recorded magnetic marks are formed in the film on silicon substrate, with a nearly uniform mark size of 170 nm when the pulse voltage is above a threshold value. Larger marks were obtained on the film on oxidized silicon substrate. The threshold voltage depends on the material work function of tip. External fields will change the mark size: negative fields lead to smaller marks and positive fields lead to larger marks. Field addition during writing also shows that positive field lowers the threshold write voltage. A model is used to quantitatively simulate our experimental results. It contains three aspects: model of emission current, model of heat transfer in a multilayered structure, and model of magnetic domain. The simulation result agrees well with our experimental results. Based on the model, the requirements to achieve smaller marks are sharp STM tip and high coercivity granular perpendicular medium fabricated on a high thermal conductivity substrate. Some experiments were done on some high coercivity samples. We achieved the smallest marks as 50 nm. We also tried writing by very sharp STM tips with radius below 10 nm, and unfortunately no marks were written. In order to achieve small marks for the purpose of 1 Terabits/in2 recording density, i.e., mark size of 25 nm, we propose writing on a granular perpendicular medium by applying a 3.5 V voltage between a sharp W STM tip (with tip radius of

  19. Fifth FLTSATCOM to be launched

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Launch of the FLTSATOOM-E, into an elliptical orbit by the Atlas Centaur launch vehicle is announced. The launch and relevant launch operations are described. A chart of the launch sequence for FLTSATCOM-E communication satellite is given.

  20. Magnetic Separation-Assistant Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition for Highly Sensitive Probing of Nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ran; Liu, Qian; Hong, Zhangyong; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-12-15

    For the widely used "off-on" fluorescence (or phosphorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET or PRET) system, the separation of donors and acceptors species was vital for enhancing the sensitivity. To date, separation of free donors from FRET/PRET inhibition systems was somewhat not convenient, whereas separation of the target-induced far-between acceptors has hardly been reported yet. We presented here a novel magnetic separation-assistant fluorescence resonance energy transfer (MS-FRET) inhibition strategy for highly sensitive detection of nucleolin using Cy5.5-AS1411 as the donor and Fe3O4-polypyrrole core-shell (Fe3O4@PPY) nanoparticles as the NIR quenching acceptor. Due to hydrophobic interaction and π-π stacking of AS1411 and PPY, Cy5.5-AS1411 was bound onto the surface of Fe3O4@PPY, resulting in 90% of fluorescence quenching of Cy5.5-AS1411. Owing to the much stronger specific interaction of AS1411 and nucleolin, the presence of nucleolin could take Cy5.5-AS1411 apart from Fe3O4@PPY and restore the fluorescence of Cy5.5-AS1411. The superparamagnetism of Fe3O4@PPY enabled all separations and fluorescence measurements complete in the same quartz cell, and thus allowed the convenient but accurate comparison of the sensitivity and fluorescence recovery in the cases of separation or nonseparation. Compared to nonseparation FRET inhibition, the separation of free Cy5.5-AS1411 from Cy5.5-AS1411-Fe3O4@PPY solution (the first magnetic separation, MS-1) had as high as 25-fold enhancement of the sensitivity, whereas further separation of the nucleolin-inducing far-between Fe3O4@PPY from the FRET inhibition solution (the second magnetic separation, MS-2) could further enhance the sensitivity to 35-fold. Finally, the MS-FRET inhibition assay displayed the linear range of 0.625-27.5 μg L(-1) (8.1-359 pM) and detection limit of 0.04 μg L(-1) (0.05 pM) of nucleolin. The fluorescence intensity recovery (the percentage ratio of the final restoring fluorescence intensity

  1. Launching jets from accretion belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-05-01

    We propose that sub-Keplerian accretion belts around stars might launch jets. The sub-Keplerian inflow does not form a rotationally supported accretion disk, but it rather reaches the accreting object from a wide solid angle. The basic ingredients of the flow are a turbulent region where the accretion belt interacts with the accreting object via a shear layer, and two avoidance regions on the poles where the accretion rate is very low. A dynamo that is developed in the shear layer amplifies magnetic fields to high values. It is likely that the amplified magnetic fields form polar outflows from the avoidance regions. Our speculative belt-launched jets model has implications on a rich variety of astrophysical objects, from the removal of common envelopes to the explosion of core collapse supernovae by jittering jets.

  2. IRIS Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation demonstrates the launch and deployment of NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission satellite via a Pegasus rocket. The launch is scheduled for June 26, 2013 from V...

  3. Shuttle Era: Launch Directors

    NASA Video Gallery

    A space shuttle launch director is the leader of the complex choreography that goes into a shuttle liftoff. Ten people have served as shuttle launch directors, making the final decision whether the...

  4. Space Launch System Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA is ready to move forward with the development of the Space Launch System -- an advanced heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new national capability for human exploration be...

  5. Launch Vehicle Operations Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackledge, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Saturn Launch Vehicle Operations Simulator (LVOS) was developed for NASA at Kennedy Space Center. LVOS simulates the Saturn launch vehicle and its ground support equipment. The simulator was intended primarily to be used as a launch crew trainer but it is also being used for test procedure and software validation. A NASA/contractor team of engineers and programmers implemented the simulator after the Apollo XI lunar landing during the low activity periods between launches.

  6. Launch Summary for 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Spacecraft launching for 1979 are identified and listed under the categories of (1) sounding rockets, and (2) artificial Earth satellites and space probes. The sounding rockets section includes a listing of the experiments, index of launch sites and tables of the meanings and codes used in the launch listing.

  7. Thermal modeling of head disk interface system in heat assisted magnetic recording

    SciTech Connect

    Vemuri, Sesha Hari; Seung Chung, Pil; Jhon, Myung S.; Min Kim, Hyung

    2014-05-07

    A thorough understanding of the temperature profiles introduced by the heat assisted magnetic recording is required to maintain the hotspot at the desired location on the disk with minimal heat damage to other components. Here, we implement a transient mesoscale modeling methodology termed lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for phonons (which are primary carriers of energy) in the thermal modeling of the head disk interface (HDI) components, namely, carbon overcoat (COC). The LBM can provide more accurate results compared to conventional Fourier methodology by capturing the nanoscale phenomena due to ballistic heat transfer. We examine the in-plane and out-of-plane heat transfer in the COC via analyzing the temperature profiles with a continuously focused and pulsed laser beam on a moving disk. Larger in-plane hotspot widening is observed in continuously focused laser beam compared to a pulsed laser. A pulsed laser surface develops steeper temperature gradients compared to continuous hotspot. Furthermore, out-of-plane heat transfer from the COC to the media is enhanced with a continuous laser beam then a pulsed laser, while the temperature takes around 140 fs to reach the bottom surface of the COC. Our study can lead to a realistic thermal model describing novel HDI material design criteria for the next generation of hard disk drives with ultra high recording densities.

  8. Launch summary for 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Sounding rockets, artificial Earth satellites, and space probes launched betweeen January 1 and December 31, 1980 are listed. Data tabulated for the rocket launchings show launching site, instruments carried, date of launch, agency rocket identification, sponsoring country, experiment discipline, peak altitude, and the experimenter or institution responsible. Tables for satellites and space probes show COSPAR designation, spacecraft name, country, launch date, epoch date, orbit type, apoapsis, periapsis and inclination period. The functions and responsibilities of the World Data Center and the areas of scientific interest at the seven subcenters are defined. An alphabetical listing of experimenters using the sounding rockets is also provided.

  9. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, C.W.; Savage, M.E.

    1992-03-17

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors. 5 figs.

  10. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.; Savage, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors.

  11. Launch operations efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diloreto, Clem; Fischer, Carl; Atkins, Bob

    1988-01-01

    The paper discusses launch operations from a program perspective. Launch operations cost is a significant part of program cost. New approaches to launch operations, integrated with lessons learned, have the potential to increase safety and reliability as well as reduce cost. Operational efficiency must be an initial program goal. Design technology and management philosophy must be implemented early to ensure operational cost goals. Manufacturing cost and launch cost are related to operational efficiency. True program savings can be realized through implementation of launch operations cost saving approaches which do not correspondingly increase cost in other program areas such as manufacturing and software development and maintenance. Launch rate is a key factor in the cost/flight analysis and the determination of launch operations efficiency goals.

  12. Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording: Fundamental Limits to Inverse Electromagnetic Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Samarth

    In this dissertation, we address the burgeoning fields of diffractive optics, metals-optics and plasmonics, and computational inverse problems in the engineering design of electromagnetic structures. We focus on the application of the optical nano-focusing system that will enable Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR), a higher density magnetic recording technology that will fulfill the exploding worldwide demand of digital data storage. The heart of HAMR is a system that focuses light to a nano- sub-diffraction-limit spot with an extremely high power density via an optical antenna. We approach this engineering problem by first discussing the fundamental limits of nano-focusing and the material limits for metal-optics and plasmonics. Then, we use efficient gradient-based optimization algorithms to computationally design shapes of 3D nanostructures that outperform human designs on the basis of mass-market product requirements. In 2014, the world manufactured ˜1 zettabyte (ZB), ie. 1 Billion terabytes (TBs), of data storage devices, including ˜560 million magnetic hard disk drives (HDDs). Global demand of storage will likely increase by 10x in the next 5-10 years, and manufacturing capacity cannot keep up with demand alone. We discuss the state-of-art HDD and why industry invented Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) to overcome the data density limitations. HAMR leverages the temperature sensitivity of magnets, in which the coercivity suddenly and non-linearly falls at the Curie temperature. Data recording to high-density hard disks can be achieved by locally heating one bit of information while co-applying a magnetic field. The heating can be achieved by focusing 100 microW of light to a 30nm diameter spot on the hard disk. This is an enormous light intensity, roughly ˜100,000,000x the intensity of sunlight on the earth's surface! This power density is ˜1,000x the output of gold-coated tapered optical fibers used in Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopes

  13. NAP1-Assisted Nucleosome Assembly on DNA Measured in Real Time by Single-Molecule Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Vlijm, Rifka; Smitshuijzen, Jeremy S. J.; Lusser, Alexandra; Dekker, Cees

    2012-01-01

    While many proteins are involved in the assembly and (re)positioning of nucleosomes, the dynamics of protein-assisted nucleosome formation are not well understood. We study NAP1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) assisted nucleosome formation at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. This method allows to apply a well-defined stretching force and supercoiling density to a single DNA molecule, and to study in real time the change in linking number, stiffness and length of the DNA during nucleosome formation. We observe a decrease in end-to-end length when NAP1 and core histones (CH) are added to the dsDNA. We characterize the formation of complete nucleosomes by measuring the change in linking number of DNA, which is induced by the NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly, and which does not occur for non-nucleosomal bound histones H3 and H4. By rotating the magnets, the supercoils formed upon nucleosome assembly are removed and the number of assembled nucleosomes can be counted. We find that the compaction of DNA at low force is about 56 nm per assembled nucleosome. The number of compaction steps and associated change in linking number indicate that NAP1-assisted nucleosome assembly is a two-step process. PMID:23050009

  14. A novel magnetic field-assisted polishing method using magnetic compound slurry and its performance in mirror surface finishing of miniature V-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youliang; Wu, Yongbo; Mitsuyoshi, Nomura

    2016-05-01

    A novel magnetic field-assisted polishing technique was proposed for finishing 3D structured surface using a magnetic compound (MC) slurry. The MC slurry was prepared by blending carbonyl-iron-particles, abrasive grains and α-cellulose into a magnetic fluid which contains nano-scale magnetite particles. An experimental setup was constructed firstly by installing an oscillation worktable and a unit onto a polishing machine. Then, experimental investigations were conducted on oxygen-free copper workpiece with parallel distributed linear V-grooves to clarify the influence of the polishing time and abrasive impact angle on the grooves surface qualities. It was found that (1) the groove form accuracy, i.e. the form retention rate η varied with the polishing locations. Although the form retention rate η deteriorated during the polishing process, the final η was greater than 99.4%; (2) the effective impact angle θm affected the material removal and form accuracy seriously. An increase of the absolute value θm resulted with an increase of material removal rate and a decrease of the form accuracy; (3) the work-surface roughness decreased more than 6 times compared with the original surface after MC slurry polishing. These results confirmed the performance of the proposed new magnetic field-assisted polishing method in the finishing of 3D-structured surface.

  15. COSMOS Launch Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnins, Indulis

    2002-01-01

    COSMOS-3M is a two stage launcher with liquid propellant rocket engines. Since 1960's COSMOS has launched satellites of up to 1.500kg in both circular low Earth and elliptical orbits with high inclination. The direct SSO ascent is available from Plesetsk launch site. The very high number of 759 launches and the achieved success rate of 97,4% makes this space transportation system one of the most reliable and successful launchers in the world. The German small satellite company OHB System co-operates since 1994 with the COSMOS manufacturer POLYOT, Omsk, in Russia. They have created the joint venture COSMOS International and successfully launched five German and Italian satellites in 1999 and 2000. The next commercial launches are contracted for 2002 and 2003. In 2005 -2007 COSMOS will be also used for the new German reconnaissance satellite launches. This paper provides an overview of COSMOS-3M launcher: its heritage and performance, examples of scientific and commercial primary and piggyback payload launches, the launch service organization and international cooperation. The COSMOS launch service business strategy main points are depicted. The current and future position of COSMOS in the worldwide market of launch services is outlined.

  16. One-pot laser-assisted synthesis of porous carbon with embedded magnetic cobalt nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Sopronyi, Mihai; Sima, Felix; Delmotte, Luc; Vaulot, Cyril; Zlotea, Claudia; Paul-Boncour, Valérie; Le Meins, Jean-Marc

    2015-05-01

    A novel one-pot laser-assisted approach is reported herein for the synthesis of ordered carbons with embedded cobalt nanoparticles. The process is based on a UV pulsed laser exposure of an ethanolic solution consisting of green carbon precursors, a structure directing agent and a cobalt salt. Very short irradiation times (5 to 30 min) are only required to polymerize and cross-link carbon precursors (i.e. phloroglucinol and glyoxylic acid) independent of a catalyst presence. The influence of three metallic salts (acetate, nitrate and chloride) on the phenolic resin and carbon characteristics (structure, texture and particle size/distribution) was systematically studied. When exposed to UV laser, the metallic salt exhibited a strong influence on the particle size and distribution in the carbon matrix rather than on the textural carbon properties. Using cobalt acetate, very small (3.5 nm) and uniformly dispersed particles were obtained by this simple, fast and green one-pot synthesis approach. An original combined 13C CP-MAS and DP-DEC solid state NMR spectroscopy analysis allowed to determine the structure of phenolic resins as well as the location of the cobalt salt in the resin. Complementarily, the 1H solid-state and relaxation NMR provided unique insights into the rigidity (cross-linking) of the phenolic resin and dispersion of the cobalt salt. The magnetic properties of cobalt nanoparticles were found to be size-dependent: large Co nanoparticles (~50 nm) behave as bulk Co whereas small Co nanoparticles are superparamagnetic.A novel one-pot laser-assisted approach is reported herein for the synthesis of ordered carbons with embedded cobalt nanoparticles. The process is based on a UV pulsed laser exposure of an ethanolic solution consisting of green carbon precursors, a structure directing agent and a cobalt salt. Very short irradiation times (5 to 30 min) are only required to polymerize and cross-link carbon precursors (i.e. phloroglucinol and glyoxylic acid

  17. High-End Concept Based on Hypersonic Two-Stage Rocket and Electro-Magnetic Railgun to Launch Micro-Satellites Into Low-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozic, O.; Longo, J. M.; Giese, P.; Behren, J.

    2005-02-01

    The electromagnetic railgun technology appears to be an interesting alternative to launch small payloads into Low Earth Orbit (LEO), as this may introduce lower launch costs. A high-end solution, based upon present state of the art technology, has been investigated to derive the technical boundary conditions for the application of such a new system. This paper presents the main concept and the design aspects of such propelled projectile with special emphasis on flight mechanics, aero-/thermodynamics, materials and propulsion characteristics. Launch angles and trajectory optimisation analyses are carried out by means of 3 degree of freedom simulations (3DOF). The aerodynamic form of the projectile is optimised to provoke minimum drag and low heat loads. The surface temperature distribution for critical zones is calculated with DLR developed Navier-Stokes codes TAU, HOTSOSE, whereas the engineering tool HF3T is used for time dependent calculations of heat loads and temperatures on project surface and inner structures. Furthermore, competing propulsions systems are considered for the rocket engines of both stages. The structural mass is analysed mostly on the basis of carbon fibre reinforced materials as well as classical aerospace metallic materials. Finally, this paper gives a critical overview of the technical feasibility and cost of small rockets for such missions. Key words: micro-satellite, two-stage-rocket, railgun, rocket-engines, aero/thermodynamic, mass optimization

  18. One-pot laser-assisted synthesis of porous carbon with embedded magnetic cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Sopronyi, Mihai; Sima, Felix; Delmotte, Luc; Vaulot, Cyril; Zlotea, Claudia; Paul-Boncour, Valérie; Le Meins, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-14

    A novel one-pot laser-assisted approach is reported herein for the synthesis of ordered carbons with embedded cobalt nanoparticles. The process is based on a UV pulsed laser exposure of an ethanolic solution consisting of green carbon precursors, a structure directing agent and a cobalt salt. Very short irradiation times (5 to 30 min) are only required to polymerize and cross-link carbon precursors (i.e. phloroglucinol and glyoxylic acid) independent of a catalyst presence. The influence of three metallic salts (acetate, nitrate and chloride) on the phenolic resin and carbon characteristics (structure, texture and particle size/distribution) was systematically studied. When exposed to UV laser, the metallic salt exhibited a strong influence on the particle size and distribution in the carbon matrix rather than on the textural carbon properties. Using cobalt acetate, very small (3.5 nm) and uniformly dispersed particles were obtained by this simple, fast and green one-pot synthesis approach. An original combined (13)C CP-MAS and DP-DEC solid state NMR spectroscopy analysis allowed to determine the structure of phenolic resins as well as the location of the cobalt salt in the resin. Complementarily, the (1)H solid-state and relaxation NMR provided unique insights into the rigidity (cross-linking) of the phenolic resin and dispersion of the cobalt salt. The magnetic properties of cobalt nanoparticles were found to be size-dependent: large Co nanoparticles (∼50 nm) behave as bulk Co whereas small Co nanoparticles are superparamagnetic. PMID:25981107

  19. Heat assisted recording on bottom layer of dual recording layer perpendicular magnetic recording media for two and a half dimensional (2.5D) magnetic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Santoso, B.; Shi, J. Z.; Xu, B. X.; Tsai, J. W. H.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a study on two and a half dimensional (2.5D) perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) media consisting of dual hard magnetic recording layers (RL) with 1st or top RL1 used for conventional data storage and 2nd or bottom RL2 used for dedicated servo with lower linear densities or DC servo patterns with focus on the writability issue of the bottom servo layer (RL2). We demonstrate experimentally the feasibility to magnetically erase, write, and re-write RL2 by laser assist on a home built heat-assisted-magnetic-recording writing test system. Experimental data (by magnetic force microscopy measurements) show that the signal amplitudes of the pre-recorded magnetic patterns for both RL1 and RL2 decrease at almost the same rate with thermal erasure using scanning laser power (Pw) from 13 mW to 23 mW, clearly indicating equally effective laser heating and close temperature rise for RL1 and RL2 for far field laser heating with laser pulse duration in sub-μs and μs range. This is further verified by theoretical simulations of the thermal distribution and the temperature rise depth profile in dual layer media by laser heating. Simulations indicate very little temperature difference of less than 6 K (˜1% of maximum temperature rise) between RL1 and RL2 because the main mechanism of temperature rises in RL1 and RL2 is due to the effective thermal conduction from the top layers to lower layers. These experimental and theoretical study results could provide useful understanding and insights into servo writing methods of 2.5D PMR media.

  20. Launch facilities as infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trial, Mike

    The idea is put forth that launch facilities in the U.S. impose inefficiencies on launch service providers due to the way they have been constructed. Rather than constructing facilities for a specific program, then discarding them when the program is complete, a better use of the facilities investment would be in constructing facilities flexible enough for use by multiple vehicle types over the course of a 25-year design lifetime. The planned National Launch System (NLS) program offers one possible avenue for the federal government to provide a nucleus of launch infrastructure which can improve launch efficiencies. The NLS goals are to develop a new space launch system to meet civil and national needs. The new system will be jointly funded by DOD and NASA but will actively consider commercial space needs. The NLS will improve reliability, responsiveness, and mission performance, and reduce operating costs. The specifics of the infrastructure concept are discussed.

  1. GPM: Waiting for Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is poised for launch from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tanegashima Space Center, scheduled for the afternoon of Feb. 27, ...

  2. Kestrel balloon launch system

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, M.J.

    1991-10-01

    Kestrel is a high-altitude, Helium-gas-filled-balloon system used to launch scientific payloads in winds up to 20 knots, from small platforms or ships, anywhere over land or water, with a minimal crew and be able to hold in standby conditions. Its major components consist of two balloons (a tow balloon and a main balloon), the main deployment system, helium measurement system, a parachute recovery unit, and the scientific payload package. The main scope of the launch system was to eliminate the problems of being dependent of launching on long airfield runways, low wind conditions, and long launch preparation time. These objectives were clearly met with Kestrel 3.

  3. Usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy in Korean women: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy is the technique of choice for lesions that are visible only with breast MRI. The purpose of this study was to report our clinical experience with MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy in Korean women. Methods A total of 13 patients with 15 lesions for MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy were prospectively entered into this study between September 2009 and November 2011. Biopsy samples were obtained in a 3-T magnet using a 9-guage MRI-compatible vacuum-assisted biopsy device. We evaluated clinical indications for biopsy, lesion characteristics on prebiopsy MRI, pathologic results, and postbiopsy complication status. Results The clinical indications for MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy were as follows: abnormalities in patients with interstitial mammoplasty on screening MRI (n = 10); preoperative evaluation of patients with a recently diagnosed cancer (n = 3); and suspicious recurrence on follow-up MRI after cancer surgery (n = 1) or chemotherapy (n = 1). All lesions have morphologic features suspicious or highly suggestive of malignancy by the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System category of MRI (C4a = 12, C4b = 2, C5 = 1). In two of the 15 lesions (13.3%, <6 mm), MRI-guided 9-gauge vacuum-assisted breast biopsy was deferred due to nonvisualization of the MRI findings that led to biopsy and the lesions were stable or disappeared on follow up so were considered benign. Of 13 biopsied lesions, pathology revealed four malignancies (4/13, 30.8%; mean size 15.5 mm) and nine benign lesions (9/13, 69.2%; size 14.2 mm). Immediate postprocedural hematoma (mean size 23.5 mm) was observed in eight out of 13 patients (61.5%) and was controlled conservatively. Conclusions Our initial experience of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy showed a success rate of 86.7% and a cancer diagnosis rate of 30.8%, which was quite satisfactory. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy is a

  4. STS-114: Post Launch Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Dean Acosta, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Public Affairs hosted this post launch press conference. Present were Mike Griffin, NASA Administrator; William Ready, Associate Administrator for Space Operations; Bill Parsons, Space Shuttle Program Manager; Mike Leinbach, NASA Launch Director; and Wayne Hill, Deputy Program Manager for Space Shuttle Program. Each expressed thanks to all of NASA Officials and employees, contractors, vendors and the crew for their hard work the past two and a half years that resulted the successful and pristine launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. The Panel emphasized that through extensive technical analysis, thorough planning and tremendous amount of public support brought them full circle again to return to flight. Flight safety, debris during rocket separation, sensors, observations from the mission control, launch conditions were some of the topics discussed with the News media.

  5. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  6. Foreign launch competition growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, R. F.; Wolfe, M. G.; Pryke, I. W.

    1986-07-01

    A survey is given of progress made by other nations in providing or preparing to provide satellite launch services. The European Space Agency has four generations of Ariane vehicles, with a fifth recently approved; a second launch facility in French Guiana that has become operational has raised the possible Ariane launch rate to 10 per year, although a May failure of an Ariane 2 put launches on hold. The French Hermes spaceplane and the British HOTOL are discussed. Under the auspices of the Italian National Space Plane, the Iris orbital transfer vehicle is developed and China's Long March vehicles and the Soviet Protons and SL-4 vehicles are discussed; the Soviets moreover are apparently developing not only a Saturn V-class heavy lift vehicle with a 150,000-kg capacity (about five times the largest U.S. capacity) but also a space shuttle and a spaceplane. Four Japanese launch vehicles and some vehicles in an Indian program are also ready to provide launch services. In this new, tough market for launch services, the customers barely outnumber the suppliers. The competition develops just as the Challenger and Titan disasters place the U.S. at a disadvantage and underline the hard work ahead to recoup its heretofore leading position in launch services.

  7. NASA launch schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a record-setting launch schedule for 1984—10 space shuttle flights (see Table 1), 10 satellite deployments from the space shuttle in orbit and 12 unmanned missions using expendable launch vehicles. Also scheduled is the launch on March 1 for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of Landsat D‧, the nation's second earth resources satellite.The launch activity will begin February 3 with the launch of shuttle mission 41-B using the orbiter Challenger. Two communications satellites will be deployed from 41-B: Westar-VI, for Western Union, and Palapa B-2 for the government of Indonesia. The 8-day mission will feature the first shuttle landing at Kennedy Space Center in Florida; and the first flight of the Manned Maneuvering Unit, a self-contained, propulsive backpack that will allow astronauts to move about in space without being tethered to the spacecraft.

  8. A new concentric double prosthesis for sutureless, magnetic-assisted aortic arch inclusion.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Acute dissection of the ascending aorta is a life-threatening condition in which the aortic wall develops one or more tears of the intima associated with intramural rupture of the media layer with subsequent formation of a two lumina vessel. The remaining outer layer is just the adventitia, with high risk of complete rupture. Vital organs may be under-perfused. Mortality rate in this acute event is about 50% if an emergent surgical procedure is not performed as soon as possible to replace the tract affected by the primary rupture. Nevertheless, the emergent surgical procedure is affected by high risk of mortality or severe neurologic sequelae, due to the need for deep hypothermia and cardiocirculatory arrest and different methods of cerebral protection. If the patient survives the acute event, a frequent outcome is the establishment of a chronic aortic dissection in the remaining aorta and late chronic dissecting aneurysm, usually starting from the surgical suture itself. Traumatism of surgical stitches and of direct blood flow pressure on weak aortic wall can be important contributing factors of the chronic disease. In conclusions, the majority of these patients undergoes a high risk operation without a complete solution of the disease. We hypothesize that excluding the aortic layers from the blood direct flow and using an anastomotic technique which does not include surgical stitches could help to significantly reduce the recurrence of aortic dissection after the acute event and shorten hypothermic arrest duration. We devised a double tubular prosthesis consisting of two concentric artificial tubes between which the aortic wall is confined and excluded from direct blood flow. We also devised a magnetic assisted sutureless anastomotic technique that seals the aortic tissue between the two prostheses and avoids the perforation of the fragile aortic wall with surgical stitches. We are presenting here this new prototype and draw a few different models. Both acute and

  9. Size dependence of magnetization switching and its dispersion of Co/Pt nanodots under the assistance of radio frequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Masaki Okamoto, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Nobuaki; Kitakami, Osamu; Shimatsu, Takehito

    2014-04-07

    We have studied the dot size dependence of microwave assisted magnetization switching (MAS) on perpendicular magnetic Co/Pt multilayer dot array. The significant microwave assistance effect has been observed over the entire dot size D ranging from 50 nm to 330 nm examined in the present study. The MAS behavior, however, critically depends on D. The excitation frequency dependence of the switching field is well consistent with the spin wave theory, indicating that the magnetization precession in MAS is in accordance with the well defined eigenmodes depending on the dot diameter. The lowest order spin wave is only excited for D ≤ 100 nm, and then the MAS effect is well consistent with that of the single macrospin prediction. On the other hand, higher order spin waves are excited for D > 100 nm, giving rise to the significant enhancement of the MAS effect. The dispersion of MAS effect also depends on D and is significantly reduced for the region of D > 100 nm. This significant reduction of the dispersion is attributed to the essential feature of the MAS effect which is insensitive to the local fluctuation of anisotropy field, such as defect, damaged layer, and so on.

  10. Thermally assisted interlayer magnetic coupling through Ba0.05Sr0.95TiO3 barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreira, Santiago J.; Avilés Félix, Luis; Sirena, Martín; Alejandro, Gabriela; Steren, Laura B.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the interlayer exchange coupling across insulating barriers observed on Ni80Fe20/Ba0.05Sr0.95TiO3/La0.66Sr0.33MnO3 (Py/BST0.05/LSMO) trilayers. The coupling mechanism has been analyzed in terms of the barrier thickness, samples' substrate, and temperature. We examined the effect of MgO (MGO) and SrTiO3 (STO) (001) single-crystalline substrates on the magnetic coupling and also on the magnetic anisotropies of the samples in order to get a deeper understanding of the magnetism of the structures. We measured a weak coupling mediated by spin-dependent tunneling phenomena whose sign and strength depend on barrier thickness and substrate. An antiferromagnetic (AF) exchange prevails for most of the samples and smoothly increases with the barrier thicknesses as a consequence of the screening effects of the BST0.05. The coupling monotonically increases with temperature in all the samples and this behavior is attributed to thermally assisted mechanisms. The magnetic anisotropy of both magnetic components has a cubic symmetry that in the case of permalloy is added to a small uniaxial component.

  11. Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lara, A.; Aliev, F. G.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Prieto, J. L.; Huth, M.

    2014-11-03

    The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

  12. Magnetization reversal assisted by half antivortex states in nanostructured circular cobalt disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, A.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Prieto, J. L.; Huth, M.; Aliev, F. G.

    2014-11-01

    The half antivortex, a fundamental topological structure which determines magnetization reversal of submicron magnetic devices with domain walls, has been suggested also to play a crucial role in spin torque induced vortex core reversal in circular disks. Here, we report on magnetization reversal in circular disks with nanoholes through consecutive metastable states with half antivortices. In-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance and broadband susceptibility measurements accompanied by micromagnetic simulations reveal that cobalt (Co) disks with two and three linearly arranged nanoholes directed at 45° and 135° with respect to the external magnetic field show reproducible step-like changes in the anisotropic magnetoresistance and magnetic permeability due to transitions between different intermediate states mediated by vortices and half antivortices confined to the dot nanoholes and edges, respectively. Our findings are relevant for the development of multi-hole based spintronic and magnetic memory devices.

  13. Bifrost: A 4th Generation Launch Architecture Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrschneider, R. R.; Young, D.; St.Germain, B.; Brown, N.; Crowley, J.; Maatsch, J.; Olds, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    A 4th generation launch architecture is studied for the purpose of drastically reducing launch costs and hence enabling new large mass missions such as space solar power and human exploration of other planets. The architecture consists of a magnetic levitation launch tube placed on the equator with the exit end elevated to approximately 20 km. Several modules exist for sending manned and unmanned payloads into Earth orbit. Analysis of the launch tube operations, launch trajectories, module aerodynamics, propulsion modules, and system costs are presented. Using the hybrid logistics module, it is possible to place payloads into low Earth orbit for just over 100 per lb.

  14. Preparation and characterization of magnetic carboxylated nanodiamonds for vortex-assisted magnetic solid-phase extraction of ziram in food and water samples.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    A simple and rapid vortex-assisted magnetic solid phase extraction (VA-MSPE) method for the separation and preconcentration of ziram (zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate), subsequent detection of the zinc in complex structure of ziram by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) has been developed. The ziram content was calculated by using stoichiometric relationship between the zinc and ziram. Magnetic carboxylated nanodiamonds (MCNDs) as solid-phase extraction adsorbent was prepared and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These magnetic carboxylated nanodiamonds carrying the ziram could be easily separated from the aqueous solution by applying an external magnetic field; no filtration or centrifugation was necessary. Some important factors influencing the extraction efficiency of ziram such as pH of sample solution, amount of adsorbent, type and volume of eluent, extraction and desorption time and sample volume were studied and optimized. The total extraction and detection time was lower than 10min The preconcentration factor (PF), the precision (RSD, n=7), the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 160, 7.0%, 5.3µgL(-1) and 17.5µgL(-1), respectively. The interference of various ions has been examined and the method has been applied for the determination of ziram in various waters, foodstuffs samples and synthetic mixtures. PMID:27343589

  15. Mechanism of coercivity enhancement by Ag addition in FePt-C granular films for heat assisted magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Varaprasad, B. S. D. Ch. S.; Takahashi, Y. K. Wang, J.; Hono, K.; Ina, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ueno, W.; Nitta, K.; Uruga, T.

    2014-06-02

    We investigated the Ag distribution in a FePtAg-C granular film that is under consideration for a heat assisted magnetic recording medium by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure. Ag is rejected from the core of FePt grains during the deposition, forming Ag-enriched shell surrounding L1{sub 0}-ordered FePt grains. Since Ag has no solubility in both Fe and Pt, the rejection of Ag induces atomic diffusions thereby enhancing the kinetics of the L1{sub 0}-order in the FePt grains.

  16. A compact model for magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) switched by thermally assisted Spin transfer torque (TAS + STT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weisheng; Duval, Julien; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Chappert, Claude

    2011-12-01

    Thermally assisted spin transfer torque [TAS + STT] is a new switching approach for magnetic tunnel junction [MTJ] nanopillars that represents the best trade-off between data reliability, power efficiency and density. In this paper, we present a compact model for MTJ switched by this approach, which integrates a number of physical models such as temperature evaluation and STT dynamic switching models. Many experimental parameters are included directly to improve the simulation accuracy. It is programmed in the Verilog-A language and compatible with the standard IC CAD tools, providing an easy parameter configuration interface and allowing high-speed co-simulation of hybrid MTJ/CMOS circuits.

  17. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its electric-field-assisted switching of Heusler-compound-based perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhaoqiang; Shen, Lei; Cai, Yongqing; Wu, Qingyun; Zeng, Minggang; Han, Guchang; Feng, Yuan Ping

    2014-10-01

    Employing density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we systematically investigate the structural, magnetic and magnetoelectric properties of the Co2FeAl(CFA)/MgO interface, as well as the spin-dependent transport characteristics of the CFA/MgO/CFA perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs). We find that the structure of the CFA/MgO interface with the oxygen-top FeAl termination has high thermal stability, which is protected by the thermodynamic equilibrium limit. Furthermore, this structure is found to have perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA). Giant electric-field-assisted modifications of this interfacial MCA through magnetoelectric coupling are demonstrated with an MCA coefficient of up to 10-7 erg V-1 cm. In addition, our non-collinear spin transport calculations of the CFA/MgO/CFA p-MTJ predict a good magnetoresistance performance of the device.

  18. Hi-C Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    The High resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) was launched on a NASA Black Brant IX two-stage rocket from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico July 11, 2012. The experiment reached a maximum velocit...

  19. Commercial space launches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, David W.

    1984-04-01

    While the space shuttle is expected to be the principle Space Transportation System (STS) of the United States, the Reagan Administration is moving ahead with the President's declared space policy of encouraging private sector operation of expendable launch vehicles (ELV's). With the signing of the “Commercial Space Launch Law” on October 30, the administration hopes that it has opened up the door for commercial ventures into space by streamlining regulations and coordinating applications for launches. The administration considers the development and operation of private sector ELV's as an important part of an overall U.S. space policy, complementing the space shuttle and government ELV's. The law follows by nearly a year the creation of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation at the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), which will coordinate applications for commercial space launches.

  20. Anchor Trial Launch

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  1. GPM Launch Coverage

    NASA Video Gallery

    A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory aboard, launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan o...

  2. Advanced launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Jan C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is presented. The costs, reliability, capabilities, infrastructure are briefly described. Quality approach, failure modes, structural design, technology benefits, and key facilities are outlined. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs.

  3. Expedition 27 Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA astronaut Ron Garan and Russian cosmonauts Andrey Borisenko and Alexander Samokutyaev launch in their Soyuz TMA-21 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on April 4, 2011 (April...

  4. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Cancer.gov

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  5. NASA Now: Glory Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this episode of NASA Now, Dr. Hal Maring joins us to explain why the upcoming launch of the Glory satellite is so important to further our understanding of climate change. He also will speak on ...

  6. Launch of Juno!

    NASA Video Gallery

    An Atlas V rocket lofted the Juno spacecraft toward Jupiter from Space Launch Complex-41. The 4-ton Juno spacecraft will take five years to reach Jupiter on a mission to study its structure and dec...

  7. IRVE 3 Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment, or IRVE-3, launched on July 23, 2012, from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. The purpose of the IRVE-3 test was to show that a space capsule can use an infl...

  8. Synthesis and magnetic properties of (Eu-Ni) substituted Y-type hexaferrite by surfactant assisted co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Irshad; Islam, M. U.; sadiq, Imran; Karamat, Nazia; Iftikhar, Aisha; khan, M. Azhar; Shah, Afzal; Athar, Muhammad; Shakir, Imran; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem

    2015-07-01

    A series of (Eu-Ni) substituted Y-type hexaferrite with composition Sr2Co(2-x)NixEuyFe(12-y)O22 (x=0.0-1, Y=0.0-0.1) were prepared by the surfactant assisted co-precipitation method. The present samples were sintered at 1050 °C for 8 h. The shape of the particles is plate-like which is very advantageous for various applications and the grain size varies from 73 to 269 nm. The values of saturation magnetization (Ms), remanent magnetization (Mr) and magnetic moment (nB) were found to decrease which are attributed to the weakening of super exchange interactions. The values of in-plane Squareness ratios (Mr/Ms) ranging from 0.41 to 0.65 whereas in case of out of plane measurement it varies from 0.30 to 0.62.The investigated samples can be used in perpendicular recording media (PRM) due to high value of coercivity 2300 Oe which is analogous to the those of M-type and W-type hard magnetic.

  9. Structural and magnetic characterization of Sm-doped GaN grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehara, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuta; Hasegawa, Shigehiko

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated structural, optical and magnetic properties of Sm-doped GaN thin films grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction reveal that Ga1- x Sm x N films with a SmN mole fraction of ˜8% or below are grown on GaN templates without segregation of any secondary phases. With increasing SmN mole fraction, the c-axis lattice parameter of the GaSmN films linearly increases. GaSmN films with low Sm concentrations exhibit inner-4f transitions of Sm3+ in photoluminescence spectra. The present findings show that Sm atoms are substituted for some Ga atoms as trivalent ions (Sm3+). The Ga1- x Sm x N films display hysteresis loops in magnetization versus external magnetic field (M-H) curves even at 300 K. We will discuss the origin of these features together with the corresponding temperature dependences of magnetization.

  10. STS-64 launch view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Passing through some of the trailer clouds of an overcast sky which temporarily postponed its launch, the Space Shuttle Discovery heads for its 19th Earth orbital flight. Several kilometers away, astronaut John H. Casper, Jr., who took this picture, was piloting the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) from which the launch and landing area weather was being monitored. Onboard Discovery were astronauts Richard N. Richards, L. Blaine Hammond, Jr., Mark C. Lee, Carl J. Meade, Susan J. Helms, and Jerry M. Linenger.

  11. Dynamics Explorer launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Simultaneously launched from the WSMC, two satellites are to be placed into polar, copolar orbit in order to acquire data on the coupling phenomena between Earth's lower thermosphere and the magnetosphere, as part of the Solar-Terrestrial Program. The mission sequence, instruments, and science data processing system are described as well as the characteristics of the Delta 3913 launch vehicle, and payload separation staging.

  12. Electromagnetic launch, then lessening chemical thrust over time as laser beam powered ion thrust grows{emdash}to any orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, T.M.

    1996-03-01

    The ElectroMagnetic (EM) Launch Tube (LT), using High-Temp SuperConduction (HTSC) EM launch coils if developed, will be built in a tall building, or, if not, at a steep angle up the west slope of an extinct volcano. The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) exits the LT at such high velocity that the otherwise violent entry into the atmosphere is made possible by Special-Laser-Launch-Assist (SLLA), which ionizes and expands the atmosphere immediately ahead of the RLV. At first a brief period of chemical thrust is followed by a long period of ion thrust during ascent to orbit. As decades pass and greater ion thrust is developed, the period of chemical thrust shortens until it is no longer needed. The RLV{close_quote}s ion thrusters are powered by laser/maser, beamed first from the launch site, then from two large Solar-Power-Satellites (SPS) 180{degree} apart in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) orbit. In orbit, the RLV is limited in where it can go only by the amount of propellant it carries or is stored in various orbits. The RLV can land at a launch site on Earth by using both chemical and ion thrust at first, and later by ion thrust alone as developments cause a far lighter RLV to carry no chemical engines/fuel/tanks. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Optimization of Magnetic Field-Assisted Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes for Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Raniszewski, Grzegorz; Pyc, Marcin; Kolacinski, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    One of the most effective ways of synthesizing carbon nanotubes is the arc discharge method. This paper describes a system supported by a magnetic field which can be generated by an external coil. An electric arc between two electrodes is stabilized by the magnetic field following mass flux stabilization from the anode to the cathode. In this work four constructions are compared. Different configurations of cathode and coils are calculated and presented. Exemplary results are discussed. The paper describes attempts of magnetic field optimization for different configurations of electrodes. PMID:25295922

  14. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  15. Microwave assisted magnetization reversal in cylindrical antidot arrays with in-plane and perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumak, Mehmet; Ture, Kerim; Aktas, Gulen; Vega, Victor; Prida, Victor; Garcia, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    Porous anodic alumina is a particularly attractive self-ordered system used as template to fabricate nanostructures. The anodic film contains a self-ordered hexagonal array of parallel pores with tunable pore size and interpore distance, and whose pore locations can be templated. Deposition of magnetic films onto porous alumina leads to the formation of porous magnetic films, whose properties differ significantly from those of unpatterned films. The study of antidot arrays has both technological and fundamental importance. Although porous alumina films are typically synthesized in a planar geometry, in this work we deposited NiFe and Ti/CoCrPt magnetic films with in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy onto cylindrical-geometry porous anodic alumina substrates to achieve cylindrical antidot arrays. The effect of both, the magnitude of the AC current and the circular magnetic field on the magnetization reversal has been studied for in-plane and perpendicular anisotropies. The level of reduction in the switching field was found to be dependent on the power, the frequency of the microwave pulses and the circular applied magnetic field. Such a reduction is associate with the competition between pumping and damping processes.

  16. Launch Period Development for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalkowski, Theresa D.; Johannesen, Jennie R.; Lam, Try

    2008-01-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter is targeted to launch in 2011 and would reach the giant planet about five years later. The interplanetary trajectory is planned to include two large deep space maneuvers and an Earth gravity assist a little more than two years after launch. In this paper, we describe the development of a 21-day launch period for Juno with the objective of keeping overall launch energy and delta-V low while meeting constraints imposed on Earth departure, the deep space maneuvers' timing and geometry, and Jupiter arrival.

  17. AXONOMETRIC, LAUNCH DOOR AND DOOR CYLINDER, LAUNCH PLATFORM ROLLER GUIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AXONOMETRIC, LAUNCH DOOR AND DOOR CYLINDER, LAUNCH PLATFORM ROLLER GUIDE, CRIB SUSPENSION SHOCK STRUT, LAUNCH PLATFORM - Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S-8, Launch Facility, Approximately 3 miles east of Winters, 500 feet southwest of Highway 1770, center of complex, Winters, Runnels County, TX

  18. Fundamental limits in heat-assisted magnetic recording and methods to overcome it with exchange spring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, D.; Vogler, C.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Windl, R.; Breth, L.; Fidler, J.

    2015-04-01

    The switching probability of magnetic elements for heat-assisted recording with pulsed laser heating was investigated. It was found that FePt elements with a diameter of 5 nm and a height of 10 nm show, at a field of 0.5 T, thermally written-in errors of 12%, which is significantly too large for bit-patterned magnetic recording. Thermally written-in errors can be decreased if larger-head fields are applied. However, larger fields lead to an increase in the fundamental thermal jitter. This leads to a dilemma between thermally written-in errors and fundamental thermal jitter. This dilemma can be partly relaxed by increasing the thickness of the FePt film up to 30 nm. For realistic head fields, it is found that the fundamental thermal jitter is in the same order of magnitude of the fundamental thermal jitter in conventional recording, which is about 0.5-0.8 nm. Composite structures consisting of high Curie top layer and FePt as a hard magnetic storage layer can reduce the thermally written-in errors to be smaller than 10-4 if the damping constant is increased in the soft layer. Large damping may be realized by doping with rare earth elements. Similar to single FePt grains in composite structure, an increase of switching probability is sacrificed by an increase of thermal jitter. Structures utilizing first-order phase transitions breaking the thermal jitter and writability dilemma are discussed.

  19. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb (sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 1b(sub f)/s/lb(sub m) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  20. Filling the launch gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeser, S.

    1986-05-01

    Vehicles proposed to fill the gap in the U.S. space program's space transport needs for the next decade resulting from the January Challenger disaster, are discussed. Prior to the accident, the Air Force planned to purchase a Complementary Expendable Launch Vehicle system consisting of 10 single-use Titan-34D7 rockets. Another heavy lift booster now considered is the Phoenix H. Commercial launch vehicle systems projected to be available in the necessary time frame include the 215,000-pound thrust 4000-pound LEO payload capacity NASA Delta, the 11,300-pound LEO payload capacity Atlas Centaur the first ICBM, and the all-solid propellant expendable 2000-pound LEO payload Conestoga rocket. Also considered is the man-rated fully reusable Phoenix vertical take-off and vertical-landing launch vehicle.

  1. STS-91 Launch of Discovery from Launch Pad 39-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The last mission of the Shuttle-Mir program begins as the Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at 6:06:24 p.m. EDT June 2. A torrent of water is seen flowing onto the mobile launcher platform (MLP) from numerous large quench nozzles, or 'rainbirds,' mounted on its surface. This water, part of the Sound Suppression System, helps protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy and rocket exhaust reflected from the flame trench and MLP during launch. On board Discovery are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Pilot Dominic L. Gorie; and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin. The nearly 10-day mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as an STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir.

  2. Zvezda Launch Coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Footage shows the Proton Rocket (containing the Zvezda module) ready for launch at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Russia. The interior and exterior of Zvezda are seen during construction. Computerized simulations show the solar arrays deploying on Zvezda in space, the maneuvers of the module as it approaches and connects with the International Space Station (ISS), the installation of the Z1 truss on the ISS and its solar arrays deploying, and the installations of the Destiny Laboratory, Remote Manipulator System, and Kibo Experiment Module. Live footage then shows the successful launch of the Proton Rocket.

  3. Juno II Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    The modified Jupiter C (sometimes called Juno I), used to launch Explorer I, had minimum payload lifting capabilities. Explorer I weighed slightly less than 31 pounds. Juno II was part of America's effort to increase payload lifting capabilities. Among other achievements, the vehicle successfully launched a Pioneer IV satellite on March 3, 1959, and an Explorer VII satellite on October 13, 1959. Responsibility for Juno II passed from the Army to the Marshall Space Flight Center when the Center was activated on July 1, 1960. On November 3, 1960, a Juno II sent Explorer VIII into a 1,000-mile deep orbit within the ionosphere.

  4. STS-64 launch view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    With a crew of six NASA astronauts aboard, the Space Shuttle Discovery heads for its nineteenth Earth-orbital mission. Launch was delayed because of weather, but all systems were 'go,' and the spacecraft left the launch pad at 6:23 p.m. (EDT) on September 9, 1994. Onboard were astronauts Richard N. Richards, L. Blaine Hammond, Carl J. Meade, Mark C. Lee, Susan J. Helms, and Jerry M. Linenger (051-2); Making a bright reflection in nearby marsh waters, the Space Shuttle Discovery heads for its 19th mission in earth orbit (053).

  5. NASA Launch Services Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginbotham, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has need to procure a variety of launch vehicles and services for its unmanned spacecraft. The Launch Services Program (LSP) provides the Agency with a single focus for the acquisition and management of Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launch services. This presentation will provide an overview of the LSP and its organization, approach, and activities.

  6. Designing a Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) Nanocapsule for Magnetic Field-assisted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denmark, Daniel; Mukherjee, Pritish; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2014-03-01

    The method of synthesis and the characteristics of polymer based nanocapsules as biomedical drug delivery systems are presented. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been incorporated into these capsules for effective guidance with external magnetic fields to transport therapeutic compounds to various parts of the human body. Once they have reached their destination they can be stimulated to release the drug to the target tissue through externally applied fields. The polymeric material that constitutes the capsules is specifically designed to melt away with the external stimuli to deliver the therapeutic bio agents near the target tissue. In this work we use nebulization to create aqueous poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles that decompose after being heated beyond their transition temperature. Transmission Electron Microscopic imaging (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments have been conducted to study the decomposition of the capsules under external stimuli. Distribution of the magnetic nanoparticles within the capsules and their role in delivering the bio agents have been investigated by the Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM).

  7. Size-tuned Highly-ordered Magnetic Nanodot Arrays via ALD-Assisted Block Copolymer Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; Lin, Chun-Hao; Gladfelter, Wayne L.; Hillmyer, Marc H.; Leighton, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Block copolymer nanolithography of large-area well-ordered magnetic nanostructures is now possible via a variety of approaches and holds considerable appeal for fundamental science and for bit patterned recording media. Here, we demonstrate a non-lift-off damascene-type approach combined with low temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a conformal ZnO layer to provide size-controlled magnetic nanodots. Perpendicularly-aligned nonporous templates were achieved by solvent annealing polystyrene- b-polylactide (PS-PLA) films. Low temperature ALD was then used to conformally coat the template with a ZnO layer of variable thickness to systematically reduce the pore diameter. Our damascene-type non-lift-off process was then used to synthesize Ni80Fe20 dot arrays from such templates, achieving tunable dot diameters (6-30 nm) and controlled dot height (by Ar milling time). Magnetic measurements were used as a probe of island volume, good agreement being obtained between simple calculations, imaging, and blocking temperature measurements. The results demonstrate a simple route to size control from a fixed polymer template, enabling detailed studies of separation-dependent inter-dot magnetic interactions for example. This work was supported primarily by the NSF through the University of Minnesota MRSEC under Award Number DMR-0819885.

  8. Magnetic effervescent tablet-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of selenium for speciation in foods and beverages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Wu, Long; Cao, Jiaqi; Hong, Xincheng; Ye, Rui; Chen, Weiji; Yuan, Ting

    2016-07-01

    A novel, simple and rapid method based on magnetic effervescent tablet-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (MEA-IL-DLLME) followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) determination was established for the speciation of selenium in various food and beverage samples. In the procedure, a special magnetic effervescent tablet containing CO2 sources (sodium carbonate and sodium dihydrogenphosphate), ionic liquids and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was used to combine extractant dispersion and magnetic recovery procedures into a single step. The parameters influencing the microextraction efficiency, such as pH of the sample solution, volume of ionic liquid, amount of MNPs, concentration of the chelating agent, salt effect and matrix effect were investigated and optimised. Under the optimised conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) for Se(IV) were 0.021 μg l(-)(1) and the linear dynamic range was 0.05-5.0 μg l(-)(1). The relative standard deviation for seven replicate measurements of 1.0 μg l(-)(1) of Se(IV) was 2.9%. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by analysis of the standard reference materials (GBW10016 tea, GBW10017 milk powder, GBW10043 Liaoning rice, GBW10046 Henan wheat, GBW10048 celery). The proposed method was successfully applied to food and beverage samples including black tea, milk powder, mushroom, soybean, bamboo shoots, energy drink, bottled water, carbonated drink and mineral water for the speciation of Se(IV) and Se(VI) with satisfactory relative recoveries (92.0-108.1%). PMID:27181611

  9. Railgun launch of small bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Drobyshevski, E.M.; Zhukov, B.G.; Sakharov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The small body launching using gas or plasma faces the fundamental problem caused by excess energy loss due to great wall surface/volume of the barrel ratio. That is why the efficiency of the plasma armature (PA) railgun acceleration is maximum for 8--10 mm-size bodies and drops as their size decreases. For the nuclear fusion applications, where {number_sign}1--2 mm-size pellets at 5--10 km/s velocity are desirable, one is forced to search for compromise between the body size (3--4 mm) and its velocity (3 km/s). Under these conditions, EM launchers did not demonstrate an advantage over the light-gas guns. When elaborating the {number_sign}1 mm railgun, the authors made use of the ideology of the body launching at constant acceleration close to the body strength or the electrode skin-layer explosion limits. That shortened the barrel length sufficiently. The system becomes highly compact thus permitting rapid test of new operation modes and different modifications of the design including the magnetic field augmentation. As a result of these refinements, the difficulties caused by the catastrophic supply of mass ablated from the electrodes were overcome and regimes of {number_sign}1 mm body non-sabot speed-up to 4.5 km/s were found. Potentialities of the small system created are far from being exhausted.

  10. Head-disk Interface Study for Heat Assisted Magnetic Recording (HAMR) and Plasmonic Nanolithography for Patterned Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shaomin

    The magnetic storage areal density keeps increasing every year, and magnetic recording-based hard disk drives provide a very cheap and effective solution to the ever increasing demand for data storage. Heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) and bit patterned media have been proposed to increase the magnetic storage density beyond 1 Tb/in2. In HAMR systems, high magnetic anisotropy materials are recommended to break the superparamagnetic limit for further scaling down the size of magnetic bits. However, the current magnetic transducers are not able to generate strong enough field to switch the magnetic orientations of the high magnetic anisotropy material so the data writing is not able to be achieved. So thermal heating has to be applied to reduce the coercivity for the magnetic writing. To provide the heating, a laser is focused using a near field transducer (NFT) to locally heat a ~(25 nm)2 spot on the magnetic disk to the Curie temperature, which is ~ 400 C-600°C, to assist in the data writing process. But this high temperature working condition is a great challenge for the traditional head-disk interface (HDI). The disk lubricant can be depleted by evaporation or decomposition. The protective carbon overcoat can be graphitized or oxidized. The surface quality, such as its roughness, can be changed as well. The NFT structure is also vulnerable to degradation under the large number of thermal load cycles. The changes of the HDI under the thermal conditions could significantly reduce the robustness and reliability of the HAMR products. In bit patterned media systems, instead of using the continuous magnetic granular material, physically isolated magnetic islands are used to store data. The size of the magnetic islands should be about or less than 25 nm in order to achieve the storage areal density beyond 1 Tb/in2. However, the manufacture of the patterned media disks is a great challenge for the current optical lithography technology. Alternative lithography