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Sample records for magnetic relaxation method

  1. Nonlinear force-free extrapolation of the coronal magnetic field based on the magnetohydrodynamic relaxation method

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Choe, G. S.; Kim, K. S.; Pandey, V. S.; Shiota, D.; Kusano, K.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation code based on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation method. We extend the classical MHD relaxation method in two important ways. First, we introduce an algorithm initially proposed by Dedner et al. to effectively clean the numerical errors associated with ∇ · B . Second, the multigrid type method is implemented in our NLFFF to perform direct analysis of the high-resolution magnetogram data. As a result of these two implementations, we successfully extrapolated the high resolution force-free field introduced by Low and Lou with better accuracy in a drastically shorter time. We also applied our extrapolation method to the MHD solution obtained from the flux-emergence simulation by Magara. We found that NLFFF extrapolation may be less effective for reproducing areas higher than a half-domain, where some magnetic loops are found in a state of continuous upward expansion. However, an inverse S-shaped structure consisting of the sheared and twisted loops formed in the lower region can be captured well through our NLFFF extrapolation method. We further discuss how well these sheared and twisted fields are reconstructed by estimating the magnetic topology and twist quantitatively.

  2. Magnetic relaxation with vortex creep observed by the magneto-optical image method for high Tc superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wongi; Lee, Jhinhwan; Youm, Dojun; Yoo, Jaeun

    2016-06-01

    The relaxation of magnetic flux in high Tc superconducting films was investigated. After the samples were cooled in the applied magnetic fields, the magnetic field was turned off and the changes of the remaining magnetic flux distribution were observed by using the magneto-optical image method. The induced current density was examined which varies with the logarithmic-time dependence associated with the creep motions of vortices. The overall magnitude of the induced current density is observed to decrease as the external magnetic field applied during cooling is increased. The range of external fields examined was 30–50 mT. This could be explained by taking into account the formation of meandering shapes of vortices which develop during the period of transition to the creep mode. The results of the numerical simulation for this effect are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Magnetization Transfer Induced Biexponential Longitudinal Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Prantner, Andrew M.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Garbow, Joel R.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Longitudinal relaxation of brain water 1H magnetization in mammalian brain in vivo is typically analyzed on a per voxel basis using a monoexponential model, thereby assigning a single relaxation time constant to all 1H magnetization within a given voxel. This approach was tested by obtaining inversion recovery data from grey matter of rats at 64 exponentially-spaced recovery times. Using Bayesian probability for model selection, brain water data were best represented by a biexponential function characterized by fast and slow relaxation components. At 4.7 T, the amplitude fraction of the rapidly relaxing component is 3.4 ± 0.7 % with a rate constant of 44 ± 12 s-1 (mean ± SD; 174 voxels from 4 rats). The rate constant of the slow relaxing component is 0.66 ± 0.04 s-1. At 11.7 T, the corresponding values are 6.9 ± 0.9 %, 19 ± 5 s-1, and 0.48 ± 0.02 s-1 (151 voxels from 4 rats). Several putative mechanisms for biexponential relaxation behavior were evaluated, and magnetization transfer between bulk water protons and non-aqueous protons was determined to be the source of biexponential longitudinal relaxation. MR methods requiring accurate quantification of longitudinal relaxation may need to take this effect explicitly into account. PMID:18759367

  4. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  5. Magnetic relaxation of high spin magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nie

    The magnetic relaxation phenomena in Mn12 and the physics underlining these experiment results are investigated in this dissertation. We give a review on currently available theories to account for the spin or paramagnetic relaxation occurring in this system. Density matrix formalism is used to investigate the general problem of a system interacting with a bath of thermal equilibrium phonons, which gives a set of rate equations. Numerical solutions to the rate equations are also carried out. Finally comparisons between the theory and the experimentals are made to show the merits and deficiencies of the theoretical approach that we have adopted.

  6. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  7. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  8. Relaxed States in Magnetized Pair Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Mahajan, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss possibility of possible relaxed states in magnetized pair plasmas. It is shown that stationary relaxed states are described by the double curl Beltrami/Mahajan-Yoshida equation. We can thus have steady state tructures on the scale sizes of the order of the electron (ion) skin depth in an electron-positron (electron-positron-ion) plasma.

  9. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  10. Temperature relaxation in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Chao; Ren, Haijun; Cai, Huishan; Li, Ding

    2013-10-15

    A magnetic field greatly affects the relaxation phenomena in a plasma when the particles’ thermal gyro-radii are smaller than the Debye length. Its influence on the temperature relaxation (TR) is investigated through consideration of binary collisions between charged particles in the presence of a uniform magnetic field within a perturbation theory. The relaxation times are calculated. It is shown that the electron-electron (e-e) and ion-ion (i-i) TR rates first increase and then decrease as the magnetic field grows, and the doubly logarithmic term contained in the electron-ion (e-i) TR rate results from the exchange between the electron parallel and the ion perpendicular kinetic energies.

  11. The multigrid method: Fast relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, J. C., Jr.; Brandt, A.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-level grid method was studied as a possible means of accelerating convergence in relaxation calculations for transonic flows. The method employs a hierarchy of grids, ranging from very coarse (e.g. 4 x 2 mesh cells) to fine (e.g. 64 x 32); the coarser grids are used to diminish the magnitude of the smooth part of the residuals, hopefully with far less total work than would be required with optimal iterations on the finest grid. To date the method was applied quite successfully to the solution of the transonic small-disturbance equation for the velocity potential in conservation form. Nonlifting transonic flow past a parabolic arc airfoil is the example studied, with meshes of both constant and variable step size.

  12. Temperature of the magnetic nanoparticle microenvironment: estimation from relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreard, I. M.; Reeves, D. B.; Zhang, X.; Kuehlert, E.; Forauer, E. R.; Weaver, J. B.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate temperature measurements are essential to safe and effective thermal therapies for cancer and other diseases. However, conventional thermometry is challenging so using the heating agents themselves as probes allows for ideal local measurements. Here, we present a new noninvasive method for measuring the temperature of the microenvironment surrounding magnetic nanoparticles from the Brownian relaxation time of nanoparticles. Experimentally, the relaxation time can be determined from the nanoparticle magnetization induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies. A previously described method for nanoparticle temperature estimation used a low frequency Langevin function description of magnetic dipoles and varied the excitation field amplitude to estimate the energy state distribution and the corresponding temperature. We show that the new method is more accurate than the previous method at higher applied field frequencies that push the system farther from equilibrium.

  13. Dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Deissler, Robert J. Wu, Yong; Martens, Michael A.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) the relaxation time of the magnetization in response to externally applied magnetic fields is determined by the Brownian and Néel relaxation mechanisms. Here the authors investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the magnetic field strength and the implications for MPI and MPS. Methods: The Fokker–Planck equation with Brownian relaxation and the Fokker–Planck equation with Néel relaxation are solved numerically for a time-varying externally applied magnetic field, including a step-function, a sinusoidally varying, and a linearly ramped magnetic field. For magnetic fields that are applied as a step function, an eigenvalue approach is used to directly calculate both the Brownian and Néel relaxation times for a range of magnetic field strengths. For Néel relaxation, the eigenvalue calculations are compared to Brown's high-barrier approximation formula. Results: The relaxation times due to the Brownian or Néel mechanisms depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. In particular, the Néel relaxation time is sensitive to the magnetic field strength, and varies by many orders of magnitude for nanoparticle properties and magnetic field strengths relevant for MPI and MPS. Therefore, the well-known zero-field relaxation times underestimate the actual relaxation times and, in particular, can underestimate the Néel relaxation time by many orders of magnitude. When only Néel relaxation is present—if the particles are embedded in a solid for instance—the authors found that there can be a strong magnetization response to a sinusoidal driving field, even if the period is much less than the zero-field relaxation time. For a ferrofluid in which both Brownian and Néel relaxation are present, only one relaxation mechanism may dominate depending on the magnetic field strength, the driving frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the

  14. Magnetic relaxation behavior in Tb-doped perovskite manganite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingtang

    2011-01-01

    Tb-doped LaMnO 3 perovskite manganite has been synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction method. The XRD patterns of the sample revealed that it has a single perovskite-type phase with orthorhombic symmetry at room temperature. The magnetic properties of the sample were investigated. The results of the static and dynamic magnetization measurements show that there is the magnetic relaxation behavior of the cluster (spin) glass in the Tb-doped LaMnO 3 sample. The outcomes of the ac nonlinear magnetization indicate that the magnetic relaxation behavior of the cluster (spin) glass was attributed to the coexistence and competition of a ferromagnetic double exchange between Mn 3+ and Mn 4+ and an antiferromagnetic superexchange coupling among Tb 3+ and Tb 3+ as well as Mn 3+ and Mn 3+.

  15. Formation of magnetic discontinuities through viscous relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2014-05-15

    According to Parker's magnetostatic theorem, tangential discontinuities in magnetic field, or current sheets (CSs), are generally unavoidable in an equilibrium magnetofluid with infinite electrical conductivity and complex magnetic topology. These CSs are due to a failure of a magnetic field in achieving force-balance everywhere and preserving its topology while remaining in a spatially continuous state. A recent work [Kumar, Bhattacharyya, and Smolarkiewicz, Phys. Plasmas 20, 112903 (2013)] demonstrated this CS formation utilizing numerical simulations in terms of the vector magnetic field. The magnetohydrodynamic simulations presented here complement the above work by demonstrating CS formation by employing a novel approach of describing the magnetofluid evolution in terms of magnetic flux surfaces instead of the vector magnetic field. The magnetic flux surfaces being the possible sites on which CSs develop, this approach provides a direct visualization of the CS formation, helpful in understanding the governing dynamics. The simulations confirm development of tangential discontinuities through a favorable contortion of magnetic flux surfaces, as the magnetofluid undergoes a topology-preserving viscous relaxation from an initial non-equilibrium state with twisted magnetic field. A crucial finding of this work is in its demonstration of CS formation at spatial locations away from the magnetic nulls.

  16. Magnetic relaxation in uranium ferromagnetic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineev, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    There is proposed a phenomenological description of quasielastic neutron scattering in the ferromagnetic metals UGe2 and UCoGe based on their property that magnetization supported by the moments located at uranium atoms is not a conserved quantity relaxing to equilibrium by the interaction with an itinerant electron subsystem. As a result the linewidth of quasielastic neutron scattering at q→0 acquires nonvanishing value at all temperatures but the Curie temperature.

  17. Magnetic relaxation in dysprosium-dysprosium collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Bonna K.; Johnson, Cort; Kleppner, Daniel; Greytak, Thomas J.; Brahms, Nathan; Au, Yat Shan; Connolly, Colin B.; Doyle, John M.

    2011-01-15

    The collisional magnetic reorientation rate constant g{sub R} is measured for magnetically trapped atomic dysprosium (Dy), an atom with large magnetic dipole moments. Using buffer gas cooling with cold helium, large numbers (>10{sup 11}) of Dy are loaded into a magnetic trap and the buffer gas is subsequently removed. The decay of the trapped sample is governed by collisional reorientation of the atomic magnetic moments. We find g{sub R}=1.9{+-}0.5x10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 390 mK. We also measure the magnetic reorientation rate constant of holmium (Ho), another highly magnetic atom, and find g{sub R}=5{+-}2x10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 690 mK. The Zeeman relaxation rates of these atoms are greater than expected for the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, suggesting that another mechanism, such as an anisotropic electrostatic interaction, is responsible. Comparison with estimated elastic collision rates suggests that Dy is a poor candidate for evaporative cooling in a magnetic trap.

  18. Magnetic Nanoparticle Quantitation with Low Frequency Magnetic Fields: Compensating for Relaxation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John B.; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Kuehlert, Esra; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Reeves, Daniel B.; Perreard, Irina M.; Fiering, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the number of nanoparticles present in tissue is central to many in vivo and in vitro applications. Magnetic nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity both in vivo and in vitro using the harmonics of their magnetization produced in a sinusoidal magnetic field. However, relaxation effects damp the magnetic harmonics rendering them of limited use in quantitation. We show that an accurate measure of the number of nanoparticles can be made by correcting for relaxation effects. Correction for relaxation reduced errors of 50% for larger nanoparticles in high relaxation environments to 2%. The result is a method of nanoparticle quantitation capable of in vivo and in vitro applications including histopathology assays, quantitative imaging, drug delivery and thermal therapy preparation. PMID:23867287

  19. Braided magnetic fields: equilibria, relaxation and heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontin, D. I.; Candelaresi, S.; Russell, A. J. B.; Hornig, G.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes containing non-trivial field line braiding (or linkage), using mathematical and computational modelling, in the context of testable predictions for the laboratory and their significance for solar coronal heating. We investigate the existence of braided force-free equilibria, and demonstrate that for a field anchored at perfectly-conducting plates, these equilibria exist and contain current sheets whose thickness scales inversely with the braid complexity—as measured for example by the topological entropy. By contrast, for a periodic domain braided exact equilibria typically do not exist, while approximate equilibria contain thin current sheets. In the presence of resistivity, reconnection is triggered at the current sheets and a turbulent relaxation ensues. We finish by discussing the properties of the turbulent relaxation and the existence of constraints that may mean that the final state is not the linear force-free field predicted by Taylor’s hypothesis.

  20. 1H relaxation enhancement induced by nanoparticles in solutions: influence of magnetic properties and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Taheri, S Mehdizadeh; Kozłowski, A; Förster, S; Rössler, E A

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles that induce nuclear relaxation are the most promising materials to enhance the sensitivity in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the magnetic field dependence of the relaxation enhancement in solutions, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1)H spin-lattice relaxation for decalin and toluene solutions of various Fe2O3 nanoparticles was investigated. The relaxation experiments were performed in a frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz by applying Field Cycling method, and in the temperature range of 257-298 K, using nanoparticles differing in size and shape: spherical--5 nm diameter, cubic--6.5 nm diameter, and cubic--9 nm diameter. The relaxation dispersion data were interpreted in terms of a theory of nuclear relaxation induced by magnetic crystals in solution. The approach was tested with respect to its applicability depending on the magnetic characteristics of the nanocrystals and the time-scale of translational diffusion of the solvent. The role of Curie relaxation and the contributions to the overall (1)H spin-lattice relaxation associated with the electronic spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation was thoroughly discussed. It was demonstrated that the approach leads to consistent results providing information on the magnetic (electronic) properties of the nanocrystals, i.e., effective electron spin and relaxation times. In addition, features of the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation resulting from the electronic properties of the crystals and the solvent diffusion were explained. PMID:24811643

  1. Multigrid Methods for Mesh Relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M J

    2006-06-12

    When generating a mesh for the initial conditions for a computer simulation, you want the mesh to be as smooth as possible. A common practice is to use equipotential mesh relaxation to smooth out a distorted computational mesh. Typically a Laplace-like equation is set up for the mesh coordinates and then one or more Jacobi iterations are performed to relax the mesh. As the zone count gets really large, the Jacobi iteration becomes less and less effective and we are stuck with our original unrelaxed mesh. This type of iteration can only damp high frequency errors and the smooth errors remain. When the zone count is large, almost everything looks smooth so relaxation cannot solve the problem. In this paper we examine a multigrid technique which effectively smooths out the mesh, independent of the number of zones.

  2. Delayed Over-Relaxation for iterative methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antuono, M.; Colicchio, G.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a variant of the relaxation step used in the most widespread iterative methods (e.g. Jacobi Over-Relaxation, Successive Over-Relaxation) which combines the iteration at the predicted step, namely (n + 1), with the iteration at step (n - 1). We provide a theoretical analysis of the proposed algorithm by applying such a delayed relaxation step to a generic (convergent) iterative scheme. We prove that, under proper assumptions, this significantly improves the convergence rate of the initial iterative method. As a relevant example, we apply the proposed algorithm to the solution of the Poisson equation, highlighting the advantages in comparison with classical iterative models.

  3. Pharmaceutical Applications of Relaxation Filter-Selective Signal Excitation Methods for (19)F Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Case Study With Atorvastatin in Dosage Formulation.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mamiko Nasu; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed several new relaxation filter-selective signal excitation (RFS) methods for (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) that allow (13)C signal extraction of the target components from pharmaceuticals. These methods were successful in not only qualification but also quantitation over the wide range of 5% to 100%. Here, we aimed to improve the sensitivity of these methods and initially applied them to (19)F solid-state NMR, on the basis that the fluorine atom is one of the most sensitive NMR-active nuclei. For testing, we selected atorvastatin calcium (ATC), an antilipid BCS class II drug that inhibits 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and is marketed in crystalline and amorphous forms. Tablets were obtained from 2 generic drug suppliers, and the ATC content occurred mainly as an amorphous form. Using the RFS method with (19)F solid-state NMR, we succeeded in qualifying trace amounts (less than 0.5% w/w level) of crystalline phase (Form I) of ATC in the tablets. RFS methods with (19)F solid-state NMR are practical and time efficient and can contribute not only to the study of pharmaceutical drugs, including those with small amounts of a highly potent active ingredient within a formulated product, but also to the study of fluoropolymers in material sciences. PMID:26886305

  4. Estimating the contribution of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a magnetic fluid through dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Torres-Díaz, I.; Chiu-Lam, A.; Hernández, M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate how dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements (DMS) can be used to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation to the dynamic magnetic response of a magnetic fluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles. The method applies to suspensions with particles that respond through Brownian or Néel relaxation and for which the characteristic Brownian and Néel relaxation times are widely separated. First, we illustrate this using magnetic fluids consisting of mixtures of particles that relax solely by the Brownian or Néel mechanisms. Then, it is shown how the same approach can be applied to estimate the relative contributions of Brownian and Néel relaxation in a suspension consisting of particles obtained from a single synthesis and whose size distribution straddles the transition from Néel to Brownian relaxation.

  5. A fast determination method for transverse relaxation of spin-exchange-relaxation-free magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jixi Qian, Zheng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-04-15

    We propose a fast and accurate determination method for transverse relaxation of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer. This method is based on the measurement of magnetic resonance linewidth via a chirped magnetic field excitation and the amplitude spectrum analysis. Compared with the frequency sweeping via separate sinusoidal excitation, our method can realize linewidth determination within only few seconds and meanwhile obtain good frequency resolution. Therefore, it can avoid the drift error in long term measurement and improve the accuracy of the determination. As the magnetic resonance frequency of the SERF magnetometer is very low, we include the effect of the negative resonance frequency caused by the chirp and achieve the coefficient of determination of the fitting results better than 0.998 with 95% confidence bounds to the theoretical equation. The experimental results are in good agreement with our theoretical analysis.

  6. Multistage spectral relaxation method for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems.

    PubMed

    Saberi Nik, Hassan; Rebelo, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method application for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems. The proposed method, called the multistage spectral relaxation method (MSRM) is based on a technique of extending Gauss-Seidel type relaxation ideas to systems of nonlinear differential equations and using the Chebyshev pseudospectral methods to solve the resulting system on a sequence of multiple intervals. In this new application, the MSRM is used to solve famous hyperchaotic complex systems such as hyperchaotic complex Lorenz system and the complex permanent magnet synchronous motor. We compare this approach to the Runge-Kutta based ode45 solver to show that the MSRM gives accurate results. PMID:25386624

  7. Multistage Spectral Relaxation Method for Solving the Hyperchaotic Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Nik, Hassan; Rebelo, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method application for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems. The proposed method, called the multistage spectral relaxation method (MSRM) is based on a technique of extending Gauss-Seidel type relaxation ideas to systems of nonlinear differential equations and using the Chebyshev pseudospectral methods to solve the resulting system on a sequence of multiple intervals. In this new application, the MSRM is used to solve famous hyperchaotic complex systems such as hyperchaotic complex Lorenz system and the complex permanent magnet synchronous motor. We compare this approach to the Runge-Kutta based ode45 solver to show that the MSRM gives accurate results. PMID:25386624

  8. Magnetohydrodynamics dynamical relaxation of coronal magnetic fields . I. Parallel untwisted magnetic fields in 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Parnell, C. E.; Hood, A. W.

    2010-05-01

    Context. For the last thirty years, most of the studies on the relaxation of stressed magnetic fields in the solar environment have only considered the Lorentz force, neglecting plasma contributions, and therefore, limiting every equilibrium to that of a force-free field. Aims: Here we begin a study of the non-resistive evolution of finite beta plasmas and their relaxation to magnetohydrostatic states, where magnetic forces are balanced by plasma-pressure gradients, by using a simple 2D scenario involving a hydromagnetic disturbance to a uniform magnetic field. The final equilibrium state is predicted as a function of the initial disturbances, with aims to demonstrate what happens to the plasma during the relaxation process and to see what effects it has on the final equilibrium state. Methods: A set of numerical experiments are run using a full MHD code, with the relaxation driven by magnetoacoustic waves damped by viscous effects. The numerical results are compared with analytical calculations made within the linear regime, in which the whole process must remain adiabatic. Particular attention is paid to the thermodynamic behaviour of the plasma during the relaxation. Results: The analytical predictions for the final non force-free equilibrium depend only on the initial perturbations and the total pressure of the system. It is found that these predictions hold surprisingly well even for amplitudes of the perturbation far outside the linear regime. Conclusions: Including the effects of a finite plasma beta in relaxation experiments leads to significant differences from the force-free case.

  9. NMR Relaxation in Systems with Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Temperature Study

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Hejasee, Rola H.; Qadri, Shahnaz; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure and model NMR relaxation enhancement due to the presence of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles at different temperatures. Materials and Methods Relaxation rates were measured at 1.5 T using FSE sequences in samples of agarose gel doped with uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 nanoparticles over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using chemical co-precipitation included scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometry. Results Relaxivity (in s−1 mM−1 Fe) for the uncoated and coated particles, respectively, increased as follows: from 2.5 to 3.2 and 0.4 to 0.7 for T1, while for T2 it increased from 162.3 to 253.7 and 59.7 to 82.2 over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. T2 data was fitted to the echo limited motional regime using one fitting parameter that reflects the degree of agglomeration of particles into a cluster. This parameter was found to increase linearly with temperature and was larger for the PEG coated particles than the uncoated ones. Conclusion The increase of 1/T2 with temperature is modeled successfully using echo limited motional regime where both diffusion of the protons and nanoparticle cluster size increase with temperature. Both transverse and longitudinal relaxation efficiencies are reduced by PEG coating at all temperatures. If prediction of relaxation rates under different particle concentrations and operating temperatures is possible then the use of MNP in temperature monitoring and hyperthermia applications may be achieved. PMID:23720101

  10. Control of Transport-Barrier Relaxations by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, M.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.

    2009-01-30

    Transport-barrier relaxation oscillations in the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations are investigated using three-dimensional global fluid turbulence simulations from first principles at the edge of a tokamak. It is shown that resonant magnetic perturbations have a stabilizing effect on these relaxation oscillations and that this effect is due mainly to a modification of the pressure profile linked to the presence of both residual magnetic island chains and a stochastic layer.

  11. Effects of magnetic field on anisotropic temperature relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Chao; Ren Haijun; Cai Huishan; Li Ding

    2013-03-15

    In a strongly magnetized plasma, where the particles' thermal gyro-radii are smaller than the Debye length, the magnetic field greatly affects the plasma's relaxation processes. The expressions for the time rates of change of the electron and ion parallel and perpendicular temperatures are obtained and calculated analytically for small anisotropies through considering binary collisions between charged particles in the presence of a uniform magnetic field by using perturbation theory. Based on these expressions, the effects of the magnetic field on the relaxation of anisotropic electron and ion temperatures due to electron-electron collisions, ion-ion collisions, and electron-ion collisions are investigated. Consequently, the relaxation times of anisotropic electron and ion temperatures to isotropy are calculated. It is shown that electron-ion collisions can affect the relaxation of an anisotropic ion distribution in the strong magnetic field.

  12. {sup 1}H relaxation enhancement induced by nanoparticles in solutions: Influence of magnetic properties and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Taheri, S. Mehdizadeh; Förster, S.; Kozłowski, A.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles that induce nuclear relaxation are the most promising materials to enhance the sensitivity in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the magnetic field dependence of the relaxation enhancement in solutions, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation for decalin and toluene solutions of various Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles was investigated. The relaxation experiments were performed in a frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz by applying Field Cycling method, and in the temperature range of 257–298 K, using nanoparticles differing in size and shape: spherical – 5 nm diameter, cubic – 6.5 nm diameter, and cubic – 9 nm diameter. The relaxation dispersion data were interpreted in terms of a theory of nuclear relaxation induced by magnetic crystals in solution. The approach was tested with respect to its applicability depending on the magnetic characteristics of the nanocrystals and the time-scale of translational diffusion of the solvent. The role of Curie relaxation and the contributions to the overall {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation associated with the electronic spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation was thoroughly discussed. It was demonstrated that the approach leads to consistent results providing information on the magnetic (electronic) properties of the nanocrystals, i.e., effective electron spin and relaxation times. In addition, features of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation resulting from the electronic properties of the crystals and the solvent diffusion were explained.

  13. Development of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods in pharmaceutical application with new selective signal excitation methods for 13 C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using 1 H T1rho relaxation time.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Mamiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Mimura, Hisashi; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Most pharmaceutical drug substances and excipients in formulations exist in a crystalline or amorphous form, and an understanding of their state during manufacture and storage is critically important, particularly in formulated products. Carbon 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful for studying the chemical and physical state of pharmaceutical solids in a formulated product. We developed two new selective signal excitation methods in (13) C solid-state NMR to extract the spectrum of a target component from such a mixture. These methods were based on equalization of the proton relaxation time in a single domain via rapid intraproton spin diffusion and the difference in proton spin-lattice relaxation time in the rotating frame ((1) H T1rho) of individual components in the mixture. Introduction of simple pulse sequences to one-dimensional experiments reduced data acquisition time and increased flexibility. We then demonstrated these methods in a commercially available drug and in a mixture of two saccharides, in which the (13) C signals of the target components were selectively excited, and showed them to be applicable to the quantitative analysis of individual components in solid mixtures, such as formulated products, polymorphic mixtures, or mixtures of crystalline and amorphous phases. PMID:23147444

  14. Magnetic relaxation behaviour in Pr2NiSi3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhira, Santanu; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ranganathan, R.

    2016-05-01

    Time dependent isothemal remanent magnetizatin (IRM) behaviour for polycrystalline compound Pr2NiSi3 have been studied below its characteristic temperature. The compound undergoes slow magnetic relaxation with time. Along with competing interaction, non-magnetic atom disorder plays an important role in formation of non-equilibrium glassy like ground state for this compound.

  15. Structural origin of low temperature glassy relaxation in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Suvra; Regmi, Rajesh; Lawes, Gavin

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles often exhibit glass-like relaxation features at low temperatures. Here we discuss the effects of doping boron, cobalt, gadolinium and lanthanum on the low temperature magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We investigated the structure of the nanoparticles using both X-ray diffraction and Raman studies, and find evidence for secondary phase formation in certain samples. We acquired Transmission Electron Microscopic images to give direct information on the morphology and microstructure of these doped nanoparticles. We measured the ac out-of-phase susceptibility (χ//) vs temperature (T) to parameterize the low temperature glassy magnetic relaxation. All samples show low temperature magnetic relaxation, but the amplitude of the signal increases dramatically for certain dopants. We attribute these low temperature frequency-dependent magnetic relaxation features to structural defects, which are enhanced in some of the doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These studies also confirm that the low temperature relaxation in nanoparticles arises from single particle effects and are not associated with interparticle interactions.

  16. Relaxation Analysis of Porous Media at High Magnetic Field Strengths: The Influence of Internal Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.; Roberts, S. T.; Holland, D. J.; Blake, A.; Fordham, E. J.; Gladden, L. F.

    2011-03-01

    The strengths of surface interaction in catalytic materials or wettability in oil-field reservoir rocks can be assessed based on the ratio of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times T1/T2. It is often desirable to measure these relaxation times at intermediate or high magnetic field strengths (B0⩾1 T) in order to retain chemical shift information and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. However, T2 relaxation is influenced by diffusion through internal magnetic field gradients. These internal gradients, caused by the magnetic susceptibility contrast between liquid and solid, scale with increasing field strength and result in the observation of an effective T2,eff relaxation time. Here, we discuss a method by which the "true" surface relaxivity dominated T2 can be recovered using the example of materials relevant to liquid-phase catalysis. This method extends the range of magnetic field strengths available for use in porous media studies. We consider the use of T2,eff—T2,eff exchange experiments as an alternative probe of pore size in high-field relaxation analysis of oil reservoir rocks. We also show prelilminary results from a NMR grain size measurement utilizing Bayesian analysis of single point imaging k-space data.

  17. Magnetic phases and relaxation effects in fullerite C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigvinadze, J. G.; Buntar, V.; Ashimov, S. M.; Dolbin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A highly sensitive torsional vibration technique is used to study the magnetic properties of fullerite C60 (99.98%) at temperatures of 77-300 K in dynamic and static experiments. Vibrational energy absorption peaks associated with phase transitions and realignment of the magnetic structure of the fullerite are detected at T = 152, 195, 230, and 260 K. Relaxation magnetic processes in fullerite C60 at room temperature are studied. "Spontaneous" rotation of a motionless sample of fullerite freely suspended on an elastic filament is observed when external longitudinal or transverse magnetic fields are switched on. The direction of the "spontaneous" rotation changes with time. It is proposed that these phenomena are related to relaxation processes in the rotational subsystem of C60 molecular rotators, as well as to magnetic flux trapped in the fullerite and weakly damped eddy currents induced in the sample by the applied field.

  18. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments in porous media with portable Halbach-Magnets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, A.; Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2009-04-01

    Mobile NMR became a powerful tool following the development of portable NMR sensors for well logging. By now there are numerous applications of mobile NMR in materials analysis and chemical engineering where, for example, unique information about the structure, morphology and dynamics of polymers is obtained, and new opportunities are provided for geo-physical investigations [1]. In particular, dynamic information can be retrieved by two-dimensional Laplace exchange NMR, where the initial NMR relaxation environment is correlated with the final relaxation environment of molecules migrating from one environment to the other within a so-called NMR mixing time tm [2]. Relaxation-relaxation exchange experiments of water in inorganic porous media were performed at low and moderately inhomogeneous magnetic field with a simple, portable Halbach-Magnet. By conducting NMR transverse relaxation exchange experiments for several mixing times and converting the results to 2D T2 distributions (joint probability densities of transverse relaxation times T2) with the help of the inverse 2D Laplace Transformation (ILT), we obtained characteristic exchange times for different pore sizes. The results of first experiments on soil samples are reported, which reveal information about the complex pore structure of soil and the moisture content. References: 1. B. Blümich, J. Mauler, A. Haber, J. Perlo, E. Danieli, F. Casanova, Mobile NMR for Geo-Physical Analysis and Material Testing, Petroleum Science, xx (2009) xxx - xxx. 2. K. E. Washburn, P.T. Callaghan, Tracking pore to pore exchange using relaxation exchange spectroscopy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 175502.

  19. Magnetic decoupling studies of Rb relaxation in Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. M.; Walter, D. K.; Happer, W.

    2001-05-01

    We present the results of extensive experiments on the relaxation of ^85Rb and ^87Rb due to gas-phase interactions with Xe in the presence of third-body gases in the pressure range from tens of torr to more than an atmosphere. By studying the relaxation as a function of applied magnetic field from 0 to 6000 G, we are able to separate the Rb relaxation into contributions from Rb--Xe binary collisions and from Rb--Xe van der Waals molecules. We have determined to high accuracy the strength of the Rb--Xe spin-rotation coupling constant, and we report the temperature dependences of the Rb--Xe binary relaxation cross section, the molecular formation rate, and the molecular break-up rate.

  20. Physical role of topological constraints in localized magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeates, A. R.; Russell, A. J. B.; Hornig, G.

    2015-06-01

    Predicting the final state of turbulent plasma relaxation is an important challenge, both in astro-physical plasmas such as the Sun's corona and in controlled thermonuclear fusion. Recent numerical simulations of plasma relaxation with braided magnetic fields identified the possibility of a novel constraint, arising from the topological degree of the magnetic field-line mapping. This constraint implies that the final relaxed state is drastically different for an initial configuration with topological degree 1 (which allows a Taylor relaxation) and one with degree 2 (which does not reach a Taylor state). Here, we test this transition in numerical resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations, by embedding a braided magnetic field in a linear force-free background. Varying the background force-free field parameter generates a sequence of initial conditions with a transition between topological degree 1 and 2. For degree 1, the relaxation produces a single twisted flux tube, whereas for degree 2 we obtain two flux tubes. For predicting the exact point of transition, it is not the topological degree of the whole domain that is relevant, but only that of the turbulent region.

  1. Measurement of the true transverse nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in the presence of field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.; Gladden, L. F.

    2013-08-01

    A measure of the nuclear spin transverse relaxation time T2, as determined using the nuclear magnetic resonance Carr-Purcell Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, provides unique information characterizing the microstructure of porous media which are themselves ubiquitous across fields of petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. However, the CPMG measurement is sensitive to diffusion in large magnetic field gradients. Under such conditions an effective relaxation time T_{2,eff} is observed instead, described by a combination of relaxation and diffusion exponents. The relaxation exponent always varies as nte (where n is the number, and te is the temporal separation, of spin echoes). The diffusion exponent varies as nt_e^k, where 1 < k ⩽ 3, although the exact analytic form is often unknown. Here we present a general approach to separating the influence of relaxation and diffusion by utilizing a composite diffusion exponent. Any T_{2,eff} component with a power of k > 1 is removed to provide a measure of the true T2 relaxation time distribution from CPMG data acquired in the presence of a strong background gradient. We apply the technique to discriminate between the effects of relaxation and diffusion in porous media using catalysts and rocks as examples. The method is generally applicable to any CPMG measurements conducted in the presence of a static magnetic field gradient.

  2. Diffusion MRI/NMR magnetization equations with relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Dilip; Daniel, Simon

    2012-10-01

    Bloch-Torrey diffusion magnetization equation ignores relaxation effects of magnetization. Relaxation times are important in any diffusion magnetization studies of perfusion in tissues(Brain and heart specially). Bloch-Torrey equation cannot therefore describe diffusion magnetization in a real-life situation where relaxation effects play a key role, characteristics of tissues under examination. This paper describes derivations of two equations for each of the y and z component diffusion NMR/MRI magnetization (separately) in a rotating frame of reference, where rf B1 field is applied along x direction and bias magnetic field(Bo) is along z direction. The two equations are expected to further advance the science & technology of Diffusion MRI(DMRI) and diffusion functional MRI(DFMRI). These two techniques are becoming increasingly important in the study and treatment of neurological disorders, especially for the management of patients with acute stroke. It is rapidly becoming a standard for white matter disorders, as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can reveal abnormalities in white matter fibre structure and provide models of brain connectivity.

  3. Magnetic relaxation of diluted and self-assembled cobalt nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. X.; Wen, G. H.; Xiao, Gang; Sun, Shouheng

    2003-04-01

    We have studied the magnetic relaxation of monodispersed 4 nm cubic ɛ-cobalt nanocrystals in both randomly oriented and pre-aligned assemblies. The blocking temperature TB, for the closely packed Co nanocrystal assemblies, is 30% higher than that of the highly diluted and well-dispersed Co nanocrystal-organic composites. This increase is attributed to the strong magnetic dipole interaction induced from the close packing of the nanocrystals. It is found that the frequency-dependent susceptibility data, obtained from the diluted samples, can be fitted to the half-circle Argand Diagrams, indicating a single barrier (or very narrow energy distribution) of the nanocrystals. This agrees well with the physical observation from TEM that the nanocrystals are monodispersed. The long time magnetic relaxation measurements reveal that energy barrier distribution in a pre-aligned nanocrystal assembly is significantly different from that in a randomly oriented one.

  4. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  5. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature. PMID:26340435

  6. Magnetization relaxation in sputtered thin permalloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, R. C.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Aguiar, F. M. De; Rezende, S. M.; Fermin, J. R.; Azevedo, A.

    2004-05-01

    In order to understand the underlying phenomena of magnetization damping in metallic thin films, samples of permalloy films were grown by magnetron sputtering, and their 8.6-GHz ferromagnetic resonance linewidth ΔH has been measured as a function of the Permalloy (Py) film thickness t, at room temperature. We made samples of Py(t)/Si(001) and X/Py(t)/X/Si(001), with X=Pd (40Å), and Cr (25Å), with 20Å < t < 200Å. While ΔH scales with t-2 in the bare Py/Si series, it is shown that the damping behavior strongly depends on X in the sandwich samples.

  7. Suppression of magnetic relaxation by a transverse alternating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshin, I. F.; Kalinov, A. V.; Fisher, L. M. Yampol'skii, V. A.

    2007-07-15

    The evolution of the spatial distribution of the magnetic induction in a superconductor after the action of the alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the trapped magnetic flux has been analyzed. The observed stabilization of the magnetic induction profile is attributed to the increase in the pinning force, so that the screening current density becomes subcritical. The last statement is corroborated by direct measurements.

  8. Relaxation dispersion in MRI induced by fictitious magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-04-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ≥ 2. RAFF generates a fictitious field (E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i.e. the angle ε between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ε > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange (e.g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ε induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ε ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T(₁ρ) experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T(₁ρ) method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable. PMID:21334231

  9. Relaxation Dispersion in MRI Induced by Fictitious Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J.; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-01-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ≥ 3. RAFF generates a fictitious field (E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i.e. the angle ε between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ε > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange (e.g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ε induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ε ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T1ρ experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T1ρ method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable. PMID:21334231

  10. Relaxation dispersion in MRI induced by fictitious magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J.; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-04-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ⩾2. RAFF generates a fictitious field ( E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i. e. the angle ɛ between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ɛ > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/ cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange ( e. g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ɛ induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ɛ ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T1ρ experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T1ρ method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable.

  11. Relaxed core projector-augmented-wave method.

    PubMed

    Marsman, M; Kresse, G

    2006-09-14

    We extend the full-potential projector-augmented-wave method beyond the frozen core approximation, i.e., include the self-consistent optimization of the core charge density, in such a manner that the valence wave functions remain orthogonal to the core. The method consists of an on-the-fly repseudization of the all-electron problem, solving for the self-consistent core charge density within a spherical approximation. The key ideas in our procedure are to keep the projector functions fixed throughout the electronic minimization and to derive the new pseudopartial waves from these original projector functions, at each step of the electronic minimization procedure. Results of relaxed core calculations for atomic interconfigurational energies, structural energy differences between bulk phases of Fe, atomization energies of a subset of Pople's G2-1 set, and the Rh 3d surface core level shifts for the (log3 x log3)-Rh(111) surface at 1/3 CO coverage are presented. PMID:16999509

  12. Relaxed core projector-augmented-wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsman, M.; Kresse, G.

    2006-09-01

    We extend the full-potential projector-augmented-wave method beyond the frozen core approximation, i.e., include the self-consistent optimization of the core charge density, in such a manner that the valence wave functions remain orthogonal to the core. The method consists of an on-the-fly repseudization of the all-electron problem, solving for the self-consistent core charge density within a spherical approximation. The key ideas in our procedure are to keep the projector functions fixed throughout the electronic minimization and to derive the new pseudopartial waves from these original projector functions, at each step of the electronic minimization procedure. Results of relaxed core calculations for atomic interconfigurational energies, structural energy differences between bulk phases of Fe, atomization energies of a subset of Pople's G2-1 set, and the Rh 3d surface core level shifts for the (√3 ×√3 )-Rh(111) surface at 1/3 CO coverage are presented.

  13. High Frequency Dynamics in Hemoglobin Measured by Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Ken; Van-Quynh, Alexandra; Bryant, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles for formate, acetate, and water protons are reported for aqueous solutions of hemoglobin singly and doubly labeled with a nitroxide and mercury(II) ion at cysteines at β-93. Using two spin labels, one nuclear and one electron spin, a long intramolecular vector is defined between the two β-93 positions in the protein. The paramagnetic contributions to the observed 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate constant are isolated from the magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles obtained on a dual-magnet apparatus that provides spectral density functions characterizing fluctuations sensed by intermoment dipolar interactions in the time range from the tens of microseconds to ∼1 ps. Both formate and acetate ions are found to bind specifically within 5 Å of the β-93 spin-label position and the relaxation dispersion has inflection points corresponding to correlation times of 30 ps and 4 ns for both ions. The 4-ns motion is identified with exchange of the anions from the site, whereas the 30-ps correlation time is identified with relative motions of the spin label and the bound anion in the protein environment close to β-93. The magnetic field dependence of the paramagnetic contributions in both cases is well described by a simple Lorentzian spectral density function; no peaks in the spectral density function are observed. Therefore, the high frequency motions of the protein monitored by the intramolecular vector defined by the electron and nuclear spin are well characterized by a stationary random function of time. Attempts to examine long vector fluctuations by employing electron spin and nuclear spin double-labeling techniques did not yield unambiguous characterization of the high frequency motions of the vector between β-93 positions on different chains. PMID:15475581

  14. Scheduled Relaxation Jacobi method: Improvements and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adsuara, J. E.; Cordero-Carrión, I.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Aloy, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    Elliptic partial differential equations (ePDEs) appear in a wide variety of areas of mathematics, physics and engineering. Typically, ePDEs must be solved numerically, which sets an ever growing demand for efficient and highly parallel algorithms to tackle their computational solution. The Scheduled Relaxation Jacobi (SRJ) is a promising class of methods, atypical for combining simplicity and efficiency, that has been recently introduced for solving linear Poisson-like ePDEs. The SRJ methodology relies on computing the appropriate parameters of a multilevel approach with the goal of minimizing the number of iterations needed to cut down the residuals below specified tolerances. The efficiency in the reduction of the residual increases with the number of levels employed in the algorithm. Applying the original methodology to compute the algorithm parameters with more than 5 levels notably hinders obtaining optimal SRJ schemes, as the mixed (non-linear) algebraic-differential system of equations from which they result becomes notably stiff. Here we present a new methodology for obtaining the parameters of SRJ schemes that overcomes the limitations of the original algorithm and provide parameters for SRJ schemes with up to 15 levels and resolutions of up to 215 points per dimension, allowing for acceleration factors larger than several hundreds with respect to the Jacobi method for typical resolutions and, in some high resolution cases, close to 1000. Most of the success in finding SRJ optimal schemes with more than 10 levels is based on an analytic reduction of the complexity of the previously mentioned system of equations. Furthermore, we extend the original algorithm to apply it to certain systems of non-linear ePDEs.

  15. Anti-Relaxation Coatings at High Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Ben; Happer, Will; Patton, Brian; Budker, Dmitry; Balabas, Mikhail

    2011-05-01

    Polarized alkali metal vapors are the basis for many technologies and experiments in atomic physics such as magnetometers, atomic clocks, precision measurements and spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP). These applications all rely on long relaxation times of the populations and coherences in the vapor, and considerable effort has been spent developing techniques to extend these times. The significant relaxation due to the glass walls of vapor cells can be drastically reduced by applying a coating of organic molecules such as paraffin to the cell's interior. To study the effects of anti-relaxation coatings on alkali vapors, we measured the ground-state populations of cesium vapor in coated vapor cells at high magnetic field. In this regime, each ground-state sublevel population can be individually measured with a weak D1 (S1 / 2 -->P1 / 2) laser while a stronger D2 (S1 / 2 -->P3 / 2) laser depopulates a single sublevel. We physically translated the probe beam to measure the populations at different distances from the wall of the vapor cell, over a range of pump laser frequencies. We also measured the longitudinal relaxation rates of the cesium populations in the coated vapor cells by monitoring absorption of the probe while modulating the pump laser intensity.

  16. Study of stomach motility using the relaxation of magnetic tracers.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, A A; Baffa, O; Oliveira, R B

    1999-07-01

    Magnetic tracers can be observed in the interior of the human body to give information about their quantity, position and state of order. With the aim of detecting and studying the degree of disorder of these tracers after they have been previously magnetized inside the stomach, a system composed of magnetization coils and magnetic detectors was developed. Helmholtz coils of diameter 84 cm were used to magnetize the sample and the remanent magnetization (RM) was detected with two first-order gradiometric fluxgate arrays each with a 15 cm base line, sensitivity of 0.5 nT and common mode rejection (CMR) of at least 10. The system allows simultaneous measurement in the anterior and posterior projections of the stomach. Measurements of the time evolution of the RM were performed in vitro and in normal subjects after the ingestion of a test meal labelled with magnetic particles. The data were fitted with an exponential curve and the relaxation time tau was obtained. Initial studies were performed to ascertain the action of a drug that is known to affect the gastric motility, showing that the decay of the remanent magnetization was indeed due to stomach contractions. PMID:10442706

  17. Evaluation of brain edema using magnetic resonance proton relaxation times

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Nishimura, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies on the evaluation of water content in cases of brain edema were performed in vivo, using MR proton relaxation times (longitudinal relaxation time, T1; transverse relaxation time, T2). Brain edema was produced in the white matter of cats by the direct infusion method. The correlations between proton relaxation times obtained from MR images and the water content of white matter were studied both in autoserum-infused cats and in saline-infused cats. The correlations between T1 as well as T2 and the water content in human vasogenic brain edema were also examined and compared with the data obtained from the serum group. T1 and T2 showed good correlations with the water content of white matter not only in the experimental animals but also in the clinical cases. The quality of the edema fluid did not influence relaxation time and T1 seemed to represent almost solely the water content of the tissue. T2, however, was affected by the nature of existence of water and was more sensitive than T1 in detecting extravasated edema fluid. It seems feasible therefore to evaluate the water content of brain edema on the basis of T1 values.

  18. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Measurements in Frog Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Edward D.; Homer, Louis D.

    1974-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements are reported for frog muscle as a function of temperature and Larmor frequency. Each T1ρ, T2, and T1 measurement covered a time domain sufficient to identify the average relaxation time for most intracellular water. Using regression analysis the data were fit with a model where intracellular water molecules are exchanging between a large compartment in which mobility is similar to ordinary water and a small compartment in which motion is restricted. The regression results suggest that: the restricted compartment exhibits a distribution of motions skewed toward that of free water; the residence time of water molecules in the restricted compartment is approximately 1 ms; and, the activation entropy for some water molecules in the restricted compartment is negative. PMID:4547668

  19. Proton magnetic relaxation and internal rotations in tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Utton, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation studies of the proton spin-lattice relaxation time (PSLRT) and proton second moment (PSM) are reported. Tetramethylammonium cadmium chloride (TMCC) was selected as a diamagnetic member of the isomorphic series, and hence proton data relate directly to the motion of the tetramethylammonium ion in the absence of paramagnetic ions. In the model adopted, the correlation time for hindered motion of one of the methyl groups differs from that of the other three groups in the low-temperature phase below 104 K. PSLRT and PSM values agree closely with experimental data with this model. Crystallographic phase transitions in TMCC occur at 104 K and 119 K according to the PSLRT measurements. Dipolar interactions between adjacent protons account for the PSLR rates below 104 K.

  20. Cross relaxation of the proton magnetization in ammonium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punkkinen, M.; Vuorimäki, A. H.; Ylinen, E. E.

    1990-01-01

    Expressions are derived for the time constants T1D and TSD of the NH 4 protons in tunneling ammonium compounds below the line-width transition temperature. T1D characterizes the speed of the spin-lattice relaxation of the dipolar energy and TSD the speed of the cross relaxation between the A and T symmetry species. The expressions should be valid if all the tunnel splittings between the T species levels are larger than the magnetic dipolar interaction. Predictions are compared with new experimental results on TSD in (NH 4) 2PbCl 6 and with some earlier results on TSD and T1D in (NH 4) 2 SnBr 6 and NH 4ClO 4. They support the conclusion that for T1D> TSD the T levels are nondegenerate, while the condition T1D< TSD refers to at least a partial degeneracy.

  1. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  2. Magnetic relaxation studies on a single-molecule magnet by time-resolved inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, O.; Carver, G.; Dobe, C.; Biner, D.; Sieber, A.; Güdel, H. U.; Mutka, H.; Ollivier, J.; Chakov, N. E.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved inelastic neutron scattering measurements on an array of single-crystals of the single-molecule magnet Mn12ac are presented. The data facilitate a spectroscopic investigation of the slow relaxation of the magnetization in this compound in the time domain.

  3. Relaxation time measurements by an electronic method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brousseau, R.; Vanier, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a simple electronic system that permits the direct measurement of time constants of decaying signals. The system was used in connection with relaxation experiments on hydrogen and rubidium masers and was found to operate well. The use of a computing counter in the systems gives the possibility of making averages on several experiments and obtaining the standard deviation of the results from the mean. The program for the computing counter is given.

  4. On-chip Brownian relaxation measurements of magnetic nanobeads in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2013-06-01

    We present and demonstrate a new method for on-chip Brownian relaxation measurements on magnetic nanobeads in the time domain using magnetoresistive sensors. The beads are being magnetized by the sensor self-field arising from the bias current passed through the sensors and thus no external magnetic fields are needed. First, the method is demonstrated on Brownian relaxation measurements of beads with nominal sizes of 40, 80, 130, and 250 nm. The results are found to compare well to those obtained by an already established measurement technique in the frequency domain. Next, we demonstrate the time and frequency domain methods on Brownian relaxation detection of clustering of streptavidin coated magnetic beads in the presence of different concentrations of biotin-conjugated bovine serum albumin and obtain comparable results. In the time domain, a measurement is carried out in less than 30 s, which is about six times faster than in the frequency domain. This substantial reduction of the measurement time allows for continuous monitoring of the bead dynamics vs. time and opens for time-resolved studies, e.g., of binding kinetics.

  5. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and {sup 13}C enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 {angstrom}. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time > 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1}. The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O{sub 2} and ultraviolet. A method for measuring {sup 14}N-{sup 1}H J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in {sup 13}C enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  6. Nuclear magnetic relaxation studies of semiconductor nanocrystals and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachleben, J. R.

    1993-09-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, small biomolecules, and C-13 enriched solids were studied through the relaxation in NMR spectra. Surface structure of semiconductor nanocrystals (CdS) was deduced from high resolution H-1 and C-13 liquid state spectra of thiophenol ligands on the nanocrystal surfaces. The surface coverage by thiophenol was found to be low, being 5.6 and 26% for nanocrystal radii of 11.8 and 19.2 angstrom. Internal motion is estimated to be slow with a correlation time greater than 10(exp -8) s(exp -1). The surface thiophenol ligands react to form a dithiophenol when the nanocrystals were subjected to O2 and ultraviolet. A method for measuring (N-14)-(H-1) J-couplings is demonstrated on pyridine and the peptide oxytocin; selective 2D T(sub 1) and T(sub 2) experiments are presented for measuring relaxation times in crowded spectra with overlapping peaks in 1D, but relaxation effects interfere. Possibility of carbon-carbon cross relaxation in C-13 enriched solids is demonstrated by experiments on zinc acetate and L-alanine.

  7. Magnetic Spin Relaxation Probed with Sweep Speed Dependent Coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gredig, Thomas; Byrne, Matthew

    The magnetic spin relaxation of finite-length iron chains has been investigated in iron phthalocyanine thin films by means of sweep speed dependence on magnetic coercivity. The Fe(II) ions are embedded in a carbon matrix and molecules self-assemble during vacuum sublimation, so that the Fe(II) cores form well-separated chains of 1.3 nm and tunable chain lengths within the polycrystalline thin film. The average length of the chains is controlled through deposition variables and ranges from 30 nm to 300 nm. The coercivity strongly increases with chain length in this regime. This may be an interesting experimental realization of a low-dimensional finite-sized Ising model. The coercivity dependence on chain length and sweep speed is described with an Ising model based on Glauber dynamics. Research support from NSF under Grant DMR 0847552.

  8. Effect of substrate rotation on domain structure and magnetic relaxation in magnetic antidot lattice arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, Sougata; Mallik, Srijani; Bedanta, Subhankar

    2015-08-28

    Microdimensional triangular magnetic antidot lattice arrays were prepared by varying the speed of substrate rotation. The pre-deposition patterning has been performed using photolithography technique followed by a post-deposition lift-off. Surface morphology taken by atomic force microscopy depicted that the growth mechanism of the grains changes from chain like formation to island structures due to the substrate rotation. Study of magnetization reversal via magneto optic Kerr effect based microscopy revealed reduction of uniaxial anisotropy and increase in domain size with substrate rotation. The relaxation measured under constant magnetic field becomes faster with rotation of the substrate during deposition. The nature of relaxation for the non-rotating sample can be described by a double exponential decay. However, the relaxation for the sample with substrate rotation is well described either by a double exponential or a Fatuzzo-Labrune like single exponential decay, which increases in applied field.

  9. Magnetic relaxation behavior of lanthanide substituted Dawson-type tungstoarsenates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Lizhen; Li Fengyan; Xu Lin; Liu Xizheng; Gao Guanggang

    2010-02-15

    Two new polyoxometalate compounds [(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}N]{sub 8}[Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}]{sub 2}[(alpha{sub 2}-As{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61})Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O (Ln=Er (1), Dy (2)) have been prepared by the trivacant Dawson-type anion [alpha-As{sub 2}W{sub 15}O{sub 56}]{sup 12-} and trivalent rare earth ion and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR spectra, thermogravimetric and electrochemical analyses. The centrosymmetric polyoxoanion, {l_brace}[(alpha{sub 2}-As{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61})Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sup 14-}, bounded to each other via Ln{sup 3+} connecting to terminal W-O oxygen atoms. Furthermore, the polyoxoanions are linked by [Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}]{sup 3+} to form an extensive 3D supramolecular network structure depending on hydrogen bond. The magnetic properties of the two compounds have been studied by measuring their magnetic susceptibilities in the temperature range 2.0-300.0 K, indicating the depopulation of the stark components at low temperature and/or very weak antiferromagnetic interactions between magnetic centers. Low-temperature ac magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal a slow magnetic relaxation behavior for 2. - Graphical abstract: Two polyoxometalate compounds [(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}N]{sub 8}[Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}]{sub 2}[(alpha{sub 2}-As{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61})Ln(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O (Ln=Er (1), Dy (2)) have been prepared. The dynamic magnetic measurements for 2 display a slow relaxation of magnetization, showing a frequency-dependent susceptibility.

  10. One-step detection of pathogens and viruses: combining magnetic relaxation switching and magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Cha, Ruitao; Sun, Jiashu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-03-24

    We report a sensing methodology that combines magnetic separation (MS) and magnetic relaxation switching (MS-MRS) for one-step detection of bacteria and viruses with high sensitivity and reproducibility. We first employ a magnetic field of 0.01 T to separate the magnetic beads of large size (250 nm in diameter) from those of small size (30 nm in diameter) and use the transverse relaxation time (T2) of the water molecules around the 30 nm magnetic beads (MB30) as the signal readout of the immunoassay. An MS-MRS sensor integrates target enrichment, extraction, and detection into one step, and the entire immunoassay can be completed within 30 min. Compared with a traditional MRS sensor, an MS-MRS sensor shows enhanced sensitivity, better reproducibility, and convenient operation, thus providing a promising platform for point-of-care testing. PMID:25743636

  11. Relaxation method and TCLE method of linear response in terms of thermo-field dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Mizuhiko

    2008-03-01

    The general formulae of the dynamic susceptibility are derived using the relaxation method and the TCLE method for the linear response by introducing the renormalized hat-operator in terms of thermo-field dynamics (TFD). In the former method, the Kubo formula is calculated for systems with no external driving fields, while in the latter method the admittance is directly calculated from time-convolutionless equations with external driving terms. The relation between the two methods is analytically investigated, and also the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is examined for the two methods in terms of TFD. The TCLE method is applied to an interacting spin system, and a formula of the transverse magnetic susceptibility is derived for such a system. The transverse magnetic susceptibility of an interacting spin system with S = 1 / 2 spins is obtained up to the first order in powers of the spin-spin interaction.

  12. Dispersion of T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in crude oils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph J; Hürlimann, Martin; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Freed, Denise; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-09-15

    Crude oils, which are complex mixtures of hydrocarbons, can be characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation methods to yield physical properties and chemical compositions. In particular, the field dependence, or dispersion, of T1 relaxation can be used to investigate the presence and dynamics of asphaltenes, the large molecules primarily responsible for the high viscosity in heavy crudes. However, the T2 relaxation dispersion of crude oils, which provides additional insight when measured alongside T1, has yet to be investigated systematically. Here we present the field dependence of T1-T2 correlations of several crude oils with disparate densities. While asphaltene and resin-containing crude oils exhibit significant T1 dispersion, minimal T2 dispersion is seen in all oils. This contrasting behavior between T1 and T2 cannot result from random molecular motions, and thus, we attribute our dispersion results to highly correlated molecular dynamics in asphaltene-containing crude oils. PMID:24919743

  13. Ba-ferrite particles for magnetic liquids with enhanced Neel relaxation time and loss investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, R.; Hiergeist, R.; Gawalek, W.; Hoell, A.

    2003-03-01

    Nanometer-scale particles are interesting because of their unique magnetic properties. Barium ferrite with particle sizes ⪉ 10 nm behave superparamagnetically and show at bigger sizes the transition to single domain behaviour. Beside the particle size, the anisotropy energy K_1\\cdot V, and thus the Neel relaxation time, depends also on the amount of doping. The glass crystallisation method was used for preparation of different Ba-ferrites. Ferrofluids have been prepared using Isopar^{circledR} M or dodecane as a carrier liquid. Magnetic parameters were obtained by VSM, hysteresis losses (specific loss power) of ferrite powders by a hysteresometer at 50 Hz. Magnetic core sizes were calculated from hysteresis loops. SANS curves of a ferrofluid reveal single magnetic particles and aggregated magnetic particles with an incomplete organic shell. Figs 3, Refs 9.

  14. Measuring Cytokine Concentrations Using Magnetic Spectroscopy of Nanoparticle Brownian Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Shi, Yipeng; Weaver, John

    The magnetic particle spectroscopy is a newly developed non-invasive technique for obtaining information about the nanoparticles' micro environment. In this technique the nanoparticles' magnetization, induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies, is processed to analyze rotational freedom of nanoparticles. By analyzing average rotational freedom, it is possible to measure the nanoparticle's relaxation time, and hence get an estimate of the temperature and viscosity of the medium. In molecular concentration sensing, the rotational freedom indicates the number of nanoparticles that are bound by a selected analyte. We have developed microscopic nanoparticles probes to measure the concentration of selected molecules. The nanoparticles are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely. Previously, sensitivity measurements has been reported to be of the factor of 200. However, with our newer perpendicular field setup (US Patent Application Serial No 61/721,378), it possible to sense cytokine concentrations as low as 5 Pico-Molar in-vitro. The excellent sensitivity of this apparatus is due to isolation of the drive field from the signal so the output can be amplified to a higher level. Dartmouth College.

  15. Method to measure the relaxation rates of molecular levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, J. S.; Mandula, K.; Sorlei, Zsuzsa

    The influence of buffer gases (He and SF6) on vibrational and relaxational rates has been studied. The line shapes (width and amplitude) of the small signal gain of the 119-micron methanol laser line are measured at different methanol vapor and buffer gas pressures using an infrared far-infrared double resonance method. The relaxation rates are calculated using the modified rate equations of the Henningsen-Jensen model.

  16. Spin-spin relaxation in magnetically dilute crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.; Lvov, D. V.; Veretennikov, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is examined in paramagnetic systems with a small concentration of spins. The free induction signal (FIS) and resonance line shape function (LSF) are calculated. The theory is based on the introduction of an auxiliary system where one spin does not have a flip-flop interaction with the surroundings. The FIS is calculated for this spin using the Anderson-Weiss-Kubo theory and its memory function is used to construct the memory of the main system. The needed numerical coefficients are obtained from expansions of the FIS in terms of the concentration. Here the polarization transport in magnetically dilute systems is taken into account for the first time. This is shown to lead to significant slowing down of the decay in the FIS for times longer than the phase relaxation time. Existing experimental data are compared with theoretical models. Satisfactory agreement is obtained for the description of the central part of the LSF after an additional experimentally observed broadening is introduced in the theory. Data on the amplitude and position of the sideband peaks from the different experiments are not in good agreement with one another or with the theory.

  17. Finite magnetic relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging: comparison of measurements and ferrohydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, R.; Hensley, D.; Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Croft, L. R.; Ceron, S.; Goodwill, P. W.; Conolly, S. M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging tomographic imaging technology that detects magnetic nanoparticle tracers by exploiting their non-linear magnetization properties. In order to predict the behavior of nanoparticles in an imager, it is possible to use a non-imaging MPI relaxometer or spectrometer to characterize the behavior of nanoparticles in a controlled setting. In this paper we explore the use of ferrohydrodynamic magnetization equations for predicting the response of particles in an MPI relaxometer. These include a magnetization equation developed by Shliomis (Sh) which has a constant relaxation time and a magnetization equation which uses a field-dependent relaxation time developed by Martsenyuk, Raikher and Shliomis (MRSh). We compare the predictions from these models with measurements and with the predictions based on the Langevin function that assumes instantaneous magnetization response of the nanoparticles. The results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the ferrohydrodynamic models and the measurements without the use of fitting parameters and provide further evidence of the potential of ferrohydrodynamic modeling in MPI.

  18. Optimal Transport, Convection, Magnetic Relaxation and Generalized Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Yann

    2009-10-01

    . Finally, we show how a “stringy” generalization of the AHT model can be related to the magnetic relaxation model studied by Arnold and Moffatt to obtain stationary solutions of the Euler equations with prescribed topology (see Arnold and Khesin in Topological methods in hydrodynamics. Applied mathematical sciences, vol. 125, Springer, Berlin, 1998; Moffatt in J. Fluid Mech. 159:359-378, 1985, Topological aspects of the dynamics of fluids and plasmas. NATO adv. sci. inst. ser. E, appl. sci., vol. 218, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1992; Schonbek in Theory of the Navier-Stokes equations, Ser. adv. math. appl. sci., vol. 47, pp. 179-184, World Sci., Singapore, 1998; Vladimirov et al. in J. Fluid Mech. 390:127-150, 1999; Nishiyama in Bull. Inst. Math. Acad. Sin. (N.S.) 2:139-154, 2007).

  19. Structural origin for low-temperature relaxation features in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S. S.; Regmi, R.; Lawes, G.

    2013-08-01

    In addition to superparamagnetic relaxation associated with coherent spin reversal, magnetic nanoparticles often also exhibit additional relaxation features in the magnetic dissipation at low temperatures. Our studies show that the incorporation of boron, gadolinium and lanthanum into iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles substantially enhances these low-temperature magnetic relaxation properties. The structural and morphological studies of these nanoparticles were conducted using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The doped samples have retained the crystal structure of the parent Fe3O4 nanoparticles, although the shape and size of some of the nanoparticle samples have changed. Using ac magnetic susceptibility measurements, we parameterized the low-temperature magnetic features, with the amplitude of the associated magnetic relaxation showing a dramatic increase for certain dopants. The enhanced frequency-dependent magnetic relaxation features can be attributed to structural, rather than magnetic, defects in these doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These results strongly suggest that the low-temperature magnetic relaxation typically observed in magnetic nanoparticles is a single-particle effect produced by structural defects and is not significantly influenced by interparticle interactions.

  20. Orientational dynamics in magnetic fluids under strong coupling of external and internal relaxations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikher, Yu. L.; Stepanov, V. I.; Bacri, J. C.; Perzynski, R.

    2005-03-01

    For the geometry of crossed magnetic fields—one constant and one oscillating—a kinetic model for the field-induced birefringence of a ferrofluid, which allows for the internal and external magnetic relaxations in colloidal particles, is constructed. Using it to interpret the Argand diagrams, one gets an opportunity to analyze the effect of coherent relaxation: the case of exact coincidence of the diffusion rates of the particle magnetic moment.

  1. An NCN-pincer ligand dysprosium single-ion magnet showing magnetic relaxation via the second excited state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yun-Nan; Ungur, Liviu; Granroth, Garrett E.; Powell, Annie K.; Wu, Chunji; Nagler, Stephen E.; Tang, Jinkui; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Cui, Dongmei

    2014-06-01

    Single-molecule magnets are compounds that exhibit magnetic bistability purely of molecular origin. The control of anisotropy and suppression of quantum tunneling to obtain a comprehensive picture of the relaxation pathway manifold, is of utmost importance with the ultimate goal of slowing the relaxation dynamics within single-molecule magnets to facilitate their potential applications. Combined ab initio calculations and detailed magnetization dynamics studies reveal the unprecedented relaxation mediated via the second excited state within a new DyNCN system comprising a valence-localized carbon coordinated to a single dysprosium(III) ion. The essentially C2v symmetry of the DyIII ion results in a new relaxation mechanism, hitherto unknown for mononuclear DyIII complexes, opening new perspectives for means of enhancing the anisotropy contribution to the spin-relaxation barrier.

  2. An NCN-pincer ligand dysprosium single-ion magnet showing magnetic relaxation via the second excited state

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yun-Nan; Ungur, Liviu; Granroth, Garrett E.; Powell, Annie K.; Wu, Chunji; Nagler, Stephen E.; Tang, Jinkui; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Cui, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets are compounds that exhibit magnetic bistability purely of molecular origin. The control of anisotropy and suppression of quantum tunneling to obtain a comprehensive picture of the relaxation pathway manifold, is of utmost importance with the ultimate goal of slowing the relaxation dynamics within single-molecule magnets to facilitate their potential applications. Combined ab initio calculations and detailed magnetization dynamics studies reveal the unprecedented relaxation mediated via the second excited state within a new DyNCN system comprising a valence-localized carbon coordinated to a single dysprosium(III) ion. The essentially C2v symmetry of the DyIII ion results in a new relaxation mechanism, hitherto unknown for mononuclear DyIII complexes, opening new perspectives for means of enhancing the anisotropy contribution to the spin-relaxation barrier. PMID:24969218

  3. Relaxation of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in ultra-low magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. C.; Chiu, L. L.; Liao, S. H.; Chen, H. H.; Horng, H. E.; Liu, C. W.; Liu, C. I.; Chen, K. L.; Chen, M. J.; Wang, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the spin-spin relaxation rate, 1/T2, and spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1/T1, of protons' spins induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids are investigated using a high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device-detected magnetometer in ultra-low fields. The biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles are the anti-human C-reactive protein (antiCRP) coated onto dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxides Fe3O4, which is labeled as Fe3O4-antiCRP. The ferrofluids are dextran-coated iron oxides. It was found that both 1/T2 and 1/T1 of protons in Fe3O4-antiCRP are enhanced by the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. Additionally, both the 1/T1 and 1/T2 of Fe3O4-antiCRP are close to that of ferrofluids, which are dextran-coated Fe3O4 dispersed in phosphate buffer saline. Characterizing the relaxation of Fe3O4-antiCRP can be useful for biomedical applications.

  4. Correlation of superparamagnetic relaxation with magnetic dipole interaction in capped iron-oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, J.; Stromberg, F.; Darbandi, M.; Schöppner, C.; Keune, W.; Wende, H.

    2015-01-01

    Six nanometer sized iron-oxide nanoparticles capped with an organic surfactant and/or silica shell of various thicknesses have been synthesized by a microemulsion method to enable controllable contributions of interparticle magnetic dipole interaction via tunable interparticle distances. Bare particles with direct surface contact were used as a reference to distinguish between interparticle interaction and surface effects by use of Mössbauer spectroscopy. Superparamagnetic relaxation behaviour was analyzed by SQUID-magnetometry techniques, showing a decrease of the blocking temperature with decreasing interparticle interaction energies kBT0 obtained by AC susceptibility. A many-state relaxation model enabled us to describe experimental Mössbauer spectra, leading to an effective anisotropy constant Keff ≈ 45 kJm-3 in case of weakly interacting particles, consistent with results from ferromagnetic resonance. Our unique multi-technique approach, spanning a huge regime of characteristic time windows from about 10 s to 5 ns, provides a concise picture of the correlation of superparamagnetic relaxation with interparticle magnetic dipole interaction.

  5. Kinetic equations for hopping transport and spin relaxation in a random magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilin, A. V.; Kabanov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    We derive the kinetic equations for a hopping transport that take into account an electron spin and the possibility of double occupation. In the Ohmic regime, the equations are reduced to the generalized Miller-Abrahams resistor network. We apply these equations to the problem of the magnetic moment relaxation due to the interaction with the random hyperfine fields. It is shown that in a wide range of parameters the relaxation rate is governed by the hops with the similar rates as spin precession frequency. It is demonstrated that at the large time scale spin relaxation is nonexponential. We argue that the nonexponential relaxation of the magnetic moment is related to the spin of electrons in the slow-relaxing traps. Interestingly, the traps can significantly influence the spin relaxation in the infinite conducting cluster at large times.

  6. Magnetic-field dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckhoff, Jan; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the rotational dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic fields is of academic interest but also important for applications such as magnetic particle imaging where the particles are exposed to magnetic fields with amplitudes of up to 25 mT. We have experimentally studied the dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on ac and dc magnetic field amplitude using ac susceptibility measurements in the frequency range between 2 Hz and 9 kHz for field amplitudes up to 9 mT. As samples, single-core iron oxide nanoparticles with core diameters between 20 nm and 30 nm were used either suspended in water-glycerol mixtures or immobilized by freeze-drying. The experimentally determined relaxation times are compared with theoretical models. It was found that the Néel relaxation time decays much faster with increasing field amplitude than the Brownian one. Whereas the dependence of the Brownian relaxation time on the ac and dc field amplitude can be well explained with existing theoretical models, a proper model for the dependence of the Néel relaxation time on ac field amplitude for particles with random distribution of easy axes is still lacking. The extrapolation of the measured relaxation times of the 25 nm core diameter particles to a 25 mT ac field with an empirical model predicts that the Brownian mechanism clearly co-determines the dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic particle imaging applications, in agreement with magnetic particle spectroscopy data.

  7. [Fluorescent and Magnetic Relaxation Switch Immunosensor for the Detecting Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica in Water Samples].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-bai; Zhang, Yan; An, Wen-ting; Wei, Yan-li; Wang, Yu; Shuang, Shao-min

    2015-11-01

    Fluoroimmunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic relaxation switch (MRS) immunoassay based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMN) were constructed to detect Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) in water samples. In fluoroimmunoassay, magnetic beads was conjugated with S. enterica capture antibody (MB-Ab2) to enrich S. enterica from sample solution, then the QDs was conjugated with the S. enterica detection antibody (QDs-Ab1) to detect S. enterica based on sandwich immunoassay format. And the fluorescence intensity is positive related to the bacteria concentration of the sample. Results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) of this method was 102 cfu · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 2 h. In MRS assay, magnetic nanoparticle-antibody conjugate (MN-Ab1) can switch their dispersed and aggregated state in the presence of the target. This state of change can modulate the spin-spin relaxation time (T₂) of the neighboring water molecule. The change in T₂(ΔT₂) positively correlates with the amount of the target in the sample. Thus, AT can be used as a detection signal in MRS immunosensors. Results showed that LOD of MRS sensor for S. enterica was 10³ cfu · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 0.5 h. Two methods were compared in terms of advantages and disadvantages in detecting S. enterica. PMID:26978918

  8. Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times in brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Kamman, R.L.; Go, K.G.; Berendsen, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Proton relaxation times of protein solutions, bovine brain, and edematous feline brain tissue were studied as a function of water concentration, protein concentration, and temperature. In accordance with the fast proton exchange model for relaxation, a linear relation could be established between R1 and the inverse of the weight fraction of tissue water. This relation also applied to R2 of gray matter and of protein solutions. No straightforward relation with water content was found for R2 of white matter. Temperature-dependent studies indicated that in this case, the slow exchange model for relaxation had to be applied. The effect of macromolecules in physiological relevant concentrations on the total relaxation behavior of edematous tissue was weak. Total water content changes predominantly affected the relaxation rates. The linear relation may have high clinical potential for assessment of the status of cerebral edema on the basis of T1 and T2 readings from MR images.

  9. Spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Rıza E-mail: rerdem29@hotmail.com; Gülpınar, Gül; Yalçın, Orhan; Pawlak, Andrzej

    2014-07-21

    A qualitative study of the spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field is presented. We have first determined the time dependence of the deviation of the lattice distortion parameter δΔ from the equilibrium state within framework of a technique combining the statistical equilibrium theory based on the transfer matrix method and the linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. We have shown that the time dependence of the lattice distortion parameter is characterized by a single time constant (τ) which diverges around the critical point in both dimerized (Δ≠0) and uniform (Δ=0) phase regions. When the temperature and magnetic field are fixed to certain values, the time τ depends only on exchange coupling between the spins. It is a characteristic time associated with the long wavelength fluctuations of distortion. We have also taken into account the effects of spatial fluctuations on the relaxation time using the full Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional. We have found an explicit expression for the relaxation time as a function of temperature, coupling constant and wave vector (q) and shown that the critical mode corresponds to the case q=0. Finally, our results are found to be in good qualitative agreement with the results obtained in recent experimental study on synchrotron x-ray scattering and muon spin relaxation in diluted material Cu{sub 1−y}Mg{sub y}GeO{sub 3} where the composition y is very close to 0.0209. These results can be considered as natural extensions of some previous works on static aspects of the problem.

  10. Magnetic-Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a High-Temperature Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Fiksel, G.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    2009-07-10

    The first direct measurement of magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle flux in the core of a high-temperature plasma is reported. Transport occurs due to magnetic field fluctuations associated with global tearing instabilities. The electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density and radial magnetic fluctuations, accounts for density profile relaxation during a magnetic reconnection event. The measured particle transport is much larger than that expected for ambipolar particle diffusion in a stochastic magnetic field.

  11. NMR measurement of oil shale magnetic relaxation at high magnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Washburn, Kathryn E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low field is used extensively to provide porosity and pore-size distributions in reservoir rocks. For unconventional resources, due to low porosity and permeability of the samples, much of the signal exists at very short T2 relaxation times. In addition, the organic content of many shales will also produce signal at short relaxation times. Despite recent improvements in low-field technology, limitations still exist that make it difficult to account for all hydrogen-rich constituents in very tight rocks, such as shales. The short pulses and dead times along with stronger gradients available when using high-field NMR equipment provides a more complete measurement of hydrogen-bearing phases due to the ability to probe shorter T2 relaxation times (-5 sec) than can be examined using low-field equipment. Access to these shorter T2 times allows for confirmation of partially resolved peaks observed in low-field NMR data that have been attributed to solid organic phases in oil shales. High-field (300 MHz or 7 T) NMR measurements of spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 magnetic relaxation of raw and artificially matured oil shales have potential to provide data complementary to low field (2 MHz or 0.05T) measurements. Measurements of high-field T2 and T1-T2 correlations are presented. These data can be interpreted in terms of organic matter phases and mineral-bound water known to be present in the shale samples, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and show distributions of hydrogen-bearing phases present in the shales that are similar to those observed in low field measurements.

  12. Slowing hot-carrier relaxation in graphene using a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plochocka, P.; Kossacki, P.; Golnik, A.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Berger, C.; de Heer, W. A.; Potemski, M.

    2009-12-01

    A degenerate pump-probe technique is used to investigate the nonequilibrium carrier dynamics in multilayer graphene. Two distinctly different dynamics of the carrier relaxation are observed. A fast relaxation (˜50fs) of the carriers after the initial effect of phase-space filling followed by a slower relaxation (˜4ps) due to thermalization. Both relaxation processes are less efficient when a magnetic field is applied at low temperatures which is attributed to the suppression of the electron-electron Auger scattering due to the nonequidistant Landau-level spacing of the Dirac fermions in graphene.

  13. In Vitro Longitudinal Relaxivity Profile of Gd(ABE-DTTA), an Investigational Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Varga-Szemes, Akos; Kiss, Pal; Rab, Andras; Suranyi, Pal; Lenkey, Zsofia; Simor, Tamas; Bryant, Robert G.; Elgavish, Gabriel A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose MRI contrast agents (CA) whose contrast enhancement remains relatively high even at the higher end of the magnetic field strength range would be desirable. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate such a desired magnetic field dependency of the longitudinal relaxivity for an experimental MRI CA, Gd(ABE-DTTA). Materials and Methods The relaxivity of 0.5mM and 1mM Gd(ABE-DTTA) was measured by Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) in the range of 0.0002 to 1T. Two MRI and five NMR instruments were used to cover the range between 1.5 to 20T. Parallel measurement of a Gd-DTPA sample was performed throughout as reference. All measurements were carried out at 37°C and pH 7.4. Results The relaxivity values of 0.5mM and 1mM Gd(ABE-DTTA) measured at 1.5, 3, and 7T, within the presently clinically relevant magnetic field range, were 15.3, 11.8, 12.4 s-1mM-1 and 18.1, 16.7, and 13.5 s-1mM-1, respectively. The control 4 mM Gd-DTPA relaxivities at the same magnetic fields were 3.6, 3.3, and 3.0 s-1mM-1, respectively. Conclusions The longitudinal relaxivity of Gd(ABE-DTTA) measured within the presently clinically relevant field range is three to five times higher than that of most commercially available agents. Thus, Gd(ABE-DTTA) could be a practical choice at any field strength currently used in clinical imaging including those at the higher end. PMID:26872055

  14. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15–20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  15. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and (1)H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Maria R; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications. PMID:27265726

  16. Sodium-23 and potassium-39 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation in eye lens. Examples of quadrupole ion magnetic relaxation in a crowded protein environment.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A; Paschalis, P; Schleich, T

    1992-01-01

    Single and multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the motional dynamics of sodium and potassium ions in concentrated protein solution, represented in this study by cortical and nuclear bovine lens tissue homogenates. Both ions displayed homogeneous biexponential magnetic relaxation behavior. Furthermore, the NMR relaxation behavior of these ions in lens homogenates was consistent either with a model that assumed the occurrence of two predominant ionic populations, "free" and "bound," in fast exchange with each other or with a model that assumed an asymmetric Gaussian distribution of correlation times. Regardless of the model employed, both ions were found to occur in a predominantly "free" or "unbound" rapidly reorienting state. The fraction of "bound" 23Na+, assuming a discrete two-site model, was approximately 0.006 and 0.017 for cortical and nuclear homogenates, respectively. Corresponding values for 39K+ were 0.003 and 0.007, respectively. Estimated values for the fraction of "bound" 23Na+ or 39K+ obtained from the distribution model (tau C greater than omega L-1) were less than or equal to 0.05 for all cases examined. The correlation times of the "bound" ions, derived using either a two-site or distribution model, yielded values that were at least one order of magnitude smaller than the reorientational motion of the constituent lens proteins. This observation implies that the apparent correlation time for ion binding is dominated by processes other than protein reorientational motion, most likely fast exchange between "free" and "bound" environments. The results of NMR visibility studies were consistent with the above findings, in agreement with other studies performed by non-NMR methods. These studies, in combination with those presented in the literature, suggest that the most likely role for sodium and potassium ions in the lens appears to be the regulation of cell volume by affecting the

  17. Superparamagnetic relaxation and magnetic anisotropy energy distribution in CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel ferrite nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Rondinone, A.J.; Samia, A.C.S.; Zhang, Z.J.

    1999-08-19

    Superparamagnetism is a unique feature of magnetic nanoparticles. Spinel ferrite nanoparticles provide great opportunities for studying the mechanism of superparamagnetic properties. CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystallites have been synthesized with a microemulsion method. The neutron diffraction studies and the temperature-dependent decay of magnetization show the superparamagnetic relaxation occurring in these nanoparticles. The neutron diffraction shows a high degree of inversion with the 78% tetrahedral sites occupied by Fe{sup 3+} cations. The nanoparticles with a 12 nm diameter have a blocking temperature around 320 K. The field-cooled and zero-field-cooled magnetization measurements display a divergence below the blocking temperature. The energy barrier distribution of magnetic anisotropy is derived from the temperature-dependent decay of magnetization. The magnetic anisotropy is clearly the origin of the divergence in the field-cooled and zero-field-cooled magnetization measurements. The energy barrier distribution function is used in a computer simulation of the zero-field-cooled magnetization, and the calculated magnetization has a great consistency with experimentally measured values. These studies on the magnetic anisotropy distribution elucidate the mechanism of superparamagnetic relaxation and facilitate the design and control of superparamagnetic properties in nanoparticles.

  18. Utilizing 3d-4f magnetic interaction to slow the magnetic relaxation of heterometallic complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Lei; Min, Fan-Yong; Wang, Chao; Lin, Shuang-Yan; Liu, Zhiliang; Tang, Jinkui

    2015-05-01

    The synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties of four related heterometallic complexes with formulas [Dy(III)2Co(II)(C7H5O2)8]·6H2O (1), [Dy(III)2Ni(II)(C7H5O2)8]·(C7H6O2)2 (2), Tb(III)2Co(II)(C7H5O2)8 (3), and Dy(III)2Cd(II)(C7H5O2)8 (4) were reported. Each of complexes has a perfectly linear arrangement of the metal ions with two terminal Ln(III) (Ln(III) = Dy(III), Tb(III)) ions and one central M(II) (M(II) = Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II)) ion. It was found that 1-3 displayed obvious magnetic interactions between the spin carriers according to the direct current (dc) susceptibility measurements. Alternating current (ac) magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that complexes 1-4 all exhibit single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior, while the replacement of the diamagnetic Cd(II) by paramagnetic ions leads to a significant slowing of the relaxation thanks to the magnetic interactions between 3d and 4f ions, resulting in higher relaxation barrier for complexes 1 and 2. Moreover, both Dy2Co and Dy2Ni compounds exhibit dual relaxation pathways that may originate from the single ion behavior of individual Dy(III) ions and the coupling between Dy(III) and Co(II)/Ni(II) ions, respectively, which can be taken as the feature of 3d-4f SMMs. The Ueff for 1 of 127 K is a relatively high value among the reported 3d-4f SMMs. The results demonstrate that the magnetic coupling between 3d and 4f ions is crucial to optimize SMM parameters. The synthetic approach illustrated in this work represents an efficient route to design nd-4f based SMMs via incorporating suitable paramagnetic 3d and even 4d and 5d ions into the d-f system. PMID:25906391

  19. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  20. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  1. Magnetic relaxation due to spin pumping in thick ferromagnetic films in contact with normal metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, S. M.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Azevedo, A.

    2013-07-01

    Spin pumping is the most important magnetic relaxation channel in ultrathin ferromagnetic layers in contact with normal metals (NMs). Recent experiments indicate that in thick films of insulating yttrium iron garnet (YIG) there is a large broadening of the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) lines with deposition of a thin Pt layer which cannot be explained by the known damping processes. Here we present a detailed study of the magnetic relaxation due to spin pumping in bilayers made of a ferromagnetic material (FM) and a NM. Two alternative approaches are used to calculate the transverse and longitudinal relaxation rates used in the Bloch-Bloembergen formulation of damping. In one we consider that the dynamic exchange coupling at the interface transfers magnetic relaxation from the heavily damped conduction electron spins in the NM layer to the magnetization of the FM layer while the other utilizes spin currents and the concept of the spin-mixing conductance at the interface. While in thin FM films, the relaxation rates vary with the inverse of the FM layer thickness; in thick films, they become independent of the thickness because in the FM/NM structure the FMR excitation has a surface mode character. Regardless of the thickness range the longitudinal relaxation rate is twice the transverse rate resulting in damping of the magnetization with constant amplitude characterizing a Gilbert process. The enhanced spin-pumping damping explains the experimental observations in YIG/Pt bilayers.

  2. New electric field methods in chemical relaxation spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Persoons, A; Hellemans, L

    1978-01-01

    New stationary relaxation methods for the investigation of ionic and dipolar equilibria are presented. The methods are based on the measurement of non-linearities in conductance and permittivity under high electric field conditions. The chemical contributions to the nonlinear effects are discussed in their static as well as their dynamic behavior. A sampling of experimental results shows the potential and range of possible applications of the new techniques. It is shown that these methods will become useful in the study of nonlinear responses to perturbation, in view of the general applicability of the experimental principles involved. PMID:708817

  3. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  4. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for (13)C NMR relaxation studies.

    PubMed

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of (15)N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to (13)C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and (13)C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly (13)C-labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions. PMID:27003380

  5. Manganese-deoxyribonucleic acid binding modes. Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion results.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, S D; Bryant, R G

    1986-01-01

    Ion-DNA interactions are discussed and the applied magnetic field strength dependence of water proton spin-lattice relaxation rates is used to study the Mn(II)-DNA interaction both qualitatively and quantitatively. Associations in which the manganese II (Mn(II)) ion is completely immobilized on the DNA are identified as well as a range of associations in which the ion is only partially reorientationally restricted. Quantitative analysis of the strength of the association in which manganese is immobilized is carried out both with and without a counter-ion condensation correction for electrostatic attraction of the mobile ions. From competition experiments with manganese the relative strengths of the interactions of magnesium and calcium with DNA are found to be identical but less than that of manganese with DNA and the affinity of lithium for DNA is found to be slightly higher than that of sodium. The data demonstrate that the reduced mobility of nonsite-bound ions may have a significant effect on DNA-ion binding analyses performed using magnetic resonance and relaxation methods. PMID:3779006

  6. Muon spin relaxation studies of the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, R. H.

    The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems is discussed and the role of muon spin relaxation in elucidating these properties is emphasized. Relevant properties of all six heavy fermion superconductors are briefly surveyed and instances where superconductivity and magnetism compete, coexist, and couple with one another are pointed out. Current theoretical concepts underlying these phenomena are highlighted.

  7. Muon spin relaxation studies of the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.

    1993-10-01

    The interplay between magnetism and superconductivity in heavy fermion systems is discussed and the role of muon spin relaxation in elucidating these properties is emphasized. Relevant properties of all six heavy fermion superconductors are briefly surveyed and instances where superconductivity and magnetism compete, coexist and couple with one another are pointed out. Current theoretical concepts underlying these phenomena are highlighted.

  8. Local magnetic relaxation close to the second peak in BSCCO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, S.; Konczykowski, M.; Kes, P. H.; Zeldov, E.

    1997-08-01

    Local magnetic relaxation measurements were performed on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (BSCCO) single crystals using a Hall-sensor array. The recorded field profiles provide unambiguous evidence of a crossover from surface barrier to bulk pinning in the second magnetization peak region. Both contributions to the magnetization exhibit a pronounced relaxation. For fields above the second peak we observe an additional crossover from bulk-pinning at short time scales, with Bean-like profiles, to dome-shape profiles originating from surface barrier at long times.

  9. Theoretical methods for creep and stress relaxation studies of SSC coil

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, J.; Markley, F.

    1992-04-01

    Extrapolation of laboratory measurements of SSC coil properties to the actual construction of SSC magnets requires mathematical models of the experimental data. A variety of models were used to approximate the data collected from creep and stress relaxation experiments performed on Kapton film and SSC coil samples. The coefficients for these mathematical models were found by performing a least-squares fit via the program MINUIT. Once the semiempirical expressions for the creep data were found, they were converted to expressions for stress relaxation using an approximate I pn of the Laplace integral relating the two processes. The data sets from creep experiments were also converted directly to stress relaxation data by numeric integration. Both of these methods allow comparison of data from two different methods of measuring viscoelastic properties. Three companion papers presented at this conference will present: Stress relaxation in SSC 50mm dipole coil. Measurement of the elastic modulus of Kapton perpendicular to the plane of the film at room and cryogenic temperatures. Temperature dependence of the viscoelastic properties of SSC coil insulation (Kapton).

  10. Proton magnetic relaxation in aromatic polyamides during water vapor sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smotrina, T. V.; Chulkova, Yu. S.; Karasev, D. V.; Lebedeva, N. P.; Perepelkin, K. E.; Grebennikov, S. F.

    2009-07-01

    The state of the components in the aromatic polyamide-water system was studied by NMR and sorption. A comparative analysis of spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation in aromatic para-polyamide ( para-aramid) technical fibers Rusar, Kevlar, and Technora was performed depending on the sorption value. The NMR results correlated with the supramolecular structure of polymers and quasi-chemical equation parameters for water vapor sorption.

  11. Transmitted light relaxation and microstructure evolution of ferrofluids under gradient magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Li, Decai; Li, Feng; Zhu, Quanshui; Xie, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Using light transmission experiments and optical microscope observations with a longitudinal gradient magnetic field configuration, the relationship between the behavior of the transmitted light relaxation and the microstructure evolution of ionic ferrofluids in the central region of an axisymmetric field is investigated. Under a low-gradient magnetic field, there are two types of relaxation process. When a field is applied, the transmitted light intensity decreases to a minimum within a time on the order of 101-102 s. It is then gradually restored, approaching its initial value within a time on the order of 102 s. This is type I relaxation, which corresponds to the formation of magnetic columns. After the transmission reaches this value, it either increases or decreases slowly, stabilizing within a time on the order of 103 s, according to the direction of the field gradient. This is a type II relaxation, which results from the shadowing effect, corresponding to the motion of the magnetic columns under the application of a gradient force. Under a magnetic field with a centripetal high-gradient (magnetic materials subjected to a force pointing toward the center of the axisymmetric field), the transmitted light intensity decreases monotonously and more slowly than that under a low-gradient field. Magnetic transport and separation resulted from magnetophoresis under high-gradient fields, changing the formation dynamics of the local columns and influencing the final state of the column system.

  12. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Peng, Bin; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  13. Anomalous D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Yu, T.; Wu, M. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report an anomalous scaling of the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation with the momentum relaxation in semiconductor quantum wells under a strong magnetic field in the Voigt configuration. We focus on the case in which the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the spin-orbit-coupling-induced effective magnetic field and its magnitude is much larger than the latter one. It is found that the longitudinal spin relaxation time is proportional to the momentum relaxation time even in the strong-scattering limit, indicating that the D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation demonstrates Elliott-Yafet-like behavior. Moreover, the transverse spin relaxation time is proportional (inversely proportional) to the momentum relaxation time in the strong- (weak-) scattering limit, both in the opposite trends against the well-established conventional D’yakonov-Perel’ spin relaxation behaviors. We further demonstrate that all the above anomalous scaling relations come from the unique form of the effective inhomogeneous broadening.

  14. Magnetic relaxation and lower critical field in MgB2 wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y, Feng; G, Yan; Y, Zhao; Pradhan, A. K.; F, Liu C.; X, Zhang P.; L, Zhou

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic relaxation behaviour, critical current density Jc and lower critical field Hc1 have been investigated in MgB2/Ta/Cu wires. It is found that Jc and Hc1 decrease linearly with temperature in the whole temperature region below Tc. The relaxation rate is very small and has a weak temperature dependence compared to high-Tc superconductors. Also, the pinning potential is much larger and the temperature and field dependences of the pinning potential are briefly discussed.

  15. Effect of magnetic field and iron content on NMR proton relaxation of liver, spleen and brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Hocq, Aline; Luhmer, Michel; Saussez, Sven; Louryan, Stéphane; Gillis, Pierre; Gossuin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Iron accumulation is observed in liver and spleen during hemochromatosis and important neurodegenerative diseases involve iron overload in brain. Storage of iron is ensured by ferritin, which contains a magnetic core. It causes a darkening on T2 -weighted MR images. This work aims at improving the understanding of the NMR relaxation of iron-loaded human tissues, which is necessary to develop protocols of iron content measurements by MRI. Relaxation times measurements on brain, liver and spleen samples were realized at different magnetic fields. Iron content was determined by atomic emission spectroscopy. For all samples, the longitudinal relaxation rate (1/T1 ) of tissue protons decreases with the magnetic field up to 1 T, independently of iron content, while their transverse relaxation rate (1/T2 ) strongly increases with the field, either linearly or quadratically, or a combination thereof. The extent of the inter-echo time dependence of 1/T2 also varies according to the sample. A combination of theoretical models is necessary to describe the relaxation of iron-containing tissues. This can be due to the presence, inside tissues, of ferritin clusters of different sizes and densities. When considering all samples, a correlation (r(2)  = 0.6) between 1/T1 and iron concentration is observed at 7.0 T. In contrast the correlation between 1/T2 and iron content is poor, even at high field (r(2)  = 0.14 at 7.0 T). Our results show that MRI methods based on T1 or T2 measurements will easily detect an iron overloading at high magnetic field, but will not provide an accurate quantification of tissue iron content at low iron concentrations. PMID:24954138

  16. Resonantly enhanced spin-lattice relaxation of Mn2 + ions in diluted magnetic (Zn,Mn)Se/(Zn,Be)Se quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debus, J.; Ivanov, V. Yu.; Ryabchenko, S. M.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Maksimov, A. A.; Semenov, Yu. G.; Braukmann, D.; Rautert, J.; Löw, U.; Godlewski, M.; Waag, A.; Bayer, M.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of spin-lattice relaxation in the magnetic Mn2 + ion system of (Zn,Mn)Se/(Zn,Be)Se quantum-well structures are studied using optical methods. Pronounced cusps are found in the giant Zeeman shift of the quantum-well exciton photoluminescence at specific magnetic fields below 10 T, when the Mn spin system is heated by photogenerated carriers. The spin-lattice relaxation time of the Mn ions is resonantly accelerated at the cusp magnetic fields. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that a cusp occurs at a spin-level mixing of single Mn2 + ions and a quick-relaxing cluster of nearest-neighbor Mn ions, which can be described as intrinsic cross-relaxation resonance within the Mn spin system.

  17. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ante(k) (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries. PMID:25494741

  18. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T{sub 2}, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T{sub 2} provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T{sub 2} distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T{sub 2} is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form −ant{sub e}{sup k} (where n is the number and t{sub e} the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T{sub 2} distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  19. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  20. Magnetic relaxation and correlating effective magnetic moment with particle size distribution in maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisane, K. L.; Despeaux, E. C.; Seehra, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    The role of particle size distribution inherently present in magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) is examined in considerable detail in relation to the measured magnetic properties of oleic acid-coated maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) NPs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the sol-gel synthesized γ-Fe2O3 NPs showed a log-normal distribution of sizes with average diameter =7.04 nm and standard deviation σ=0.78 nm. Magnetization, M, vs. temperature (2-350 K) of the NPs was measured in an applied magnetic field H up to 90 kOe along with the temperature dependence of the ac susceptibilities, χ‧ and χ″, at various frequencies, fm, from 10 Hz to 10 kHz. From the shift of the blocking temperature from TB=35 K at 10 Hz to TB=48 K at 10 kHz, the absence of any significant interparticle interaction is inferred and the relaxation frequency fo=2.6×1010 Hz and anisotropy constant Ka=5.48×105 erg/cm3 are determined. For TTB, the data of M vs. H up to 90 kOe at several temperatures are analyzed two different ways: (i) in terms of the modified Langevin function yielding an average magnetic moment per particle μp=7300(500) μB; and (ii) in terms of log-normal distribution of moments yielding <μ>=6670 μB at 150 K decreasing to <μ>=6100 μB at 300 K with standard deviations σ≃<μ>/2. It is argued that the above two approaches yield consistent and physically meaningful results as long as the width parameter, s, of the log-normal distribution is less than 0.83.

  1. Effect of surfactant and solvent on spin-lattice relaxation dynamics of magnetic nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sourav; Chen, Hsiang-Yun; Chen, Tai-Yen; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Son, Dong Hee

    2013-04-25

    The effect of varying the surfactant and solvent medium on the dynamics of spin-lattice relaxation in photoexcited Fe3O4 nanocrystals has been investigated by measuring the time-dependent magnetization employing pump-probe transient Faraday rotation technique. The variation of the surfactants having surface-binding functional groups modified not only the static magnetization but also the dynamics of the recovery of the magnetization occurring via spin-lattice relaxation in the photoexcited Fe3O4 nanocrystals. The variation of the polarity and size of the solvent molecules can also influence the spin-lattice relaxation dynamics. However, the effect is limited to the nanocrystals having sufficiently permeable surfactant layer, where the small solvent molecules (e.g., water) can access the surface and dynamically modify the ligand field on the surface. PMID:23003213

  2. Electron spin relaxation can enhance the performance of a cryptochrome-based magnetic compass sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattnig, Daniel R.; Sowa, Jakub K.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    The radical pair model of the avian magnetoreceptor relies on long-lived electron spin coherence. Dephasing, resulting from interactions of the spins with their fluctuating environment, is generally assumed to degrade the sensitivity of this compass to the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Here we argue that certain spin relaxation mechanisms can enhance its performance. We focus on the flavin–tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome, currently the only candidate magnetoreceptor molecule. Correlation functions for fluctuations in the distance between the two radicals in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome 1 were obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and used to calculate the spin relaxation caused by modulation of the exchange and dipolar interactions. We find that intermediate spin relaxation rates afford substantial enhancements in the sensitivity of the reaction yields to an Earth-strength magnetic field. Supported by calculations using toy radical pair models, we argue that these enhancements could be consistent with the molecular dynamics and magnetic interactions in avian cryptochromes.

  3. Slow magnetic relaxation in lanthanide complexes with chelating nitronyl nitroxide radical.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Li, Li-Cun; Liao, Dai-Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Two rare-earth radical complexes [Ln(hfac)(3)NIT-2Py].0.5C(7)H(16) [Ln = Tb (1), Dy (2)] have been synthesized and characterized structurally as well as magnetically. Both complexes are isomorphous, in which the NIT-2Py radical is coordinated to the Ln(III) ion in a chelating manner. Magnetic studies reveal that complex 1 shows a frequency-dependent, alternating-current magnetic susceptibility typical of a single-molecule magnet, whereas slow magnetic relaxation is observed in 2 under an applied direct-current field. PMID:20438100

  4. Relaxation method of compensation in an optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.; Daiuto, Brian J.

    1987-01-01

    An iterative method is proposed for the sharpening of programmable filters in a 4-f optical correlator. Continuously variable spatial light modulators (SLMs) permit the fine adjustment of optical processing filters so as to compensate for the departures from ideal behavior of a real optical system. Although motivated by the development of continuously variable phase-only SLMs, the proposed sharpening method is also applicable to amplitude modulators and, with appropriate adjustments, to binary modulators as well. A computer simulation is presented that illustrates the potential effectiveness of the method: an image is placed on the input to the correlator, and its corresponding phase-only filter is adjusted (allowed to relax) so as to produce a progressively brighter and more centralized peak in the correlation plane. The technique is highly robust against the form of the system's departure from ideal behavior.

  5. Gadolinium oxide nanoplates with high longitudinal relaxivity for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Minjung; Sethi, Richa; Ananta Narayanan, Jeyarama Subramanian; Lee, Seung Soo; Benoit, Denise N.; Taheri, Nasim; Decuzzi, Paolo; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2014-10-01

    Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values moderately reduce as the size of the Gd2O3 nanoplates increases, and are always larger for the PAA-OA coating. Cytotoxicity studies on human dermal fibroblast cells documented no significant toxicity, with 100% cell viability preserved up to 250 μM for the PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates. Given the 10 times increase in longitudinal relaxivity over the commercially available Gd-based molecular agents and the favorable toxicity profile, the 2 nm PAA-OA coated Gd2O3 nanoplates could represent a new class of highly effective T1 MRI contrast agents.Molecular-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often characterized by insufficient relaxivity, thus requiring the systemic injection of high doses to induce sufficient contrast enhancement at the target site. In this work, gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoplates are produced via a thermal decomposition method. The nanoplates have a core diameter varying from 2 to 22 nm, a thickness of 1 to 2 nm and are coated with either an oleic acid bilayer or an octylamine modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-OA) polymer layer. For the smaller nanoplates, longitudinal relaxivities (r1) of 7.96 and 47.2 (mM s)-1 were measured at 1.41 T for the oleic acid bilayer and PAA-OA coating, respectively. These values

  6. The haem-accessibility in leghaemoglobin of Lupinus luteus as observed by proton magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Vuk-pavlović, S; Benko, B; Maricić, S; Lahajnar, G; Kuranova, I P; Vainshtein, B K

    1976-01-01

    Using the solvent-protons' longitudinal magnetic relaxation rates (p.m.r.) for Lupinus luteus leghaemoglobin derivatives the accessibility of the haem has been evaluated by our "stereo-chemical p.m.r. titration" method with nonexchangeable protons of aliphatic lower alcohols in otherwise deuterated solutions. The haem in leghaemoglobin is more accessible and its protein environment more flexible compared with vertebrate haemoglobins. The correlation time in aquometleghaemglobin aqueous solution has been determined by measuring the frequency dispersion of the p.m.r. rates between 6.1 and 93 MHZ. Taking into account the measured value of tauc = (7.7 +/- 0.5 x 10(-10) s the iron-to-proton inter-spin distances have been calculated. The significance of these distances as well as the electronic g-factor anisotrophy for elucidation of fine structural details of the haem-environment are discussed. PMID:965150

  7. Phase diagram and magnetic relaxation phenomena in Cu2OSeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, F.; Wilhelm, H.; Aqeel, A.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Lefering, A. J. E.; Brück, E. H.; Pappas, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present an investigation of the magnetic-field-temperature phase diagram of Cu2OSeO3 based on dc magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements covering a broad frequency range of four orders of magnitude, from very low frequencies reaching 0.1 Hz up to 1 kHz. The experiments were performed in the vicinity of Tc=58.2 K and around the skyrmion lattice A phase. At the borders between the different phases the characteristic relaxation times reach several milliseconds and the relaxation is nonexponential. Consequently the borders between the different phases depend on the specific criteria and frequency used and an unambiguous determination is not possible.

  8. The global relaxation redistribution method for reduction of combustion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2014-07-28

    An algorithm based on the Relaxation Redistribution Method (RRM) is proposed for constructing the Slow Invariant Manifold (SIM) of a chosen dimension to cover a large fraction of the admissible composition space that includes the equilibrium and initial states. The manifold boundaries are determined with the help of the Rate Controlled Constrained Equilibrium method, which also provides the initial guess for the SIM. The latter is iteratively refined until convergence and the converged manifold is tabulated. A criterion based on the departure from invariance is proposed to find the region over which the reduced description is valid. The global realization of the RRM algorithm is applied to constant pressure auto-ignition and adiabatic premixed laminar flames of hydrogen-air mixtures. PMID:25084876

  9. The global relaxation redistribution method for reduction of combustion kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E.; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2014-07-01

    An algorithm based on the Relaxation Redistribution Method (RRM) is proposed for constructing the Slow Invariant Manifold (SIM) of a chosen dimension to cover a large fraction of the admissible composition space that includes the equilibrium and initial states. The manifold boundaries are determined with the help of the Rate Controlled Constrained Equilibrium method, which also provides the initial guess for the SIM. The latter is iteratively refined until convergence and the converged manifold is tabulated. A criterion based on the departure from invariance is proposed to find the region over which the reduced description is valid. The global realization of the RRM algorithm is applied to constant pressure auto-ignition and adiabatic premixed laminar flames of hydrogen-air mixtures.

  10. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, J.; Reich, M.; Danby, G.

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager includes a generator for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager also includes a sensor for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object. 25 figs.

  11. Magnetic imager and method

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James; Reich, Morris; Danby, Gordon

    1997-07-22

    A magnetic imager 10 includes a generator 18 for practicing a method of applying a background magnetic field over a concealed object, with the object being effective to locally perturb the background field. The imager 10 also includes a sensor 20 for measuring perturbations of the background field to detect the object. In one embodiment, the background field is applied quasi-statically. And, the magnitude or rate of change of the perturbations may be measured for determining location, size, and/or condition of the object.

  12. Magnetic helicity and the relaxation of fossil fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of an active dynamo, purely poloidal magnetic field configurations are unstable to large-scale dynamical perturbations, and decay via reconnection on an Alfvénic time-scale. Nevertheless, a number of classes of dynamo-free stars do exhibit significant, long-lived, surface magnetic fields. Numerical simulations suggest that the large-scale poloidal field in these systems is stabilized by a toroidal component of the field in the stellar interior. Using the principle of conservation of total helicity, we develop a variational principle for computing the structure of the magnetic field inside a conducting sphere surrounded by an insulating vacuum. We show that, for a fixed total helicity, the minimum energy state corresponds to a force-free configuration. We find a simple class of axisymmetric solutions, parametrized by angular and radial quantum numbers. However, these solutions have a discontinuity in the toroidal magnetic field at the stellar surface which will exert a toroidal stress on the surface of the star. We then describe two other classes of solutions, the standard spheromak solutions and ones with fixed surface magnetic fields, the latter being relevant for neutron stars with rigid crusts. We discuss the implications of our results for the structure of neutron star magnetic fields, the decay of fields, and the origin of variability and outbursts in magnetars.

  13. Glioma cell density in a rat gene therapy model gauged by water relaxation rate along a fictitious magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Timo; Sierra, Alejandra; Hanson, Timothy; Sorce, Dennis J; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Gröhn, Olli

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal and transverse rotating-frame relaxation time constants, T(1) (ρ) and T(2) (ρ) , have previously been successfully applied to detect gene therapy responses and acute stroke in animal models. Those experiments were performed with continuous-wave irradiation or with frequency-modulated pulses operating in an adiabatic regime. The technique called Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) is a recent extension of frequency-modulated rotating-frame relaxation methods. In RAFF, spin locking takes place along a fictitious magnetic field, and the decay rate is a function of both T(1ρ) and T(2ρ) processes. In this work, the time constant characterizing water relaxation with RAFF (T(RAFF) ) was evaluated for its utility as a marker of response to gene therapy in a rat glioma model. To investigate the sensitivity to early treatment response, we measured several rotating-frame and free-precession relaxation time constants and the water apparent diffusion coefficients, and these were compared with histological cell counts in 8 days of treated and control groups of animals. T(RAFF) was the only parameter exhibiting significant association with cell density in three different tumor regions (border, intermediate, and core tissues). These results indicate that T(RAFF) may provide a marker to identify tumors responding to treatment. PMID:21721037

  14. Glioma cell density in a rat gene therapy model gauged by water relaxation rate along a fictitious magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Liimatainen, Timo; Sierra, Alejandra; Hanson, Timothy; Sorce, Dennis J; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Gröhn, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal and transverse rotating frame relaxation time constants, T1ρ and T2ρ, have previously been successfully applied to detect gene therapy responses and acute stroke in animal models. Those experiments were performed with continuous wave irradiation or with frequency-modulated pulses operating in an adiabatic regime. The technique called Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) is a recent extension of frequency-modulated rotating frame relaxation methods. In RAFF, spin-locking takes place along a fictitious magnetic field and the decay rate is a function of both T1ρ and T2ρ processes. In the present work, the time constant characterizing water relaxation with RAFF (TRAFF) was evaluated for its utility as a marker of response to gene therapy in a rat glioma model. To investigate the sensitivity to early treatment response, we measured several rotating frame and free precession relaxation time constants and the water apparent diffusion coefficients, and these were compared with histological cell counts in 8 days of treated and control groups of animals. TRAFF was the only parameter exhibiting significant association with cell density in three different tumor regions (border, intermediate, and core tissues). These results indicate that TRAFF may provide a marker to identify tumors responding to treatment. PMID:21721037

  15. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saville, Steven L.; Woodward, Robert C.; House, Michael J.; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R.; St Pierre, Tim G.; Mefford, O. Thompson

    2013-02-01

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R2, is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R2 measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications.It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R2, is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to

  16. Characterisation and application of ultra-high spin clusters as magnetic resonance relaxation agents.

    PubMed

    Guthausen, Gisela; Machado, Julyana R; Luy, Burkhard; Baniodeh, Amer; Powell, Annie K; Krämer, Steffen; Ranzinger, Florian; Herrling, Maria P; Lackner, Susanne; Horn, Harald

    2015-03-21

    In Magnetic Resonance Tomography (MRT) image contrast can be improved by adding paramagnetic relaxation agents such as lanthanide ions. Here we report on the use of highly paramagnetic isostructural Fe(III)/4f coordination clusters with a [Fe10Ln10] core to enhance relaxation. Measurements were performed over the range of (1)H Larmor frequencies of 10 MHz to 1.4 GHz in order to determine the relevant parameters for longitudinal and transverse relaxivities. Variation of the lanthanide ion allows differentiation of relaxation contributions from electronic states and molecular dynamics. We find that the transverse relaxivities increase with field, whereas the longitudinal relaxivities depend on the nature of the lanthanide. In addition, the Gd(III) analogue was selected in particular to test the interaction with tissue observed using MRT. Studies on biofilms used in waste water treatment reveal that the behaviour of the high-spin clusters is different from what is observed for common relaxation agents with respect to the penetration into the biofilms. The Fe10Gd10 cluster adheres to the surface of the biofilm better than the commercial agent Gadovist. PMID:25670214

  17. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Keith A; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J; Westervelt, R M

    2010-10-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T2CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T2CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T2CP∝N-0.44 for aggregates with d = 2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T2CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times. PMID:20689678

  18. Tuning the Magnetic Interactions and Relaxation Dynamics of Dy2 Single-Molecule Magnets.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shufang; Guo, Yun-Nan; Ungur, Liviu; Tang, Jinkui; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2015-09-28

    Efficient modulation of single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior was realized by deliberate structural modification of the Dy2 cores of [Dy2(a'povh)2(OAc)2(DMF)2] (1) and [Zn2Dy2(a'povh)2(OAc)6]⋅4 H2O (2; H2a'povh = N'-[amino(pyrimidin-2-yl)methylene]-o-vanilloyl hydrazine). Compound 1 having fourfold linkage between the two dysprosium ions shows high-performance SMM behavior with a thermal energy barrier of 322.1 K, whereas only slow relaxation is observed for compound 2 with only twofold connection between the dysprosium ions. This remarkable discrepancy is mainly because of strong axiality in 1 due to one pronounced covalent bond, as revealed by experimental and theoretical investigations. The significant antiferromagnetic interaction derived from bis(μ2-O) and two acetate bridging groups was found to be crucial in leading to a nonmagnetic ground state in 1, by suppressing zero-field quantum tunneling of magnetization. PMID:26272604

  19. The effect of magnetically induced linear aggregates on proton transverse relaxation rates of aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Woodward, Robert C; House, Michael J; Tokarev, Alexander; Hammers, Jacob; Qi, Bin; Shaw, Jeremy; Saunders, Martin; Varsani, Rahi R; St Pierre, Tim G; Mefford, O Thompson

    2013-03-01

    It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R(2), is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. It is widely known that chain formation occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. In this work we examine the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles. A series of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying stabilizing ligand brush lengths were synthesized. These systems were characterized with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dark-field optical microscopy, and proton transverse relaxation rate measurements. The dark field optical microscopy and R(2) measurements were made in similar magnetic fields over the same time scale so as to correlate the reduction of the transverse relaxivity with the formation of linear aggregates. Our results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal arrangement of the system in a magnetic field, producing differences in the rate and size of chain formation, and hence systematic changes in transverse relaxation rates over time. With increasing ligand brush length, attractive inter-particle interactions are reduced, which results in slower aggregate formation and shorter linear aggregate length. These results have implications for the stabilization, characterization and potentially the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticle systems used in biomedical applications. PMID:23389324

  20. Enhancement of spin relaxation in an FeDy2 Fe coordination cluster by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guo; Mereacre, Valeriu; Kostakis, George E; Wolny, Juliusz A; Schünemann, Volker; Powell, Annie K

    2014-09-22

    Two [FeLn2 Fe(μ3 -OH)2 (teg)2 (N3 )2 (C6 H5 COO)4 ] compounds (where Ln=Y(III) and Dy(III) ; teg=triethylene glycol anion) have been synthesized and studied using SQUID and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic measurements on both compounds indicate dominant antiferromagnetic interactions between the metal centers. Analysis of the (57) Fe Mössbauer spectra complement the ac magnetic susceptibility measurements, which show how a static magnetic field can quench the slow relaxation of magnetization generated by the anisotropic Dy(III) ions. PMID:25197018

  1. Switching of Slow Magnetic Relaxation Dynamics in Mononuclear Dysprosium(III) Compounds with Charge Density.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kwang Soo; Baldoví, José J; Lee, Woo Ram; Song, Jeong Hwa; Yoon, Sung Won; Suh, Byoung Jin; Coronado, Eugenio; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro; Hong, Chang Seop

    2016-06-01

    The symmetry around a Dy ion is recognized to be a crucial parameter dictating magnetization relaxation dynamics. We prepared two similar square-antiprismatic complexes, [Dy(LOMe)2(H2O)2](PF6) (1) and Dy(LOMe)2(NO3) (2), where LOMe = [CpCo{P(O)(O(CH3))2}3], including either two neutral water molecules (1) or an anionic nitrate ligand (2). We demonstrated that in this case relaxation dynamics is dramatically affected by the introduction of a charged ligand, stabilizing the easy axis of magnetization along the nitrate direction. We also showed that the application of either a direct-current field or chemical dilution effectively stops quantum tunneling in the ground state of 2, thereby increasing the relaxation time by over 3 orders of magnitude at 3.5 K. PMID:27186802

  2. Fast neutron irradiation effects on magnetization relaxation in YBCO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lensink, J.G.; Griessen, R. . Faculty of Physics and Astronomy); Wiesinger, H.P.; Sauerzopf, F.M.; Weber, H.W. ); Crabtree, G.W. )

    1991-07-01

    A high-quality YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} single crystal has been investigated by torque magnetometry prior to and following fast neutron irradiation to a fluence of 2{times}10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). In addition to large enhancements of the critical current densities, which have been observed in similar form previously by Sauerzopf et al, we find a dramatic change in the relaxation behavior following irradiation. At low temperatures ({le} 50 k) the relaxation rates are lowered by factors up to 4 in the irradiated state in a magnetic field of 1.5 T. At higher temperatures, on the other hand, they are enhanced compared to the unirradiated state. Both before and after irradiation, the magnetization relaxation follows a logarithmic time dependence, which we ascribe to thermally activated flux motion.

  3. Effects of Off-Resonance Irradiation, Cross-Relaxation, and Chemical Exchange on Steady-State Magnetization and Effective Spin-Lattice Relaxation Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-04-01

    In the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field, recovery of longitudinal magnetization to a steady state is not purely monoexponential. Under reasonable conditions with zero initial magnetization, recovery is nearly exponential and an effective relaxation rate constant R1eff = 1/T1eff can be obtained. Exact and approximate formulas for R1eff and steady-state magnetization are derived from the Bloch equations for spins undergoing cross-relaxation and chemical exchange between two sites in the presence of an off-resonance radiofrequency field. The relaxation formulas require that the magnetization of one spin is constant, but not necessarily zero, while the other spin relaxes. Extension to three sites with one radiofrequency field is explained. The special cases of off-resonance effects alone and with cross-relaxation or chemical exchange, cross-relaxation alone, and chemical exchange alone are compared. The inaccuracy in saturation transfer measurements of exchange rate constants by published formulas is discussed for the creatine kinase reaction.

  4. A method for measuring the Néel relaxation time in a frozen ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, Ronald J.; Thakur, Jagdish; Mosher, Nathaniel; Perkins-Harbin, Emily; Kumon, Ronald E.; Wang, Lihua; Rablau, Corneliu; Vaishnava, Prem P.

    2015-08-01

    We report a novel method of determining the average Néel relaxation time and its temperature dependence by calculating derivatives of the measured time dependence of temperature for a frozen ferrofluid exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The ferrofluid, composed of dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (diameter 13.7 nm ± 4.7 nm), was synthesized via wet chemical precipitation and characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. An alternating magnetic field of constant amplitude ( H 0 = 20 kA/m) driven at frequencies of 171 kHz, 232 kHz, and 343 kHz was used to determine the temperature dependent magnetic energy absorption rate in the temperature range from 160 K to 210 K. We found that the specific absorption rate of the ferrofluid decreased monotonically with temperature over this range at the given frequencies. From these measured data, we determined the temperature dependence of the Néel relaxation time and estimate a room-temperature magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant of 40 kJ/m3, in agreement with previously published results.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation in muscle water.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M; Puon, P S

    1981-01-01

    The origin of the nonexponentiality of proton spin echoes of skeletal muscle has been carefully examined. It is shown that the slowly decaying part of the proton spin echoes is not due to extracellular water. First, for muscle from mice with in vivo deuteration, the deuteron spin echoes were also nonexponential, but the slowly decaying part had a larger weighing factor. Second, for glycerinated muscle in which cell membranes were disrupted, the proton spin echoes were similar to those in intact muscle. Third, the nonexponentiality of the proton spin echoes in intact muscle increased when postmortem rigor set in. Finally, when the lifetimes of extracellular water and intracellular water were taken into account in the exchange, it was found that the two types of water would not give two resolvable exponentials with the observed decay constants. It is suggested that the unusually short T2's and the nonexponential character of the spin echoes of proton and deuteron in muscle water are mainly due to hydrogen exchange between water and functional groups in the protein filaments. These groups have large dipolar or quadrupolar splittings, and undergo hydrogen exchange with water at intermediate rates. The exchange processes and their effects on the spin echoes are pH-dependent. The dependence of transverse relaxation of pH was observed in glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers. PMID:7272437

  6. First-passage-time approach to overbarrier relaxation of magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klik, Ivo; Gunther, Leon

    1990-08-01

    We consider the irreversible dynamics of the magnetization vector M in a single-domain particle. The dynamics is given by a stochastic phenomenological equation due to Gilbert. It contains a damping field proportional to M and a corresponding white noise field component. The probability distribution function satisfies a Fokker-Planck equation derived by Brown. We give the overbarrier decay rate κ out of a metastable minimum. First we rederive the well-known expression for κ for an axially symmetric model. We argue that this result is unphysical. For systems of general point symmetry of the magnetic anisotropy energy we give κ in both the low-damping and intermediate- to high-damping limits.

  7. A novel oxime-derived 3d-4f single-molecule magnet exhibiting two single-ion magnetic relaxations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Yi; Yang, En-Cui; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new oxime-derived {DyNi} cluster with a paramagnetic butterfly-shaped Dy core and peripheral diamagnetic planar-square Ni(II) ions was solvothermally synthesized. The weak ferromagnetically coupled cluster exhibits field-induced single-molecule magnetic behavior with two thermally activated single-ion relaxations. PMID:27377056

  8. Nuclear magnetic relaxation induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization: Longitudinal relaxation dispersion for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2013-10-01

    In complex biological or colloidal samples, magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) experiments using the field-cycling technique can characterize molecular motions on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds, provided that a rigorous theory of nuclear spin relaxation is available. In gels, cross-linked proteins, and biological tissues, where an immobilized macromolecular component coexists with a mobile solvent phase, nuclear spins residing in solvent (or cosolvent) species relax predominantly via exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of anisotropic nuclear (electric quadrupole or magnetic dipole) couplings. The physical or chemical exchange processes that dominate the MRD typically occur on a time scale of microseconds or longer, where the conventional perturbation theory of spin relaxation breaks down. There is thus a need for a more general relaxation theory. Such a theory, based on the stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) for the EMOR mechanism, is available for a single quadrupolar spin I = 1. Here, we present the corresponding theory for a dipole-coupled spin-1/2 pair. To our knowledge, this is the first treatment of dipolar MRD outside the motional-narrowing regime. Based on an analytical solution of the spatial part of the SLE, we show how the integral longitudinal relaxation rate can be computed efficiently. Both like and unlike spins, with selective or non-selective excitation, are treated. For the experimentally important dilute regime, where only a small fraction of the spin pairs are immobilized, we obtain simple analytical expressions for the auto-relaxation and cross-relaxation rates which generalize the well-known Solomon equations. These generalized results will be useful in biophysical studies, e.g., of intermittent protein dynamics. In addition, they represent a first step towards a rigorous theory of water 1H relaxation in biological tissues, which is a prerequisite for unravelling the molecular basis of soft

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements. PMID:20365625

  10. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Three-spin systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-07-21

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have developed a non-perturbative theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole couplings, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we implement the general dipolar EMOR theory for a macromolecule-bound three-spin system, where one, two, or all three spins exchange with the bulk solution phase. In contrast to the previously studied two-spin system with a single dipole coupling, there are now three dipole couplings, so relaxation is affected by distinct correlations as well as by self-correlations. Moreover, relaxation can now couple the magnetizations with three-spin modes and, in the presence of a static dipole coupling, with two-spin modes. As a result of this complexity, three secondary dispersion steps with different physical origins can appear in the longitudinal relaxation dispersion profile, in addition to the primary dispersion step at the Larmor frequency matching the exchange rate. Furthermore, and in contrast to the two-spin system, longitudinal relaxation can be significantly affected by chemical shifts and by the odd-valued ("imaginary") part of the spectral density function. We anticipate that the detailed studies of two-spin and three-spin systems that have now been completed will provide the foundation for developing an approximate multi-spin dipolar EMOR theory sufficiently accurate and computationally efficient to allow quantitative molecular-level interpretation of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation data from biophysical model systems and soft biological tissue. PMID:27448879

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: Three-spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-07-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Starting from the stochastic Liouville equation, we have developed a non-perturbative theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole couplings, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we implement the general dipolar EMOR theory for a macromolecule-bound three-spin system, where one, two, or all three spins exchange with the bulk solution phase. In contrast to the previously studied two-spin system with a single dipole coupling, there are now three dipole couplings, so relaxation is affected by distinct correlations as well as by self-correlations. Moreover, relaxation can now couple the magnetizations with three-spin modes and, in the presence of a static dipole coupling, with two-spin modes. As a result of this complexity, three secondary dispersion steps with different physical origins can appear in the longitudinal relaxation dispersion profile, in addition to the primary dispersion step at the Larmor frequency matching the exchange rate. Furthermore, and in contrast to the two-spin system, longitudinal relaxation can be significantly affected by chemical shifts and by the odd-valued ("imaginary") part of the spectral density function. We anticipate that the detailed studies of two-spin and three-spin systems that have now been completed will provide the foundation for developing an approximate multi-spin dipolar EMOR theory sufficiently accurate and computationally efficient to allow quantitative molecular-level interpretation of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation data from biophysical model systems and soft biological tissue.

  12. Nuclear magnetic relaxation, correlation time spectrum, and molecular dynamics in a linear polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, V. M. Krasnopol'skii, G. S.

    2008-08-15

    The pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method at a proton frequency of 25 MHz at temperatures of 22-160{sup o}C is used to detect the transverse magnetization decay in polyisoprene rubbers with various molecular masses, to determine the NMR damping time T{sub 2}, and to measure spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} and time T{sub 2eff} of damping of solid-echo signals under the action of a sequence of MW-4 pulses modified by introducing 180{sup o} pulses. The dispersion dependences of T{sub 2eff} obtained for each temperature are combined into one using the temperature-frequency equivalence principle. On the basis of the combined dispersion dependence of T{sub 2eff} and the data on T{sub 2} and T{sub 1}, the correlation time spectrum of molecular movements is constructed. Analysis of the shape of this spectrum shows that the dynamics of polymer molecules can be described in the first approximation by the Doi-Edwards tube-reptation model.

  13. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation.

  14. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  15. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Tombácz, Etelka; Bányai, István; Babos, Magor; Palkó, András

    2012-09-01

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide.

  16. NMR shift and relaxation measurements in pulsed high-field magnets up to 58T.

    PubMed

    Kohlrautz, J; Reichardt, S; Green, E L; Kühne, H; Wosnitza, J; Haase, J

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at fields up to 58T in pulsed magnets at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory are reported. The challenge to resolve NMR shifts in these time-dependent fields is addressed for the first time, and it is shown that this can indeed be accomplished with high precision with an internal reference. As a result, signal averaging is possible during a single magnetic field pulse, but also for multiple pulses. Thus, even very weak signals can in principle be recorded and their shifts can be determined. In a second set of experiments, the measurement of nuclear relaxation is investigated. Using adiabatic inversion with the inherent time dependence of the magnetic field and small-angle inspection, it is shown that relaxation measurements are possible, as well. The shift experiments were performed with (27)Al NMR on a mixture of aluminum metal and a Linde type A zeolite. For the relaxation studies, (27)Al NMR and (69)Ga NMR on the metals aluminum and gallium were preformed, respectively. PMID:26760950

  17. NMR shift and relaxation measurements in pulsed high-field magnets up to 58 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlrautz, J.; Reichardt, S.; Green, E. L.; Kühne, H.; Wosnitza, J.; Haase, J.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments at fields up to 58 T in pulsed magnets at the Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory are reported. The challenge to resolve NMR shifts in these time-dependent fields is addressed for the first time, and it is shown that this can indeed be accomplished with high precision with an internal reference. As a result, signal averaging is possible during a single magnetic field pulse, but also for multiple pulses. Thus, even very weak signals can in principle be recorded and their shifts can be determined. In a second set of experiments, the measurement of nuclear relaxation is investigated. Using adiabatic inversion with the inherent time dependence of the magnetic field and small-angle inspection, it is shown that relaxation measurements are possible, as well. The shift experiments were performed with 27Al NMR on a mixture of aluminum metal and a Linde type A zeolite. For the relaxation studies, 27Al NMR and 69Ga NMR on the metals aluminum and gallium were preformed, respectively.

  18. T 1 Relaxation Measurement of Ex-Vivo Breast Cancer Tissues at Ultralow Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Hwang, Seong-min; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Lim, Sanghyun; Han, Jae Ho; Yim, Hyunee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Jung, Yong Sik; Kim, Ku Sang

    2015-01-01

    We investigated T1 relaxations of ex-vivo cancer tissues at low magnetic fields in order to check the possibility of achieving a T1 contrast higher than those obtained at high fields. The T1 relaxations of fifteen pairs (normal and cancerous) of breast tissue samples were measured at three magnetic fields, 37, 62, and 122 μT, using our superconducting quantum interference device-based ultralow field nuclear magnetic resonance setup, optimally developed for ex-vivo tissue studies. A signal reconstruction based on Bayesian statistics for noise reduction was exploited to overcome the low signal-to-noise ratio. The ductal and lobular-type tissues did not exhibit meaningful T1 contrast values between normal and cancerous tissues at the three different fields. On the other hand, an enhanced T1 contrast was obtained for the mucinous cancer tissue. PMID:25705658

  19. Suppression of spin-exchange relaxation in tilted magnetic fields within the geophysical range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtes, Theo; Pustelny, Szymon; Fritzsche, Stephan; Schultze, Volkmar; Stolz, Ronny; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on the relaxation of spin coherence due to the spin-exchange mechanism arising in the electronic ground states of alkali-metal vapor atoms. As opposed to the well-explored formation of a stretched state in a longitudinal geometry (magnetic field parallel to the laser propagation direction) we employ adapted hyperfine-selective optical pumping in order to suppress spin-exchange relaxation. By comparing measurements of the intrinsic relaxation rate of the spin coherence in the ground state of cesium atoms with detailed density-matrix simulations we show that the relaxation due to spin-exchange collisions can be reduced substantially even in a tilted magnetic field of geomagnetic strength, the major application case of scalar magnetic surveying. This explains the observed striking improvement in sensitivity and further deepens the understanding of the light-narrowed Mx magnetometer, which was presented recently. Additionally, new avenues for investigating the dynamics in alkali-metal atoms governed by the spin-exchange interaction and interacting with arbitrary external fields open up.

  20. Estimation of magnetic relaxation property for CVD processed YBCO-coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Shikimachi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    Ion Beam Assist Deposition/Chemical Vapor Deposition(IBAD/CVD)-processed YBCO-coated conductors with high critical current density Jc at high magnetic fields are expected to be applied to superconducting equipments such as superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES). For application to superconducting magnet in SMES one of the most important properties for superconductors is the relaxation property of superconducting current. In this paper, the relaxation property is investigated for IBAD/CVD-processed YBCO-coated conductors of the superconducting layer in the range of 0.18-0.90 μm. This property can be quantitatively characterized by the apparent pinning potential, U0∗. It is found that U0∗ takes a smaller value due to the two-dimensional pinning mechanism at high magnetic fields for conductor with thinner superconducting layer. Although U0∗ decreases with increasing thickness at low magnetic fields at 20 K, it increases at high magnetic fields. The results are theoretically explained by the model of the flux creep and flow based on the dimensionality of flux pinning. Scaling analysis is examined for the dependence of U0∗ on the magnetic field, temperature and the layer thickness.

  1. T2 relaxation effects on apparent N-acetylaspartate concentration in proton magnetic resonance studies of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Bethany K.; Rouse, Elizabeth D.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Olson, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, many magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies reported lower N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in key brain regions of patients with schizophrenia (SZ) compared to healthy subjects. A smaller number of studies report no difference in NAA. Many sources of variance may contribute to these discordant results including heterogeneity of the SZ subject populations and methodological differences such as MRS acquisition parameters, and post-acquisition analytic methods. The current study reviewed proton MRS literature reporting measurements of NAA in SZ with a focus on methodology. Studies which reported lower NAA were significantly more likely to have used longer echo times (TEs), while studies with shorter TEs reported no concentration difference. This suggests that NAA quantitation using MRS was affected by the choice of TE, and that published MRS literature reporting NAA in SZ using a long TE is confounded by apparent differential T2 relaxation effects between SZ and healthy control groups. Future MRS studies should measure T2 relaxation times. This would allow for spectral concentration measurements to be appropriately corrected for these relaxation effects. In addition, as metabolite concentration and T2 relaxation times are completely independent variables, this could offer distinct information about the metabolite of interest. PMID:23769421

  2. Tuning Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Dysprosium Layer Compound through Guest Molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Li, Jian; Meng, Yin-Shan; Sun, Hao-Ling; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Sun, Jun-Liang; Gao, Song

    2016-08-15

    A novel two-dimensional dysprosium(III) complex, [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF·H2O·2CH3OH (1), has been successfully synthesized from a new pyridine-N-oxide (PNO)-containing ligand, namely, N'-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)pyridine-N-oxidecarbohydrazide (H2L). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that complex 1 is composed of a dinuclear dysprosium subunit, which is further extended by the PNO part of the ligand to form a two-dimensional layer. Magnetic studies indicate that complex 1 shows well-defined temperature- and frequency-dependent signals under a zero direct-current (dc) field, typical of slow magnetic relaxation with an effective energy barrier Ueff of 33.6 K under a zero dc field. Interestingly, powder X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis reveal that compound 1 undergoes a reversible phase transition that is induced by the desorption and absorption of methanol and water molecules. Moreover, the desolvated sample [Dy(L)(CH3COO)]·0.5DMF (1a) also exhibits slow magnetic relaxation but with a higher anisotropic barrier of 42.0 K, indicating the tuning effect of solvent molecules on slow magnetic relaxation. PMID:27483199

  3. Magnetic and relaxation properties of multifunctional polymer-based nanostructured bioferrofluids as MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Houshang; Bustamante, Rodney; Millán, Angel; Silva, Nuno J O; Piñol, Rafael; Gabilondo, Lierni; Palacio, Fernando; Arosio, Paolo; Corti, Maurizio; Lascialfari, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    A series of maghemite/polymer composite ferrofluids with variable magnetic core size, which show a good efficiency as MRI contrast agents, are presented. These ferrofluids are biocompatible and can be proposed as possible platforms for multifunctional biomedical applications, as they contain anchoring groups for biofunctionalization, can incorporate fluorescent dyes, and have shown low cellular toxicity. The magnetic properties of the ferrofluids have been determined by means of magnetization and ac susceptibility measurements as a function of temperature and frequency. The NMR dispersion profiles show that the low frequency behavior of the longitudinal relaxivity r(1) is well described by the heuristic model of (1)H nuclear relaxation induced by superparamagnetic nanoparticles proposed by Roch and co-workers. The contrast efficiency parameter, i.e., the nuclear transverse relaxivity r(2), for samples with d > 10 nm assumes values comparable with or better than the ones of commercial samples, the best results obtained in particles with the biggest magnetic core, d = 15 nm. The contrast efficiency results are confirmed by in vitro MRI experiments at ν = 8.5 MHz, thus allowing us to propose a set of optimal microstructural parameters for multifunctional ferrofluids to be used in MRI medical diagnosis. PMID:21574179

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Spin-Noise and Unusual Relaxation of Oxygen-17 in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendet-Taicher, Eli

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have evolved into widely used techniques, providing diagnostic power in medicine and material sciences due to their high precision and non-invasive nature. Due to the small population differences between spin energy states, a significant sensitivity problem for NMR arises. The low sensitivity of NMR is probably its greatest limitation for applications to biological systems. An alternative probe tuning strategy based on the spin-noise response for application in standard one-dimensional and common high-resolution multidimensional standard biomolecular NMR experiments has shown an increase of up to 50% signal-to-noise (SNR) in one-dimensional NMR experiments and an increase of up to 22% in multi-dimensional ones. The method requires the adjustment of the optimal tuning condition, which may be offset by several hundreds kHz from the conventional tuning settings using the noise response of the water protons as an indicator. This work is described in the first part of the thesis (chapters 2--3). The second part (Chapter 4) of the thesis deals with anomalous oxygen-17 NMR relaxation behavior in water. Oxygen-17 (17O), which has spin of 5/2 and a natural abundance of 0.0373% possesses an electric quadrupole moment. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation occur by the quadrupole interaction, while the J-coupling to 1H spins and exchange are deciding factors. T1 and T2 of 17O in water have been previously measured over a large range of temperatures. The spin-spin relaxation times of 17O as a function of temperature show an anomalous behaviour, expressed by a local maximum at the temperature of maximum density (TMD) of water. It is shown that the same anomalous behaviour shifts to the respective temperatures of maximum density for H2O/D2O solutions with different compositions and salt concentrations. This phenomenon can be correlated to the pH dependency of T2 of 17O in water, and water proton exchange rates

  5. Field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization in a pentacoordinate Co(II) compound [Co(phen)(DMSO)Cl2].

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ivan; Marx, Raphael; Herchel, Radovan; Neugebauer, Petr; van Slageren, Joris; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-09-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic properties of a pentacoordinate [Co(phen)(DMSO)Cl2] compound (phen = 1,10'-phenanthroline, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) were thoroughly studied by experimental (SQUID magnetometry and HF-EPR spectroscopy) and theoretical methods (DFT and CASSCF calculations). It has been found from temperature/field-dependent magnetization measurements that the studied compound possesses a large and negative magnetic anisotropy (D = -17(1) cm(-1)) with large rhombicity (E/D = 0.24(5)), and these experimental results are in agreement with ab initio calculations (D = -17.7 cm(-1), E/D = 0.31). Interdoublet resonances were not observed in the HF-EPR measurements, but the large rhombicity was confirmed (DEPR = -17.7 cm(-1) (fixed from CASSCF calculations), E/DEPR = 0.33). A frequency dependent out-of-phase susceptibility signal was observed only in a non-zero static magnetic field (B = 0.1 T) and the following parameters of slow-relaxation of magnetisation were derived from the experimental data: either the energy of spin reversal barrier, Ueff = 10.4 K, and the relaxation time, τ0 = 5.69 × 10(-9) s using the Debye model, or Ueff = 21.4-40.3 K and τ0 = 0.248-58.3 × 10(-9) based on a simplified model. PMID:26229042

  6. Effects of pulmonary inhalation on hyperpolarized krypton-83 magnetic resonance T1 relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupic, K. F.; Elkins, N. D.; Pavlovskaya, G. E.; Repine, J. E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-07-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface-to-volume ratio, and surface temperature. The work presented here explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4% spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to study the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data were highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function.

  7. Effects of Pulmonary Inhalation on Hyperpolarized Krypton-83 Magnetic Resonance T1 Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, K.F.; Elkins, N.D.; Pavlovskaya, G.E.; Repine, J.E.; Meersmann, T.

    2011-01-01

    The 83Kr magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation time T1 of krypton gas in contact with model surfaces was previously found to be highly sensitive to surface composition, surface to volume ratio, and surface temperature. The current work explored aspects of pulmonary 83Kr T1 relaxation measurements in excised lungs from healthy rats using hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr with approximately 4.4 % spin polarization. MR spectroscopy without spatial resolution was applied to the ex vivo lungs that actively inhale hp 83Kr through a custom designed ventilation system. Various inhalation schemes were devised to explore the influence of anatomical dead space upon the measured 83Kr T1 relaxation times. The longitudinal 83Kr relaxation times in the distal airways and the respiratory zones were independent of the lung inhalation volume, with T1 = 1.3 s and T1 = 1.0 s, depending only on the applied inhalation scheme. The obtained data was highly reproducible between different specimens. Further, the 83Kr T1 relaxation times in excised lungs were unaffected by the presence of up to 40% oxygen in the hp gas mixture. The results support the possible importance of 83Kr as a biomarker for evaluating lung function. PMID:21628780

  8. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated.

  9. Flow restrictive and shear reducing effect of magnetization relaxation in ferrofluid cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chamkor; Das, Arup Kumar; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report the effects of a uniform stationary magnetic field on the flow of ferrofluid (FF) inside a boundary driven cavity. A coupled set of conservation equations for the flow field, the Maxwell's magnetostatic equations, and the constitutive magnetization equation are solved numerically. The non-dimensional groups primarily influencing the phenomenon are first systematically identified through the normalization of the complete set of equations. We find the magnetization relaxation effects, under the stationary uniform field, to be flow restrictive in nature. The misalignment between the local magnetic field and the magnetization suppresses the vorticity field in the cavity, shifts the primary central vortex, and reduces the average shear stress at the boundaries. As a consequence, it becomes apparent that at a given Reynolds number, the application of uniform magnetic field can reduce the shear drag at the boundaries of the cavity, of course at an expense of reduced flow rate in their vicinity. Our study uniquely reveals that the relaxation time effects are dominant in the regions of ferrofluid flow where the change in the magnitude of the vorticity takes place over a length scale which is much smaller than the characteristic length scale of the flow geometry. Depending on the magnitudes of influencing parameters, the solution exhibits anomalous characteristics, such as creeping and saturating behavior.

  10. Site-Resolved Two-Step Relaxation Process in an Asymmetric Dy2 Single-Molecule Magnet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jung, Julie; Zhang, Peng; Guo, Mei; Zhao, Lang; Tang, Jinkui; Le Guennic, Boris

    2016-01-22

    Elaborate chemical design is of utmost importance in order to slow down the relaxation dynamics in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) and hence improve their potential applications. Much interest was devoted to the study of distinct relaxation processes related to the different crystal fields of crystallographically independent lanthanide ions. However, the assignment of the relaxation processes to specific metal sites remains a challenging task. To address this challenge, a new asymmetric Dy2 SMM displaying a well-separated two-step relaxation process with the anisotropic centers in fine-tuned local environments was elaborately designed. For the first time a one-to-one relationship between the metal sites and the relaxation processes was evidenced. This work sheds light on complex multiple relaxation and may direct the rational design of lanthanide SMMs with enhanced magnetic properties. PMID:26670125

  11. Picosecond water dynamics adjacent to charged paramagnetic ions measured by magnetic relaxation dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisitza, Natasha; Bryant, Robert G.

    2007-03-01

    Measurements of water-proton spin-lattice relaxation rate constants as a function of magnetic field strength [magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD)] in aqueous solutions of paramagnetic solutes reveal a peak in the MRD profile. These previously unobserved peaks require that the time correlation functions describing the water-proton-electron dipolar coupling have a periodic contribution. In aqueous solutions of iron(III) ion the peak corresponds to a frequency of 8.7cm-1, which the authors ascribe to the motion of water participating in the second coordination sphere of the triply charged solute ion. Similar peaks of weaker intensity in the same time range are observed for aqueous solutions of chromium(III) chloride as well as for ion pairs formed by ammonium ion with trioxalatochromate(III) ion. The widths of the dispersion peaks are consistent with a lifetime for the periodic motion in the range of 5ps or longer.

  12. Magnetic flux relaxation in YBa2Cu3)(7-x) thin film: Thermal or athermal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitta, Satish; Stan, M. A.; Warner, J. D.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic flux relaxation behavior of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin film on LaAlO3 for H is parallel to c was studied in the range 4.2 - 40 K and 0.2 - 1.0 T. Both the normalized flux relaxation rate S and the net flux pinning energy U increase continuously from 1.3 x 10(exp -2) to 3.0 x 10(exp -2) and from 70 to 240 meV respectively, as the temperature T increases from 10 to 40 K. This behavior is consistent with the thermally activated flux motion model. At low temperatures, however, S is found to decrease much more slowly as compared with kT, in contradiction to the thermal activation model. This behavior is discussed in terms of the athermal quantum tunneling of flux lines. The magnetic field dependence of U, however, is not completely understood.

  13. Magnetic Slowing Down of Spin Relaxation due to Binary Collisions of Alkali-Metal Atoms with Buffer-Gas Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, D. K.; Griffith, W. M.; Happer, W.

    2002-03-01

    We report the first studies of magnetic decoupling of the spin relaxation of alkali-metal atoms due to binary collisions with buffer gases. When binary collisions are the dominant relaxation mechanism, the relaxation and its magnetic decoupling are well described by the S-damping rate ΓSD due to the spin-rotation interaction γN˙S, the spin exchange rate ΓEX for collisions between alkali atoms, and a new ``Carver rate'' ΓC, due to the pressure-shift interaction δAİS, which can substantially broaden the magnetic decoupling curve while having no influence on the zero-field rates.

  14. Understanding the effects of diffusion and relaxation in magnetic resonance imaging using computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Greg

    The work described in this dissertation was motivated by a desire to better understand the cellular pathology of ischemic stroke. Two of the three bodies of research presented herein address and issue directly related to the investigation of ischemic stroke through the use of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) methods. The first topic concerns the development of a computationally efficient finite difference method, designed to evaluate the impact of microscopic tissue properties on the formation of DWMRI signal. For the second body of work, the effect of changing the intrinsic diffusion coefficient of a restricted sample on clinical DWMRI experiments is explored. The final body of work, while motivated by the desire to understand stroke, addresses the issue of acquiring large amounts of MRI data well suited for quantitative analysis in reduced scan time. In theory, the method could be used to generate quantitative parametric maps, including those depicting information gleaned through the use of DWMRI methods. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to several topics. A description of the use of DWMRI methods in the study of ischemic stroke is covered. An introduction to the fundamental physical principles at work in MRI is also provided. In this section the means by which magnetization is created in MRI experiments, how MRI signal is induced, as well as the influence of spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation are discussed. Attention is also given to describing how MRI measurements can be sensitized to diffusion through the use of qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the process. Finally, the reader is given a brief introduction to the use of numerical methods for solving partial differential equations. In Chapters 2, 3 and 4, three related bodies of research are presented in terms of research papers. In Chapter 2, a novel computational method is described. The method reduces the computation resources required to simulate DWMRI experiments. In

  15. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  16. A luminescent heptanuclear DyIr6 complex showing field-induced slow magnetization relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dai; Ren, Min; Bao, Song-Song; Li, Li; Zheng, Li-Min

    2014-08-01

    The first example of iridium/lanthanide phosphonates, i.e. [DyIr6(ppy)12(bpp)2(bppH)4](CF3SO3)·8H2O (1) (ppy(-) = 2-phenylpyridine, bpp(2-) = 2-pyridylphosphonate) is reported. It shows dual functions with the photoluminescence and field-induced slow magnetization relaxation originating from the Ir and Dy moieties, respectively. PMID:24942060

  17. Densely Packed Lanthanide Cubane Based 3D Metal-Organic Frameworks for Efficient Magnetic Refrigeration and Slow Magnetic Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soumava; Mondal, Amit Kumar; Konar, Sanjit

    2016-03-01

    Two isostructural densely packed squarato-bridged lanthanide-based 3D metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) [Ln5(μ3-OH)5(μ3-O)(CO3)2(HCO2)2(C4O4)(H2O)2] [Ln = Gd (1) and Dy (2)] show giant cryogenic magnetic refrigeration (for 1) and slow magnetic relaxation (for 2). The structural analyses reveal the presence of a self-assembled crown-shaped building unit with a cubane-based rectangular moiety that leads to a special array of metal centers in 3D space in the complexes. Magnetic investigations confirm that complex 1 exhibits one of the largest cryogenic magnetocaloric effects among the molecular magnetic refrigerant materials reported so far (-ΔSm = 64.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) for ΔH = 9 T at 3 K). The cryogenic cooling effect (of 1) is also quite comparable with that of the commercially used magnetic refrigerant gadolinium-gallium garnet, whereas for complex 2, slow relaxation of magnetization was observed below 10 K. PMID:26881286

  18. An extended magnetic viscous relaxation dating for calibrating an older age: an example of tsunamigenic coral boulders in Ishigaki Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Nakamura, N.; Goto, K.; Kumagai, Y.; Minoura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    2015-12-01

    A key to the understanding of past tsunami events is the ability to accurately date them. Analysis of past tsunami sediments is one of the most important tools for past tsunami reconstruction. A typical example of such tsunami sediment is tsunamigenic boulders. In Ishigaki Island, Japan, coral boulders that had been transported by tsunamis were distributed on the beach and land areas. Although the historical occurrences of several huge tsunamis were estimated based on large numbers of radiocarbon dating for coral boulders, radiocarbon dating can not determine a multiple rotational history by multiple tsunamis. A viscous remanet magnetization (VRM) dating method can be used to date any geological event that results in significant movements of a rock. Sato et al. (2014) applied VRM dating for comparing the radiocarbon age of these boulders. If a magnetic-mineral bearing rock is moved or re-oriented, the magnetism of the smaller magnetic grains re-aligns to the direction of the ambient magnetic field with time. This phenomenon is well known as Néel's (1949, 1955) single-domain (SD) relaxation theory. Pullaiah et al. (1975) derived a time-temperature (t-T relation) relation by assuming Néel's (1949, 1955) theory of magnetite. In principle, an experimental combination of short relaxation time and high temperature for removing VRM can determine the unknown relaxation time (tsunami age) at room temperature. We have been applied t-T relation to the coral boulders on Ishigaki Island, but their estimated ages showed older than radiocarbon dating. The longer relaxation time means that the observed magnetic relaxation is slower than the original Néel's theory. Such slow relaxation has been described by a stretched exponential function. The stretched exponential law provided a reasonable fit to the published experimental data. Thus, in this study, we revisit Néel's theory to provide a new t-T relation based on stretched exponential function.

  19. Superspin relaxation in Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluids: A dynamic susceptibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Cristian E.; Morris, Joshua L.; Eastman, Michael P.

    2012-07-01

    We have used frequency-resolved (100 Hz < f < 10,000 Hz) ac magnetic susceptibility measurements to directly determine the Néel and Brown relaxation times in 30-nm-size Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluids at temperatures between 200 and 300 K. Our data collected on both powder and magnetic fluid samples allow the separation of the contributions from the Néel and Brown relaxation mechanisms that act concomitantly within the above-mentioned temperature range. At all temperatures we find that the Brown relaxation times (τB) are shorter than their Néel counterparts (τN), evidence that the Brown mechanism yields the major contribution towards the system's overall superspin dynamics. τB exhibits a steep two-order-of-magnitude decrease upon heating, from τB = 1 × 10-3 s at T = 237 K to τB = 1.5 × 10-5 s at T = 270 K, a behavior mostly driven by the heating-induced reduction of the liquid carrier's viscosity.

  20. Relaxation Dynamics and Magnetic Anisotropy in a Low-Symmetry Dy(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Lucaccini, Eva; Briganti, Matteo; Perfetti, Mauro; Vendier, Laure; Costes, Jean-Pierre; Totti, Federico; Sessoli, Roberta; Sorace, Lorenzo

    2016-04-11

    The magnetic behaviour of a Dy(LH)3 complex (LH(-) is the anion of 2-hydroxy-N'-[(E)-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]benzhydrazide) was analysed in depth from both theoretical and experimental points of view. Cantilever torque magnetometry indicated that the complex has Ising-type anisotropy, and provided two possible directions for the easy axis of anisotropy due to the presence of two magnetically non-equivalent molecules in the crystal. Ab initio calculations confirmed the strong Ising-type anisotropy and disentangled the two possible orientations. The computed results obtained by using ab initio calculations were then used to rationalise the composite dynamic behaviour observed for both pure Dy(III) phase and Y(III) diluted phase, which showed two different relaxation channels in zero and non-zero static magnetic fields. In particular, we showed that the relaxation behaviour at the higher temperature range can be correctly reproduced by using a master matrix approach, which suggests that Orbach relaxation is occurring through a second excited doublet. PMID:26960531

  1. Experimental investigation of plasma relaxation using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott; University of New Mexico Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation in a low density background plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear HelCat device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes within the intergalactic medium. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5-10 kV and ~100 kA. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities ~1.2Cs and densities ~1020 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  2. NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) of thin films obtained by magnetic resonance force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Won, Soonho; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil

    2015-05-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The samples were CaF2 thin films which were 50 nm and 150 nm thick. T1 was measured at 18 K using a cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency. A comparison of the bulk and two thin films showed that T1 becomes shorter as the film thickness decreases. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, all three samples were loaded onto different beams of a multi-cantilever array and measured in the same experimental environment. PMID:25828244

  3. NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of thin films obtained by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Won, Soonho; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil

    2015-05-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The samples were CaF2 thin films which were 50 nm and 150 nm thick. T1 was measured at 18 K using a cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency. A comparison of the bulk and two thin films showed that T1 becomes shorter as the film thickness decreases. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, all three samples were loaded onto different beams of a multi-cantilever array and measured in the same experimental environment.

  4. Influence of the ligand field on slow magnetization relaxation versus spin crossover in mononuclear cobalt complexes.

    PubMed

    Habib, Fatemah; Luca, Oana R; Vieru, Veacheslav; Shiddiq, Muhandis; Korobkov, Ilia; Gorelsky, Serge I; Takase, Michael K; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Hill, Stephen; Crabtree, Robert H; Murugesu, Muralee

    2013-10-18

    The electronic and magnetic properties of the complexes [Co(terpy)Cl2 ] (1), [Co(terpy)(NCS)2 ] (2), and [Co(terpy)2 ](NCS)2 (3) were investigated. The coordination environment around Co(II) in 1 and 2 leads to a high-spin complex at low temperature and single-molecule magnet properties with multiple relaxation pathways. Changing the ligand field and geometry with an additional terpy ligand leads to spin-crossover behavior in 3 with a gradual transition from high spin to low spin. PMID:24009214

  5. Homochiral mononuclear Dy-Schiff base complexes showing field-induced double magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Min; Xu, Zhong-Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Bao, Song-Song; Zheng, Ze-Hua; Zhang, Zai-Chao; Zheng, Li-Min

    2016-01-14

    A pair of enantiopure mononuclear dysprosium/salen-type complexes (Et3NH)[Dy((R,R)/(S,S)-3-NO2salcy)2] (/), where 3-NO2salcyH2 represents N,N'-(1,2-cyclohexanediylethylene)bis(3-nitrosalicylideneiminato), are reported. The enantiomer contains two crystallographically independent dysprosium(iii) ions, each chelated by two enantiopure 3-NO2salcy(2-) ligands forming a [DyN4O4] core. Detailed magnetic studies on compound reveal a field-induced dual magnetic relaxation behavior, originating from single ion anisotropy and intermolecular interactions, respectively. PMID:26621766

  6. Slow magnetic relaxation in mononuclear seven-coordinate cobalt(II) complexes with easy plane anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Chen, Shu-Yang; Sun, Yi-Chen; Guo, Yu-Mei; Yu, Lu; Chen, Xue-Tai; Wang, Zhenxing; Ouyang, Z W; Song, You; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2015-07-01

    Two mononuclear seven-coordinate cobalt(II) complexes [Co(L)3(NO3)2] (L = 4-tert-butylpyridine, 1; L = isoquinoline, 2) were prepared and structurally analyzed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The coordination spheres of 1 and 2 exhibit distorted pentagonal bipyramid geometry. Analysis of their direct-current magnetic data reveals the existence of easy plane anisotropy (D > 0) with a small transverse anisotropy (E), which was further confirmed by high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy. Field-induced slow magnetic relaxations were observed under the applied dc field in complexes 1 and 2 by alternating-current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Importantly, these complexes are new instances of mononuclear high-coordinate cobalt(II)-based single-molecule magnets. PMID:26027953

  7. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  8. Fluctuation-Induced Particle Transport and Density Relaxation in a Stochastic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, David L.

    2009-11-01

    Particle transport and density relaxation associated with electromagnetic fluctuations is an unresolved problem of long standing in plasma physics and magnetic fusion research. In toroidal fusion plasmas, magnetic field fluctuations can arise spontaneously from global MHD instabilities, e.g., tearing fluctuations associated with sawtooth oscillations. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) have also been externally imposed to mitigate the effect of edge localized modes (ELMs) by locally enhancing edge transport in Tokamaks. Understanding stochastic-field-driven transport processes is thus not only of basic science interest but possibly critical to ELM control in ITER. We report on the first direct measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport in the core of a high-temperature plasma, the MST reversed field pinch. Measurements focus on the sawtooth crash, when the stochastic field resulting from tearing reconnection is strongest, and are accomplished using newly developed, laser-based, differential interferometry and Faraday rotation techniques. The measured electron particle flux, resulting from the correlated product of electron density (δn) and radial magnetic fluctuations (δbr), accounts for density profile relaxation during these magnetic reconnection events. Surprisingly, the electron diffusion is 30 times larger than estimates of ambipolarity-constrained transport in a stochastic magnetic field. A significant ion flux associated with parallel ion flow velocity fluctuations (δvi,//) correlated with δbr appears responsible for transport larger than predictions from the quasi-linear test particle model. These results indicate the need for improved understanding of particle transport in a stochastic magnetic field. Work performed in collaboration with W.X. Ding, W.F. Bergerson, T.F. Yates, UCLA; D.J. Den Hartog, G. Fiksel, S.C. Prager, J.S. Sarff and the MST Group, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  9. Unexpected suppression of spin-lattice relaxation via high magnetic field in a high-spin iron(iii) complex.

    PubMed

    Zadrozny, Joseph M; Graham, Michael J; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Freedman, Danna E

    2016-08-01

    A counterintuitive three-order of magnitude slowing of the spin-lattice relaxation rate is observed in a high spin qubit at high magnetic field via multifrequency pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. PMID:27463410

  10. A magnetic nanoparticles relaxation sensor for protein-protein interaction detection at ultra-low magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Peixiang; Dong, Hui; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Zhang, Yi; Willbold, Dieter; Offenhaeusser, Andreas; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-15

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can serve as magnetic relaxation sensors (MRSs) to detect different biological targets, because the clustering of magnetic particle may cause the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) decrease of the surrounding water protons. However, the application of MNPs in clinical NMR systems faces the challenge of poor stability at magnetic field strengths in the order of tesla. The recently developed ultra-low field (ULF) NMR technique working at microtesla (μT) range then becomes a candidate. Herein, we incorporated superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) as the detector in the ultra-low field system to enhance the sensitivity. We functionalized the Fe3O4 nanoparticles with the gama-aminobutyrate type A receptor-associated proteins (GABARAP), which specifically interact with calreticulin (CRT). As a result of the interaction between GABARAP and CRT, the clustering of the functionalized MNPs generates local magnetic fields, which accelerate the dephasing of the water protons in the vicinity. We analyzed the relation between T2 values and the CRT concentrations at 211μT and the low detection limit for CRT is 10 pg/ml, which is superior to the immunoblot system. The high sensitivity of the ULF NMR system for protein-protein interaction detection demonstrates the potential to use this inexpensive, portable system for quick biochemical and clinical assays. PMID:26914374

  11. Heterometallic 3d-4f single-molecule magnets: ligand and metal ion influences on the magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Le, Crystal; Ungur, Liviu; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Abrahams, Brendan F; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murray, Keith S

    2015-04-01

    Six tetranuclear 3d–4f single-molecule magnet (SMM) complexes formed using N-n-butyldiethanolamine and N-methyldiethanolamine in conjunction with ortho- and para-substituted benzoic acid and hexafluoroacetoacetone ligands yield two families, both having a butterfly metallic core. The first consists of four complexes of type {Co2(III)Dy2(III)} and {Co2(III)Co(II)Dy(III)} using N-n-butyldiethanolamine with variation of the carboxylate ligand. The anisotropy barriers are 80 cm–1, (77 and 96 cm–1—two relaxation processes occur), 117 and 88 cm–1, respectively, each following a relaxation mechanism from a single DyIII ion. The second family consists of a {Co2(III)Dy2(III)} and a {Cr2(III)Dy2(III)} complex, from the ligand combination of N-methyldiethanolamine and hexafluoroacetylacetone. Both show SMM behavior, the Co(III) example displaying an anisotropy barrier of 23 cm–1. The Cr(III) complex displays a barrier of 28 cm–1, with longer relaxation times and open hysteresis loops, the latter of which is not seen in the Co(III) case. This is a consequence of strong Dy(III)–Cr(III) magnetic interactions, with the relaxation arising from the electronic structure of the whole complex and not from a single DyIII ion. The results suggest that the presence of strong exchange interactions lead to significantly longer relaxation times than in isostructural complexes where the exchange is weak. The study also suggests that electron-withdrawing groups on both bridging (carboxylate) and terminal (β-diketonate) ligands enhance the anisotropy barrier. PMID:25796958

  12. Probing α-relaxation with nuclear magnetic resonance echo decay and relaxation: a study on nitrile butadiene rubber.

    PubMed

    Sturniolo, Simone; Pieruccini, Marco; Corti, Maurizio; Rigamonti, Attilio

    2013-01-01

    One dimensional (1)H NMR measurements have been performed to probe slow molecular motions in nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) around its calorimetric glass transition temperature Tg. The purpose is to show how software aided data analysis can extract meaningful dynamical data from these measurements. Spin-lattice relaxation time, free induction decay (FID) and magic sandwich echo (MSE) measurements have been carried out at different values of the static field, as a function of temperature. It has been evidenced how the efficiency of the MSE signal in reconstructing the original FID exhibits a sudden minimum at a given temperature, with a slight dependence from the measuring frequency. Computer simulations performed with the software SPINEVOLUTION have shown that the minimum in the efficiency reconstruction of the MSE signal corresponds to the average motional frequency taking a value around the inter-proton coupling. The FID signals have been fitted with a truncated form of a newly derived exact correlation function for the transverse magnetization of a dipolar interacting spin pair, which allows one to avoid the restriction of the stationary and Gaussian approximations. A direct estimate of the conformational dynamics on approaching the Tg is obtained, and the results are in agreement with the analysis performed via the MSE reconstruction efficiency. The occurrence of a wide distribution of correlation frequencies for the chains motion, with a Vogel-Fulcher type temperature dependence, is addressed. A route for a fruitful study of the dynamics accompanying the glass transition by a variety of NMR measurements is thus proposed. PMID:23379979

  13. Collisional Relaxation of a Strongly Magnetized, Two-Isotope, Pure Ion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, C. Y.; O'Neil, T. M.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2012-10-01

    The collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized pure ion plasmafootnotetextP.J. Hjorth and T.M. O'Neil, Phys. Fluids 26, 2128(1983); M.E. Glinsky, et al., Phys. Fluids B 4, 1156 (1992). that is composed of two species with slightly different mass is discussed. We assume the ordering φC1,φC2|φC1-φC2|v / b , where φC1 and φC2 are the two cyclotron frequencies, v is the thermal velocity, and b is the classical distance of closest approach. We find that the total cyclotron action for the two species I1 and I2 are adiabatic invariants conserved on the timescale of a few collisions, so the Gibbs distribution relaxes to the form [-H/T-α1I1-α2I2], where α1 and α2 are thermodynamic variables like the temperature T. On a timescale longer than the collisional timescale, the two species share action so that α1 and α2 relax to a common value α. During this process, + remains constant. On an even longer timescale, the total action ceases to be a good constant of the motion and α relaxes to zero, yielding the usual Gibbs distribution [ - H/T].

  14. Preparation of amyloid-like fibrils containing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Effect of protein aggregation on proton relaxivity

    SciTech Connect

    Viktor Andersson, B.; Skoglund, Caroline; Uvdal, Kajsa; Solin, Niclas

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of amyloid materials labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of amyloid materials by electron tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of protein aggregation on the magnetic nanoparticle properties. -- Abstract: A method to prepare amyloid-like fibrils functionalized with magnetic nanoparticles has been developed. The amyloid-like fibrils are prepared in a two step procedure, where insulin and magnetic nanoparticles are mixed simply by grinding in the solid state, resulting in a water soluble hybrid material. When the hybrid material is heated in aqueous acid, the insulin/nanoparticle hybrid material self assembles to form amyloid-like fibrils incorporating the magnetic nanoparticles. This results in magnetically labeled amyloid-like fibrils which has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and electron tomography. The influence of the aggregation process on proton relaxivity is investigated. The prepared materials have potential uses in a range of bio-imaging applications.

  15. Distributions of transverse relaxation times for soft-solids measured in strongly inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelcea, R. I.; Fechete, R.; Culea, E.; Demco, D. E.; Blümich, B.

    2009-02-01

    The single-sided NMR-MOUSE sensor that operates in highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields is used to record a CPMG 1H transverse relaxation decay by CPMG echo trains for a series of cross-linked natural rubber samples. Effective transverse relaxation rates 1/ T2,short and 1/ T2,long were determined by a bi-exponential fit. A linear dependence of transverse relaxation rates on cross-link density is observed for medium to large values of cross-link density. As an alternative to multi-exponential fits the possibility to analyze the dynamics of soft polymer network in terms of multi-exponential decays via the inverse Laplace transformation was studied. The transient regime and the effect of the T1/ T2 ratio in inhomogeneous static and radiofrequency magnetic fields on the CPMG decays were studied numerically using a dedicated C++ program to simulate the temporal and spatial dependence of the CPMG response. A correction factor T2/ T2,eff is derived as a function of the T1/ T2 ratio from numerical simulations and compared with earlier results from two different well logging devices. High-resolution T1- T2 correlations maps are obtained by two-dimensional Laplace inversion of CPMG detected saturation recovery curves. The T1- T2 experimental correlations maps were corrected for the T1/ T2 effect using the derived T2/ T2,eff correction factor.

  16. Resonant Scattering off Magnetic Impurities in Graphene: Mechanism for Ultrafast Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, D.; Gmitra, M.; Fabian, J.

    We give a tutorial account of our recently proposed mechanism for spin relaxation based on spin-flip resonant scattering off local magnetic moments. The mechanism is rather general, working in any material with a resonant local moment, but we believe that its particular niche is graphene, whose measured spin relaxation time is 100-1000 ps. Conventional spin-orbit coupling based mechanisms (Elliott-Yafet or Dyakonov-Perel) would require large concentrations (1000 ppm) of impurities to explain this. Our mechanism needs only 1 ppm of resonant local moments, as these act as local spin hot spots: the resonant scatterers do not appear to substantially affect graphene's measured resistivity, but are dominating spin relaxation. In principle, the local moments can come from a variety of sources. Most likely would be organic molecule adsorbants or metallic adatoms. As the representative model, particularly suited for a tutorial, we consider hydrogen adatoms which are theoretically and experimentally demonstrated to yield local magnetic moments when chemisorbed on graphene. We introduce the scattering formalism and apply it to graphene, to obtain the T-matrix and spin-flip scattering rates using the generalized Fermi golden rule.

  17. Long-distance super-exchange and quantum magnetic relaxation in a hybrid metal-organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Tian; Shipeng, Shen; Junzhuang, Cong; Liqin, Yan; Yisheng, Chai; Young, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid metal-organic framework [(CH3)2NH2]Fe(HCOO)3 with a perovskite-like structure exhibits a variety of unusual magnetic behaviors at low temperatures. While the long-distance super-exchange through the Fe-O-CH-O-Fe exchange path leads to a canted antiferromagnetic ordering at TN ˜ 19 K, a second transition of magnetic blocking develops at TB ˜ 9 K. The stair-shaped magnetization hysteresis loops below TB resemble the behaviors of resonant quantum tunneling of magnetization in single-molecular quantum magnets. Moreover, the magnetic relaxation also exhibits several features of resonant quantum relaxation, such as the exponential law with a single characteristic relaxation time, and the nonmonotonic dependence of relaxation rate on the applied magnetic field with a much faster relaxation around the resonant fields. The origin of quantum tunneling behaviors in the [(CH3)2NH2]Fe(HCOO)3 metal-organic framework is discussed in terms of magnetic phase separation due to the modification of hydrogen bonding on the long-distance super-exchange interaction. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11227405, 51371192, and 51371193) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200).

  18. Transverse susceptibility method in nanoparticulate magnetic media.

    PubMed

    Cimpoesu, Dorin; Spinu, Leonard; Stancu, Alexandru

    2008-06-01

    Transverse susceptibility (TS) method is a reliable method for the determination of anisotropy in nanoparticulate media. To correctly evaluate the value of anisotropy in various modern nanostructured materials, a number of theoretical problems related to the method have to be well understood to avoid significant systematic errors. This paper presents the state of the art in the TS method which includes the expression for single domain particles with any type of anisotropy, the theoretical and micromagnetic, using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation and stochastic LLG equation studies of the effects of ac field amplitude, inter-particle interactions, and magnetic relaxation. The problem of both real and imaginary parts of the TS signal is also discussed. PMID:18681012

  19. Measurement of dynamic magnetization induced by a pulsed field: Proposal for a new rock magnetism method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-02-01

    This study proposes a new method for measuring transient magnetization of natural samples induced by a pulsed field with duration of 11 ms using a pulse magnetizer. An experimental system was constructed, consisting of a pair of differential sensing coils connected with a high-speed digital oscilloscope for data acquisition. The data were transferred to a computer to obtain an initial magnetization curve and a descending branch of a hysteresis loop in a rapidly changing positive field. This system was tested with synthetic samples (permalloy ribbon, aluminum plate, and nickel powder) as well as two volcanic rock samples. Results from the synthetic samples showed considerable differences from those measured by a quasi-static method using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). These differences were principally due to the time-dependent magnetic properties or to electromagnetic effects, such as magnetic viscosity, eddy current loss, or magnetic relaxation. Results from the natural samples showed that the transient magnetization-field curves were largely comparable to the corresponding portions of the hysteresis loops. However, the relative magnetization (scaled to the saturation magnetization) at the end of a pulse was greater than that measured by a VSM. This discrepancy, together with the occurrence of rapid exponential decay after a pulse, indicates magnetic relaxations that could be interpreted in terms of domain wall displacement. These results suggest that with further developments, the proposed technique can become a useful tool for characterizing magnetic particles contained in a variety of natural materials.

  20. Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Magnetic-field Relaxations in Solar-coronal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, B. C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper treats the relaxation of a magnetic field into a minimum-energy force-free state in a cold (pressure-less) viscous fluid, under the frozen-in condition of perfect electrical conductivity and letting the viscosity-dissipated energy be completely lost. A non-Newtonian fluid in popular use is studied in relation to the Newtonian viscous fluid, as two alternative numerical means to (1) construct force-free fields representing solar coronal structures in realistic geometry and (2) investigate the Parker theory of spontaneous formation of electric current sheets as a basic MHD process. Faraday's induction equation imposes an independent condition on the fluid velocity at rigid, perfectly conducting boundaries. This boundary condition is quite compatible with Newtonian mechanics but not with the non-Newtonian fluid model where velocity is equated to the Lorentz force with a free, positive multiplicative-factor. This defining property gives rise to unphysical or artificial singularities not previously known that are completely distinct from the physically admissible singularities representing the current sheets of the Parker theory. In particular, the non-Newtonian fluid takes a magnetic field with neutral points from any one of a continuum of initial states into an unphysical state instead of the proper force-free end-state accessible by Newtonian relaxation. The validity of previously published MHD results based on this non-Newtonian fluid, including some counterclaims against the Parker theory, is dubious. Investigating the Parker theory requires numerical relaxation models capable of anticipating and accurately describing inevitable current-sheet singularities. By including a weak resistivity to dissipate the inevitable current sheets as they form, the field can change topology intermittently to seek a terminal force-free state free of singularities. The minimum-energy state of this more complete model corresponds to the long-lived relaxed structures in the

  1. NEWTONIAN AND NON-NEWTONIAN MAGNETIC-FIELD RELAXATIONS IN SOLAR-CORONAL MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B. C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper treats the relaxation of a magnetic field into a minimum-energy force-free state in a cold (pressure-less) viscous fluid, under the frozen-in condition of perfect electrical conductivity and letting the viscosity-dissipated energy be completely lost. A non-Newtonian fluid in popular use is studied in relation to the Newtonian viscous fluid, as two alternative numerical means to (1) construct force-free fields representing solar coronal structures in realistic geometry and (2) investigate the Parker theory of spontaneous formation of electric current sheets as a basic MHD process. Faraday's induction equation imposes an independent condition on the fluid velocity at rigid, perfectly conducting boundaries. This boundary condition is quite compatible with Newtonian mechanics but not with the non-Newtonian fluid model where velocity is equated to the Lorentz force with a free, positive multiplicative-factor. This defining property gives rise to unphysical or artificial singularities not previously known that are completely distinct from the physically admissible singularities representing the current sheets of the Parker theory. In particular, the non-Newtonian fluid takes a magnetic field with neutral points from any one of a continuum of initial states into an unphysical state instead of the proper force-free end-state accessible by Newtonian relaxation. The validity of previously published MHD results based on this non-Newtonian fluid, including some counterclaims against the Parker theory, is dubious. Investigating the Parker theory requires numerical relaxation models capable of anticipating and accurately describing inevitable current-sheet singularities. By including a weak resistivity to dissipate the inevitable current sheets as they form, the field can change topology intermittently to seek a terminal force-free state free of singularities. The minimum-energy state of this more complete model corresponds to the long-lived relaxed structures in the

  2. A novel three-dimensional mesh deformation method based on sphere relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xuan; Li, Shuixiang

    2015-10-01

    In our previous work (2013) [19], we developed a disk relaxation based mesh deformation method for two-dimensional mesh deformation. In this paper, the idea of the disk relaxation is extended to the sphere relaxation for three-dimensional meshes with large deformations. We develop a node based pre-displacement procedure to apply initial movements on nodes according to their layer indices. Afterwards, the nodes are moved locally by the improved sphere relaxation algorithm to transfer boundary deformations and increase the mesh quality. A three-dimensional mesh smoothing method is also adopted to prevent the occurrence of the negative volume of elements, and further improve the mesh quality. Numerical applications in three-dimension including the wing rotation, bending beam and morphing aircraft are carried out. The results demonstrate that the sphere relaxation based approach generates the deformed mesh with high quality, especially regarding complex boundaries and large deformations.

  3. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Lograsso, B.K.; Anderson, I.E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles. Wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties. 13 figures.

  4. Method of making permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Dennis, Kevin W.; Lograsso, Barbara K.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1993-09-07

    A method for making an isotropic permanent magnet comprises atomizing a melt of a rare earth-transition metal alloy (e.g., an Nd--Fe--B alloy enriched in Nd and B) under conditions to produce protectively coated, rapidly solidified, generally spherical alloy particles wherein a majority of the particles are produced/size classified within a given size fraction (e.g., 5 to 40 microns diameter) exhibiting optimum as-atomized magnetic properties and subjecting the particles to concurrent elevated temperature and elevated isotropic pressure for a time effective to yield a densified, magnetically isotropic magnet compact having enhanced magnetic properties and mechanical properties.

  5. Detection of Cancer-Specific Proteases Using Magnetic Relaxation of Peptide-Conjugated Nanoparticles in Biological Environment.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sonu; Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2016-06-01

    Protease expression is closely linked to malignant phenotypes of different solid tumors; as such, their detection is promising for diagnosis and treatment of cancers, Alzheimer's, and vascular diseases. Here, we describe a new method for detecting proteases by sensitively monitoring the magnetic relaxation of monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) using magnetic particle spectrometer (MPS). In this assay, tailored peptides functioning as activatable nanosensors link magnetic nanoparticles and possess selective sites that are recognizeable and cleaveable by specific proteases. When these linker peptides, labeled with biotin at N- and C-terminals, are added to the neutravidin functionalized IONPs, nanoparticles aggregate, resulting in well-defined changes in the MPS signal. However, as designed, in the presence of proteases these peptides are cleaved at predetermined sites, redispersing IONPs, and returning the MPS signal(s) close to its preaggregation state. These changes observed in all aspects of the MPS signal (peak intensity, its position as a function of field amplitude, and full width at half-maximum-when combined, these three also eliminate false positives), help to detect specific proteases, relying only on the magnetic relaxation characteristics of the functionalized nanoparticles. We demonstrate the general utility of this assay by detecting one each from the two general classes of proteases: trypsin (digestive serine protease, involved in various cancers, promoting proliferation, invasion, and metastasis) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2, observed through metastasis and tumor angiogenesis). This MPS based protease-assay is rapid, reproducible, and highly sensitive and can form the basis of a feasible, high-throughput method for detection of various other proteases. PMID:27219521

  6. Multilevel relaxation model for describing the Moessbauer spectra of nanoparticles in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chuev, M. A.

    2012-04-15

    A theory is developed for the Moessbauer absorption spectra of an ensemble of single-domain particles in a magnetic field. This theory is based on the generalization of a relaxation model with a quantummechanical description of the stationary states of a particle and on the formalism of Liouville operators for describing the hyperfine interaction for a hyperfine field changing in both the magnitude and direction for various stationary states. The general scheme of calculating relaxation Moessbauer spectra in terms of a standard stochastic approach is substantially optimized using operations with block matrices and a unique tridiagonalization of high-rank non-Hermitian matrices with a simple nonorthogonal transformation in the calculation procedure. The resulting model can easily be implemented on a personal computer. It considers the physical mechanisms of formation of a hyperfine structure in a spectrum of nanoparticles in a real situation and self-consistently describes the qualitative features of the nontrivial evolution of spectra with the temperature and the magnetic-field direction and strength, which has been detected in {sup 57}Fe nucleus experiments performed on magnetic nanoparticles for half a century.

  7. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Muncaci, S.; Ardelean, I.; Boboia, S.

    2013-11-13

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  8. The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muncaci, S.; Boboia, S.; Ardelean, I.

    2013-11-01

    In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe2O3) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

  9. Intra-well relaxation process in magnetic fluids subjected to strong polarising fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, C. N.; Fannin, P. C.; Mălăescu, I.; Barvinschi, P.; Ercuţa, A.

    2012-02-01

    We report on the frequency and field dependent complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of a kerosene-based magnetic fluid with iron oxide nanoparticles, stabilized with oleic acid, in the frequency range 0.1-6 GHz and over the polarising field range of 0-168.4 kA/m. By increasing polarising field, H, a subsidiary loss-peak clearly occurs in the vicinity of the ferromagnetic resonance peak, from which it remains distinct even in strong polarising fields of 168.4 kA/m. This is in contrast to other reported cases in which the intra-well relaxation process is manifested only as a shoulder of the resonance peak, which vanishes in polarising fields larger than that of 100 kA/m. The results of the XRD analysis connected to the anisotropy field results confirm that the investigated sample contains particles of magnetite and of the tetragonal phase of maghemite. Taking into account the characteristics of our sample, the theoretical analysis revealed that the intra-well relaxation process of the small particles of the tetragonal phase of maghemite may be responsible for the subsidiary loss peak of the investigated magnetic fluid.

  10. Temperature dependence of proton NMR relaxation times at earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedbalski, Peter; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Parish, Christopher; Ferguson, Sarah; Cervantes, Eduardo; Oomen, Anisha; Krishnan, Anagha; Goyal, Aayush; Lumata, Lloyd

    The theoretical description of relaxation processes for protons, well established and experimentally verified at conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fields, has remained untested at low fields despite significant advances in low field NMR technology. In this study, proton spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times in pure water and water doped with varying concentrations of the paramagnetic agent copper chloride have been measured from 6 to 92oC at earth's magnetic field (1700 Hz). Results show a linear increase of T1 with temperature for each of the samples studied. Increasing the concentration of the copper chloride greatly reduced T1 and reduced dependence on temperature. The consistency of the results with theory is an important confirmation of past results, while the ability of an ultra-low field NMR system to do contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is promising for future applicability to low-cost medical imaging and chemical identification. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  11. Earth's magnetic field enabled scalar coupling relaxation of 13C nuclei bound to fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N in amide groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavazza, Enrico; Kubala, Eugen; Gringeri, Concetta V.; Düwel, Stephan; Durst, Markus; Schulte, Rolf F.; Menzel, Marion I.

    2013-02-01

    Scalar coupling relaxation, which is usually only associated with closely resonant nuclei (e.g., 79Br-13C), can be a very effective relaxation mechanism. While working on hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, fast liquid-state polarization decay during transfer to the MRI scanner was observed. This behavior could hypothetically be explained by substantial T1 shortening due to a scalar coupling contribution (type II) to the relaxation caused by the fast-relaxing quadrupolar 14N adjacent to the 13C nucleus in the amide group. This contribution is only effective in low magnetic fields (i.e., less than 800 μT) and prevents the use of molecules bearing the 13C-amide group as hyperpolarized MRS/MRI probes. In the present work, this hypothesis is explored both theoretically and experimentally. The results show that high hyperpolarization levels can be retained using either a 15N-labeled amide or by applying a magnetic field during transfer of the sample from the polarizer to the MRI scanner.

  12. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  13. Determination of magnetic anisotropies, interlayer coupling, and magnetization relaxation in FeCoB/Cr/FeCoB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y.; Cevher, Z.; Ebrahim, M.; Lou, J.; Pettiford, C.; Sun, N. X.; Ren, Y. H.

    2009-09-01

    We studied magnetic anisotropic properties, interlayer coupling, and spin wave relaxation in ten periods of CoFeB/Cr/CoFeB films grown on seed layers of Cu with a Co:Fe:B composition ratio of 2:2:1. The measurements were taken in samples with 50 Å layers of CoFeB using the ferromagnetic resonance technique. The thickness of the Cr interlayers was varied from 4 to 40 Å for understanding the mechanisms of interlayer coupling. We investigated the magnetic anisotropy parameters by rotating the sample with respect to the microwave magnetic field from in plane to perpendicular to the plane. We identify both the acoustic branch and the optical branch in the spin wave resonance spectra. The effective interlayer coupling constant and the out-of-plane anisotropy show an oscillatory change, while the uniaxial in-plane anisotropy increases monotonically with increasing the thickness of the spacing layers. Moreover, we show that the spin wave relaxation can be optimized by adjusting the interlayer exchange interactions.

  14. Redoxable heteronanocrystals functioning magnetic relaxation switch for activatable T1 and T2 dual-mode magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Hoon; Son, Hye-Young; Kim, Ga-Yun; Park, Kwangyeol; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2016-09-01

    T1/T2 dual-mode magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents (DMCAs) have gained much attention because of their ability to improve accuracy by providing two pieces of complementary information with one instrument. However, most of these agents are "always ON" systems that emit MR contrast regardless of their interaction with target cells or biomarkers, which may result in poor target-to-background ratios. Herein, we introduce a rationally designed magnetic relaxation switch (MGRS) for an activatable T1/T2 dual MR imaging system. Redox-responsive heteronanocrystals, consisting of a superparamagnetic Fe3O4 core and a paramagnetic Mn3O4 shell, are synthesized through seed-mediated growth and subsequently surface-modified with polysorbate 80. The Mn3O4 shell acts as both a protector of Fe3O4 in aqueous environments to attenuate T2 relaxation and as a redoxable switch that can be activated in intracellular reducing environments by glutathione. This simultaneously generates large amounts of magnetically decoupled Mn(2+) ions and allows Fe3O4 to interact with the water protons. This smart nanoplatform shows an appropriate hydrodynamic size for the EPR effect (10-100 nm) and demonstrates biocompatibility. Efficient transitions of OFF/ON dual contrast effects are observed by in vitro imaging and MR relaxivity measurements. The ability to use these materials as DMCAs is demonstrated via effective passive tumor targeting for T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:27281684

  15. Casein-Coated Fe5C2 Nanoparticles with Superior r2 Relaxivity for Liver-Specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cowger, Taku A.; Tang, Wei; Zhen, Zipeng; Hu, Kai; Rink, David E.; Todd, Trever J.; Wang, Geoffrey D.; Zhang, Weizhong; Chen, Hongmin; Xie, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively used as T2 contrast agents for liver-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The applications, however, have been limited by their mediocre magnetism and r2 relaxivity. Recent studies show that Fe5C2 nanoparticles can be prepared by high temperature thermal decomposition. The resulting nanoparticles possess strong and air stable magnetism, suggesting their potential as a novel type of T2 contrast agent. To this end, we improve the synthetic and surface modification methods of Fe5C2 nanoparticles, and investigated the impact of size and coating on their performances for liver MRI. Specifically, we prepared 5, 14, and 22 nm Fe5C2 nanoparticles and engineered their surface by: 1) ligand addition with phospholipids, 2) ligand exchange with zwitterion-dopamine-sulfonate (ZDS), and 3) protein adsorption with casein. It was found that the size and surface coating have varied levels of impact on the particles' hydrodynamic size, viability, uptake by macrophages, and r2 relaxivity. Interestingly, while phospholipid- and ZDS-coated Fe5C2 nanoparticles showed comparable r2, the casein coating led to an r2 enhancement by more than 2 fold. In particular, casein coated 22 nm Fe5C2 nanoparticle show a striking r2 of 973 mM-1s-1, which is one of the highest among all of the T2 contrast agents reported to date. Small animal studies confirmed the advantage of Fe5C2 nanoparticles over iron oxide nanoparticles in inducing hypointensities on T2-weighted MR images, and the particles caused little toxicity to the host. The improvements are important for transforming Fe5C2 nanoparticles into a new class of MRI contrast agents. The observations also shed light on protein-based surface modification as a means to modulate contrast ability of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:26379788

  16. Epitaxial growth and stress relaxation of vapor-deposited Fe-Pd magnetic shape memory films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnemund, L.; Edler, T.; Kock, I.; Seibt, M.; Mayr, S. G.

    2009-11-01

    To achieve maximum performance in microscale magnetic shape memory actuation devices epitaxial films several hundred nanometers thick are needed. Epitaxial films were grown on hot MgO substrates (500 °C and above) by e-beam evaporation. Structural properties and stress relaxation mechanisms were investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, in situ substrate curvature measurements and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The high misfit stress incorporated during Vollmer-Weber growth at the beginning was relaxed by partial or perfect dislocations depending on the substrate temperature. This relaxation allowed the avoidance of a stress-induced breakdown of epitaxy and no thickness limit for epitaxy was found. For substrate temperatures of 690 °C or above, the films grew in the fcc austenite phase. Below this temperature, iron precipitates were formed. MD simulations showed how these precipitates influence the movements of partial dislocations, and can thereby explain the higher stress level observed in the experiments in the initial stage of growth for these films.

  17. Measurement of the Thermal Properties of a Metal Using a Relaxation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, John N.; McMaster, Richard H.

    1975-01-01

    An undergraduate experiment is described which employs a relaxation method for the measurement of the thermal conductivity and specific heat of a metallic sample in a temperature range of 0-100 degrees centigrade. (Author/CP)

  18. Collisional Relaxation of a Strongly Magnetized, Two Isotope, Pure Ion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, C. Y.; O'Neil, T. M.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2011-10-01

    The collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized pure ion plasmathat is composed of two species with slightly different mass is discussed. We have in mind two isotopes of the same singly ionized atom. Parameters are assumed to be ordered as Ωc 1, Ωc 2 >> |Ωc 1 -Ωc 2 | >> v / b , where Ωc 1 and Ωc 2 are the two cyclotron frequencies, v is the thermal velocity, and b is the classical distance of closest approach. For this ordering, the total cyclotron action for the two species, J1 =∑jɛ 1m1v⊥12 / 2Ωc 1 and J2 =∑jɛ 2m2v⊥j2 / 2Ωc 2 , are adiabatic invariants that constrain the collisional dynamics. On the time scale of a few collisions, entropy is maximized subject to the constancy of the total Hamiltonian H and the two actions J1 and J2, yielding a Gibbs distribution of the form exp [ - H / T -α1J1 -α2J2 ] . Collisional relaxation to the usual Gibbs distribution, exp [ - H / T ] , takes place on two time scales, each of which is exponentially longer than the usual collisional time scale. First, the two species share action so that α1 and α2 relax to a common value α. On an even longer time scale, the total action ceases to be a good constant of the motion and α relaxes to zero. Supported by NSF PHY-0903877 and DOE DE-SC0002451.

  19. Superconducting layer thickness dependence of magnetic relaxation property in CVD processed YGdBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Shikimachi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2011-11-01

    One of the most important properties of coated conductors for Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is the relaxation property of persistent superconducting current. This property can be quantitatively characterized by the apparent pinning potential U0∗. In this paper, the dependence of U0∗ on the thickness of superconducting layer d is investigated in the range of 0.33-1.43 μm at the temperature range of 20-30 K and in magnetic fields up to 6.5 T for Y 0.7Gd 0.3Ba 2Cu 3O 7- δ coated conductors. It was found that the value of critical current density did not appreciably depend on d at 20 K. This indicates that no structural deterioration of superconducting layer occurs during the process of increasing thickness. U0∗ increases and then tends to decrease with an increasing magnetic field. The magnetic field at which U0∗ starts to decrease increases with increasing thickness. This property was analyzed using the flux creep-flow model. Application of scaling law is examined for the dependence of U0∗ on magnetic field and temperature. It was found that the dependence could be expressed using scaling parameters B,U0 peak∗ in the temperature range 20-30 K.

  20. Diffusion, relaxation, and chemical exchange in casein gels: A nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Antje; Creamer, Lawrence K.; Hubbard, Penny L.; Callaghan, Paul T.

    2005-01-01

    Water in protein/water mixtures can be described in terms of bound water and free water, by exchange between these two states, and by its exchange with appropriate sites on the protein. 1H-NMR diffusion and relaxation measurements provide insights into the mobility of these states. T2 relaxation-time dispersions (i.e., T2 relaxation times at different echo pulse spacings) reveal additional information about exchange. We present a comprehensive set of diffusion and T2 dispersion measurements on casein gels for which the protein/water ratio ranges from 0.25 to 0.5. The combination of these methods, taken in conjunction with concentration dependence, allows a good estimate of the parameters required to fit the data with Luz/Meiboom and Carver/Richards models for relaxation and chemical exchange. We compare the exchange (a) between water and protein and (b) between free water and bound water. Further, we attempt to distinguish chemical site exchange and diffusion/susceptibility exchange.

  1. Collisional relaxation of bi-Maxwellian plasma temperatures in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2016-07-01

    In the literature, collisional processes are customarily discussed within the context of the Boltzmann-Balescu-Lenard-Landau type of collision integral, but such an equation is strictly valid for unmagnetized plasmas. For plasmas immersed in the ambient magnetic field, the foundational equation that describes binary collisions must be generalized to include the effects of magnetic field. The present paper makes use of such an equation in order to describe the collisional relaxation of temperatures under the assumption of bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The formalism derived in the present paper may be useful for studying the effects of binary collisions on the isotropization of temperatures in the solar wind plasma, among possible applications.

  2. Iron oxide nanoparticles as magnetic relaxation switching (MRSw) sensors: Current applications in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, David; Lopez, Soledad; García-Martin, María Luisa; Pozo, David

    2016-07-01

    Since pioneering work in the early 60s on the development of enzyme electrodes the field of sensors has evolved to different sophisticated technological platforms. Still, for biomedical applications, there are key requirements to meet in order to get fast, low-cost, real-time data acquisition, multiplexed and automatic biosensors. Nano-based sensors are one of the most promising healthcare applications of nanotechnology, and prone to be one of the first to become a reality. From all nanosensors strategies developed, Magnetic Relaxation Switches (MRSw) assays combine several features which are attractive for nanomedical applications such as safe biocompatibility of magnetic nanoparticles, increased sensitivity/specificity measurements, possibility to detect analytes in opaque samples (unresponsive to light-based interferences) and the use of homogeneous setting assay. This review aims at presenting the ongoing progress of MRSw technology and its most important applications in clinical medicine. PMID:26949164

  3. Field-Induced Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Mononuclear Manganese(III)-Porphyrin Complex.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Álvarez, Alejandro; Vallejo, Julia; Pardo, Emilio; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Krzystek, J; Armentano, Donatella; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cano, Joan

    2015-11-23

    We report on a novel manganese(III)-porphyrin complex with the formula [Mn(III) (TPP)(3,5-Me2 pyNO)2 ]ClO4 ⋅CH3 CN (2; 3,5-Me2 pyNO=3,5-dimethylpyridine N-oxide, H2 TPP=5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin), in which the Mn(III) ion is six-coordinate with two monodentate 3,5-Me2 pyNO molecules and a tetradentate TPP ligand to build a tetragonally elongated octahedral geometry. The environment in 2 is responsible for the large and negative axial zero-field splitting (D=-3.8 cm(-1) ), low rhombicity (E/|D|=0.04) of the high-spin Mn(III) ion, and, ultimately, for the observation of slow magnetic-relaxation effects (Ea =15.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G) in this rare example of a manganese-based single-ion magnet (SIM). Structural, magnetic, and electronic characterizations were carried out by means of single-crystal diffraction studies, variable-temperature direct- and alternating-current measurements and high-frequency and -field EPR spectroscopic analysis followed by quantum-chemical calculations. Slow magnetic-relaxation effects were also observed in the already known analogous compound [Mn(III) (TPP)Cl] (1; Ea =10.5 cm(-1) at H=1000 G). The results obtained for 1 and 2 are compared and discussed herein. PMID:26481722

  4. Metabolic properties in stroked rats revealed by relaxation-enhanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy at ultrahigh fields.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Noam; Rosenberg, Jens T; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Muniz, Jose A; Grant, Samuel C; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) yields site-specific signatures that directly report metabolic concentrations, biochemistry and kinetics-provided spectral sensitivity and quality are sufficient. Here, an enabling relaxation-enhanced (RE) MRS approach is demonstrated that by combining highly selective spectral excitations with operation at very high magnetic fields, delivers spectra exhibiting signal-to-noise ratios >50:1 in under 6 s for ~5 × 5 × 5 (mm)(3) voxels, with flat baselines and no interference from water. With this spectral quality, MRS was used to interrogate a number of metabolic properties in stroked rat models. Metabolic confinements imposed by randomly oriented micro-architectures were detected and found to change upon ischaemia; intensities of downfield resonances were found to be selectively altered in stroked hemispheres; and longitudinal relaxation time of lactic acid was found to increase by over 50% its control value as early as 3-h post ischaemia, paralleling the onset of cytotoxic oedema. These results demonstrate potential of (1)H MRS at ultrahigh fields. PMID:25229942

  5. Magnetic relaxation, current sheets, and structure formation in an extremely Tenuous fluid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bajer, K.; Moffatt, H. K.

    2013-12-20

    The process of relaxation of a unidirectional magnetic field in a highly conducting tenuous fluid medium is considered. Null points of the field play a critical role in this process. During an initial stage of relaxation, variations in magnetic pressure are eliminated, and current sheets build up in the immediate neighborhood of null points. This initial phase is followed by a long diffusive phase of slow algebraic decay of the field, during which fluid is continuously sucked into the current sheets, leading to exponential growth of fluid density and concentration of mass around the null points, which show a tendency to cluster. Ultimately, this second phase of algebraic decay gives way to a final period of exponential decay of the field. The peaks of density at the null points survive as a fossil relic of the decay process. Numerical solution of the governing equations provides convincing confirmation of this three-stage scenario. Generalizations to two- and three-dimensional fields are briefly considered.

  6. Protein self-association induced by macromolecular crowding: a quantitative analysis by magnetic relaxation dispersion.

    PubMed

    Snoussi, Karim; Halle, Bertil

    2005-04-01

    In the presence of high concentrations of inert macromolecules, the self-association of proteins is strongly enhanced through an entropic, excluded-volume effect variously called macromolecular crowding or depletion attraction. Despite the predicted large magnitude of this universal effect and its far-reaching biological implications, few experimental studies of macromolecular crowding have been reported. Here, we introduce a powerful new technique, fast field-cycling magnetic relaxation dispersion, for investigating crowding effects on protein self-association equilibria. By recording the solvent proton spin relaxation rate over a wide range of magnetic field strengths, we determine the populations of coexisting monomers and decamers of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in the presence of dextran up to a macromolecular volume fraction of 27%. Already at a dextran volume fraction of 14%, we find a 30-fold increase of the decamer population and 510(5)-fold increase of the association constant. The analysis of these results, in terms of a statistical-mechanical model that incorporates polymer flexibility as well as the excluded volume of the protein, shows that the dramatic enhancement of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor self-association can be quantitatively rationalized in terms of hard repulsive interactions. PMID:15665132

  7. Magnetic spectra and Richter aftereffect relaxation in CexY3-xFe5O12 ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fu; Wang, Xian; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-05-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic properties of cerium (Ce) doped yttrium iron garnet CexY3-xFe5O12 (x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2) ferrites (YIG) have been reported in this work. The ferrites were fabricated by the traditional solid-state reaction method. All ferrite samples reveal pure garnet structure identified by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The substitution of cerium not only enhances the saturation magnetization of the samples, but also regulates the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant K1. Obvious differences in permeability spectra over a frequency of 1 MHz - 1 GHz can be observed. It is verified that the permeability dispersion and magnetic losses of Ce-doped YIG ferrite contain the contribution of Richter aftereffect relaxation due to the existence of Fe2+ ions. The fitting results of the permeability spectra applied three-mechanism model is in good agreement with experimental data, which successfully explains the mechanisms of magnetic losses observed at 1 MHz to 1 GHz for Ce-doped YIG ferrite. In addition, the frequency shift of Richter aftereffect has also been discussed.

  8. Nuclear magnetic relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism: General theory with applications to two-spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhiwei; Halle, Bertil

    2016-02-01

    In aqueous systems with immobilized macromolecules, including biological tissue, the longitudinal spin relaxation of water protons is primarily induced by exchange-mediated orientational randomization (EMOR) of intra- and intermolecular magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. We have embarked on a systematic program to develop, from the stochastic Liouville equation, a general and rigorous theory that can describe relaxation by the dipolar EMOR mechanism over the full range of exchange rates, dipole coupling strengths, and Larmor frequencies. Here, we present a general theoretical framework applicable to spin systems of arbitrary size with symmetric or asymmetric exchange. So far, the dipolar EMOR theory is only available for a two-spin system with symmetric exchange. Asymmetric exchange, when the spin system is fragmented by the exchange, introduces new and unexpected phenomena. Notably, the anisotropic dipole couplings of non-exchanging spins break the axial symmetry in spin Liouville space, thereby opening up new relaxation channels in the locally anisotropic sites, including longitudinal-transverse cross relaxation. Such cross-mode relaxation operates only at low fields; at higher fields it becomes nonsecular, leading to an unusual inverted relaxation dispersion that splits the extreme-narrowing regime into two sub-regimes. The general dipolar EMOR theory is illustrated here by a detailed analysis of the asymmetric two-spin case, for which we present relaxation dispersion profiles over a wide range of conditions as well as analytical results for integral relaxation rates and time-dependent spin modes in the zero-field and motional-narrowing regimes. The general theoretical framework presented here will enable a quantitative analysis of frequency-dependent water-proton longitudinal relaxation in model systems with immobilized macromolecules and, ultimately, will provide a rigorous link between relaxation-based magnetic resonance image contrast and molecular parameters.

  9. Superconducting magnet and fabrication method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method of trapping a field in a block of superconductor material, includes providing (i) a block of material defining a bore, (ii) a high permeability core within the bore that defines a low reluctance path through the bore, (iii) a high permeability external structure on the exterior of the block of material that defines a low reluctance path between opposite ends of the core, and (iv) an electromagnet configured to apply a magnetic field around the high permeability core. The method proceeds by energizing the electromagnet to produce an applied magnetic field around the high permeability core, cooling the block of material sufficiently to render the block of material superconducting, de-energizing the electromagnet to result in a trapped magnetic field, and at least partially removing the low reluctance path defined by the core and the external structure in order to increase the magnetic flux density of the trapped magnetic field.

  10. Carrier relaxation in (In,Ga)As quantum dots with magnetic field-induced anharmonic level structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtze, H.; Bayer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Sophisticated models have been worked out to explain the fast relaxation of carriers into quantum dot ground states after non-resonant excitation, overcoming the originally proposed phonon bottleneck. We apply a magnetic field along the quantum dot heterostructure growth direction to transform the confined level structure, which can be approximated by a Fock-Darwin spectrum, from a nearly equidistant level spacing at zero field to strong anharmonicity in finite fields. This changeover leaves the ground state carrier population rise time unchanged suggesting that fast relaxation is maintained upon considerable changes of the level spacing. This corroborates recent models explaining the relaxation by polaron formation in combination with quantum kinetic effects.

  11. Protein corona affects the relaxivity and MRI contrast efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Houshang; Bordonali, Lorenzo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Wan, Sha; Monopoli, Marco P.; Lynch, Iseult; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being considered for use in biomedical applications such as biosensors, imaging contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. In a biological fluid, proteins associate in a preferential manner with NPs. The small sizes and high curvature angles of NPs influence the types and amounts of proteins present on their surfaces. This differential display of proteins bound to the surface of NPs can influence the tissue distribution, cellular uptake and biological effects of NPs. To date, the effects of adsorption of a protein corona (PC) on the magnetic properties of NPs have not been considered, despite the fact that some of their potential applications require their use in human blood. Here, to investigate the effects of a PC (using fetal bovine serum) on the MRI contrast efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs), we have synthesized two series of SPIONs with variation in the thickness and functional groups (i.e. surface charges) of the dextran surface coating. We have observed that different physico-chemical characteristics of the dextran coatings on the SPIONs lead to the formation of PCs of different compositions. 1H relaxometry was used to obtain the longitudinal, r1, and transverse, r2, relaxivities of the SPIONs without and with a PC, as a function of the Larmor frequency. The transverse relaxivity, which determines the efficiency of negative contrast agents (CAs), is very much dependent on the functional group and the surface charge of the SPIONs' coating. The presence of the PC did not alter the relaxivity of plain SPIONs, while it slightly increased the relaxivity of the negatively charged SPIONs and dramatically decreased the relaxivity of the positively charged ones, which was coupled with particle agglomeration in the presence of the proteins. To confirm the effect of the PC on the MRI contrast efficiency, in vitro MRI experiments at ν = 8.5 MHz were performed using a low-field MRI scanner. The MRI

  12. Protein corona affects the relaxivity and MRI contrast efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Houshang; Bordonali, Lorenzo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Wan, Sha; Monopoli, Marco P.; Lynch, Iseult; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly being considered for use in biomedical applications such as biosensors, imaging contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles. In a biological fluid, proteins associate in a preferential manner with NPs. The small sizes and high curvature angles of NPs influence the types and amounts of proteins present on their surfaces. This differential display of proteins bound to the surface of NPs can influence the tissue distribution, cellular uptake and biological effects of NPs. To date, the effects of adsorption of a protein corona (PC) on the magnetic properties of NPs have not been considered, despite the fact that some of their potential applications require their use in human blood. Here, to investigate the effects of a PC (using fetal bovine serum) on the MRI contrast efficiency of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs), we have synthesized two series of SPIONs with variation in the thickness and functional groups (i.e. surface charges) of the dextran surface coating. We have observed that different physico-chemical characteristics of the dextran coatings on the SPIONs lead to the formation of PCs of different compositions. 1H relaxometry was used to obtain the longitudinal, r1, and transverse, r2, relaxivities of the SPIONs without and with a PC, as a function of the Larmor frequency. The transverse relaxivity, which determines the efficiency of negative contrast agents (CAs), is very much dependent on the functional group and the surface charge of the SPIONs' coating. The presence of the PC did not alter the relaxivity of plain SPIONs, while it slightly increased the relaxivity of the negatively charged SPIONs and dramatically decreased the relaxivity of the positively charged ones, which was coupled with particle agglomeration in the presence of the proteins. To confirm the effect of the PC on the MRI contrast efficiency, in vitro MRI experiments at ν = 8.5 MHz were performed using a low-field MRI scanner. The MRI

  13. Relaxation of giant resonances: Semimicroscopic description (Methods, Results, and Prospects)

    SciTech Connect

    Urin, M. H.

    2011-08-15

    An account of a semimicroscopic approach to globally describing dominant relaxation modes for giant resonances in spherical nuclei is given. This approach is based on the continuum version of the random-phase approximation and on a phenomenological description of the fragmentation effect. The fragmentation effect in question is taken into account in the 'pole' approximation in terms of the excitationenergy-dependent imaginary part of the single-particle effective optical potential directly in the equations of the approximation in question. In the practical implementation of the above approach, use is made of the Landau-Migdal interaction in the particle-hole channel and a phenomenological mean field of the nucleus being considered, these two being related by a partial-consistency condition. The results obtained within this approach by calculating integrated and differential features for a number of giant resonances over a broad range of excitation energies are used to perform a comparison with available experimental data and to predict the results of possible experiments. A particle-hole optical model that serves both as a substantiation for the existing version of the semimicroscopic approach and as a basic element for describing excitations of the particle-hole type at an arbitrary (albeit rather high) energy is formulated.

  14. Magnetic Coupling and Relaxation at Interfaces Measured by Ferromagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adur, Rohan

    (FMRFM). In this thesis I shall demonstrate the use of FMR spectroscopy and FMRFM to study static and dynamic couplings in ferromagnetic materials with emphasis on interfaces. First, I introduce the basic concepts of ferromagnetic resonance and spin wave relaxation. Second, I present the results of using conventional FMR spectroscopy to study the tuneable static effective fields in a ferromagnet, which manifest as anisotropy fields that define the energy landscape and equilibrium direction of the magnetization. Third, I explore both dipolar and exchange couplings between magnetizations which are dynamic in nature, and only manifest when the magnetizations are precessing. Fourth, I demonstrate the use of FMRFM to observe the modification of localized modes in a ferromagnetic film engineered with a lateral interface. Fifth, I describe the design of an FMRFM microscope and management of spurious background effects in an FMRFM experiment. Sixth, I measure relaxation from the localized modes in an insulating ferromagnetic film, which reveal a size-dependent damping effect that was unexpected in an insulating system. This suggests that spin transport from the interface of the localized mode can dictate its relaxation, even in the absence of conduction electrons. Finally, I observe a frequency-independent linewidth broadening contribution that also depends on mode size and this may give a measure of the inhomogeneous fields within a ferromagnetic sample.

  15. Heterometallic Cu(II)-Dy(III) Clusters of Different Nuclearities with Slow Magnetic Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Modak, Ritwik; Sikdar, Yeasin; Cosquer, Goulven; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Yamashita, Masahiro; Goswami, Sanchita

    2016-01-19

    The synthesis, structures, and magnetic properties of two heterometallic Cu(II)-Dy(III) clusters are reported. The first structural motif displays a pentanuclear Cu(II)4Dy(III) core, while the second one reveals a nonanuclear Cu(II)6Dy(III)3 core. We employed o-vanillin-based Schiff base ligands combining o-vanillin with 3-amino-1-propanol, H2vap, (2-[(3-hydroxy-propylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol), and 2-aminoethanol, H2vae, (2-[(3-hydroxy-ethylimino)-methyl]-6-methoxy-phenol). The differing nuclearities of the two clusters stem from the choice of imino alcohol arm in the Schiff bases, H2vap and H2vae. This work is aimed at broadening the diversity of Cu(II)-Dy(III) clusters and to perceive the consequence of changing the length of the alcohol arm on the nuclearity of the cluster, providing valuable insight into promising future synthetic directions. The underlying topological entity of the pentanuclear Cu4Dy cluster is reported for the first time. The investigation of magnetic behaviors of 1 and 2 below 2 K reveals slow magnetic relaxation with a significant influence coming from the variation of the alcohol arm affecting the nature of magnetic interactions. PMID:26702645

  16. Nonlinear magnetization relaxation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in superimposed ac and dc magnetic bias fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Serguey V.; Déjardin, Pierre-Michel; El Mrabti, Halim; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear ac response of the magnetization M(t) of a uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic nanoparticle subjected to both ac and dc bias magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths and orientations is determined by averaging Gilbert’s equation augmented by a random field with Gaussian white-noise properties in order to calculate exactly the relevant statistical averages. It is shown that the magnetization dynamics of the uniaxial particle driven by a strong ac field applied at an angle to the easy axis of the particle (so that the axial symmetry is broken) alters drastically leading to different nonlinear effects due to coupling of the thermally activated magnetization reversal mode with the precessional modes of M(t) via the driving ac field.

  17. Collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized two-species pure ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.; Dubin, Daniel H.

    2014-04-01

    The collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized pure ion plasma that is composed of two species with slightly different masses is discussed. We have in mind two isotopes of the same singly ionized atom. Parameters are assumed to be ordered as Ω1,Ω2≫|Ω1-Ω2|≫v¯ij/b ¯ and v¯⊥j/Ωj≪b ¯, where Ω1 and Ω2 are two cyclotron frequencies, v¯ij=√T∥/μij is the relative parallel thermal velocity characterizing collisions between particles of species i and j, and b ¯=2 e2/T∥ is the classical distance of closest approach for such collisions, and v ¯⊥j/Ωj=√2T⊥j/mj /Ωj is the characteristic cyclotron radius for particles of species j. Here, μij is the reduced mass for the two particles, and T∥ and T⊥j are temperatures that characterize velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For this ordering, the total cyclotron action for the two species, I1=∑i ∈1m1v⊥i2/(2Ω1) and I2=∑i∈2m2v⊥i2/(2Ω2) are adiabatic invariants that constrain the collisional dynamics. On the timescale of a few collisions, entropy is maximized subject to the constancy of the total Hamiltonian H and the two actions I1 and I2, yielding a modified Gibbs distribution of the form exp[-H /T∥-α1I1-α2I2]. Here, the αj's are related to T∥ and T⊥j through T⊥j=(1/T∥+αj/Ωj)-1. Collisional relaxation to the usual Gibbs distribution, exp[-H /T∥], takes place on two timescales. On a timescale longer than the collisional timescale by a factor of (b ¯2Ω12/v¯112)exp{5[3π(b¯|Ω1-Ω2|/v ¯12)]2/5/6}, the two species share action so that α1 and α2 relax to a common value α. On an even longer timescale, longer than the collisional timescale by a factor of the order exp {5[3π(v¯11)]2/5/6}, the total action ceases to be a good constant of the motion and α relaxes to zero.

  18. Orientational dynamics of ferrofluids with finite magnetic anisotropy of the particles: relaxation of magneto-birefringence in crossed fields.

    PubMed

    Raikher, Yu L; Stepanov, V I; Bacri, J-C; Perzynski, R

    2002-08-01

    Dynamic birefringence in a ferrofluid subjected to crossed bias (constant) and probing (pulse or ac) fields is considered, assuming that the nanoparticles have finite magnetic anisotropy. This is done on the basis of the general Fokker-Planck equation that takes into account both internal magnetic and external mechanical degrees of freedom of the particle. We describe the orientation dynamics in terms of the integral relaxation time of the macroscopic orientation order parameter. To account for an arbitrary relation between the bias (external) and anisotropy (internal) fields, an interpolation expression for the integral relaxation time is proposed and justified. A developed description is used to interpret the measurements of birefringence relaxation in magnetic fluids with nanoparticles of high (cobalt ferrite) and low (maghemite) anisotropy. The proposed theory appears to be in full qualitative agreement with all the experimental data available. PMID:12241160

  19. Depth-resolved magnetic and structural analysis of relaxing epitaxial Sr2CrReO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucy, Jeremy; Yang, Fengyuan; Hauser, Adam; Liu, Yaohua; Zhou, Hua; Choi, Yongseong; Te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Haskel, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Structural relaxation in a Sr2CrReO6 epitaxial film, with strong spin-orbit coupling, leads to depth-dependent magnetism. We combine a couple of depth-resolved synchrotron x-ray techniques, including two-dimensional reciprocal space mapping and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments, to demonstrate this effect. An 800 nm film of Sr2CrReO6, grown with tensile epitaxial strain on SrCr0.5Nb0.5O3(200 nm)/LSAT, relaxes away from the Sr2CrReO6/SrCr0.5Nb0.5O3 interface. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements of the film elucidate the in-plane strain relaxation while depth-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Re L edge reveals the magnetic contributions of the Re site. The smooth relaxation of the film correlates with a systematic change in the magnetism.This provides an interesting and powerful way to probe the depth-varying structural and magnetic properties of a complex oxide with synchrotron-source x-ray techniques. Work supported by the NSF, Grant No. DMR-1420451.

  20. A NEW IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS-RELAXATION METHOD FOR NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD EXTRAPOLATION IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2012-04-20

    The magnetic field in the solar corona is usually extrapolated from a photospheric vector magnetogram using a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) model. NLFFF extrapolation needs considerable effort to be devoted to its numerical realization. In this paper, we present a new implementation of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) relaxation method for NLFFF extrapolation. The magnetofrictional approach, which is introduced for speeding the relaxation of the MHD system, is realized for the first time by the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme. A magnetic field splitting method is used to further improve the computational accuracy. The bottom boundary condition is prescribed by incrementally changing the transverse field to match the magnetogram, and all other artificial boundaries of the computational box are simply fixed. We examine the code using two types of NLFFF benchmark tests, the Low and Lou semi-analytic force-free solutions and a more realistic solar-like case constructed by van Ballegooijen et al. The results show that our implementation is successful and versatile for extrapolations of either the relatively simple cases or the rather complex cases that need significant rebuilding of the magnetic topology, e.g., a flux rope. We also compute a suite of metrics to quantitatively analyze the results and demonstrate that the performance of our code in extrapolation accuracy basically reaches the same level of the present best-performing code, i.e., that developed by Wiegelmann.

  1. Rotational relaxation time of polyelectrolyte xanthan chain via single molecule tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Yong; Jung, Hyun Wook; Hyun, Jae Chun

    2012-12-01

    Effect of solvent viscosity on the longest rotational relaxation time of xanthan molecule has been examined using a single molecule tracking method. Incorporating inverted epi-fluorescence microscope and chargedcoupled device (CCD) camera, various features of xanthan ( i.e., radius of gyration, orientation angle, etc.) were interpreted by image processing algorithm from the captured real xanthan images. From the best-fit of the autocorrelation function on the orientation angle, the longest rotational relaxation time was effectively determined. Rotational relaxation time increases with the medium solvent viscosity due to the slow movement of xanthan molecule. It is confirmed that there is a good agreement between experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations on the relaxation patterns of xanthan chain.

  2. The investigation of placental relaxation and estimation of placental perfusion using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Duncan, K R; Gowland, P; Francis, S; Moore, R; Baker, P N; Johnson, I R

    1998-09-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) is a form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which acquires images in milliseconds rather than minutes as with conventional MRI. The images produced using EPI are affected by the physiological environment in which the hydrogen atoms producing the signals are found, a process referred to as relaxation. Also by producing images a matter of milliseconds apart, quantification of perfusion within the tissue being imaged is feasible. The objective of this study was to investigate T1 and T2 relaxation times along with perfusion in placentae from normal pregnancies at different gestations and also to compare these to pregnancies complicated by abnormal placental function. A cross-sectional study of normal and compromised pregnancies from 20 weeks to term and a longitudinal study of normal pregnancy were performed. Placental T1, T2 relaxation times, and perfusion were measured using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging. Placental T1 and T2 relaxation times decreased in normal pregnancy (P<0.001). Relaxation times in pregnancies associated with placental pathology appeared to be reduced for that gestation although the numbers were too small to allow any statistical validation. No differences in placental perfusion with gestation or between normal and compromised pregnancy were demonstrated using this technique. This is the first demonstration of placental magnetic resonance relaxation and perfusion measurements in normal pregnancy using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging. In the future it may be possible to identify compromised pregnancies by differences in placental T1 and T2 relaxation times, using this novel non-invasive technique. PMID:9778128

  3. [Neuromuscular relaxation and CCMDP. The Zilgrei and Feldenkrais methods 2].

    PubMed

    Santoro, F; Maiorana, C; Faccin, C

    1989-10-31

    The Authors show two neuromuscular release methods employed in the treatment of cranio-cervico-mandibular syndrome; these methods work at the place of origin of the pathology resolving the symptoms in different districts of the body. PMID:2701432

  4. A biharmonic relaxation method for calculating thermal stress in cooled irregular cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holms, Arthur G

    1952-01-01

    A numerical method was developed for calculating thermal stresses in irregular cylinders cooled by one or more internal passages. The use of relaxation methods and elementary methods of finite differences was found to give approximations to the correct values when compared with previously known solutions for concentric circular cylinders possessing symmetrical and asymmetrical temperature distributions.

  5. Structure, synthetic methods, magnetic properties and biomedical applications of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    This paper is aimed at conducting a survey of the synthetic methods and magnetic properties of nanoparticles as ferrofluids used in biomedicine. As compared with other works in the field, the distinctive feature of the current work is the systematic study of recent advances in ferrofluids utilized in hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The most important feature for application of ferrofluids is super-paramagnetic behavior of magnetic cores with relatively high saturation magnetization. Although Fe3O4 nanoparticles have traditionally been used in medicine; the modified Mn-ferrite has recently received special attention due to its higher saturation magnetization and r2-relaxivity as a contrast agent in MRI. Co-ferrite nanoparticles are also good candidates for hyperthermia treatment because of their high coercivity and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The thermal decomposition and hydrothermal methods are good candidates for obtaining appropriate super-paramagnetic particles. PMID:23623058

  6. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance and proton relaxation times in experimental heterotopic heart transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene, M.; Lechat, P.; Hadjiisky, P.; Teillac, A.; Grosgogeat, Y.; Cabrol, C.

    1986-01-01

    It should be possible to detect heart transplant rejection by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging if it induces myocardial T1 and T2 proton relaxation time alterations or both. We studied 20 Lewis rats after a heterotopic heart transplantation. In vitro measurement of T1 and T2 was performed on a Minispec PC20 (Bruker) 3 to 9 days after transplantation. Histologic analysis allowed the quantification of rejection process based on cellular infiltration and myocardiolysis. Water content, a major determinant of relaxation time, was also studied. T1 and T2 were significantly prolonged in heterotopic vs orthotopic hearts (638 +/- 41 msec vs 606 +/- 22 msec for T1, p less than 0.01 and 58.2 +/- 8.4 msec vs 47.4 +/- 1.9 msec for T2, p less than 0.001). Water content was also increased in heterotopic hearts (76.4 +/- 2.3 vs 73.8 +/- 1.0, p less than 0.01). Most importantly, we found close correlations between T1 and especially T2 vs water content, cellular infiltration, and myocardiolysis. We conclude that rejection reaction should be noninvasively detected by NMR imaging, particularly with pulse sequences emphasizing T2.

  8. Relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) of desiccation in M9787 silicone pads.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M; Cherry, Brian Ray; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2004-06-01

    The production and aging of silicone materials remains an important issue in the weapons stockpile due to their utilization in a wide variety of components and systems within the stockpile. Changes in the physical characteristics of silicone materials due to long term desiccation has been identified as one of the major aging effects observed in silicone pad components. Here we report relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) spectroscopy characterization of the silica-filled and unfilled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polydiphenylsiloxane (PDPS) copolymer (M9787) silicone pads within desiccating environments. These studies were directed at providing additional details about the heterogeneity of the desiccation process. Uniform NMR spin-spin relaxation time (T2) images were observed across the pad thickness indicating that the drying process is approximately uniform, and that the desiccation of the M9787 silicone pad is not a H2O diffusion limited process. In a P2O5 desiccation environment, significant reduction of T2 was observed for the silica-filled and unfilled M9787 silicone pad for desiccation up to 225 days. A very small reduction in T2 was observed for the unfilled copolymer between 225 and 487 days. The increase in relative stiffness with desiccation was found to be higher for the unfilled copolymer. These R-NMRI results are correlated to local changes in the modulus of the material

  9. Pentanuclear lanthanide pyramids based on thiacalix[4]arene ligand exhibiting slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jing-Yuan; Ru, Jing; Gao, Feng; Song, You; Zhou, Xin-Hui; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-09-21

    A series of pentanuclear Ln(III) clusters, [Ln5(μ4-OH)(μ3-OH)4(L1)(acac)6] (H4L1 = p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arene; acac = acetylacetonate; Ln = Dy, Ho, Er) and [Ln5(μ5-OH)(μ3-OH)4(L1)(L2)2(acac)2(CH3OH)2] (H3L2 = 5,11,17,23-tetrakis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-25,26,27-trihydroxy-28-methoxy thiacalix[4]arene; Ln = Dy, Ho, Er), have been synthesized based on the thiacalix[4]arene ligand. All of these complexes feature a square-based pyramid with four triangular Ln3 structural motifs. One μ4-OH group bridges four Ln(III) ions in the basal plane of , while the OH group in complexes adopts the μ5-coordination mode. Our results illuminate the coordination modes of the versatile thiacalix[4]arene ligands and their application to new cluster compounds. The structural and magnetic studies confirm that the molecular symmetries and coordination geometries for lanthanide metal cores have a significant effect on some parameters as single-molecule magnets. Among them, two Dy5 pyramids exhibit distinct slow magnetic relaxation. PMID:26237158

  10. Ion heating during magnetic relaxation in the helicity injected torus-II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, R.G.; Redd, A.J.; Hamp, W.T.; Smith, R.J.; Jarboe, T.R.

    2005-12-15

    Ion doppler spectroscopy (IDS) is applied to the helicity injected torus (HIT-II) spherical torus to measure impurity ion temperature and flows. [A. J. Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] The IDS instrument employs a 16-channel photomultiplier and can track temperature and velocity continuously through a discharge. Data for the coaxial helicity injection (CHI), transformer, and combined current drive configurations are presented. Ion temperatures for transformer-driven discharges are typically equal to or somewhat lower than electron temperatures measured by Thomson scattering. Internal reconnection events in transformer-driven discharges cause rapid ion heating. The CHI discharges exhibit anomalously high ion temperatures >250 eV, which are an order of magnitude higher than Thomson measurements, indicating ion heating through magnetic relaxation. The CHI discharges that exhibit current and poloidal flux buildup after bubble burst show sustained ion heating during current drive.

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations of water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Patural, Laetitia; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Govin, Alexandre; Grosseau, Philippe; Ruot, Bertrand; Deves, Olivier

    2012-10-15

    We show how nuclear magnetic spin-lattice relaxation dispersion of proton-water (NMRD) can be used to elucidate the effect of cellulose ethers on water retention and hydration delay of freshly-mixed white cement pastes. NMRD is useful to determine the surface diffusion coefficient of water, the specific area and the hydration kinetics of the cement-based material. In spite of modifications of the solution's viscosity, we show that the cellulosic derivatives do not modify the surface diffusion coefficient of water. Thus, the mobility of water present inside the medium is not affected by the presence of polymer. However, these admixtures modify significantly the surface fraction of mobile water molecules transiently present at solid surfaces. This quantity measured, for the first time, for all admixed cement pastes is thus relevant to explain the water retention mechanism.

  12. Spatial content-based scene matching using a relaxation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Caixia

    consideration. Subsequently, by considering the spatial distribution and structure similarity in a neighborhood, we formulate a global compatibility in a relaxation manner to measure the overall goodness of correspondence. An optimal matching is achieved by finding an optimal morphism that maximizes this compatibility function. In this work, we further extend the invariant metric to incorporate additional scene content (i.e. buildings) in the form of object configurations present within individual road network loops (e.g. as they may become available from other GIS layers). For the local similarity, we developed an assessment framework to quantitatively measure the similarity of spatial configuration, where there is no need for semantic information (e.g. names) for buildings, a prior information necessary for spatial scene similarity in many alternative approaches. By combining diverse but co-located pieces of information (e.g. roads and buildings) in an integrated process, this multilayer scene matching allows us to integrate information that may become available from different sources, better addressing the evolving needs of the geoinformatics community. This novel integration enables achieving matching under perplexing scenario where the structure of each intersection in networks is identical.

  13. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  14. Two field-induced slow magnetic relaxation processes in a mononuclear Co(ii) complex with a distorted octahedral geometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Han, Yuan; Cao, Fan; Wei, Rong-Min; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Song, You

    2016-05-31

    A distorted octahedral Co(II) complex is reported with homoscorpionate ligands. This complex comprised a field-induced single-molecule magnet, showing two slow relaxation processes under a low dc field (<800 Oe) and only one process under a high dc field (≥800 Oe), which was an unusually discovery for 3d metal ions. On the basis of the ac magnetic data, we show for the first time that one of the slow relaxation processes in the low dc field originates from intermolecular dipolar interactions. Interestingly, the Raman process is predominant in the spin reversal relaxation process. The origin of the behaviours of the complex was elucidated by ab initio calculations. PMID:27180637

  15. Methods for diffusive relaxation in the Pn equation

    SciTech Connect

    Hauck, Cory D; Mcclarren, Ryan G; Lowrie, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    We present recent progress in the development of two substantially different approaches for simulating the so-called of P{sub N} equations. These are linear hyperbolic systems of PDEs that are used to model particle transport in a material medium, that in highly collisional regimes, are accurately approximated by a simple diffusion equation. This limit is based on a balance between function values and gradients of certain variables in the P{sub N} system. Conventional reconstruction methods based on upwinding approximate such gradients with an error that is dependent on the size of the computational mesh. Thus in order to capture the diffusion limit, a given mesh must resolve the dynamics of the continuum equation at the level of the mean-free-path, which tends to zero in the diffusion limit. The two methods analyzed here produce accurate solutions in both collisional and non-collisional regimes; in particular, they do not require resolution of the mean-free-path in order to properly capture the diffusion limit. The first method is a straight-forward application of the discrete Galerkin (DG) methodology, which uses additional variables in each computational cell to capture the balance between function values and gradients, which are computed locally. The second method uses a temporal splitting of the fast and slow dynamics in the P{sub N} system to derive so-called regularized equations for which the diffusion limit is built-in. We focus specifically on the P{sub N} equations for one-dimensional, slab geometries. Preliminary results for several benchmark problems are presented which highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Further improvements and extensions are also discussed.

  16. Magnetic relaxation in Zn(PO3)2·Er(PO3)3 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendáč, M.; Tibenská, K.; Čižmár, E.; Tkáč, V.; Orendáčová, A.; Holubová, J.; Černošek, Z.; Černošková, E.

    2016-08-01

    The results of experimental studies of alternating (ac) magnetic susceptibility and specific heat of Zn(PO3)2·Er(PO3)3 glass are reported. Despite a high concentration of magnetic Er(III) ions the analysis of ac susceptibility ruled out the formation of a spin glass state in the used range of temperatures. Two relaxation processes were identified. The first one is thermally activated with a crossover in its temperature dependence observed at nominally 7 K. The relaxation at lower temperatures seems to be governed by a direct process with pronounced effect of phonon bottleneck. Striking deceleration of spin dynamics with increasing temperature found above 7 K is tentatively attributed to overcoming Ioffe - Regel crossover and strong scattering of acoustic phonons on local modes. Simplified prediction derived from a soft-mode-dynamics model confirms the presence of the boson peak observed in specific heat data and reasonably predicts the temperature of the crossover. The second process is consistent with a cross - tunneling relaxation. The obtained results suggest that magnetic doping of glasses and studying magnetic relaxation may represent an alternative tool for the investigation of lattice modes in glasses.

  17. Measurement of electron spin-lattice relaxation times in radical doped butanol samples at 1 K using the NEDOR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, C.; Herick, J.; Berlin, A.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.

    2012-12-01

    The electron spin-lattice relaxation time (T1e) of TEMPO- and trityl-doped butanol samples at 2.5 T and temperatures between 0.95 K and 2.17 K was studied by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using the nuclear-electron double resonance (NEDOR) method. This method is based on the idea to measure the NMR lineshift produced by the local field of paramagnetic impurities, whose polarization can be manipulated. This is of technical advantage as measurements can be performed under conditions typically used for the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) process - in our case 2.5 T and temperatures around 1 K - where a direct measurement on the electronic spins would be far more complicated to perform. As T1e is a crucial parameter determining the overall efficiency of DNP, the effect of the radical type, its spin concentration, the temperature and the oxygen content on T1e has been investigated. For radical concentrations as used in DNP (several 1019 spins/cm3) the relaxation rate (T1e-1) has shown a linear dependence on the paramagnetic electron concentration for both radicals investigated. Experiments with perdeuterated and ordinary butanol have given no indication for any influence of the host materials isotopes. The measured temperature dependence has shown an exponential characteristic. It is further observed that the oxygen content in the butanol samples has a considerable effect on the electron relaxation time and thus influences the nuclear relaxation time and polarization rate during the DNP. The experiments also show a variation in the NMR linewidth, leading to comparable time constants as determined by the lineshift. NEDOR measurements were also performed on irradiated, crystal grains of 6LiD. These samples exhibited a linewidth behavior similar to that of the cylindrically shaped butanol samples.

  18. Approximate method for solving relaxation problems in terms of material`s damagability under creep

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitenko, A.F.; Sukhorukov, I.V.

    1995-03-01

    The technology of thermoforming under creep and superplasticity conditions is finding increasing application in machine building for producing articles of a preset shape. After a part is made there are residual stresses in it, which lead to its warping. To remove residual stresses, moulded articles are usually exposed to thermal fixation, i.e., the part is held in compressed state at a certain temperature. Thermal fixation is simply the process of residual stress relaxation, following by accumulation of total creep in the material. Therefore the necessity to develop engineering methods for calculating the time of thermal fixation and relaxation of residual stresses to a safe level, not resulting in warping, becomes evident. The authors present an approximate method of calculation of stress-strain rate of a body during relaxation. They use a system of equations which describes a material`s creep, simultaneously taking into account accumulation of damages in it.

  19. A simple method for characterizing and engineering thermal relaxation of an optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weijian; Zhu, Jiangang; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Yang, Lan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal properties of a photonic resonator are determined not only by intrinsic properties of materials, such as thermo-optic coefficient, but also by the geometry and structure of the resonator. Techniques for characterization and measurement of thermal properties of individual photonic resonator will benefit numerous applications. In this work, we demonstrate a method to optically measure the thermal relaxation time and effective thermal conductance of a whispering gallery mode microcavity using optothermal effect. Two nearby optical modes within the cavity are optically probed, which allows us to quantify the thermal relaxation process of the cavity by analyzing changes in the transmission spectra induced by optothermal effect. We show that the effective thermal conductance can be experimentally deduced from the thermal relaxation measurement, and it can be tailored by changing the geometric parameters of the cavity. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the proposed analytical modeling. This method can be applied to various resonators in different forms.

  20. Nanoscale {LnIII(24)ZnII(6)} Triangular Metalloring with Magnetic Refrigerant, Slow Magnetic Relaxation, and Fluorescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhao, Lang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chao; Yuan, Sen-Wen; Tang, Jinkui

    2015-12-01

    The self-assembly of Ln(ClO4)3 · 6H2O and Zn(OAc)2 · 2H2O with pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid (HL) results in the formation of three novel nanosized {LnIII(24)ZnII(6)} triangular metallorings, [Gd24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(H2O)14](ClO4)7(OAc) · 2CH3OH · 26H2O (1), [Tb24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(CH3O)2(CH3OH)2(H2O)10](ClO4)5(OH) · 6CH3OH · 12H2O (2), and (H3O)[Dy24Zn6L24(OAc)22(μ3-OH)30(H2O)14](ClO4)7(OAc)2 · 4CH3OH · 22H2O (3), having the largest nuclearity among any known Ln/Zn clusters. Magnetic and luminescent studies reveal the special prowess for each lanthanide complex. Magnetic studies reveal that 1 exhibits a significant cryogenic magnetocaloric effect with a maximum -ΔSm (isothermal magnetic entropy change) value of 30.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 2.5 K and 7 T and that a slow magnetization relaxation is observed for the dysprosium analogue. In addition, the solid-state photophysical properties of 2 display strong characteristic Tb(III) photoluminescent emission in the visible region, suggesting that Tb(III)-based luminescence is sensitized by the effective energy transfer from the ligand HL to the metal centers. PMID:26600284

  1. Molecular diffusion in disordered interfacial media as probed by pulsed field gradients and nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, P.; Korb, J.-P.; Bryant, R. G.

    1999-10-01

    We address the question of probing the fluid dynamics in disordered interfacial media by Pulsed field gradient (PFG) and Magnetic relaxation dispersion (MRD) techniques. We show that the PFG method is useful to separate the effects of morphology from the connectivity in disordered macroporous media. We propose simulations of molecular dynamics and spectral density functions, J(ω), in a reconstructed mesoporous medium for different limiting conditions at the pore surface. An algebraic form is found for J(ω) in presence of a surface diffusion and a local exploration of the pore network. A logarithmic form of J(ω) is found in presence of a pure surface diffusion. We present magnetic relaxation dispersion experiments (MRD) for water and acetone in calibrated mesoporous media to support the main results of our simulations and theories. Nous présentons les avantages respectifs des méthodes de gradients de champs pulsés (PFG) et de relaxation magnétique nucléaire en champs cyclés (MRD) pour sonder la dynamique moléculaire dans les milieux interfaciaux désordonnés. La méthode PFG est utile pour séparer la morphologie et la connectivité dans des milieux macroporeux. Des simulations de diffusion moléculaire et de densité spectrale J(ω) en milieux mésoporeux sont présentées dans différentes conditions limites aux interfaces des pores. Nous trouvons une forme de dispersion algébrique de J(ω) pour une diffusion de surface assistée d'une exploration locale du réseau de pores et une forme logarithmique dans le cas d'une simple diffusion de surface. Les résultats expérimentaux de la méthode MRD pour de l'eau et de l'acétone dans des milieux mésoporeux calibrés supportent les résultats principaux de nos simulations et théories.

  2. Three-dimensional gyrokinetic simulation of the relaxation of a magnetized temperature filament

    SciTech Connect

    Sydora, R. D.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.; Van Compernolle, B.

    2015-10-15

    An electromagnetic, 3D gyrokinetic particle code is used to study the relaxation of a magnetized electron temperature filament embedded in a large, uniform plasma of lower temperature. The study provides insight into the role played by unstable drift-Alfvén waves observed in a basic electron heat transport experiment [D. C. Pace et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 122304 (2008)] in which anomalous cross-field transport has been documented. The simulation exhibits the early growth of temperature-gradient-driven, drift-Alfvén fluctuations that closely match the eigenmodes predicted by linear theory. At the onset of saturation, the unstable fluctuations display a spiral spatial pattern, similar to that observed in the laboratory, which causes the rearrangement of the temperature profile. After saturation of the linear instability, the system exhibits a markedly different behavior depending on the inclusion in the computation of modes without variation along the magnetic field, i.e., k{sub z} = 0. In their absence, the initial filament evolves into a broadened temperature profile, self-consistent with undamped, finite amplitude drift-Alfvén waves. But the inclusion of k{sub z} = 0 modes causes the destruction of the filament and damping of the drift-Alfvén modes leading to a final state consisting of undamped convective cells and multiple, smaller-scale filaments.

  3. Metabolic T1 dynamics and longitudinal relaxation enhancement in vivo at ultrahigh magnetic fields on ischemia.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Noam; Rosenberg, Jens T; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Grant, Samuel C; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-11-01

    Interruptions in cerebral blood flow may lead to devastating neural outcomes. Magnetic resonance has a central role in diagnosing and monitoring these insufficiencies, as well as in understanding their underlying metabolic consequences. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in particular can probe ischemia via the signatures of endogenous metabolites including lactic acid (Lac), N-acetylaspartate, creatine (Cre), and cholines. Typically, MRS reports on these metabolites' concentrations. This study focuses on establishing the potential occurrence of in vivo longitudinal relaxation enhancement (LRE) effects-a phenomenon involving a reduction of the apparent T1 with selective bandwidth excitations- in a rat stroke model at 21.1 T. Statistically significant reductions in Cre's apparent T1s were observed at all the examined post-ischemia time points for both ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, thereby establishing the existence of LREs for this metabolite in vivo. Ischemia-dependent LRE trends were also noted for Lac in the ipsilateral hemisphere only 24 hours after ischemia. Metabolic T1s were also found to vary significantly as a function of post-stroke recovery time, with the most remarkable and rapid changes observed for Lac T1s. The potential of such measurements to understand stroke at a molecular level and assist in its diagnosis, is discussed. PMID:25204392

  4. Metabolic T1 dynamics and longitudinal relaxation enhancement in vivo at ultrahigh magnetic fields on ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Noam; Rosenberg, Jens T; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Grant, Samuel C; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Interruptions in cerebral blood flow may lead to devastating neural outcomes. Magnetic resonance has a central role in diagnosing and monitoring these insufficiencies, as well as in understanding their underlying metabolic consequences. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in particular can probe ischemia via the signatures of endogenous metabolites including lactic acid (Lac), N-acetylaspartate, creatine (Cre), and cholines. Typically, MRS reports on these metabolites' concentrations. This study focuses on establishing the potential occurrence of in vivo longitudinal relaxation enhancement (LRE) effects—a phenomenon involving a reduction of the apparent T1 with selective bandwidth excitations— in a rat stroke model at 21.1 T. Statistically significant reductions in Cre's apparent T1s were observed at all the examined post-ischemia time points for both ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres, thereby establishing the existence of LREs for this metabolite in vivo. Ischemia-dependent LRE trends were also noted for Lac in the ipsilateral hemisphere only 24 hours after ischemia. Metabolic T1s were also found to vary significantly as a function of post-stroke recovery time, with the most remarkable and rapid changes observed for Lac T1s. The potential of such measurements to understand stroke at a molecular level and assist in its diagnosis, is discussed. PMID:25204392

  5. Magnetic anisotropy and spin wave relaxation in CoFe/PtMn/CoFe trilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y. H.; Wu, C.; Gong, Y.; Pettiford, C.; Sun, N. X.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the magnetic anisotropic properties and the spin wave relaxation in trilayer films of CoFe/PtMn/CoFe grown on the seed layer Ru or NiFeCr with CoFe compositions being Co-16 at. % Fe. The measurements were taken in samples with the ferromagnetic layers of CoFe varying from 10 to 500 Å by the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) technique. The magnetic anisotropic parameters were investigated by rotating the field aligned axis with respect to the spectral field in the configurations of both in plane and out of plane. We determine the effective in-plane anisotropy field of ˜0.005 T, the uniaxial out-of-plane anisotropy of ˜-0.3 T, and the exchange stiffness D of ˜512 meV Å2. Moreover, spin wave damping was estimated by analyzing the FMR linewidth and line shape as a function of the angle between the external field and easy axis and as a function of the thickness of the CoFe layers. We identify an extrinsic contribution of the damping parameter dominated by two-magnon scattering in addition to the intrinsic Gilbert term with a damping parameter, α =0.012. Further, we reveal that a significant linewidth broadening could also be caused by the overlap of the surface and the uniform spin wave excitations. The FMR lines show a strong dependence of the surface anisotropy contribution of free energy in trilayer films.

  6. (19)F spin-lattice relaxation of perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on temperature and magnetic field strength (7.0-14.1T).

    PubMed

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W M; Ahrens, Eric T

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine ((19)F) MRI of perfluorocarbon-labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for (19)F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of (19)F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated the R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc<1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new (19)F MRI agents and methods is discussed. PMID:24594752

  7. 19F Spin-lattice Relaxation of Perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on Temperature and Magnetic Field Strength (7.0-14.1T)

    PubMed Central

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine (19F) MRI of perfluorocarbon labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for 19F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of 19F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1 T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc < 1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new 19F MRI agents and methods is discussed. PMID:24594752

  8. 19F spin-lattice relaxation of perfluoropolyethers: Dependence on temperature and magnetic field strength (7.0-14.1 T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadayakkara, Deepak K.; Damodaran, Krishnan; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Bulte, Jeff W. M.; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2014-05-01

    Fluorine (19F) MRI of perfluorocarbon-labeled cells has become a powerful technique to track the migration and accumulation of cells in living organisms. It is common to label cells for 19F MRI with nanoemulsions of perfluoropolyethers that contain a large number of chemically equivalent fluorine atoms. Understanding the mechanisms of 19F nuclear relaxation, and in particular the spin-lattice relaxation of these molecules, is critical to improving experimental sensitivity. To date, the temperature and magnetic field strength dependence of spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R1) for perfluoropolyethers has not been described in detail. In this study, we evaluated the R1 of linear perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and cyclic perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether (PCE) at three magnetic field strengths (7.0, 9.4, and 14.1 T) and at temperatures ranging from 256-323 K. Our results show that R1 of perfluoropolyethers is dominated by dipole-dipole interactions and chemical shift anisotropy. R1 increased with magnetic field strength for both PCE and PFPE. In the temperature range studied, PCE was in the fast motion regime (ωτc < 1) at all field strengths, but for PFPE, R1 passed through a maximum, from which the rotational correlation time was estimated. The importance of these measurements for the rational design of new 19F MRI agents and methods is discussed.

  9. A novel improved method for analysis of 2D diffusion relaxation data—2D PARAFAC-Laplace decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tønning, Erik; Polders, Daniel; Callaghan, Paul T.; Engelsen, Søren B.

    2007-09-01

    This paper demonstrates how the multi-linear PARAFAC model can with advantage be used to decompose 2D diffusion-relaxation correlation NMR spectra prior to 2D-Laplace inversion to the T2- D domain. The decomposition is advantageous for better interpretation of the complex correlation maps as well as for the quantification of extracted T2- D components. To demonstrate the new method seventeen mixtures of wheat flour, starch, gluten, oil and water were prepared and measured with a 300 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer using a pulsed gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence followed by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse echo train. By varying the gradient strength, 2D diffusion-relaxation data were recorded for each sample. From these double exponentially decaying relaxation data the PARAFAC algorithm extracted two unique diffusion-relaxation components, explaining 99.8% of the variation in the data set. These two components were subsequently transformed to the T2- D domain using 2D-inverse Laplace transformation and quantitatively assigned to the oil and water components of the samples. The oil component was one distinct distribution with peak intensity at D = 3 × 10 -12 m 2 s -1 and T2 = 180 ms. The water component consisted of two broad populations of water molecules with diffusion coefficients and relaxation times centered around correlation pairs: D = 10 -9 m 2 s -1, T2 = 10 ms and D = 3 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1, T2 = 13 ms. Small spurious peaks observed in the inverse Laplace transformation of original complex data were effectively filtered by the PARAFAC decomposition and thus considered artefacts from the complex Laplace transformation. The oil-to-water ratio determined by PARAFAC followed by 2D-Laplace inversion was perfectly correlated with known oil-to-water ratio of the samples. The new method of using PARAFAC prior to the 2D-Laplace inversion proved to have superior potential in analysis of diffusion-relaxation spectra, as it

  10. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C₃₂H₁₆MnN₈).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S

    2016-04-01

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T(C)  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T(C) has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ' and χ″, near the quoted T(C). Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k(B)  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k(B)  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured |D|/  >  J. PMID:26954989

  11. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C32H16MnN8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S.

    2016-04-01

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T C  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T C has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ‧ and χ″, near the quoted T C. Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k B  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k B  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured \\mid D\\mid   >  J.

  12. Successive over relaxation method in solving two-point fuzzy boundary value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahalan, A. A.; Muthuvalu, M. S.; Sulaiman, J.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, numerical methods are considered in solving the fuzzy boundary value problem (FBVP). This boundary value problem will then be discretized to derive second order finite difference equation and hence generated fuzzy linear system. The approximation solver towards system of linear equations is described through the implementation of the Gauss-Seidel (GS) and Successive Over Relaxation (SOR) iterative methods. Then several numerical experiments were shown to illustrate the effectiveness of SOR iterative method compared with the GS method.

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of some lanthanide (Ln = Eu(iii), Gd(iii) and Nd(iii)) cyanoacetate polymers: field-induced slow magnetic relaxation in the Gd and Nd substitutions.

    PubMed

    Arauzo, A; Lazarescu, A; Shova, S; Bartolomé, E; Cases, R; Luzón, J; Bartolomé, J; Turta, C

    2014-08-28

    The lanthanide(iii) cyanoacetate complexes of the formula {[Ln2(CNCH2COO)6(H2O)4]·2H2O}n, where Ln = Eu (), Gd (), Nd (), have been prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. Complexes and are isostructural and differ from the binding scheme of the neodymium compound , structurally described earlier. In all cases, the cyano group of the cyanoacetate ligand is not coordinated to the lanthanide cation. The carboxylic groups exhibit different binding modes: 2-bidentate-chelating, 2-bidentate and 2-tridentate-chelating bridging for and , and 4-bidentate and 2-tridentate-chelating bridging for the complex . The Eu compound shows field induced paramagnetism, as expected for a non-magnetic ground state with mixing from higher states. Combining the dc magnetization and luminescence measurements the spin-orbit coupling constant λ = 343 ± 4 cm(-1) was found, averaged over the two different sites for Eu in the lattice. In the Gd complex , a crystal field splitting of D/kB = -0.11 ± 0.01 K has been found for the S = 7/2 multiplet of the Gd(iii) ion. No slow relaxation at H = 0 is observed because the low anisotropy barrier allows fast spin reversal through classical processes. The application of an external magnetic field induces two slow relaxation processes. It is argued that the first relaxation rate is caused by the resonant phonon trapping (RPT) mechanism, while the second, slower relaxation rate is due to the lifting of the Kramers degeneracy on the ground state. For compound heat capacity and dc susceptibility measurements indicate that at very low temperatures the ground state Kramers doublet has strong single ion anisotropy. The energy to the next excited doublet ΔZFS/kB = 104 K has been calculated by ab initio calculation methods. The g* tensor has also been calculated, showing that it has predominant anisotropy along the z-axis, and there is an important transversal component. At H = 0 quantum tunnelling is an effective mechanism in producing a

  14. Thermodynamically metastable thiocyanato coordination polymer that shows slow relaxations of the magnetization.

    PubMed

    Werner, Julia; Rams, Michał; Tomkowicz, Zbigniew; Runčevski, Tomče; Dinnebier, Robert E; Suckert, Stefan; Näther, Christian

    2015-03-16

    Reaction of cobalt thiocyanate with 4-acetylpyridine leads to the formation of [Co(NCS)2(4-acetylpyridine)2]n (3/I). In its crystal structure the Co cations are connected by pairs of μ-1,3-bridging thiocyanato ligands into dimers that are further connected into layers by single anionic ligands. DTA-TG measurements of Co(NCS)2(4-acetyl-pyridine)4 (1) led to the formation of 3/I. In contrast, when the hydrate Co(NCS)2(4-acetyl-pyridine)2(H2O)2 (2) is decomposed, a mixture of 3/I and a thermodynamically metastable form 3/II is obtained. Further investigations reveal that thermal annealing of 2 leads to the formation of 3/II, that contains only traces of the stable form 3/I. DSC and temperature dependent X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) measurements prove that 3/II transforms into 3/I on heating. The crystal structure of 3/II was determined ab initio from XRPD data. In its crystal structure the Co cations are linked by pairs of bridging thiocyanato anions into a 1D coordination polymer, and thus, 3/II is an isomer of 3/I. Magnetic measurements disclose that the stable form 3/I only shows paramagnetism without any magnetic anomaly down to 2 K. In contrast, the metastable form 3/II shows ferromagnetic behavior. The phase transition into ordered state at Tc = 3.8 K was confirmed by specific heat measurements. Alternating current susceptibility measurements show frequency dependent maxima in χ' and χ″, which is indicative for a slow relaxation of the magnetization. PMID:25741770

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles colourization by a mixing-frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Liang; Wu, Kai; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Brownian and Néel relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can be characterized by a highly sensitive mixing-frequency method using a search-coil based detection system. The unique magnetic properties of MNPs have been used for biomarkers detection. In this paper, we present a theory and implement an experimental detection scheme using the mixing-frequency method to identify different MNPs simultaneously. A low-frequency sinusoidal magnetic field is applied to saturate the MNPs periodically. A high-frequency sinusoidal magnetic field is then applied to generate mixing-frequency signals that are highly specific to the magnetization of MNPs. The spectra of each MNP can be defined as the complex magnetization of the MNPs over the field frequency. The magnetic spectra of various MNPs and magnetic beads have been characterized and compared. The differences between the MNPs spectra enable us to identify the individual MNPs at the same time. A test has been done to verify the ratio of two different MNPs in mixed samples based on the proposed theory. The experimental results show that the mixing-frequency method is a promising method for MNPs colourization.

  16. A multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for high-speed compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Zhong, Cheng-Wen

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a coupling compressible model of the lattice Boltzmann method. In this model, the multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann scheme is used for the evolution of density distribution functions, whereas the modified single-relaxation-time (SRT) lattice Boltzmann scheme is applied for the evolution of potential energy distribution functions. The governing equations are discretized with the third-order Monotone Upwind Schemes for scalar conservation laws finite volume scheme. The choice of relaxation coefficients is discussed simply. Through the numerical simulations, it is found that compressible flows with strong shocks can be well simulated by present model. The numerical results agree well with the reference results and are better than that of the SRT version. Project supported by the Innovation Fund for Aerospace Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2009200066) and the Aeronautical Science Fund of China (Grant No. 20111453012).

  17. Lanthanide-Directed Fabrication of Four Tetranuclear Quadruple Stranded Helicates Showing Magnetic Refrigeration and Slow Magnetic Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Amit Kumar; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Malviya, Amita; Konar, Sanjit

    2016-06-01

    A rare class of four tetranuclear lanthanide based quadruple stranded helicates namely, [Ln4L4(OH)2](OAc)2·xH2O (Ln = Gd(III)(1), Dy(III)(2) and x = 4, 5 respectively), [Er4L4(OH)2](NO3)2·9H2O (3), and [Dy4L4(NO3)](NO3)2·2CH3OH·H2O (4) were synthesized by employing succinohydrazone derived bis-tridentate ligand (H2L) and characterized. Structures of 1-3 are similar to each other except the nature of counterions and number of lattice water molecules. In 4, a distorted nitrate ion was arranged in a hexagonal manner holding four dysprosium centers in a slightly twisted manner. Because of the symmetrical nature of each complex, the C4 axis crosses the center of helicate resulting a pseudo-D4 coordination environment. Each ligand coordinates to lanthanide centers in helical manner forming mixture of left (Λ) and right (Δ) handed discrete units. Complex 1 exhibits antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between nearby Gd(III) centers and shows magnetic refrigeration (-ΔSm = 24.4 J kg(-1) K(-1) for ΔH = 7 T at 3 K). AC magnetic susceptibility measurements of 2 and 4 demonstrate slow relaxation behavior, with Ueff (effective energy barrier) of 20.5 and 4.6 K, respectively. As per our knowledge, complexes 1, 2, and 4 represent the first examples of aesthetically pleasing quadruple stranded helicates showing potential magnetocaloric effect and single-molecule-magnet-like behavior. PMID:27196362

  18. Modified small angle magnetization rotation method in multilayer magnetic microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrejón, J.; Badini, G.; Pirota, K.; Vázquez, M.

    2007-09-01

    The small angle magnetization rotation (SAMR) technique is a widely used method to quantify magnetostriction in elongated ultrasoft magnetic materials. In the present work, we introduce significant optimization of the method, particularly simplification of the required equipment, profiting of the very peculiar characteristics of a recently introduced family of multilayer magnetic microwires consisting of a soft magnetic core, insulating intermediate layer and a hard magnetic outer layer. The introduced modified SAMR method is used not only to determine the saturation magnetostriction constant of the soft magnetic nucleus but also the magnetoelastic and magnetostatic coupling. This new method has a great potential in multifunctional sensor applications.

  19. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument. PMID:21806196

  20. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  1. Photoacoustic spectroscopy and thermal relaxation method to evaluate corn moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrochi, F.; Medina, A. N.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Luz, M. L. S.; Dalpasquale, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    In this study, samples of popcorn with different degrees of moisture were analyzed. The optical absorption bands at the mid infrared were measured using photoacoustic spectroscopy and were correlated to the sample moisture. The results were in agreement with moisture data determined by the well known reference method, the Karl Fischer. In addition, the thermal relaxation method was used to determine the sample specific heat as a function of the moisture content. The results were also in agreement with the two mentioned methods.

  2. Composite scheme using localized relaxation with non-standard finite difference method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vivek; Raghurama Rao, S. V.

    2008-04-01

    Non-standard finite difference methods (NSFDM) introduced by Mickens [ Non-standard Finite Difference Models of Differential Equations, World Scientific, Singapore, 1994] are interesting alternatives to the traditional finite difference and finite volume methods. When applied to linear hyperbolic conservation laws, these methods reproduce exact solutions. In this paper, the NSFDM is first extended to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, by a novel utilization of the decoupled equations using characteristic variables. In the second part of this paper, the NSFDM is studied for its efficacy in application to nonlinear scalar hyperbolic conservation laws. The original NSFDMs introduced by Mickens (1994) were not in conservation form, which is an important feature in capturing discontinuities at the right locations. Mickens [Construction and analysis of a non-standard finite difference scheme for the Burgers-Fisher equations, Journal of Sound and Vibration 257 (4) (2002) 791-797] recently introduced a NSFDM in conservative form. This method captures the shock waves exactly, without any numerical dissipation. In this paper, this algorithm is tested for the case of expansion waves with sonic points and is found to generate unphysical expansion shocks. As a remedy to this defect, we use the strategy of composite schemes [R. Liska, B. Wendroff, Composite schemes for conservation laws, SIAM Journal of Numerical Analysis 35 (6) (1998) 2250-2271] in which the accurate NSFDM is used as the basic scheme and localized relaxation NSFDM is used as the supporting scheme which acts like a filter. Relaxation schemes introduced by Jin and Xin [The relaxation schemes for systems of conservation laws in arbitrary space dimensions, Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics 48 (1995) 235-276] are based on relaxation systems which replace the nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws by a semi-linear system with a stiff relaxation term. The relaxation parameter ( λ) is chosen locally

  3. Role of Magnetic Exchange Interactions in the Magnetization Relaxation of {3d-4f} Single-Molecule Magnets: A Theoretical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Beg, Mohammad Faizan; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-01-11

    Combined density functional and ab initio calculations are performed on two isomorphous tetranuclear {Ni3 (III) Ln(III) } star-type complexes [Ln=Gd (1), Dy (2)] to shed light on the mechanism of magnetic exchange in 1 and the origin of the slow magnetization relaxation in complex 2. DFT calculations correctly reproduce the sign and magnitude of the J values compared to the experiments for complex 1. Acute ∢Ni-O-Gd bond angles present in 1 instigate a significant interaction between the 4fxyz orbital of the Gd(III) ion and 3d${{_{x{^{2}}- y{^{2}}}}}$ orbital of the Ni(II) ions, leading to rare and strong antiferromagnetic Ni⋅⋅⋅Gd interactions. Calculations reveal the presence of a strong next-nearest-neighbour Ni⋅⋅⋅Ni antiferromagnetic interaction in complex 1 leading to spin frustration behavior. CASSCF+RASSI-SO calculations performed on complex 2 suggest that the octahedral environment around the Dy(III) ion is neither strong enough to stabilize the mJ |±15/2〉 as the ground state nor able to achieve a large ground-state-first-excited-state gap. The ground-state Kramers doublet for the Dy(III) ion is found to be the mJ |±13/2〉 state with a significant transverse anisotropy, leading to very strong quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM). Using the POLY_ANISO program, we have extracted the JNiDy interaction as -1.45 cm(-1) . The strong Ni⋅⋅⋅Dy and next-nearest-neighbour Ni⋅⋅⋅Ni interactions are found to quench the QTM to a certain extent, resulting in zero-field SMM behavior for complex 2. The absence of any ac signals at zero field for the structurally similar [Dy(AlMe4 )3 ] highlights the importance of both the Ni⋅⋅⋅Dy and the Ni⋅⋅⋅Ni interactions in the magnetization relaxation of complex 2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the roles of both the Ni⋅⋅⋅Dy and Ni⋅⋅⋅Ni interactions in magnetization relaxation of a {3d-4f} molecular magnet have been established. PMID

  4. Ferromagnetic interactions and slow magnetic relaxation behaviors of two lanthanide coordination polymers bridged by 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ming; Li, Xiuhua; Cui, Ping; Zhao, Bin

    2015-03-15

    Two lanthanide-based frameworks: (Ln(phen)(NDA){sub 1.5}(H{sub 2}O)){sub n} (Ln=Gd(1), NDA=2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate anion, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), and ([Dy(phen)(NDA){sub 1.5}]·0.5H{sub 2}NDA){sub n} (2) were structurally and magnetically characterized. Compound 1 exhibits 2D layer structure, belonging to the triclinic system with space group P−1, while compound 2 features a 3D framework with space group P−1. The magnetic studies revealed that ferromagnetic coupling existed between adjacent lanthanide ions in 1 and 2, and frequency-dependence out-of-phase signals in the measurement of alternate-current susceptibilities were observed for 2, albeit without reaching the characteristic maxima above 2 K, implying slow magnetic relaxation behavior in 2. After the application of a dc field, good peak shapes of ac signal were obtained and got the energy barrier ΔE/k{sub B}=29 K and the pre-exponential factor τ{sub 0}=4.47×10{sup −7} s at 2000 Oe field; and when the dc field was in 5000 Oe, giving ΔE/k{sub B}=40 K and τ{sub 0}=2.82×10{sup −6}. - Graphical abstract: Two novel lanthanide-based frameworks 1 and 2 were structurally and magnetically characterized. The results revealed that ferromagnetic coupling exists between adjacent lanthanide ions in 1 and 2, and 2 displayed slow magnetic relaxation behavior with the energy barrier of 29 K. - Highlights: • Two lanthanide frameworks were synthesized and magnetically characterized. • The magnetism studies indicate slow magnetic relaxation behavior in 2. • Weak ferromagnetic coupling existing between adjacent lanthanide centers.

  5. Effects of diffusion in magnetically inhomogeneous media on rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, John T.; Gore, John C.

    2014-12-01

    In an aqueous medium containing magnetic inhomogeneities, diffusion amongst the intrinsic susceptibility gradients contributes to the relaxation rate R1ρ of water protons to a degree that depends on the magnitude of the local field variations ΔBz, the geometry of the perturbers inducing these fields, and the rate of diffusion of water, D. This contribution can be reduced by using stronger locking fields, leading to a dispersion in R1ρ that can be analyzed to derive quantitative characteristics of the material. A theoretical expression was recently derived to describe these effects for the case of sinusoidal local field variations of a well-defined spatial frequency q. To evaluate the degree to which this dispersion may be extended to more realistic field patterns, finite difference Bloch-McConnell simulations were performed with a variety of three-dimensional structures to reveal how simple geometries affect the dispersion of spin-locking measurements. Dispersions were fit to the recently derived expression to obtain an estimate of the correlation time of the field variations experienced by the spins, and from this the mean squared gradient and an effective spatial frequency were obtained to describe the fields. This effective spatial frequency was shown to vary directly with the second moment of the spatial frequency power spectrum of the ΔBz field, which is a measure of the average spatial dimension of the field variations. These results suggest the theory may be more generally applied to more complex media to derive useful descriptors of the nature of field inhomogeneities. The simulation results also confirm that such diffusion effects disperse over a range of locking fields of lower amplitude than typical chemical exchange effects, and should be detectable in a variety of magnetically inhomogeneous media including regions of dense microvasculature within biological tissues.

  6. Observation of slow magnetic relaxation in triple-stranded lanthanide helicates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang-Yan; Xu, Gong-Feng; Zhao, Lang; Guo, Yun-Nan; Guo, Yang; Tang, Jinkui

    2011-08-28

    Two dinuclear triple-stranded helicates [Ln(2)L(3)](3+) (Ln = Dy and Tb) obtained via self-assembly from the ligand HL (2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol di(benzoylhydrazone)) and lanthanide perchlorate have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structural analysis demonstrates that three ligand strands wrap around a pseudo-threefold axis defined by the two metal ions, leading to a 'meso'-relation between the right- (Δ) and left-hand (Λ) configurations of [Ln(2)L(3)](3+) in the crystal. Each Ln(III) ion is coordinated by nine donor atoms in a distorted tricapped trigonal-prismatic arrangement. Alternating current (ac) susceptibility measurements of [Dy(2)L(3)](3+) reveal a frequency-dependent out-of-phase signal under a 700 Oe dc field, indicating the onset of the slow relaxation of magnetization with a roughly estimated activation energy of ∼5 K and τ(0) of 10(-7) s. PMID:21743912

  7. Global magnetic fluctuations in S-1 Spheromak plasmas and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.; Hart, G.W.; Nam, C.H.; Yamada, M.

    1985-05-01

    Globally coherent modes have been observed during formation in the S-1 Spheromak plasma by analysis of magnetic field fluctuations measured from outside the plasma. The modes are of low n number (2 less than or equal to n less than or equal to 5), where n is defined by the functional dependence e/sup in phi/ of the fluctuation on toroidal angle phi. These modes are shown to be related to flux conversion and plasma relaxation toward a minimum-energy state during the spheromak formation. The modes are active while the q profile is rapidly changing, with q on-axis, q/sub 0/, rising to 0.7. A significant finding is the temporal progression through the n = 5, 4, 3, 2; m = 1 mode sequence as q rises through rational fractions m/n. During formation, peak amplitudes of the n = 2, 3, 4 modes relative to the unperturbed field have been observed as high as 20%, while more typical amplitudes are below 5%.

  8. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-07

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were P{sub pe}=4.0×10{sup 22} eV/m for InSb and P{sub pe}=1.2×10{sup 23} eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  9. Calculation of the electron spin relaxation times in InSb and InAs by the projection-reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nam Lyong

    2014-12-01

    The electron spin relaxation times in a system of electrons interacting with piezoelectric phonons mediated through spin-orbit interactions were calculated using the formula derived from the projection-reduction method. The results showed that the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the relaxation times in InSb and InAs were similar. The piezoelectric material constants obtained by a comparison with the reported experimental result were Ppe=4.0 ×1022 eV/m for InSb and Ppe=1.2 ×1023 eV/m for InAs. The result also showed that the relaxation of the electron spin by the Elliot-Yafet process is more relevant for InSb than InAs at a low density.

  10. New simulation approach using classical formalism to water nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersions in presence of superparamagnetic particles used as MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, Q. L.; Gossuin, Y.; Gillis, P.; Delangre, S.

    2012-09-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles are used as negative contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging: owing to their large magnetic moment the water proton spins are dephased, which accelerates the nuclear magnetic relaxation of an aqueous sample containing these particles. Transverse and longitudinal relaxation times depend on several parameters of the nanoparticles such as radius and magnetization and on experimental parameters such as the static magnetic field or echo time. In this work, we introduce a new simulation methodology, using a classical formalism, allowing the simulation of the NMR signal during transverse and longitudinal relaxation induced by superparamagnetic particles in an aqueous solution, which, to our knowledge has never been done before. Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles are obtained for a wide range of nanoparticle radii and magnetizations. The results can be classified in two regimes—the well-known motional averaging and static regimes. This generalizes previous studies focusing on transverse relaxation at high magnetic field (larger than 1 T). Simulation results correspond to analytical theories in their validity range and so far unknown dependences of the relaxation with magnetization and radii of the NMR dispersions profiles are observed, which could be used to characterize experimental samples containing large superparamagnetic particles.

  11. General relaxation schemes in multigrid algorithms for higher order singularity methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oskam, B.; Fray, J. M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Relaxation schemes based on approximate and incomplete factorization technique (AF) are described. The AF schemes allow construction of a fast multigrid method for solving integral equations of the second and first kind. The smoothing factors for integral equations of the first kind, and comparison with similar results from the second kind of equations are a novel item. Application of the MD algorithm shows convergence to the level of truncation error of a second order accurate panel method.

  12. Spectral Methods for Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. L.; Gee, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral methods, that is, those based in the Fourier transform, have long been employed in the analysis of magnetic anomalies. For example, Schouten and MaCamy's Earth filter is used extensively to map patterns to the pole, and Parker's Fourier transform series facilitates forward modeling and provides an efficient algorithm for inversion of profiles and surveys. From a different, and perhaps less familiar perspective, magnetic anomalies can be represented as the realization of a stationary stochastic process and then statistical theory can be brought to bear. It is vital to incorporate the full 2-D power spectrum, even when discussing profile data. For example, early analysis of long profiles failed to discover the small-wavenumber peak in the power spectrum predicted by one-dimensional theory. The long-wavelength excess is the result of spatial aliasing, when energy leaks into the along-track spectrum from the cross-track components of the 2-D spectrum. Spectral techniques may be used to improve interpolation and downward continuation of survey data. They can also evaluate the reliability of sub-track magnetization models both across and and along strike. Along-strike profiles turn out to be surprisingly good indicators of the magnetization directly under them; there is high coherence between the magnetic anomaly and the magnetization over a wide band. In contrast, coherence is weak at long wavelengths on across-strike lines, which is naturally the favored orientation for most studies. When vector (or multiple level) measurements are available, cross-spectral analysis can reveal the wavenumber interval where the geophysical signal resides, and where noise dominates. One powerful diagnostic is that the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-path components of the field must be constant 90 degrees. To illustrate, it was found that on some very long Project Magnetic lines, only the lowest 10% of the wavenumber band contain useful geophysical signal. In this

  13. Magnetic phase diagram of La2 -xSrxCoO4 revised using muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. C.; Xiao, F.; Lancaster, T.; De Renzi, R.; Allodi, G.; Bordignon, S.; Freeman, P. G.; Pratt, F. L.; Giblin, S. R.; Möller, J. S.; Blundell, S. J.; Boothroyd, A. T.; Prabhakaran, D.

    2016-04-01

    We report the results of a muon-spin relaxation (μ SR ) investigation of La2 -xSrxCoO4 , an antiferromagnetic insulating series which has been shown to support charge ordered and magnetic stripe phases and an hourglass magnetic excitation spectrum. We present a revised magnetic phase diagram, which shows that the suppression of the magnetic ordering temperature is highly sensitive to small concentrations of holes. Distinct behavior within an intermediate x range (0.2 ≤x ≲0.6 ) suggests that the putative stripe ordered phase extends to lower x than previously thought. Further charge doping (0.67 ≤x ≤0.9 ) prevents magnetic ordering for T ≳1.5 K .

  14. Asymptotic dependence of the relaxation time of the magnetization of a ferromagnetic particle on the anisotropy of the particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, C. N.; Cregg, P. J.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    1992-01-01

    It is known that the direction of the magnetization vector of very fine single-domain ferromagnetic particles fluctuates under the influence of thermal agitation. Perturbation theory is applied rigorously to a singular integral equation to derive an asymptotic formula for the relaxation time of the magnetization, for the case of uniaxial anisotropy and an applied magnetic field. The result agrees with that of Brown [Phys. Rev. 130, 1677 (1963)] as described succinctly by Aharoni [Phys. Rev. 177, 793 (1969)]. It should be emphasized that both Gilbert's equation and the earlier Landau-Lifshitz equation are merely phenomenological equations, which are used to explain the time decay of the average magnetization. Brown suggested that the Gilbert equation should be augmented by a white-noise driving term in order to explain the effect of thermal fluctuations of the surroundings on the magnetization.

  15. Magnetic relaxation dynamics driven by the first-order character of magnetocaloric La(Fe,Mn,Si)13.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Edmund; Bratko, Milan; Caplin, A David; Barcza, Alexander; Katter, Matthias; Ghivelder, Luis; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-08-13

    Here, we study the temporal evolution of the magnetic field-driven paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the La(Fe,Mn,Si)13 material family. Three compositions are chosen that show varying strengths of the first-order character of the transition, as determined by the relative magnitude of their magnetic hysteresis and temperature separation between the zero-field transition temperature Tc and the temperature Tcrit, where the transition becomes continuous. Systematic variations in the fixed field, isothermal rate of relaxation are observed as a function of temperature and as a function of the degree of first-order character. The relaxation rate is reduced in more weakly first-order compositions and is also reduced as the temperature is increased towards Tcrit At temperatures above Tcrit, the metastability of the transition vanishes along with its associated temporal dynamics.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'. PMID:27402929

  16. Assembly of single molecular magnets from dinuclear to 2D Dy-compounds with significant change of relaxation energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Fang, Ming; Kang, Xiao-Min; Hou, Yin-Ling; Zhao, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A dinuclear Dy(III) compound (1) was structurally and magnetically characterized, displaying a single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior with a relaxation energy barrier of 21(1) K. Interestingly, by only adding a suitable substituent on the ligand in , as an SMM building unit, can be further assembled into a two-dimensional (2D) framework (2), which possesses a typical SMM behavior and a high relaxation energy barrier of 68(2) K. The result implied that the assembly of an SMM can effectively tune the energy barrier. To our knowledge, a cluster-based SMM assembled into a new 2D framework with SMM behavior is seldom reported. PMID:26634233

  17. Analysis of Preconditioning and Relaxation Operators for the Discontinuous Galerkin Method Applied to Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2001-01-01

    The explicit stability constraint of the discontinuous Galerkin method applied to the diffusion operator decreases dramatically as the order of the method is increased. Block Jacobi and block Gauss-Seidel preconditioner operators are examined for their effectiveness at accelerating convergence. A Fourier analysis for methods of order 2 through 6 reveals that both preconditioner operators bound the eigenvalues of the discrete spatial operator. Additionally, in one dimension, the eigenvalues are grouped into two or three regions that are invariant with order of the method. Local relaxation methods are constructed that rapidly damp high frequencies for arbitrarily large time step.

  18. Detection method of flexion relaxation phenomenon based on wavelets for patients with low back pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nougarou, François; Massicotte, Daniel; Descarreaux, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) can be defined as a reduction or silence of myoelectric activity of the lumbar erector spinae muscle during full trunk flexion. It is typically absent in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Before any broad clinical utilization of this neuromuscular response can be made, effective, standardized, and accurate methods of identifying FRP limits are needed. However, this phenomenon is clearly more difficult to detect for LBP patients than for healthy patients. The main goal of this study is to develop an automated method based on wavelet transformation that would improve time point limits detection of surface electromyography signals of the FRP in case of LBP patients. Conventional visual identification and proposed automated methods of time point limits detection of relaxation phase were compared on experimental data using criteria of accuracy and repeatability based on physiological properties. The evaluation demonstrates that the use of wavelet transform (WT) yields better results than methods without wavelet decomposition. Furthermore, methods based on wavelet per packet transform are more effective than algorithms employing discrete WT. Compared to visual detection, in addition to demonstrating an obvious saving of time, the use of wavelet per packet transform improves the accuracy and repeatability in the detection of the FRP limits. These results clearly highlight the value of the proposed technique in identifying onset and offset of the flexion relaxation response in LBP subjects.

  19. A Lagrangian Relaxation Method for Crew and Vehicle Rescheduling of Railway Passenger Transportation and its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Tomiyama, Tomoe; Morita, Toyohisa; Murata, Tomohiro

    We propose a method for solving the crew rescheduling problem (CRP) and the vehicle rescheduling problem (VRP) based on the Lagrangian relaxation method. The CRP/VRP is formulated as an integer programming problem on the basis of a network flow modeling approach from which a Lagrangian relaxation problem is constructed by relaxing the constraint that links multiple resources. Using two procedures that generate the upper and lower bounds of the primal problem, both of which utilize an efficient shortest path algorithm for the directed acyclic graph (DAG), the proposed method gradually improves the gap between the upper and lower bounds while updating Lagrangian multipliers. Experimental results of real-world vehicle rescheduling data from Japanese railway lines indicated that the proposed method generated feasible solutions that were confirmed to be fairly close to the optimal solutions according to the gap between the upper and lower bounds, and also clarified the quality of the other method's solution by using the gap, which could lead to streamlining and sophisticating real-world rescheduling related activities.

  20. A New Method for Coronal Magnetic Field Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Sibaek; Choe, Gwangson; Lim, Daye

    2015-08-01

    We present a new, simple, variational method for reconstruction of coronal force-free magnetic fields based on vector magnetogram data. Our method employs vector potentials for magnetic field description in order to ensure the divergence-free condition. As boundary conditions, it only requires the normal components of magnetic field and current density so that the boundary conditions are not over-specified as in many other methods. The boundary normal current distribution is initially fixed once and for all and does not need continual adjustment as in stress-and-relax type methods. We have tested the computational code based on our new method in problems with known solutions and those with actual photospheric data. When solutions are fully given at all boundaries, the accuracy of our method is almost comparable to best performing methods in the market. When magnetic field data are given only at the photospheric boundary, our method excels other methods in most “figures of merit” devised by Schrijver et al. (2006). Furthermore the residual force in the solution is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that of any other method. It can also accommodate the source-surface boundary condition at the top boundary. Our method is expected to contribute to the real time monitoring of the sun required for future space weather forecasts.

  1. Butterfly hysteresis and slow relaxation of the magnetization in (Et 4N) 3Fe 2F 9: manifestations of a single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenker, Ralph; Leuenberger, Michael N.; Chaboussant, Grégory; Güdel, Hans U.; Loss, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    (Et 4N) 3Fe 2F 9 exhibits a butterfly-shaped hysteresis below 5 K when the magnetic field is parallel to the threefold axis, in accordance with a very slow magnetization relaxation in the timescale of minutes. This is attributed to an energy barrier Δ=2.40 K resulting from the S=5 dimer ground state of [Fe 2F 9] 3- and a negative axial anisotropy. The relaxation partly occurs via thermally assisted quantum tunneling. These features of a single-molecule magnet are observable at temperatures comparable to the barrier height, due to an extremely inefficient energy exchange between the spin system and the phonons. The butterfly shape of the hysteresis arises from a phonon avalanche effect.

  2. Experimental investigation in plasma relaxation by using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2012-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation process being conducted in the HELCAT device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5 - 10kV. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities 1.2Cs and densities 10e20 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter lambda determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  3. Spatial analysis of magnetic resonance T1ρ and T2 relaxation times improves classification between subjects with and without osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Stahl, Robert; Blumenkrantz, Gabrielle; Romero, Adan; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that functional analysis of knee cartilage based on magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation times is a valuable tool in the understanding of osteoarthritis (OA). In this work, the regional spatial distribution of knee cartilage T1ρ and T2 relaxation times based on texture and laminar analyses was studied to investigate if they provide additional insight compared to global mean values in the study of OA. Methods: Knee cartilage of 36 subjects, 19 healthy controls and 17 with mild OA, was divided into 16 compartments. T1ρ and T2 relaxation times were studied with first order statistics, eight texture parameters with four different orientations using gray-level co-occurrence matrices and by subdividing each compartment into two different layers: Deep and superficial. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to evaluate the potential of each technique to correctly classify the populations. Results: Although the deep and superficial cartilage layers had in general significantly different T1ρ and T2 relaxation times, they performed similarly in terms of subject discrimination. The subdivision of lateral and medial femoral compartments into weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing regions did not improve discrimination. Also it was found that the most sensitive region was the patella and that T1ρ discriminated better than T2. The most important finding was that with respect to global mean values, laminar and texture analyses improved subject discrimination. Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that spatially assessing MR images of the knee cartilage relaxation times using laminar and texture analyses could lead to better and probably earlier identification of cartilage matrix abnormalities in subjects with OA. PMID:19810478

  4. Serial changes in the T1 magnetic relaxation parameter after myocardial infarction in man.

    PubMed Central

    Been, M; Smith, M A; Ridgway, J P; Douglas, R H; de Bono, D P; Best, J J; Muir, A L

    1988-01-01

    A low field resistive nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system (0.08 Tesla) was used to study the in vivo changes in the relaxation parameter T1 of the left ventricular myocardium from the first day to six months after acute myocardial infarction in 41 consecutive patients admitted to a coronary care unit. T1 maps were constructed from transverse and coronal images at various times after infarction. Thrombolytic treatment had been successful in 28 patients. Thirty three of the 34 patients studied within two weeks of infarction had a significantly increased T1 value but this developed only after the third day in four. At day 1-3 the mean (1 SD) maximum T1 was 413 (29) ms (n = 23) compared with 430 (41) ms (n = 22) at day 4-7, 433 (35) ms (n = 24) at day 8-14, 420 (34) at one month (n = 22), 388 (39) (n = 20) at three months, and 361 (24) (n = 14) at six months. The number of regions of interest with an increased T1 followed a similar time course. Although the increase in T1 measured at three months correlated with the initial maximum creatine kinase and with the left ventricular ejection fraction measured at one month, the number of regions with abnormal T1 from day 4 through to one month correlated best with left ventricular ejection fraction. There was no significant difference in T1 between patients with or without reperfusion. The rise in T1 over the first few days together with the prolonged time course of T1 increase suggests that the increase in T1 may reflect cellular infiltration as much or more than tissue oedema. Images Fig 3 PMID:3342143

  5. COPD Patients Have Short Lung Magnetic Resonance T1 Relaxation Time.

    PubMed

    Alamidi, Daniel F; Morgan, Alexandra R; Hubbard Cristinacce, Penny L; Nordenmark, Lars H; Hockings, Paul D; Lagerstrand, Kerstin M; Young, Simon S; Naish, Josephine H; Waterton, John C; Maguire, Niall C; Olsson, Lars E; Parker, Geoffrey J M

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide attractive biomarkers for assessment of pulmonary disease in clinical trials as it is free from ionizing radiation, minimally invasive and allows regional information. The aim of this study was to characterize lung MRI T1 relaxation time as a biomarker of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); and specifically its relationship to smoking history, computed tomography (CT), and pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements in comparison to healthy age-matched controls. Lung T1 and inter-quartile range (IQR) of T1 maps from 24 COPD subjects and 12 healthy age-matched non-smokers were retrospectively analyzed from an institutional review board approved study. The subjects underwent PFTs and two separate MR imaging sessions at 1.5 tesla to test T1 repeatability. CT scans were performed on the COPD subjects. T1 repeatability (intraclass correlation coefficient) was 0.72 for repeated scans acquired on two visits. The lung T1 was significantly shorter (p < 0.0001) and T1 IQR was significantly larger (p = 0.0002) for the COPD subjects compared to healthy controls. Lung T1 significantly (p = 0.001) correlated with lung density assessed with CT. Strong significant correlations (p < 0.0001) between lung T1 and all PFT measurements were observed. Cigarette exposure did not correlate with lung T1 in COPD subjects. In conclusion, lung MRI T1 mapping shows potential as a repeatable, radiation free, non-invasive imaging technique in the evaluation of COPD. PMID:26488310

  6. Implicit-correction-based immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with two relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Seta, Takeshi; Rojas, Roberto; Hayashi, Kosuke; Tomiyama, Akio

    2014-02-01

    In the present paper, we verify the effectiveness of the two-relaxation-time (TRT) collision operator in reducing boundary slip computed by the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM). In the linear collision operator of the TRT, we decompose the distribution function into symmetric and antisymmetric components and define the relaxation parameters for each part. The Chapman-Enskog expansion indicates that one relaxation time for the symmetric component is related to the kinematic viscosity. Rigorous analysis of the symmetric shear flows reveals that the relaxation time for the antisymmetric part controls the velocity gradient, the boundary velocity, and the boundary slip velocity computed by the IB-LBM. Simulation of the symmetric shear flows, the symmetric Poiseuille flows, and the cylindrical Couette flows indicates that the profiles of the numerical velocity calculated by the TRT collision operator under the IB-LBM framework exactly agree with those of the multirelaxation time (MRT). The TRT is as effective in removing the boundary slip as the MRT. We demonstrate analytically and numerically that the error of the boundary velocity is caused by the smoothing technique using the δ function used in the interpolation method. In the simulation of the flow past a circular cylinder, the IB-LBM based on the implicit correction method with the TRT succeeds in preventing the flow penetration through the solid surface as well as unphysical velocity distortion. The drag coefficient, the wake length, and the separation points calculated by the present IB-LBM agree well with previous studies at Re = 10, 20, and 40. PMID:25353605

  7. Memory effects and magnetic relaxation in single-crystalline La0.9Sr0.1CoO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Mandal, P.; Prabhakaran, D.

    2014-07-01

    We report a detailed investigation of magnetic relaxation and memory effects in La0.9Sr0.1CoO3 single crystal from dc magnetization measurements. The analysis of magnetic relaxation at different temperatures and magnetic fields below the freezing temperature Tf reveals the characteristics of the spin-glass phase. Below Tf, striking memory effects have been clearly observed in different experimental protocols. The memory effect in the zero-field-cooled magnetization further establishes that the glassy magnetic state arises from the cooperative spin-spin interaction but not due to the independent relaxation of metastable phase clusters. The asymmetric response with respect to negative and positive temperature changes favors the hierarchical model of memory effects rather than the droplet model discussed in other works for different insulating and metallic Heisenberg spin glasses.

  8. Relaxation phenomena in current-induced switching in thin magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, J.; Araujo, J. P.; Carpinteiro, F.; Sousa, J. B.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Freitas, P. P.

    2005-04-01

    Recently, reversible resistance ( R) changes were observed in thin tunnel junctions (TJ) when a critical electrical current was applied. These changes are called current-induced switching (CIS) and are attributed to electromigration in nanoconstrictions in the insulating barrier. Here, we study the CIS effect on a thin TJ prepared by IBD, displaying a 3.4% R change when a CIS cycle is performed at room temperature. After complete ( or half) CIS cycles with adequate maximum currents, we monitored R as a function of time. In both cases a non-monotonic relaxation occurs with two distinct relaxation times, τ1˜10min, τ2˜10min. First R increases ( decreases) rapidly, but then a slow relaxation dominates, reducing ( increasing) R. These opposite relaxation processes suggest two independent physical mechanisms acting simultaneously inside the TJ. The physical origin of these effects is discussed.

  9. On a bivariate spectral relaxation method for unsteady magneto-hydrodynamic flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Magagula, Vusi M; Motsa, Sandile S; Sibanda, Precious; Dlamini, Phumlani G

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a significant improvement to the implementation of the spectral relaxation method (SRM) for solving nonlinear partial differential equations that arise in the modelling of fluid flow problems. Previously the SRM utilized the spectral method to discretize derivatives in space and finite differences to discretize in time. In this work we seek to improve the performance of the SRM by applying the spectral method to discretize derivatives in both space and time variables. The new approach combines the relaxation scheme of the SRM, bivariate Lagrange interpolation as well as the Chebyshev spectral collocation method. The technique is tested on a system of four nonlinear partial differential equations that model unsteady three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic flow and mass transfer in a porous medium. Computed solutions are compared with previously published results obtained using the SRM, the spectral quasilinearization method and the Keller-box method. There is clear evidence that the new approach produces results that as good as, if not better than published results determined using the other methods. The main advantage of the new approach is that it offers better accuracy on coarser grids which significantly improves the computational speed of the method. The technique also leads to faster convergence to the required solution. PMID:27119059

  10. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.; Overton, W.C. Jr.; Stewart, W.F.

    The disclosure relates to refrigeration through magnetizing and demagnitizing a body by rotating it within a magnetic field. Internal and external heat exchange fluids and in one embodiment, a regenerator, are used.

  11. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Overton, Jr., William C.; Stewart, Walter F.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosure relates to refrigeration through magnetizing and demagnitizing a body by rotating it within a magnetic field. Internal and external heat exchange fluids and in one embodiment, a regenerator, are used.

  12. Scaling Laws at the Nano Size: The Effect of Particle Size and Shape on the Magnetism and Relaxivity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Smolensky, Eric D.; Park, Hee-Yun E.; Zhou, Yue; Rolla, Gabriele A.; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Botta, Mauro; Pierre, Valérie C.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles govern their relaxivities and efficacy as contrast agents for MRI. These properties are in turn determined by their composition, size and morphology. Herein we present a systematic study of the effect of particle size and shape of magnetite nanocrystals synthesized by thermal decompositions of iron salts on both their magnetism and their longitudinal and transverse relaxivities, r1 and r2, respectively. Faceted nanoparticles demonstrate superior magnetism and relaxivities than spherical nanoparticles of similar size. For faceted nanoparticles, but not for spherical ones, r1 and r2 further increase with increasing particle size up to a size of 18 nm. This observation is in accordance with increasing saturation magnetization for nanoparticles increasing in size up to 12 nm, above which a plateau is observed. The NMRD (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion) profiles of MIONs (Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles) display an increase in longitudinal relaxivity with decreasing magnetic field strength with a plateau below 1 MHz. The transverse relaxivity shows no dependence on the magnetic field strength between 20 MHz and 500 MHz. These observations translate to phantom MR images: in T1-weighted SWIFT (SWeep imaging with Fourier Transform) images MIONs have a positive contrast with little dependence on particle size, whereas in T2-weighted gradient-echo images MIONs create a negative contrast which increases in magnitude with increasing particle size. Altogether, these results will enable the development of particulate MRI contrast agents with enhanced efficacy for biomedical and clinical applications. PMID:23819021

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  14. Theory of the ac spin valve effect: a new method to measure spin relaxation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, Denis; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2012-02-01

    Parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) configurations of FNF junctions have, in a dc regime, different resistivities (RAP>RP), giving rise to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect, which can be explained within the spin injection drift-diffusion model. We extend the model to include ac phenomena and predict new spin dynamical phenomenon; the resonant amplification and depletion of spin accumulation in the P and AP configurations, respectively. As the major new effect, the spin valve magnetoimpedance of the FNF junction oscillates with the driving ac frequency, which leads to negative GMR effect (|ZAP|<|ZP|). We show that from the spin-valve oscillation periods, measured all electrically in the GHz regime, the spin relaxation times could be extracted without any magnetic field and sample size changes (contrary to other techniques). For thin tunnel junctions the ac signal becomes pure Lorentzian, also enabling one to obtain the spin relaxation time of the N region from the signal width. This work, was published in Physical Review Letters,10, 176604 (2011).

  15. Determination of diffusion coefficients in polypyrrole thin films using a current pulse relaxation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Vandyke, Leon S.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The current pulse E sub oc relaxation method and its application to the determination of diffusion coefficients in electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole thin films is described. Diffusion coefficients for such films in Et4NBF4 and MeCN are determined for a series of submicron film thicknesses. Measurement of the double-layer capacitance, C sub dl, and the resistance, R sub u, of polypyrrole thin films as a function of potential obtained with the galvanostatic pulse method is reported. Measurements of the electrolyte concentration in reduced polypyrrole films are also presented to aid in the interpretation of the data.

  16. Diffusion of point defects in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochet, Mickaël; Béland, Laurent Karim; Joly, Jean-François; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-06-01

    We study point-defect diffusion in crystalline silicon using the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method with on-the-fly catalog building capabilities based on the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), coupled to the standard Stillinger-Weber potential. We focus more particularly on the evolution of crystalline cells with one to four vacancies and one to four interstitials in order to provide a detailed picture of both the atomistic diffusion mechanisms and overall kinetics. We show formation energies, activation barriers for the ground state of all eight systems, and migration barriers for those systems that diffuse. Additionally, we characterize diffusion paths and special configurations such as dumbbell complex, di-interstitial (IV-pair+2I) superdiffuser, tetrahedral vacancy complex, and more. This study points to an unsuspected dynamical richness even for this apparently simple system that can only be uncovered by exhaustive and systematic approaches such as the kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

  17. Oxide trap relaxation spectroscopy: A new difference method to determine trap in oxidized silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Changhua; Xu, Mingzhen; Liu, Xiaowei; He, Yandong; Wang, Yangyuan

    1995-03-01

    A difference analysis method has been presented to separate and characterize interface and oxide traps generated in the metal-oxide-semiconductor structure under Fowler-Nordheim stress. The oxide trap relaxation measurement has been performed in dynamic voltage mode. For a high constant voltage stress condition, the effective oxide traps can be obtained by the difference Fowler-Nordheim current relaxation characteristics. For a low-voltage condition, the interface and effective oxide traps can be separated and determined by the difference subthreshold voltage relaxation characteristics. Using combined difference Fowler-Nordheim current and subthreshold voltage measurements, the density, centroid, and generation/capture cross section of the oxide traps can be obtained without the double current-voltage technique, thus permitting more accurate and quick measurement of the generated oxide traps. All difference Fowler-Nordheim current and subthreshold voltage versus the electron-fluence characteristics exhibit spectrum features. Analytical expressions for computing the interface and oxide traps have been derived and experimental results have been presented for a Fowler-Nordheim tunnel metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. Two interface and two oxide traps generated at Fowler-Nordheim stress have been obtained by the new technique.

  18. Relaxation Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging Investigation of Heterogeneous Aging in a Hydroxy-Terminated Polybutadiene-Based Elastomer

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.; Cherry, Brian R.; Minard, Kevin R.; Celina, Mat C.

    2005-12-27

    Relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (R-NMRI) was employed to investigate the effects of thermo-oxidative aging in a hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) based elastomer. A series of three-dimensional (3D) Hahn-echo weighted single point images (SPI) of the elastomer were utilized to generate a 3D parameter map of the aged material. NMR spin-spin relaxation times (T2) were measured for each voxel producing a 3D NMR parameter (T2) map of the aged polymer. These T2 maps reveal a dramatic reduction of local polymer mobility near the aging surface with the degree of T2 heterogeneity varying as a function of aging. Using correlations between NMR T2 and material modulus, the impact of this heterogeneous thermo-oxidative aging on the material properties is discussed.

  19. The use of inexact ODE solver in waveform relaxation methods on a massively parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, W.S.; Wing, O.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents the use of inexact ordinary differential equation (ODE) solver in waveform relaxation methods for solving initial value problems: Since the conventional ODE solvers are inherently sequential, the inexact ODE solver is used by taking time points from only previous waveform iteration for time integration. As a result, this method is truly massively parallel, as the equation is completely unfolded both in system and in time. Convergence analysis shows that the spectral radius of the iteration equation resulting from the {open_quotes}inexact{close_quotes} solver is the same as that from the standard method, and hence the new method is robust. The parallel implementation issues on the DECmpp 12000/Sx computer will also be discussed. Numerical results illustrate that though the number of iterations in the inexact method is increased over the exact method, as expected, the computation time is much reduced because of the large-scale parallelism.

  20. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard . E-mail: Richard.Saurel@polytech.univ-mrs.fr; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-08-10

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  1. Time-parallel iterative methods for parabolic PDES: Multigrid waveform relaxation and time-parallel multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Vandewalle, S.

    1994-12-31

    Time-stepping methods for parabolic partial differential equations are essentially sequential. This prohibits the use of massively parallel computers unless the problem on each time-level is very large. This observation has led to the development of algorithms that operate on more than one time-level simultaneously; that is to say, on grids extending in space and in time. The so-called parabolic multigrid methods solve the time-dependent parabolic PDE as if it were a stationary PDE discretized on a space-time grid. The author has investigated the use of multigrid waveform relaxation, an algorithm developed by Lubich and Ostermann. The algorithm is based on a multigrid acceleration of waveform relaxation, a highly concurrent technique for solving large systems of ordinary differential equations. Another method of this class is the time-parallel multigrid method. This method was developed by Hackbusch and was recently subject of further study by Horton. It extends the elliptic multigrid idea to the set of equations that is derived by discretizing a parabolic problem in space and in time.

  2. Relaxation of bending stresses and the reversibility of residual stresses in amorphous soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil’nikov, P. S.

    2015-06-15

    The reversibility of residual bending stresses is revealed in ribbon samples of cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 3.7}Cr{sub 3.8}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 11} and Fe{sub 57}Co{sub 31}Si{sub 2.9}B{sub 9.1}: the ribbons that are free of applied stresses and bent under the action of residual stresses become completely or incompletely straight upon annealing at the initial temperatures. The influence of annealing on the relaxation of bending stresses is studied. Preliminary annealing is found to sharply decrease the relaxation rate of bending stresses, and the initial stage of fast relaxation of these stresses is absent. Complete straightening of preliminarily annealed ribbons is shown to occur at significantly higher temperatures than that of the initial ribbons. Incomplete straightening of the ribbons is explained by the fact that bending stresses relaxation at high annealing temperatures proceeds due to both reversible anelastic deformation and viscous flow, which is a fully irreversible process. Incomplete reversibility is also caused by irreversible processes, such as the release of excess free volume and clustering (detected by small-angle X-ray scattering). The revealed differences in the relaxation processes that occur in the cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys are discussed in terms of different atomic diffusion mobilities in these alloys.

  3. Size dependence in magnetic memory, relaxation and interaction of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nilotpal; Datta, Subarna; Ghosh, Barnali

    2015-05-01

    We report the study of memory effect, relaxation and interaction of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) particles of two different sizes, bulk (~60-150 μm) and nano (~80 nm) synthesized by using polymeric precursor route. Magnetic relaxation measurement has been carried out and the analysis shows the existence of two relaxation times in both the cases. Our dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies indicate the presence of two different size distributions in LSMO nano particle sample. This is attributed to the fact that particles of two different sizes can relax separately. It has been observed that both the samples show signature of magnetic memory effect. Because, the effect of disordered surface layer is more in LSMO nano than LSMO bulk particles, LSMO nano particles are found to favor demagnetized state where as LSMO bulk prefer magnetized state.

  4. VSP wave field separation: An optimization method based on block relaxation and singular value thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Chen, Wenchao; Wang, Baoli; Gao, Jinghuai

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a high-fidelity new method for wave field separation of vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data. The method can keep the characteristics of waveform and amplitude variation along with the wave propagation. As a basic assumption, we assume that the wave field data of each event flattened regular wave is a low-rank matrix. Then, we construct an optimization equation to formulate the VSP wave field separation problem. To solve the equation, we combine block relaxation (BR) with singular value thresholding (SVT) to construct a new algorithm. We apply the method proposed in this paper to both synthetic and real data, and compare the results with that of the median filter based method, which is widely used in engineering practice. We conclude that the method proposed in this paper can offer a wave field separation with higher fidelity and higher signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  5. The simulation of skin temperature distributions by means of a relaxation method.

    PubMed

    Vermey, G F

    1975-05-01

    To solve the differential equation for the heat in a two-layer, rectangular piece of skin tissue, a relaxation method, based on a finite difference technique, is used. The temperature distributions on the skin surface are calculated. The results are used to derive a criterion for the resolution for an infrared thermograph in a specific situation. A major limitation on the resolution in medical thermography is given. As an example of the power of the model, the sensitivity of the temperature profiles for variations of the layer thickness is determined. PMID:1187763

  6. In-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy induced by anisotropic strain relaxation in high lattice-mismatched Dy/Sc superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, L.; Ballesteros, C.; Ward, R. C. C.

    2014-04-01

    We report on the magnetic and structural characterization of high lattice-mismatched [Dy2nm/SctSc] superlattices, with variable Sc thickness tSc= 2-6 nm. We find that the characteristic in-plane effective hexagonal magnetic anisotropy K66,ef reverses sign and undergoes a dramatic reduction, attaining values of ≈13-24 kJm-3, when compared to K66=-0.76 MJm-3 in bulk Dy. As a result, the basal plane magnetic anisotropy is dominated by a uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) unfound in bulk Dy, which amounts to ≈175-142 kJm-3. We attribute the large downsizing in K66,ef to the compression epitaxial strain, which generates a competing sixfold magnetoelastic (MEL) contribution to the magnetocrystalline (strain-free) magnetic anisotropy. Our study proves that the in-plane UMA is caused by the coupling between a giant symmetry-breaking MEL constant Mγ ,22≈1 GPa and a morphic orthorhombiclike strain ɛγ ,1≈10-4, whose origin resides on the arising of an in-plane anisotropic strain relaxation process of the pseudoepitaxial registry between the nonmagnetic bottom layers in the superstructure. This investigation shows a broader perspective on the crucial role played by epitaxial strains at engineering the magnetic anisotropy in multilayers.

  7. Coexisting static magnetic ordering and superconductivity in CeCu2.1Si2 found by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Kossler, W. J.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Kempton, J. R.; Stronach, C. E.; Barth, S.; Gygax, F. N.; Hitti, B.; Schenck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Zero- and longitudinal-field muon spin relaxation measurements on a heavy fermion system CeCu2.1 Si2 have revealed an onset of static magnetic ordering below T(M) approximately 0.8 K, which coexists with superconductivity below T(c) = 0.7 K. The line shapes of the observed muon spin depolarization functions suggest an ordering in either spin glass or incommensurate spin-density-wave state, with a small averaged static moment of the order of 0.1 micro-B per formula unit at T approaches 0.

  8. Pseudospectral Methods of Solution of the Linear and Linearized Boltzmann Equations; Transport and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2011-05-01

    The study of the solution of the linearized Boltzmann equation has a very long history arising from the classic work by Chapman and Cowling. For small departures from a Maxwellian, the nonlinear Boltzmann equation can be linearized and the transport coefficients calculated with the Chapman-Enskog approach. This procedure leads to a set of linear integral equations which are generally solved with the expansion of the departure from Maxwellian in Sonine polynomials. The method has been used successfully for many decades to compare experimental transport data in atomic gases with theory generally carried out for realistic atom-atom differential cross sections. There are alternate pseudospectral methods which involve the discretization of the distribution function on a discrete grid. This paper considers a pseudospectral method of solution of the linearized hard sphere Boltzmann equation for the viscosity in a simple gas. The relaxation of a small departure from a Maxwellian is also considered for the linear test particle problem with unit mass ratio which is compared with the relaxation for the linearized one component Boltzmann equation.

  9. Zeolite GdNaY nanoparticles with very high relaxivity for application as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Vander Elst, Luce; Zhou, Wuzong; Muller, Robert N; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Maschmeyer, Thomas; Peters, Joop A

    2002-11-15

    In this paper we explore Gd(3+)-doped zeolite NaY nanoparticles for their potential application as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The nanoparticles have an average size of 80-100 nm, as determined by TEM and XRD. A powdered sample loaded with La3+ was characterised by means of multinuclear solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The NMR dispersion (NMRD) profiles obtained from aqueous suspensions of samples with Gd3+ doping ratios of 1.3-5.4 wt% were obtaining at different temperatures. The relaxivity increases drastically as the Gd3+ loading decreases, with values ranging between 11.4 and 37.7 s-1 mM-1 at 60 MHz and 37 degrees C. EPR spectra of aqueous suspensions of the samples suggest that an interaction between neighbouring Gd3+ ions within the same particle produces a significant increase in the transversal electronic relaxation rates in samples with a high Gd3+ content. The experimental NMRD and EPR data are explained with the use of a model that considers the system as a concentrated aqueous solution of Gd3+ in the interior of the zeolite that is in exchange with the bulk water outside the zeolite. The results obtained indicate that the Gd3+ ion is immobilised in the interior of the zeolite and that the relaxivity is mainly limited by the relatively slow diffusion of water protons from the pores of the zeolite channels into the bulk water. PMID:12613030

  10. Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of alkali metal vapor interaction with alkene-based anti-relaxation coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiak, O. Yu.; Blanchard, J. W.; Budker, D.; Olshin, P. K.; Smirnov, S. N.; Balabas, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The use of anti-relaxation coatings in alkali vapor cells yields substantial performance improvements compared to a bare glass surface by reducing the probability of spin relaxation in wall collisions by several orders of magnitude. Some of the most effective anti-relaxation coating materials are alpha-olefins, which (as in the case of more traditional paraffin coatings) must undergo a curing period after cell manufacturing in order to achieve the desired behavior. Until now, however, it has been unclear what physicochemical processes occur during cell curing, and how they may affect relevant cell properties. We present the results of nondestructive Raman-spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance investigations of the influence of alkali metal vapor (Cs or K) on an alpha-olefin, 1-nonadecene coating the inner surface of a glass cell. It was found that during the curing process, the alkali metal catalyzes migration of the carbon-carbon double bond, yielding a mixture of cis- and trans-2-nonadecene.

  11. Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of alkali metal vapor interaction with alkene-based anti-relaxation coating.

    PubMed

    Tretiak, O Yu; Blanchard, J W; Budker, D; Olshin, P K; Smirnov, S N; Balabas, M V

    2016-03-01

    The use of anti-relaxation coatings in alkali vapor cells yields substantial performance improvements compared to a bare glass surface by reducing the probability of spin relaxation in wall collisions by several orders of magnitude. Some of the most effective anti-relaxation coating materials are alpha-olefins, which (as in the case of more traditional paraffin coatings) must undergo a curing period after cell manufacturing in order to achieve the desired behavior. Until now, however, it has been unclear what physicochemical processes occur during cell curing, and how they may affect relevant cell properties. We present the results of nondestructive Raman-spectroscopy and magnetic-resonance investigations of the influence of alkali metal vapor (Cs or K) on an alpha-olefin, 1-nonadecene coating the inner surface of a glass cell. It was found that during the curing process, the alkali metal catalyzes migration of the carbon-carbon double bond, yielding a mixture of cis- and trans-2-nonadecene. PMID:26957176

  12. THE EFFECTS OF PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION REAGENTS ON 15N SPIN RELAXATION AND THE USE OF GD(DPM)3 AS A NITROGEN-15 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPIN LABEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron-nuclear relaxation times (T(1) sup e's) for (15)N and (13)C in natural abundance are measured for a series of amines of a wide range of pK(a)s using four paramagnetic relaxation reagents that are soluable in organic solutions. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(dpm)3 are seen to affect th...

  13. Slow spin relaxation induced by magnetic field in [NdCo(bpdo)(H2O)4(CN)6]⋅3H2O.

    PubMed

    Vrábel, P; Orendáč, M; Orendáčová, A; Čižmár, E; Tarasenko, R; Zvyagin, S; Wosnitza, J; Prokleška, J; Sechovský, V; Pavlík, V; Gao, S

    2013-05-01

    We report on a comprehensive investigation of the magnetic properties of [NdCo(bpdo)(H2O)4(CN)6]⋅3H2O (bpdo=4, 4'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide) by use of electron paramagnetic resonance, magnetization, specific heat and susceptibility measurements. The studied material was identified as a magnet with an effective spin S = 1/2 and a weak exchange interaction J/kB = 25 mK. The ac susceptibility studies conducted at audio frequencies and at temperatures from 1.8 to 9 K revealed that the application of a static magnetic field induces a slow spin relaxation. It is suggested that the relaxation in the magnetic field appears due to an Orbach-like process between the two lowest doublet energy states of the magnetic Nd(3+) ion. The appearance of the slow relaxation in a magnetic field cannot be associated with a resonant phonon trapping. The obtained results suggest that the relaxation is influenced by nuclear spin driven quantum tunnelling which is suppressed by external magnetic field. PMID:23587762

  14. A Study of Successive Over-relaxation Method Parallelization over Modern HPC Languages

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Sparsh

    2014-01-01

    Successive over-relaxation (SOR) is a computationally intensive, yet extremely important iterative solver for solving linear systems. Due to recent trends of exponential growth in amount of data generated and increasing problem sizes, serial platforms have proved to be insucient in providing the required computational power. In this paper, we present parallel implementations of red-black SOR method using three modern programming languages namely Chapel, D and Go. We employ SOR method for solving 2D steady-state heat conduction problem. We discuss the optimizations incorporated and the features of these languages which are crucial for improving the program performance. Experiments have been performed using 2, 4, and 8 threads and performance results are compared with serial execution. The analysis of results provides important insights into working of SOR method.

  15. FORCED FIELD EXTRAPOLATION: TESTING A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC (MHD) RELAXATION METHOD WITH A FLUX-ROPE EMERGENCE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. S.; Wang, H. N.; Du, Z. L.; Fan, Y. L.

    2013-05-10

    We undertake an attempt to reconstruct the Sun's non-force-free magnetic field. The solar corona is often considered to be magnetohydrostatic. We solve the full MHD equations with a semi-realistic atmosphere model to attain this stationary state. Our method is tested with a Sun-like model which simulates the emergence of a magnetic flux rope passing from below the photosphere into the corona. Detailed diagnostics shows that our method can model the forced field more successfully than the optimization and potential method, but it still needs to be applied to real data.

  16. Systematic variation of magnetic-field penetration depth in high-Tc superconductors studied by muon-spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Emery, V. J.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.; Suenaga, M.; Johnston, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The muon relaxation rate (sigma) was measured in the high critical temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(x) for x = 6.66, 6.95, 7.0, and La1.85 SrO.15 CuO4 in transverse external magnetic fields 1 is approximately 4 kG. A simple relation is found which connects the transition temperature T(c), the magnetic field penetration depth lambda(L), the carrier concentration n(s) and the effective mass m* as T(c) varies as sigma which varies as 1/lambda(L) squared which varies as n(s)/m*. The linear dependence T(c) varies as n(s)/m* suggests a high energy scale for the coupling between superconducting carriers.

  17. Systematic variation of magnetic-field penetration depth in high-T(c) superconductors studied by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Emery, V. J.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.; Suenaga, M.; Johnston, D. C.; Jacobson, A. J.; Lewandowski, J. T.; Brewer, J. H.; Kiefl, R. F.; Kreitzman, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The muon relaxation rate (sigma) was measured in the high critical temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(x) for x = 6.66, 6.95, 7.0, and La1.85 Sr0.15 CuO4 in transverse external magnetic fields 1 is approximately 4kG. A simple relation is found which connects the transition temperature T(c), the magnetic field penetration depth lambda(L), the carrier concentration n(s) and the effective mass m* as T(c) varies as sigma which varies as 1/lambda(L) squared which varies as n(s)/m*. The linear dependence T(c) varies as n(s)/m* suggests a high energy scale for the coupling between superconducting carriers.

  18. Composition dependence of magnetic relaxation for CoNi chain-based compounds with mixed double azide-tetrazolate bridges.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min; Ding, You-Song; Gao, En-Qing; Zhang, Zhicheng; Jia, Qin-Xiang

    2016-05-10

    Seven isomorphous 2D CoNi (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) compounds based on ferromagnetic chains with mixed double [(μ-EO-N3)(μ-N-N-tetrazolate)] (EO = end-on) were synthesized and then structurally and magnetically characterized. They are formulated as [CoNi(L)(N3)(H2O)]·H2O (), (x = 1 (), 0.86 (), 0.74 (), 0.39 (), 0.14 (), 0.10 (), 0 (); L = 3-(5-tetrazole)-N-oxide-pyridine). Magnetic studies revealed that the homo-metallic compounds ( and ) behave as metamagnets, while the hetero-metallic compounds () show interesting composition-dependent slow relaxation due to the synergy effect of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions. PMID:27071813

  19. Expansion and relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in a Pt/Co/Pt/Co/Pt multilayer with antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Stamps, R. L.; Jamet, J.-P.; Ferré, J.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.

    2012-01-01

    We detail measurements of field-driven expansion and zero-field relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin Co layers. The zero-field stability of aligned ('mirror') domains in such systems results from non-homogeneous dipolar stray fields which exist in the vicinity of the domain walls. During field-driven domain expansion, we evidence a separation of the domain walls which form the mirror domain boundary. However, the walls realign, thereby reforming a mirror domain, if their final separation is below a critical distance at the end of the field pulse. This critical distance marks the point at which the effective net interaction between the walls changes from attractive to repulsive.

  20. Expansion and relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in a Pt/Co/Pt/Co/Pt multilayer with antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, P J; Stamps, R L; Jamet, J-P; Ferré, J; Baltz, V; Rodmacq, B

    2012-01-18

    We detail measurements of field-driven expansion and zero-field relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin Co layers. The zero-field stability of aligned ('mirror') domains in such systems results from non-homogeneous dipolar stray fields which exist in the vicinity of the domain walls. During field-driven domain expansion, we evidence a separation of the domain walls which form the mirror domain boundary. However, the walls realign, thereby reforming a mirror domain, if their final separation is below a critical distance at the end of the field pulse. This critical distance marks the point at which the effective net interaction between the walls changes from attractive to repulsive. PMID:22173339

  1. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, John R.; Clem, John R.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  2. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.; Clem, J.R.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped. 5 figs.

  3. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.

    1982-07-09

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  4. A cyano-bridged single-molecule magnet: slow magnetic relaxation in a trigonal prismatic MnMo(6)(CN)(18) cluster.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Jennifer J; Hee, Allan G; Long, Jeffrey R

    2002-07-01

    We report the synthesis of the first well-documented example of a cyano-bridged single-molecule magnet. An assembly reaction parallel to that employed in producing the trigonal prismatic [(Me(3)tacn)(6)MnCr(6)(CN)(18)](2+) (Me(3)tacn = N,N',N"-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) cluster affords K[(Me(3)tacn)(6)MnMo(6)(CN)(18)](ClO(4))(3) (1), containing an analogous molybdenum(III)-substituted cluster. Fits to the DC magnetic susceptibility and magnetization data for 1 show that the MnMo(6) cluster possesses weak antiferromagnetic coupling (J = -6.7 cm(-1)), leading to an S = (13)/(2) ground state with significantly enhanced magnetic anisotropy (D = -0.33 cm(-1) and E = -0.018 cm(-1)). Consistent with these results, AC magnetic susceptibility measurements show the molecule to exhibit slow magnetic relaxation indicative of a single-molecule magnet with an energy barrier of 10 cm(-1) for spin reversal. PMID:12083909

  5. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety in nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Zargarzadeh, Maryam; Shirazi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Concerning the prevalence of test anxiety among nursing students and presence of stress in nursing education years, this study was conducted to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety among nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in three stages on 49 male and female nursing students divided into two groups (study and control). In the pre-test stage, demographic data and Sarason anxiety questionnaires were filled by 94 students (of terms 3 and 4). Then, in the intervention stage, the students having test anxiety were assigned to two groups (study and control), and the progressive muscle relaxation method was performed in the experiment group in four sessions. Then, the students did this method two times a day until final exams, immediately following which they filled the self-reported checklists. On the first day of the final exams, test anxiety questionnaire was filled by the two groups again. The collected data were analyzed by the statistical tests, i.e. χ2, paired t-test, independent sample t-test, Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, using SPSS 18. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean scores of test anxiety after intervention between the two groups of study and control (P = 0.00), but this difference was not significant before intervention (P = 0.76). Also, in the study group, there was a significant difference in the mean scores of test anxiety before and after intervention (P = 0.00), but this difference was not significant in the control group (P = 0.09). Mann–Whitney test showed no significant difference in categorization of test anxiety scores before intervention in the study and control groups (P = 0.60), but the difference was significant after intervention (P = 0.00). Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference in categorization of test anxiety scores in the study group

  6. Slow magnetic relaxation in octahedral cobalt(II) field-induced single-ion magnet with positive axial and large rhombic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Herchel, Radovan; Váhovská, Lucia; Potočňák, Ivan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2014-06-16

    Pseudooctahedral mononuclear cobat(II) complex [Co(abpt)2(tcm)2] (1), where abpt = 4-amino-3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazole and tcm = tricyanomethanide anion, shows field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization with U = 86.2 K and large axial and rhombic single-ion zero-field-splitting parameters, D = +48(2) cm(-1) and E/D = 0.27(2) (D = +53.7 cm(-1) and E/D = 0.29 from ab initio CASSCF/NEVPT2 calculations), thus presenting a new example of a field-induced single-ion magnet with transversal magnetic anisotropy. PMID:24853769

  7. Critical behavior and magnetic relaxation dynamics of Nd0.4Sr0.6MnO3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, S.; Nath, T. K.

    2013-07-01

    Detailed DC and AC magnetic properties of chemically synthesized Nd0.4Sr0.6MnO3 with different particle size (down to 27 nm) have been studied in details. We have found ferromagnetic state in the nanoparticles, whereas the bulk Nd0.4Sr0.6MnO3 is known to be an A-type antiferromagnet. A Griffiths-like phase has also been identified in the nanoparticles. Further, critical behaviour of the nanoparticles has been studied around the second-order ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition region (|(T-T C)/T C| ⩽ 0.04) in terms of modified Arrott plot, Kouvel-Fisher plot and critical isotherm analysis. The estimated critical exponents (β, γ, δ) are quite different from those predicted according to three-dimensional mean-field, Heisenberg and Ising models. This signifies a quite unusual nature of the size-induced ferromagnetic state in Nd0.4Sr0.6MnO3. The nanoparticles are found to be interacting and do not behave like ideal superparamagnet. Interestingly, we find spin glass like slow relaxation of magnetization, aging and memory effect in the nanometric samples. These phenomena have been attributed to very broad distribution of relaxation time as well as to inter-particle interaction. Experimentally, we have found out that the dynamics of the nanoparticle systems can be best described by hierarchical model of spin glasses.

  8. Study of anisotropy in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of water protons in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kasturi, S R; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C F

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropy of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of water protons in skeletal muscle tissue have been studied by the spin-echo technique. Both T1 and T2 have been measured for the water protons of the tibialis anterior muscle of mature male rats for theta = 0, 55, and 90 degrees, where theta is the orientation of the muscle fiber with respect to the static field. The anisotropy in T1 and T2 has been measured at temperatures of 28, -5 and -10 degrees C. No significant anisotropy was observed in the T1 of the tissue water, while an average anisotropy of approximately 5% was observed in T2 at room temperature. The average anisotropy of T2 at -5 and -10 degrees C was found to be approximately 2 and 1.3%, respectively. PMID:6266530

  9. The Impact of the Relaxivity Definition on the Quantitative Measurement of Glycosaminoglycans in Cartilage by MRI dGEMRIC Method

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, ShaoKuan; Xia, Yang

    2009-01-01

    The relaxivities (R-values) of the Gd(DTPA)2− ions in a series of skim-milk solutions at 0–40% milk concentrations were measured using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The R-value was found to be approximately linearly proportional to the concentration of the solid component in the milk solution. Using the R-value at 20% solid component (approximately the solid concentration in bovine nasal cartilage (BNC)), the glycosaminoglycan concentration in BNC can be quantified using the MRI dGEMRIC method without the customary scaling factor of two. This finding is also supported by the measurements using 23Na NMR spectroscopy, 23Na inductively-coupled-plasma (ICP) analysis, and biochemical assay. The choice of the R-value definition in the MRI dGEMRIC method is discussed – and the definition of Gd(DTPA)2− ions as “ millimole per volume of tissue (or milk solution for substitution)” should be used. PMID:19918900

  10. Slow Relaxation of Magnetization in an Isostructural Series of Zinc-Lanthanide Complexes: An Integrated EPR and AC Susceptibility Study.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Asma; Madalan, Augustin M; Andruh, Marius; Caneschi, Andrea; Sorace, Lorenzo

    2016-08-26

    We report the synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic and dynamic magnetic properties of a series of heterodinuclear complexes, [ZnLn(LH4 )2 ](NO3 )3 ⋅6 H2 O (Ln=Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb), with the singly deprotonated form of a new compartmentalized Schiff-base ligand, LH5 . The Ln(III) ions in these systems show a distorted square-antiprism geometry with an LnO8 coordination sphere. EPR spectroscopy and DC magnetic studies have shown that the anisotropic nature of the complexes is far more complicated than predicted on the basis of a simple electrostatic model. Among the investigated systems, only the Dy(III) derivative showed single-ion magnet behavior, in zero and an applied magnetic field, both in pure polycrystalline samples and in a series of polycrystalline samples with different degrees of dilution at the single-crystal level in the isostructural Y(III) derivative. The rich dynamics observed as functions of frequency, field, and temperature reveals that multiple relaxation mechanisms are at play, resulting in a barrier of 189 cm(-1) , which is among the highest reported for a dinuclear Zn-Dy system. Analysis of the dynamic behavior as a function of dilution degree further evidenced the persistence of non-negligible intermolecular interactions, even at the lowest concentration of 1 %. PMID:27465998

  11. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1990-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for O = to or less than 0.3 and in the temperature range 1.6 + 450 K are analyzed in terms of Cu(++) magnetic correlations and dynamics. It is described how the magnetic correlations that would result from Cu-Cu exchange are reduced by mobile charge defects related to x-doping. A comprehensive picture is given which explains satisfactorily the x and T dependence of the correlation time, of the correlation length and of the Neel temperature T(sub n)(x) as well as being consistent with known electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is discussed how, in the superconducting samples, the mobile defects also cause the decrease, for T yields T(sub c)(+) of the hyperfine Cu electron-nucleus effective interaction, leading to the coexistence of quasi-localized, reduced magnetic moments from 3d Cu electrons and mobile oxygen p-hole carriers. The temperature dependence of the effective hyperfine field around the superconducting transition yields an activation energy which could be related to the pairing energy. New specific heat measurements are also presented and discussed in terms of the above picture.

  12. On the magnetic anisotropy and nuclear relaxivity effects of Co and Ni doping in iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, T.; Albino, M.; Orsini, F.; Innocenti, C.; Basini, M.; Arosio, P.; Sangregorio, C.; Corti, M.; Lascialfari, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report a systematic experimental study of the evolution of the magnetic and relaxometric properties as a function of metal (Co, Ni) doping in iron oxide nanoparticles. A set of five samples, having the same size and ranging from stoichiometric cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) to stoichiometric nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) with intermediate doping steps, was ad hoc synthesized. Using both DC and AC susceptibility measurements, the evolution of the magnetic anisotropy depending on the doping is qualitatively discussed. In particular, we observed that the height of the magnetic anisotropy barrier is directly proportional to the amount of Co, while the Ni has an opposite effect. By Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion (NMR-D) experiments, the experimental longitudinal r1 and transverse r2 relaxivity profiles were obtained, and the heuristic theory of Roch et al. was used to analyze the data of both r1 and, for the first time, r2. While the experimental and fitting results obtained from r1 profiles were satisfying and confirmed the anisotropy trend, the model applied to r2 hardly explains the experimental findings.

  13. RADIAL TRANSPORT OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN ACCRETION DISKS. II. RELAXATION TO STEADY STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Taku; Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-12-20

    We study the time evolution of a large-scale magnetic flux threading an accretion disk. The induction equation of the mean poloidal field is solved under the standard viscous disk model. Magnetic flux evolution is controlled by two timescales: one is the timescale of the inward advection of the magnetic flux, τ{sub adv}. This is induced by the dragging of the flux by the accreting gas. The other is the outward diffusion timescale of the magnetic flux τ{sub dif}. We consider diffusion due to the Ohmic resistivity. These timescales can be significantly different from the disk viscous timescale τ{sub disk}. The behaviors of the magnetic flux evolution are quite different depending on the magnitude relationship of the timescales τ{sub adv}, τ{sub dif}, and τ{sub disk}. The most interesting phenomena occur when τ{sub adv} << τ{sub dif}, τ{sub disk}. In such a case, the magnetic flux distribution approaches a quasi-steady profile much faster than the viscous evolution of the gas disk, and the magnetic flux has also been tightly bundled to the inner part of the disk. In the inner part, although the poloidal magnetic field becomes much stronger than the interstellar magnetic field, the field strength is limited to the maximum value that is analytically given by our previous work. We also find a condition for the initial large magnetic flux, which is a fossil of the magnetic field dragging during the early phase of star formation that survives for a duration in which significant gas disk evolution proceeds.

  14. Magnetic field penetration depth of La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4 measured by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossler, W. J.; Kempton, J. R.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Uemura, Y. J.

    1987-01-01

    Muon-spin-relaxation measurements have been performed on a high-Tc superconductor La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4. In an external transverse magnetic field of 500 G, a magnetic field penetration depth of 2000 A at T = 10 K has been determined from the muon-spin-relaxation rate which increased with decreasing temperature below Tc. From this depth and the Pauli susceptibility, the superconducting carrier density is estimated at 3 x 10 to the 21st per cu cm. The zero-field relaxation rates above and below Tc were equal, which suggests that the superconducting state in this sample is not associated with detectable static magnetic ordering.

  15. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation.

  16. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized (129)Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon ((129)Xe and (131)Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of (129)Xe could be increased 2-7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of (129)Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm(2)/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm(2)/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  17. Transverse spin relaxation and diffusion-constant measurements of spin-polarized 129Xe nuclei in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohu; Chen, Chang; Qu, Tianliang; Yang, Kaiyong; Luo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field gradient in a sample cell containing spin-polarized 129Xe atoms will cause an increased relaxation rate. We measured the transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe verse the applied magnetic field gradient and the cell temperature. We then compared the different transverse spin relaxation behavior of dual isotopes of xenon (129Xe and 131Xe) due to magnetic field gradient in the same cell. The experiment results show the residual magnetic field gradient can be measured and compensated by applying a negative magnetic gradient in the sample cell. The transverse spin relaxation time of 129Xe could be increased 2–7 times longer when applying an appropriate magnetic field gradient. The experiment results can also be used to determine the diffusion constant of 129Xe in H2 and N2 to be 0.4 ± 0.26 cm2/sec and 0.12 ± 0.02 cm2/sec. The results are close with theoretical calculation. PMID:27049237

  18. Relaxation and approximate factorization methods for the unsteady full potential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Ide, H.; Gorski, J.

    1984-01-01

    The unsteady form of the full potential equation is solved in conservation form, using implicit methods based on approximate factorization and relaxation schemes. A local time linearization for density is introduced to enable solution to the equation in terms of phi, the velocity potential. A novel flux-biasing technique is applied to generate proper forms of the artificial viscosity, to treat hyperbolic regions with shocks and sonic lines present. The wake is properly modeled by accounting not only for jumps in phi, but also for jumps in higher derivatives of phi obtained from requirements of density continuity. The far field is modeled using the Riemann invariants to simulate nonreflecting boundary conditions. Results are presented for flows over airfoils, cylinders, and spheres. Comparisons are made with available Euler and full potential results.

  19. Method for reducing snap in magnetic amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, R. L. E.; Word, J. L.

    1968-01-01

    Method of reducing snap in magnetic amplifiers uses a degenerative feedback circuit consisting of a resistor and a separate winding on a magnetic core. The feedback circuit extends amplifier range by allowing it to be used at lower values of output current.

  20. Magnetic relaxation -- coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.

    1993-12-31

    During this quarter, the CW (continuous wave) and pulsed EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) have been examined of the swelled Argonne Premium whole coals and the swelled residues of these coals. The CW EPR spectra will not be of high quality due to the unexpectedly microwave-lossy character of the pyridine used for swelling. Being relatively unaffected by this characteristic, the pulsed EPR measurements of the spin relaxation times of the broad (non-inertinite) and narrow (inertinite) macerals have been completed. Although detailed analyses of these results have not yet been done, marked differences have been found between the relaxation times of the swelled and unswelled coals and residues. The most startling are the less than 200 nsec times T{sub 1} of the spin-lattice relaxation of the inertinite radicals in the swelled samples. The T{sub 1} of this maceral in the unswelled coal were approaching 1 millisecond. The T{sub 1} contrast was much less pronounced between the swelled and non-swelled non-inertinite macerals. The prospects of significant progress in coal pore size measurements with xenon and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) have dimmed since the beginning of this project. This assessment is based on the dearth of these types of studies, a paper at a contractors` meeting on this subject that did not materialize, and discussions with colleagues with experience with the technique in coals. Instead, the authors have been developing a pulsed EPR technique for the spin probing of molecular motion to be applied to pores in carbonaceous materials. This report contains a copy of a nearly final draft of a paper being prepared on the development of this technique, entitled {open_quotes}Physical Characterization of the State of Motion of the Phenalenyl Spin Probe in Cation-Exchanged Faujasite Zeolite Supercages with Pulsed EPR.{close_quotes}

  1. Effects of fiber type and diet on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times of skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mardini, I.A.; McCarter, R.J.; Fullerton, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    NMR studies of muscle have typically used muscles of mixed fiber composition and have not taken into account the metabolic state of the host. Samples of psoas (type IIB fibers) and soleus (type I fibers) muscles were obtained from 3 groups of rabbits: group C, fed regular chow; group DK fed a potassium deficient diet; and group HC fed a high cholesterol diet. The T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ relaxation times of psoas and soleus muscles were not significantly different for group C. Following dietary manipulation, (groups KD and HC), however, the relaxation times of the psoas and soleus muscles were significantly different. There was also a significant difference in water content of psoas muscles in groups KD and HC vs. group C but the observed differences in NMR results could be only partially accounted for by the shift in water content. The authors results suggest that (1) changes in ion or cholesterol concentration are capable of inducing changes in water bonding and structuring in muscle tissues; (2) diet must be added to the growing list of environmental factors that can cause NMR contrast changes; (3) selective use of muscles rich in one fiber type or another for NMR measurements could provide either control or diagnostic information, related to changes in body composition.

  2. A family of tetranuclear quinolinolate Dy(iii)-based single-molecule magnets: effects of periphery ligand replacement on their magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da; Tian, Yong-Mei; Sun, Wen-Bin; Li, Hong-Feng; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Yan, Peng-Fei

    2016-02-14

    Three complexes with formula {Dy(q)2(L)}2(μ3-OH)2{Dy(q)(L)}2(solvents) (where q = 8-quinolinolate; L = acetylacetone (acac) with (CH2Cl2)2 = solvent (1), 1,3-diphenyl-1,3-propanedione (DBM) and (CH2Cl2)2 = solvent (2), and hexafluoroacetylacetone (hfac) and CHCl3 = solvent (3)) were structurally and magnetically characterized. They have similar Dy4 structural cores bridged by N and O atoms from 8-quinolinolate, and only differ in the peripheral β-diketonate ligands. The variable-frequency and temperature alternating-current (ac) magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that complexes 1 and 2 display significant zero-field single-molecule-magnet (SMM) behavior, while complex 3 exhibits the field-induced SMM behavior, albeit they possess the nearly same primary coordination sphere. The ac susceptibility measurement on the diluted samples verified that their relaxation was of purely molecular origin, and their distinct slow magnetic behaviors were related to the replacement of the peripheral β-diketonate ligand, which is responsible for their different individual Dy(iii) ions' magnetic anisotropy and intramolecular coupling, as confirmed by ab initio calculation. PMID:26744071

  3. Suppressing of slow magnetic relaxation in tetracoordinate Co(II) field-induced single-molecule magnet in hybrid material with ferromagnetic barium ferrite.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The novel field-induced single-molecule magnet based on a tetracoordinate mononuclear heteroleptic Co(II) complex involving two heterocyclic benzimidazole (bzi) and two thiocyanido ligands, [Co(bzi)2(NSC)2], (CoL4), was prepared and thoroughly characterized. The analysis of AC susceptibility data resulted in the spin reversal energy barrier U = 14.7 cm(-1), which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction, U(theor). = 20.2 cm(-1), based on axial zero-field splitting parameter D = -10.1 cm(-1) fitted from DC magnetic data. Furthermore, mutual interactions between CoL4 and ferromagnetic barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BaFeO) in hybrid materials resulted in suppressing of slow relaxation of magnetization in CoL4 for 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 mass ratios of CoL4 and BaFeO despite the lack of strong magnetic interactions between two magnetic phases. PMID:26039085

  4. Suppressing of slow magnetic relaxation in tetracoordinate Co(II) field-induced single-molecule magnet in hybrid material with ferromagnetic barium ferrite

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Ivan; Herchel, Radovan; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The novel field-induced single-molecule magnet based on a tetracoordinate mononuclear heteroleptic Co(II) complex involving two heterocyclic benzimidazole (bzi) and two thiocyanido ligands, [Co(bzi)2(NSC)2], (CoL4), was prepared and thoroughly characterized. The analysis of AC susceptibility data resulted in the spin reversal energy barrier U = 14.7 cm−1, which is in good agreement with theoretical prediction, Utheor. = 20.2 cm−1, based on axial zero-field splitting parameter D = −10.1 cm−1 fitted from DC magnetic data. Furthermore, mutual interactions between CoL4 and ferromagnetic barium ferrite BaFe12O19 (BaFeO) in hybrid materials resulted in suppressing of slow relaxation of magnetization in CoL4 for 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1 mass ratios of CoL4 and BaFeO despite the lack of strong magnetic interactions between two magnetic phases. PMID:26039085

  5. The Effect of Crystal Packing and ReIV Ions on the Magnetisation Relaxation of [Mn6]-Based Molecular Magnets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Cano, Joan; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Brechin, Euan K

    2015-01-01

    The energy barrier to magnetisation relaxation in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) proffers potential technological applications in high-density information storage and quantum computation. Leading candidates amongst complexes of 3d metals ions are the hexametallic family of complexes of formula [Mn6O2(R-sao)6(X)2(solvent)y] (saoH2=salicylaldoxime; X=mono-anion; y=4–6; R=H, Me, Et, and Ph). The recent synthesis of cationic [Mn6][ClO4]2 family members, in which the coordinating X ions were replaced with non-coordinating anions, opened the gateway to constructing families of novel [Mn6] salts in which the identity and nature of the charge balancing anions could be employed to alter the physical properties of the complex. Herein we demonstrate initial experiments to show that this is indeed possible. By replacing the diamagnetic ClO4− anions with the highly anisotropic ReIV ion in the form of [ReIVCl6]2−, the energy barrier to magnetisation relaxation is increased by up to 30 %. PMID:25951415

  6. Magnetic flux reconstruction methods for shaped tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Chi-Wa

    1993-12-01

    The use of a variational method permits the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to be solved by reducing the problem of solving the 2D non-linear partial differential equation to the problem of minimizing a function of several variables. This high speed algorithm approximately solves the GS equation given a parameterization of the plasma boundary and the current profile (p` and FF` functions). The author treats the current profile parameters as unknowns. The goal is to reconstruct the internal magnetic flux surfaces of a tokamak plasma and the toroidal current density profile from the external magnetic measurements. This is a classic problem of inverse equilibrium determination. The current profile parameters can be evaluated by several different matching procedures. Matching of magnetic flux and field at the probe locations using the Biot-Savart law and magnetic Green`s function provides a robust method of magnetic reconstruction. The matching of poloidal magnetic field on the plasma surface provides a unique method of identifying the plasma current profile. However, the power of this method is greatly compromised by the experimental errors of the magnetic signals. The Casing Principle provides a very fast way to evaluate the plasma contribution to the magnetic signals. It has the potential of being a fast matching method. The performance of this method is hindered by the accuracy of the poloidal magnetic field computed from the equilibrium solver. A flux reconstruction package has been implemented which integrates a vacuum field solver using a filament model for the plasma, a multi-layer perception neural network as an interface, and the volume integration of plasma current density using Green`s functions as a matching method for the current profile parameters. The flux reconstruction package is applied to compare with the ASEQ and EFIT data. The results are promising.

  7. Ferromagnetic interactions and slow magnetic relaxation behaviors of two lanthanide coordination polymers bridged by 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ming; Li, Xiuhua; Cui, Ping; Zhao, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Two lanthanide-based frameworks: {Ln(phen)(NDA)1.5(H2O)}n (Ln=Gd(1), NDA=2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate anion, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), and {[Dy(phen)(NDA)1.5]·0.5H2NDA}n (2) were structurally and magnetically characterized. Compound 1 exhibits 2D layer structure, belonging to the triclinic system with space group P-1, while compound 2 features a 3D framework with space group P-1. The magnetic studies revealed that ferromagnetic coupling existed between adjacent lanthanide ions in 1 and 2, and frequency-dependence out-of-phase signals in the measurement of alternate-current susceptibilities were observed for 2, albeit without reaching the characteristic maxima above 2 K, implying slow magnetic relaxation behavior in 2. After the application of a dc field, good peak shapes of ac signal were obtained and got the energy barrier ΔE/kB=29 K and the pre-exponential factor τ0=4.47×10-7 s at 2000 Oe field; and when the dc field was in 5000 Oe, giving ΔE/kB=40 K and τ0=2.82×10-6.

  8. Observation of anomalously long relaxation phenomena in Pb 3BiS x thin films under pulsed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, I.; Yasuda, T.

    1998-04-01

    We report the observation of very long relaxation time under pulsed magnetic fields of 0.15-1.3 kG for the Pb3BiS x thin films ( x=2.0-3.0) biased at a certain current at liquid helium temperatures below 4.2 K. Both the superconducting ( x=2.0, 2.5, 2.7) and nonsuperconducting ( x=3.0) films exhibit the novel phenomena. They develop with reducing bath temperature below 4.2 K. The response time to a pulsed magnetic field ranges from a few seconds to a few tens of seconds much greater than those expected from the conventional microscopic lifetimes in the solid. The observed pulse shape is quite asymmetric, and the rise time is longer than the fall time. It strongly depends on the amplitude of magnetic field, but it weakly depends on the sulfur concentration x. The discussion is given in connection with the possible formation of quasilocal states of charge carriers separated from the band states by a barrier.

  9. Theory of NMR 1 /T1 relaxation in a quantum spin nematic in an applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerald, Andrew; Shannon, Nic

    2016-05-01

    There is now strong theoretical evidence that a wide range of frustrated magnets should support quantum spin-nematic order in an applied magnetic field. Nonetheless, the fact that spin-nematic order does not break time-reversal symmetry makes it very difficult to detect in experiment. In this article, we continue the theme begun in Phys. Rev. B 88, 184430 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.184430, of exploring how spin-nematic order reveals itself in the spectrum of spin excitations. Building on an earlier analysis of inelastic neutron scattering [Phys. Rev. B 91, 174402 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.174402], we show how the NMR 1 /T1 relaxation rate could be used to identify a spin-nematic state in an applied magnetic field. We emphasize the characteristic universal features of 1 /T1 using a symmetry-based description of the spin-nematic order parameter and its fluctuations. Turning to the specific case of spin-1/2 frustrated ferromagnets, we show that the signal from competing spin-wave excitations can be suppressed through a judicious choice of nuclear site and field direction. As a worked example, we show how 31P NMR in the square lattice frustrated ferromagnet BaCdVO (PO4)2 is sensitive to spin-nematic order.

  10. RELAXATION OF MAGNETIC FIELD RELATIVE TO PLASMA DENSITY REVEALED FROM MICROWAVE ZEBRA PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Sijie; Yan Yihua; Tan Baolin E-mail: yyh@nao.cas.cn

    2012-12-20

    It is generally considered that the emission of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures requires high density and high temperature, which is similar to the situation of the flaring region where primary energy is released. Therefore, a parameter analysis of ZPs may reveal the physical conditions of the flaring source region. This work investigates the variations of 74 microwave ZP structures observed by the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou) at 2.6-3.8 GHz in nine solar flares, and we find that the ratio between the plasma density scale height L{sub N} and the magnetic field scale height L{sub B} in emission sources displays a tendency to decrease during the flaring processes. The ratio L{sub N} /L{sub B} is about 3-5 before the maximum of flares. It decreases to about 2 after the maximum. The detailed analysis of three typical X-class flares implies that the variation of L{sub N} /L{sub B} during the flaring process is most likely due to topological changes of the magnetic field in the flaring source region, and the stepwise decrease of L{sub N} /L{sub B} possibly reflects the magnetic field relaxation relative to the plasma density when the flaring energy is released. This result may also constrain solar flare modeling to some extent.

  11. Geometric Magnetic Frustration in Li3Mg2OsO6 Studied with Muon Spin Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, J. P.; Derakhshan, S.; Greedan, J. E.

    Geometric frustration manifests when the spatial arrangement of ions inhibits magnetic order. Typically associated with antiferromagnetically (AF)-correlated moments on triangular or tetrahedral lattices, frustration occurs in a variety of structures and systems, resulting in rich phase diagrams and exotic ground states. As a window to exotic physics revealed by the cancellation of normally dominant interactions, the research community has taken great interest in frustrated systems. One family of recent interest are the rock-salt ordered oxides A5BO6, in which the B sites are occupied by magnetic ions comprising a network of interlocked tetrahedra, and nonmagnetic ions on the A sites control the B oxidation state through charge neutrality. Here we will discuss studies of Li3Mg2OsO6 using muon spin relaxation (μSR), a highly sensitive local probe of magnetism. Previous studies of this family included Li5OsO6, which exhibits AF order below 50K with minimal evidence for frustration, and Li4MgReO6, which exhibits glassy magnetism. Li3Mg2RuO6, meanwhile, exhibits long-range AF, with the ordering temperature suppressed by frustration. But its isoelectronic twin, Li3Mg2OsO6 (5d3 vs. 4d3) exhibits very different behavior, revealed by μSR to be a glassy ground state below 12K. Understanding why such similar systems exhibit diverse ground-state behavior is key to understanding the nature of geometric magnetic frustration. Financial support from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  12. Static magnetic ordering of CeCu2.1Si2 found by muon spin relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Kossler, W. J.; Yu, X. H.; Schone, H. E.; Kempton, J. R.; Stronach, C. E.; Barth, S.; Gygax, F. N.; Hitti, B.; Schenck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Zero- and longitudinal-field muon spin relaxation measurements on a polycrystal sample of a heavy fermion superconductor CeCu2.1 Si2 (T(c) = 0.7 K) have revealed an onset of static magnetic ordering below T approximately 0.8 K. The line shapes of the observed spectra in zero field indicate a wide distribution of static random local fields at muon sites, suggesting that the ordering is either spin glass or incommensurate spin-density-wave state. The observed width of the random local field at T = 0.05 K corresponds to a small averaged static moment of the order of 0.1 micro-B per formula unit.

  13. Magnetic correlations in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 from NQR relaxation and specific heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsa, F.; Rigamonti, A.

    1991-01-01

    La-139 and Cu-63 Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) relaxation measurements in La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO4 for x ranging from 0 up to 0.3, with particular emphasis on the effect of doping on the Cu(2+) magnetic correlations and dynamics, are reviewed. In the low doping limit, x less than or equal to 0.05, the results can be interpreted consistently in terms of a simple phenomenological 'two-fluids' model whereby the effect of thermally-activated mobile O(2p) holes is the one of disrupting locally the Cu(2+) spin correlations. For x greater than or equal to 0.1, the results indicate the onset, as T approaches T(sub c)(+), of a strong coupling between Cu(2+) spins and the Fermi liquid of O(2p) holes leading to the apparent disappearance of localized Cu(2+) moment in connection with the opening of a superconducting gap.

  14. Structure–Redox–Relaxivity Relationships for Redox Responsive Manganese-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A library of 10 Mn-containing complexes capable of switching reversibly between the Mn(II) and Mn(III) oxidation states was prepared and evaluated for potential usage as MRI reporters of tissue redox activity. We synthesized N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-N,N′,N′-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HBET) and N-(2-hydroxybenzyl-N,N′,N′-trans-1,2-cyclohexylenediaminetriacetic acid (CyHBET) ligands functionalized (−H, −OMe, −NO2) at the 5-position of the aromatic ring. The Mn(II) complexes of all ligands and the Mn(III) complexes of the 5-H and 5-NO2 functionalized ligands were synthesized and isolated, but the Mn(III) complexes with the 5-OMe functionalized ligands were unstable. 1H relaxivity of the 10 isolable complexes was measured at pH 7.4 and 37 °C, 1.4 T. Thermodynamic stability, pH-dependent complex speciation, hydration state, water exchange kinetics of the Mn(II) complexes, and pseudo-first order reduction kinetics of the Mn(III) complexes were studied using a combination of pH-potentiometry, UV–vis spectroscopy, and 1H and 17O NMR measurements. The effects of ligand structural and electronic modifications on the Mn(II/III) redox couple were studied by cyclic voltammetry. The Mn(II) complexes are potent relaxation agents as compared to the corresponding Mn(III) species with [MnII(CyHBET)(H2O)]2– exhibiting a 7.5-fold higher relaxivity (3.3 mM–1 s–1) than the oxidized form (0.4 mM–1 s–1). At pH 7.4, Mn(II) exists as a mixture of fully deprotonated (ML) and monoprotonated (HML) complexes and Mn(II) complex stability decreases as the ligands become more electron-releasing (pMn for 10 μM [MnII(CyHBET–R′)(H2O)]2– decreases from 7.6 to 6.2 as R′ goes from −NO2 to −OMe, respectively). HML speciation increases as the electron-releasing nature of the phenolato-O donor increases. The presence of a water coligand is maintained upon conversion from HML to ML, but the water exchange rate of ML is faster by up to 2 orders of magnitude (kex310 for

  15. The Search for Magnetic Order in delta-Pu metal using muon spin relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R; Ohishi, K; Fluss, M; Morris, G; MacLaughlin, D; Shu, L; Chung, B; McCall, S; Bauer, E; Sarrao, J; Ito, T; Higemoto, W

    2006-10-16

    We review results from previous muon spin relaxation ({mu}SR) measurements in applied fields of H{sub 0} = 0 and 0.25 T which established an upper limit for the ordered or disordered frozen spin moment above T = 4 K in {delta}-Pu (4.3 at. % Ga) of {micro}{sub ord} {le} 10{sup -3} {mu}{sub B}. In addition, we present new data in H{sub 0} = 0.25 T and 2 T applied field on a highly annealed {delta}-Pu (4.3 at. % Ga) sample. Neither the muon Knight shift (H{sub 0} = 2 T) nor the inhomogeneous linewidths in the new sample show appreciable temperature dependence below about T = 60 K, also consistent with no spin freezing. Recent theoretical arguments advanced to explain these results are mentioned.

  16. Formation and Relaxation of Two-Dimensional Vortex Crystals in a Magnetized Pure-Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kiwamoto, Y.; Hashizume, N.; Soga, Y.; Aoki, J.; Kawai, Y.

    2007-09-14

    Systematic examinations are carried out experimentally about the contribution of background vorticity distributions (BGVD's) to the spontaneous formation and decay of ordered arrays (vortex crystals) composed of strong vortices (clumps) by using a pure-electron plasma. It is found that the BGVD level needs to be higher for an increasing number of clumps to form vortex crystals and that the number of the clumps constituting the crystal decreases in time as {proportional_to}{gamma}lnt in contrast to {proportional_to}t{sup -{xi}} with {xi}{approx_equal}1 as accepted well in turbulence models. The decay rate {gamma} increases with the BGVD level. The observed configurations of the clumps cover the theoretically predicted catalogue of vortex arrays in superfluid helium, suggesting a possible relaxation path of the crystal states.

  17. Broadband alternating current magnetic susceptibility: Method and application to the characterization of magnetic particles in igneous rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, K.

    2012-12-01

    Low-field alternating current magnetic susceptibility (MS) is among the most commonly used magnetic property, not only in rock and mineral magnetism but also in environmental magnetism studies. This study proposes a new rock magnetic method, Frequency Spectrum of MS (FSM), based on the measurement of the real component of MS over a wide range of frequency (100 Hz to 500 kHz) and the measurement of the imaginary component at high frequencies in the order of 10-102 kHz. This study presents the FSM results at room and low temperatures obtained from a variety of igneous rocks with SP to SD grain sizes, including acidic to basic volcanic rocks in Japan and a basalt in Hawaii. The FSMs from the andesite samples at room temperature unexceptionally show small but anomalous increase, as much as 5%, over a specific frequency interval between 10 kHz and 120 kHz. In contrast, FSMs of basalts from Oshima and Hawaii show no such peak, a typical pattern indicating the presence of SP grain ensembles. The anomalous FSM from the andesites suggests a new rock and mineral magnetic behavior indicating either magnetic resonance or magnetic relaxation. Considering the anomalous FSM patterns and their variations at low temperatures, it is suggested that the hypothetical resonance could be relevant to some magnetoelastic phenomenon, in which magnetic energy could be dissipated through a long-range, magnetostructural coupling, most likely, magnetostriction. The fact that the annealed andesite samples showed less developed FSM anomaly strongly supports this hypothesis, because annealing generally lowers the internal stress leading to the reduction of resistance in a forced oscillation system. Analyses of the low temperature results confirm magnetic relaxation phenomena taking place at low temperatures, and consequently support the above interpretation.

  18. Electric Potential Surrounding Two Conducting Spheres: An Exercise for Advancing Student Understanding of the Method of Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Hugh; Chartrand, Bridget; Beach, John

    2016-03-01

    In undergraduate computational physics courses, the method of relaxation provides a well-established technique for obtaining solutions to Laplace's Equation. The technique's value stems from its accessibility and clear dependence on the properties of solutions to Laplace's Equation. We have created an exercise that allows students to develop an experiential understanding of the method of images and its connection to the properties of solutions to Laplace's Equation. The problem of two conducting spheres separated by a relatively small distance and maintained at fixed but distinct electric potentials is considered. Using the method of relaxation, students solve the problem in two-dimensions, three-dimensions with a Dirichlet condition on the outer boundary and three-dimensions using a Neumann condition on the outer boundary. At each step, the results are compared to a solution obtained using the method of images for a spherical conductor in an iterative fashion. Through this comparison, students gain insight into the significance of their choices for the solving the problem using the method of relaxation. We will discuss application of the relaxation method to this problem, validation by the method of images, and potential use in an undergraduate computational physics course.

  19. Measurements of Heme Relaxation and Ligand Recombination in Strong Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Ye, Xiong; Yu, Anchi; Champion, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Heme cooling signals and diatomic ligand recombination kinetics are measured in strong magnetic fields (up to 10 Tesla). We examined diatomic ligand recombination to heme model compounds (NO and CO), myoglobin (NO and O2), and horseradish peroxidase (NO). No magnetic field induced rate changes in any of the samples were observed within the experimental detection limit. However, in the case of CO binding to heme in glycerol and O2 binding to myoglobin, we observe a small magnetic field dependent change in the early time amplitude of the optical response that is assigned to heme cooling. One possibility, consistent with this observation, is that there is a weak magnetic field dependence of the non-radiative branching ratio into the vibrationally hot electronic ground state during CO photolysis. Ancillary studies of the “spin-forbidden” CO binding reaction in a variety of heme compounds in the absence of magnetic field demonstrate a surprisingly wide range for the Arrhenius prefactor. We conclude that CO binding to heme is not always retarded by unfavorable spin selection rules involving a double spin-flip superexchange mechanism. In fact, it appears that the small prefactor (~109s−1) found for CO rebinding to Mb may be anomalous, rather than the general rule for heme-CO rebinding. These results point to unresolved fundamental issues that underlie the theory of heme-ligand photolysis and rebinding. PMID:19588986

  20. Solution of Ambrosio-Tortorelli model for image segmentation by generalized relaxation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambra, Pasqua; Tartaglione, Gaetano

    2015-03-01

    Image segmentation addresses the problem to partition a given image into its constituent objects and then to identify the boundaries of the objects. This problem can be formulated in terms of a variational model aimed to find optimal approximations of a bounded function by piecewise-smooth functions, minimizing a given functional. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are a set of two coupled elliptic partial differential equations with varying coefficients. Numerical solution of the above system often relies on alternating minimization techniques involving descent methods coupled with explicit or semi-implicit finite-difference discretization schemes, which are slowly convergent and poorly scalable with respect to image size. In this work we focus on generalized relaxation methods also coupled with multigrid linear solvers, when a finite-difference discretization is applied to the Euler-Lagrange equations of Ambrosio-Tortorelli model. We show that non-linear Gauss-Seidel, accelerated by inner linear iterations, is an effective method for large-scale image analysis as those arising from high-throughput screening platforms for stem cells targeted differentiation, where one of the main goal is segmentation of thousand of images to analyze cell colonies morphology.

  1. Reprint of Solution of Ambrosio-Tortorelli model for image segmentation by generalized relaxation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambra, Pasqua; Tartaglione, Gaetano

    2015-04-01

    Image segmentation addresses the problem to partition a given image into its constituent objects and then to identify the boundaries of the objects. This problem can be formulated in terms of a variational model aimed to find optimal approximations of a bounded function by piecewise-smooth functions, minimizing a given functional. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are a set of two coupled elliptic partial differential equations with varying coefficients. Numerical solution of the above system often relies on alternating minimization techniques involving descent methods coupled with explicit or semi-implicit finite-difference discretization schemes, which are slowly convergent and poorly scalable with respect to image size. In this work we focus on generalized relaxation methods also coupled with multigrid linear solvers, when a finite-difference discretization is applied to the Euler-Lagrange equations of Ambrosio-Tortorelli model. We show that non-linear Gauss-Seidel, accelerated by inner linear iterations, is an effective method for large-scale image analysis as those arising from high-throughput screening platforms for stem cells targeted differentiation, where one of the main goal is segmentation of thousand of images to analyze cell colonies morphology.

  2. New analysis of the small-angle-magnetization-rotation method for magnetostriction measurements on amorphous ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, A. M.; Missell, F. P.

    1987-09-01

    The small-angle-magnetization-rotation (SAMR) method for measuring the saturation magnetostrictin λ s has been reanalyzed, taking into account the underlying domain structure of the amorphous ribbon. Although the condition for determining λ s reamins unchenged, the modifications introduced allow one to understand many additional features of the experimental data. With the appropriate modifications, the SAMR method can be used to study stress relaxation in amorphous alloys. Examples are given Fe-based and Co-based alloys.

  3. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-03-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection processes.

  4. Historic Methods for Capturing Magnetic Field Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    I investigated two late 19th-century methods for capturing magnetic field images from iron filings for historical insight into the pedagogy of hands-on physics education methods, and to flesh out teaching and learning practicalities tacit in the historical record. Both methods offer opportunities for close sensory engagement in data-collection…

  5. Bis-phenoxido and bis-acetato bridged heteronuclear {Co(III)Dy(III)} single molecule magnets with two slow relaxation branches.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Susanta; Titiš, Ján; Valigura, Dušan; Boča, Roman; Mohanta, Sasankasekhar

    2016-04-25

    Two bis-μ-phenoxido-bis-μ-acetato heterobimetallic {Co(III)Dy(III)} complexes and , formulated as [Co(III)Dy(III)L(μ-OAc)2(NO3)2] derived from the comparable hexadentate Schiff bases N,N'-ethylenebis(3-ethoxysalicylaldimine) and N,N'-ethylenebis(3-methoxysalicylaldimine) were synthesized and X-ray structure analysis confirms their nearly identical structures. These are the first examples of bis(μ-phenoxido)-bis(μ-carboxylato) {Co(III)Dy(III)} systems. The AC susceptibility measurements show that both complexes exhibit a field-induced slow magnetic relaxation with two relaxation branches. While the high-frequency process spans the usual range of the relaxation time for analogous single molecule magnets (τ0 ∼ 10(-7) s), the low-frequency branch is as slow as τ ∼ 0.1 s at T = 1.9 K and B = 0.2 T. PMID:27046444

  6. Ionothermal synthesis of two oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains with slow magnetization relaxation by using a deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Liu, Jun-Liang; Zhang, Ze-Min; Lin, Wei-Quan; Lin, Zhuo-Jia; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2013-09-28

    Two novel isostructural oxalate-bridged lanthanide(III) chains, (choline)[Ln(ox)(H2O)3Cl]Cl·H2O (Ln = Dy/Er), were first obtained ionothermally by using a choline chloride-oxalic acid eutectic mixture as both solvent and structure-directing agent, both of which show field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization. PMID:23903323

  7. Ferromagnetic coupling mediated by Coπ non-covalent contacts in a pentacoordinate Co(ii) compound showing field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization.

    PubMed

    Nemec, I; Herchel, R; Trávníček, Z

    2016-08-01

    [Co(II)(dpt)(NCS)2], where dpt = bis(3-aminopropyl)amine, was identified as a pentacoordinate Co(II) compound showing field-induced slow relaxation of magnetization. Furthermore, intermolecular ferromagnetic coupling mediated by Coπ non-covalent contacts, where π orbitals originate from the thiocyanato ligand, is reported for the first time. PMID:27435418

  8. Field and dilution effects on the magnetic relaxation behaviours of a 1D dysprosium(iii)-carboxylate chain built from chiral ligands.

    PubMed

    Han, Tian; Leng, Ji-Dong; Ding, You-Song; Wang, Yanyan; Zheng, Zhiping; Zheng, Yan-Zhen

    2015-08-14

    A one-dimensional dysprosium(iii)-carboxylate chain in which the Dy(III) ions sit in a pseudo D(2d)-symmetry environment is synthesized and shows different slow magnetic relaxation behaviours depending on the field and dilution effects. Besides, the chiral ligand introduces the additional functions of the Cotton effect and polarization for this compound. PMID:26159885

  9. Magnetization relaxation, critical current density, and vortex dynamics in a Ba0.66K0.32BiO3 +δ single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jian; Deng, Qiang; Yang, Huan; Wang, Zhihe; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2015-06-01

    We have conducted extensive investigations on the magnetization and its dynamical relaxation on a Ba0.66K0.32BiO3 +δ single crystal. It is found that the magnetization-relaxation rate is rather weak compared to that in cuprate superconductors, indicating a higher collective vortex pinning potential (or activation energy), although the intrinsic pinning potential Uc is weaker. A detailed analysis leads to the following discoveries: (1) A second-peak effect on the magnetization-hysteresis loop was observed in a very wide temperature region, ranging from 2 to 24 K. Its general behavior is similar to that in YBa2Cu3O7 . (2) Associated with the second-peak effect, the magnetization-relaxation rate is inversely related to the transient superconducting current density Js, revealing a quite general and similar mechanism for the second-peak effect in many high-temperature superconductors. (3) A detailed analysis based on the collective creep model reveals a large glassy exponent μ and a small intrinsic pinning potential Uc. (4) Investigation on the volume pinning force density shows that the data can be scaled to the formula Fp∝bp(1-b ) q , with p =2.79 and q =3.14 , where b is the reduced magnetic field to the irreversible magnetic field. The maximum normalized pinning force density appears near b ≈0.47 . Finally, a vortex phase diagram is drawn to show the phase transitions or crossovers between different vortex phases.

  10. Long-Lasting and Efficient Tumor Imaging Using a High Relaxivity Polysaccharide Nanogel Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Chan, Minnie; Lux, Jacques; Nishimura, Tomoki; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Almutairi, Adah

    2015-09-14

    Clinically approved small-molecule magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents are all rapidly cleared from the body and offer weak signal enhancement. To avoid repeated administration of contrast agent and improve signal-to-noise ratios, agents with stronger signal enhancement and better retention in tumors are needed. Therefore, we focused on hydrogels because of their excellent water accessibility and biodegradability. Gadolinium (Gd)-chelating cross-linkers were incorporated into self-assembled pullulan nanogels to both impart magnetic properties and to stabilize this material that has been extensively studied for medical applications. We show that these Gd-chelating pullulan nanogels (Gd-CHPOA) have the highest reported relaxivity for any hydrogel-based particles and accumulate in the 4T1 tumors in mice at high levels 4 h after injection. This combination offers high signal enhancement and lasts up to 7 days to delineate the tumor clearly for longer imaging time scales. Importantly, this long-term accumulation does not cause any damage or toxicity in major organs up to three months after injection. Our work highlights the clinical potential of Gd-CHPOA as a tumor-imaging MRI contrast agent, permitting tumor identification and assessment with a high signal-to-background ratio. PMID:26278775

  11. Turbulence in Toroidally Confined Plasma: Ion - - Gradient-Driven Turbulence; Dynamics of Magnetic Relaxation in Current-Carrying Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyung Su.

    This thesis is devoted to two studies of low-frequency turbulence in toroidally confined plasma. Low-frequency turbulence is believed to play an important role in anomalous transport in toroidal confinement devices. The first study pertains the the development of an analytic theory of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence in tokamaks. Energy-conserving, renormalized spectrum equations are derived and solved in order to obtain the spectra of stationary ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence. Corrections to mixing-length estimates are calculated explicitly. The resulting anomalous ion thermal diffusivity is derived and is found to be consistent with experimentally-deduced ion thermal diffusivities. The associated electron thermal diffusivity, particle and heat-pinch velocities are also calculated. The effects of impurity gradients on saturated ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence are discussed and a related explanation of density profile steepening during Z-mode operation is proposed. The second study is devoted to the role of multiple helicity nonlinear interactions of tearing modes and dynamics of magnetic relaxation in a high-temperature current-carrying plasma. To extend the resistive MHD theory of magnetic fluctuations and dynamo activity observed in the reversed field pinch, the fluid equations for high-temperature regime are derived and basic nonlinear interaction mechanism and the effects of diamagnetic corrections to the MHD turbulence theory are studied for the case of fully developed, densely packed turbulence. Modifications to the MHD dynamo theory and anomalous thermal transport and confinement scaling predictions are examined.

  12. Elastic and anelastic relaxations accompanying magnetic ordering and spin-flop transitions in hematite, Fe2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oravova, Lucie; Zhang, Zhiying; Church, Nathan; Harrison, Richard J.; Howard, Christopher J.; Carpenter, Michael A.

    2013-03-01

    Hematite, Fe2O3, provides in principle a model system for multiferroic (ferromagnetic/ferroelastic) behavior at low levels of strain coupling. The elastic and anelastic behavior associated with magnetic phase transitions in a natural polycrystalline sample have therefore been studied by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) in the temperature range from 11 to 1072 K. Small changes in softening and attenuation are interpreted in terms of weak but significant coupling of symmetry-breaking and non-symmetry-breaking strains with magnetic order parameters in the structural sequence R\\overline{3}c{1}^{\\prime}\\rightarrow C 2/c\\rightarrow R\\overline{3}c. The R\\overline{3}c{1}^{\\prime}\\rightarrow C 2/c transition at TN = 946 ± 1 K is an example of a multiferroic transition which has both ferromagnetic (from canting of antiferromagnetically ordered spin moments) and ferroelastic (rhombohedral → monoclinic) character. By analogy with the improper ferroelastic transition in Pb3(PO4)2, W and W‧ ferroelastic twin walls which are also 60° and 120° magnetic domain walls should develop. These have been tentatively identified from microstructures reported in the literature. The very low attenuation in the stability field of the C2/c structure in the polycrystalline sample used in the present study, in comparison with the strong acoustic dissipation reported for single crystal samples, implies, however, that the individual grains each consist of a single ferroelastic domain or that the twin walls are strongly pinned by grain boundaries. This absence of attenuation allows an intrinsic loss mechanism associated with the transition point to be seen and interpreted in terms of local coupling of shear strains with fluctuations which have relaxation times in the vicinity of ˜10-8 s. The first order C 2/c\\rightarrow R\\overline{3}c (Morin) transition occurs through a temperature interval of coexisting phases but the absence of an acoustic loss peak suggests that the

  13. MM-wave emission by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, I. A. Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burmasov, V. S.; Popov, S. S.; Postupaev, V. V.; Sklyarov, V. F.; Vyacheslavov, L. N.; Burdakov, A. V.; Sorokina, N. V.; Gavrilenko, D. E.; Kasatov, A. A.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Trunev, Yu. A.; Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Polosatkin, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    There are described electromagnetic spectra of radiation emitted by magnetized plasma during sub-relativistic electron beam in a double plasma frequency band. Experimental studies were performed at the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The electron beam had the following parameters: 70–110 keV for the electron energy, 1–10 MW for the beam power and 30–300 μs for its duration. The spectrum was measured in 75–230 GHz frequency band. The frequency of the emission follows variations in electron plasma density and magnetic field strength. The specific emission power on the length of the plasma column is estimated on the level 0.75 kW/cm.

  14. Current methods for synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Sima; Sehrig, Fatemeh Zeinali; Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Goloujeh, Mehdi Soleymani; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of different kinds of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) has attracted much attention. During the last few years, a large portion of the articles published about MNPs have described efficient routes to attain shape-controlled and highly stable MNPs with narrow size distribution. In this review, we have reported several popular methods including co-precipitation, microemulsion, thermal decomposition, solvothermal, sonochemical, microwave-assisted, chemical vapor deposition, combustion, carbon arc, and laser pyrolysis, for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:25435409

  15. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. The reorientation of t-butyl groups in butylated hydroxytoluene: A deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectral and relaxation time study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polson, James M.; Fyfe, J. D. Dean; Jeffrey, Kenneth R.

    1991-03-01

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times were determined in order to study the dynamics of t-butyl groups in butylated hydroxytoluene. The results are consistent with a model first proposed by Beckmann et al. [J. Magn. Reson. 36, 199 (1979)], where there is an inequivalence between the methyl groups within each t-butyl group. While two methyl groups reorient rapidly relative to the whole t-butyl rotation, the remaining methyl group is more restricted in its motion, reorienting at a rate comparable to that of the t-butyl group itself. The spin-lattice relaxation data show two T1 minima, the high temperature minimum (40 °C) corresponding to the combined t-butyl and ``slow'' methyl rotations, and the low temperature minimum corresponding to ``fast'' methyl group rotation. Using an explicitly defined T1 fitting function, the T1 data yield activation energies of 2.2 and 6.0 kcal/mol for the fast methyl and t-butyl rotations, respectively, both in agreement with Beckmann's values obtained from proton T1 experiments. It was also possible to simulate the low temperature deuterium NMR spectra from T=-160 °C to T=-80 °C using the aforementioned dynamical inequivalence between the t-butyl methyl groups. While the fast methyl group rotation was in the motional narrowing region for T>-160 °C, it was possible, from the simulations, to determine the t-butyl exchange rates to within 10%. The jump rates are remarkably close to the values predicted from the T1 results. Above -80 °C, the spectra could not be simulated, implying that a third motion must be present to further alter the high temperature line shapes. The effective axial asymmetry of the T>-20° spectra indicates that the additional motion involves a two site exchange.

  17. A finite difference method with periodic boundary conditions for simulations of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance experiments in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Greg; Harkins, Kevin D.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Trouard, Theodore P.

    2012-02-01

    A new finite difference (FD) method for calculating the time evolution of complex transverse magnetization in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy experiments is described that incorporates periodic boundary conditions. The new FD method relaxes restrictions on the allowable time step size employed in modeling which can significantly reduce computation time for simulations of large physical extent and allow for more complex, physiologically relevant, geometries to be simulated.

  18. Nuclear relaxation rates study of GTP(gamma F)-tubulin interaction using 19F-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, O

    1989-07-01

    To study the relationship between the exchangeable GTP binding site (E-site) and the high affinity metal binding site we synthesized P3-fluoro P1-5'-guanosine tripaosphate (GTP(gamma F), an analog of GTP. Our results show that this analog binds to the exchangeable GTP binding site of calf brain tubulin. The values of the dissociation constant and the stoichiometry of the GTP(gamma F)-Mn(II) complex as determined by EPR spectroscopy were 1.64 x 10(-4) M and one mole of manganese per mole of nucleotide, respectively. The distance separating the high-affinity binding site for the divalent metal ion and the exchangeable nucleotide binding site was evaluated by using high-resolution 19F-NMR. The 31P- and 19F-NMR spectra of GTP(gamma F) were studied, both the fluorine and the gamma-phosphate were split in a doublet with a coupling constant of 936 Hz. Tubulin purified by the method of Weisenberg (Weisenberg, R.C., and Timashef, S.N. (1970) Biochemistry 9, 4110-4116) was treated with colchicine to stabilize it, GTP(gamma F) was added and the 254.1 MHz 19fluorine relaxation rates measured within the first four hours. Longitudinal and transversal relaxation rates were determined in the presence of colchicine-tubulin-Mn(II), (paramagnetic complex), or the ternary complex with magnesium (diamagnetic complex). The analysis of the temperature-dependent relaxation data indicates that the metal and the exchangeable nucleotide binding sites are separated by a maximal distance of 6 at 35 degrees C, to 8.1 A at 12 degrees C. PMID:2619317

  19. Planar tetranuclear lanthanide clusters with the Dy4 analogue displaying slow magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Gass, Ian A; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S

    2011-12-21

    Two isostructural tetranuclear lanthanide clusters of general formula [Ln(III)(4)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(o-van)(4)(O(2)CC(CH(3))(3))(4)(NO(3))(2)]·CH(2)Cl(2)·1.5H(2)O (Ln = Gd (1) and Dy (2)) (o-van = 3-methoxysalicylaldehydato anion) are reported. The metallic cores of both complexes display a planar 'butterfly' arrangement. Magnetic studies show that both are weakly coupled, with 2 displaying probable SMM behaviour. PMID:22031449

  20. Prognostic Significance of Transverse Relaxation Rate (R2*) in Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Young; Ko, Eun Sook; Han, Boo-Kyung; Kim, Eun Ju; Kim, Sun Mi; Lim, Yaeji; Kim, Rock Bum

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and prognostic factors. Materials and Methods A total of 159 women with invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) sequence at 3 T. The distribution of the measured R2* values were analyzed, and the correlation between R2* and various prognostic factors (age, tumor size, histologic grade, lymphovascular invasion, and axillary lymph node status, as well as expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, p53, and Ki-67) were retrospectively assessed using patient medical records. Results The baseline R2* values of the IDCs were very heterogeneous with wide range among the patients. The mean R2* value was (32.8 ± 14.0) Hz with a median of 29.3 Hz (range 13.5–109.4 Hz). In multivariate analysis, older age was associated with decreased R2* value (P = 0.011) and IDCs with p53-overexpression showed higher R2* values than those without p53-overexpression group (P = 0.031). Other prognostic factors were not significantly correlated with R2* value. Conclusion In this study, R2* values were significantly correlated with age and expression of p53. Further studies are necessary to determine the prognostic value of BOLD-MRI. PMID:27384310

  1. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.

    2000-02-08

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: (a) forming a melt comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; (b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and (c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R{sub 2.1}Q{sub 13.9}B{sub 1}.

  2. Atomization methods for forming magnet powders

    DOEpatents

    Sellers, Charles H.; Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.

    2000-01-01

    The invention encompasses methods of utilizing atomization, methods for forming magnet powders, methods for forming magnets, and methods for forming bonded magnets. The invention further encompasses methods for simulating atomization conditions. In one aspect, the invention includes an atomization method for forming a magnet powder comprising: a) forming a melt comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; b) atomizing the melt to form generally spherical alloy powder granules having an internal structure comprising at least one of a substantially amorphous phase or a substantially nanocrystalline phase; and c) heat treating the alloy powder to increase an energy product of the alloy powder; after the heat treatment, the alloy powder comprising an energy product of at least 10 MGOe. In another aspect, the invention includes a magnet comprising R, Q, B, Z and X, wherein R is a rare earth element; X is an element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and mixtures thereof; Q is an element selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co and mixtures thereof; and Z is an element selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr, Hf and mixtures thereof; the magnet comprising an internal structure comprising R.sub.2.1 Q.sub.13.9 B.sub.1.

  3. Modified methods of stellar magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The standard methods of the magnetic field measurement, based on an analysis of the relation between the Stokes V-parameter and the first derivative of the total line profile intensity, were modified by applying a linear integral operator \\hat{L} to both sides of this relation. As the operator \\hat{L}, the operator of the wavelet transform with DOG-wavelets is used. The key advantage of the proposed method is an effective suppression of the noise contribution to the line profile and the Stokes parameter V. The efficiency of the method has been studied using model line profiles with various noise contributions. To test the proposed method, the spectropolarimetric observations of the A0 star α2 CVn, the Of?p star HD 148937, and the A0 supergiant HD 92207 were used. The longitudinal magnetic field strengths calculated by our method appeared to be in good agreement with those determined by other methods.

  4. A Dynamic Discrete Dislocation Plasticity Method for the Dimulation of Plastic Relaxation under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrutxaga-Lerma, Benat; Sutton, Adrian; Eakins, Daniel; Balint, Daniel; Dini, Daniele

    2013-06-01

    This talk intends to offer some insight as to how Discrete Dislocation Plasticity (DDP) can be adapted to simulate plastic relaxation processes under weak shock loading and high strain rates. In those circumstances, dislocations are believed to be the main cause of plastic relaxation in crystalline solids. Direct simulation of dislocations as the dynamic agents of plastic relaxation in those cases remains a challenge. DDP, where dislocations are modelled as discrete discontinuities in elastic continuum media, is often unable to adequately simulate plastic relaxation because it treats dislocation motion quasi-statically, thus neglecting the time-dependent nature of the elastic fields and assuming that they instantaneously acquire the shape and magnitude predicted by elastostatics. Under shock loading, this assumption leads to several artefacts that can only be overcome with a fully time-dependent formulation of the elastic fields. In this talk one of such formulations for the creation, annihilation and arbitrary motion of straight edge dislocations will be presented. These solutions are applied in a two-dimensional model of time-dependent plastic relaxation under shock loading, and some relevant results will be presented. EPSRC CDT in Theory and Simulation of Materials

  5. A nine-coordinated dysprosium(III) compound with an oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer exhibiting two slow magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Ke, Hongshan; Liu, Xiangyu; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping

    2015-10-21

    A 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) compound, formulated as [Dy(C2O4)1.5(H2O)3]n·2nH2O (1), has been hydrothermally isolated. As for compound 1, structural analysis reveals that the nine-coordinated Dy(III) ions reside in a slightly distorted tricapped trigonal prism. Under an applied magnetic field of 700 Oe, the compound was magnetically characterized as a new example that two slow relaxations of the magnetization processes can be observed in a 2D oxalate-bridged dysprosium(III) layer. PMID:26327427

  6. Critical fluctuations in DOPC/DPPC-d62/cholesterol mixtures: 2H magnetic resonance and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Davis, James H; Ziani, Latifa; Schmidt, Miranda L

    2013-07-28

    Static and magic angle spinning (MAS) (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments have been performed on a series of multilamellar dispersions of di-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/di-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-d62/cholesterol in water to investigate the compositional fluctuations which occur in the region of the line of critical points for this ternary system. The strong dependence of the MAS line widths on temperature, sample composition, and spinning rate provides a direct measure of the magnitude of the fluctuations in the (2)H quadrupolar Hamiltonian. These data are analyzed in terms of models for critical fluctuations in composition leading to a value for the critical index for the correlation length, ν(c) = 0.628, consistent with a three dimensional Ising model. PMID:23902029

  7. Relaxation and coherent oscillations in the spin dynamics of II-VI diluted magnetic quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, F.; Cygorek, M.; Tamborenea, P. I.; Axt, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    We study theoretically the ultrafast spin dynamics of II-VI diluted magnetic quantum wells in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. We extend a recent study where it was shown that the spin-orbit interaction and the exchange sd coupling in bulk and quantum wells can compete resulting in qualitatively new dynamics when they act simultaneously. We concentrate on Hg1-x-yMnxCdyTe quantum wells, which have a highly tunable Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our calculations use a recently developed formalism which incorporates electronic correlations originating from the exchange sd-coupling. We find that the dependence of electronic spin oscillations on the excess energy changes qualitatively depending on whether or not the spin-orbit interaction dominates or is of comparable strength with the sd interaction.

  8. Joint numerical microscale simulations of multiphase flow and NMR relaxation behavior in porous media using Lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Stiebler, M.; Klitzsch, N.

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a useful tool to estimate transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. However, as there is no unique relation between the NMR signal and these properties in rocks, a variety of empirical models on deriving hydraulic properties from NMR relaxometry data have been published. Complementary to laboratory measurements, this paper introduces a numerical framework to jointly simulate NMR relaxometry experiments and two-phase flow on the micrometer scale. Herein, the NMR diffusion equations were tied to an established Lattice Boltzmann algorithm used in computational fluid dynamics. The numerically simulated NMR data were validated for both surface-limited and diffusion-limited relaxation regimes using analytical solutions available for fully and partially water-saturated simple pore geometries. Subsequently, simulations were compiled using a complex pore space derived from three-dimensional computer tomography (CT) data of an unconsolidated sand and the results were compared to respective NMR T1 relaxometry data. The NMR transients simulated for different water saturations matched the measured data regarding initial amplitudes (i.e., porosity and saturation) and relaxation behavior (i.e., distribution of water-saturated pores). Thus, we provide a simulation tool that enables study of the influences of structural and physicochemical properties, such as pore connectivity and pore coupling, surface relaxivity, or diffusivity, on partially saturated porous media, e.g, rocks or soils, with NMR T1 relaxometry data.

  9. Ammonia synthesis using magnetic induction method (MIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitasari, P.; Razak, J. Abd; Yahya, N.

    2012-09-01

    The most challenging issues for ammonia synthesis is to get the high yield. New approach of ammonia synthesis by using Magnetic Induction Method (MIM) and the Helmholtz Coils has been proposed. The ammonia detection was done by using Kjeldahl Method and FTIR. The system was designed by using Autocad software. The magnetic field of MIM was vary from 100mT-200mT and the magnetic field for the Helmholtz coils was 14mT. The FTIR result shows that ammonia has been successfully formed at stretching peaks 1097,1119,1162,1236, 1377, and 1464 cm-1. UV-VIS result shows the ammonia bond at 195nm of wavelength. The ammonia yield was increase to 244.72μmole/g.h by using the MIM and six pairs of Helmholtz coils. Therefore this new method will be a new promising method to achieve the high yield ammonia at ambient condition (at 25δC and 1atm), under the Magnetic Induction Method (MIM).

  10. The search for negative amplitude components in quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times: the example of 1H magnetization exchange in articular cartilage and hydrated collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantazzini, Paola; Galassi, Francesca; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J. S.; Vittur, Franco

    2011-06-01

    When inverting nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation data in order to obtain quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times for fluids in porous media, it is common practice to impose a non-negative (NN) constraint on the distributions. While this approach can be useful in reducing the effects of data distortion and/or preventing wild oscillations in the distributions, it may give misleading results in the presence of real negative amplitude components. Here, some examples of valid negative components for articular cartilage and hydrated collagen are given. Articular cartilage is a connective tissue, consisting mainly of collagen, proteoglycans and water, which can be considered, in many aspects, as a porous medium. Separate T1 relaxation data are obtained for low-mobility ('solid') macromolecular 1H and for higher-mobility ('liquid') 1H by the separation of these components in free induction decays, with α denoting the solid/liquid 1H ratio. When quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times (T1) of the solid and liquid signal components of cartilage or collagen are computed from experimental relaxation data without imposing the usual NN constraint, valid negative peaks may appear. The features of the distributions, in particular negative peaks, and the fact that peaks at longer times for macromolecular and water protons are at essentially the same T1, are interpreted as the result of a magnetization exchange between these two spin pools. For the only-slightly-hydrated collagen samples, with α>1, the exchange leads to small negative peaks at short T1 times for the macromolecular component. However, for the cartilage, with substantial hydration or for a strongly hydrated collagen sample, both with αLt1, the behavior is reversed, with a negative peak for water at short times. The validity of a negative peak may be accepted (dismissed) by a high (low) cost of NN in error of fit. Computed distributions for simulated data using observed signal

  11. Reassessing the single relaxation time Lattice Boltzmann method for the simulation of Darcy’s flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestininzi, Pietro; Montessori, Andrea; La Rocca, Michele; Succi, Sauro

    2016-09-01

    It is shown that the single relaxation time (SRT) version of the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation permits to compute the permeability of Darcy’s flows in porous media within a few percent accuracy. This stands in contrast with previous claims of inaccuracy, which we relate to the lack of recognition of the physical dependence of the permeability on the Knudsen number.

  12. New method for predicting lifetime of seals from compression-stress relaxation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Keenan, M.R.; Wise, J.

    1998-06-01

    Interpretation of compression stress-relaxation (CSR) experiments for elastomers in air is complicated by (1) the presence of both physical and chemical relaxation and (2) anomalous diffusion-limited oxidation (DLO) effects. For a butyl material, the authors first use shear relaxation data to indicate that physical relaxation effects are negligible during typical high temperature CSR experiments. They then show that experiments on standard CSR samples ({approximately}15 mm diameter when compressed) lead to complex non-Arrhenius behavior. By combining reaction kinetics based on the historic basic autoxidation scheme with a diffusion equation appropriate to disk-shaped samples, they derive a theoretical DLO model appropriate to CSR experiments. Using oxygen consumption and permeation rate measurements, the theory shows that important DLO effects are responsible for the observed non-Arrhenius behavior. To minimize DLO effects, they introduce a new CSR methodology based on the use of numerous small disk samples strained in parallel. Results from these parallel, minidisk experiments lead to Arrhenius behavior with an activation energy consistent with values commonly observed for elastomers, allowing more confident extrapolated predictions. In addition, excellent correlation is noted between the CSR force decay and the oxygen consumption rate, consistent with the expectation that oxidative scission processes dominate the CSR results.

  13. Confined acoustic phonon-mediated spin relaxation in a twodimensional quantum dot in the presence of perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, K. A.; Vartanian, A. L.; Stepanyan, A. G.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The spin-relaxation time due to the electron-acoustic phonon scattering in GaAs quantum dots is studied after the exact diagonalization of the electron Hamiltonian with the spin-orbit coupling. It has been shown that in comparison with flexural phonons, the electron coupling with the dilatational phonons causes 3 orders faster spin relaxation. We have found that the relaxation rate of the spin-flip is an order of magnitude smaller than that of the spin- conserving.

  14. Gd-Complexes of New Arylpiperazinyl Conjugates of DTPA-Bis(amides): Synthesis, Characterization and Magnetic Relaxation Properties.

    PubMed

    Ba-Salem, Abdullah O; Ullah, Nisar; Shaikh, M Nasiruzzaman; Faiz, Mohamed; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Two new DTPA-bis(amide) based ligands conjugated with the arylpiperazinyl moiety were synthesized and subsequently transformed into their corresponding Gd(III) complexes 1 and 2 of the type [Gd(L)H2O]·nH2O. The relaxivity (R1) of these complexes was measured, which turned out to be comparable with that of Omniscan®, a commercially available MRI contrast agent. The cytotoxicity studies of these complexes indicated that they are non-toxic, which reveals their potential and physiological suitability as MRI contrast agents. All the synthesized ligands and complexes were characterized with the aid of analytical and spectroscopic methods, including elemental analysis, 1H-NMR, FT-IR, XPS and fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry. PMID:25939069

  15. Spin relaxation in disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzheparov, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A review is given on theoretical grounds and typical experimental appearances of spin dynamics and relaxation in solids containing randomly distributed nuclear and/or electronic spins. Brief content is as follows. Disordered and magnetically diluted systems. General outlines of the spin transport theory. Random walks in disordered systems (RWDS). Observable values in phase spin relaxation, free induction decay (FID). Interrelation of longitudinal and transversal relaxation related to dynamics of occupancies and phases. Occupation number representation for equations of motion. Continuum media approximation and inapplicability of moment expansions. Long-range transitions vs percolation theory. Concentration expansion as a general constructive basis for analytical methods. Scaling properties of propagators. Singular point. Dynamical and kinematical memory in RWDS. Ways of regrouping of concentration expansions. CTRW and semi-phenomenology. Coherent medium approximation for nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities. Combining of memory functions and cumulant expansions for calculation of FID. Path integral representations for RWDS. Numerical simulations of RWDS. Spin dynamics in magnetically diluted systems with low Zeeman and medium low dipole temperatures. Cluster expansions, regularization of dipole interactions and spectral dynamics.

  16. RECONSTRUCTION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD USING THE CESE-MHD METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang; Xiang, Changqing; Fan, Yuliang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: fanyuliang@bao.ac.cn

    2011-02-01

    We present a new implementation of the MHD relaxation method for reconstruction of the nearly force-free coronal magnetic field from a photospheric vector magnetogram. A new numerical MHD scheme is proposed to solve the full MHD equations by using the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element method. The bottom boundary condition is prescribed in a similar way as in the stress-and-relax method, by changing the transverse field incrementally to match the magnetogram, and other boundaries of the computational box are set by the nonreflecting boundary conditions. Applications to the well-known benchmarks for nonlinear force-free-field reconstruction, the Low and Lou force-free equilibria, validate the method and confirm its capability for future practical application, with observed magnetograms as inputs.

  17. Treatment motives as predictors of acquisition and transfer of relaxation methods to everyday life.

    PubMed

    Krampen, Günter; von Eye, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This article presents results from four studies of the significance of type and number of initial treatment motives for acquisition and transfer to everyday life of progressive relaxation (PR) and autogenic training (AT). On the basis of theories of treatment motivation and compliance, we hypothesize that motives for participation are determinants of learning and transfer. Results are reported from (1) two studies with 113 participants in introductory courses on AT and 94 participants in introductory courses on PR and (2) two replication studies with 94 (AT) and 101 participants (PR). Participants indicated their motives for participation. Short-term indicators of treatment success include number of dropouts and subjective evaluations of relaxation exercises; long-term outcomes include transfer of relaxation exercises to everyday life and evaluations of exercise evaluations at follow-up 3 to 6 months after the end of course. Results suggest that for both AT and PR, dropout and subjective relaxation exercise evaluations can be predicted from participation motives. Long-term outcomes can be predicted only for AT. However, for both PR and AT it is shown that for up to four motives, the number of initial course motives is correlated with short-term and long-term predictors of course outcome. We conclude that motivation for participation is highly relevant to client-course matching and adaptive indication of relaxation therapies. Results lead to a threshold hypothesis about the relationship between the number of participation motives and short-term as well as long-term learning and transfer outcome. PMID:16287150

  18. Study on the Calculation of Magnetic Force Based on the Equivalent Magnetic Charge Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangang; Tan, Qingchang; Zhang, Yongqi; Zhang, Kuo

    Magnetic drivers have been used widely in the pharmaceutical, chemical, petroleum, food and other industries with its perfect sealing without contact. Common method of calculating of the magnetic force are the Maxwell equations, empirical formulas, and he equivalent magnetic charge method as well. The Maxwell equations method is the most complicated and the empirical formulas method is the simplest with low accuracy. The equivalent magnetic charge method is simpler than the Maxwell equations method and more accurate than the empirical formulas method. In this paper, the magnetic force of the magnetic driver of reciprocate in line is calculated with the equivalent magnetic charge method and was compared with the experiment.

  19. Magnetic filtration process, magnetic filtering material, and methods of forming magnetic filtering material

    SciTech Connect

    Taboada-Serrano, Patricia; Tsouris, Constantino; Contescu, Cristian I; McFarlane, Joanna

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides magnetically responsive activated carbon, and a method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon. The method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon typically includes providing activated carbon in a solution containing ions of ferrite forming elements, wherein at least one of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +3 and at least a second of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +2, and increasing pH of the solution to precipitate particles of ferrite that bond to the activated carbon, wherein the activated carbon having the ferrite particles bonded thereto have a positive magnetic susceptibility. The present invention also provides a method of filtering waste water using magnetic activated carbon.

  20. New Methods of Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2015-04-01

    The standard methods of magnetic field measurements, based on the relation between the Stokes V parameter and the first derivative of the line profile intensity were modified by applying a linear integral transform to both sides of this relation. We used the wavelet integral transform with the DOG wavelets. The key advantage of the proposed method is the effective suppression of the noise contribution both to the line profile and the Stokes V parameter. To test the proposed method, spectropolarimetric observations of the young O star θ1 Ori C were used. We also demonstrate that the smoothed Time Variation Spectra (smTVS) can be used as a tool for detecting the local stellar magnetic fields.

  1. Magnetic Relaxation Switch Detecting Boric Acid or Borate Ester through One-Pot Synthesized Poly(vinyl alcohol) Functionalized Nanomagnetic Iron Oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guilong; Lu, Shiyao; Qian, Junchao; Zhong, Kai; Yao, Jianming; Cai, Dongqing; Cheng, Zhiliang; Wu, Zhengyan

    2015-08-01

    We developed a highly efficient magnetic relaxation switch (MRS) system based on poly(vinyl alcohol) functionalized nanomagnetic iron oxide (PVA@NMIO) particles for the detection of boric acid or borate ester (BA/BE). It was found that the addition of BA/BE induced the aggregation of PVA@NMIO particles, resulting in a measurable change in the T2 relaxation time in magnetic resonance measurements. The main mechanism was proposed that the electron-deficient boron atoms of BA/BE caused the aggregation of PVA@NMIO particles through covalent binding to the hydroxyl groups of PVA. This novel detection system displayed excellent selectivity, high sensitivity, and rapid detection for BA/BE. Thus, this system may provide a great application prospect for detection of BA/BE. PMID:26171794

  2. Tracking evolution of myoglobin stability in cetaceans using experimentally calibrated computational methods that account for generic protein relaxation.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jeppe; Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) from land to water is one of the most spectacular events in mammal evolution. It has been suggested that selection for higher myoglobin stability (∆G of folding) allowed whales to conquer the deep-diving niche. The stability of multi-site protein variants, including ancient proteins, is however hard to describe theoretically. From a compilation of experimental ∆∆G vs. ∆G we first find that protein substitutions are subject to large generic protein relaxation effects. Using this discovery, we develop a simple two-parameter model that predicts multi-site ∆∆G as accurately as standard methods do for single-site mutations and reproduces trends in contemporary myoglobin stabilities. We then apply this new method to the study of the evolution of Mb stability in cetaceans: With both methods the main change in stability (about 1kcal/mol) occurred very early, and stability was later relaxed in dolphins and porpoises, but was further increased in the sperm whales. This suggests that single proteins can affect whole organism evolution and indicates a role of Mb stability in the evolution of cetaceans. Transition to the deep-diving niche probably occurred already in the ancestor of contemporary baleen and toothed whales. In summary, we have discovered generic stability relaxation effects in proteins that, when incorporated into a simple model, improves the description of multi-site protein variants. PMID:27068539

  3. The solution of the relaxation problem for the Boltzmann equation by the integral iteration method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limar, Y. F.

    1972-01-01

    The Boltzmann equation is considered in terms of the problem of relaxation of some initial distribution function which depends only on velocities, to Maxwell's distribution function. The Boltzmann equation is given for the relaxation problem in which the distribution function f(t, u, v) is time dependent and is also dependent on two other variables u and v (the velocities of rigid spherical molecules). An iteration process is discussed in which the velocity space u, v is subdivided into squares, the distribution function in each square being approximated by the second-order surface from the values of the distribution function at nine points. The set of all of these points forms a network of u, v values at the nodes of which the distribution function can be found.

  4. Real Gas Computation Using an Energy Relaxation Method and High-Order WENO Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montarnal, Philippe; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we use a recently developed energy relaxation theory by Coquel and Perthame and high order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes to simulate the Euler equations of real gas. The main idea is an energy decomposition into two parts: one part is associated with a simpler pressure law and the other part (the nonlinear deviation) is convected with the flow. A relaxation process is performed for each time step to ensure that the original pressure law is satisfied. The necessary characteristic decomposition for the high order WENO schemes is performed on the characteristic fields based on the first part. The algorithm only calls for the original pressure law once per grid point per time step, without the need to compute its derivatives or any Riemann solvers. Both one and two dimensional numerical examples are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of this approach.

  5. Numerical methods for TVD transport and coupled relaxing processes in gases and plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1990-01-01

    The construction of second-order upwind schemes for nonequilibrium plasmas, for both one- and two-fluid formulations is demonstrated. Coupled relaxation processes, including ionization kinetics and radiative processes and their algorithms for nonequilibrium, multiple temperature conditions are described as well. The paper applies the numerical techniques on some simple test cases, points out critical problems and their solutions, and makes qualitative comparisons with known results, whenever possible.

  6. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-08-05

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  7. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  8. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap.

  9. Method for obtaining large levitation pressure in superconducting magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-10-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for compressing magnetic flux to achieve high levitation pressures. Magnetic flux produced by a magnetic flux source travels through a gap between two high temperature superconducting material structures. The gap has a varying cross-sectional area to compress the magnetic flux, providing an increased magnetic field and correspondingly increased levitation force in the gap. 4 figs.

  10. Apparatus and method for handling magnetic particles in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for handling magnetic particles suspended in a fluid, relying upon the known features of a magnetic flux conductor that is permeable thereby permitting the magnetic particles and fluid to flow therethrough; and a controllable magnetic field for the handling. The present invention is an improvement wherein the magnetic flux conductor is a monolithic porous foam.

  11. Yellow to greenish-blue colour-tunable photoluminescence and 4f-centered slow magnetic relaxation in a cyanido-bridged Dy(III)(4-hydroxypyridine)-Co(III) layered material.

    PubMed

    Chorazy, Szymon; Wang, Junhao; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-09-14

    A cyanido-bridged layered {[Dy(III)(4-OHpy)2(H2O)3][Co(III)(CN)6]}·0.5H2O (1) (4-OHpy = 4-hydroxypyridine) framework with dual photo-luminescence and magnetic properties was prepared. 1 exhibits visible emission whose color, yellow to greenish-blue, is switchable by selected wavelengths of UV excitation light. Magnetic data revealed that 1 shows not only the slow magnetic relaxation of a typical Dy(III) single-ion origin but also the relaxation process caused by the magnetic dipole-magnetic dipole interactions between the neighbouring Dy(III) centers. PMID:27523162

  12. Strain relaxation and enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenrui; Jiao, Liang; Li, Leigang; Jian, Jie; Khatkhatay, Fauzia; Chu, Frank; Chen, Aiping; Jia, Quanxi; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Wang, Haiyan

    2014-02-10

    Self-assembled BiFeO{sub 3}:CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (BFO:CFO) vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films have been fabricated on SrTiO{sub 3} (001) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. The strain relaxation mechanism between BFO and CFO with a large lattice mismatch has been studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared nanocomposite films exhibit enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as the BFO composition increases. Different anisotropy sources have been investigated, suggesting that spin-flop coupling between antiferromagnetic BFO and ferrimagnetic CFO plays a dominant role in enhancing the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy.

  13. Magnetic relaxation: Coal swelling, extraction, pore size. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Doetschman, D.C.; Mehlenbacher, R.C.; Ito, O.

    1993-11-01

    An electron spin and proton magnetic relaxation study is presented on the effects of the solvent extraction of coal on the macromolecular network of the coal and on the mobile molecular species that are initially within the coal. The eight Argonne Premium coals were extracted at room temperature with a 1:1 (v/v) N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP)-CS{sub 2} solvent mixture under an inert atmosphere. As much solvent as possible was removed from extract and residue by treatment under vacuum oven conditions ({approximately}10{sup {minus}2} torr at 145--150{degrees}C) until constant weight was achieved. The extraction, without further washing with other solvents, results in substantial uptake of NMP, apparently by H-bonding or acid-base interactions. The NMP uptake tends to be higher in coal matter with higher heteroatom (N,O,S) content and the NMP more tightly bound. The molecular material in the medium rank bituminous coals is more aromatic and heteroatom-poor than the macromolecular material and is mobilized by the extracting solvent. Likewise the more aromatic and heteroatom-poor molecular, free radicals are also extracted. However, mobilization of the molecular free radicals by solvent and the exposure of free radicals by the macromolecular matrix to solvent or species dissolved in the solvent, results in preferential reactions of the more aromatic and heteroatom-poor free radicals. Greater losses of extract free radicals, being the more aromatic, occur than residue free radicals. As a consequence, the surviving extract radicals exhibit a greater heteroatom content than the original whole coals, as determined from EPR g value changes.

  14. Flux Pinning Properties and Magnetic Relaxation of Superconducting SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, J. C.; Sun, Y.; Ding, Y.; Yuan, F. F.; Liu, J. T.; Shi, Z. X.; Li, X. W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic Co ion doped SmFeAsO polycrystal was synthesized via solid-state reaction. Resistivity, SEM and magnetic hysteresis loops (MHLs) were measured to investigate magnetic properties of the sample. Critical current densities as well as the flux pinning forces densities were estimated from MHLs. This paper reports for the first time the research of superconducting MHLs as well as magnetic relaxation properties of SmFe0.9Co0.1AsO. Results suggest that: (i) A tail effect in the resistivity measurement together with the rapid decrease in critical current densities at low fields shows the evidence for granularity of the sample; (ii) The asymmetry of the MHLs may be caused by the Bean-Livingstone (BL) surface pinning or granular nature, and none of theoretical models are suitable to the scaling behaviors of flux pinning forces densities; (iii) The anomalous tendency of the temperature dependence of magnetic relaxation rate as well as the effective pinning energy were observed, which may be attributed to the competition between the bulk pinning and the BL surface pinning.

  15. Imaging signatures of meningioma and low-grade glioma: a diffusion tensor, magnetization transfer and quantitative longitudinal relaxation time MRI study.

    PubMed

    Piper, Rory J; Mikhael, Shadia; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Laidlaw, David H; Whittle, Ian R; Bastin, Mark E

    2016-05-01

    Differentiation of cerebral tumor pathology currently relies on interpretation of conventional structural MRI and in some cases histology. However, more advanced MRI methods may provide further insight into the organization of cerebral tumors and have the potential to aid diagnosis. The objective of this study was to use multimodal quantitative MRI to measure the imaging signatures of meningioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). Nine adults with meningioma and 11 with LGG were identified, and underwent standard structural, quantitative longitudinal relaxation time (T1) mapping, magnetization transfer and diffusion tensor MRI. Maps of mean (〈D〉), axial (λAX) and radial (λRAD) diffusivity, fractional anisotropy (FA), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and T1 were generated on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Using structural and echo-planar T2-weighted MRI, manual region-of-interest segmentation of brain tumor, edema, ipsilateral and contralateral normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) was performed. Differences in imaging signatures between the different tissue types, both absolute mean values and ratios relative to contralateral NAWM, were assessed using t-tests with statistical significance set at p<0.05. For both absolute mean values and ratios relative to contralateral NAWM, there were significant differences in 〈D〉, λAX, λRAD, FA, MTR and T1 between meningioma and LGG tumor tissue, respectively. Only T1 and FA differed significantly between edematous tissue associated with the two tumor types. These results suggest that multimodal MRI biomarkers are significantly different, particularly in tumor tissue, between meningioma and LGG. By using quantitative multimodal MRI it may be possible to identify tumor pathology non-invasively. PMID:26708035

  16. Magnetic irreversibility: An important amendment in the zero-field-cooling and field-cooling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira Dias, Fábio; das Neves Vieira, Valdemar; Esperança Nunes, Sabrina; Pureur, Paulo; Schaf, Jacob; Fernanda Farinela da Silva, Graziele; de Paiva Gouvêa, Cristol; Wolff-Fabris, Frederik; Kampert, Erik; Obradors, Xavier; Puig, Teresa; Roa Rovira, Joan Josep

    2016-02-01

    The present work reports about experimental procedures to correct significant deviations of magnetization data, caused by magnetic relaxation, due to small field cycling by sample transport in the inhomogeneous applied magnetic field of commercial magnetometers. The extensively used method for measuring the magnetic irreversibility by first cooling the sample in zero field, switching on a constant applied magnetic field and measuring the magnetization M(T) while slowly warming the sample, and subsequently measuring M(T) while slowly cooling it back in the same field, is very sensitive even to small displacement of the magnetization curve. In our melt-processed YBaCuO superconducting sample we observed displacements of the irreversibility limit up to 7 K in high fields. Such displacements are detected only on confronting the magnetic irreversibility limit with other measurements, like for instance zero resistance, in which the sample remains fixed and so is not affected by such relaxation. We measured the magnetic irreversibility, Tirr(H), using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) from Quantum Design. The zero resistance data, Tc0(H), were obtained using a PPMS from Quantum Design. On confronting our irreversibility lines with those of zero resistance, we observed that the Tc0(H) data fell several degrees K above the Tirr(H) data, which obviously contradicts the well known properties of superconductivity. In order to get consistent Tirr(H) data in the H-T plane, it was necessary to do a lot of additional measurements as a function of the amplitude of the sample transport and extrapolate the Tirr(H) data for each applied field to zero amplitude.

  17. Magnetic resonance characterization of tissue engineered cartilage via changes in relaxation times, diffusion coefficient, and shear modulus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ziying

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to describe a combined MR relaxation (T(2) and T(1ρ)), diffusion (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC]), and elastography (shear stiffness) method of fully characterizing the development of tissue-engineered cartilage in terms of the changes in its composition, structure, and mechanical properties during tissue growth. Then, we may better use MR-based methodologies to noninvasively monitor and optimize the cartilage tissue engineering process without sacrificing the constructs. This process begins by demonstrating the potential capability of T(2), T(1ρ), ADC, and shear stiffness in characterizing a scaffold-free engineered cartilage. The results show that, in addition to the conventional T(2) and ADC, T(1ρ) and MRE can be used as potential biomarkers to assess the specific changes in proteoglycan content and mechanical properties of engineered cartilage during culture. Moreover, to increase the efficiency of MR characterization, two new methodologies for simultaneous acquisition of diffusion and MRE (dMRE), and T(1ρ) and MRE (T(1ρ)-MRE) are introduced that allow the simultaneous characterization of both biochemical and mechanical properties of engineered cartilage tissue. The feasibilities of dMRE and T(1ρ)-MRE approaches are validated on tissue-mimicking phantoms. The results show good correspondence between simultaneous acquisitions and conventional separate acquisition methods. PMID:25403876

  18. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  19. A theoretical study of rotational diffusion models for rod-shaped viruses. The influence of motion on 31P nuclear magnetic resonance lineshapes and transversal relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1993-01-01

    Information about the interaction between nucleic acids and coat proteins in intact virus particles may be obtained by studying the restricted backbone dynamics of the incapsulated nucleic acids using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In this article, simulations are carried out to investigate how reorientation of a rod-shaped virus particle as a whole and isolated nucleic acid motions within the virion influence the 31P NMR lineshape and transversal relaxation dominated by the phosphorus chemical shift anisotropy. Two opposite cases are considered on a theoretical level. First, isotropic rotational diffusion is used as a model for mobile nucleic acids that are loosely or partially bound to the protein coat. The effect of this type of diffusion on lineshape and transversal relaxation is calculated by solving the stochastic Liouville equation by an expansion in spherical functions. Next, uniaxial rotational diffusion is assumed to represent the mobility of phosphorus in a virion that rotates as a rigid rod about its length axis. This type of diffusion is approximated by an exchange process among discrete sites. As turns out from these simulations, the amplitude and the frequency of the motion can only be unequivocally determined from experimental data by a combined analysis of the lineshape and the transversal relaxation. In the fast motional region both the isotropic and the uniaxial diffusion model predict the same transversal relaxation as the Redfield theory. For very slow motion, transversal relaxation resembles the nonexponential relaxation as observed for water molecules undergoing translational diffusion in a magnetic field gradient. In this frequency region T2e is inversely proportional to the cube root of the diffusion coefficient. In addition to the isotropic and uniaxial diffusion models, a third model is presented, in which fast restricted nucleic acid backbone motions dominating the lineshape are superimposed on a slow rotation of the

  20. Feasibility of high-resolution one-dimensional relaxation imaging at low magnetic field using a single-sided NMR scanner applied to articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2015-02-01

    Low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance increases the contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate in many biological tissues; one prominent example is hyaline articular cartilage. In order to take advantage of this increased contrast and to profile the depth-dependent variations, high resolution parameter measurements are carried out which can be of critical importance in an early diagnosis of cartilage diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the maximum achievable spatial resolution of parameter profiles is limited by factors such as sensor geometry, sample curvature, and diffusion limitation. In this work, we report on high-resolution single-sided NMR scanner measurements with a commercial device, and quantify these limitations. The highest achievable spatial resolution on the used profiler, and the lateral dimension of the sensitive volume were determined. Since articular cartilage samples are usually bent, we also focus on averaging effects inside the horizontally aligned sensitive volume and their impact on the relaxation profiles. Taking these critical parameters into consideration, depth-dependent relaxation time profiles with the maximum achievable vertical resolution of 20 μm are discussed, and are correlated with diffusion coefficient profiles in hyaline articular cartilage in order to reconstruct T2 maps from the diffusion-weighted CPMG decays of apparent relaxation rates.

  1. Two Polymorphic Forms of a Six-Coordinate Mononuclear Cobalt(II) Complex with Easy-Plane Anisotropy: Structural Features, Theoretical Calculations, and Field-Induced Slow Relaxation of the Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Roy, Subhadip; Oyarzabal, Itziar; Vallejo, Julia; Cano, Joan; Colacio, Enrique; Bauza, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Kirillov, Alexander M; Drew, Michael G B; Das, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    A mononuclear cobalt(II) complex [Co(3,5-dnb)2(py)2(H2O)2] {3,5-Hdnb = 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid; py = pyridine} was isolated in two polymorphs, in space groups C2/c (1) and P21/c (2). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that 1 and 2 are not isostructural in spite of having equal formulas and ligand connectivity. In both structures, the Co(II) centers adopt octahedral {CoN2O4} geometries filled by pairs of mutually trans terminal 3,5-dnb, py, and water ligands. However, the structures of 1 and 2 disclose distinct packing patterns driven by strong intermolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonds, leading to their 0D→2D (1) or 0D→1D (2) extension. The resulting two-dimensional layers and one-dimensional chains were topologically classified as the sql and 2C1 underlying nets, respectively. By means of DFT theoretical calculations, the energy variations between the polymorphs were estimated, and the binding energies associated with the noncovalent interactions observed in the crystal structures were also evaluated. The study of the direct-current magnetic properties, as well as ab initio calculations, reveal that both 1 and 2 present a strong easy-plane magnetic anisotropy (D > 0), which is larger for the latter polymorph (D is found to exhibit values between +58 and 117 cm(-1) depending on the method). Alternating current dynamic susceptibility measurements show that these polymorphs exhibit field-induced slow relaxation of the magnetization with Ueff values of 19.5 and 21.1 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The analysis of the whole magnetic data allows the conclusion that the magnetization relaxation in these polymorphs mainly takes place through a virtual excited state (Raman process). It is worth noting that despite the notable difference between the supramolecular networks of 1 and 2, they exhibit almost identical magnetization dynamics. This fact suggests that the relaxation process is intramolecular in nature and that the virtual state involved in the

  2. Method and apparatus for control of a magnetic structure

    DOEpatents

    Challenger, Michael P.; Valla, Arthur S.

    1996-06-18

    A method and apparatus for independently adjusting the spacing between opposing magnet arrays in charged particle based light sources. Adjustment mechanisms between each of the magnet arrays and the supporting structure allow the gap between the two magnet arrays to be independently adjusted. In addition, spherical bearings in the linkages to the magnet arrays permit the transverse angular orientation of the magnet arrays to also be adjusted. The opposing magnet arrays can be supported above the ground by the structural support.

  3. Ferrohydrodynamic evaluation of rotational viscosity and relaxation in certain ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh

    2012-07-01

    A significant effect of aggregation dynamics for aqueous ferrofluid (AF) and kerosene based ferrofluid (KF) using magnetic field dependent capillary viscosity and magneto-optical relaxation measurements is studied. For better comparison parameters of AF and KF are kept similar. Ferrohydrodynamic equations of chain forming ferrofluids, dilute ferrofluids, and Brownian dynamic simulations are compared. It is observed that the rotational viscosity of AF is larger than that of KF due to field induced aggregates in it and strong dipolar interactions. It is also observed that at Ωτ ~ 0.04 both AF and KF viscosity becomes almost similar, suggesting similar behavior at that shear rate. The magneto-optical relaxation in AF exhibits nonexponential behavior when relaxed from higher magnetic field and follows irreversible thermodynamics, whereas for KF the relaxation is exponential and follows the effective field method. This discrepancy is explained based on aggregation dynamics of magnetic particles. Results are well described by the corresponding theoretical models. PMID:23005542

  4. Slow magnetic relaxation in four square-based pyramidal dysprosium hydroxo clusters ligated by chiral amino acid anions - a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Thielemann, Dominique T; Wagner, Anna T; Lan, Yanhua; Anson, Christopher E; Gamer, Michael T; Powell, Annie K; Roesky, Peter W

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis and characterization of three chiral and one achiral amino acid anion ligated dysprosium hydroxo clusters [Dy5(OH)5(α-AA)4(Ph2acac)6] (α-AA = d-PhGly, l-Pro, l-Trp, Ph2Gly; Ph2acac = dibenzoylmethanide) are reported. The solid state structures were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction and show that five Dy(iii) ions are arranged in a square-based pyramidal geometry with NO7-donor-sets for the basal and O8-donor-sets for the apical Dy atom. Both static (dc) and dynamic (ac) magnetic properties were investigated for all four compounds and show a slow relaxation of magnetization, indicative of single molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour below 10 K in all cases. The similar SMM behaviour observed for all four compounds suggests that the very similar coordination geometries seen for the dysprosium atoms in all members of this family, which are independent of the amino acid ligand used, play a decisive role in steering the contribution of the single ion anisotropies to the observed magnetic relaxation. PMID:23986134

  5. Graphene oxide-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle composite with high transverse proton relaxivity value for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesha, N.; Srivastava, Chandan; Poojar, Pavan; Geethanath, Sairam; Qurishi, Yasrib

    2015-04-21

    The potential of graphene oxide–Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite as an image contrast enhancing material in magnetic resonance imaging has been investigated. Proton relaxivity values were obtained in three different homogeneous dispersions of GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites synthesized by precipitating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in three different reaction mixtures containing 0.01 g, 0.1 g, and 0.2 g of graphene oxide. A noticeable difference in proton relaxivity values was observed between the three cases. A comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization revealed discrete differences in the extent of reduction of the graphene oxide and spacing between the graphene oxide sheets in the three composites. The GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite framework that contained graphene oxide with least extent of reduction of the carboxyl groups and largest spacing between the graphene oxide sheets provided the optimum structure for yielding a very high transverse proton relaxivity value. It was found that the GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites possessed good biocompatibility with normal cell lines, whereas they exhibited considerable toxicity towards breast cancer cells.

  6. Tuning the Origin of Magnetic Relaxation by Substituting the 3d or Rare-Earth Ions into Three Isostructural Cyano-Bridged 3d-4f Heterodinuclear Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Zhen; Xie, Shuang; Li, Hui-Li; Zhu, Wen-Hua; Liu, Li; Dong, Xun-Qing; He, Wei-Xun; Ren, Jin-Chao; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Powell, Annie K

    2015-11-01

    Three isostructural cyano-bridged 3d-4f compounds, [YFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (1), [DyFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (2), and [DyCo(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (3), were successfully assembled by site-targeted substitution of the 3d or rare-earth ions. All compounds have been structurally characterized to display slightly distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal local coordination geometry around the rare-earth ions. Magnetic analyses revealed negligible magnetic coupling in compound 1, antiferromagnetic intradimer interaction in 2, and weak ferromagnetic coupling through dipolar-dipolar interaction in 3. Under an applied direct-current (dc) field, 1 (Hdc = 2.5 kOe, τ0 = 1.3 × 10(-7) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) and 3 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 7.1 × 10(-11) s, and Ueff/kB = 63 K) respectively indicated magnetic relaxation behavior based on a single [Fe(III)]LS ion and a Dy(III) ion; nevertheless, 2 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 9.7 × 10(-8) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) appeared to be a single-molecule magnet based on a cyano-bridged DyFe dimer. Compound 1, which can be regarded as a single-ion magnet of the [Fe(III)]LS ion linked to a diamagnetic Y(III) ion in a cyano-bridged heterodimer, represents one of the rarely investigated examples based on a single Fe(III) ion explored in magnetic relaxation behavior. It demonstrated that the introduction of intradimer magnetic interaction of 2 through a cyano bridge between Dy(III) and [Fe(III)]LS ions negatively affects the energy barrier and χ″(T) peak temperature compared to 3. PMID:26473654

  7. Paramagnetic relaxation of long-lived coherences in solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maninder; Srinivas, Chinthalapalli; Deb, Mayukh; Kurur, Narayanan D

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived coherences (LLCs) are known to have lifetimes much longer than transverse magnetization or single quantum coherences (SQCs). The effect of paramagnetic ions on the relaxation of LLCs is not known. This is particularly important, as LLCs have potential applications in various fields like analytical NMR, in vivo NMR and MR imaging methods. We study here the behaviour of LLCs in the presence of paramagnetic relaxation agents. The stepwise increase in the concentration of the metal ion is followed by measuring various relaxation rates. The effect of paramagnetic ions is analysed in terms of the external random field's contribution to the relaxation of two coupled protons in 2,3,6-trichlorobenzaldehyde. The LLCs relax faster than ordinary SQCs in the presence of paramagnetic ions of varying character. This is explained on the basis of an increase in the contribution of the external random field to relaxation due to a paramagnetic relaxation mechanism. Comparison is also made with ordinary Zeeman relaxation rates like R1, R2, R1ρ and also with rate of relaxation of long-lived states RLLS which are known to be less sensitive to paramagnetically induced relaxation. Also, the extent of correlation of random fields at two proton sites is studied and is found to be strongly correlated with each other. The obtained correlation constant is found to be independent of the nature of added paramagnetic impurities. PMID:24151221

  8. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl.sub.2 or (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen.

  9. New magnetic resonance imaging methods in nephrology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morrell, Glen; Rusinek, Henry; Sigmund, Eric; Chandarana, Hersh; Lerman, Lilach O.; Prasad, Pottumarthi Vara; Niles, David; Artz, Nathan; Fain, Sean; Vivier, Pierre H.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Lee, Vivian S.

    2013-01-01

    Established as a method to study anatomic changes, such as renal tumors or atherosclerotic vascular disease, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to interrogate renal function has only recently begun to come of age. In this review, we briefly introduce some of the most important MRI techniques for renal functional imaging, and then review current findings on their use for diagnosis and monitoring of major kidney diseases. Specific applications include renovascular disease, diabetic nephropathy, renal transplants, renal masses, acute kidney injury and pediatric anomalies. With this review, we hope to encourage more collaboration between nephrologists and radiologists to accelerate the development and application of modern MRI tools in nephrology clinics. PMID:24067433

  10. Dual stage active magnetic regenerator and method

    DOEpatents

    Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1999-03-30

    A dual stage active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as well as method using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle includes a high temperature stage refrigerant comprising DyAl{sub 2} or (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than 0 and less than about 0.3 in combination with a low temperature stage comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} where x is selected to be greater than about 0.5 and less than 1 to provide significantly improved refrigeration efficiency in the liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen. 17 figs.

  11. MRI contrast from relaxation along a fictitious field (RAFF).

    PubMed

    Liimatainen, Timo; Sorce, Dennis J; O'Connell, Robert; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2010-10-01

    A new method to measure rotating frame relaxation and to create contrast for MRI is introduced. The technique exploits relaxation along a fictitious field (RAFF) generated by amplitude- and frequency-modulated irradiation in a subadiabatic condition. Here, RAFF is demonstrated using a radiofrequency pulse based on sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulations of equal amplitudes, which gives rise to a stationary fictitious magnetic field in a doubly rotating frame. According to dipolar relaxation theory, the RAFF relaxation time constant (T(RAFF)) was found to differ from laboratory frame relaxation times (T(1) and T(2)) and rotating frame relaxation times (T(1ρ) and T(2ρ)). This prediction was supported by experimental results obtained from human brain in vivo and three different solutions. Results from relaxation mapping in human brain demonstrated the ability to create MRI contrast based on RAFF. The value of T(RAFF) was found to be insensitive to the initial orientation of the magnetization vector. In the RAFF method, the useful bandwidth did not decrease as the train length increased. Finally, as compared with an adiabatic pulse train of equal duration, RAFF required less radiofrequency power and therefore can be more readily used for rotating frame relaxation studies in humans. PMID:20740665

  12. Simple and efficient relaxation methods for interfaces separating compressible fluids, cavitating flows and shocks in multiphase mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Saurel; Fabien Petitpas; Ray A. Berry

    2009-03-01

    Numerical approximation of the five-equation two-phase flow of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, R. Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002–3024] is examined. This model has shown excellent capabilities for the numerical resolution of interfaces separating compressible fluids as well as wave propagation in compressible mixtures [A. Murrone, H. Guillard, A five equation reduced model for compressible two phase flow problems, Journal of Computational Physics 202(2) (2005) 664–698; R. Abgrall, V. Perrier, Asymptotic expansion of a multiscale numerical scheme for compressible multiphase flows, SIAM Journal of Multiscale and Modeling and Simulation (5) (2006) 84–115; F. Petitpas, E. Franquet, R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II. The artificial heat exchange for multiphase shocks, Journal of Computational Physics 225(2) (2007) 2214–2248]. However, its numerical approximation poses some serious difficulties. Among them, the non-monotonic behavior of the sound speed causes inaccuracies in wave’s transmission across interfaces. Moreover, volume fraction variation across acoustic waves results in difficulties for the Riemann problem resolution, and in particular for the derivation of approximate solvers. Volume fraction positivity in the presence of shocks or strong expansion waves is another issue resulting in lack of robustness. To circumvent these difficulties, the pressure equilibrium assumption is relaxed and a pressure non-equilibrium model is developed. It results in a single velocity, non-conservative hyperbolic model with two energy equations involving relaxation terms. It fulfills the equation of state and energy conservation on both sides of interfaces and guarantees correct transmission of shocks across them. This formulation considerably simplifies numerical

  13. Simple and efficient relaxation methods for interfaces separating compressible fluids, cavitating flows and shocks in multiphase mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Saurel, Richard Petitpas, Fabien; Berry, Ray A.

    2009-03-20

    Numerical approximation of the five-equation two-phase flow of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, R. Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024] is examined. This model has shown excellent capabilities for the numerical resolution of interfaces separating compressible fluids as well as wave propagation in compressible mixtures [A. Murrone, H. Guillard, A five equation reduced model for compressible two phase flow problems, Journal of Computational Physics 202(2) (2005) 664-698; R. Abgrall, V. Perrier, Asymptotic expansion of a multiscale numerical scheme for compressible multiphase flows, SIAM Journal of Multiscale and Modeling and Simulation (5) (2006) 84-115; F. Petitpas, E. Franquet, R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II. The artificial heat exchange for multiphase shocks, Journal of Computational Physics 225(2) (2007) 2214-2248]. However, its numerical approximation poses some serious difficulties. Among them, the non-monotonic behavior of the sound speed causes inaccuracies in wave's transmission across interfaces. Moreover, volume fraction variation across acoustic waves results in difficulties for the Riemann problem resolution, and in particular for the derivation of approximate solvers. Volume fraction positivity in the presence of shocks or strong expansion waves is another issue resulting in lack of robustness. To circumvent these difficulties, the pressure equilibrium assumption is relaxed and a pressure non-equilibrium model is developed. It results in a single velocity, non-conservative hyperbolic model with two energy equations involving relaxation terms. It fulfills the equation of state and energy conservation on both sides of interfaces and guarantees correct transmission of shocks across them. This formulation considerably simplifies numerical resolution

  14. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  15. Mechanism of rotational relaxation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanyi, J. C.; Woodall, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    A model is presented which describes the characteristic pattern of relaxation of a nonthermal rotational distribution of hydrogen halide, peaked initially at high rotational quantum number J, to a thermal distribution without generating a peak at intermediate J. A method for correcting infrared chemiluminiscence data for modest rotational relaxation is also suggested.

  16. Synthesis, Magnetic Properties, Map Images, and Water Proton Relaxivities of D-Glucuronic Acid Coated Ln2O3 Nanoparticles (Ln = Ho and Er).

    PubMed

    Kattel, Krishna; Kim, Cho Rong; Xu, Wenlong; Kim, Tae Jeong; Park, Jang Woo; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Gang Ho

    2015-09-01

    T2 MRI contrast agents cannot be synthesized by using molecules but nanoparticles because appreciable magnetic moments at room temperature are needed. Recently, some of lanthanide (Ln) oxide nanoparticles have shown decent magnetic moments at room temperature and even at ultrasmall particle diameters. In this study, we explored D-glucuronic acid coated Ln2O3 nanoparticles (Ln = Ho and Er) with ultrasmall particle diameters. They showed decent magnetic moments at room temperature and as a result, appreciable transverse water proton relaxivities (r2s) at 1.5 tesla MR field. Clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R2 map images were observed in both samples. These results showed that D-glucuronic acid coated Ln2O3 nanoparticles (Ln = Ho and Er) would be potential T2 MRI contrast agents at high MR fields. PMID:26716328

  17. A series of tetranuclear lanthanide complexes comprising two edge-sharing triangular units with field-induced slow magnetic relaxation for Dy4 species.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shufang; Zhao, Lang; Guo, Yun-Nan; Deng, Ruiping; Guo, Yang; Tang, Jinkui

    2011-09-01

    The syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic studies are reported for a series of Ln(4) clusters formulated as Ln(4)(μ(3)-OH)(2)(php)(2)(OAc)(6)(H(2)O)(2)]·4MeOH·nH(2)O (Ln = Gd (1), Tb (2), Dy (3) (n = 2) and Ho (4) (n = 0); H(2)php = 2,6-(picolinoylhydrazone)pyridine). The overall metal core of each cluster is comprised of two edge-sharing triangular Ln(3) units linked by μ(3)-OH bridges. Direct-current (dc) magnetic susceptibility studies reveal that the Ln(III) ions are very weakly coupled in all four compounds. Alternating-current (ac) magnetic susceptibility studies for 3 indicate that field-induced slow relaxation phenomenon occurs for this compound. PMID:21789321

  18. A new application of the nonlinear dielectric method for studying relaxation processes in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, M.; Ziolo, J.; Rzoska, S. J.

    1996-12-01

    The measurement setup for studying changes of electric permittivity induced in liquids by a strong electric field nonlinear dielectric effect, (NDE) is presented. The construction is based on the idea of frequency modulation of an LC generator (with an inductance L and a capacitance C in resonant circuit), proposed by Malecki [J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. II 72, 104 (1976)]. The strong electric field is applied in the form of rectangular pulses (typically 1-4 ms). The setup enables measurements in a broad range of frequencies (80 kHz-12 MHz) and contains a new calibrating system, minimizing the influence of systematic error on the measured NDE values. We also indicate menthol as a standard, reference liquid in NDE studies. New applications of the NDE technique for studying relaxation processes in critical solution are also presented. They are based on the time resolved analysis of NDE decay after switching off the strong electric field.

  19. A Fast Method of Transforming Relaxation Functions Into the Frequency Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mopsik, Frederick I.

    1999-01-01

    The limits to the error due to truncation of the numeric integration of the one-sided Laplace transform of a relaxation function in the time domain into its equivalent frequency domain are established. Separate results are given for large and small ω. These results show that, for a given ω, only a restricted range of time samples is needed to perform the computation to a given accuracy. These results are then combined with a known error estimate for integration by cubic splines to give a good estimate for the number of points needed to perform the computation to a given accuracy. For a given data window between t1 and t2, the computation time is shown to be proportional to ln(t1/t2).

  20. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  1. Syntheses, structures, and magnetic analyses of a family of heterometallic hexanuclear [Ni4M2] (M = Gd, Dy, Y) compounds: observation of slow magnetic relaxation in the Dy(III) derivative.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hongshan; Zhao, Lang; Guo, Yang; Tang, Jinkui

    2012-02-20

    We described the syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic behavior of a novel series of heterometallic [Ni(4)M(2)] [M = Gd (1), Dy (2) and Y (3)] hexanuclear compounds afforded by the reaction of rare-earth(III) nitrate, nickel(II) acetate, and Schiff-base ligand 2-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylideneamino)phenol (H(2)L) in a mixture of ethanol and dichloromethane in the presence of triethylamine. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that all three compounds have a metal core made up of two Ni(2)MO(4) defective cubanes. The magnetic properties of all compounds have been studied. Solid-state direct-current magnetic susceptibility analyses demonstrate competing antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions within both compounds 1 and 3. Solid-state alternating-current magnetic susceptibility investigations show a frequency-dependent out-of-phase signal for compound 2 below 4 K, suggestive of slow magnetic relaxation. PMID:22320187

  2. Single-molecule magnetism in a family of {Co(III)2Dy(III)2} butterfly complexes: effects of ligand replacement on the dynamics of magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Ungur, Liviu; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murray, Keith S

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis and structural characterization of four related heterometallic complexes of formulas [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OMe)2(teaH)2(O2CPh)4(MeOH)4](NO3)2·MeOH·H2O (1a) and [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OMe)2(teaH)2(O2CPh)4(MeOH)2(NO3)2]·MeOH·H2O (1b), [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OMe)2(dea)2(O2CPh)4(MeOH)4](NO3)2 (2), [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OMe)2(mdea)2(O2CPh)4(NO3)2] (3), and [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OMe)2(bdea)2(O2CPh)4(MeOH)4](NO3)2·0.5MeOH·H2O (4a) and [Dy(III)2Co(III)2(OMe)2(bdea)2(O2CPh)4(MeOH)2(NO3)2]·MeOH·1.5H2O (4b) are reported (teaH3 = triethanolamine, deaH2 = diethanolamine, mdeaH2 = N-methyldiethanolamine, and bdeaH2 = N-n-butyldiethanolamine). Compounds 1 (≡ 1a and 1b) and 4 (≡ 4a and 4b) both display two unique molecules within the same crystal and all compounds display a butterfly type core, with the Dy(III) ions occupying the central body positions and the diamagnetic Co(III) ions the outer wing-tip sites. Compounds 1-4 were investigated via direct current and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements, and it was found that each complex displayed single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior. All four compounds display unique coordination and geometric environments around the Dy(III) ions and it was found that each displays a different anisotropy barrier. Ab initio calculations were performed on 1-4 and these determined the low lying electronic structure of each Dy(III) ion and the magnetic interactions for each cluster. It was found that there was a strong correlation between the calculated energy gap between the ground and first excited states of the single-ion ligand-field split Dy(III) levels and the experimentally observed anisotropy barrier. Furthermore, the transverse g factors found for the Dy(III) ions, defining the tunnelling rates within the ground Kramers doublets, are largest for 1, which agrees with the experimental observation of the shortest relaxation time in the high-temperature domain for this complex. The magnetic exchange between the Dy

  3. Cryptate 13C and 23Na nuclear magnetic relaxation as a probe of counterion dynamics in aqueous polyacrylate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Maarel, J. R. C.; Van Duijn, D.; De Bleijser, J.; Leyte, J. C.

    1987-03-01

    In a series of fully alkali neutralized polyacrylate solutions the counterions are included by a macrobicyclic ligand (cryptand) to form a well-defined coordination shell. Vapor pressure experiments show the polyacrylate-cryptate system to behave osmotically as an ordinary polyelectrolyte solution. Cryptate 13C and 23Na relaxation show that the influence of polyions on the counter-ion reorientational mobility is moderate. The main 23Na relaxation mechanism is found to be the fluctuating electric field gradient caused by the surrounding ligand.

  4. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation. PMID:26961387

  5. MRI Contrast from Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF)

    PubMed Central

    Liimatainen, Timo; Sorce, Dennis J.; O’Connell, Robert; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2016-01-01

    A new method to measure rotating frame relaxation and to create contrast for MRI is introduced. The technique exploits relaxation along a fictitious field (RAFF) generated by amplitude- and frequency-modulated irradiation in a sub-adiabatic condition. Here, RAFF is demonstrated using a radiofrequency pulse based on sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulations of equal amplitudes, which gives rise to a stationary fictitious magnetic field in a doubly rotating frame. According to dipolar relaxation theory, the RAFF relaxation time constant (TRAFF) was found to differ from laboratory frame relaxation times (T1 and T2) and rotating frame relaxation times (T1ρ and T2ρ). This prediction was supported by experimental results obtained from human brain in vivo and three different solutions. Results from relaxation mapping in human brain demonstrated the ability to create MRI contrast based on RAFF. The value of TRAFF was found to be insensitive to the initial orientation of the magnetization vector. Finally, as compared with adiabatic pulse trains of equal durations, RAFF required less radiofrequency power and therefore can be more readily used for rotating frame relaxation studies in humans. PMID:20740665

  6. Relaxed Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Kyle

    2004-01-01

    Relaxed intensity refers to a professional philosophy, demeanor, and way of life. It is the key to being an effective educational leader. To be successful one must be relaxed, which means managing stress efficiently, having fun, and enjoying work. Intensity allows one to get the job done and accomplish certain tasks or goals. Educational leaders…

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the calcaneus: preliminary assessment of trabecular bone-dependent regional variations in marrow relaxation time compared with dual X-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guglielmi, G.; Selby, K.; Blunt, B. A.; Jergas, M.; Newitt, D. C.; Genant, H. K.; Majumdar, S.

    1996-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Marrow transverse relaxation time (T2*) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may be related to the density and structure of the surrounding trabecular network. We investigated regional variations of T2* in the human calcaneus and compared the findings with bone mineral density (BMD), as measured by dual X-ray absorpiometry (DXA). Short- and long-term precisions were evaluated first to determine whether MR imaging would be useful for the clinical assessment of disease status and progression in osteoporosis. METHODS: Gradient-recalled echo MR images of the calcaneus were acquired at 1.5 T from six volunteers. Measurements of T2* were compared with BMD and (for one volunteer) conventional radiography. RESULTS: T2* values showed significant regional variation; they typically were shortest in the superior region of the calcaneus. There was a linear correlation between MR and DXA measurements (r = .66 for 1/T2* versus BMD). Differences in T2* attributable to variations in analysis region-of-interest placement were not significant for five of the six volunteers. Sagittal MR images had short- and long-term precision errors of 4.2% and 3.3%, respectively. For DXA, the precision was 1.3% (coefficient of variation). CONCLUSION: MR imaging may be useful for trabecular bone assessment in the calcaneus. However, given the large regional variations in bone density and structure, the choice of an ROI is likely to play a major role in the accuracy, precision, and overall clinical efficacy of T2* measurements.

  8. A relaxation method for the energy and morphology of grain boundaries and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnels, Brandon; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Conti, Sergio; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The energy density of crystal interfaces exhibits a characteristic "cusp" structure that renders it non-convex. Furthermore, crystal interfaces are often observed to be faceted, i.e., to be composed of flat facets in alternating directions. In this work, we forge a connection between these two observations by positing that the faceted morphology of crystal interfaces results from energy minimization. Specifically, we posit that the lack of convexity of the interfacial energy density drives the development of finely faceted microstructures and accounts for their geometry and morphology. We formulate the problem as a generalized minimal surface problem couched in a geometric measure-theoretical framework. We then show that the effective, or relaxed, interfacial energy density, with all possible interfacial morphologies accounted for, corresponds to the convexification of the bare or unrelaxed interfacial energy density, and that the requisite convexification can be attained by means of a faceting construction. We validate the approach by means of comparisons with experiment and atomistic simulations including symmetric and asymmetric tilt boundaries in face-centered cubic (FCC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) crystals. By comparison with simulated and experimental data, we show that this simple model of interfacial energy combined with a general microstructure construction based on convexification is able to replicate complex interfacial morphologies, including thermally induced morphological transitions.

  9. Irradiation Creep of Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide as Estimated by Bend Stress Relaxation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Kondo, Sosuke; Kohyama, Akira

    2007-01-01

    The bend stress relaxation technique was applied for an irradiation creep study of high purity, chemically vapor-deposited beta-phase silicon carbide (CVD SiC) ceramic. A constant bend strain was applied to thin strip samples during neutron irradiation to fluences 0.2-4.2 dpa at various temperatures in the range {approx}400 to {approx}1080 C. Irradiation creep strain at <0.7 dpa exhibited only a weak dependence on irradiation temperature. However, the creep strain dependence on fluence was non-linear due to the early domination of the initial transient creep, and a transition in creep behavior was found between 950 and 1080 C. Steady-state irradiation creep compliances of polycrystalline CVD SiC at doses >0.7 dpa were estimated to be 2.7({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -7} and 1.5({+-}0.8) x 10{sup -6} (MPa dpa){sup -1} at {approx}600 to {approx}950 C and {approx}1080 C, respectively, whereas linear-averaged creep compliances of 1-2 x 10{sup -6} (MPa dpa){sup -1} were obtained for doses of 0.6-0.7 dpa at all temperatures. Monocrystalline 3C SiC samples exhibited significantly smaller transient creep strain and greater subsequent deformation when loaded along <0 1 1> direction.

  10. Rapid and sensitive detection of an intracellular pathogen in human peripheral leukocytes with hybridizing magnetic relaxation nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Boukhriss, Hamza; Santra, Santimukul; Naser, Saleh A; Perez, J Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are still a major global healthcare problem. The quick and sensitive detection of pathogens responsible for these infections would facilitate correct diagnosis of the disease and expedite treatment. Of major importance are intracellular slow-growing pathogens that reside within peripheral leukocytes, evading recognition by the immune system and detection by traditional culture methods. Herein, we report the use of hybridizing magnetic nanosensors (hMRS) for the detection of an intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The hMRS are designed to bind to a unique genomic sequence found in the MAP genome, causing significant changes in the sample's magnetic resonance signal. Clinically relevant samples, including tissue and blood, were screened with hMRS and results were compared with traditional PCR analysis. Within less than an hour, the hMRS identified MAP-positive samples in a library of laboratory cultures, clinical isolates, blood and homogenized tissues. Comparison of the hMRS with culture methods in terms of prediction of disease state revealed that the hMRS outperformed established culture methods, while being significantly faster (1 hour vs 12 weeks). Additionally, using a single instrument and one nanoparticle preparation we were able to detect the intracellular bacterial target in clinical samples at the genomic and epitope levels. Overall, since the nanoparticles are robust in diverse environmental settings and substantially more affordable than PCR enzymes, the potential clinical and field-based use of hMRS in the multiplexed identification of microbial pathogens and other disease-related biomarkers via a single, deployable instrument in clinical and complex environmental samples is foreseen. PMID:22496916

  11. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of an Intracellular Pathogen in Human Peripheral Leukocytes with Hybridizing Magnetic Relaxation Nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Boukhriss, Hamza; Santra, Santimukul; Naser, Saleh A.; Perez, J. Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are still a major global healthcare problem. The quick and sensitive detection of pathogens responsible for these infections would facilitate correct diagnosis of the disease and expedite treatment. Of major importance are intracellular slow-growing pathogens that reside within peripheral leukocytes, evading recognition by the immune system and detection by traditional culture methods. Herein, we report the use of hybridizing magnetic nanosensors (hMRS) for the detection of an intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The hMRS are designed to bind to a unique genomic sequence found in the MAP genome, causing significant changes in the sample’s magnetic resonance signal. Clinically relevant samples, including tissue and blood, were screened with hMRS and results were compared with traditional PCR analysis. Within less than an hour, the hMRS identified MAP-positive samples in a library of laboratory cultures, clinical isolates, blood and homogenized tissues. Comparison of the hMRS with culture methods in terms of prediction of disease state revealed that the hMRS outperformed established culture methods, while being significantly faster (1 hour vs 12 weeks). Additionally, using a single instrument and one nanoparticle preparation we were able to detect the intracellular bacterial target in clinical samples at the genomic and epitope levels. Overall, since the nanoparticles are robust in diverse environmental settings and substantially more affordable than PCR enzymes, the potential clinical and field-based use of hMRS in the multiplexed identification of microbial pathogens and other disease-related biomarkers via a single, deployable instrument in clinical and complex environmental samples is foreseen. PMID:22496916

  12. Integrated breathing and relaxation training (the Papworth method) for adults with asthma in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Elizabeth A; West, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Background An integrated breathing and relaxation technique known as the Papworth method has been implemented by physiotherapists since the 1960s for patients with asthma and dysfunctional breathing, but no controlled trials have been reported. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Papworth method in a randomised controlled trial. Methods Eighty‐five patients (36 men) were individually randomised to the control group (n = 46) or to the intervention group receiving five sessions of treatment by the Papworth method (n = 39). Both groups received usual medical care. Assessments were undertaken at baseline, post‐treatment (6 months after baseline) and at 12 months. The primary outcome measure was the St George's Respiratory Symptoms Questionnaire (SGRQ). Secondary outcome measures included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Nijmegen dysfunctional breathing questionnaire and objective measures of respiratory function. Results Post‐treatment and 12 month data were available for 78 and 72 patients, respectively. At the post‐treatment assessment the mean (SD) score on the SGRQ Symptom subscale was 21.8 (18.1) in the intervention group and 32.8 (20.1) in the control group (p = 0.001 for the difference). At the 12 month follow‐up the corresponding figures were 24.9 (17.9) and 33.5 (15.9) (p = 0.007 for the difference). SGRQ Total scores and HADS and Nijmegen scores were similarly significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group. The groups did not differ significantly following the treatment on objective measures of respiratory function except for relaxed breathing rate. Conclusions The Papworth method appears to ameliorate respiratory symptoms, dysfunctional breathing and adverse mood compared with usual care. Further controlled trials are warranted to confirm this finding, assess the effect in other patient groups and determine whether there is some effect on objective measures of

  13. Method of magnetic separation and apparatus therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, Robin R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for magnetically separating and collecting particulate matter fractions of a raw sample according to relative magnetic susceptibilities of each fraction so collected is disclosed. The separation apparatus includes a splitter which is used in conjunction with a magnetic separator for achieving the desired fractionation.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance-paramagnetic relaxation enhancements: Influence of spatial quantization of the electron spin when the zero-field splitting energy is larger than the Zeeman energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernathy, S. M.; Miller, J. C.; Lohr, L. L.; Sharp, R. R.

    1998-09-01

    Dissolved paramagnetic ions generally provide an efficient mechanism for the relaxation of nuclear spins in solution, a phenomenon called the nuclear magnetic resonance-paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (NMR-PRE). Metal ions with electron spins S⩾1 exhibit rich NMR relaxation phenomena originating in the properties of the zero-field splitting (zfs) interaction, which vanishes for spin-1/2 ions but which is nonzero for S⩾1 ions in site symmetry lower than cubic. For S⩾1 ions in the vicinity of the zfs-limit, i.e., at magnetic-field strengths low enough that the zfs energy exceeds the Zeeman energy, the NMR-PRE depends strongly on the detailed structure of the electron spin energy levels as well as on the spatial quantization of the spin motion. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the NMR-PRE produced by integer spins can be influenced strongly by the small intradoublet zero-field splittings, i.e., the splittings between the components of the non-Kramers doublets, which are produced by noncylindrical components of the crystal field potential. These small splittings produce relatively low-frequency oscillations in the dipolar field associated with (the spin component along the molecule-fixed ẑ axis). These motions decouple the nuclear spin from the electron spin, thereby depressing, in some cases very strongly, the NMR-PRE. The presence of a relatively small Zeeman field, comparable in magnitude to the intradoublet spacing but small compared to the larger interdoublet zfs splittings, causes a major change in the spin wave functions which has profound effects on the motions of the electron spin. When the Zeeman energy exceeds the small zfs splitting, the oscillatory motion of damps out, with the result that the electron spin couples more effectively to the nuclear spin, providing a more efficient NMR relaxation pathway. NMR-PRE data are presented for the S=1 complex Ni(II)(o-pda)2Cl2 (o-pda=ortho-phenylenediamine) which confirm the

  15. Nonlinear Boltzmann equation for the homogeneous isotropic case: Some improvements to deterministic methods and applications to relaxation towards local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asinari, P.

    2011-03-01

    Boltzmann equation is one the most powerful paradigms for explaining transport phenomena in fluids. Since early fifties, it received a lot of attention due to aerodynamic requirements for high altitude vehicles, vacuum technology requirements and nowadays, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMs). Because of the intrinsic mathematical complexity of the problem, Boltzmann himself started his work by considering first the case when the distribution function does not depend on space (homogeneous case), but only on time and the magnitude of the molecular velocity (isotropic collisional integral). The interest with regards to the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation goes beyond simple dilute gases. In the so-called econophysics, a Boltzmann type model is sometimes introduced for studying the distribution of wealth in a simple market. Another recent application of the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation is given by opinion formation modeling in quantitative sociology, also called socio-dynamics or sociophysics. The present work [1] aims to improve the deterministic method for solving homogenous isotropic Boltzmann equation proposed by Aristov [2] by two ideas: (a) the homogeneous isotropic problem is reformulated first in terms of particle kinetic energy (this allows one to ensure exact particle number and energy conservation during microscopic collisions) and (b) a DVM-like correction (where DVM stands for Discrete Velocity Model) is adopted for improving the relaxation rates (this allows one to satisfy exactly the conservation laws at macroscopic level, which is particularly important for describing the late dynamics in the relaxation towards the equilibrium).

  16. Relative permittivity measurement during the thrombus formation process using the dielectric relaxation method for various hematocrit values.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yuta; Sapkota, Achyut; Maruyama, Osamu; Kosaka, Ryo; Yamane, Takashi; Takei, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    The relative permittivity ε' and the dielectric loss ε″ for various hematocrit values H for static bovine blood condition have been measured using the dielectric relaxation method to detect thrombosis in real time. The suitable measurement frequency f m ranged within 60 kHz to 1 MHz, and the relaxation frequency of red blood cells (RBCs) f rc was observed to be 2 MHz. In the f m, the temporal change of normalized ε' exhibited a minimum (called as bottom point). The bottom point was observed to be exponentially shortened as H increased. This characteristic of the ε'* minimum is discussed from three viewpoints: during fibrin formation, direct thrombus formation, and rouleaux formation processes. ε'* during the fibrin formation process decreased over time, irrespective of f. However, ε'* in f m during the direct thrombus formation process and during the aggregation formation process increased immediately and rapidly over time. Therefore, the ε'* bottom point in f m might be the indication of micrometer-scale thrombus formation by RBC aggregation due to fibrin formation. PMID:26058831

  17. Solution of elliptic partial differential equations by fast Poisson solvers using a local relaxation factor. 1: One-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for solving a large class of two- and three-dimensional nonseparable elliptic partial differential equations (PDE's) is developed and tested. It uses a modified D'Yakanov-Gunn iterative procedure in which the relaxation factor is grid-point dependent. It is easy to implement and applicable to a variety of boundary conditions. It is also computationally efficient, as indicated by the results of numerical comparisons with other established methods. Furthermore, the current algorithm has the advantage of possessing two important properties which the traditional iterative methods lack; that is: (1) the convergence rate is relatively insensitive to grid-cell size and aspect ratio, and (2) the convergence rate can be easily estimated by using the coefficient of the PDE being solved.

  18. Critical current, magnetization relaxation and activation energies for YBa 2Cu 3O 7 and YBa 2Cu 4O 8 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Hai-hu; Schnack, H. G.; Griessen, R.; Dam, B.; Rector, J.

    1995-02-01

    By means of high-sensitivity capacitance torque magnetometers we have measured the superconducting current js and the dynamic magnetic-moment relaxation of YBa 2Cu 3O 7 and YBa 2Cu 4O 8 films of typically 100 nm thickness at temperatures between 2 K and Tc in magnetic fields up to 6 T. For the measurements of the dynamic relaxation rate Q≡d ln js/d ln (d Be/d t) magnetic-field sweep rates were varied between 0.5 and 40 mT/s. At low fields (typically 0.5 T) the dynamical relaxation rate exhibits a plateau at Q≈0.06 in YBa 2Cu 3O 7 and 0.04 in YBa 2Cu 4O 8. At high fields ( Be= μ0He≈ 6 T) the plateaus have completely disappeared and Q increases almost linearly with increasing temperature. At all fields a sharp increase up to Q≊1 is observed when the irreversibility line is approached. By means of the generalized inversion scheme (GIS), the js( T, Be) and Q ( T, Be) data are used to determined the current dependent activation energy U ( j, T, Be) for thermally activted flux creep. Although the GIS does not make any a priori assumptions about the explicit functional dependences on T and j, the U( j, T=0, Be) function derived from the experimental data by means of the GIS can remarkably well be described with the collective-creep interpolation formula U( j)=( Uc/ μ)[( jc/ j) μ-1] with μ≈0.6 for currents j>0.15 jc ( T=0, Be) where Jc( T=0, Be) is the critical current at T=0, and wi Uc depending on Be. At lower current densities U( j, T=0, Be) does not diverge as j-0.6 but shifts gradually to a weaker ln( jc/ j) dependence. At low temperatures the current and relaxation data cannot be explained in terms of a thermally activated flux-motion model. Quantum creep has an influence up to ˜13 K.

  19. RELAX: detecting relaxed selection in a phylogenetic framework.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, Joel O; Murrell, Ben; Smith, Martin D; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Scheffler, Konrad

    2015-03-01

    Relaxation of selective strength, manifested as a reduction in the efficiency or intensity of natural selection, can drive evolutionary innovation and presage lineage extinction or loss of function. Mechanisms through which selection can be relaxed range from the removal of an existing selective constraint to a reduction in effective population size. Standard methods for estimating the strength and extent of purifying or positive selection from molecular sequence data are not suitable for detecting relaxed selection, because they lack power and can mistake an increase in the intensity of positive selection for relaxation of both purifying and positive selection. Here, we present a general hypothesis testing framework (RELAX) for detecting relaxed selection in a codon-based phylogenetic framework. Given two subsets of branches in a phylogeny, RELAX can determine whether selective strength was relaxed or intensified in one of these subsets relative to the other. We establish the validity of our test via simulations and show that it can distinguish between increased positive selection and a relaxation of selective strength. We also demonstrate the power of RELAX in a variety of biological scenarios where relaxation of selection has been hypothesized or demonstrated previously. We find that obligate and facultative γ-proteobacteria endosymbionts of insects are under relaxed selection compared with their free-living relatives and obligate endosymbionts are under relaxed selection compared with facultative endosymbionts. Selective strength is also relaxed in asexual Daphnia pulex lineages, compared with sexual lineages. Endogenous, nonfunctional, bornavirus-like elements are found to be under relaxed selection compared with exogenous Borna viruses. Finally, selection on the short-wavelength sensitive, SWS1, opsin genes in echolocating and nonecholocating bats is relaxed only in lineages in which this gene underwent pseudogenization; however, selection on the functional

  20. Structural and magnetic properties of manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method using mixture of fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angadi, V. Jagadeesha; Rudraswamy, B.; Sadhana, K.; Praveena, K.

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis and magnetic investigation Mn1-xZnxFe2O4 with stoichiometry (x=0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9 and 1.0) were synthesized by solution combustion method using mixture of fuel this is first of its kind. As synthesized Mn-Zn nanoferrites were characterized by X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at room temperature. The magnetic domain relaxation was investigated by inductance spectroscopy (IS) and the observed magnetic domain relaxation frequency (fr) was increased with the increase in grain size. The Room temperature magnetic properties were studied using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It was observed that the real and imaginary part of permeability (μ‧ and μ″), saturation magnetization (Ms), remanance magnetization (Mr) and magneton number (Mr/Ms) were decreases gradually with increasing Zn2+ concentration. The decrease in the saturation magnetization may be explained as, the Zn2+ concentration increases the relative number of ferric ions on the A sites diminishes and this reduces the A-B interaction. Hence synthesized materials are good for high frequency applications.

  1. Analysis of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance lineshapes and transversal relaxation of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1993-01-01

    The experimentally observed 31P lineshapes and transversal relaxation of 15% (wt/wt) M13, 30% M13, and 30% tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are compared with lineshapes and relaxation curves that are simulated for various types of rotational diffusion using the models discussed previously (Magusin, P. C. M. M., and M. A. Hemminga. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:1851-1860). It is found that isotropic diffusion cannot explain the observed lineshape effects. A rigid rod diffusion model is only successful in describing the experimental data obtained for 15% M13. For 30% M13 the experimental lineshape and relaxation curve cannot be interpreted consistently and the TMV lineshape cannot even be simulated alone, indicating that the rigid rod diffusion model does not generally apply. A combined diffusion model with fast isolated motions of the encapsulated nucleic acid dominating the lineshape and a slow overall rotation of the virion as a whole, which mainly is reflected in the transversal relaxation, is able to provide a consistent picture for the 15 and 30% M13 samples, but not for TMV. Strongly improved lineshape fits for TMV are obtained assuming that there are three binding sites with different mobilities. The presence of three binding sites is consistent with previous models of TMV. The best lineshapes are simulated for a combination of one mobile and two static sites. Although less markedly, the assumption that two fractions of DNA with different mobilities exist within M13 also improves the simulated lineshapes. The possible existence of two 31P fractions in M13 sheds new light on the nonintegral ratio 2.4:1 between the number of nucleotides and protein coat subunits in the phage: 83% of the viral DNA is less mobile, suggesting that the binding of the DNA molecule to the protein coat actually occurs at the integral ratio of two nucleotides per protein subunit. PMID:8369412

  2. Superparamagnetic behaviour and T 1, T 2 relaxivity of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjura Hoque, S.; Srivastava, C.; Venkatesha, N.; Kumar, P. S. Anil; Chattopadhyay, K.

    2013-05-01

    In the present study, ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation followed by calcinations at 473 and 673 K for 4 h. Particle sizes obtained were 4 and 6 nm for the calcination temperatures of 473 and 673 K, respectively. To study the origin of system's low temperature spin dynamic behaviour, temperature dependence of susceptibility ? was investigated as a function of particle size and frequency. Slight increase in the grain size from 4 nm at 473 K to 6 nm at 673 K has led to a peak shift of temperature dependence of susceptibility measured at a constant frequency of 400 Hz. Temperature dependence of ? at different frequencies also resulted in peak shift. Relaxation time dependence of peak temperature obeys a power law, which provides the fitting parameters within the range of superparamagnetic nature of the particles. Further, dependence of relaxation time and peak temperature obeys Vogel-Fulcher law rather than Néel-Brown equation demonstrating that the particles follow the behaviour of superparamagnetism of slightly interacting system. Spin-lattice, T 1 and spin-spin, T 2 relaxivity of proton of the water molecule in the presence of chitosan-coated superparamagnetic ZnFe2O4 nanoparticle yields the values of 0.002 and 0.360 s-1 per ppm.

  3. Multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann front tracking method for two-phase flow with surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hai-Qiong; Zeng, Zhong; Zhang, Liang-Qi; Liang, Gong-You; Hiroshi, Mizuseki; Yoshiyuki, Kawazoe

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, an improved incompressible multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann-front tracking approach is proposed to simulate two-phase flow with a sharp interface, where the surface tension is implemented. The lattice Boltzmann method is used to simulate the incompressible flow with a stationary Eulerian grid, an additional moving Lagrangian grid is adopted to track explicitly the motion of the interface, and an indicator function is introduced to update the fluid properties accurately. The interface is represented by using a four-order Lagrange polynomial through fitting a set of discrete marker points, and then the surface tension is directly computed by using the normal vector and curvature of the interface. Two benchmark problems, including Laplace's law for a stationary bubble and the dispersion relation of the capillary wave between two fluids are conducted for validation. Excellent agreement is obtained between the numerical simulations and the theoretical results in the two cases.

  4. Computational electromagnetic methods for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Luis J.

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive technique used both as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience and as a FDA approved treatment for depression. During TMS, coils positioned near the scalp generate electric fields and activate targeted brain regions. In this thesis, several computational electromagnetics methods that improve the analysis, design, and uncertainty quantification of TMS systems were developed. Analysis: A new fast direct technique for solving the large and sparse linear system of equations (LSEs) arising from the finite difference (FD) discretization of Maxwell's quasi-static equations was developed. Following a factorization step, the solver permits computation of TMS fields inside realistic brain models in seconds, allowing for patient-specific real-time usage during TMS. The solver is an alternative to iterative methods for solving FD LSEs, often requiring run-times of minutes. A new integral equation (IE) method for analyzing TMS fields was developed. The human head is highly-heterogeneous and characterized by high-relative permittivities (107). IE techniques for analyzing electromagnetic interactions with such media suffer from high-contrast and low-frequency breakdowns. The novel high-permittivity and low-frequency stable internally combined volume-surface IE method developed. The method not only applies to the analysis of high-permittivity objects, but it is also the first IE tool that is stable when analyzing highly-inhomogeneous negative permittivity plasmas. Design: TMS applications call for electric fields to be sharply focused on regions that lie deep inside the brain. Unfortunately, fields generated by present-day Figure-8 coils stimulate relatively large regions near the brain surface. An optimization method for designing single feed TMS coil-arrays capable of producing more localized and deeper stimulation was developed. Results show that the coil-arrays stimulate 2.4 cm into the head while stimulating 3

  5. Projecting Whole--Body Future Patterns--The Field Anomaly Relaxation (FAR) Method. Memorandum Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhyne, Russell F.

    As one of a series of reports in progress, this report is introduced with a discussion of the concepts underlying long-range planning of any kind, and the methods of research used to describe alternative patterns of evolution or change within various policy fields. The FAR method, which emerged out of the Contingent U.S. Patterns (CUSPs) analysis…

  6. Two Isostructural Metal-Organic Frameworks Directed by the Different Center Metal Ions, Exhibiting the Ferrimagnetic Behavior and Slow Magnetic Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun-Long; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Yang, Guo-Ping; Wang, Lu; Jin, Jun-Cheng; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Two 3D isostructural metal-organic frameworks with 1D ferrimagnetic chains, formulated as [M3(L)(μ3-OH)2(H2O)4] [H4L = (1,1':4',1″-terphenyl)-2',3,3″,5'-tetracarboxylic acid, where M = Mn for 1 and Co for 2], have been successfully synthesized by employing different center metal ions and a multicarboxylate ligand under identical reaction conditions in this work. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction data of 1 and 2 reveal that the complexes are two 3D isostructural frameworks based on 1D [M3(OH)2]n chains composed of triangular subunits as rod-shaped secondary building units, which are classified as binodal 4,6-connected fry nets with the point symbol (5(10)·6(3)·7(8))(5(4)·6(2)). The magnetic properties revealed that complexes 1 and 2 exhibit ferrimagnetic behavior. Also, the alternating-current susceptibility of 2 displays slow magnetic relaxation, showing interesting magnetic behavior of a single-chain magnet with an effective energy barrier of 32 K. PMID:27327901

  7. A method for embedding circular force-free flux ropes in potential magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, V. S.; Török, T.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method for constructing approximate force-free equilibria in pre-eruptive configurations in which a thin force-free flux rope is embedded into a locally bipolar-type potential magnetic field. The flux rope is assumed to have a circular-arc axis, a circular cross-section, and electric current that is either concentrated in a thin layer at the boundary of the rope or smoothly distributed across it with a maximum of the current density at the center. The entire solution is described in terms of the magnetic vector potential in order to facilitate the implementation of the method in numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes that evolve the vector potential rather than the magnetic field itself. The parameters of the flux rope can be chosen so that its subsequent MHD relaxation under photospheric line-tied boundary conditions leads to nearly exact numerical equilibria. To show the capabilities of our method, we apply it to several cases with different ambient magnetic fields and internal flux-rope structures. These examples demonstrate that the proposed method is a useful tool for initializing data-driven simulations of solar eruptions.

  8. Pentanuclear heterometallic {Ni2Ln3} (Ln = Gd, Dy, Tb, Ho) assemblies. Single-molecule magnet behavior and multistep relaxation in the dysprosium derivative.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli; Bag, Prasenjit; Kroener, Wolfgang; Gieb, Klaus; Müller, Paul

    2013-11-18

    The reaction between Ln(III) chloride and NiCl2·4H2O salts in presence of a multidentate sterically unencumbered ligand, (E)-2,2'-(2-hydroxy-3-((2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl)-5-methylbenzylazanediyl)diethanol (LH4) leads to the synthesis of four isostructural pentanuclear hetereometallic complexes [Ni2Dy3(LH)4]Cl (1), [Ni2Gd3(LH)4]Cl (2), [Ni2Tb3(LH)3(LH2)]Cl2 (3), [Ni2 Ho3 (LH)3 (LH2)]Cl2 (4) with unprecedented topology. Here the two compounds 1 are 2 are monocationic and crystallize in chiral space group, P2(1)2(1)2(1) whereas compounds 3 and 4 are dicationic and crystallize in achiral space group P2(1)/n. The total metal framework, {Ni2Ln3} unit is held by four triply deprotonated ligands [LH](3-) in 1 and 2 whereas in case of 3 and 4 three triply deprotonated [LH](3-) and one doubly deprotonated [LH2](2-) ligands are involved. In these complexes both the lanthanide ions and the nickel(II) ions are doubly bridged and the bridging is composed of oxygen atoms derived from either phenolate or ethoxide groups. The analysis of SQUID measurements reveal a high magnetic ground state and a slow relaxation of the magnetization with two relaxation regimes for 1. For the thermally activated regime we found an effective energy barrier of U(eff) = 85 K. Micro Hall probe loop measurements directly proof the single-molecule magnet (SMM) nature of 1 with a blocking temperature of T(B) = 3 K and an open hysteresis for sweep rates faster than 50 mT/s. PMID:24236759

  9. Practical method using superposition of individual magnetic fields for initial arrangement of undulator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Shioya, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have developed a practical method for determining an excellent initial arrangement of magnetic arrays for a pure-magnet Halbach-type undulator. In this method, the longitudinal magnetic field distribution of each magnet is measured using a moving Hall probe system along the beam axis with a high positional resolution. The initial arrangement of magnetic arrays is optimized and selected by analyzing the superposition of all distribution data in order to achieve adequate spectral quality for the undulator. We applied this method to two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), called U#16-2 and U#02-2, at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The measured field distribution of the undulator was demonstrated to be excellent for the initial arrangement of the magnet array, and this method saved a great deal of effort in adjusting the magnetic fields of EPUs.

  10. SS{sub p}G: A strongly orthogonal geminal method with relaxed strong orthogonality

    SciTech Connect

    Cagg, Brett A. Rassolov, Vitaly A.

    2014-10-28

    Strong orthogonality is an important constraint placed on geminal wavefunctions in order to make variational minimization tractable. However, strong orthogonality prevents certain, possibly important, excited configurations from contributing to the ground state description of chemical systems. The presented method lifts strong orthogonality constraint from geminal wavefunction by computing a perturbative-like correction to each geminal independently from the corrections to all other geminals. The method is applied to the Singlet-type Strongly orthogonal Geminals variant of the geminal wavefunction. Comparisons of this new SS{sub p}G method are made to the non-orthogonal AP1roG and the unconstrained Geminal Mean-Field Configuration Interaction method using small atomic and molecular systems. The correction is also compared to Density Matrix Renormalization Group calculations performed on long polyene chains in order to assess its scalability and applicability to large strongly correlated systems. The results of these comparisons demonstrate that although the perturbative correction is small, it may be a necessary first step in the systematic improvement of any strongly orthogonal geminal method.

  11. Large loop conformation sampling using the activation relaxation technique, ART-nouveau method.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-07-01

    We present an adaptation of the ART-nouveau energy surface sampling method to the problem of loop structure prediction. This method, previously used to study protein folding pathways and peptide aggregation, is well suited to the problem of sampling the conformation space of large loops by targeting probable folding pathways instead of sampling exhaustively that space. The number of sampled conformations needed by ART nouveau to find the global energy minimum for a loop was found to scale linearly with the sequence length of the loop for loops between 8 and about 20 amino acids. Considering the linear scaling dependence of the computation cost on the loop sequence length for sampling new conformations, we estimate the total computational cost of sampling larger loops to scale quadratically compared to the exponential scaling of exhaustive search methods. PMID:22488731

  12. A sample-saving method for heat capacity measurements on powders using relaxation calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachs, Edgar; Benisek, Artur

    2011-08-01

    An experimental method is described for determining the low-temperature heat capacity (Cp) of mg-sized powder samples using the Quantum Design “Physical Properties Measurement System” (PPMS). The powder is contained in an Al pan as an ∼1 mm thick compressed layer. The sample is not mixed with Apiezon N grease, as compared to other methods. Thus, it is not contaminated and can be used for further study. This is necessary for samples that are only available in tiny amounts. To demonstrate the method various samples, all insulating in nature, were studied including benzoic acid, sapphire and different silicate minerals. The measurements show that the method has an accuracy in Cp to better than 1% at T above 30-50 K and ±3-5% up to ±10% below. The experimental procedure is based on three independent PPMS and three independent differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The DSC Cp data are used to slightly adjust the PPMS Cp data by a factor C. This is done because heat capacities measured with a DSC device are more accurate around ambient T (⩽0.6%) than PPMS values and is possible because the deviation of PPMS heat capacities from reference values is nearly constant between about 50 K and 300 K. The resulting standard entropies agree with published reference values within 0.21% for the silicates, by 0.34% for corundum, and by 0.9% for powdered benzoic acid. The method thus allows entropy determinations on powders with an accuracy of better than 1%. The advantage of our method compared to other experimental techniques is that the sample powder is not contaminated with grease and that heat capacity values show less scatter at high temperatures.

  13. A sample-saving method for heat capacity measurements on powders using relaxation calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dachs, Edgar; Benisek, Artur

    2011-08-01

    An experimental method is described for determining the low-temperature heat capacity (C(p)) of mg-sized powder samples using the Quantum Design "Physical Properties Measurement System" (PPMS). The powder is contained in an Al pan as an ∼1 mm thick compressed layer. The sample is not mixed with Apiezon N grease, as compared to other methods. Thus, it is not contaminated and can be used for further study. This is necessary for samples that are only available in tiny amounts. To demonstrate the method various samples, all insulating in nature, were studied including benzoic acid, sapphire and different silicate minerals. The measurements show that the method has an accuracy in C(p) to better than 1% at T above 30-50 K and ±3-5% up to ±10% below. The experimental procedure is based on three independent PPMS and three independent differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. The DSC C(p) data are used to slightly adjust the PPMS C(p) data by a factor CpDSC/CpPPMSat298K. This is done because heat capacities measured with a DSC device are more accurate around ambient T (⩽0.6%) than PPMS values and is possible because the deviation of PPMS heat capacities from reference values is nearly constant between about 50 K and 300 K. The resulting standard entropies agree with published reference values within 0.21% for the silicates, by 0.34% for corundum, and by 0.9% for powdered benzoic acid. The method thus allows entropy determinations on powders with an accuracy of better than 1%. The advantage of our method compared to other experimental techniques is that the sample powder is not contaminated with grease and that heat capacity values show less scatter at high temperatures. PMID:21886915

  14. Generalization of the relaxation method for the inverse solution of nonlinear and linear transfer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1977-01-01

    A mapping transformation is derived for the inverse solution of nonlinear and linear integral equations of the types encountered in remote sounding studies. The method is applied to the solution of specific problems for the determination of the thermal and composition structure of planetary atmospheres from a knowledge of their upwelling radiance.

  15. Asymmetric MRI magnet design using a hybrid numerical method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Crozier, S; Doddrell, D M

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes a hybrid numerical method for the design of asymmetric magnetic resonance imaging magnet systems. The problem is formulated as a field synthesis and the desired current density on the surface of a cylinder is first calculated by solving a Fredholm equation of the first kind. Nonlinear optimization methods are then invoked to fit practical magnet coils to the desired current density. The field calculations are performed using a semi-analytical method. A new type of asymmetric magnet is proposed in this work. The asymmetric MRI magnet allows the diameter spherical imaging volume to be positioned close to one end of the magnet. The main advantages of making the magnet asymmetric include the potential to reduce the perception of claustrophobia for the patient, better access to the patient by attending physicians, and the potential for reduced peripheral nerve stimulation due to the gradient coil configuration. The results highlight that the method can be used to obtain an asymmetric MRI magnet structure and a very homogeneous magnetic field over the central imaging volume in clinical systems of approximately 1.2 m in length. Unshielded designs are the focus of this work. This method is flexible and may be applied to magnets of other geometries. PMID:10579958

  16. The spin relaxation of nitrogen donors in 6H SiC crystals as studied by the electron spin echo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savchenko, D.; Shanina, B.; Kalabukhova, E.; Pöppl, A.; Lančok, J.; Mokhov, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present the detailed study of the spin kinetics of the nitrogen (N) donor electrons in 6H SiC wafers grown by the Lely method and by the sublimation "sandwich method" (SSM) with a donor concentration of about 1017 cm-3 at T = 10-40 K. The donor electrons of the N donors substituting quasi-cubic "k1" and "k2" sites (Nk1,k2) in both types of the samples revealed the similar temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1), which was described by the direct one-phonon and two-phonon processes induced by the acoustic phonons proportional to T and to T9, respectively. The character of the temperature dependence of the T1-1 for the donor electrons of N substituting hexagonal ("h") site (Nh) in both types of 6H SiC samples indicates that the donor electrons relax through the fast-relaxing centers by means of the cross-relaxation process. The observed enhancement of the phase memory relaxation rate (Tm-1) with the temperature increase for the Nh donors in both types of the samples, as well as for the Nk1,k2 donors in Lely grown 6H SiC, was explained by the growth of the free electron concentration with the temperature increase and their exchange scattering at the N donor centers. The observed significant shortening of the phase memory relaxation time Tm for the Nk1,k2 donors in the SSM grown sample with the temperature lowering is caused by hopping motion of the electrons between the occupied and unoccupied states of the N donors at Nh and Nk1,k2 sites. The impact of the N donor pairs, triads, distant donor pairs formed in n-type 6H SiC wafers on the spin relaxation times was discussed.

  17. A comparison of magnetic resonance methods for spatially resolved T2 distribution measurements in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashaee, S.; Marica, F.; Newling, B.; Balcom, B. J.

    2015-05-01

    Naturally occurring porous media are usually characterized by a distribution of pore sizes. If the material is fluid saturated, the 1H magnetic resonance (MR) signal depends on the pore size, the surface relaxivity and the fluid itself. Measurement of the transverse relaxation time T2 is a well-established technique to characterize material samples by means of MR. T2 distribution measurements, including T2 distribution mapping, are widely employed in clinical applications and in petroleum engineering. T2 distribution measurements are the most basic measurement employed to determine the fluid-matrix properties in MR core analysis. Three methods for T2 distribution mapping, namely spin-echo single point imaging (SE-SPI), DANTE-Z Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) and adiabatic inversion CPMG are compared in terms of spatial resolution, minimum observable T2 and sensitivity. Bulk CPMG measurement is considered to be the gold standard for T2 determination. Bulk measurement of uniform samples is compared to the three spatially resolved measurements. SE-SPI is an imaging method, which measures spatially resolved T2s in samples of interest. A variant is introduced in this work that employs pre-equalized magnetic field gradient waveforms and is therefore able to measure shorter T2s than previously reported. DANTE-Z CPMG and adiabatic inversion CPMG are faster, non-imaging, local T2 distribution measurements. The DANTE-Z pulse train and adiabatic inversion pulse are compared in terms of T1 or T2 relaxation time effects during the RF pulse application, minimum pulse duration, requisite RF pulse power, and inversion profile quality. In addition to experimental comparisons, simulation results are presented.

  18. High-pressure nuclear-magnetic-resonance study of carbon-13 relaxation in 2-ethylhexyl benzoate and 2-ethylhexyl cyclohexanecarboxylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamy, S. T.; Grandinetti, P. J.; Masuda, Y.; Campbell, D.; Jonas, J.

    1991-03-01

    Natural abundance carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times and 13G-1H nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) times of 2-ethyl hexylbenzoate (EHB) and 2-ethyl hexylcyclohexanecarboxylate (EHC) have been measured along isotherms of -20, 0, 20, 40, and 80 °C at pressures of 1-5000 bars using high-pressure, high-resolution NMR techniques. The ability to use pressure as an experimental variable has allowed us to study a wide range of molecular motions from extreme narrowing into the slow motional regime. In addition, the high-resolution capability even at high pressure permits the measurement of 13C and NOE for each individual carbon in the molecules studied. Relaxation in both molecules is successfully analyzed in terms of a model assuming a Cole-Davidson distribution of correlation times. The comparison of parameters used in the model demonstrates the increased flexibility of the EHC ring over the EHB ring and also shows how the presence of the flexible ring contributes to the increased over-all mobility of the EHC molecule. The analysis of molecular reorientations in terms of activation volumes also indicates that EHB motion is highly restricted at low temperature.

  19. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  20. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.