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Sample records for magnetic spreading anomalies

  1. Seafloor spreading in the eastern Gulf of Mexico: New evidence for marine magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskamani, Philip K.

    Possible sea-floor spreading anomalies are indentified in marine magnetic surveys conducted in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. A symmetric pattern of lineated anomalies can be correlated with the geomagnetic time scale using previously proposed opening histories for the Gulf of Mexico basin. Lineated magnetic anomalies are characterized by amplitudes of up to 30 nT and wavelengths of 45-55 km, and are correlatable across 12 different ship tracks spanning a combined distance of 6,712 km. The magnetic lineations are orientated in a NW-SE direction with 3 distinct positive lineations on either side of the inferred spreading ridge anomalies. The magnetic anomalies were forward modeled with a 2 km thick magnetic crust composed of vertically bounded blocks of normal and reverse polarity at a model source depth of 10 km. Remnant magnetization intensity and inclination are 1.6 A m-1 and 0.2° respectively, chosen to best fit the magnetic observed amplitudes and, for inclination, in accord with the nearly equatorial position of the Gulf of Mexico during Jurassic seafloor spreading. The current magnetic field is modeled with declination and inclination of and 0.65° and 20° respectively. Using a full seafloor spreading rate of 1.7 cm/yr, the anomalies correlate with magnetic chrons M21 to M10. The inferred spreading direction is consistent with previous suggestions of a North-East to South-West direction of sea-floor spreading off the west coast of Florida beginning 149 Ma (M21) and ending 134 Ma (M10). The opening direction is also consistent with the counter-clockwise rotation of Yucatan proposed in past models.

  2. Contribution of oceanic gabbros to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kikawa, E; Ozawa, K

    1992-10-30

    The contribution of oceanic gabbros, representative rocks for layer 3 of the oceanic crust, to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies has been controversial because of the large variation in magnetic properties. Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 118 contains a continuous 500.7-meter section of oceanic gabbro that allows the relations between magnetization and petrologic characteristics, such as the degree of metamorphism and the magmatic evolution, to be clarified. The data suggest that oceanic gabbros, together with the effects of metamorphism and of magmatic evolution, account for a significant part of the marine magnetic anomalies. PMID:17777035

  3. A New Seafloor Spreading Model of the Red Sea: Magnetic Anomalies and Plate Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Tapponnier, P.; Afifi, A. M.; Zinger, M. A.; Franken, D.; Muzaiyen, E.

    2013-12-01

    A high resolution aeromagnetic survey over the Saudi Arabian side of the Red Sea confirms the existence of consistent magnetic anomaly patterns, continuous from 16 to 24°N, and episodic up to 28°N, typical of slow to ultraslow spreading centers. The older Saudi-Sudanese aeromagnetic survey shows that these anomalies are symmetrical between 18 and 23°N. The strong, short-wavelength anomalies over the central trough south of 24°N have long been identified as Chrons 1 to 3 (0-5 Ma). By contrast, the weaker, longer-wavelength anomalies over adjacent sediment-covered areas do not fit standard magnetic anomaly models. The abrupt basement deepening from ~ 1.5 km in the central trough to ~ 5 km beneath the sediments partly accounts for the lower amplitude but not for the lack of short wavelengths. Other spreading centers also lack short-wavelength, high-amplitude magnetic anomalies where covered by thick sediments (Andaman Basin, Juan de Fuca Ridge). We interpret this to reflect the absence of a well-defined layer of pillow lavas, whose emplacement is hampered by rapid, abundant sedimentation. The formation of dykes and sills instead of extrusive lavas results in weaker, less coherent magnetization, generating longer-wavelength anomalies. We test this inference by removing the extrusive basalt contribution from a slow spreading center crustal magnetization model. The computed magnetic anomalies fit well with the shape and amplitude of the anomalies observed in the Red Sea. Two major long-wavelength anomalies are dated at 10-11 Ma (Chron 5) and 14-15 Ma (Chron 5B), implying seafloor spreading back to at least 15 Ma and constraining plate-kinematic reconstructions. Beyond being a key to the geological evolution of the Red Sea, these results emphasize that oceanic crust may exist without clear, short wavelength magnetic anomalies, particularly at the onset of seafloor spreading, when abundant sedimentation may preclude the formation of pillow lavas. The location of many

  4. Early India-Australia Spreading History Revealed by Newly Detected Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S.; Whittaker, J. M.; Granot, R.; Müller, D.

    2013-12-01

    The seafloor within the Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP), offshore Western Australia, is the only section of crust that directly records the early spreading history between India and Australia during the Mesozoic breakup of Gondwana. However, this early spreading has been poorly constrained due to an absence of data, including marine magnetic anomalies and data constraining the crustal nature of key tectonic features. Here, we present new magnetic anomaly data from the PAP that shows that the crust in the western part of the basin was part of the Indian Plate - the conjugate flank to the oceanic crust immediately offshore the Perth margin, Australia. We identify a sequence of M2 and older anomalies in the west PAP within crust that initially moved with the Indian Plate, formed at intermediate half-spreading rates (35 mm/yr) consistent with the conjugate sequence on the Australian Plate. More speculatively, we reinterpret the youngest anomalies in the east PAP, finding that the M0-age crust initially formed on the Indian Plate was transferred to the Australian Plate by a westward jump or propagation of the spreading ridge shortly after M0 time. Samples dredged from the Gulden Draak and Batavia Knolls (at the western edge of the PAP) reveal that these bathymetric features are continental fragments rather than igneous plateaus related to Broken Ridge. These microcontinents rifted away from Australia with Greater India during initial breakup at ~130 Ma, then rifted from India following the cessation of spreading in the PAP (~101-103 Ma).

  5. Magnetic and gravity anomalies of the slow-spreading system in the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, M.; Fujimoto, H.; Tamaki, K.; Okino, K.

    2002-12-01

    The spreading system in the Gulf of Aden between Somalia, NE Africa, and Arabia has an ENE-WSW trend and its half spreading rate is about 1.0 cm/yr (e.g., Jestin et al., 1994). Previous studies (e.g., Tamsett and Searle, 1988) provided the general morphology of the spreading system. To reveal detailed morphology and tectonics of the spreading system in the Gulf of Aden, geophysical investigation was conducted along the spreading system between 45°30OE and 50°20OE by the R/V Hakuho-maru from December 2000 to January 2001. Bathymetric data were collected using an echo sounder SEA BEAM 2120 aboard R/V Hakuho-maru. Magnetic and gravity data were collected by towed proton magnetometer and shipboard gravimeter, respectively. The strike of the spreading centers east of 46°30OE is N65°W. The topographic expression of the spreading centers east of N46°30OE is an axial rift valley offset by transform faults siilar to that observed at slow spreading centers in other areas. The bathymetric feature of the spreading centers between 45°50OE and 46°30OE with a strike N80°E is N65°W trending en-echelon basins. The spreading center west of 45°50OE with a strike E-W is bouned by linear ridges and its bathymetric expression is N65°W trending en-echelon ridges. The axial rift valley west of N46°30OE is not offset by any prominent transform faults. Negative magnetic anomaly is dominant over the axial valleys. Its amplitude is about 500 nT and the wavelength is about 30 km. Prominent linear negative magnetic anomaly, which is more than 1000 nT, exists west of N46°30OE. The strike of the linear magnetic anomaly correlates with that of axial valleys west of N46°30OE. Mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly of the spreading centers increases eastward. This trend correlates with the eastward deepening of spreading centers.

  6. Investigation of spreading center ecolution by joint inversion of seafloor magnetic anomaly and tectonic fabric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    Spreading center segments that have experienced a complex tectonic history including rift propagation may have a complicated signature in bathymetric and magnetic anomaly data. To gain insight into the history of such regions, we have developed techniques in which both the magnetic anomaly patterns and seafloor fabric trends are predicted theoretically, and the combined predictions are compared numerically with the data to estimate best fitting parameters for the propagation history. Fitting functions are constructed to help determine which model best matches the digitized fabric and magnetic anomaly data. Such functions offer statistical criteria for choosing the best fit model. We use this approach to resolve the propagation history of the Cobb Offset along the Juan de Fuca ridge. In this example, the magnetic anomaly data prove more useful in defining the geometry of the propagation events, while the fabric, with its greater temporal resolution, is more useful for constraining the rate of propagation. It thus appears that joint inversion of magnetic and seafloor fabric data can be valuable in tectonic analyses.

  7. Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies in the Perth Abyssal Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Simon E.; Whittaker, Joanne M.; Granot, Roi; Müller, Dietmar R.

    2013-07-01

    seafloor within the Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP), offshore Western Australia, is the only section of crust that directly records the early spreading history between India and Australia during the Mesozoic breakup of Gondwana. However, this early spreading has been poorly constrained due to an absence of data, including marine magnetic anomalies and data constraining the crustal nature of key tectonic features. Here, we present new magnetic anomaly data from the PAP that shows that the crust in the western part of the basin was part of the Indian Plate—the conjugate flank to the oceanic crust immediately offshore the Perth margin, Australia. We identify a sequence of M2 and older anomalies in the west PAP within crust that initially moved with the Indian Plate, formed at intermediate half-spreading rates (35 mm/yr) consistent with the conjugate sequence on the Australian Plate. More speculatively, we reinterpret the youngest anomalies in the east PAP, finding that the M0-age crust initially formed on the Indian Plate was transferred to the Australian Plate by a westward jump or propagation of the spreading ridge shortly after M0 time. Samples dredged from the Gulden Draak and Batavia Knolls (at the western edge of the PAP) reveal that these bathymetric features are continental fragments rather than igneous plateaus related to Broken Ridge. These microcontinents rifted away from Australia with Greater India during initial breakup at ~130 Ma, then rifted from India following the cessation of spreading in the PAP (~101-103 Ma).

  8. Magnetic anomalies and seafloor spreading rates in the northern South Atlantic.

    PubMed

    van Andel, T H; Moore, T C

    1970-04-25

    A geomagnetic profile across the northern South Atlantic yields spreading rates for the last 70 m.y. which vary from 1.6 to 2.0 cm/year. There is evidence for three regional discontinuities in the spreading history of the South Atlantic. PMID:16057239

  9. Axial magnetic anomalies over slow-spreading ridge segments: insights from numerical 3-D thermal and physical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, Sébastien; Dyment, Jérôme; Tisseau, Chantal; Goslin, Jean

    2003-09-01

    The axial magnetic anomaly amplitude along Mid-Atlantic Ridge segments is systematically twice as high at segment ends compared with segment centres. Various processes have been proposed to account for such observations, either directly or indirectly related to the thermal structure of the segments: (1) shallower Curie isotherm at segment centres, (2) higher Fe-Ti content at segment ends, (3) serpentinized peridotites at segment ends or (4) a combination of these processes. In this paper the contribution of each of these processes to the axial magnetic anomaly amplitude is quantitatively evaluated by achieving a 3-D numerical modelling of the magnetization distribution and a magnetic anomaly over a medium-sized, 50 km long segment. The magnetization distribution depends on the thermal structure and thermal evolution of the lithosphere. The thermal structure is calculated considering the presence of a permanent hot zone beneath the segment centre. The `best-fitting' thermal structure is determined by adjusting the parameters (shape, size, depth, etc.) of this hot zone, to fit the modelled geophysical outputs (Mantle Bouguer anomaly, maximum earthquake depths and crustal thickness) to the observations. Both the thermoremanent magnetization, acquired during the thermal evolution, and the induced magnetization, which depends on the present thermal structure, are modelled. The resulting magnetic anomalies are then computed and compared with the observed ones. This modelling exercise suggests that, in the case of aligned and slightly offset segments, a combination of higher Fe-Ti content and the presence of serpentinized peridotites at segment ends will produce the observed higher axial magnetic anomaly amplitudes over the segment ends. In the case of greater offsets, the presence of serpentinized peridotites at segment ends is sufficient to account for the observations.

  10. Three-dimensional inversion of marine magnetic anomalies on the equatorial Atlantic Ridge (St. Paul Fracture Zone): Delayed magnetization in a magmatically starved spreading center?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sichler, Bertrand; HéKinian, Roger

    2002-12-01

    The St. Paul Fracture Zone (FZ) in the equatorial Atlantic is interrupted by three intratransform ridge (ITR) spreading centers. A detailed magnetic survey, corrected for the diurnal variations using a moored magnetic station, six submersible dives, and three bottom-towed video camera tracks provide data on the most eastern ITR (0°37'N, 25°27'W). Visual observations and submersible sampling displayed a high ultramafic/volcanic ratio, supporting the assumption that the ITR is in a magmatically starved state. Volcanics were mainly found on the rift valley floor from 4700 to 4000 m and as a thin cap (<160 m) on the top of the eastern rift crest (2700 m). Most of the rift walls consist essentially of serpentinized peridotites and gabbros. The magnetic data show a well-defined ridge centered anomaly. A generalized inversion method was applied to the field data to calculate the crustal equivalent magnetization, assuming that the seafloor is broken down into elementary cells of 1 × 1 × 0.5 km3 which fit the topography. The average of absolute value of equivalent magnetization is 2.7 A m-1. The width of the central normal polarity (Brunhes epoch) is wider (at least 34 km) than that indicated by the NUVEL-1 kinematic model (24.5 km). This 40% excess is believed to be significant and is thought to be the result of prolonged chemical remanent magnetization acquired during the serpentinization of peridotites. In a magmatically starved accretion segment, we suggest that peridotites could continue to acquire magnetization as long as tectonic activities facilitate the circulation of seawater in the upper mantle.

  11. Opening of the Gulf of Mexico and the Nature of the Crust in the Deep Gulf: New Evidence from Seafloor Spreading Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, D. L.; Eskamani, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    The seafloor spreading history in the Gulf of Mexico is poorly constrained due to a lack of recognized seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies, a paucity of deep penetrating seismic data, and absence of drilling to constrain crystalline ocean floor composition and ages. We have identified lineated magnetic anomalies in the eastern Gulf on profiles collected during the Woods Hole R/V Farnella FRNL85-2 cruise that correlate with magnetic chrons M21R to M10. Forward modeling shows that these anomalies formed during creation of weakly magnetized new seafloor in the eastern Gulf between 149-134 Ma at an average half-spreading rate of 3.2 cm/yr. The oldest anomalies are located against stretched continental crust beneath the western Florida shelf on the east and the Yucatan shelf on the west. The youngest anomalies form a juxtaposed conjugate pair that mark the location of an extinct spreading ridge between Yucatan and Florida. Seismic velocities of the crust in the eastern Gulf and the amplitude of the magnetic anomalies are similar to the Iberian and Newfoundland rifted margins, where the early stages of continental breakup were accommodated by exhumation of subcontinental lithosphere rather than creation of new basaltic oceanic crust. We infer that the eastern Gulf of Mexico is underlain by exhumed sub-continental peridotitic mantle intruded by lesser volumes of basaltic igneous rocks generated by decompression melting of the asthenosphere during the late stages of opening of the Gulf. The long wavelength characteristics of the magnetic and gravity fields in the eastern Gulf, as well as the seismic velocity structure of the crust, differ from those in the central and western Gulf, which are more similar to typical magmatic rifted margins. This suggests that the character of the Gulf changes along strike, from a magmatic western portion to an amagmatic eastern portion. Paleogeographic restoration of the lineated magnetic anomaly pattern suggests a 4-phase model for

  12. Pacific plate apparent polar wander between 67 Ma and 44 Ma determined from the analysis of the skewness of both vector and scalar magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Gordon, R. G.; Horner-Johnson, B. C.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific plate apparent polar wander between 67 Ma and 44 Ma determined from the analysis of the skewness of both vector and scalar magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading The apparent polar wander (APW) path for the Pacific plate is important to the study of Pacific plate motions and their relation to circum-Pacific tectonics. It can be used to discriminate between alternative plate motion circuits, determine the motion of Pacific hotspots relative to the paleomagnetic axis, and test the fixed hotspot hypothesis. The pioneering investigations of Jean Francheteau and his colleagues of Pacific plate APW through the analysis of magnetic anomalies over seamounts helped to demonstrate that the Pacific plate has had substantial northward motion relative to the spin axis since Cretaceous time. We also investigate the APW of the Pacific plate through analysis of magnetic anomalies. Instead of anomalies over seamounts, however, we investigate the skewness (asymmetry) of magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading. In prior work, skewness analysis of shipboard magnetic profiles has been used to determine Pacific paleomagnetic poles for chron 25r (57 Ma B.P.; Petronotis et al., 1994), chron 27r to 31n (62 to 69 Ma B.P.; Acton and Gordon, 1991) and chron 32n (72 Ma B.P.; Petronotis and Gordon, 1999). Recently, vector aeromagnetic data from low paleolatitudes, combined with shipboard profiles from low paleolatitudes, were used to determine a paleomagnetic pole with compact confidence limits for anomaly 12r (32 Ma B.P.; Horner-Johnson and Gordon, 2010). Here we use the low-paleolatitude shipboard- and vector aero-magnetic profiles to determine new paleomagnetic poles for the Pacific plate. A new feature of our analysis is a correction for the spreading-rate dependence of anomalous skewness (Koivisto et al. 2011). We estimate anomalous skewness as a function of spreading rate for each anomaly by creating many synthetic profiles using the model of Dyment and Arkani

  13. Binning of satellite magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, H. K.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomaly signals over satellite orbits were simulated to investigate numerical averaging as an anomaly estimator. Averaging as an anomaly estimator involves significant problems concerning spatial and amplitude smoothing of the satellite magnetic observations. The results of simulations suggest that the error of numerical averaging constitutes a small and relatively minor component of the total error-budget of higher orbital anomaly estimates, whereas for lower orbital estimates numerical averaging error increases substantially. As an alternative to numerical averaging, least-squares collocation was investigated and observed to produce substantially more accurate anomaly estimates, particularly as the orbital elevation of prediction was decreased towards the crustal sources. In contrast to averaging, collocation is a significantly more resource-intensive procedure to apply because of the practical, but surmountable problems related to establishing and inverting the covariance matrix for accurate anomaly prediction. However, collocation may be much more effectively used to exploit the anomaly details contained in the lower orbital satellite magnetic data for geologic analysis.

  14. Magnetic Anomaly Lineations in the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Y.; Nakanishi, M.; Tamaki, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Huchon, P.; Leroy, S. D.; Styles, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present the magnetic anomaly lineations in the Gulf of Aden. The Gulf of Aden has slow spreading ridges between the Arabia Plate and Somalia Plate. The Arabian plate moves away from Somalia Plate in an NE direction, at a rate of about 2 cm/yr. Previous works indicates that seafloor spreading started about 20 Ma in the eastern part of the Gulf of Aden and propagated westward. The spreading axis has a E-W trend west of 46 E and that east of 46 E has a N60 W trend. We examined magnetic data acquired in the cruises by R/V L'Atalante in 1995, R/V Hakuho-maru from 2000 to 2001, R/V Maurice Ewing in 2001, and Shackleton in 1975 and 1979. We also used data obtained from National Geophysical Data Center, NOAA. We calculated magnetic anomalies using the latest Internation Geomagnetic Reference Field. Elongated negative magnetic anomalies, which amplitude are more than 500 nT, observed over the spreading centers. Most of the elongated anomalies are parallel with the spreading centers. The elongated magnetic anomalies west of 46 30'E have an E-W trend around the spreading centers. Several discontinuities in the magnetic anomaly contour map illustrate the position of the fracture zones concealed by sediments. We identified magnetic lineations from 43 E to 52 E. Most of magnetic lineations west and east of 46 30'E have N-E and N60-65 W strikes, respectively. The oldest lineations are C3r (5.48~5.74 Ma) between 43 10'E and 44 E and C5Ar (12.4~12.7 Ma) east of 44 E. Our identification of magnetic anomaly lineations indicates a symmetric seafloor spreading with a spreading rate of about 1.0 cm/yr, although Leroy et al. (2004) showed an asymmetric seafloor spreading of the Sheba Ridge, east of our study area. The kinematics of the Arabia plate changed about 5 Ma, but our results did not show any coeval change in spreading rates of the spreading system in the Gulf of Aden.

  15. Spreading rate dependence of gravity anomalies along oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Patricia M; Lin, Jian; Behn, Mark D; Montési, Laurent G J

    2007-07-12

    Mid-ocean ridge morphology and crustal accretion are known to depend on the spreading rate of the ridge. Slow-spreading mid-ocean-ridge segments exhibit significant crustal thinning towards transform and non-transform offsets, which is thought to arise from a three-dimensional process of buoyant mantle upwelling and melt migration focused beneath the centres of ridge segments. In contrast, fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by smaller, segment-scale variations in crustal thickness, which reflect more uniform mantle upwelling beneath the ridge axis. Here we present a systematic study of the residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly of 19 oceanic transform faults that reveals a strong correlation between gravity signature and spreading rate. Previous studies have shown that slow-slipping transform faults are marked by more positive gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments, but our analysis reveals that intermediate and fast-slipping transform faults exhibit more negative gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments. This finding indicates that there is a mass deficit at intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults, which could reflect increased rock porosity, serpentinization of mantle peridotite, and/or crustal thickening. The most negative anomalies correspond to topographic highs flanking the transform faults, rather than to transform troughs (where deformation is probably focused and porosity and alteration are expected to be greatest), indicating that crustal thickening could be an important contributor to the negative gravity anomalies observed. This finding in turn suggests that three-dimensional magma accretion may occur near intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults. PMID:17625563

  16. Satellite magnetic anomalies over subduction zones - The Aleutian Arc anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. C.; Frey, H.; Thomas, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Positive magnetic anomalies seen in MAGSAT average scalar anomaly data overlying some subduction zones can be explained in terms of the magnetization contrast between the cold subducted oceanic slab and the surrounding hotter, nonmagnetic mantle. Three-dimensional modeling studies show that peak anomaly amplitude and location depend on slab length and dip. A model for the Aleutian Arc anomaly matches the general trend of the observed MAGSAT anomaly if a slab thickness of 7 km and a relatively high (induced plus viscous) magnetization contrast of 4 A/m are used. A second source body along the present day continental margin is required to match the observed anomaly in detail, and may be modeled as a relic slab from subduction prior to 60 m.y. ago.

  17. Interpretation of magnetic anomalies over the Grenada Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Dale E.; Hall, Stuart A.; Casey, John F.; Millegan, Patrick S.

    1993-10-01

    The Grenada Basin is a back arc basin located near the eastern border of the Caribbean Plate. The basin is bounded on the west by the north-south trending Aves Ridge (a remnant island arc) and on the east by the active Lesser Antilles island arc. Although this physiography suggests that east-west extension formed the basin, magnetic anomalies over the basin exhibit predominantly east-west trends. If the observed magnetic anomalies over the basin are produced by seafloor spreading, then the orientation of extension is complex. Extension in back arc basins is roughly normal to the trench, although some basins exhibit oblique extension. Present models for the formation of the Grenada Basin vary from north-south extension through northeast-southwest extension to east-west extension. An interpretation of magnetic anomalies over the Grenada Basin supports basin development by nearly east-west extension. Low amplitude magnetic anomaly trends subparallel to the island arc magnetic anomaly trends over the southern part of the basin and the results of forward three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic modeling are consistent with this conclusion. Late Cenozoic tectonic movements may have been responsible for disrupting the magnetic signature over the northern part of the basin. On the basis of our 3-D analysis, we attribute the prominent east-west trending anomalies of the Grenada Basin to fracture zones formed during seafloor spreading at low latitude. This east-west trend is not interpreted as indicating north-south extension of the basin.

  18. Crustal structure interpreted from magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Frey, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    This review, discusses publications during the last quadrennium (1987-1990) that used aeromagnetic data, marine magnetic data, satellite magnetic data, and rock magnetic and petrologic data to provide information on the sources of magnetic anomalies. The publications reviewed reflect increased integration of rock magnetic property and petrologic studies with magnetic anomaly interpretation studies, particularly in deep crustal magnetization, exploration for hydrocarbons, and inversion of marine magnetic anomalies. Interpretations of aeromagnetic data featuring image display techniques and using the horizontal gradient method for locating magnetization boundaries became standard.

  19. Spectral Methods for Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. L.; Gee, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral methods, that is, those based in the Fourier transform, have long been employed in the analysis of magnetic anomalies. For example, Schouten and MaCamy's Earth filter is used extensively to map patterns to the pole, and Parker's Fourier transform series facilitates forward modeling and provides an efficient algorithm for inversion of profiles and surveys. From a different, and perhaps less familiar perspective, magnetic anomalies can be represented as the realization of a stationary stochastic process and then statistical theory can be brought to bear. It is vital to incorporate the full 2-D power spectrum, even when discussing profile data. For example, early analysis of long profiles failed to discover the small-wavenumber peak in the power spectrum predicted by one-dimensional theory. The long-wavelength excess is the result of spatial aliasing, when energy leaks into the along-track spectrum from the cross-track components of the 2-D spectrum. Spectral techniques may be used to improve interpolation and downward continuation of survey data. They can also evaluate the reliability of sub-track magnetization models both across and and along strike. Along-strike profiles turn out to be surprisingly good indicators of the magnetization directly under them; there is high coherence between the magnetic anomaly and the magnetization over a wide band. In contrast, coherence is weak at long wavelengths on across-strike lines, which is naturally the favored orientation for most studies. When vector (or multiple level) measurements are available, cross-spectral analysis can reveal the wavenumber interval where the geophysical signal resides, and where noise dominates. One powerful diagnostic is that the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-path components of the field must be constant 90 degrees. To illustrate, it was found that on some very long Project Magnetic lines, only the lowest 10% of the wavenumber band contain useful geophysical signal. In this

  20. Satellite Magnetic Anomalies of Africa and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator); Olivier, R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary MAGSAT scalar magnetic anomaly data of Africa, Europe, and adjacent marine areas were reduced to the pole assuming a constant inducing Earth's magnetic field of 60,000 nT. This process leads to a consistent anomaly data set free from marked variations in directional and intensity effects of the Earth's magnetic field over this extensive region. The resulting data are correlated with long wave length-pass filtered free-air gravity anomalies; regional heat flow, and tectonic data to investigate magatectonic elements and the region's geologic history. Magnetic anomalies are related to both ancient as well as more recent Cenozoic structural features.

  1. Northern east Pacific rise: Magnetic anomaly and bathymetric framework

    SciTech Connect

    Klitgord, K.D.; Mammerickx, J.

    1982-08-10

    The oceanic crust in the eastern Pacific between 7/sup 0/N and 30/sup 0/N and east of 127/sup 0/W contains a fairly complete history of the spreading centers associated with the East Pacific Rise since 25 m.y. B.P. (late Oligocene). In this paper, we have summarized the seafloor spreading magnetic-anomaly data and the bathymetric data that reflect the record of this technique history. The well-defined magnetic lineations north of the Clarion fracture zone, in the mouth of the Gulf of California, and on the east flank of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) are carefully examined and used to provide a guide for interpreting the spreading pattern between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones, southward of the Rivera fracture zone over the Mathematician Ridge, and over the entire EPR east of the Mathematician Ridge between the Rivera and Siqueiros fracture zones. The bathymetric data provide a trace of the fracture zone pattern in each of the above mentioned areas. The fracture zone bathymetry and the seafloor spreading magnetc lineations on the EPR south of the Rivera fracture zone have a distinctive fanning pattern caused by close poles of rotation and plate boundary reorganizations. All these data provide a good record of the plate reorganizations in the middle Miocene at magnetic anomaly 5A time (12.5 to 11 m.y. B.P.), in the late Miocene at a magnetic anomaly 3'--4 time (6.5 m.y. B.P.), and in the Pliocene at magnetic anomaly 2'--3 time (3.5 m.y.B.P.). Several abandoned spreading centers, including the Mathematician Ridge, were left behind as a result of these reorganizations. The Mathematician Ridge is shown to be a set of ridges and trough whose origin is related to the tectonics activity associated with each of the above mentioned reorganizations since anomaly 5A.

  2. Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental rifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Radially polarized MAGSAT anomalies of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the anomalies. The longevity of continental scale magnetic anomalies contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity anomalies which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.

  3. The source of marine magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Vine-Matthews hypothesis (1963) is examined. This hypothesis suggests that oceanic rocks become polarized in the direction of the magnetic field at the time of their formation, thus recording the polarity history of the earth's magnetic field. This produces the lineated magnetic anomalies on either side of the midoceanic ridge crests. The strength of these magnetic anomalies is studied to determine the strength of magnetization. Indirect determinations of the magnetization intensity of the oceanic crust and direct observations of the oceanic crust are compared. It is found that the average magnetization of a 6-km thick oceanic crust is 1.18 A/m.

  4. Magnetic and gravity anomalies in the Americas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The cleaning and magnetic tape storage of spherical Earth processing programs are reported. These programs include: NVERTSM which inverts total or vector magnetic anomaly data on a distribution of point dipoles in spherical coordinates; SMFLD which utilizes output from NVERTSM to compute total or vector magnetic anomaly fields for a distribution of point dipoles in spherical coordinates; NVERTG; and GFLD. Abstracts are presented for papers dealing with the mapping and modeling of magnetic and gravity anomalies, and with the verification of crustal components in satellite data.

  5. The magnetic anomaly of the Ivreazone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, G.

    1979-01-01

    A magnetic field survey was made in the Ivreazone in 1969/70. The results were: significant anomaly of the vertical intensity is found. It follows the basic main part of the Ivrea-Verbano zone and continues to the south. The width of the anomaly is about 10 km, the maximum measures about +800 gamma. The model interpretation shows that possibly the anomaly belongs to an amphibolitic body, which in connection with the Ivrea-body was found by deep seismic sounding. Therefore, the magnetic anomaly provides further evidence for the conception that the Ivrea-body has to be regarded as a chip of earthmantle material pushed upward by tectonic processes.

  6. US Aeromagnetic and Satellite Magnetic Anomaly Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W. (Principal Investigator); Sexton, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Scalar aeromagnetic data obtained by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (NOO) Vector Magnetic Survey of the conterminous U.S. were screened for periods of intense diurnal magnetic activity and reduced to anomaly form, filtered, and continued upward. A number of correlations between the NOO, POGO and preliminary MAGSAT data are evident at satellite elevations, including a prominent transcontinental magnetic high which extends from the Anadarko Basin to the Cincinnati Arch. The transcontinental magnetic high is breached by negative anomalies located over the Rio Grande Rift and Mississippi River Aulacogen. Differentially reduced-to-pole NOO and POGO magnetic anomaly data show that the transcontinental magnetic high corresponds to a well-defined regional trend of negative free-air gravity and enhanced crustal thickness anomalies.

  7. Marine Magnetic Anomalies and the Reconstruction of the World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Until the middle of the 20th century little was known about magnetic anomalies in the oceans. Then it was discovered that there are relatively large anomalies in most of the oceans and they were unrelated to any geological structure known at that time. In the early 1950's large anomalies had been found over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and linear anomalies over the eastern continental shelf of North America and, shortly after that, off the west coast. A survey of the ridge south of Iceland showed that the anomalies were linear, parallel to the ridge axis, and symmetrical about the axis. Using the theory that the anomalies were caused by geomagnetic field reversals and seafloor spreading it was possible to greatly extend the time scale of geomagnetic reversals, to determine the velocity of seafloor spreading and estimate the time of opening of the North Atlantic. Lamont had a world-wide collection of marine magnetic profiles. These were used, systematically, to determine the positions of most of the land masses of the world since the beginnings of the world's present oceans.

  8. Lunar magnetic anomalies and surface optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.; Schubert, G.

    1980-04-01

    Consideration is given to the influence of lunar magnetic anomalies on the darkening of the lunar surface by solar wind ion bombardment. It is shown that lunar magnetic anomalies with dipole moments much greater than 5 x 10 to the 13th gauss cu cm will strongly deflect the typical solar wind, producing local plasma voids at the lunar surface. Direct measurements of lunar magnetic fields have shown most lunar magnetic fields to have moments below this level, with the exception of anomalies detected in the areas of the Reiner Gamma albedo feature, the Van de Graaff-Aitken region and Mare Marginis. Such magnetic anomalies are shown to be capable of accounting for the higher albedo and swirl-like morphology f these features by the deflection and focusing incident solar wind ions, which tend to darken the surface upon impact.

  9. Reduction of satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slud, E. V.; Smith, P. J.; Langel, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of global magnetic anomaly maps derived from satellite data is facilitated by inversion to the equivalent magnetization in a constant thickness magnetic crust or, equivalently, by reduction to the pole. Previous inversions have proven unstable near the geomagnetic equator. The instability results from magnetic moment distributions which are admissible in the inversion solution but which make only small contribution to the computed values of anomaly field. Their admissibility in the solution could result from noisy or incomplete data or from small poorly resolved anomalies. The resulting magnetic moments are unrealistically large and oscillatory. Application of the method of principal components (e.g. eigenvalue decomposition and selective elimination of less significant eigenvectors) is proposed as a way of overcoming the instability and the method is demonstrated by applying it to the region around the Bangui anomaly in Central Africa.

  10. Global magnetic anomaly and aurora of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.

    1990-01-01

    The large offset and tilt of Neptune's dipole magnetic field combine to create a global magnetic anomaly, analogous to but much more important than earth's South Atlantic Anomaly. Energetic particle precipitation loss within the Neptune anomaly creates 'atmospheric drift shadows' within which particle fluxes are greatly reduced. The energetic particle dropout observed by Voyager near closest approach occurred near the predicted times when Voyager passed within the atmospheric drift shadow. Extremely soft, structured bursts of ions and electrons within the drift shadow may result from plasma wave-induced pitch angle scattering of trapped particles confined near the magnetic equator. The dropout does not necessarily imply that Voyager passed through an earth-like discrete auroral zone, as earlier reported. The ion and electron fluxes observed within the dropout period correspond to particles that must precipitate to Neptune's atmosphere within the anomaly region. This anomaly precipitation can account for a major portion of the ultraviolet emissions previously identified as Neptune aurora.

  11. Understanding Magnetic Anomalies and Their Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise testing the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis of plate tectonics. Includes 14 questions with explanations using graphs and charts. Provides a historical account of the current plate tectonic and magnetic anomaly theory. (MVL)

  12. Initial scalar magnetic anomaly map from Magsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Phillips, J. D.; Horner, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Magsat data acquired during the November 1979-June 1980 mission was used to derive a scalar magnetic anomaly map covering +50 to -50 deg geographic latitude, and the separation of anomaly fields from core and external fields was accomplished by techniques developed for POGO satellite data. Except in the Atlantic and Pacific at latitudes south of -15 deg, comparison of the Magsat map with its POGO data-derived counterpart shows basic anomaly patterns to be reproducible, and higher resolution due to Magsat's lower measurement altitude. Color-coded scalar anomaly maps are presented for both satellites.

  13. Satellite elevation magnetic anomaly maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The problem of inverting 2 deg average MAGSAT scalar anomalies for the region 80 W, 60 E longitude and 40 S, 70 N latitude was attempted on the LARS computer; however, the effort was aborted due to insufficient allocation of CPU-time. This problem is currently being resubmitted and should be implemented shortly for quantitative comparison with free-air gravity anomaly, geothermal, and tectonic data.

  14. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Experimental and analytical data on magnetic mineralogy was provided as an aid to the interpretation of magnetic anomaly maps. An integrated program, ranging from the chemistry of materials from 100 or more km depth within the Earth, to an examination of the MAGSAT anomaly maps at about 400 km above the Earth's surface, was undertaken. Within this framework, a detailed picture of the pertinent mineralogical and magnetic relationships for the region of West Africa was provided. Efforts were directed toward: (1) examining the geochemistry, mineralogy, magnetic properties, and phases relations of magnetic oxides and metal alloys in rocks demonstrated to have originated in the lower crust of upper mantle, (2) examining the assumption that these rocks portray the nature of their source regions; and (3) examining the regional geology, tectonics, gravity field and the MAGSAT anomaly maps for West Africa.

  15. Geologic analysis of averaged magnetic satellite anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, H. K.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Ridgway, J. R.; Hinze, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate relative advantages and limitations for quantitative geologic analysis of magnetic satellite scalar anomalies derived from arithmetic averaging of orbital profiles within equal-angle or equal-area parallelograms, the anomaly averaging process was simulated by orbital profiles computed from spherical-earth crustal magnetic anomaly modeling experiments using Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration. The results indicate that averaging can provide reasonable values at satellite elevations, where contributing error factors within a given parallelogram include the elevation distribution of the data, and orbital noise and geomagnetic field attributes. Various inversion schemes including the use of equivalent point dipoles are also investigated as an alternative to arithmetic averaging. Although inversion can provide improved spherical grid anomaly estimates, these procedures are problematic in practice where computer scaling difficulties frequently arise due to a combination of factors including large source-to-observation distances ( 400 km), high geographic latitudes, and low geomagnetic field inclinations.

  16. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  17. CHAMP Magnetic Anomalies of the Antarctic Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2003-01-01

    Regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations components and hence difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. In particular, the un-modeled effects of the strong auroral external fields and the complicated- behavior of the core field near the geomagnetic poles conspire to greatly reduce the crustal magnetic signal-to-noise ratio in the polar regions relative to the rest of the Earth. We can, however, use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric and core field components from the dynamic external field effects. To help isolate regional lithospheric from core field components, the correlations between CHAMP magnetic anomalies and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations can also be exploited.. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic observations for an improved magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Orsted and noisier Magsat observations, the CHAMP magnetic anomalies at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intracrustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic.

  18. The magnetic signature of hydrothermal systems in slow spreading environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; Dyment, Jérôme

    Slow spreading mid-ocean ridges like the Mid-Atlantic Ridge host a remarkable diversity of hydrothermal systems including vent systems located on the neovolcanic axis, large axial volcanoes, in transform faults and nontransform offsets, and associated with low-angle detachment faults, now recognized as a major tectonic feature of slow spreading environments. Hydrothermal systems are hosted in various lithologies from basalt to serpentinized peridotite and exposed lower oceanic crust. The substantial variations of hydrothermal processes active in these environments have important implications for the magnetic structure of oceanic crust and upper mantle. Hydrothermal processes can both destroy the magnetic minerals in basalt, diabase, and gabbro and create magnetic minerals by serpentinization of ultramafic rocks and deposition of magnetic minerals. We report on the diversity of magnetic anomaly signatures over the vent systems at slow spreading ridges and show that the lateral scale of hydrothermal alteration is fundamentally a local phenomenon. This highly focused process leads to magnetic anomalies on the scale of individual vent fields, typically a few hundreds of meters or less in size. To detect such features, high-resolution, near-bottom magnetic surveys are required rather than sea surface surveys. High-resolution surveys are now more tractable with deep-towed systems, dynamically positioned ships, and with the recent development of autonomous underwater vehicles, which allow detailed mapping of the seafloor on a scale relevant to hydrothermal activity. By understanding these present-day active hydrothermal systems, we can explore for yet to be discovered buried deposits preserved off-axis, both to determine past history of hydrothermal activity and for resource assessment.

  19. Geological reasons for change in intensity of linear magnetic anomalies of the Kursk magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhavoronkin, I. A.; Kopayev, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    The geological reasons for fluctuations in the anomalous field intensity along the polar axes were examined. The Kursk magnetic anomaly is used as the basis for the study. A geological-geophysical section was constructed which used the results of the interpretation of gravimagnetic anomalies.

  20. New magnetic anomaly map of the East Antarctic continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golynsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Sergey; Kazankov, Andrey

    2010-05-01

    Marine magnetic survey coverage of the southern part of Indian Ocean is to a certain extent limited for defining the magnetic pattern of the continental margin of East Antarctica. The USA research vessels collected the bulk of the marine magnetic data in the beginning of 1960's. During the succeeding years Australian, German, Japanese, Russian and other international scientific programs made major contributions to the network of marine magnetic data. Since the beginning of new century only two nations (Russian and Australian) have acquired the marine magnetic data in the southern part of Indian Ocean. The marine surveys in the Cosmonaut Sea, the western part of the Cooperation Sea in the Davis and Mawson Seas were accomplished by the PMGRE in 2000-2009 field seasons. The marine magnetic data collected during two seasons (2001-2002) within the AASOPP Project which was established in early 2000 to define the outer limits of the continental shelf offshore of the Australian Antarctic Territory (AAT) covered the full length of the AAT from 40OE to 160OE. The new magnetic anomaly map of the East Antarctic continental margin incorporates all available data acquired by the international community since the IGY 1957-58 through to 2009. Results of the compilation do not radically alter recent models describing first-order motions between the Antarctic, Australian and Indian plates, but they help to resolve uncertainties in early break-up history of opening between these plates. The timing and direction of early seafloor spreading in the area off the Antarctic margin, once conjugate to part of the Southern Greater Indian margin and to Australian margin, along the largely unknown region of the Enderby Basin, Davis Sea and Mawson Sea has been analyzed by many authors using different data sets. It is highly likely that spreading in the Enderby Basin occurred around the same time as the well documented M-sequence (anomalies M10 to M0) off the Perth Basin, Western Australia

  1. Initial vector magnetic anomaly map from Magsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Schnetzler, C. C.; Phillips, J. D.; Horner, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Global magnetic component anomaly field maps have been derived from the Magsat vector magnetometer data obtained from November 1979 through May 1980. The amplitude of variations of the components over the maps are between 10 and 15 nT, well above the noise in the data. Averaged data, in 2-by-2 deg blocks, exhibit standard errors of the mean of about 1 nT over most of the X and Z maps, and about 2 nT over most of the Y maps. Errors rise to about twice these amounts near the auroral belts. Most of the anomalies in the component data are consistent with a crustal magnetization model which incorporates dipoles aligned only in the direction of the main field. However, there appear to be some regions which require dipoles aligned in some other direction i.e., remanent magnetization.

  2. Equivalent magnetization over the World's Ocean and the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, Jerome; Choi, Yujin; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Thébault, Erwan; Quesnel, Yoann; Roest, Walter; Lesur, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    As a by-product of our recent work to build a candidate model over the oceans for the second version of the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM), we derived global distributions of the equivalent magnetization in oceanic domains. In a first step, we use classic point source forward modeling on a spherical Earth to build a forward model of the marine magnetic anomalies at sea-surface. We estimate magnetization vectors using the age map of the ocean floor, the relative plate motions, the apparent polar wander path for Africa, and a geomagnetic reversal time scale. We assume two possible magnetized source geometry, involving both a 1 km-thick layer bearing a 10 A/m magnetization either on a regular spherical shell with a constant, 5 km-deep, bathymetry (simple geometry) or following the topography of the oceanic basement as defined by the bathymetry and sedimentary thickness (realistic geometry). Adding a present-day geomagnetic field model allows the computation of our initial magnetic anomaly model. In a second step, we adjust this model to the existing marine magnetic anomaly data, in order to make it consistent with these data. To do so, we extract synthetic magnetic along the ship tracks for which real data are available and we compare quantitatively the measured and computed anomalies on 100, 200 or 400 km-long sliding windows (depending the spreading rate). Among the possible comparison criteria, we discard the maximal range - too dependent on local values - and the correlation and coherency - the geographical adjustment between model and data being not accurate enough - to favor the standard deviation around the mean value. The ratio between the standard deviations of data and model on each sliding window represent an estimate of the magnetization ratio causing the anomalies, which we interpolate to adjust the initial magnetic anomaly model to the data and therefore compute a final model to be included in our WDMAM candidate over the oceanic regions

  3. Statistical prediction of satellite magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, H. K.; Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Ravat, D. N.

    1990-01-01

    Computationally rapid statistical procedures are presented for satellite altitude normalizations and the gridding of magnetic anomaly data, as an alternative to the more commonly used but computationally expensive equivalent-source inversion procedures. The statistical predictions of Magsat observations over South America have demonstrated the great computational advantages of collocation over equivalent source inversion in gridding magnetic anomally data; in general, three-dimensional collocation is an efficient and cost-effective approach for obtaining altitude-normalized anomally grids from orbital or arbitrarily distributed data.

  4. Magnetic anomalies northeast of Cape Adare, northern Victoria Land (Antarctica), and their relation to onshore structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Damaske, D.; Läufer, A.L.; Goldmann, F.; Möller, H.-D.; Lisker, F.

    2007-01-01

    An aeromagnetic survey was flown over the offshore region northeast of Cape Adare and the magnetic anomalies compared to onshore structures between Pennell Coast and Tucker Glacier. The magnetic anomalies show two nearly orthogonal major trends. NNW-SSE trending anomalies northeast of Cape Adare represent seafloor spreading within the Adare Trough. A connection of these anomalies to the Northern Basin of the Ross Sea is not clear. Onshore faults are closely aligned to offshore anomalies. Main trends are NW-SE to NNW-SSE and NE-SW to NNESSW. NNW-SSE oriented dextral-transtensional to extensional faults parallel the Adare Peninsula and Adare Trough anomalies. NE-SW trending normal faults appear to segment the main Hallett volcanic bodies.

  5. Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frawley, James J.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic component anomaly maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor's magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative anomaly pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these anomalies we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable anomaly pairs and from these we computed paleo-poles that were nearly equally divided between north, south and mid-latitudes. These results suggest that during the existence of the martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals and excursions.

  6. Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Frawley, James J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic component anomaly maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor s magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative anomaly pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these anomalies we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable anomaly pairs and from these we computed four North and 3 South poles with two at approximately 60 degrees north latitude. These results suggest that during the existence of the Martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals.

  7. Gravity and magnetic anomaly data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Progress on the analysis MAGSAT data is reported. The MAGSAT data from 40 deg S to 70 deg N latitude and 30 deg W to 60 E longitude was reduced to radial polarization. In addition, gravity anomaly data from this area were processed and a variety of filtered maps were prepared for combined interpretation of the gravity and magnetic data in conjunction with structural and tectonic maps of the area. The VERSATEC listings and cross-reference maps of variable and array names for the spherical Earth analysis programs NVERTSM, SMFLD, NVERTG, and GFLD were also prepared.

  8. Leveraging Somali Basin Magnetic Anomalies to Constrain Gondwana Breakup and Early Indian Ocean Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. K.; Lawver, L. A.; Norton, I. O.; Gahagan, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Somali Basin, found between the Horn of Africa and Madagascar was formed during the rifting of East and West Gondwana. Understanding the evolution of the basin has historically been hindered by enigmatic seafloor fabric and an apparent paucity of magnetic anomaly data. Recent iterations of satellite gravity data have revealed nearly complete fracture zones as well as a distinct extinct spreading ridge within the basin. Through a thorough compilation of available Somali Basin shiptrack profiles, we have been able to successfully model and interpret magnetic anomalies with exceptional detail. This complication is unrivaled in completeness and provides unprecedented insight into basin formation. Using this high quality data, we have interpreted magnetic anomalies M0r (120.8 Ma) to M24Bn (152.43 Ma) about the extinct ridge. The interpreted Somali Basin spreading rate and spreading direction, through anomaly M15n (135.76 Ma), are similar to those observed in the neighboring coeval Mozambique Basin. This similarity suggests that East Gondwana separated from West Gondwana as a cohesive unit, and that the internal rifting of East Gondwana began later around 135 Ma. Our magnetic anomaly interpretations have been combined with additional magnetic interpretations from around the Indian Ocean to build a regionally consistent plate model of Gondwana breakup and early Indian Ocean formation. This plate model will be crucial for future efforts unraveling a precise history of East Gondwana fragmentation and constraining the formation of the Enderby Basin offshore East Antarctica and Bay of Bengal offshore East India.

  9. Remanent magnetization model for the broken ridge satellite magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    A crustal model for the interpretation of the Broken Ridge satellite magnetic anomaly was constructed from bathymetric data assuming an Airy-type isostatic compensation. An average crustal magnetization of 6 A.m is required to account for the observed anomaly amplitudes provided that the whole crust is homogeneously magnetized. In contrast, a model representing only the topographic expression of the Broken Ridge, above the surrounding sea floor, requires a magnetization of the order of 40 A.m-1. Since this latter figure is much higher than is to be expected from studies of magnetic properties of oceanic rocks, it is concluded that the majority of the crustal volume of Broken Ridge is magnetized relatively uniformly. The direction of the source magnetization is consistent with an inclination shallower than the present geomagnetic field and close to that of an axial dipole. Since a more northerly source location for Broken Ridge is contrary to the paleolatitude data it is though that the magnetization represents a magnetization obtained by averaging the geomagnetic field direction over a sufficient time to remove secular variation effects. This pattern is indicative of viscous magnetization.

  10. Marine magnetic anomalies - The origin of the stripes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of recent observational and theoretical investigations of lineated magnetic anomalies on the ocean floor are summarized in tables, graphs, and diagrams and analyzed. Topics addressed include early lineation models, inversions of magnetic anomalies to obtain source functions, deep-tow studies of magnetic anomalies, evidence from the long-wavelength component of the magnetic field (including Magsat observations), and direct measurements of the magnetic properties of oceanic rocks. It is concluded that the source of the lineated anomalies must reside in most of the oceanic crust, not just in the pillow lavas of layer 2A.

  11. A global magnetic anomaly map. [obtained from POGO satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, R. D.; Davis, W. M.; Cain, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A subset of POGO satellite magnetometer data has been formed that is suitable for analysis of crustal magnetic anomalies. Using a thirteenth order field model, fit to these data, magnetic residuals have been calculated over the world to latitude limits of plus 50 deg. These residuals averaged over one degree latitude-longitude blocks represent a detailed global magnetic anomaly map derived solely from satellite data. Preliminary analysis of the map indicates that the anomalies are real and of geological origin.

  12. Indoor waypoint navigation via magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Timothy H; Anderson, Shane M; Lichter, Patrick A; Condon, John P; Sheikh, Suneel I; Hedin, Daniel S

    2011-01-01

    A wide assortment of technologies have been proposed to construct indoor navigation services for the blind and vision impaired. Proximity-based systems and multilateration systems have been successfully demonstrated and employed. Despite the technical success of these technologies, broad adoption has been limited due to their significant infrastructure and maintenance costs. An alternative approach utilizing the indoor magnetic signatures inherent to steel-frame buildings solves the infrastructure cost problem; in effect the existing building is the location system infrastructure. Although magnetic indoor navigation does not require the installation of dedicated hardware, the dedication of resources to produce precise survey maps of magnetic anomalies represents a further barrier to adoption. In the present work an alternative leader-follower form of waypoint-navigation system has been developed that works without surveyed magnetic maps of a site. Instead the wayfarer's magnetometer readings are compared to a pre-recorded magnetic "leader" trace containing magnetic data collected along a route and annotated with waypoint information. The goal of the navigation system is to correlate the follower's magnetometer data with the leader's to trigger audio cues at precise points along the route, thus providing location-based guidance to the user. The system should also provide early indications of off-route conditions. As part of the research effort a smartphone based application was created to record and annotate leader traces with audio and numeric data at waypoints of interest, and algorithms were developed to determine (1) when the follower reaches a waypoint and (2) when the follower goes off-route. A navigation system utilizing this technology would enable a low-cost indoor navigation system capable of replaying audio annotations at precise locations along pre-recorded routes. PMID:22255538

  13. Current thinking about Jupiter's magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodent, D.; Gerard, J.-C.; Gustin, J.; Clarke, J. T.; Connerney, J. E.

    Repeated imaging of Jupiter's aurora has shown that the northern main oval has a distorted 'kidney bean' shape in the general range of 90-150o System III longitude, which appears unchanged since 1994. While it is more difficult to observe the conjugate regions in the southern aurora, no corresponding distortion appears in the south. Recent improved accuracy in locating the auroral footprint emission of Io has provided new information about the geometry of Jupiter's magnetic field in this and other areas. The persistent pattern of the main oval implies a disturbance of the local magnetic field, and the increased latitudinal separation of the locus of the Io footprint from the main oval implies a locally weaker field strength. The most recent images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) allow us to complement previous observations with the location of the auroral footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede in the region of interest. Their footpaths vary in parallel and form a kink in the 90-150° S3 sector which strongly suggests the presence of a magnetic anomaly in this region.

  14. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in developing predictive abilities to evaluate the potential stabilities of magnetic minerals in the Earth crust and mantle by: (1) computing oxidation state profiling as a function of temperature and pressure; (2) compiling data on basalts to establish validity of the oxidation state profiles; (3) determining Fe-Ni alloys in association with magnetitie as a function of temperature and oxidation state; and (4) acquiring large chemical data banks on the mineral ilmenite which decomposes to mineral spinel in the presence of high sulfur or carbonate environments in the lower crust upper mantle. In addition to acquiring these data which are related to constraining Curie isotherm depths, an excellent correlation was found between MAGSAT anomaly data and the geology of West Africa.

  15. A Magnetic Petrology Database for Satellite Magnetic Anomaly Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, K.; Wasilewski, P.; Didenko, A.; Genshaft, Y.; Pashkevich, I.

    2002-05-01

    A Magnetic Petrology Database (MPDB) is now being compiled at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in cooperation with Russian and Ukrainian Institutions. The purpose of this database is to provide the geomagnetic community with a comprehensive and user-friendly method of accessing magnetic petrology data via Internet for more realistic interpretation of satellite magnetic anomalies. Magnetic Petrology Data had been accumulated in NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, United Institute of Physics of the Earth (Russia) and Institute of Geophysics (Ukraine) over several decades and now consists of many thousands of records of data in our archives. The MPDB was, and continues to be in big demand especially since recent launching in near Earth orbit of the mini-constellation of three satellites - Oersted (in 1999), Champ (in 2000), and SAC-C (in 2000) which will provide lithospheric magnetic maps with better spatial and amplitude resolution (about 1 nT). The MPDB is focused on lower crustal and upper mantle rocks and will include data on mantle xenoliths, serpentinized ultramafic rocks, granulites, iron quartzites and rocks from Archean-Proterozoic metamorphic sequences from all around the world. A substantial amount of data is coming from the area of unique Kursk Magnetic Anomaly and Kola Deep Borehole (which recovered 12 km of continental crust). A prototype MPDB can be found on the Geodynamics Branch web server of Goddard Space Flight Center at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/magnpetr.html. The MPDB employs a searchable relational design and consists of 7 interrelated tables. The schema of database is shown at http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/doc.html. MySQL database server was utilized to implement MPDB. The SQL (Structured Query Language) is used to query the database. To present the results of queries on WEB and for WEB programming we utilized PHP scripting language and CGI scripts. The prototype MPDB is designed to search database by major satellite magnetic

  16. Continental and oceanic magnetic anomalies: Enhancement through GRM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to the POGO and MAGSAT satellites, the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) satellite system will orbit at a minimum elevation to provide significantly better resolved lithospheric magnetic anomalies for more detailed and improved geologic analysis. In addition, GRM will measure corresponding gravity anomalies to enhance our understanding of the gravity field for vast regions of the Earth which are largely inaccessible to more conventional surface mapping. Crustal studies will greatly benefit from the dual data sets as modeling has shown that lithospheric sources of long wavelength magnetic anomalies frequently involve density variations which may produce detectable gravity anomalies at satellite elevations. Furthermore, GRM will provide an important replication of lithospheric magnetic anomalies as an aid to identifying and extracting these anomalies from satellite magnetic measurements. The potential benefits to the study of the origin and characterization of the continents and oceans, that may result from the increased GRM resolution are examined.

  17. A model of ocean basin crustal magnetization appropriate for satellite elevation anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Herman H.

    1987-01-01

    A model of ocean basin crustal magnetization measured at satellite altitudes is developed which will serve both as background to which anomalous magnetizations can be contrasted and as a beginning point for studies of tectonic modification of normal ocean crust. The model is based on published data concerned with the petrology and magnetization of the ocean crust and consists of viscous magnetization and induced magnetization estimated for individual crustal layers. Thermal remanent magnetization and chemical remanent magnetization are excluded from the model because seafloor spreading anomalies are too short in wavelength to be resolved at satellite altitudes. The exception to this generalization is found at the oceanic magnetic quiet zones where thermal remanent magnetization and chemical remanent magnetization must be considered along with viscous magnetization and induced magnetization.

  18. Improving the geological interpretation of magnetic and gravity satellite anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W. (Principal Investigator); Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Current limitations in the quantitative interpretation of satellite-elevation geopotential field data and magnetic anomaly data were investigated along with techniques to overcome them. A major result was the preparation of an improved scalar magnetic anomaly map of South America and adjacent marine areas directly from the original MAGSAT data. In addition, comparisons of South American and Euro-African data show a strong correlation of anomalies along the Atlantic rifted margins of the continents.

  19. MAGSAT correlations with geoid anomalies. [magnetic anomalies in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowin, C. O. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    A digital data library of MAGSAT data is described and its applications and capabilities are reviewed. Polynomial trends were removed from each half-orbit in order to estimate and remove ring current effects from the data. The MAGSAT data in the Gulf of Mexico region was analyzed to define better the possible relation of the negative MAGSAT anomaly there to the negative residual geoid anomaly in the western Gulf of Mexico. Since the shape and location of the negative magnetic anomaly are variable depending upon the particular polynomial surface and curve orders used, no definitive conclusion as to the degree of correspondance between the residual geoid and MAGSAT lithosphere anomalies is offered.

  20. Negative gravity anomaly over spreading rift valleys: Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, Carl; Milligan, Julie

    1985-03-01

    A pronounced negative free-air gravity anomaly commonly occurs over the median valley of slow spreading ocean ridges. Previous results, using Wiener filtering and cross-spectral analysis techniques for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, obtained estimates of the elastic plate thickness in the range of 7-13 km and the existence of a residual negative gravity anomaly over the median rift valley, suggesting that the rift valley has a response function different than the remainder of the spreading ridge. In this paper we have improved the derivation of the topography-gravity admittance function for spreading ocean crust by carefully avoiding several sources of spectral splattering when processing the data: (1) selecting data from a cruise that followed a flowline of central North Atlantic relative plate motion and hence is least corrupted by fracture zones; and (2) accounting for the difference in distance between the gravity meter and the regional variation in elevation as the ridge crest is traversed. Improvements of lesser importance include the use of cubic splines to interpolate to equally spaced data rather than linear interpolation, and correction of the free-air anomaly values for long-wavelength variations of the indirect effect. Comparison of the resulting admittance function to elastic flexure response functions suggests an elastic plate thickness of about 8 km. The improved admittance function, when convolved with the ridge topography, provides a predicted gravity profile that accounts very well for the negative anomaly over the rift valley. Therefore, the isostatic response function for the rift valley is similar to that for the topography away from the rift valley.

  1. Study of gravity and magnetic anomalies using MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The results of modeling satellite-elevation magnetic and gravity data using the constraints imposed by near surface data and seismic evidence shows that the magnetic minimum can be accounted for by either an intracrustal lithologic variation or by an upwarp of the Curie point isotherm. The long wavelength anomalies of the NOO's-vector magnetic survey of the conterminous U.S. were contoured and processed by various frequency filters to enhance particular characteristics. A preliminary inversion of the data was completed and the anomaly field calculated at 450 km from the equivalent magnet sources to compare with the POGO satellite data. Considerable progress was made in studing the satellite magnetic data of South America and adjacent marine areas. Preliminary versions of the 1 deg free-air gravity anomaly map (20 m gal contour interval) and the high cut (lambda approximately 8 deg) filtered anomaly maps are included.

  2. Magnetic anomalies over the Andaman Islands and their geological significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subba Rao, P. B. V.; Radhakrishna, M.; Haripriya, K.; Rao, B. Someswara; Chandrasekharam, D.

    2016-03-01

    The Andaman Islands form part of the outer-arc accretionary sedimentary complex belonging to the Andaman-Sumatra active subduction zone. The islands are characterized by thick cover of Neogene sediments along with exposed ophiolite rocks at few places. A regional magnetic survey was carried out for the first time over the Andaman Islands with a view to understand the correlation of anomaly signatures with surface geology of the islands. The residual total field magnetic anomaly maps have revealed distinct magnetic anomalies having intermediate to high amplitude magnetic signatures and correlate with the areas over/close to the exposed ophiolite rocks along the east coast of north, middle and the south Andaman Islands. The 2D modelling of magnetic anomalies along selected E-W profiles across the islands indicate that the ophiolite bodies extend to a depth of about 5-8 km and spatially correlate with the mapped fault/thrust zones.

  3. The south-central United States magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W. (Principal Investigator); Starich, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The South-Central United States Magnetic Anomaly is the most prominent positive feature in the MAGSAT scalar magnetic field over North America. The anomaly correlates with increased crustal thickness, above average crustal velocity, negative free air gravity anomalies and an extensive zone of Middle Proterozoic anorogenic felsic basement rocks. Spherical dipole source inversion of the MAGSAT scalar data and subsequent calculation of reduced to pole and derivative maps provide constraints for a crustal magnetic model which corresponds geographically to the extensive Middle Proterozoic felsic rocks trending northeasterly across the United States. These felsic rocks contain insufficient magnetization or volume to produce the anomaly, but are rather indicative of a crustal zone which was disturbed during a Middle Proterozoic thermal event which enriched magnetic material deep in the crust.

  4. The south-central United States magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starich, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The South-Central United States Magnetic Anomaly is the most prominent positive feature in the MAGSAT scalar magnetic field over North America. The anomaly correlates with increased crustal thickness, above average crustal velocity, negative free-air gravity anomalies and an extensive zone of Middle Proterozoic anorogenic felsic basement rocks. Spherical dipole source inversion of the MAGSAT scalar data and subsequent calculation of reduced-to-pole and derivative maps provide additional constraints for a crustal magnetic model which corresponds geographically to the extensive Middle Proterozoic felsic rocks trending northeasterly across the United States. These felsic rocks contain insufficient magnetization or volume to produce the anomaly, but are rather indicative of a crustal zone which was disturbed during a Middle Proterozoic thermal event which enriched magnetic material deep in the crust.

  5. Magnetic anomalies and tectonic fabric of marginal basins North of New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Malahoff, A.; Feden, R.H.; Fleming, H.S.

    1982-05-10

    Detailed airborne magnetic studies conducted over the region of the S. W. Pacific marginal basins extending from the Solomon Islands to New Zealand suggest that three major phases of basin formation and island arc development have occurred in this region. Development of the Tasman Sea took place during the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene. Development of the basins to the east of the Tasman Sea occurred predominantly during the Oligocene as well as during the Upper Miocene to Recent. The South Fuji Basin, consisting of the Kupe and Minerva Abyssal Plains, is marked by the presence of possibly two RRR triple junction spreading centers that were active between the times of anomalies 13 to 7 (36--25.5 m.y.). The Kupe Abyssal Plain shows the presence of residual magnetic anomalies 7 to 13 of the eastern limb of the proposed spreading center. The western limb appears to have been subducted beneath the present site of the Three Kings Rise. This seafloor spreading phase (calculated half-spreading rate of 35 mm/yr) was coincident with the overthrusting phase of the New Caledonia ultramafic rocks. During that period, active volcanism along the then continuous Solomons-New Hebrides-Fiji-Lau Island arc was taking place. Magnetic anomalies from 1 to 4 (0--8 m.y. B. P.) are seen to extend along a clearly defined lineation pattern over the North Fuji Basin.

  6. Do Satellite Magnetic Anomaly Data Accurately Portray the Crustal Component?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Scalar aeromagnetic data obtained during the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (NOO)-Vector Magnetic Survey of the conterminous United States were upward continued by equivalent point source inversion and compared with POGO satellite magnetic anomaly and preliminary scalar MAGSAT data. Initial comparisons indicate that the upward continued NOO data is dominated by long wavelength (approximately equal to 1000 to 3000 km) anomalies which are not present in the satellite anomaly data. Thus, the comparison of the data sets is poor. Several possible sources for these differences are present in the data analysis chain. However, upon removal of these long wavelengths from the upward continued NOO data, a close comparison observed between the anomalies verifies that satellite magnetic anomaly data do portray the crustal component within a range of wavelengths from roughly 1000 km down to the resolution limit of the observations.

  7. Alternative explanation for intermediate--wavelength magnetic anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Shure, L.; Parker, R.L.

    1981-12-10

    Harrison and Carle and others have examined very long profiles of the magnetic field and have calculated one-dimensional power spectra. In these they expect to see, but do not find, a minimum in power at intermediate wavelengths, between 65 and 150 km. Conventional one-dimensional models of the field predict very little power in this band, which lies between the spectral peaks arising from sources in the crust and the core. Mantle sources or high-intensity, long-wavelength magnetizations have been proposed to account for the observations. An alternative, more plausible explanation is that one-dimensional spectra of two-dimensional fields contain contributions from wavenumbers in the perpendicular (i.e., nonsampled) direction. Unless the seafloor spreading anomalies are perfectly lineated at right angles to the profile, some low-wavenumber energy must be attributed to this effect; we propose that such directional aliasing is a major factor in the power spectra. To support this idea we discuss theoretical models and analyze a large-scale marine survey.

  8. Hematite Versus Magnetite as the Signature for Planetary Magnetic Anomalies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetshka, Gunther; Taylor, Patrick T.; Wasilewski, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies are the result of adjacent geologic units having contrasting magnetization. This magnetization arises from induction and/or remanence. In a planetary context we now know that Mars has significant crustal magnetic anomalies due to remanent magnetization, while the Earth has some anomalies where remanence can be shown to be important. This picture, however, is less clear because of the nature and the magnitude of the geomagnetic field which is responsible for superimposed induced magnetization. Induced magnetization assumes a magnetite source, because of its much greater magnetic susceptibility when compared with other magnetic minerals. We investigated the TRM (thermoremanent magnetization) acquisition of hematite, in weak magnetic fields up to 1 mT, to determine if the remanent and induced magnetization of hematite could compete with magnetite. TRM acquisition curves of magnetite and hematite show that multi-domain hematite reaches TRM saturation (0.3 - 0.4 A sq m/kg) in fields as low as 100 microT. However, multi-domain magnetite reaches only a few percent of its TRM saturation in a field of 100 microT (0.02 - 0.06 A sq m/kg). These results suggest that a mineral such as hematite and, perhaps, other minerals with significant remanence and minor induced magnetization may play an important role in providing requisite magnetization contrast. Perhaps, and especially for the Mars case, we should reevaluate where hematite and other minerals, with efficient remanence acquisition, exist in significant concentration, allowing a more comprehensive explanation of Martian anomalies and better insight into the role of remanent magnetization in terrestrial crustal magnetic anomalies.

  9. Distribution of narrow-width magnetic anomalies in Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.

    1964-01-01

    Data for aeromagnetic profiles obtained in Antarctica during the 1963-64 austral summer were used together with earlier results to construct a map showing the areal distribution of narrow-width magnetic anomalies. Numerous anomalies are associated with known volcanic mountains in western Antarctica. A large area of few anomalies is probably a result of an extension of the thick metasedimentary section observed in the Ellsworth Mountains. Portions of the Trans-Antarctic Mountains have associated anomalies which are probably caused by late Cenozoic volcanic rocks.

  10. The south-central United States magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starich, P. J.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A positive magnetic anomaly, which dominates the MAGSAT scalar field over the south-central United States, results from the superposition of magnetic effects from several geologic sources and tectonic structures in the crust. The highly magnetic basement rocks of this region show good correlation with increased crustal thickness, above average crustal velocity and predominantly negative free-air gravity anomalies, all of which are useful constraints for modeling the magnetic sources. The positive anomaly is composed of two primary elements. The western-most segment is related to middle Proterozoic granite intrusions, rhyolite flows and interspersed metamorphic basement rocks in the Texas panhandle and eastern New Mexico. The anomaly and the magnetic crust are bounded to the west by the north-south striking Rio Grande Rift. The anomaly extends eastward over the Grenville age basement rocks of central Texas, and is terminated to the south and east by the buried extension of the Ouachita System. The northern segment of the anomaly extends eastward across Oklahoma and Arkansas to the Mississippi Embayment. It corresponds to a general positive magnetic region associated with the Wichita Mountains igneous complex in south-central Oklahoma and 1.2 to 1.5 Ga. felsic terrane to the north.

  11. Statistical magnetic anomalies from satellite measurements for geologic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, H. K.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    The errors of numerically averaging satellite magnetic anomaly data for geologic analysis are investigated using orbital anomaly simulations of crustal magnetic sources by Gauss-Legendre quadrature integration. These simulations suggest that numerical averaging errors constitute small and relatively minor contributions to the total error-budget of higher orbital estimates (approx. 400 km), whereas for lower orbital estimates the error of averaging may increase substantially. Least-squares collocation is also investigated as an alternative to numerical averaging and found to produce substantially more accurate anomaly estimates as the elevation of prediction is decreased towards the crustal sources.

  12. Basement configuration of KG offshore basin from magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, V.; Swamy, K. V.; Raj, Neetha

    2016-04-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies along three representative profiles falling between shelf break and continent-ocean boundary in the offshore Krishna-Godavari basin were quantitatively interpreted for understanding the nature and structure of the magnetic basement using inversion technique. The interpretation of the anomalies shows that the magnetic basement lies deeper than the base of the sediments, i.e., acoustic basement identified by the seismic studies. This interpretation also shows that the magnetic basement is faulted along the NW-SE direction with the upthrown side lying to the north of the anomaly trend of this region. The coincidence of magnetizations observed through the present interpretation with that of charnockites of neighbouring EGMB and onshore K-G basin areas indicates that EGMB geology (charnockites, granitic gneiss, etc.) extends up to COB in the offshore K-G basin.

  13. Magnetic anomalies along the contact between sedimentary and igneous rocks:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Speer, A. J.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2002-05-01

    Intrusion of the Liberty Hill granite (South Carolina) into the surrounding shale causes a distinct aureole along the metamorphic contact. The aureole is divided by five isograds, which are the result of a sequence of continuous reactions. One consequence of the continuous reactions is production of contrasting proportion of magnetite and exsolved titanohematite. The continuous change in the relative amounts of these two minerals, controls the magnetic properties of the hornfelses. This causes magnetic anomaly changes associated with the aureole with inflexions occurring at the isograds. The maximum intensity of the magnetic anomaly coincides with the maximum abundance of titanohematite. The anomaly sharply drops when stable remanence of titanohematite is replaced by unstable remanence of magnetite. Magnetic properties of the aureole, which is the contact between igneous and sedimentary rocks, demonstrate an example of magnetic remanence acquisition in petrological environment that is likely to occur on planet Mars.

  14. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The Curie Balance was brought to operational stage and is producing data of a preliminary nature. Substantial problems experienced in the assembly and initial operation of the instrument were, for the most part, rectified, but certain problems still exist. Relationships between the geology and the gravity and MAGSAT anomalies of West Africa are reexamined in the context of a partial reconstruction of Gondwanaland.

  15. A study of the Rima Sirsalis lunar magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srnka, L. J.; Hoyt, J. L.; Harvey, J. V. S.; Mccoy, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The source of the lunar magnetic anomaly associated with the Rima Sirsalis linear rille has been modelled using the vector field intensities due to arbitrary uniform magnetization in a rectangular prism. It is shown that in order to match the Apollo 16 subsatellite data, the lunar surface near the rille must have a vertical magnetization of 6,000-9,000 G if the anomaly is due to flux leakage from a gap in the crust with the dimensions of the rille. An alternative explanation is that Rima Sirsalis and its surroundings are the site of a vertical magnetization contrast of 100,000-10,000 G which is at least as wide as the rille and extends to a depth of tens of kilometers in the crust. A wider magnetic source reduces the required magnetization (or depth) proportionately, since to first order the field at high altitude is proportional to the magnetic dipole moment per unit length.

  16. Magsat magnetic anomaly contrast across Labrador Sea passive margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Lauren M.; Frey, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Many passive margins not complicated by nearby anomalous crustal structure have satellite elevation crustal magnetic anomaly contrasts across them that are recognizable in reduced-to-pole versions of the Magsat and POGO data. In the Labrador Sea region this contrast is particularly well developed with strong positive anomalies overlying the continental crust of Greenland and eastern Canada and prominent negative anomalies situated over the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. In this work, forward modeling of the large-scale crustal bodies in this region (continental, oceanic, passive margin, several anomalous structures) was used to show that the Magsat anomaly contrast is due simply to the change in crustal susceptibility and thickness at the continental/oceanic crustal transition. Because the thickness varies more than the average susceptibility from continental to oceanic crust, the strong anomaly contrast is essentially an edge effect due mostly to the change in crustal structure.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Oscar M

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used in the management of pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies for diagnosing and assessing extent of lesions and for evaluating response to therapy. MR imaging studies often involve a combination of T1- and T2-weighted images in addition to MR angiography and fat-suppressed post-contrast sequences. The MR imaging features of these vascular anomalies when combined with clinical findings can aid in diagnosis. In cases of complex vascular malformations and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies, MR imaging can be used to evaluate accompanying soft-tissue and bone anomalies. This article reviews the MR imaging protocols and appearances of the most common pediatric soft-tissue vascular anomalies. PMID:27229506

  18. SEISMIC DISCRIMINATION OF THERMAL AND MAGNETIC ANOMALIES IN SUNSPOT UMBRAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.; Cally, P. S.; Rempel, M.

    2010-08-20

    Efforts to model sunspots based on helioseismic signatures need to discriminate between the effects of (1) a strong magnetic field that introduces time-irreversible, vantage-dependent phase shifts, apparently connected to fast- and slow-mode coupling and wave absorption and (2) a thermal anomaly that includes cool gas extending an indefinite depth beneath the photosphere. Helioseismic observations of sunspots show travel times considerably reduced with respect to equivalent quiet-Sun signatures. Simulations by Moradi and Cally of waves skipping across sunspots with photospheric magnetic fields of order 3 kG show travel times that respond strongly to the magnetic field and relatively weakly to the thermal anomaly by itself. We note that waves propagating vertically in a vertical magnetic field are relatively insensitive to the magnetic field, while remaining highly responsive to the attendant thermal anomaly. Travel-time measurements for waves with large skip distances into the centers of axially symmetric sunspots are therefore a crucial resource for discrimination of the thermal anomaly beneath sunspot umbrae from the magnetic anomaly. One-dimensional models of sunspot umbrae based on compressible-radiative-magnetic-convective simulations such as by Rempel et al. can be fashioned to fit observed helioseismic travel-time spectra in the centers of sunspot umbrae. These models are based on cooling of the upper 2-4 Mm of the umbral subphotosphere with no significant anomaly beneath 4.5 Mm. The travel-time reductions characteristic of these models are primarily a consequence of a Wilson depression resulting from a strong downward buoyancy of the cooled umbral medium.

  19. How the Martian Magnetic Anomalies Reduce the Planetary Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A.; Sauvaud, J.; Barabash, S.

    2012-12-01

    The present paper uses the Mars Express Ion spectrometer IMA data to check the spatial distribution of the planetary origin ions populating the induced magnetosphere of Mars. It was shown that there are two main planetary ions sources located: 1) in the region of the magnetosphere current sheet, 2) in the ring-shape region contouring the planet ionosphere. The planetary ions in the current sheet (source 1) are quickly accelerated up to several keV energy by JxB force, while ring shape (source 2) distributed ions reach just several tens eV. A statistical study of the planetary ion distribution taking into account location of Martian magnetic anomalies shows that planetary ions fill the magnetosphere in the regions free of the magnetic anomalies only. We can see that magnetic anomalies create small magnetospheres that protect ionospheric ions from the escape. This mechanism works well for both ion sources.

  20. Lunar magnetic anomalies detected by the Apollo subsatellite magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Russell, C. T.; Wilhelms, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Properties of lunar crustal magnetization thus far deduced from Apollo subsatellite magnetometer data are reviewed using two of the most accurate available magnetic anomaly maps, one covering a portion of the lunar near side and the other a part of the far side. The largest single anomaly found within the region of coverage on the near-side map correlates exactly with a conspicuous light-colored marking in western Oceanus Procellarum called Reiner Gamma. This feature is interpreted as an unusual deposit of ejecta from secondary craters of the large nearby primary impact crater Cavalerius. The mean altitude of the far-side anomaly gap is much higher than that of the near side map and the surface geology is more complex; individual anomaly sources have therefore not yet been identified. The mechanism of magnetization and the origin of the magnetizing field remain unresolved, but the uniformity with which the Reiner Gamma deposit is apparently magnetized, and the north-south depletion of magnetization intensity across a substantial portion of the far side, seem to require the existence of an ambient field, perhaps of global or larger extent.

  1. The magnetic anomalies significantrly reduce the Martian ionospheric escape rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Sauvaud, J.-A.

    2012-09-01

    Looking forward to the MAVEN mission, it seems very useful to return to Mars Express data to refresh an important problem of Martian atmosphere escape: what role the crustal magnetic field may play in this process? There are several publications on this topic with completely opposite conclusions. The last hybrid simulations show that the magnetic anomalies significantly reduce the ion loss rate during solar minimum. We are trying to use a new approach to Mars Express IMA data analysis to check how it is possible. On the base of a statistical study of the ion distributions in the Martian magnetotail we show that the characteristic accelerated ions are not associated with the magnetic anomalies but only with interplanetary magnetic field clock angle. Moreover the magnetic anomalies screen and deviate the escaping flow leading to reducing of the total loss rate. We have calculated a "quasiexperimental" escaping rate in an assumption of the total absence of the magnetic anomalies. We are comparing this value with a real measured escape rate.

  2. First high-resolution near-seafloor survey of magnetic anomalies of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Xu, X.; Li, C.; Sun, Z.; Zhu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Qiu, N.

    2013-12-01

    -wavelength anomalies were unrecognized in sea surface measurements. (3) Preliminary results showed that the study regions might have experienced several episodes of magnetic reversal events that were not recognized in existing models. (4) We are currently investigating the geomagnetic timing of these relatively short-duration events to determine the detailed spreading history of the sub-basins of the SCS. These high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic survey lines are located close to the planned drilling sites of IODP Expedition 349 scheduled for January-March 2014.

  3. The early break-up phase of the South Atlantic - magnetic anomalies, volcanism and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, H.; Schreckenberger, B.; Franke, D.; Becker, K.; Schnabel, M.

    2013-12-01

    The South Atlantic has been generally recognized as a prime example for continental break-up with accompanying volcanic activity reflected today in massive seaward dipping reflector sequences (SDRS) in reflection as well as high velocity lower crust in refraction seismic data. The early history of the South Atlantic passive margin evolution is investigated in the view of interlaced magnetic anomalies related to seafloor spreading lineations and anomalies caused by seaward-dipping reflector sequences (SDRS). As the Atlantic opened from South to North, the magma-poor segments of the southernmost South Atlantic are also the oldest segments of the Ocean. Therefore, the magma-poor segments on the conjugated margins must be considered crucial in the understanding of the initial phase of spreading and rifting concluding in the opening of the South Atlantic. The interpretation of pre-M5n lineations define timing of the termination of excess breakup related volcanic activity and the transition to 'normal' seafloor spreading. Termination of magnetic anomalies within SDR wedges point towards a scissor-like succession in volcanic activity from south to north, following the opening of the South Atlantic. Reflection, refraction seismic and potential field data show that while the two conjugated margins share much of their structural features such as segmentation and abundant volcanism, they are by no means perfectly symmetrical. This is for example shown in shelf width, strength of the magnetic anomalies or orientation of break-up related sedimentary basins. From our data, we suggest changes in spreading and later rifting direction to be the cause of for these asymmetries. This directional change is also suggested to be responsible for the change in margin character from magma-poor to volcanic rather than solely a spontaneous change in crustal melt-generation. New models for the magnetic response of SDRS reveal a high variability within the wedges on either side of the Atlantic

  4. Spectral Correlation of Antarctic Satellite Magnetic and Gravity Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, S. B.; von Frese, R. R.; Kim, H.; Potts, L.; Kim, J.; Gaya-Pique, L. R.

    2005-05-01

    Large areas of the Antarctic continent lack terrestrial or airborne magnetic and gravity survey coverage due to the harsh climate and extended distances involved. Satellite missions therefore play an important role, often being the only source of information for the study of remote regions. NASA's GRACE satellite mission provides global-scale gravity measurements with a much higher spatial resolution than previous missions. The free-air gravity anomalies in Antarctica from GRACE offer new insights on the poorly understood Antarctic crust. New interpretations and candidates for further investigation are presented from spectral correlation analysis between the new GRACE free-air gravity anomalies and magnetic anomalies measured by the CHAMP and Ørsted satellites. We quantify the anomaly correlations using correlation filters based on Poisson's relation. Favorability indices are derived that highlight the positive and negative correlations between the satellite observed geopotential anomalies. Several positively and negatively correlated regional anomalies yield new insights on the enigmatic crustal tectonics of Queen Maud Land, Enderby Land and other regions of East Antarctica, and the West Antarctic Peninsula.

  5. Improved determination of vector lithospheric magnetic anomalies from MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay

    1993-01-01

    Scientific contributions made in developing new methods to isolate and map vector magnetic anomalies from measurements made by Magsat are described. In addition to the objective of the proposal, the isolation and mapping of equatorial vector lithospheric Magsat anomalies, isolation of polar ionospheric fields during the period were also studied. Significant progress was also made in isolation of polar delta(Z) component and scalar anomalies as well as integration and synthesis of various techniques of removing equatorial and polar ionospheric effects. The significant contributions of this research are: (1) development of empirical/analytical techniques in modeling ionospheric fields in Magsat data and their removal from uncorrected anomalies to obtain better estimates of lithospheric anomalies (this task was accomplished for equatorial delta(X), delta(Z), and delta(B) component and polar delta(Z) and delta(B) component measurements; (2) integration of important processing techniques developed during the last decade with the newly developed technologies of ionospheric field modeling into an optimum processing scheme; and (3) implementation of the above processing scheme to map the most robust magnetic anomalies of the lithosphere (components as well as scalar).

  6. Short wavelength magnetic anomalies in the Indian and Pacific Oceans after the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (40-83 Ma).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, C.; Dyment, J.; Gallet, Y.; Hulot, G.

    2004-12-01

    Temporal variations of the magnetic field of the Earth span a large spectrum of timescales : from year to hundred of millions of years (from secular variation to variations of the magnetic reversals frequency). Many questions remain unsolved, particularly about the long term evolution of the intensity of the magnetic field and about a possible link between secular variation and the magnetic reversals frequency. Study of marine magnetic measurements may complement measurements of the remanent magnetisation acquired on volcanic rocks or sediments in order to recover the long term evolution of the intensity of the magnetic field. Indeed, the magmatic oceanic crust is a good recorder of the magnetic reversals but also of the variations of the intensity of the magnetic field. The goal of this study is to use marine magnetic anomaly profiles to estimate fluctuations of the magnetic field for a period when the reversal rate was low (40-83 Ma) and to compare it with the last millions of years which are characterised by a high reversals frequency. Many sea-surface magnetic profiles are available. Magnetic anomalies are of two origins : the variations of the magnetic field during the cooling of the oceanic crust and local effects due to the structure of the lithosphere. In order to discriminate between the paleovariations of the magnetic field (the signal) and the local effects (the noise), the study deals with different regions of the Earth. The Indian and Pacific Oceans exhibit fast spreading rates during the period investigated and insure better resolution. In each study area, selected profiles are reduced to the pole, stretched with the help of the main magnetic anomalies (due to reversals) and stacked in order to increase the signal to noise ratio. Preliminary results reveals systematic micro-anomalies which correspond to variations of the magnetic dipole intensity or short polarity intervals. Over the 40 Ma period investigated, we observed the same micro-anomalies than

  7. Magnetic Anomalies over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 27{degrees}N.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J D

    1967-08-25

    Ten magnetic profiles across the mid-Atlantic ridge near 27 degrees N show trends that are parallel to the ridge axis and symmetrical about the ridge axis. The configuration of magnetic bodies that could account for the pattern supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the origin of magnetic anomalies over oceanic ridges. A polarity-reversal time scale inferred from models for sea-floor spreading in the Pacific-Antarctic ridge and radiometrically dated reversals of the geomagnetic field indicates a spreading rate of 1.25 centimeters per year during the last 6 million years and a rate of 1.65 centimeters per year between 6 and 10 million years ago. A similar analysis of more limited data over the mid-Atlantic ridge near 22 degrees N also indicates a change in the spreading rate. Here a rate of 1.4 centimeters per year appears to have been in effect during the last 5 million years; between 5 and 9 million years ago, an increased rate of 1.7 centimeters per year is indicated. The time of occurrence and relative magnitude of these changes in the spreading rate, about 5 to 6 million years ago and 18 to 27 percent, respectively, accords with the spreading rate change implied for the Juan de Fuca ridge in the northeast Pacific. PMID:17792827

  8. Identification of a magnetic anomaly at Jupiter from satellite footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodent, Denis

    2004-07-01

    Repeated imaging of Jupiter's aurora has shown that the northern main oval has a distorted 'kidney bean' shape in the general range of 90-140? System III longitude, which appears unchanged since 1994. While it is more difficult to observe the conjugate regions in the southern aurora, no corresponding distortion appears in the south. Recent improved accuracy in locating the satellite footprint auroral emissions has provided new information about the geometry of Jupiter's magnetic field in this and other areas. The study of the magnetic field provides us with insight into the state of matter and the dynamics deep down Jupiter. There is currently no other way to do this from orbit. The persistent pattern of the main oval implies a disturbance of the local magnetic field, and the increased latitudinal separation of the locus of satellite footprints from each other and from the main oval implies a locally weaker field strength. It is possible that these phenomena result from a magnetic anomaly in Jupiter's intrinsic magnetic field, as was proposed by A. Dessler in the 1970's. There is presently only limited evidence from the scarcity of auroral footprints observed in this longitude range. We propose to obtain HST UV images with specific observing geometries of Jupiter to determine the locations of the auroral footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede in cycle 13 to accurately determine the magnetic field geometry in the suggested anomaly region, and to either confirm or refute the suggestion of a local magnetic anomaly.

  9. The possibilities of paleomagnetic and geohistorical analyses of "tiny wiggles" short-period marine magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, S. A.; Merkuryev, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies of the tiny wiggles (TW) type can be used to solve geohistorical and paleomagnetic problems. The model fields corresponding to Paleocene-Eocene anomalies in the northwestern Indian Ocean, which were formed during the fast-spreading stage, were studied. For these fields, widely used interpretation methods were compared with a method proposed previously by the authors. The testing was performed with first the classical block model and then more complex models reflecting actual processes of oceanic accretion and magnetic field variations in the past. It was shown that the proposed method has advantages for this problem; it gives an error close to the minimum possible error and can adequately be used in interpretations. Spectral and statistical methods are used to estimate the magnetic anomaly resolving power and to study some factors that can exert a distorting influence. In addition, model examples have been used to indicate how the TW determination accuracy is affected by diurnal variations in the main magnetic field (MMF) and by ancient magnetization vector determination errors.

  10. Intermediate-wavelength magnetic anomalies over the central Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrecque, J. L.; Cande, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    A technique to extract the intermediate wavelength anomaly field from random ship tracks has been developed and is applied to extract the field from marine survey data of the central Pacific in the band pass of 4000-400 km. The technique minimizes the effects of external field sources, secular variation, and strike aliasing. The derived data field is compared to the equivalent MAGSAT data set, and it is shown that anomalies observed in both fields are correlatable to geologic features within the oceanic lithosphere but differ in amplitude by a factor of two. Likely sources for this discrepancy are identified. It is also shown that remanent magnetization of the central Pacific seamounts produces negative magnetic anomalies which are observed at satellite altitude.

  11. Plasma acceleration above martian magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lundin, R; Winningham, D; Barabash, S; Frahm, R; Holmström, M; Sauvaud, J-A; Fedorov, A; Asamura, K; Coates, A J; Soobiah, Y; Hsieh, K C; Grande, M; Koskinen, H; Kallio, E; Kozyra, J; Woch, J; Fraenz, M; Brain, D; Luhmann, J; McKenna-Lawler, S; Orsini, R S; Brandt, P; Wurz, P

    2006-02-17

    Auroras are caused by accelerated charged particles precipitating along magnetic field lines into a planetary atmosphere, the auroral brightness being roughly proportional to the precipitating particle energy flux. The Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms experiment on the Mars Express spacecraft has made a detailed study of acceleration processes on the nightside of Mars. We observed accelerated electrons and ions in the deep nightside high-altitude region of Mars that map geographically to interface/cleft regions associated with martian crustal magnetization regions. By integrating electron and ion acceleration energy down to the upper atmosphere, we saw energy fluxes in the range of 1 to 50 milliwatts per square meter per second. These conditions are similar to those producing bright discrete auroras above Earth. Discrete auroras at Mars are therefore expected to be associated with plasma acceleration in diverging magnetic flux tubes above crustal magnetization regions, the auroras being distributed geographically in a complex pattern by the many multipole magnetic field lines extending into space. PMID:16484488

  12. The next generation Antarctic digital magnetic anomaly map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Frese, R.R.B; Golynsky, A.V.; Kim, H.R.; Gaya-Piqué, L.; Thébault, E.; Chiappinii, M.; Ghidella, M.; Grunow, A.; ADMAP Working Group

    2007-01-01

    S (Golynsky et al., 2001). This map synthesized over 7.1 million line-kms of survey data available up through 1999 from marine, airborne and Magsat satellite observations. Since the production of the initial map, a large number of new marine and airborne surveys and improved magnetic observations from the Ørsted and CHAMP satellite missions have become available. In addition, an improved core field model for the Antarctic has been developed to better isolate crustal anomalies in these data. The next generation compilation also will likely represent the magnetic survey observations of the region in terms of a high-resolution spherical cap harmonic model. In this paper, we review the progress and problems of developing an improved magnetic anomaly map to facilitate studies of the Antarctic crustal magnetic field

  13. New magnetic anomaly map of East Antarctica and surrounding regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golynsky, A.; Blankenship, D.; Chiappini, M.; Damaske, D.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Golynsky, D.; Goncharov, A.; Ishihara, T.; Ivanov, S.; Jokat, W.; Kim, H.R.; König, M.; Masolov, V.; Nogi, Y.; Sand, M.; Studing, M.; ADMAP Working Group

    2007-01-01

    community over East Antarctica and surrounding regions, significantly upgrade the Antarctic Digital Magnetic Anomaly Project (ADMAP) compilation and lead to substantial improvements in magnetic anomaly pattern recognition. New data have been matched in one inverse operation by minimizing the data differences for the areas of overlap. The aeromagnetic data show many previously unknown magnetic patterns, lineaments and trends, defining the spatial extent of Ferrar volcanics and plutonic Granite Harbour Intrusives in the Transantarctic Mountains and previously unknown tectonic trends of the East Antarctic craton. Regional aeromagnetic investigations have successfully delineated Early Paleozoic inherited crustal features along the flanks of the West Antarctic Rift System and the southern boundary of the Archean Ruker Terrane in the Prince Charles Mountains. Magnetic records along the East Antarctic continental margin provide new constraints on the breakup of Gondwana.

  14. Geophysical interpretation of the magnetic anomalies of the Earth derived from MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.; Strangway, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The ambiguities about geophysical implications based on the correlation of scalar magnetic anomalies and geological features were investigated. A method was developed to convert scalar magnetic anomalies into a map of the lateral variations of magnetic susceptibility of the lithosphere. This map is directly correlated with the causative sources. The method is based on spherical harmonic analysis of lateral variations seen on the scalar magnetic anomaly map and those of the lithospheric magnetic susceptibility. The harmonic coefficients are related through the fundamental causality relationship governing a magnetized body and its associated scalar magnetic anomaly. The main features of the resulting magnetic susceptibility anomalies are outlined.

  15. Approximating edges of source bodies from magnetic or gravity anomalies.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Simpson, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Cordell and Grauch (1982, 1985) discussed a technique to estimate the location of abrupt lateral changes in magnetization or mass density of upper crustal rocks. The final step of their procedure is to identify maxima on a contoured map of horizontal gradient magnitudes. Attempts to automate their final step. The method begins with gridded magnetic or gravity anomaly data and produces a plan view of inferred boundaries of magnetic or gravity sources. The method applies to both local surveys and to continent-wide compilations of magnetic and gravity data.-from Authors

  16. New digital magnetic anomaly database for North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, C.A.; Pilkington, M.; Cuevas, A.; Hernandez, I.; Urrutia, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Consejo de Recursos Minerales of Mexico (CRM) are compiling an upgraded digital magnetic anomaly database and map for North America. This trinational project is expected to be completed by late 2002.

  17. Macquarie island and the cause of oceanic linear magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Varne, R; Gee, R D; Quilty, P G

    1969-10-10

    Macquarie Islands is formed of probably Pliocene oceanic crust. Intruded into pillow lavas is a belt of harzburgite and layered gabbro mnasses cut by dike swarms. Similar belt-like structures may cause the linear magnetic anomalies of the ocean. PMID:17731490

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstructive Müllerian anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Kamal Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Dhivya; Kanagaraj, Vikrant

    2013-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly of the urogenital tract involving Müllerian ducts and Wolffian structures. It is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic modality for demonstrating anatomic variation and associated complications. PMID:24082660

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in obstructive Müllerian anomalies.

    PubMed

    Sen, Kamal Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Dhivya; Kanagaraj, Vikrant

    2013-04-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly of the urogenital tract involving Müllerian ducts and Wolffian structures. It is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic modality for demonstrating anatomic variation and associated complications. PMID:24082660

  20. Potential Mars 2001 Sites Coincident with Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, M. S.

    1999-06-01

    Of the areas that meet the engineering criteria for MSP 01, only two are coincident with magnetic anomalies measured by the MAG/ER instrument on MGS. Area A is centered on about 10 deg S, 202 deg W and extends from about 7.5 deg S to 15 S. This area is associated with three bands of magnetic anomalies, two with positive values surrounding an area with negative values. Area B corresponds with a circular high positive magnetic anomaly and is centered at 13.5 deg S, 166 deg W. In addition to magnetic anomalies, the proposed sites have other attributes that make then attractive from of standpoint of meeting the objectives of the Mars Program. The landing site candidates meet the engineering requirements outlined on the Mars '01 landing site page htip://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/landingsite. These are (source of data in parentheses): latitude between 3 deg N and 12 deg S, rock abundance between 5-10% (IRTM), fine-component thermal inertia > 4 cgs units (IRTM), topography < 2.5 km (MOLA). There are three exceptions: 1) Area B contains sites that lie up to about 15 deg S, 2) some sites are considered that have rock abundance values of 3-13%. 3) High resolution Viking coverage may not be available. These exceptions will be noted.

  1. Potential Mars 2001 Sites Coincident with Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Of the areas that meet the engineering criteria for MSP 01, only two are coincident with magnetic anomalies measured by the MAG/ER instrument on MGS. Area A is centered on about 10 deg S, 202 deg W and extends from about 7.5 deg S to 15 S. This area is associated with three bands of magnetic anomalies, two with positive values surrounding an area with negative values. Area B corresponds with a circular high positive magnetic anomaly and is centered at 13.5 deg S, 166 deg W. In addition to magnetic anomalies, the proposed sites have other attributes that make then attractive from of standpoint of meeting the objectives of the Mars Program. The landing site candidates meet the engineering requirements outlined on the Mars '01 landing site page htip://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/2001/landingsite. These are (source of data in parentheses): latitude between 3 deg N and 12 deg S, rock abundance between 5-10% (IRTM), fine-component thermal inertia > 4 cgs units (IRTM), topography < 2.5 km (MOLA). There are three exceptions: 1) Area B contains sites that lie up to about 15 deg S, 2) some sites are considered that have rock abundance values of 3-13%. 3) High resolution Viking coverage may not be available. These exceptions will be noted.

  2. Axial Anomaly, Dirac Sea, and the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kharzeev, D.E.

    2010-05-26

    Gribov viewed the axial anomaly as a manifestation of the collective motion of Dirac fermions with arbitrarily high momenta in the vacuum. In the presence of an external magnetic field and a chirality imbalance, this collective motion becomes directly observable in the form of the electric current - this is the chiral magnetic effect (CME). I give an elementary introduction into the physics of CME, and discuss the experimental status and recent developments.

  3. Estimation of lower crust magnetization form satellite derived anomaly field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.; Allenby, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Various lines of evidence point to the lower crust as the source of the long-wavelength magnetic anomaly field measured by the POGO and Magsat satellites. Using seismically determined lower crust thicknesses and equivalent source inversion of the satellite anomaly data, magnetization for the lower crust for much of the United States has been calculated. The average magnetization for two hundred sixty-six 150 x 150 km areas is 3.5 A/m with a standard deviation of 1.1 A/m. These values are consistent with laboratory measurements of mafic-ultramafic rocks expected in the lower crust, and in agreement with previous estimates of lower crust magnetization based on long-wavelength aeromagnetic data. Average lower crust thickness for the same areas is 18.2 km (sigma = 6.4). Thus, over large regions, it appears that variation in magnetization and variation in magnetic layer thickness contribute almost equally in causing the anomaly field variation at satellite altitude.

  4. Petrologic and geophysical sources of long-wavelength crustal magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Schlinger, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic mineralogy and magnetic properties of the deep crust are studied as they pertain to the interpretation of long wavelength, or regional, crustal magnetic anomalies in satellite magnetic data and near surface magnetic data. The conclusions have relevance to the understanding of regional magnetic anomalies in magnetic field measuring satellite missions data. There are two separable studies: (1) a synthesis of available information of regional magnetic anomalies and the magnetization of metamorphic and igneous rocks, and (2) a detailed field, analytical, and experimental study of in situ and laboratory specimens from a terrain that offers exposures of high grade granlite facies rocks that have associated regional magnetic and gravity anomalies.

  5. The geomagnetic field during the Cretaceous Normal superchron from marine magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granot, R.; Dyment, J.; Gallet, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Superchrons are remarkable geomagnetic field features during which the polarity remained stable for several tens of Myr. The latest interval to experience steady polarity, the Cretaceous Normal superchron (CNS, between ~121 and 83 Myr ago), is best expressed above the oceanic crust where sea surface magnetic anomalies lack a prominent stripe pattern. Here we show, using the first deep-tow magnetic profile encompassing the entire CNS, together with widely-distributed sea surface magnetic anomaly data, that the variability of the dipolar geomagnetic field increased at the beginning of the superchron, leading to a period of highly fluctuating field between 110 and 100 Myr ago. A transition back to a more stable field resulted in a subdued magnetic signal in the last 9 Myr of the superchron. This long-term pattern requires that the conditions at the core-mantle boundary have significantly varied during the superchron. Besides their geomagnetic implications, our results provide new time markers to re-evaluate seafloor-spreading history during the CNS, when important plate reorganizations took place and ultrahigh spreading rates have been speculated but not directly confirmed.

  6. On the origin of the Bangui magnetic anomaly, central African empire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    1977-01-01

    A large magnetic anomaly was recognized in satellite magnetometer data over the Central African Empire in central Africa. They named this anomaly the Bangui magnetic anomaly due to its location near the capital city of Bangui, C.A.E. Because large crustal magnetic anomalies are uncommon, the origin of this anomaly has provoked some interest. The area of the anomaly was visited to make ground magnetic measurements, geologic observations, and in-situ magnetic susceptibility measurements. Some rock samples were also collected and chemically analyzed. The results of these investigations are presented.

  7. Lunar magnetic anomalies detected by the Apollo substatellite magnetometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, L.L.; Coleman, P.J., Jr.; Russell, C.T.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Properties of lunar crustal magnetization thus far deduced from Apollo subsatellite magnetometer data are reviewed using two of the most accurate presently available magnetic anomaly maps - one covering a portion of the lunar near side and the other a part of the far side. The largest single anomaly found within the region of coverage on the near-side map correlates exactly with a conspicuous, light-colored marking in western Oceanus Procellarum called Reiner Gamma. This feature is interpreted as an unusual deposit of ejecta from secondary craters of the large nearby primary impact crater Cavalerius. An age for Cavalerius (and, by implication, for Reiner Gamma) of 3.2 ?? 0.2 ?? 109 y is estimated. The main (30 ?? 60 km) Reiner Gamma deposit is nearly uniformly magnetized in a single direction, with a minimum mean magnetization intensity of ???7 ?? 10-2 G cm3/g (assuming a density of 3 g/cm3), or about 700 times the stable magnetization component of the most magnetic returned samples. Additional medium-amplitude anomalies exist over the Fra Mauro Formation (Imbrium basin ejecta emplaced ???3.9 ?? 109 y ago) where it has not been flooded by mare basalt flows, but are nearly absent over the maria and over the craters Copernicus, Kepler, and Reiner and their encircling ejecta mantles. The mean altitude of the far-side anomaly gap is much higher than that of the near-side map and the surface geology is more complex, so individual anomaly sources have not yet been identified. However, it is clear that a concentration of especially strong sources exists in the vicinity of the craters Van de Graaff and Aitken. Numerical modeling of the associated fields reveals that the source locations do not correspond with the larger primary impact craters of the region and, by analogy with Reiner Gamma, may be less conspicuous secondary crater ejecta deposits. The reason for a special concentration of strong sources in the Van de Graaff-Aitken region is unknown, but may be indirectly

  8. Magnetization of lower crust and interpretation of regional magnetic anomalies - Example from Lofoten and Vesteralen, Norway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinger, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    During the last 20 years, studies have been conducted regarding the regional, or long-wavelength, geomagnetic anomalies of the lower crust of the earth. The present paper is mainly concerned with the petrologic and geophysical interpretation of the observed features. Attention is given to magnetic mineralogy and magnetic properties of high-grade rocks from Lofoten and Vesteralen, regional geology and geophysics, field measurements and sampling, magnetic mineralogy of the lower crust, the effects of metamorphism upon magnetic mineralogy and magnetic properties of high-grade rocks, susceptibility-temperature relations and the Hopkinson effect, and petrologic sources of regional crustal magnetic anomalies.

  9. The resolution of a magnetic anomaly map expected from GRM data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangway, D. W.; Arkani-Hamed, J.; Teskey, D. J.; Hood, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the MAGSAT mission were used to derive a global scalar magnetic anomaly map at an average altitude of about 400 km. It was possible to work with 2 data sets corresponding to dawn and dusk. The anomalies which were repeatable at dawn and at dusk was identified and the error limits of these anomalies were estimated. The repeatable anomalies were downward continued to about 10 km altitude. The anomalies over Canada were correlated quantitatively with bandpass filtered magnetic anomalies derived from aeromagnetic surveys. The close correlation indicates that the repeatable anomalies detected from orbit are due to geological causes. This correlation supports the geological significance of the global anomaly map.

  10. Matched filtering method for separating magnetic anomaly using fractal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoxiong; Cheng, Qiuming; Zhang, Henglei

    2016-05-01

    Fractal/scaling distribution of magnetization in the crust has found with growing body of evidences from spectral analysis of borehole susceptibility logs and magnetic field data, and fractal properties of magnetic sources have already been considered in processing magnetic data such as the Spector and Grant method for depth determination. In this study, the fractal-based matched filtering method is presented for separating magnetic anomalies caused by fractal sources. We argue the benefits of considering fractal natures of source distribution for data processing in magnetic exploration: the first is that the depth determination can be improved by using multiscaling model to interpret the magnetic data power spectrum; the second is that the matched filtering can be reconstructed by employing the difference in scaling exponent together with the corrected depth and amplitude estimates. In the application of synthetic data obtained from fractal modeling and real aeromagnetic data from the Qikou district of China, the proposed fractal-based matched filtering method obtains more reliable depth estimations as well as improved separation between local anomalies (caused by volcanic rocks) and regional field (crystalline basement) in comparison with the conventional matched filtering method.

  11. Low energy spread ion source with a coaxial magnetic filter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    2000-01-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending magnetic filter consisting of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy spread utilizes a cylindrical magnetic filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial magnetic filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy spread in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).

  12. Manifestation of the petrogeneration zones of Northern and the Bering seas in ground magnetic anomalies and anomalies of satellite Champ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Tamara; Krasinsky, Egor; Petrova, Alevtina; Demina, Irina

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this paper are showed results of studying of specificity of a deep structure of zones of petrogeneration Northern and the Bering seas on aeromagnetic and satellite magnetometric datas. Research lateral and vertical heterogeneitys an earth's crust of Northern sea is carried out on the basis of the analysis of measurements of satellite Champ at height of 100 km and the digital database created on materials of sea shooting of a geomagnetic field, executed on non-magnetic schooner "Zarya". On sea measurements in Northern sea through large oil fields and gas ( Frigg, Ekofisk, Forties trough, Leman, etc.). Geomagnetic sections for an interval of depths from 1 up to 30 km are constructed. It has allowed to study character of distribution of magnetization of breeds of a cover, horizontal lamination intracore layers of an earth's crust and to allocate in zones petrogeneration synvertical fluidoconduct zones the channels described by alternation of not magnetic and low-magnetic layers. They were showed on geomagnetic sections as permeable zones quasi- laminated structures with the lowered magnetic properties in an interval of depths from 8 up to 28 km. Comparison to a map of the magnetic anomalies measured at height of 100 km by satellite Champ, has shown, that areas of the greatest petrocongestions North Sea рифта at height of 100 km are dated for a zone of gradients and a minimum of northeast displacement of regional anomalies of western and east blocks of Northern sea. It corresponds to representations about an orientation of a fissuring zone and the increased size of a geothermal gradient North Sea rift and is corresponded position allocated on hydromagnetic structures deep fluidoconduct channels. Thus, distribution to water areas of deposits of deposits is emphasized not only low-magnetic areas in a thickness of a sedimentary cover where they are directly located, but also by not magnetic lenses in breeds of the base spreading it in intervals of

  13. Mesozoic Kinematic Evolution of the Central Atlantic Inferred From Regional Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labails, C.; Olivet, J.; Aslanian, D.; Sichler, B.; Roest, W.; Evain, M.

    2007-12-01

    The magnetic anomaly signature of Central Atlantic margins is well defined by the gridded data published by Verhoef et al. (1996) on the North American region. However, a gridded dataset for the West African margin (South of the Canary Islands) was lacking. We have used magnetic data from the Geodas database, an Ifremer dataset and personnal communication from H.A. Roeser and W.J.M. Van der Linden in order to produce a gridded magnetic data of the Dakhla margin and to better constrain the kinematics of Central Atlantic early opening. Our model adopts the breakup timing of 195 Ma as proposed by Sahabi et al. (2004) - 20 myr earlier than what was generally proposed in previous models. According to our interpretation of the newly compiled magnetic data, the early opening of Central Atlantic was characterized by three distinct phases. In contrast to other models, we propose that for the first 30 myr (195-165 Ma, Lias-Dogger) the oceanic accretion was extremely slow (~0.8 cm/y). At the Blake Spur time, (around 165 Ma, Callovian basis), a drastic change occurred, both in the relative plate motions (initially NNW-SSE, it becomes NO-SE) and spreading rate (that increases up to ~ 4.8 cm/y). The BSMA (Blake Spur Magnetic Anomaly) is related to a great basement topographic change. From magnetic chron M22 (150 Ma, Tithonian basis) onwards, the spreading rate slowed down to about 2.6 cm/y and remained constant until magnetic chron M0 (125 Ma, Barremian-Aptian limit).

  14. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  15. Interpretation of long- and short-wavelength magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeNoyer, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Magset was launched on October 30, 1979. More than a decade of examining existing data, devising appropriate models of the global magnetic field, and extending methods for interpreting long-wavelength magnetic anomalies preceded this launch Magnetic data collected by satellite can be interrupted by using a method of analysis that quantitively describes the magnetic field resulting from three-dimensional geologic structures that are bounded by an arbitrary number of polygonal faces, Each face my have any orientation and three or more sides. At each point of the external field, the component normal to each face is obtained by using an expression for the solid angle subtended by a generalized polygon. The "cross" of tangential components are relatively easy to obtain for the same polygons. No approximations have been made related to orbit height that restrict the dimensions of the polygons relative to the distance from the external field points. This permits the method to be used to model shorter wavelength anomalies obtained from aircraft or ground surveys. The magnetic fields for all the structures considered are determine in the same rectangular coordinate system. The coordinate system is in depended from the orientation of geologic trends and permits multiple structures or bodies to be included in the same magnetic field calculations. This single reference system also simplified adjustments in position and direction to account for earth curvature in regional interpretation.

  16. PIC simulation of plasma waves above lunar magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokgo, K.; Woo, C. H.; Min, K.; Hwang, J.

    2015-12-01

    We simulated the interaction between solar wind and lunar magnetic anomaly. Reiner Gamma anomaly (7.4°N, 300.9°E) and average solar wind parameters are used for our simulation. To increase spatial resolution for wave analysis, simulation geometry was restricted to 2-dimension. At the top of simulation box, continuous solar wind particle injection was designed to reproduce steady solar wind condition and particles left through the bottom side of simulation box. Mini-magnetosphere was formed above the lunar surface as a result of the interaction between solar wind particle and dipole magnetic field. As it affect incident solar wind particles, electromagnetic field fluctuations were generated and wave structures were observed above mini magnetosphere.

  17. Tracking pigeons in a magnetic anomaly and in magnetically "quiet" terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffner, Ingo; Fuhrmann, Patrick; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2011-07-01

    Pigeons were released at two sites of equal distance from the loft, one within a magnetic anomaly, the other in magnetically quiet terrain, and their tracks were recorded with the help of GPS receivers. A comparison of the beginning of the tracks revealed striking differences: within the anomaly, the initial phase lasted longer, and the distance flown was longer, with the pigeons' headings considerably farther from the home direction. During the following departure phase, the birds were well homeward oriented at the magnetically quiet site, whereas they continued to be disoriented within the anomaly. Comparing the tracks in the anomaly with the underlying magnetic contours shows considerable differences between individuals, without a common pattern emerging. The differences in magnetic intensity along the pigeons' path do not differ from a random distribution of intensity differences around the release site, indicating that the magnetic contours do not directly affect the pigeons' routes. Within the anomaly, pigeons take longer until their flights are oriented, but 5 km from the release point, the birds, still within the anomaly, are also significantly oriented in the home direction. These findings support the assumption that magnetically anomalous conditions initially interfere with the pigeons' navigational processes, with birds showing rather individual responses in their attempts to overcome these problems.

  18. A magnetic anomaly of possible economic significance in southeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zietz, Isidore

    1964-01-01

    An aeromagnetic survey in southeastern Minnesota by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the State of Minnesota has revealed a high-amplitude, linear, and narrow magnetic feature that suggests a possible source of Precambrian iron-formation of economic value. For the past few years the U. S. Geological Survey has been conducting detailed geophysical studies of the midcontinent gravity anomaly--a broad, high-amplitude feature that extends from Lake Superior through the States of Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and part of Kansas. As part of this study an aeromagnetic survey of the southern part of the State was made in cooperation with the State of Minnesota during the summer of 1963, in which a linear high-amplitude anomaly of the order of 4,000 gammas was discovered. Because of the high amplitude, the linearity, and the narrowness of the magnetic feature, it is believed the source may be Precambrian iron-formation of possible economic value. The anomalous area is in Fillmore County, approximately between the towns of Lanesboro and Peterson in the extreme southeastern part of the State. (See figures 1 and 2.) At the site of the anomaly, Cambrian sedimentary rocks occur in the valley of the Root River, and Ordovician rocks (nearly flat lying) mantle the upland areas. The uplands are largely covered by glacial deposits, which are relatively thin (Paul K. Sims, written communication, 1964). Depths to the Precambrian are estimated to range from 500 feet to 1,000 feet below the surface. The aeromagnetic map shown in figure 2 was compiled from continuous magnetic profiles made along east-west flight lines 1,000 feet above ground, and spaced approximately 1 mile apart. Contour intervals of 20, 100, and 500 gammas were used depending on the intensity. The instrument for the survey was a flux-gate type magnetometer (AN/ASQ-3A) which measures total-field variations. The contour map displays variations in magnetic pattern which are typical of shallow Precambrian rocks

  19. Deep-sea Vector Magnetic Anomalies over the Bayonnaise Knoll Caldera (Izu-Ogasawara Arc) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsho, C.; Ura, T.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Bayonnaise Knoll caldera is located on the eastern margin of the backarc rift zone of the Izu-Ogasawara island arc. The caldera rim is ~3 km in diameter and 100-200 m high from the caldera floor 840-920 m deep. A large active hydrothermal field associated with sulfide deposit, called the Hakurei site, has been found at the foot of the southeastern caldera wall. We conducted deep-sea magnetic measurements using autonomous underwater vehicles to map ~75 % of an area 3 km by 4 km in the caldera. The magnetic vector field data were collected at 40-150 m altitude along the survey lines spaced 80-200 m apart. We improved the conventional correction method applied for removing the effect of vehicle magnetization, which greatly enhanced the precision of the resulting vector anomalies and allowed us to use the vector anomaly instead of the total intensity anomaly for inversion analysis. The magnetization distribution obtained using the vector anomaly was significantly different from the one obtained using the total intensity anomaly, especially in areas where the survey tracks were widely spaced. The aliasing effect appears in areas of sparse data distribution, and the magnetic field is more correctly calculated from the vector anomaly than the total intensity anomaly. The magnetization distribution in the caldera has two major features: a ~1.5-km wide belt of high magnetization, trending NNW-SSE through the caldera, and a clear low magnetization zone, ~300 m x ~500 m wide, extending over the Hakurei site. The high magnetization belt is considered to reflect basaltic volcanism associated with the backarc rifting that occurred after the formation of the Bayonnaise Knoll. The low magnetization zone is interpreted as the alteration zone resulting from the hydrothermal activity. Several zones of localized high magnetization are recognized within the high magnetization belt, some of them in the caldera wall adjacent to the low magnetization zone of the Hakurei site. We

  20. The moon: Sources of the crustal magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, L.L.; Coleman, P.J., Jr.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Previously unmapped Apollo 16 subsatellite magnetometer data collected at low altitudes over the lunar near side are presented. Medium-amplitude magnetic anomalies exist over the Fra Mauro and Cayley Formations (primary and secondary basin ejecta emplaced 3.8 to 4.0 billion years ago) but are nearly absent over the maria and over the craters Copernicus, Kepler, and Reiner and their encircling ejecta mantles. The largest observed anomaly (radial component ??? 21 gammas at an altitude of 20 kilometers) is exactly correlated with a conspicuous light-colored deposit on western Oceanus Procellarum known as Reiner ??. Assuming that the Reiner ?? deposit is the source body and estimating its maximum average thickness as 10 meters, a minimum mean magnetization level of 5.2 ?? 2.4 ?? 10-2 electromagnetic units per gram, or ??? 500 times the stable magnetization component of the most magnetic returned sample, is calculated. An age for its emplacement of ??? 2.9 billion years is inferred from photogeologic evidence, implying that magnetization of lunar crustal materials must have continued for a period exceeding 1 billion years. Copyright ?? 1979 AAAS.

  1. Apparatus for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by squid gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1984-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  2. Thermal Sensitivity of MD Hematite: Implication for Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Wasilewski, Peter J.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic remanence of crustal rocks can reside in three common rock-forming magnetic minerals: magnetite, pyrrhotite, and hematite. Thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) of magnetite and pyrrhotite is carried mostly by single domain (SD) grains. The TRM of hematite grains, however, is carried mostly by multidomain (NM) grains. This characteristic is illustrated by TRM acquisition curves for hematite of variable grainsizes. The transition between truly NM behavior and tendency towards SD behavior his been established between hematite grainsizes of 0. 1 and 0.05 mm. Coarse grainsize of lower crustal rocks and the large sensitivity of MD hematite grains to acquire TRM indicates that hematite could be a significant contributor to long-wavelength magnetic anomalies.

  3. Petrological Explanations for the Magnetic Anomalies Detected on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The discovery of crustal magnetization in some locations on Mars, particularly the southern highlands, has major implications for the early evolution of Mars. The east-west-trending linear features in the southern highlands with alternating polarity may be the result of an early seafloor spreading process similar to that seen on Earth today. The larger magnetization of the martian crust compared to the Earth can be attributed to its higher Fe content and the proposed minerals associated with this magnetization are multidomain hematite and pyrrhotite. In this study, we discuss the petrological evolution of basalts on Earth and Mars and suggest processes that may enhance crystallization of magnetic minerals in the martian rocks, thereby accounting for their intense magnetic properties.

  4. Viscous remanent magnetization model for the Broken Ridge satellite magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    An equivalent source model solution of the satellite magnetic field over Australia obtained by Mayhew et al. (1980) showed that the satellite anomalies could be related to geological features in Australia. When the processing and selection of the Magsat data over the Australian region had progressed to the point where interpretation procedures could be initiated, it was decided to start by attempting to model the Broken Ridge satellite anomaly, which represents one of the very few relatively isolated anomalies in the Magsat maps, with an unambiguous source region. Attention is given to details concerning the Broken Ridge satellite magnetic anomaly, the modeling method used, the Broken Ridge models, modeling results, and characteristics of magnetization.

  5. Improving the geological interpretation of magnetic and gravity satellite anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, William J.; Braile, Lawrence W.; Vonfrese, Ralph R. B.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the geologic component of observed satellite magnetic and gravity fields requires accurate isolation of the geologic component of the observations, theoretically sound and viable inversion techniques, and integration of collateral, constraining geologic and geophysical data. A number of significant contributions were made which make quantitative analysis more accurate. These include procedures for: screening and processing orbital data for lithospheric signals based on signal repeatability and wavelength analysis; producing accurate gridded anomaly values at constant elevations from the orbital data by three-dimensional least squares collocation; increasing the stability of equivalent point source inversion and criteria for the selection of the optimum damping parameter; enhancing inversion techniques through an iterative procedure based on the superposition theorem of potential fields; and modeling efficiently regional-scale lithospheric sources of satellite magnetic anomalies. In addition, these techniques were utilized to investigate regional anomaly sources of North and South America and India and to provide constraints to continental reconstruction. Since the inception of this research study, eleven papers were presented with associated published abstracts, three theses were completed, four papers were published or accepted for publication, and an additional manuscript was submitted for publication.

  6. Numerical Simulations on Origin of Galilean Moons' Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, LiQuo; Kuang, WeiJia; Ma, ShiZhuang

    2011-01-01

    Galileo mission detected the magnetic anomalies originated from Galilean moons. These anomalies are likely generated in the moons interiors, under the influence of a strong ambient Jovian field. Among various possible generation mechanisms of the anomalies, we focus on magneto-convection and dynamos in the interiors via numerical simulation. To mimic the electromagnetic environment of the moons, we introduce in our numerical model an external uniform magnetic field B(sub 0) with a fixed orientation but varying field strength. Our results show that a finite B(sub 0) can substantially alter the dynamo processes inside the core. When the ambient field strength B(sub 0) increases to approximately 40% of the field generated by the pure dynamo action, the convective state in the core changes significantly: the convective flow decreases by 80% in magnitude, but the differential rotation becomes stronger in much of the fluid layer, leading to a stronger field generated in the core. The field morphologies inside the core tend to align with the ambient field, while the flow patterns show the symmetry-breaking effect under the influence of B(sub 0). Furthermore, the generated field tends to be temporally more stable.

  7. Spreading of Magnetic Reconnection X-lines in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassak, Paul; Shepherd, Lucas

    2012-03-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic reconnection often begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the out-of-plane direction in time. A number of authors have studied this problem for magnetotail applications such as substorms and bursty bulk flows, for which the out-of-plane (guide) field is typically small. However, spreading also occurs in laboratory experiments and two-ribbon solar flares (such as the Bastille Day flare), and is inferred to occur at the dayside magnetopause. The reconnection site in each of these settings is known or thought to have a significant guide field. With no guide field, it was shown that the reconnection spreading is controlled by the species that carries the current. However, laboratory experiments with a large guide field (Katz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 104, 255004, 2010) revealed that spreading takes place in both directions at the Alfven speed based on the guide field. This implies a qualitative change of behavior as the guide field varies. We present a scaling argument for the condition on the guide field at which the nature of the spreading switches from being caused by current carriers to Alfven waves. Further, we show results of three-dimensional two-fluid simulations that agree with the theory. We discuss applications to observations.

  8. Interpretation of Magnetic Phase Anomalies over 2D Tabular Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, phase angle (inverse tangent of the ratio of the horizontal to vertical gradients of magnetic anomalies) profile over two-dimensional tabular bodies has been subjected to detailed analysis for determining the source parameters. Distances between certain characteristic positions on this phase curve are related to the parameters of two-dimensional tabular magnetic sources. In this paper, I have derived the mathematical expressions for these relations. It has been demonstrated here that for locating the origin of the 2D tabular source, knowledge on the type of the model (contact, sheet, dyke, and fault) is not necessary. A procedure is evolved to determine the location, depth, width and magnetization angle of the 2D sources from the mathematical expressions. The method is tested on real field data. The effect of the overlapping bodies is also discussed with two synthetic examples. The interpretation technique is developed for contact, sheet, dike and inclined fault bodies.

  9. Magnetic torque anomaly in the quantum limit of Weyl semimetals.

    PubMed

    Moll, Philip J W; Potter, Andrew C; Nair, Nityan L; Ramshaw, B J; Modic, K A; Riggs, Scott; Zeng, Bin; Ghimire, Nirmal J; Bauer, Eric D; Kealhofer, Robert; Ronning, Filip; Analytis, James G

    2016-01-01

    Electrons in materials with linear dispersion behave as massless Weyl- or Dirac-quasiparticles, and continue to intrigue due to their close resemblance to elusive ultra-relativistic particles as well as their potential for future electronics. Yet the experimental signatures of Weyl-fermions are often subtle and indirect, in particular if they coexist with conventional, massive quasiparticles. Here we show a pronounced anomaly in the magnetic torque of the Weyl semimetal NbAs upon entering the quantum limit state in high magnetic fields. The torque changes sign in the quantum limit, signalling a reversal of the magnetic anisotropy that can be directly attributed to the topological nature of the Weyl electrons. Our results establish that anomalous quantum limit torque measurements provide a direct experimental method to identify and distinguish Weyl and Dirac systems. PMID:27545105

  10. Magnetic torque anomaly in the quantum limit of Weyl semimetals

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Philip J. W.; Potter, Andrew C.; Nair, Nityan L.; Ramshaw, B. J.; Modic, K. A.; Riggs, Scott; Zeng, Bin; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Bauer, Eric D.; Kealhofer, Robert; Ronning, Filip; Analytis, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Electrons in materials with linear dispersion behave as massless Weyl- or Dirac-quasiparticles, and continue to intrigue due to their close resemblance to elusive ultra-relativistic particles as well as their potential for future electronics. Yet the experimental signatures of Weyl-fermions are often subtle and indirect, in particular if they coexist with conventional, massive quasiparticles. Here we show a pronounced anomaly in the magnetic torque of the Weyl semimetal NbAs upon entering the quantum limit state in high magnetic fields. The torque changes sign in the quantum limit, signalling a reversal of the magnetic anisotropy that can be directly attributed to the topological nature of the Weyl electrons. Our results establish that anomalous quantum limit torque measurements provide a direct experimental method to identify and distinguish Weyl and Dirac systems. PMID:27545105

  11. The Russian contribution in WDMAM-2011 magnetic anomalies and anomalies of satellite Champ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livinova, Tamara; Glebovsky, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    In VSEGEI is created the renovated digital cartographical model of an anomalous magnetic field (AMF) of territory of Russia and adjacent aquatory of scale 1:2 500000 on the basis of the available base summary digital materials prepared at various times by two organizations: VSEGEI and VNIIOkeangeologia. For this purpose uniform technological rules which have provided satisfactory synthesis of digital data files of an anomalous magnetic field in scale 1:2 500000 have been developed and realized. As a result of processing digital data file AMF the divergences reached 200 нТл, have been eliminated. For inclusion in WDMAM-2011 the Russian side the digital model counted on height 1 km on a grid 5х5км is offered. Anomalous values are designed from normal field VSEGEI of an epoch of 1965. The magnetic grid (5x5 km) within the Russian continental shelf compiled in VNIIOkeangeologia was leveled, adjusted and merged with those created in VSEGEI on shore of Russian Federation. Data processing is made by software Geosoft. Russian magnetic database in the Arctic Ocean was created as a result of adjusting of all historical and recent magnetic data sets, collected several organizations during the period about 40 years. Within the deep part of the Arctic Ocean this information was leveled, adjusted and combined with all available US magnetic data sets under cooperative project between and US Naval Research Laboratory. A result of this compilation is presented by grid of magnetic anomalies (5x5 km) that was used in the CAMP-GM project.

  12. Utility of Satellite Magnetic Observations for Estimating Near-Surface Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, Jeong Woo; Park, Chan Hong

    2003-01-01

    Regional to continental scale magnetic anomaly maps are becoming increasingly available from airborne, shipborne, and terrestrial surveys. Satellite data are commonly considered to fill the coverage gaps in regional compilations of these near-surface surveys. For the near-surface Antarctic magnetic anomaly map being produced by the Antarctic Digital Magnetic Anomaly Project (ADMAP), we show that near-surface magnetic anomaly estimation is greatly enhanced by the joint inversion of the near-surface data with the satellite observations relative to the conventional technique such as minimum curvature. Orsted observations are especially advantageous relative to the Magsat data that have order-of-magnitude greater measurement errors, albeit at much lower orbital altitudes. CHAMP is observing the geomagnetic field with the same measurement accuracy as the Orsted mission, but at the lower orbital altitudes covered by Magsat. Hence, additional significant improvement in predicting near-surface magnetic anomalies can result as these CHAMP data are available. Our analysis also suggests that considerable new insights on the magnetic properties of the lithosphere may be revealed by a further order-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of the magnetometer measurements at minimum orbital altitude.

  13. MAGSAT satellite magnetic anomaly map over South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    A scalar magnetic anomaly map was prepared for South America and adjacent marine areas directly from original MAGSAT orbits. Special problems associated with the separation of external field and crustal anomalies, and the reduction of data to a common altitude are addressed. External fields are manifested in a long-wavelength ring current effect, a medium-wavelength equatorial electrojet, and short-wavelength noise. The noise is reduced by selecting profiles from quiet periods (Kp or = 3), and the effect of the electrojet is minimized by drawing the data set from dawn profiles only. The ring current is corrected through the use of a standard equation, augmented by further digital band-pass filtering. Profiles thus filtered differ primarily in amplitude due solely to satellite altitude differences. These differences are normalized by an inversion of the profile data onto a grid of equivalent point dipoles, and recalculated at an altitude of 350 km. The low altitudes in the study area cause instability in the inversion, necessitating separate inversions of several sub-areas which are subsequently merged. Crustal anomalies reduced-to-the-pole exhibit marked correlations to known tectonic features.

  14. Comparison between the recent U.S. composite magnetic anomaly map and Magsat anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.; Taylor, P. T.; Langel, R. A.; Hinze, W. J.; Phillips, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of Magsat data with a Composite Magnetic Anomaly Map (CMAM) of the conterminous U.S. reported by Zietz (1982). The investigation was initiated to test the validity of the satellite measurements, and to provide insights into error or problems in either data set. It is found that upward continuation of the digital CMAM data is not in qualitative agreement with the Magsat map. However, if a least squares fit polynomial surface is taken out prior to upward continuation, there is improved quantitative agreement between a residual CMAM and Magsat. Causes for the remaining differences between the residual, upward continued CMAM and the Magsat map are also considered.

  15. The last frontier? High-resolution, near-bottom measurements of the Hawaiian Jurassic magnetic anomaly sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, M.; Tominaga, M.; Sager, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    different spreading centers. In 2011, we undertook the next generation of near-bottom magnetic studies utilizing new autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technology (Sentry) and concurrent deeptow and seismic profiling surveys of the Hawaiian anomaly sequence. Preliminary results show a similar anomaly record to the Japanese sequence: an overall decrease in anomaly amplitude from M19 to M38 and a period of low amplitude, which in turn is preceded by a return to stronger amplitude anomalies. The magnetic anomaly correlations between Hawaiian and Japanese sea-surface level profiles confirm the reversal record back in time, at least, to M38. At the mid-water and near-bottom AUV levels, the magnetic data clearly show the short-wavelength anomaly character of the M29-M38 sequence, indicating that the fast reversals observed in the Japanese lineations are also present in the Hawaiian lineation set. The strong similarity of overall anomaly patterns between Japanese and Hawaiian sequences supports the preliminary conclusion that geomagnetic field behavior during the Jurassic was dynamic, with fast reversals and changing intensity, and certainly not "quiet". Finally, AUV surveys provide measurements of the marine magnetic anomaly record whose resolution is limited only by the crustal recording process and crustal magnetic architecture rather than spatial resolution.

  16. Optimal processing of satellite-derived magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown how the concept of the power spectrum can be extended to two-dimensional spatial power spectra and how it can be used in determining optimal data processing methods for satellite-derived magnetic anomaly data and planning missions to obtain such data. The analysis techniques are applied to the data set and data-processing procedure described by Mayhew et al. (1980), a study that treats magnetic anomaly data for Australia and the surrounding ocean obtained by the polar orbit POGO series satellites. It is shown that the data-processing method used by Mayhew et al. is approximately equivalent to an invariant two-dimensional linear filter and that it is reasonably close to optimal with respect to accuracy, although some possible improvements are suggested. However, as is usual when filtering data, some real 'signal' is unavoidably removed along with the 'noise' resulting in errors that can be quite large. A method for reducing these errors by using additional data from a medium inclination orbit satellite (for example, 60 deg inclination) is proposed.

  17. Underwater magnetic gradiometer for magnetic anomaly detection, localization, and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Sulzberger, G.; Bono, J.; Skvoretz, D.; Allen, G. I.; Clem, T. R.; Ebbert, M.; Bennett, S. L.; Ostrom, R. K.; Tzouris, A.

    2007-04-01

    GE Security and the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City (NSWC-PC) have collaborated to develop a magnetic gradiometer, called the Real-time Tracking Gradiometer or RTG that is mounted inside an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV). The RTG is part of a buried mine hunting platform being developed by the United States Navy. The RTG has been successfully used to make test runs on mine-like targets buried off the coast of Florida. We will present a general description of the system and latest results describing system performance. This system can be also potentially used for other applications including those in the area of Homeland Security.

  18. Solar wind interaction with the Reiner Gamma crustal magnetic anomaly: Connecting source magnetization to surface weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Andrew R.; Fatemi, Shahab; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Hemingway, Doug; Holmström, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Remanent magnetization has long been known to exist in the lunar crust, yet both the detailed topology and ultimate origin(s) of these fields remains uncertain. Some crustal magnetic fields coincide with surface albedo anomalies, known as lunar swirls, which are thought to be formed by differential surface weathering of the regolith underlying crustal fields due to deflection of incident solar wind protons. Here, we present results from a three-dimensional, self-consistent, plasma hybrid model of the solar wind interaction with two different possible source magnetizations for the Reiner Gamma anomaly. We characterize the plasma interaction with these fields and the resulting spatial distribution of charged-particle weathering of the surface and compare these results to optical albedo measurements of Reiner Gamma. The model results constrain the proposed source magnetizations for Reiner Gamma and suggest that vertical crustal magnetic fields are required to produce the observed "dark lanes."

  19. World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map; specifications for 2011 Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Juha V.

    2010-05-01

    WDMAM2007 will be updated to WDMAM2011, upon submission and evaluation of candidate grids. Specifications of the grid: - Quantity: Magnetic total component anomaly in limited bandwidth - Altitude: 2.5 km above the geoid - Resolution 2.5 km - Grid to be produced: the same c. 5km resolution grid knots as for WDMAM 2007 plus refinement to 2.5 km resolution - Source data: WDMAM2007 data, plus new data sets, especially in the southern hemisphere - Reduction: CM4 or CM5 (most up to date), where possible - Reference: MF6 or most up to date version of MF Schedule: - Candidate Team registration and data submission deadline: EGU 2010. - Candidate grid submission deadline: October 1 2010. - Evaluation: ready at Fall AGU 2010 - Manuscript submission to CGMW: EGU 2011 - Final manuscript and grid ready for distribution: IUGG 2011. More information at WDMAM website: http://projects.gtk.fi/WDMAM/ Contacts: WDMAM executives, addresses given on the website above.

  20. On the possibility of detecting large-scale crustal remanent magnetization with Magsat vector magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galliher, S. C.; Mayhew, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic anomaly component data measured by Magsat is compared with synthetic anomaly component fields arising from an equivalent source dipole array at the earth's surface generated from total field anomaly data alone. It is found that the synthetic components fit the component data regardless of the dipole orientation assigned to the equivalent sources and of the dipole spacing. Tentative conclusions are: (1) over the U.S., vector anomaly fields can be determined to the accuracy of the measurements from the total field anomaly data alone; and (2) the equivalent source technique is not useful for determining the direction of large-scale crustal magnetization.

  1. Absolute Magnetization Distribution on Back-arc Spreading Axis Hosting Hydrothermal Vents; Insight from Shinkai 6500 Magnetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Okino, K.; Honsho, C.; Mochizuki, N.; Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.

    2013-12-01

    Near-bottom magnetic profiling using submersible, deep-tow, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) make possible to conduct high-resolution surveys and depict detailed magnetic features reflecting, for instance, the presence of fresh lavas or hydrothermal alteration, or geomagnetic paleo-intensity variations. We conducted near-bottom three component magnetic measurements onboard submersible Shinkai 6500 in the Southern Mariana Trough, where five active hydrothermal vent fields (Snail, Yamanaka, Archean, Pica, and Urashima sites) have been found in both on- and off-axis areas of the active back-arc spreading center, to detect signals from hydrothermally altered rock and to distinguish old and new submarine lava flows. Fourteen dives were carried out at an altitude of 1-40 m during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-10 and YK10-11 cruises in 2010. We carefully corrected the effect of the induced and permanent magnetizations of the submersible by applying the correction method for the shipboard three-component magnetometer measurement modified for deep-sea measurement, and subtracted the IGRF values from the corrected data to obtain geomagnetic vector anomalies along the dive tracks. We then calculated the synthetic magnetic vector field produced by seafloor, assumed to be uniformly magnetized, using three dimensional forward modeling. Finally, values of the absolute magnetizations were estimated by using a linear transfer function in the Fourier domain from the observed and synthetic magnetic anomalies. The distribution of estimated absolute magnetization generally shows low values around the five hydrothermal vent sites. This result is consistent with the equivalent magnetization distribution obtained from previous AUV survey data. The areas of low magnetization are also consistent with hydrothermal deposits identified in video records. These results suggest that low magnetic signals are due to hydrothermal alteration zones where host rocks are

  2. An equivalent layer magnetization model for the United States derived from satellite altitude magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Long wavelength magnetic anomalies measured by the Pogo series satellites at altitudes 400-700 km over the United States and adjacent areas are inverted to an equivalent layer magnetization model based on an equal area dipole source array at the earth's surface. Minimum source spacing giving a stable solution and a physically meaningful magnetization distribution is 300 km, and a scheme is presented for effectively sampling the distribution on a grid twice as fine. The model expresses lateral variation in the vertical integral of magnetization and is a starting point for models of lateral variation in the form of the magnetization-depth curve in the magnetic crust. The magnetization model contours correlate with large-scale tectonic features, and in the western part of the country, probably reflect Curie isotherm undulations.

  3. Estimating Antarctic Near-Surface Magnetic Anomalies from Oersted and CHAMP Satellite Magnetometer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Golynsky, Alexander V.; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2004-01-01

    Significant improvement in predicting near-surface magnetic anomalies can result from the highly accurate magnetic observations of the CHAMP satellite that is orbiting at about 400 km altitude. In general, regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations due to wavelength coupling in the spherical harmonic representation and thus are difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. However, efforts to isolate the regional lithospheric from core field components can exploit the correlations between the CHAMP magnetic anomalies and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations. In addition, we can use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric field components from the dynamic external field effects. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic conservations for an improved magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Oersted and noisier Magsat observations, CHAMP magnetic anomalies at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intra-crustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic. Moreover, these results greatly facilitate predicting magnetic anomalies in the regional coverage gaps of the ADMAP compilation of Antarctic magnetic anomalies from shipborne, airborne and ground surveys. Our analysis suggests that considerable new insights on the magnetic properties of the lithosphere may be revealed by a further order-of-magnitude improvement in the accuracy of the magnetometer.

  4. Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Reiner Gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Wang, Xu; Lembège, Bertrand; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni; Horányi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Discovered by early astronomers during the Renaissance, the Reiner Gamma formation is one of the most peculiar lunar surface features. Observations have shown that the tadpole-shaped albedo marking, the so-called swirl, found on the Oceanus Procellarum is co-located with one of the strongest magnetic anomalies (LMA) on our Moon. In previous work, using a horizontal dipole model [Deca et al. 2014, 2015], we have described the formation of a mini-magnetosphere structure surrounding the swirl pattern, locally shielding the underlying lunar surface from the impinging solar wind, and hinting at a correlation with its main surface albedo brightness marking in a distinctive concentric oval shape. Using the observed magnetic field model [Tsunakawa et al. 2015] in our full-kinetic electromagnetic framework, iPic3D, we reproduce a surface weathering pattern closely resembling the details of the Reiner Gamma swirls. This work therefore provides strong evidence that the solar wind standoff theory for lunar swirl formation is the dominant process to explain the albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma region. This work was supported by NASA's SSSERVI/IMPACT and by the Swedish National Space Board, Grant No. 136/11. Resources supporting this work were provided by the NASA High-End Computing (HEC) Program through the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) Division at Ames Research Center. Test simulations utilised the Janus supercomputer, supported by NSF (CNS-0821794) and CU Boulder.

  5. Magnetic anomaly depth and structural index estimation using different height analytic signals data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuai; Huang, Danian; Su, Chao

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a new semi-automatic inversion method for magnetic anomaly data interpretation that uses the combination of analytic signals of the anomaly at different heights to determine the depth and the structural index N of the sources. The new method utilizes analytic signals of the original anomaly at different height to effectively suppress the noise contained in the anomaly. Compared with the other high-order derivative calculation methods based on analytic signals, our method only computes first-order derivatives of the anomaly, which can be used to obtain more stable and accurate results. Tests on synthetic noise-free and noise-corrupted magnetic data indicate that the new method can estimate the depth and N efficiently. The technique is applied to a real measured magnetic anomaly in Southern Illinois caused by a known dike, and the result is in agreement with the drilling information and inversion results within acceptable calculation error.

  6. Sources of lunar magnetic anomalies and their bulk directions of magnetization - Additional evidence from Apollo orbital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    A relatively high-amplitude magnetic anomaly directly detected with the Apollo 15 subsatellite magnetometer and centered near the crater Gerasimovich on the southeastern lunar far side is found to correlate with the location of a conspicuous Reiner Gamma-type swirl marking visible on a Zond 8 photograph. Examinations of available direct and indirect orbital magnetics measurements demonstrate that most strong anomalies occur in areas where morphologically similar markings are concentrated. Even though photogeologic studies indicate an impact-related origin for the swirls, both the swirls and their associated strong anomalies tend to exist preferentially in or near areas that have been seismically modified. Modeling of improved vector magnetic anomaly maps is used to infer 28 independent bulk directions of magnetization for relatively strong and isolated lunar magnetic anomaly sources.

  7. Surveying the South Pole-Aitken basin magnetic anomaly for remnant impactor metallic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lawrence, David J.; Klima, Rachel L.; Blewett, David T.

    2014-11-01

    The Moon has areas of magnetized crust ("magnetic anomalies"), the origins of which are poorly constrained. A magnetic anomaly near the northern rim of South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin was recently postulated to originate from remnant metallic iron emplaced by the SPA basin-forming impactor. Here, we remotely examine the regolith of this SPA magnetic anomaly with a combination of Clementine and Lunar Prospector derived iron maps for any evidence of enhanced metallic iron content. We find that these data sets do not definitively detect the hypothesized remnant metallic iron within the upper tens of centimeters of the lunar regolith.

  8. Surveying the South Pole-Aitken basin magnetic anomaly for remnant impactor metallic iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, Joshua T.S.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lawrence, David M.; Klima, Rachel L.; Blewett, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon has areas of magnetized crust ("magnetic anomalies"), the origins of which are poorly constrained. A magnetic anomaly near the northern rim of South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin was recently postulated to originate from remnant metallic iron emplaced by the SPA basin-forming impactor. Here, we remotely examine the regolith of this SPA magnetic anomaly with a combination of Clementine and Lunar Prospector derived iron maps for any evidence of enhanced metallic iron content. We find that these data sets do not definitively detect the hypothesized remnant metallic iron within the upper tens of centimeters of the lunar regolith.

  9. Determination Gradients of the Earth's Magnetic Field from the Measurements of the Satellites and Inversion of the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karoly, Kis; Taylor, Patrick T.; Geza, Wittmann

    2014-01-01

    We computed magnetic field gradients at satellite altitude, over Europe with emphasis on the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly (KMA). They were calculated using the CHAMP satellite total magnetic anomalies. Our computations were done to determine how the magnetic anomaly data from the new ESA/Swarm satellites could be utilized to determine the structure of the magnetization of the Earths crust, especially in the region of the KMA. Since the ten years of 2 CHAMP data could be used to simulate the Swarm data. An initial East magnetic anomaly gradient map of Europe was computed and subsequently the North, East and Vertical magnetic gradients for the KMA region were calculated. The vertical gradient of the KMA was determined using Hilbert transforms. Inversion of the total KMA was derived using Simplex and Simulated Annealing algorithms. Our resulting inversion depth model is a horizontal quadrangle with upper 300-329 km and lower 331-339 km boundaries.

  10. Simultaneous observations of F2 layer stratification and spread F at postmidnight over a northern equatorial anomaly region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Yang, Guobin; Deng, Chi; Zhou, Chen; Zhu, Peng; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of F2 layer stratification and spread F at postmidnight (00:00 LT to 05:00 LT) were carried out on 22, 23, and 28 November 2013, using ionosondes distributed over a northern equatorial anomaly region at three specific locations, i.e., Puer (PUR, 22.7°N, 101.05°E, dip latitude 12.9°N), Chiang Mai (CMU, 18.8°N, 98.9°E, dip latitude 9.04°N), and Chumphon (CPN, 10.7°N, 99.4°E, dip latitude 0.93°N). The results show that both the PUR and CMU stations observed the F2 layer stratification at postmidnight in the Northern Hemisphere, frequently accompanied with gravity waves (the periods~30-100 min). It is reported that F2 layer stratification at postmidnight can be observed in the Northern Hemisphere for the first time. It is suggested that the thermospheric neutral wind triggered by gravity waves strongly contribute to the altitude dependence of the combined vertical plasma velocity, which consequently poses significant impacts on the occurrence of the low-latitude F2 layer stratification at postmidnight. In addition, the spread F other than F2 layer stratification was observed at the CPN station located at the geomagnetic equator, suggesting that smaller geomagnetic inclination tend to inhibit the postmidnight F2 layer stratification in the equatorial region. Furthermore, on 23 November 2013 a good correlation was identified between the F2 layer stratification at PUR and the spread F at both CMU and CPN, possibly due to that the large-scale gravity waves originating at middle latitudes contribute to the nighttime spread F observed in the low-latitude and equatorial regions.

  11. Magnetic Anomaly Amplitudes on the Gakkel Ridge: Indicators of Ridge Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Lawver, L. A.; Brozena, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    For most of its length, the Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean's Eurasia Basin is characterized by a discontinuous magnetic signature with regions of missing or low-amplitude central anomalies punctuated by short, high-amplitude segments. The ridge segment in between the Morris Jesup Rise and the Yermak Plateau has an unusually large amplitude central magnetic anomaly that is more than four times the amplitude of the flanking anomalies. This ridge segment is straight, without large offsets, for about 150 km. The difference in character between the central anomaly in this segment and the rest of Gakkel Ridge is striking. The western half of the Gakkel Ridge and the Eurasia Basin were surveyed in 1998-99 by a Naval Research Laboratory aerogeophysical campaign that measured magnetics, gravity, and sea-surface topography. The new magnetic data densify the historical US Navy aeromagnetic data and improve the resolution of the magnetic anomaly field in this region. This new field highlights the variability of the Gakkel Ridge over time, showing regions of strong anomalies that are continuous along strike and anomalies that fade away or become discontinuous. In particular, anomalies 15y to 21o show regions of high amplitudes on both sides of the ridge for varying distances along strike. We suggest that these high-amplitude segments were formed at times when the Gakkel Ridge at this location had a high-amplitude central magnetic anomaly like the present day high-amplitude segment or the shorter ones distributed along the ridge. The higher central anomaly amplitudes may be associated with variations in geochemistry and/or melt delivery along the ridge. Recent dredging of zero-aged crust along the Gakkel Ridge showed a good but not perfect correlation of high-amplitude central anomalies and basalt recovery (P. Michael, personal communication). This magnetic data set in conjunction with future dredging provides an opportunity to constrain past ridge variability.

  12. Magsat to CHAMP: Magnetic Satellite Explorations of Lithospheric Anomalies over Kursk, Bangui and the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.; Taylor, Patrick T.; vonFrese, R. R.; Kim, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    We compare crustal magnetic anomaly maps over the Kursk (Russia) and Bangui (Central African Republic) isolated anomalies and the Antarctic derived from the Magsat, \\Orsted and CHAMP satellite fields. We wish to demonstrate how progress in satellite magnetic missions has improved the recovery of the crustal magnetic field. The 6-month long Magsat mission of 25 years ago generated two major methods of processing satellite magnetic anomaly data for lithospheric studies. The first was a global perspective using spherical harmonics that emphasize the more regional and global lithospheric fields. However, these fields commonly do not resolve local anomaly features in any detail. Therefore a second procedure involved the use of the individual satellite orbit or track data to recover small-scale anomalies on a regional scale. We present results over prominent magnetic anomalies such as Kursk, Bangui and the large Antarctic continent that demonstrate how the various analysis methods affect the recovery of crustal anomalies. The more recent \\Orsted and CHAMP missions are successfully recording data with an improved accuracy and with full spatial and temporal coverage. We show and interpret the total magnetic intensity anomaly maps over these areas from all three satellite magnetometer data sets.

  13. Study on the annual variation of satellite magnetic anomaly in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Chen, B.; Yuan, J.

    2015-12-01

    The CHAMP satellite mission is providing reliable measurements from which the global lithospheric magnetic field. Using 7 years (2003~2009) of CHAMP satellite scalar magnetic field data, we derive the annual variation of satellite magnetic anomaly in China. For the satellite data selection, a wide range of geomagnetic index and other data selection filters have been used to best isolate suitably quiet magnetospheric and ionospheric conditions. By further separating the magnetic anomalies from the core and external field components in the satellite data, the result has low noise levels. We study on the annual variation of magnetic anomaly between 2003 and 2007 in China, the maps of annual variation can truly reflect the changing of the distribution of magnetic anomalies in China.

  14. Airborne detection of magnetic anomalies associated with soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, W.E.; Beard, L.P.; Helm, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Reconnaissance airborne geophysical data acquired over the 35,000-acre Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), TN, show several magnetic anomalies over undisturbed areas mapped as Copper Ridge Dolomite (CRD). The anomalies of interest are most apparent in magnetic gradient maps where they exceed 0.06 nT/m and in some cases exceed 0.5 nT/m. Anomalies as large as 25nT are seen on maps. Some of the anomalies correlate with known or suspected karst, or with apparent conductivity anomalies calculated from electromagnetic data acquired contemporaneously with the magnetic data. Some of the anomalies have a strong correlation with topographic lows or closed depressions. Surface magnetic data have been acquired over some of these sites and have confirmed the existence of the anomalies. Ground inspections in the vicinity of several of the anomalies has not led to any discoveries of manmade surface materials of sufficient size to generate the observed anomalies. One would expect an anomaly of approximately 1 nT for a pickup truck from 200 ft altitude. Typical residual magnetic anomalies have magnitudes of 5--10 nT, and some are as large as 25nT. The absence of roads or other indications of culture (past or present) near the anomalies and the modeling of anomalies in data acquired with surface instruments indicate that man-made metallic objects are unlikely to be responsible for the anomaly. The authors show that observed anomalies in the CRD can reasonably be associated with thickening of the soil layer. The occurrence of the anomalies in areas where evidences of karstification are seen would follow because sediment deposition would occur in topographic lows. Linear groups of anomalies on the maps may be associated with fracture zones which were eroded more than adjacent rocks and were subsequently covered with a thicker blanket of sediment. This study indicates that airborne magnetic data may be of use in other sites where fracture zones or buried collapse structures are of interest.

  15. An integrated geophysical study of the Beattie Magnetic Anomaly, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber-Enslin, Stephanie; Ebbing, Jörg; Webb, Susan J.

    2014-12-01

    The source of the Beattie Magnetic Anomaly (BMA) still remains unclear, with several competing hypotheses. Here we add a piece to the puzzle by investigating available potential field data over the anomaly. Filtered magnetic data show the BMA as part of a group of linear magnetic anomalies. As the linear anomaly north of the BMA is associated with exposed supracrustals, migmatites and shear zones within the Natal thrust terranes we assume a similar source for the BMA. This source geometry, constrained by seismic and MT data, fits potential field data over the BMA and other magnetic linear anomalies in the south-central and south-western Karoo. In these models the bodies deepen from ~ 5 km towards the south, with horizontal extents of ~ 20-60 km and vertical extents of ~ 10-15 km. Densities range from 2800 to 2940 kg/m3 and magnetic susceptibilities from 10 to 100 × 10- 3 SI. These magnetic susceptibilities are higher than field values from supracrustal rocks (10-60 × 10- 3 SI) but could be due to the fact that no remanent magnetisation was included in the model. The lithologies associated with the different linear anomalies vary as is evident from varying anomaly amplitudes. The strong signal of the BMA is linked to high magnetic susceptibility granulite facies supracrustals (~ 10-50 × 10- 3 SI) as seen in the Antarctic, where the mobile belt continued during Gondwana times.

  16. Magnetic Structure of Backarc Spreading Axis with Hydrothermal Vents; the Southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Okino, K.; Mochizuki, N.; Honsho, C.; Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.; Nakamura, K.

    2012-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems are important in relation to global heat and chemical fluxes as well as habitat of microbial communities. The substantial variation of hydrothermal systems in various tectonic settings has important implications for the magnetic structure of oceanic crust. It has been very difficult to detect the geophysical signature of hydrothermal systems from sea-surface data because the small scale of hydrothermal systems is below the limit of resolution. The advance of near-bottom survey methods using a submersible, deep-tow, ROV and AUV has made possible high-resolution geophysical mapping around hydrothermal areas. Near-bottom magnetic surveys can provide direct information on the magnetization of the shallower oceanic crust, implying hydrothermal alteration both in active and fossil vent sites. Near-bottom three component magnetic measurements on submersible Shinkai 6500 were carried out at hydrothermal fields in the Southern Mariana Trough, a slow spreading backarc basin. Fourteen dive surveys were conducted during cruises YK11-10 and YK10-11. We investigated the magnetic structure of four hydrothermal systems located at on- and off-axis to clarify how the geophysical and geological setting controls the fluid circulation at small scale. Recent researches at slow spreading ridges showed a relationship between crustal magnetic structure and host rock around hydrothermal vents (e.g. Tivey and Dyment, 2010), but no observation at backarc spreading axis has been reported so far. We carefully corrected the effects of induced and permanent magnetizations of the submersible by applying the method of Isezaki [1986] with dumped least-square method (Honsho et al., 2009). After subtracting the IGRF from the corrected observed data, we obtained geomagnetic vector anomalies in geographical coordinate. For three transects of the axis, we applied three methods; 2D inversion technique (Parker and Huestis, 1972), 2D forward modeling technique (Honsho et al

  17. Contributions of cretaceus quiet zone natural remanent magnetization to Magsat anomalies in the Southwest Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullerton, Lawrence G.; Frey, Herbert V.; Roark, James H.; Thomas, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The Magsat magnetic anomalies over the Southwest Indian Ocean are modeled using a combination of induced plus viscous remanent magnetization (IM/VRM) and natural remanent magnetization (NRM). Two broad, roughly parallel, SW to NE trending triple-peaked positive anomalies dominate the region, one lying south of Africa and the other north of Antarctica. Although these anomaly peaks generally correspond with the Agulhas Plateau/Maud Rise, Mozambique Plateau/Astrid Ridge, and Madagascar Ridge/Conrad Rise conjugate pairs, the IM/VRM contribution from structural characteristics (i.e., crustal thickness) accounts for only about 20% of the anomaly amplitudes. A spatially variable but observationally constrained NRM contribution in Cretaceous Quiet Zone (KQZ) crust is required to account for the location, shape, and amplitude contrast of these anomalies. Many crustal features in the Southwest Indian Ocean near Antarctica have little geophysical data to constrain their structure but do hagve tectonic conjugates near Africa for which much more geophysical data are generally available. Using geophysical and geological constraints from one member to model the magnetization structure of its conjugate reproduces the observed Magsat reduced-to-pole anomalies over both structures very well. This suggests that no significant alteration in their magnetization structure has occurred since the features split. Models of these conjugate structures show that IM/VRM reproduces the Magsat anomalies associated with non-KQZ crust but that both IM/VRM and a dominant NRM component are required to explain the anomalies associated with KQZ crust.

  18. High-resolution magnetic signature of active hydrothermal systems in the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Honsho, Chie; Dyment, Jerome; Szitkar, Florent; Mochizuki, Nobutatsu; Asada, Miho

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on five hydrothermal vent fields of the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough using Shinkai 6500, a deep-sea manned submersible. A new 3-D forward scheme was applied that exploits the surrounding bathymetry and varying altitudes of the submersible to estimate absolute crustal magnetization. The results revealed that magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetizations show a reasonable correlation with natural remanent magnetizations of rock samples collected from the seafloor of the same region. The distribution of magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetization suggests that all five andesite-hosted hydrothermal fields are associated with a lack of magnetization, as is generally observed at basalt-hosted hydrothermal sites. Furthermore, both the Pika and Urashima sites were found to have their own distinct low-magnetization zones, which could not be distinguished in magnetic anomaly data collected at higher altitudes by autonomous underwater vehicle due to their limited extension. The spatial extent of the resulting low magnetization is approximately 10 times wider at off-axis sites than at on-axis sites, possibly reflecting larger accumulations of nonmagnetic sulfides, stockwork zones, and/or alteration zones at the off-axis sites.

  19. Investigating tectonic and bathymetric features of the Indian Ocean using MAGSAT magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sailor, R. V.; Lazarewicz, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    An equivalent source anomaly map and a map of the relative magnetization for the investigation region were produced. Gravimetry, bathymetry, and MAGSAT anomaly maps were contoured in pseudocolor displays. Finally, an autoregressive spectrum estimation technique was verified with synthetic data and shown to be capable of resolving exponential power spectra using small samples of data. Interpretations were made regarding the relationship between MAGSAT data spectra and crustal anomaly spectra.

  20. Estimation of localized current anomalies in polymer electrolyte fuel cells from magnetic flux density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Takaaki; Koike, Masanori; Ando, Shigeru; Gotoh, Yuji; Izumi, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose novel inversion methods to estimate defects or localized current anomalies in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). One method is an imaging approach with L1-norm regularization that is suitable for estimation of focal anomalies compared to Tikhonov regularization. The second is a complex analysis based method in which multiple pointwise current anomalies can be identified directly and algebraically from the measured magnetic flux density.

  1. Magnetic anomaly inversion using magnetic dipole reconstruction based on the pipeline section segmentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qi; Liu, De-Jun; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Fang, Hua-Feng; Feng, Mu-Qun

    2016-06-01

    In the model of a horizontal straight pipeline of finite length, the segmentation of the pipeline elements is a significant factor in the accuracy and rapidity of the forward modeling and inversion processes, but the existing pipeline segmentation method is very time-consuming. This paper proposes a section segmentation method to study the characteristics of pipeline magnetic anomalies—and the effect of model parameters on these magnetic anomalies—as a way to enhance computational performance and accelerate the convergence process of the inversion. Forward models using the piece segmentation method and section segmentation method based on magnetic dipole reconstruction (MDR) are established for comparison. The results show that the magnetic anomalies calculated by these two segmentation methods are almost the same regardless of different measuring heights and variations of the inclination and declination of the pipeline. In the optimized inversion procedure the results of the simulation data calculated by these two methods agree with the synthetic data from the original model, and the inversion accuracies of the burial depths of the two methods are approximately equal. The proposed method is more computationally efficient than the piece segmentation method—in other words, the section segmentation method can meet the requirements for precision in the detection of pipelines by magnetic anomalies and reduce the computation time of the whole process.

  2. Analyzing and modeling gravity and magnetic anomalies using the SPHERE program and Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Computer codes were completed, tested, and documented for analyzing magnetic anomaly vector components by equivalent point dipole inversion. The codes are intended for use in inverting the magnetic anomaly due to a spherical prism in a horizontal geomagnetic field and for recomputing the anomaly in a vertical geomagnetic field. Modeling of potential fields at satellite elevations that are derived from three dimensional sources by program SPHERE was made significantly more efficient by improving the input routines. A preliminary model of the Andean subduction zone was used to compute the anomaly at satellite elevations using both actual geomagnetic parameters and vertical polarization. Program SPHERE is also being used to calculate satellite level magnetic and gravity anomalies from the Amazon River Aulacogen.

  3. Random crustal magnetization and its effect on coherence of short-wavelength marine magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Recent studies of DSDP samples from layer 2A of oceanic basement have found complex magnetic stratigraphies that seem incompatible with the frequent existence of linear short-wavelength anomalies caused by palaeomagnetic field behavior. Statistical models are developed for the lateral variation of the average magnetization of layer 2A: a Poisson series for reversals of the earth's field and a stairstep random series for discrete magnetic units. It is shown with the power-density spectra of these statistical models that lateral inhomogeneities must average out over distances of less than a few hundred meters. Specifically, individual magnetic units of the type seen at DSDP Site 332 cannot extend uniformly for distances greater than a few hundred meters. ?? 1979.

  4. Long-wavelength Magnetic and Gravity Anomaly Correlations of Africa and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J. (Principal Investigator); Olivier, R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary MAGSAT scalar magnetic anomaly data were compiled for comparison with long-wavelength-pass filtered free-air gravity anomalies and regional heat-flow and tectonic data. To facilitate the correlation analysis at satellite elevations over a spherical-Earth, equivalent point source inversion was used to differentially reduce the magnetic satellite anomalies to the radial pole at 350 km elevation, and to upward continue the first radial derivative of the free-air gravity anomalies. Correlation patterns between these regional geopotential anomaly fields are quantitatively established by moving window linear regression based on Poisson's theorem. Prominent correlations include direct correspondences for the Baltic Shield, where both anomalies are negative, and the central Mediterranean and Zaire Basin where both anomalies are positive. Inverse relationships are generally common over the Precambrian Shield in northwest Africa, the Basins and Shields in southern Africa, and the Alpine Orogenic Belt. Inverse correlations also presist over the North Sea Rifts, the Benue Rift, and more generally over the East African Rifts. The results of this quantitative correlation analysis support the general inverse relationships of gravity and magnetic anomalies observed for North American continental terrain which may be broadly related to magnetic crustal thickness variations.

  5. Long-wavelength magnetic and gravity anomaly correlations on Africa and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Olivier, R.; Hinze, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary MAGSAT scalar magnetic anomaly data were compiled for comparison with long-wavelength-pass filtered free-air gravity anomalies and regional heat-flow and tectonic data. To facilitate the correlation analysis at satellite elevations over a spherical-Earth, equivalent point source inversion was used to differentially reduce the magnetic satellite anomalies to the radial pole at 350 km elevation, and to upward continue the first radial derivative of the free-air gravity anomalies. Correlation patterns between these regional geopotential anomaly fields are quantitatively established by moving window linear regression based on Poisson's theorem. Prominent correlations include direct correspondences for the Baltic shield, where both anomalies are negative, and the central Mediterranean and Zaire Basin where both anomalies are positive. Inverse relationships are generally common over the Precambrian Shield in northwest Africa, the Basins and Shields in southern Africa, and the Alpine Orogenic Belt. Inverse correlations also presist over the North Sea Rifts, the Benue Rift, and more generally over the East African Rifts. The results of this quantitative correlation analysis support the general inverse relationships of gravity and magnetic anomalies observed for North American continental terrain which may be broadly related to magnetic crustal thickness variations.

  6. Magnetic Anomalies of the Fennoscandian Shield on a 2km resolution grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Juha V.; Aaro, Sven; Reidar Skilbrei, Jan; All, Tarmo

    2010-05-01

    Joint magnetic anomaly grid of the Fennoscandian Shield was released 2002, smoothed and used as data for the WDMAM2007. In comparison with MF5 this grid showed superior characteristics to other sets. The data will be released as a 2 km resolution grid for the WDMAM2011 with eventual updates of anomaly levels.

  7. Magnetic resonance and computed tomographic features of 4 cases of canine congenital thoracic vertebral anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Berlanda, Michele; Zotti, Alessandro; Brandazza, Giada; Poser, Helen; Calò, Pietro; Bernardini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance and computed tomography features of 4 cases of canine congenital vertebral anomalies (CVAs) are discussed. Two of the cases represent unusual presentations for such anomalies that commonly affect screw-tail or toy breeds. Moreover, the combination of CVAs and a congenital peritoneo-pericardial diaphragmatic hernia has never before been imaged. PMID:22654139

  8. Magnetic resonance and computed tomographic features of 4 cases of canine congenital thoracic vertebral anomalies.

    PubMed

    Berlanda, Michele; Zotti, Alessandro; Brandazza, Giada; Poser, Helen; Calò, Pietro; Bernardini, Marco

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance and computed tomography features of 4 cases of canine congenital vertebral anomalies (CVAs) are discussed. Two of the cases represent unusual presentations for such anomalies that commonly affect screw-tail or toy breeds. Moreover, the combination of CVAs and a congenital peritoneo-pericardial diaphragmatic hernia has never before been imaged. PMID:22654139

  9. Apparatus and method for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1981-05-22

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  10. Constraints on the tectonic development of the eastern Gulf of Mexico provided by magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Stuart A.; Najmuddin, Ilyas J.

    1994-04-01

    Boundaries between oceanic and transitional crust in the eastern Gulf of Mexico have been delineated using detailed, accurately navigated, high-quality aeromagnetic data. These data indicate that considerably more oceanic crust may be present than previously suggested by other geophysical data, especially seismic reflection data. The N-S extent of oceanic crust substantially increases westward from approximately 280 km near 87 deg W to roughly 390 km near 90 deg W, indicating the proximity (less than 10 deg) of the pole of rotation. Variations in the amount of oceanic crust together with discontinuities in the magnetic anomaly patterns, interpreted as the traces of fossil transform faults or fracture zones, have been used to obtain a rough estimate of the location of the pole of rotation (24 deg N, 81.5 deg W) for the seafloor spreading phase of opening. The magnetic data have been used to develop a model for the opening of the Gulf and to identify some geometrical relationships between its conjugate continental margins. Based upon the estimated pole position, the eastern Gulf is interpreted to have opened in an approximately NNE-SSW direction with the counterclockwise rotation of Yucatan away from North America. The seafloor spreading phase of movement accounts for about 25 deg of the counterclockwise motion of Yucatan. Rotating the Yucatan block clockwise by this amount to restore it to its predrift position places the Campeche Bank adjacent to the Mississippi Trough-Louisiana shelf. Further clockwise rotation of Yucatan by an additional 30-35 deg about this pole restores extended crust to its original thickness and is consistent with rotations of Yucatan predicted from paleomagnetic data from Chiapas.

  11. Origin of the Eastern Galicia Magnetic Anomaly (NW Spain). Implications for the Origin of Magnetic Anomalies in the Central Iberian Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayarza, P.; Martinez-Catalan, J. R.; Villalain, J. J.; Alvarez Lobato, F.; Martin Paramio, M.; Rodriguez Gómez, S.; Sanz López, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aeromagnetic map of Iberia features outstanding anomalies that have been key to define the Central Iberian Arc, a late-orogenic orocline in the western part of the Variscan belt. The most studied of them is the EGMA (Eastern Galicia Magnetic Anomaly), which follows the Lugo-Sanabria extensional dome and is probably associated with it. Among the existing models of this anomaly, those relating it with magnetite-rich inhomogeneous granites and migmatites formed during late-Variscan extension seem to be more plausible ones. However, this and other interpretations involving deep-seated mafic/ultramafic bodies lack resolution as they are based on the aeromagnetic dataset. New ground magnetic data have been acquired in the northern part of the Xistral Tectonic Window, at the core of the Lugo dome where its deepest rocks crop out. The resulting maps show that the anomaly ranges ~1000 nT (vs. 190 nT on the aeromagnetic map) and that the most important maxima lie on top of extensional detachments located on high-grade metasediments or inhomogeneous granites. 2D forward modeling indicates that the magnetization is carried by upper Neoproterozoic and early Cambrian metasediments, partially melted during late-Variscan high-T and low-P metamorphic event linked to the extensional collapse. Furthermore, the anomaly maxima are spatially related with detachments, where the metasediments were strongly sheared. Therefore, the P-T, redox and fluid pressure conditions necessary for the formation of magnetite seem related with the extensional process and the dynamics of its structures. Many magnetic anomalies of the Central Iberian Arc lie on top of Variscan extensional domes and accordingly may have a similar origin. Special attention is paid to the Gredos Magnetic Anomaly, coincident with the batholith of the same name. Preliminary magnetic mapping and modeling indicate that the anomaly is previous to the intrusion of the Jurassic Alentejo-Plasencia dyke and to the tardi

  12. Regional Mapping of the Lunar Crustal Magnetic Field: Correlation of Strong Anomalies with Curvilinear Albedo Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Yingst, A.; Zakharian, A.; Lin, R. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    Using high-resolution regional Lunar Prospector magnetometer magnetic field maps, we report here a close correlation of the strongest individual crustal anomalies with unusual curvilinear albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma class.

  13. World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map, development towards the Second Edition. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, J. V.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic anomalies are small deviations in the Earth’s main magnetic field, caused by variation of magnetization in the uppermost lithosphere. Magnetic anomalies provide spatial key information for understanding the structure and evolution of the Earths crust. In practice these anomalies are used e.g. for assessment and prospecting of geological natural resources and planning of land use. A common way to calculate a magnetic anomaly value has been to subtract International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) from a total field measurement that is cleaned from short term variation of the Earth's magnetic field. World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM) is a collaborative project between member organizations of International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) and the Commission for Geological Map of the World (CGMW). The First Edition of the map was published in 2007. It consisted of a paper map 1:50 Million and a 3 minutes global grid of total field anomalies at an altitude of 5 km above the geoid. The First Edition was aimed to compile as much as possible available land and sea magnetic data, and homogenize it by comparing anomalies with a satellite magnetic lithospheric field model. This first version was prepared in a tight schedule, to show the usefulness of the map to the community and to form a basis for later development and future editions of the map. Hence, much was left to be improved for the second edition, including sparse coverage in two continents and all southern seas. The satellite models were understood to gain more detail in near future when the CHAMP-satellite would reach lower orbits, and hence higher resolution. The SWARM-satellite constellation was seen to produce even more suitable data in a few years thereafter. Ocean magnetic data sets required careful processing and leveling. The method of homogenization of anomalies included replacing long wavelength information by satellite model spectral data, and hence rejecting

  14. Calculation of gravity and magnetic anomalies along profiles with end corrections and inverse solutions for density and magnetization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cady, John W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program is presented which performs, for one or more bodies, along a profile perpendicular to strike, both forward calculations for the magnetic and gravity anomaly fields and independent gravity and magnetic inverse calculations for density and susceptibility or remanent magnetization.

  15. Lithologic mapping test for gravity and magnetic anomalies. A case study of gravity-magnetic anomaly profile in the eastern segment of the China-Mongolia border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Meng, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhaoxi; Liu, Guofeng; Zheng, Yuanman; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xingdong; Zheng, Wanqiu

    2015-06-01

    An inversion calculation is usually needed to map lithologies with gravity-magnetic anomalies. A lithological-physical property correspondence can be established by combining data of regional rock density and magnetic susceptibility to build topological equations. In this study, topological calculations were performed using inversion data and combined with physical property data to interpret and map lithologies. Gravity-magnetic profiles from the eastern segment of the China-Mongolia border were used (Jining-Bainaimiao-Ha'ernaode geological-composite geophysical profile) in this paper. Based on gravity-magnetic anomaly inversion, the rock density and magnetic susceptibility data of Bainaimiao and Jining were adopted for lithological inversion. Distribution characteristics of four major types of magmatic rocks within 50 km of the lower half space were obtained, and results of lithologic mapping and tectonic framework were analyzed. The position of convergence between the North China Plate and Siberian Plate was confirmed. Two tectonic stages were identified, namely, interplate squeezing and intraplate deformation. Regional gravity-magnetic field properties were analyzed to discuss the orientation and date of andesites and diorites in the northern part of the survey line. We believe that they have a northeast-southwest orientation similar to gravity-magnetic anomalies of Erenhot-Xilinhot. They resemble the igneous rock near Erenhot because they both indicate magmatic intrusion during the early Carboniferous.

  16. High-altitude structure of the magnetic anomalies using the gradient measurements in stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yu.; Rotanova, N.; Belikova, M.

    2003-04-01

    HIGH-ALTITUDE STRUCTURE OF THE MAGNETIC ANOMALIES USING THE GRADIENT MEASUREMENTS IN STRATOSPHERE Yu. Tsvetkov, N. ROTANOVA, M. Belikova Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation RAS, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia rotanova@izmiran.rssi.ru/FAX: +7-095-3340124 Method of the recalculation of the anomaly magnetic field over the range of the altitudes of 20-40 km is suggested. Technique is based on the experimental data of the anomaly magnetic field, its vertical gradient and the gradient increment along vertical line, obtained from the aerostat gradient magnetic surveys in stratosphere. The high-altitude structure of the magnetic anomalies, obtained for the Baikal region has been constructed. These results were used to obtain the estimations of the deep magnetic sources. The numerous values of the low boundary of the sources are 30-35 km. These estimations of the depth coincide with the ones, obtained from the results of the spectral analysis of the same magnetic anomalies.

  17. Surface vector mapping of magnetic anomalies over the Moon using Kaguya and Lunar Prospector observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    We have provided preliminary global maps of three components of the lunar magnetic anomaly on the surface applying the surface vector mapping (SVM) method. The data used in the present study consist of about 5 million observations of the lunar magnetic field at 10-45 km altitudes by Kaguya and Lunar Prospector. The lunar magnetic anomalies were mapped at 0.2° equi-distance points on the surface by the SVM method, showing the highest intensity of 718 nT in the Crisium antipodal region. Overall features on the SVM maps indicate that elongating magnetic anomalies are likely to be dominant on the Moon except for the young large basins with the impact demagnetization. Remarkable demagnetization features suggested by previous studies are also recognized at Hertzsprung and Kolorev craters on the farside. These features indicate that demagnetized areas extend to about 1-2 radii of the basins/craters. There are well-isolated central magnetic anomalies at four craters: Leibnitz, Aitken, Jules Verne, and Grimaldi craters. Their magnetic poles through the dipole source approximation suggest occurrence of the polar wander prior to 3.3-3.5 Ga. When compared with high-albedo markings at several magnetic anomalies such as the Reiner Gamma anomalies, three-dimensional structures of the magnetic field on/near the surface are well correlated with high-albedo areas. These results indicate that the global SVM maps are useful for the study of the lunar magnetic anomalies in comparison with various geological and geophysical data.

  18. Magnetic and transport eddy-current anomalies in cylinders owing to magnetization rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.; Pascual, L.

    2001-06-01

    For a magnetic conducting cylinder with a coaxial core, where the spontaneous magnetization Ms is helical, the technical magnetization under an axial AC magnetic field or AC transport current is carried out by Ms rotations, which induce normal and lateral eddy currents. The low-frequency eddy-current anomaly factors for the magnetic and the transport case, η, are calculated as functions of the radius ratio of the core to the cylinder, p= rb/ r0, the scalar susceptibility of the shell normalized to the normal susceptibility of the core, q= χs/ χzz or χs/ χφφ, and the helical angle with respect to the z-axis, α. It is shown that for the typical case of α= π/4, the lateral-eddy-current loss is appreciably less and greater than the normal one in the magnetic and transport case, respectively, which is in contrast to the situation of a slab where both losses are equal.

  19. Subduction-zone magnetic anomalies and implications for hydrated forearc mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Brocher, T.M.; Wells, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Continental mantle in subduction zones is hydrated by release of water from the underlying oceanic plate. Magnetite is a significant byproduct of mantle hydration, and forearc mantle, cooled by subduction, should contribute to long-wavelength magnetic anomalies above subduction zones. We test this hypothesis with a quantitative model of the Cascadia convergent margin, based on gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies and constrained by seismic velocities, and find that hydrated mantle explains an important disparity in potential-field anomalies of Cascadia. A comparison with aeromagnetic data, thermal models, and earthquakes of Cascadia, Japan, and southern Alaska suggests that magnetic mantle may be common in forearc settings and thus magnetic anomalies may be useful in mapping hydrated mantle in convergent margins worldwide. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  20. Statistical averaging of marine magnetic anomalies and the aging of oceanic crust.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Visual comparison of Mesozoic and Cenozoic magnetic anomalies in the North Pacific suggests that older anomalies contain less short-wavelength information than younger anomalies in this area. To test this observation, magnetic profiles from the North Pacific are examined from crust of three ages: 0-2.1, 29.3-33.1, and 64.9-70.3Ma. For each time period, at least nine profiles were analyzed by 1) calculating the power density spectrum of each profile, 2) averaging the spectra together, and 3) computing a 'recording filter' for each time period by assuming a hypothetical seafloor model. The model assumes that the top of the source is acoustic basement, the source thickness is 0.5km, and the time scale of geomagnetic reversals is according to Ness et al. (1980). The calculated power density spectra of the three recording filters are complex in shape but show an increase of attenuation of short-wavelength information as the crust ages. These results are interpreted using a multilayer model for marine magnetic anomalies in which the upper layer, corresponding to pillow basalt of seismic layer 2A, acts as a source of noise to the magnetic anomalies. As the ocean crust ages, this noisy contribution by the pillow basalts becomes less significant to the anomalies. Consequently, magnetic sources below layer 2A must be faithful recorders of geomagnetic reversals.-AuthorPacific power density spectrum

  1. Magnetic Anomalies Within Lunar Impact Basins: Constraints on the History of the Lunar Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, N. C.; Hood, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    Previous work has shown that lunar crustal magnetization has a combination of origins including shock remanent magnetization in transient magnetic fields and thermoremanent magnetization in a steady core dynamo magnetic field (e.g., Hood and Artemieva, Icarus, 2008; Richmond and Hood, JGR, 2008; Garrick-Bethell et al., Science, 2009; Hood, Icarus, 2011). In particular, magnetic anomalies within the interiors of lunar impact basins and large craters provide a potentially valuable means of constraining the history of the former dynamo (Halekas et al., MAPS, 2003; Hood, 2011). These anomalies likely have a thermoremanent origin owing to high subsurface temperatures reached at the time of impact and therefore require a long-lived, steady magnetic field to explain their magnetization. Central anomalies have previously been confirmed to be present using Lunar Prospector magnetometer (LP MAG) data within several Nectarian-aged basins (Moscoviense, Mendel-Rydberg, Crisium, and Humboldtianum), implying that a dynamo existed during this lunar epoch (Hood, 2011). Here, we further analyze low altitude LP MAG data for several additional basins, ranging in age from Nectarian to Imbrian. Results indicate that magnetic anomalies with a probable basin-related origin are present within at least two additional Nectarian-aged basins (Serenitatis and Humorum) and one Imbrian-aged basin (Schrodinger). No discernible anomalies are present within the largest Imbrian-aged basins, Imbrium and Orientale. While there is uncertainty regarding the age of the Schrodinger basin, it has been reported to be slightly more recent than Imbrium (Wilhelms, 1984). Our initial interpretation is therefore that a dynamo likely existed during the Imbrian epoch. The absence of anomalies within Imbrium and Orientale can be explained by insufficient conditions for acquisition of strong magnetization (e.g., inadequate concentrations of efficient remanence carriers) following these relatively large impacts.

  2. Direct Observations of Magnetic Anomalies on the Lunar Surface under Varying Solar Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Futaana, Y.; Holmström, M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dhanya, M. B.; Sridharan, R.; Asamura, K.

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to Earth, the Moon does not have a global dipolar magnetic field. Since the first lunar landing with Apollo 11, we know, though, that localised magnetic fields exist on the lunar surface. Measurements conducted by the Lunar Prospector magnetometer and electron reflectometer suggested that these localised magnetic fields are able to deflect the impinging solar wind in favourable cases (Lin et al., Science 1998). Magnetohydrodynamic simulations support the implication that mini-magnetospheres are formed above the locations of strong localised magnetic fields and can hold off the impinging solar wind (Harnett and Winglee, JGR 2002). Analysis of magnetic field data from Lunar Prospector of the Reiner Gamma anomaly region showed that the distortion of the magnetic field of this anomaly strongly depends on the impinging solar wind parameters, which was interpreted that the size and shape of the mini-magnetosphere changed with the solar wind parametes (Kurata et al., GRL 2005). Wieser et al., GRL 2010 showed that SARA, the Sub-KeV Atom Analyzer on board Chandrayaan-1, is able to detect an ENA image of the mini-magnetosphere in the measured energetic neutral atom flux. Here we analysed all orbits where CENA, the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer, recorded data when a magnetic anomaly was in CENA's field-of-view. Our goal was to determine if 1) a signature of the magnetic anomaly is always visible in the ENA signal and if 2) there is a correlation between the solar wind dynamic pressure, the solar wind magnetic field, the local magnetic field strength and the reduction in the reflected ENA flux. Our results show that for the simplest case, i.e., the Gerasimovich anomaly, there is indeed a clear correlation between the shielding efficiency, the magnetic field strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure. For the other observed magnetic anomalies, for which the magnetic fields are not only weaker but also spatially more variable than that of the

  3. Structure and segmentation of the eastern Gulf of Aden basin and the Sheba ridge from gravity, bathymetric and magnetic anomalies: implications for accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S.; Maia, M.; Gente, P.; Autin, J.

    2007-12-01

    The eastern Gulf of Aden is a key place for investigating seafloor spreading processes and the evolution in space and time of the margin and ridge segmentation. The rifting of the Gulf that separated Arabia from Somalia started around 35 Ma ago followed by oceanic accretion from at least17.6 Ma. Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic data from the Encens-Sheba cruise are used to study the structure and segmentation of the eastern part of the basin and ridge, which have strong implications for accretion processes. The segmentation of the first oceanic spreading centre, which is dated at least 17.6 Ma by the magnetic anomaly (A5d) identification, seems to be directly related to the structural geometry of the margins. Then, magmatic processes governed the evolution of the segmentation. The segmentation of the oceanic crust evolved, by eastward propagation of the western segment, from three segments (from an5d to an5) to two segments (from an5). At 6 Ma (an3a) a third segment appeared by duplication of the Socotra transform fault, maybe due to a regional kinematics change. The Encens-Sheba oceanic domain is divided in two distinct areas trending NE-SW perpendicular to the Sheba ridge. (1) The Eastern area is characterized by a shorter wavelength variation of the axial segmentation with two spreading segments 30 to 40 km long, and by a thin crust particularly on the northern and southern ends of its flanks. (2) The Western zone, whose axial segment is more than 120 km long, is characterized by a thick crust and/or a hot mantle and no axial rift valley. This abnormal volcanic activity for a slow spreading ridge is emphasized by bathymetric highs with 5-10 km wide volcanic edifices, and by a negative anomaly of the MBA. These different results support the presence of an off-axis thermal anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge. The magnetic anomalies and spreading asymmetry reveal that the location of this thermal anomaly might be relatively recent (~ 10 Ma

  4. Analysis of Marine Magnetic Field Anomaly Profiles of the West Philippine Basin to Infer Its Style of Opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Hanjin; Lee, Sang-Mook

    2016-04-01

    The West Philippine Basin (WPB), located on the Philippine Sea Plate, is considered to have undergone a rapid opening during the Eocene. However, the detailed opening of the WPB and its relationship with surrounding basins were rather uncertain in the existing plate reconstruction models because of their sparse coverage. This study re-examines the opening using the sea surface marine magnetic anomaly data that were added to the database over the last several decades. Detailed rotation poles were computed different stages using Gplates program. According to our analysis, WPB started to open in NE-SW direction as early as the early Eocene (> 53 Ma) but changed gradually to N-S direction around 45 Ma. It appears that the spreading was not uniform, evidenced by jumps in the spreading axis and along-axis discontinuities with an average speed greater than previous reported. The spreading appears to have slowed down around 37 Ma and finally ceasing at around 25 Ma. The spreading was not symmetric between north and south, and this apparent asymmetry becomes notable towards the end of the opening.

  5. Reduced to Pole Long-wavelength Magnetic Anomalies of Africa and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator); Olivier, R.

    1984-01-01

    To facilitate analysis of the tectonic framework for Africa, Europe and adjacent marine areas, MAGSAT scalar anomaly data are differentially reduced to the pole and compared to regional geologic information and geophysical data including surface free-air gravity anomaly data upward continued to satellite elevation (350 km) on a spherical Earth. Comparative analysis shows magnetic anomalies correspond with both ancient as well as more recent Cenozoic structural features. Anomalies associated with ancient structures are primarily caused by intra-crustal lithologic variations such as the crustal disturbance associated with the Bangui anomaly in west-central Africa. Anomalies correlative with Cenozoic tectonic elements appear to be related to Curie isotherm perturbations. A possible example of the latter is the well-defined trend of magnetic minima that characterize the Alpine orogenic belt from the Atlas mountains to Eurasia. In contrast, a well-defined magnetic satellite minimum extends across the stable craton from Finland to the Ural mountains. Prominent magnetic maxima characterize the Arabian plate, Iceland, the Kursk region of the central Russian uplift, and generally the Precambrian shields of Africa.

  6. Reduced to pole long-wavelength magnetic anomalies of Africa and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivier, R.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    To facilitate analysis of the tectonic framework for Africa, Europe and adjacent marine areas, MAGSAT scalar anomaly data are differentially reduced to the pole and compared to regional geologic information and geophysical data including surface free-air gravity anomaly data upward continued to satellite elevation (350 km) on a spherical Earth. Comparative analysis shows magnetic anomalies correspond with both ancient as well as more recent Cenozoic structural features. Anomalies associated with ancient structures are primarily caused by intra-crustal lithologic variations such as the crustal disturbance associated with the Bangui anomaly in west-central Africa. Anomalies correlative with Cenozoic tectonic elements appear to be related to Curie isotherm perturbations. A possible example of the latter is the well-defined trend of magnetic minima that characterize the Alphine orogenic belt from the Atlas mountains to Eurasia. In contrast, a well-defined magnetic satellite minimum extends across the stable craton from Finland to the Ural mountains. Prominent magnetic maxima characterize the Arabian plate, Iceland, the Kursk region of the central Russian uplift, and generally the Precambrian shields of Africa.

  7. Changes of lithospheric magnetic anomalies with altitude (According to the CHAMP satellite)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramova, D. Yu.; Filippov, S. V.; Abramova, L. M.; Varentsov, I. M.; Lozovskii, I. N.

    2016-03-01

    Maps of the magnitude of the full vector and the vertical component of an anomalous lithospheric magnetic field over the Voronezh anticline (VA) for the three high-altitude observation levels were compiled based on geomagnetic measurements from the CHAMP satellite. The isometric positive anomaly centered at about 50° N and 37° E stands out. Its amplitude decreases with increasing observation altitude without changing the form. Comparison of the parameters of the detected anomaly with data obtained for this site by other methods confirms that it really exists and that its spatial position is accurately determined, which indicates the reliability of the values of the selected field of lithospheric anomalies. The change in the parameters of the magnetic anomaly with respect to the observation level over the Earth's surface is consistent with the concepts of geological structural features of the lithosphere in the region. The anomaly offset to the south on the satellite altitudes apparently indicates an uplift of crystalline basement rocks and a more southern position of VA deep roots relative to that accepted in the global magnetization model. The use of satellite data obtained at different altitudes opens up additional possibilities for the application of gradient methods in the interpretation of the magnetic fields of lithospheric anomalies.

  8. Satellite-Altitude Geopotential Study of the Kursk Magnetic Anomaly (KMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, Hyung Rae; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Potts, Laramie V.; Frawley, James J.

    2003-01-01

    With the successful launch of the Orsted, SAC-C and CHAMP satellites we are able to make both magnetic and gravity anomaly maps of the Earth's crust; magnetic from all three missions and gravity with CHAMP. We have used these data to study the KMA area of Russia. This is an important region for several reasons: (1) we have already made satellite magnetic anomaly maps of this region and they can be integrated with the gravity data from CHAMP for a comprehensive interpretation; (2) KMA contains the largest know reserves of iron-ore in the world; and (3) there are significant ground truth data available for this region from aeromagnetic, balloon surveys and geophysical mapping, including extensive rock magnetic/paleo-magnetic and geologic studies. Utilizing the gravity observations, collocated with the magnetic data enabled us to make a joint interpretation. While there is a high amplitude magnetic anomaly recorded over the KMA the gravity anomaly at satellite altitude revealed by CHAMP is only around 3-6 mGal but is not centered on the magnetic high. This would indicate that despite the fact that in the region of the KMA the rocks have a higher percentage of iron than in the surrounding formations the entire area is Archean-Proterozoic in age and therefore very dense.

  9. Interpretation of the magnetic anomaly over the Omaha Oil Field, Gallatin County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Sparlin, M.A. ); Lewis, R.D. . Waterways Experiment Station)

    1994-07-01

    A 40 nanoTesla (nT) magnetic anomaly identified in an aeromagnetic survey over southern Illinois contours as a localized magnetic high on the west flank of a regional magnetic low. This magnetic anomaly is generally coincident with the Omaha Oil Field in northwest Gallatin County, Illinois. It was initially assumed that cultural sources of steel associated with this oil field were the primary source of the magnetic feature; however, similar oil fields overflown by the survey do not exhibit magnetic anomalies in the data set. The Luther Rister et ux [number sign]1 well, drilled near the apex of the Omaha structural dome, encountered two zones of ultramafic intrusive rock containing 9.0% by volume magnetite. These intrusives were identified to be alnoeites which are a class of mantle-derived ultramafic rock that can be associated with the incipient stages of crustal rifting. A ground magnetic survey verified the presence of the anomaly, and provided detailed data for 3-D modeling of the source. Petrophysical evaluations, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thin section modal analysis were made on drill cuttings from the ultramafic intrusives encountered in the Luther Rister [number sign]1 well. These measurements were made to constrain the 3-D magnetic modeling by the petrophysical characteristics of the source. After removal of the regional magnetic field, the resulting 140 nT residual magnetic anomaly was successfully modeled using two ultramafic sills with an igneous feeder plug. The two igneous sills adequately account for the structural closure exhibited in the Omaha Oil Field and raise the interesting possibility of other hydrocarbon trapping structures generated by intrusives emplaced into the sedimentary section.

  10. Spherical earth gravity and magnetic anomaly analysis by equivalent point source inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation potential field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of potential field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates potential field anomalies to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the equivalent source field lead to corresponding geoidal anomalies, pseudo-anomalies, vector anomaly components, spatial derivatives, continuations, and differential magnetic pole reductions. A number of examples using 1 deg-averaged surface free-air gravity anomalies of POGO satellite magnetometer data for the United States, Mexico, and Central America illustrate the capabilities of the method.

  11. Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic field-induced regeneration anomalies in the planarian, Dugesia tigrina

    SciTech Connect

    Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    The authors recently reported that cephalic regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina was significantly delayed in populations exposed continuously to combined parallel DC and AC magnetic fields. This effect was consistent with hypotheses suggesting an underlying resonance phenomenon. The authors report here, in a parallel series of investigations on the same model system, that the incidence of regeneration anomalies presenting as tumor-like protuberances also increases significantly (P < .001) in association with exposure to weak 60 Hz magnetic fields, with peak intensities ranging between 1.0 and 80.0 {micro}T. These anomalies often culminate in the complete disaggregation of the organism. Similar to regeneration rate effects, the incidence of regeneration anomalies is specifically dependent upon the planaria possessing a fixed orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field vectors. However, unlike the regeneration rate effects, the AC magnetic field alone, in the absence of any measurable DC field, is capable of producing these anomalies. Moreover, the incidence of regeneration anomalies follows a clear dose-response relationship as a function of AC magnetic field intensity, with the threshold for induced electric field intensity estimated at 5 {micro} V/m. The addition of either 51.1 or 78.4 {micro}T DC magnetic fields, applied in parallel combination with the AC field, enhances the appearance of anomalies relative to the 60 Hz AC field alone, but only at certain AC field intensities. Thus, whereas the previous study of regeneration rate effects appeared to involve exclusively resonance interactions, the regeneration anomalies reported here appear to result primarily from Faraday induction coupling.

  12. Scalar magnetic anomaly maps of Earth derived from POGO and Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar; Langel, Robert A.; Purucker, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A new Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) scalar magnetic anomaly map at 400 km altitude is presented which consists of spherical harmonics of degree 15-60. On the basis of the common features of this map with two new Magsat anomaly maps, dawn and dusk, two scalar magnetic anomaly maps of the Earth are presented using two selection criteria with different levels of stringency. These selection criteria suppress the noncrustal components of the original maps by different amounts. The more stringent selection criteria seek to eliminate as much contamination as possible, at the expense of suppressing some anomaly signal. This map is represented by spherical harmonics of degree 15-60. The less stringent selection criteria seek to retain as much crustal signal as possible, at the expense of also retaining some contaminating fields. This map is represented by spherical harmonics of degree 15-65. The resulting two maps are highly correlated with degree correlation coefficients greater than 0.8.

  13. Intermediate-wavelength magnetic anomaly field of the North Pacific and posible source distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrecque, J. L.; Cande, S. C.; Jarrard, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    A technique that eliminates external field sources and the effects of strike aliasing was used to extract from marine survey data the intermediate wavelength magnetic anomaly field for (B) in the North Pacific. A strong correlation exists between this field and the Magsat field although a directional sensitivity in the Magsat field can be detected. The intermediate wavelength field is correlated to tectonic features. Island arcs appear as positive anomalies of induced origin likely due to variations in crustal thickness. Seamount chains and oceanic plateaus also are manifested by strong anomalies. The primary contribution to many of these anomalies appears to be due to a remanent magnetization. The source parameters for the remainder of these features are presently unidentified ambiguous. Results indicate that the sea surface field is a valuable source of information for secular variation analysis and the resolution of intermediate wavelength source parameters.

  14. The intermediate wavelength magnetic anomaly field of the north Pacific and possible source distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrecque, J. L.; Cande, S. C.; Jarrard, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A technique that eliminates external field sources and the effects of strike aliasing was used to extract from marine survey data the intermediate wavelength magnetic anomaly field for (B) in the North Pacific. A strong correlation exists between this field and the MAGSAT field although a directional sensitivity in the MAGSAT field can be detected. The intermediate wavelength field is correlated to tectonic features. Island arcs appear as positive anomalies of induced origin likely due to variations in crustal thickness. Seamount chains and oceanic plateaus also are manifested by strong anomalies. The primary contribution to many of these anomalies appears to be due to a remanent magnetization. The source parameters for the remainder of these features are presently unidentified ambiguous. Results indicate that the sea surface field is a valuable source of information for secular variation analysis and the resolution of intermediate wavelength source parameters.

  15. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies. [rock magnetic signatures and MAGSAT geological, and gravity correlations in West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Problems with the Curie balance, which severely hindered the acquisition of data, were rectified. Chemical analytical activities are proceeding satisfactorily. The magnetization characteristics of metamorphic suites were analyzed and susceptibility data for a wide range of metamorphic and igneous rocks. These rock magnetic signatures are discussed as well as the relationships between geology, gravity and MAGSAT anomalies of West Africa.

  16. Application of Magsat lithospheric modeling in South America. Part 1: Processing and interpretation of magnetic and gravity anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (Principal Investigator); Keller, G. R.; Lidiak, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Scalar magnetic anomaly data from MAGSAT, reduced to vertical polarization and long wavelength pass filtered free air gravity anomaly data of South America and the Caribbean are compared to major crustal features. The continental shields generally are more magnetic than adjacent basins, oceans and orogenic belts. In contrast, the major aulacogens are characterized by negative anomalies. Spherical earth magnetic modeling of the Amazon River and Takatu aulacogens in northeastern South America indicates a less magnetic crust associated with the aulacogens. Spherical earth modeling of both positive gravity and negative magnetic anomalies observed over the Mississippi Embayment indicate the presence of a nonmagnetic zone of high density material within the lower crust associated with the aulacogen. The MAGSAT scalar magnetic anomaly data and available free air gravity anomalies over Euro-Africa indicate several similar relationships.

  17. Magnetic anomalies in east Pacific using MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Methods for solving problems encountered in separating the core field from the crustal field are summarized as well as those methods developed for inverting total magnetic field data to obtain source functions for oceanic areas. Accounting for magnetization contrasts and the magnetization values measured in rocks of marine origin are also discussed.

  18. Soil Magnetism and Magnetic Anomalies at the Marshall's Pen Archaeological Site, Mandeville, Jamaica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, E.; Sternberg, R. S.; Delle, J. A.; Lawrence, N. D.; McAdoo, B. G.; Savina, M. E.

    2002-05-01

    Marshall's Pen, a 1000-acre parcel of land in Mandeville, Jamaica, underlain by limestone bedrock and bauxite soils, served as a coffee plantation in the early 19th century. Two to three hundred slaves of African descent worked the plantation from AD 1802 until slavery was abolished in Jamaica in 1838. The goal of the archaeological program at Marshall's Pen is to complement what little is known about Jamaican slave society from the historical record. Geophysical prospection was conducted at Marshall's Pen by ten undergraduate students as part of a Keck Geology Consortium project in the summer of 1999. In the slaves' village consisting of living and domestic labor areas, G858 cesium vapor magnetometer readings were taken every 0.1 seconds along 49 profiles, each 50 m long and spaced 1 meter apart, and magnetic susceptibility readings were taken at 1-meter intervals. Seven significant magnetic anomalies (up to 100 nT peak-to-peak) were detected in the village. Two of these were found to be caused by a buried machete and an iron woodworking tool. Three anomalies were associated with a large area of black, burned soil. Archaeological testing in this area produced partially carbonized seeds, charcoal, ceramics that were smudged after manufacture, and cutlery; this evidence suggests a domestic kitchen area. In situ susceptibility readings were zero on bedrock and low on the bauxite soils. Susceptibility readings generally correlated with the magnetics, to values as high as 50 (x 10-6, volume specific SI) in the ``kitchen'' area, suggesting a source in the susceptibility contrast for these magnetic anomalies. Soil samples were collected from the bauxite outside the village, and from the village area in the summer of 2001; ten village sites were sampled away from the kitchen area, and four from the kitchen area. Five samples from each site were boxed, weighed, and measured for laboratory susceptibility measurements. Eleven samples outide the village had a geometric mean

  19. MAGSAT investigation of crustal magnetic anomalies in the eastern Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sailor, R. V.; Lazarewicz, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies in a region of the eastern Indian Ocean were studied using data from NASA's MAGSAT mission. The investigation region (0 deg to 50 deg South, 75 to 125 deg East) contains several important tectonic features, including the Broken Ridge, Java Trench, Ninetyeast Ridge, and Southeast Indian Ridge. A large positive magnetic anomaly is associated with the Broken Ridge and smaller positive anomalies correlate with the Ninetyeast Ridge and western Australia. Individual profiles of scalar data (computed from vector components) were considered to determine the overall data quality and resolution capability. A set of MAGSAT ""Quiet-Time'' data was used to compute an equivalent source crustal magnetic anomaly map of the study region. Maps of crustal magnetization and magnetic susceptibility were computed from the equivalent source dipoles. Gravity data were used to help interpretation, and a map of the ratio of magnetization to density contrasts was computed using Poisson's relation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of induced magnetization of a crustal layer having varying thickness and composition.

  20. Why are There So Few Magnetic Anomalies in Martian Lowlands and Basins?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Aharonson, Oded; Banerdt, W. Bruce; Dombard, Andrew J.; Frey, Herbert V.; Golombek, Matthew P.; Hauck, Steven A., II; Head, James W., III; Johnson, Catherine L.; McGovern, Patrick J.

    2003-01-01

    The discovery of large areas of strongly magnetized crust on Mars [1,2] provides important information on the timing of both crustal and deeper interior processes on that planet. Critical to an understanding of that timing, as well as to the processes that have contributed to the magnetization and demagnetization of crustal materials, is the geographical distribution of magnetic anomalies discernible from spacecraft orbit. The paucity of resolved magnetic anomalies in the northern lowlands and within and surrounding the best-preserved major impact basins has been noted since the crustal field was first globally mapped [1], but no straightforward explanation of that full pattern has yet been offered. Here we suggest that ancient hydrothermal alteration of magnetic carriers in Martian lowlands and basins may have contributed to the magnetization distribution observed today.

  1. Study on crustal magnetic anomalies and Curie surface in Southeast Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guoming; Kang, Guofa; Bai, Chunhua; Wen, Limin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the Potsdam model POMME-6.2 is used to investigate the distributions of crustal magnetic anomalies and Curie surface in Southeast Tibet. The Curie surface is compared with the regional heat flow, Bouguer anomaly, Moho depth, and seismicity. The results show that the magnetic anomalies and Curie surface are both consistent with the geological structure. Sichuan Basin exhibits a high positive anomaly, while orogenic belts such as the Longmenshan, northwestern Sichuan, and western Yunnan, exhibit weak positive or negative anomalies. The distribution of magnetic anomaly confirms that escape flow from east Tibet branches into northeastward part and southward part on west Sichuan Basin, due to resistance by the rigid basin. The depth of Curie surface ranges from 20 to 34 km. The Curie surface beneath the Longmenshan, Xiaojiang and Lijiang-Xiaojinhe faults is shallow, with the uplift strike consistent with the faults. The Curie surface beneath Sichuan Basin and the central Bayan Har massif is deep, with sheet-like depressions. Strong earthquakes primarily occurred in the areas with the uplift of Curie surface. The heat flow values near Tengchong, Lijiang, Dali and Kunming are high and the Curie surface there is shallow.

  2. Interpretations of gravity and magnetic anomalies in the Songliao Basin with Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changbo; Wang, Liangshu; Sun, Bin; Feng, Runhai; Wu, Yongjing

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the method of Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition (WMD) combined with Power Spectrum Analysis (PSA) for the separation of regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. The Songliao Basin is situated between the Siberian Plate and the North China Plate, and its main structural trend of gravity and magnetic anomaly fields is NNE. The study area shows a significant feature of deep collage-type construction. According to the feature of gravity field, the region was divided into five sub-regions. The gravity and magnetic fields of the Songliao Basin were separated using WMD with a 4th order separation. The apparent depth of anomalies in each order was determined by Logarithmic PSA. Then, the shallow high-frequency anomalies were removed and the 2nd-4th order wavelet detail anomalies were used to study the basin's major faults. Twenty-six faults within the basement were recognized. The 4th order wavelet approximate anomalies were used for the inversion of the Moho discontinuity and the Curie isothermal surface.

  3. A review of problems and progress in studies of satellite magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.; Johnson, B. D.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    A review is conducted of studies performed during the Magsat project. The obtained data are considered, taking into account questions of data availability, aspects of orbit attitude determination, ionospheric noise, a field model, and an anomaly field presentation. Models for interpretation are discussed, giving attention to forward modeling, and equivalent layer inverse modeling. In an evaluation of rock property constraints, the magnetic bottom is discussed along with Curie points, metamorphism and magnetization, and the direction of magnetization.

  4. The Smoking Gun: Remanent Magnetic Anomalies on Mars and the Formation of the Crustal Dichotomy via Giant Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombard, A. J.; Johnson, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of large-scale crustal magnetic anomalies in the Southern Highlands of Mars is equivocal. Though some are indeed elongated primarily in the east-west direction, initial map projections exacerbated their linear nature, leading to the hypothesis that the anomalies are equivalent to magnetic stripes due to spreading of Earth's sea floor and hence to the proposal of plate tectonics on Mars. This interpretation, however, is inconsistent with Martian geology. For instance, a plate-tectonics model predicts the anomalies should be formed in thin, oceanic crust at low elevation, but instead they are found in the thick crust of the Highlands, not in the thin crust of the Northern Lowlands. Indeed, the formation of this Crustal Dichotomy is also equivocal, with models ranging from a giant impact (or multiple smaller impacts) near either the current north or south poles, to plate tectonics-like processes, to mantle convection, either eroding the crust in the northern hemisphere or thickening the crust in the south. Recently, the idea of a giant impact in the north has been resurrected, with the proposal that the Dichotomy results from the formation of an elliptical basin by a giant impact very early in Martian history. While it may be tempting to suggest that the current, generally demagnetized state of the Northern Lowlands may be related to this impact, this linkage makes implicit assumptions about the timing of dynamo shut-off on Mars, and it neglects other demagnetization mechanisms possibly operating in the Lowlands after such an impact (e.g., later hydrothermal processing). More direct magnetic evidence for the giant impact hypothesis would come if the remanent magnetism in Southern Highlands were relatable in a unique way to the putative impact. Here, we show that the positions of many of the dominant elongated magnetic anomalies on Mars are consistent with the first ring of a multi-ring basin. The best match comes from an ellipse ~2200 km wider than the

  5. Modeling the Solar Wind Plasma Interaction with Gerasimovich Magnetic Anomaly on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, S.; Lue, C.; Holmstrom, M.; Wieser, M.; Barabash, S.

    2014-12-01

    We study the solar wind plasma interaction with Gerasimovich magnetic anomaly on the Moon. We use a three-dimensional hybrid model of plasma and an empirical model of magnetic anomalies. We examine the effects of low and high dynamic pressures on this interaction while the Gerasimovich magnetic anomaly is located at nearly 30o and 60o solar zenith angles. We find that for the low dynamic pressure the crustal fields deflect the solar wind plasma around and form a plasma void at very close distances to the Moon (below 20 km above the surface). This is while during the high dynamic pressure the plasma void disappears and the solar wind plasma is less deflected. The deflection is associated with an electrostatic potential difference of nearly 250 and 150 V on the lunar surface during the low and high dynamic pressures, respectively, which are consistent with the observations.

  6. Gravity and magnetic anomaly modeling and correlation using the SPHERE program and Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J. (Principal Investigator); Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The spherical Earth inversion, modeling, and contouring software were tested and modified for processing data in the Southern Hemisphere. Preliminary geologic/tectonic maps and selected cross sections for South and Central America and the Caribbean region are being compiled and as well as gravity and magnetic models for the major geological features of the area. A preliminary gravity model of the Andeas Beniff Zone was constructed so that the density columns east and west of the subducted plates are in approximate isostatic equilibrium. The magnetic anomaly for the corresponding magnetic model of the zone is being computed with the SPHERE program. A test tape containing global magnetic measurements was converted to a tape compatible with Purdue's CDC system. NOO data were screened for periods of high diurnal activity and reduced to anomaly form using the IGS-75 model. Magnetic intensity anomaly profiles were plotted on the conterminous U.S. map using the track lines as the anomaly base level. The transcontinental magnetic high seen in POGO and MAGSAT data is also represented in the NOO data.

  7. Origin of long-wavelength magnetic anomalies associated with subducting oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S.; Gubbins, D.; Müller, D.; Tetley, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Many subduction zones correspond to strong long-wavelength magnetic signatures that are not predicted by forward models in which magnetisation is confined to the continental crust and unsubducted oceanic lithosphere. Previous studies have proposed this signature to be sourced within hydrated, serpentinised mantle wedge. Alternatively, thermal models of subducting oceanic lithosphere suggest slab material cool enough to hold magnetisation may persist >200 km below the Earth's surface. Here we investigate the origin of long wavelength magnetic anomalies by constructing alternative predictions of the lithospheric geomagnetic field, which we compare to the MF7 model based on satellite observations. We compare 2 models for subduction zone magnetisation, one in which the wedge is magnetised and one in which the subducted slab is magnetised. Magnetisation deeper than the Moho of the overriding plate helps to reconcile the observed anomalies for a number of subduction zones, including Sumatra, the Aleutians, and along the Pacific margin of North and Central America. North-south trending arcs, especially those near to the magnetic equator, have magnetisations within the null space that produces little or no external magnetic field, and are less distinct in the observations. A magnetic anomaly persists along the Baja and Mexican west coast, indicating that the fossil subduction zone continues from California through Central America despite limited seismic evidence of a slab there. Distinguishing between the two competing models is difficult because it depends critically on the trend in magnetic anomaly away from the trench.

  8. Remanent magnetization and three-dimensional density model of the Kentucky anomaly region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Existing software was modified to handle 3-D density and magnetization models of the Kentucky body and is being tested. Gravity and magnetic anomaly data sets are ready for use. A preliminary block model is under construction using the 1:1,000,000 maps. An x-y grid to overlay the 1:2,500,000 Albers maps and keyed to the 1:1,000,000 scale block models was created. Software was developed to generate a smoothed MAGSAT data set over this grid; this is to be input to an inversion program for generating the regional magnetization map. The regional scale 1:2,500,000 map mosaic is being digitized using previous magnetization models, the U.S. magnetic anomaly map, and regional tectonic maps as a guide.

  9. Ferromagnetic eddy current probe having eccentric magnetization for detecting anomalies in a tube

    SciTech Connect

    Cecco, V.S.; Carter, J.R.

    1993-08-17

    An eddy current probe is described for detecting anomalies in a tube made of a ferromagnetic material, comprising: a probe housing made of a non-ferromagnetic material and shaped to be introduced into the tube for inspection, said housing having a central axis substantially coinciding with the axis of the tube to be inspected when the probe is in use; at least two eddy current measuring assemblies provided in said housing, each said assembly including magnetization means for generating a magnetic field in the tube under inspection to magnetize said tube, said magnetization means producing a maximum magnetization at an area of said tube and a minimum magnetization at a diametrically opposite area of said tube and at least one eddy current measuring coil associated with said magnetization means to measure the eddy current generated in the said tube and which has a relatively high sensitivity to an anomaly at said maximum magnetization area; and said eddy current measuring assemblies being spaced apart axially within said housing and rotated about said central axis from each other by a predetermined angle so that each assembly is sensitive to anomalies differently depending upon their location in said housing.

  10. A Tale of Two Anomalies: Depletion, Dispersion, and the Connection between the Stellar Lithium Spread and Inflated Radii on the Pre-main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Garrett; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate lithium depletion in standard stellar models (SSMs) and main sequence (MS) open clusters, and explore the origin of the Li dispersion in young, cool stars of equal mass, age, and composition. We first demonstrate that SSMs accurately predict the Li abundances of solar analogs at the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) within theoretical uncertainties. We then measure the rate of MS Li depletion by removing the [Fe/H]-dependent ZAMS Li pattern from three well-studied clusters, and comparing the detrended data. MS depletion is found to be mass-dependent, in the sense of more depletion at low mass. A dispersion in Li abundance at fixed T eff is nearly universal, and sets in by ~200 Myr. We discuss mass and age dispersion trends, and the pattern is mixed. We argue that metallicity impacts the ZAMS Li pattern, in agreement with theoretical expectations but contrary to the findings of some previous studies, and suggest Li as a test of cluster metallicity. Finally, we argue that a radius dispersion in stars of fixed mass and age, during the epoch of pre-MS Li destruction, is responsible for the spread in Li abundances and the correlation between rotation and Li in young cool stars, most well known in the Pleiades. We calculate stellar models, inflated to match observed radius anomalies in magnetically active systems, and the resulting range of Li abundances reproduces the observed patterns of young clusters. We discuss ramifications for pre-MS evolutionary tracks and age measurements of young clusters, and suggest an observational test.

  11. A tale of two anomalies: Depletion, dispersion, and the connection between the stellar lithium spread and inflated radii on the pre-main sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, Garrett; Pinsonneault, Marc H. E-mail: pinsono@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2014-07-20

    We investigate lithium depletion in standard stellar models (SSMs) and main sequence (MS) open clusters, and explore the origin of the Li dispersion in young, cool stars of equal mass, age, and composition. We first demonstrate that SSMs accurately predict the Li abundances of solar analogs at the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) within theoretical uncertainties. We then measure the rate of MS Li depletion by removing the [Fe/H]-dependent ZAMS Li pattern from three well-studied clusters, and comparing the detrended data. MS depletion is found to be mass-dependent, in the sense of more depletion at low mass. A dispersion in Li abundance at fixed T{sub eff} is nearly universal, and sets in by ∼200 Myr. We discuss mass and age dispersion trends, and the pattern is mixed. We argue that metallicity impacts the ZAMS Li pattern, in agreement with theoretical expectations but contrary to the findings of some previous studies, and suggest Li as a test of cluster metallicity. Finally, we argue that a radius dispersion in stars of fixed mass and age, during the epoch of pre-MS Li destruction, is responsible for the spread in Li abundances and the correlation between rotation and Li in young cool stars, most well known in the Pleiades. We calculate stellar models, inflated to match observed radius anomalies in magnetically active systems, and the resulting range of Li abundances reproduces the observed patterns of young clusters. We discuss ramifications for pre-MS evolutionary tracks and age measurements of young clusters, and suggest an observational test.

  12. Vlasov Simulation of the Interaction Between the Solar Wind and a Dielectric Body with Magnetic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Umeda, T.; Ogino, T.

    2011-12-01

    The interaction of a plasma flow with an unmagnetized object is quite different from that with a magnetized object such as the Earth. Due to the absence of the global magnetic field, the unmagnetized object absorbs plasma particles which reach the surface, generating a plasma cavity called wake in the anti-solar side of the object. Since the velocity of the solar wind (SW) is larger than the thermal velocity of ions, ions cannot penetrate into the nightside of the moon. However, ions were observed in the deep wake by a Japanese spacecraft KAGUYA (SELENE) which is orbiting the moon in a polar orbit around 100km altitude. A key mechanism of this phenomenon is thought to be scattering of SW ions at the lunar dayside surface by an interaction between the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and a lunar magnetic anomaly. In the present study, we examine structure of the wake due to the interaction between IMF and the magnetic anomaly via a full-kinetic Vlasov simulation. We performed one of the first global Vlasov simulations of magnetosphere. We assumed a 2.5D Cartesian system in which spatial grids are taken in the 2D plane and velocity grids are taken in 3D space. There exists an insulative sphere, in which the charge accumulates at the surface. The intrinsic magnetic field of the object as the magnetic anomaly is assumed to be the 2D dipole magnetic field. The solar wind also carries an IMF. The simulation results suggest that the magnetic anomaly on the dayside surface of the moon would affect to the formation of the wake field. The structure of plasma void is modified by the convection of magnetic field motion.

  13. High Resolution Magnetic Anomaly Imaging of Southern McMurdo Sound (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, M.; Gaya Pique, L. R.; Pignatelli, A.; Wilson, T.

    2004-12-01

    During the 2003-04 austral summer season, a low-altitude, high-resolution airborne magnetic survey was conducted in the area of Southern McMurdo Sound, western Ross Sea, in the framework of the joint Italian-US initiative called GEOIMAG (GEOphysical IMAGing of Antarctic tectonic and volcanic units in the Transantarctic Mountains and Ross Sea area). The survey was flown by helicopter from McMurdo Station, at a constant terrain clearance of 70 m. Profile spacing was 350 m. The resolution of the survey, the accuracy of the data acquisition, and a preliminary digital enhancement of the processed magnetic data have contributed to highlight the short-wavelength component of the regional magnetic anomaly field, resolving volcanic bodies and faults. A broad positive anomaly tapers northward from the volcanic Brown Peninsula. The breadth and low amplitude of the anomaly suggests this may mark relatively thin deposits of volcanic material on or near the seafloor. High-frequency and high-amplitude anomalies are associated with the volcanic Daily Islands at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. Anomalies of similar amplitude and size in adjacent areas indicate additional volcanic cones occur on the seafloor and beneath the ice sheet. Low-amplitude, curvilinear anomalies with a convex shape toward McMurdo Sound occur offshore of the outlet of Ferrar Glacier and extending southward parallel to the coastline. The new data are being integrated with a multi-source database (magnetic, digital terrain data, bathymetry, regional structural trends) to obtain an unprecedented view of the magnetic signature of the major tectonic elements in the area. The structural and volcanic framework resulting from this investigation will provide important site survey information for the proposed ANDRILL drill sites in southern McMurdo Sound.

  14. Global Map of Magnetic Anomalies (MAG/ER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The radial magnetic field measured is color coded on a global map that slows the larger craters and volcanoes (dark green), spacecraft tracks below 200 km (light green), and the dichotomy boundary (solid line).

  15. Magan: A new approach to the analysis and interpretation of marine magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    The identification of marine magnetic anomalies is an important phase of plate tectonic modeling, but is limited by the lack of professional software, either free or commercial, which may help in the accomplishment of this task, and by the practice of performing approximations that may prevent in some instances a correct interpretation of the magnetic data. Although basic forward-modeling and inversion algorithms that may be incorporated in the core of gravity or magnetic application software have been published since the late 1950s, most research groups have implemented their own tools independently from each other, and apart from a few cases such computer programs are not publicly accessible. Here a new methodology of analysis of marine magnetic data is described, which allows a quantitative correlation of magnetic anomalies from different profiles and a statistical determination of relative plate velocities. The method is implemented through a new free software package, Magan, available for the MS Windows environment. The program is especially designed to work with NGDC GEODAS ship-track and aeromagnetic data, but allows the import of any ASCII text file containing magnetic anomaly data. The basic forward-modeling algorithms included in the Magan core are based on well-known techniques of potential field geophysics, modified to take into account specific requirements of marine magnetic data analysis and plate tectonic modeling. Such a kernel is flanked by a friendly graphical user interface (GUI), which helps and speeds up the interpretation of the ship-track data. In particular, the program allows one to (1) draw and edit flow lines where magnetic data can be projected, (2) calculate more accurately modeled anomalies through the use of apparent polar wander paths and single block parameters, (3) generate age-distance and time-velocity graphs, and (4) generate crossing point files that can be subsequently used to build magnetic isochrons.

  16. Regional magnetic anomaly fields: 3D Taylor polynomial and surface spline models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Jiang, Yong; Jiang, Yi; Li, Zheng; Jiang, Jin; Liu, Zhong-Wei; Ye, Mei-Chen; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Li, Xiu-Ming

    2016-03-01

    We used data from 1960.0, 1970.0, 1980.0, 1990.0, and 2000.0 to study the geomagnetic anomaly field over the Chinese mainland by using the three-dimensional Taylor polynomial (3DTP) and the surface spline (SS) models. To obtain the pure anomaly field, the main field and the induced field of the ionospheric and magnetospheric fields were removed from measured data. We also compared the SS model anomalies and the data obtained with Kriging interpolation (KI). The geomagnetic anomaly distribution over the mainland was analyzed based on the SS and 3DTP models by transferring all points from 1960.0-1990.0 to 2000.0. The results suggest that the total intensity F anomalies estimated based on the SS and KI for each year are basically consistent in distribution and intensity. The anomalous distributions in the X-, Y-, and Z-direction and F are mainly negative. The 3DTP model anomalies suggest that the intensity in the X-direction increases from -100 nT to 0 nT with longitude, whereas the intensity in the Y-direction decreases from 400 nT to 20 nT with longitude and over the eastern mainland is almost negative. The intensity in the Z-direction and F are very similar and in most areas it is about -50nT and higher in western Tibet. The SS model anomalies overall reflect the actual distribution of the magnetic field anomalies; however, because of the uneven distribution of measurements, it yields several big anomalies. Owing to the added altitude term, the 3DTP model offers higher precision and is consistent with KI.

  17. Remanent and induced magnetic anomalies over a layered intrusion: Effects from crystal fractionation and magma recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Brown, Laurie L.; Robinson, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) norite - quartz mangerite layered intrusion is part of the early Neoproterozoic Rogaland Anorthosite Province intruded into the Fennoscandian shield in south Norway at ~ 930 Ma. The BKS is exposed over an area of 230 km 2 with a thickness of ~ 7000 m and is of economic interest for ilmenite, magnetite and apatite deposits. From the point of view of magnetic minerals, in the course of fractional crystallization and magma evolution, the ilmenite becomes less Fe 3+-rich reflected by a change from ilmenite with hematite exsolution to nearly pure ilmenite. Magnetite starts to crystallize relatively late in the intrusive history, but its crystallization is interrupted by influxes of more primitive magma. The variations in aeromagnetic and ground-magnetic anomalies measured over the BKS can be explained in terms of the measured magnetic properties of NRM, susceptibility, and hysteresis presented here, and in terms of mineralogy. Early layers in the intrusion contain hemo-ilmenite. As the magma evolved and magnetite started to crystallize, this caused a distinct change over the layering from remanence-controlled negative anomalies to induced positive anomalies. When new, more primitive magma was injected into the system, hemo-ilmenite returned as the major oxide and the resulting magnetic anomalies are again negative. The most dramatic change in the magnetic signature is in the upper part of the intrusion in MCU IVe, where magnetite became a well established cumulate phase as indicated by susceptibility, but its induced magnetization is overcome by large NRMs associated either with hemo-ilmenite, or with hemo-ilmenite and magnetite exsolved from pyroxenes. The average natural remanent magnetizations change from ~ 3 A/m in MCU IVd, to 15 A/m in MCU IVe, and back to 2 A/m in the overlying MCU IVf, producing a strong negative remanent anomaly that has been followed along strike for at least 20 km by ground-magnetic measurements. The highly varied

  18. Magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) of ferromagnetic pipelines using principal component analysis (PCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinker, Arie; Moldwin, Mark B.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) method is used for detection of visually obscured ferromagnetic objects. The method exploits the magnetic field originating from the ferromagnetic object, which constitutes an anomaly in the ambient earth’s magnetic field. Traditionally, MAD is used to detect objects with a magnetic field of a dipole structure, where far from the object it can be considered as a point source. In the present work, we expand MAD to the case of a non-dipole source, i.e. a ferromagnetic pipeline. We use principal component analysis (PCA) to calculate the principal components, which are then employed to construct an effective detector. Experiments conducted in our lab with real-world data validate the above analysis. The simplicity, low computational complexity, and the high detection rate make the proposed detector attractive for real-time, low power applications.

  19. Quantitative analysis of magnetic anomaly of reinforcements in bored in-situ concrete pilesℜ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Dong, Ping; Wang, Chong; Pu, Xiaoxuan; Wu, Yongjing

    2009-09-01

    We quantitatively study magnetic anomalies of reinforcement rods in bored in-situ concrete piles for the first time and summarized their magnetic anomaly character. Key factors such as measuring borehole orientation, borehole-reinforcement distance, and multiple-section reinforcement rods are discussed which contributes valid and quantitative reference for using the magnetic method to detect reinforcement rods. Through tests with model piles, we confirm the accuracy of theoretical computations and then utilize the law discovered in theoretical computations to explain the characteristics of the actual testing curves. The results show that the Za curves of the reinforcement rod reflect important factors regarding the reinforcement rods, such as rod length, change of reinforcement ratio, length of overlap, and etc. This research perfects the magnetic method for detecting reinforcement rods in bored in-situ concrete piles and the method has great importance for preventing building contractor fraud.

  20. Hydrology in the Durius Valles Region: Evaluation of Possible Correlation with Volcanism and Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, Natalie A.; Marinangeli, Lucia; Grin, Edmond A.

    2000-01-01

    We envision the contribution of subglacial flows, hydrothermalism and sapping in the Durius Valles system and the consequences in term of climate on Mars in recent geological times. We evaluate the possible correlation of the hydrology with volcanism and magnetic anomalies.

  1. Lunar Ion Transport Near Magnetic Anomalies: Possible Implications for Swirl Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Killen, R. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    The bright swirling features on the lunar surface in areas around the Moon but most prominently at Reiner Gamma, have intrigued scientists for many years. After Apollo and later Lunar Prospector (LP} mapped the Lunar magnetic fields from orbit, it was observed that these features are generally associated with crustal magnetic anomalies. This led researchers to propose a number of explanations for the swirls that invoke these fields. Prominent among these include magnetic shielding in the form of a mini-magnetosphere which impedes space weathering by the solar wind, magnetically controlled dust transport, and cometary or asteroidal impacts that would result in shock magnetization with concomitant formation ofthe swirls. In this presentation, we will consider another possibility, that the ambient magnetic and electric fields can transport and channel secondary ions produced by micrometeorite or solar wind ion impacts. In this scenario, ions that are created in these impacts are under the influence of these fields and can drift for significant distances before encountering the magnetic anomalies when their trajectories are disrupted and concentrated onto nearby areas. These ions may then be responsible for chemical alteration of the surface leading either to a brightening effect or a disruption of space weathering processes. To test this hypothesis we have run ion trajectory simulations that show ions from regions about the magnetic anomalies can be channeled into very small areas near the anomalies and although questions remain as to nature of the mechanisms that could lead to brightening of the surface it appears that the channeling effect is consistent with the existence of the swirls.

  2. Effects of sporadic E-layer characteristics on spread-F generation in the nighttime ionosphere near a northern equatorial anomaly crest during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. C.; Chen, W. S.

    2015-06-01

    This study is to know how the characteristics of sporadic E-layer (Es-layer) affect the generation of spread-F in the nighttime ionosphere near the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly during solar minimum. The data of Es-layer parameters and spread-F are obtained from the Chungli ionograms of 1996. The Es-layer parameters include foEs (critical frequency of Es-layer), fbEs (blanketing frequency of Es-layer), and Δf (≡foEs-fbEs). Results show that the nighttime variations of foEs and fbEs medians (Δf medians) are different from (similar to) that of the occurrence probabilities of spread-F. Because the total number of Es-layer events is greater than that of spread-F events, the comparison between the medians of Es-layer parameters and the occurrence probabilities of spread-F might have a shortfall. Further, we categorize the Es-layer and spread-F events into each frequency interval of Es-layer parameters. For the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus foEs, an increasing trend is found in post-midnight of all three seasons. The increasing trend also exists in pre-midnight of the J-months and in post-midnight of all seasons, for the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus Δf. These demonstrate that the spread-F occurrence increases with increasing foEs and/or Δf. Moreover, the increasing trends indicate that polarization electric fields generated in Es-layer assist to produce spread-F, through the electrodynamical coupling of Es-layer and F-region. Regarding the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus fbEs, the significant trend only appears in post-midnight of the E-months. This implies that fbEs might not be a major factor for the spread-F formation.

  3. Comparison of Magnetic Anomalies of Lithospheric Origin Measured by Satellite and Airborne Magnetometers over Western Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Coles, R. L.; Mayhew, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomaly data from the OGO 2, 4 and 6 (Pogo) satellites are compared with upward-continued aeromagnetic data between 50 deg -85 deg N latitude and 220 deg - 260 deg E longitude. Agreement is good both in anomaly location and in amplitude, giving confidence that it is possible to proceed with the derivation and interpretation of satellite anomaly maps in all parts of the globe. The data contain a magnetic high over the Alpha ridge suggesting continental composition and a magnetic low over the southern Canada basin and northern Canadian Arctic islands (Sverdrup basin). The low in the Sverdrup basin corresponds to a region of high heat flow, suggesting a shallow Curie isotherm. A ridge of high field, with two distinct peaks in amplitude, is found over the northern portion of the platform deposits and a relative high is located in the central portion of the Churchill province. No features are present to indicate a magnetic boundary between Slave and Bear provinces, but a trend change is evident between Slave and Churchill provinces. South of 60 deg latitude a broad magnetic low is located over very thick (40-50 km) crust, interpreted to be a region of low magnetization.

  4. Three-dimensional inverse modelling of magnetic anomaly sources based on a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, Fuensanta G.; Blanco-Montenegro, Isabel; Arnoso, José

    2016-04-01

    We present a modelling method to estimate the 3-D geometry and location of homogeneously magnetized sources from magnetic anomaly data. As input information, the procedure needs the parameters defining the magnetization vector (intensity, inclination and declination) and the Earth's magnetic field direction. When these two vectors are expected to be different in direction, we propose to estimate the magnetization direction from the magnetic map. Then, using this information, we apply an inversion approach based on a genetic algorithm which finds the geometry of the sources by seeking the optimum solution from an initial population of models in successive iterations through an evolutionary process. The evolution consists of three genetic operators (selection, crossover and mutation), which act on each generation, and a smoothing operator, which looks for the best fit to the observed data and a solution consisting of plausible compact sources. The method allows the use of non-gridded, non-planar and inaccurate anomaly data and non-regular subsurface partitions. In addition, neither constraints for the depth to the top of the sources nor an initial model are necessary, although previous models can be incorporated into the process. We show the results of a test using two complex synthetic anomalies to demonstrate the efficiency of our inversion method. The application to real data is illustrated with aeromagnetic data of the volcanic island of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands).

  5. Curie isotherm map of Scotia Arc from near surface magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The opening of the Drake Passage, situated between South America and Antarctica, represents the final stage of the fragmentation of Gondwana supercontinent. It led to the Scotia Arc formation, bordering the Scotia Sea, which is surrounded by fragments of the former continental connection. It is currently composed of Scotia and Sandwich Plates. Shackleton Fracture Zone constitutes its sinistral transpressive western boundary and it is a key structure that accommodates former Phoenix and Scotia Plates' differential movement. The formation of the Drake Passage and the Scotia Sea is considered of great importance to ocean circulation, as it allows the establishment of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current that isolated the Antarctic continent, with strong implications for climate and global changes. Thermal structure of the Earth's crust is one of the main parameters controlling geodynamic processes. There is few information regarding heat flow values on Scotia arc. These values are mainly located in its westernmost, southern and easternmost part, which are not enough to extract conclusions regarding lithospheric thickness variations and asthenospheric flow. Taking advantage of the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map Project's compilation we have extracted magnetic anomaly data which fall inside the Scotia Arc and surrounding areas. This magnetic anomaly picture provides the best representation of magnetic properties to date. We propose to use spectral methods on this regional magnetic compilation to obtain depth to the bottom of magnetic sources as a proxy to infer Curie depth and heat flow distribution in the Scotia Sea.

  6. Interaction between Solar Wind and Lunar Magnetic Anomalies observed by Kaguya MAP-PACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Asamura, Kazushi; Nishino, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tadateru; Uemura, Kota; Tsunakawa, Hideo

    2010-05-01

    It is known that Moon has neither global intrinsic magnetic field nor thick atmosphere. Different from the Earth's case where the intrinsic global magnetic field prevents the solar wind from penetrating into the magnetosphere, solar wind directly impacts the lunar surface. Since the discovery of the lunar crustal magnetic field in 1960s, several papers have been published concerning the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar magnetic anomalies. MAG/ER on Lunar Prospector found heating of the solar wind electrons presumably due to the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar magnetic anomalies and the existence of the mini-magnetosphere was suggested. However, the detailed mechanism of the interaction has been unclear mainly due to the lack of the in-situ observed data of low energy ions. MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (MAP-PACE) on Kaguya (SELENE) completed its ˜1.5-year observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon on 10 June, 2009. Kaguya was launched on 14 September 2007 by H2A launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. Kaguya was inserted into a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude and continued observation for nearly 1.5 years till it impacted the Moon on 10 June 2009. During the last 5 months, the orbit was lowered to ˜50km-altitude between January 2009 and April 2009, and some orbits had further lower perilune altitude of ˜10km after April 2009. MAP-PACE consisted of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). All the sensors performed quite well as expected from the laboratory experiment carried out before launch. Since each sensor had hemispherical field of view, two electron sensors and two ion sensors that were installed on the spacecraft panels opposite to each other could cover full 3-dimensional phase space of low energy electrons and ions. One of the ion sensors IMA was

  7. New Clues on the Source of the Central Magnetic Anomaly at Haughton Impact Structure, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, Y.; Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, J.; Osinski, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The 23 km-diameter Haughton impact structure, located on Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, is one of the best-preserved medium-size complex impact structures on Earth. The impact occurred ~39 Ma ago into a target formation composed of an ~2-km thick sequence of Lower Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the Arctic Platform overlying Precambrian metamorphic basement of the Canadian Shield (Osinski et al., 2005). Clast-rich carbonate impact melt rocks fill the crater and impact-generated hydrothermal activity took place, but since then no significant geological event has affected the area. A 900 nT-amplitude magnetic anomaly with a wavelength of about 3 km is observed at the center of the crater (Pohl et al., 1988). Using high-resolution ground magnetic survey and magnetic property measurements on rock samples from inside and outside the structure, Quesnel et al. (2013) concluded that the source for this anomaly may correspond to uplifted and hydrothermally-aletered basement rocks. Hydrothermal activity can increase rock magnetization intensity by crystallization of magnetic minerals, such as magnetite and/or pyrrhotite. Here, we present the results of a new ground magnetic survey and electrical resistivity soundings conducted around the maximum of the magnetic anomaly. Drilling, with depths ranging from 5 m to 13 m was also conducted at three locations in the same area to ground truth the interpretation of geophysical data. The maximum of the magnetic anomaly is characterized by a ~50 m2 area of strong vertical magnetic gradient and low electrical resistivity, while the surroundings show weak gradient and large resistivity. Two drill holes into this localized area show about 6 m of sandy material with some more magnetic layers at about 5 m depth overlying a greenish impact melt breccia with very abundant and large clasts. Recovery in the first 9 meters is very poor, but down hole magnetic gradient measurement confirms the near 6 meter magnetic layer. A third hole was drilled

  8. Joint geophysical investigation of a small scale magnetic anomaly near Gotha, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queitsch, Matthias; Schiffler, Markus; Goepel, Andreas; Stolz, Ronny; Guenther, Thomas; Malz, Alexander; Meyer, Matthias; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Kukowski, Nina

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the multidisciplinary project INFLUINS (INtegrated FLUid Dynamics IN Sedimentary Basins) several airborne surveys using a full tensor magnetic gradiometer (FTMG) system were conducted in and around the Thuringian basin (central Germany). These sensors are based on highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a planar-type gradiometer setup. One of the main goals was to map magnetic anomalies along major fault zones in this sedimentary basin. In most survey areas low signal amplitudes were observed caused by very low magnetization of subsurface rocks. Due to the high lateral resolution of a magnetic gradiometer system and a flight line spacing of only 50m, however, we were able to detect even small magnetic lineaments. Especially close to Gotha a NW-SE striking strong magnetic anomaly with a length of 1.5 km was detected, which cannot be explained by the structure of the Eichenberg-Gotha-Saalfeld (EGS) fault zone and the rock-physical properties (low susceptibilities). Therefore, we hypothesize that the source of the anomaly must be related to an anomalous magnetization in the fault plane. To test this hypothesis, here we focus on the results of the 3D inversion of the airborne magnetic data set and compare them with existing structural geological models. In addition, we conducted several ground based measurements such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and frequency domain electromagnetics (FDEM) to locate the fault. Especially, the geoelectrical measurements were able to image the fault zone. The result of the 2D electrical resistivity tomography shows a lower resistivity in the fault zone. Joint interpretation of airborne magnetics, geoelectrical and geological information let us propose that the source of the magnetization may be a fluid-flow induced impregnation with iron-oxide bearing minerals in the vicinity of the EGS fault plane.

  9. Wave phenomena at the Moon: interaction of solar wind with magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovski, Andrei; Skalsky, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    On the first sight the lunar plasma environment seems to be very simple matter but the interaction in Moon-plasma system shows that the physical processes are complex and varied. Moreover interactions have a kinetic nature and the kinetic theory is necessary for their studying. The solar wind interaction with Moon surface has received many attention last years. The regions of enhanced crustal magnetic field (magnetic anomalies), where a magnetic field may reach till several hundred nT were found. The observations of Kaguya and Chandrayaan revealed that significant deflected proton fluxes exist over magnetic anomalies at the lunar surface. Such proton fluxes allow to imply that the magnetic anomalies may act as magnetosphere-like obstacles (mini-magnetospheres), modifying the upstream plasma. The observations of energetic neutral atoms also confirm the existence of the enhanced fluxes of deflected particles. Variety of electric fluctuations was observed during the passage of Wind spacecraft across the lunar wake: langmuir waves, electrostatic modes above electron cyclotron frequency, whistlers. The investigations by Kuncic and Cairns (2004) revealed emissions on plasma frequency and its first harmonic. Electron reflection at quasi-shock at leading edge of magnetic anomaly could drive the electric field oscillations. The generation mechanism is similar to that known for foreshock of planetary bow shock.In KAGUYA and Lunar Prospector missions the monochromatic whistlers near the Moon were observed as narrow band magnetic fluctuations with frequencies close to 1 Hz, and are mostly left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame. We review different mechanisms for wave generation in plasma environment near such mini-magnetosphere regions.

  10. Magnetic Signatures of Impact Fractured Rocks from Sierra Madera, Texas, USA - Implications to Magnetic Anomalies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Wasilewski, P. J.; Mikula, V.

    2007-05-01

    Mars Express Orbiter (sounding radar data) revealed that craters of ancient origin had been covered by thick sediments in northern hemisphere. Mars MOLA topography mission identified many crater on Mars surface. Thus despite the Mars dichotomy, both northern and southern hemisphere have been covered by impacts to similar density. Mars currently has no global magnetic field of internal origin. In southern hemisphere, magnetic field intensities due to anomalies of remanent origin are much lower over the gigantic impact craters (e.g. Hellas, Prometheus, and Argyre). Low magnetic field may not relate to the absence of internal dynamo but due to impacts. For example, the aerial survey over a two billion year old, largest crater on Earth, Vredefort in South Africa observed much lower magnetic intensity over the crater, despite of the strongly magnetized simgle domain (SD) magnetite in shocked granites. Randomized magnetic vector orientations caused by impact may be the origin of the lower magnetic field observed on both Vredefort and Mars. We conducted magnetic analysis for a suite of Sierra Madera Impact deformed rock sites with complete shatter cone structures and multiple striated joint set (MSJS), and the initial results were intriguing. NRM vector orientations, REM ratios, and AF demagnetization curves showed contrasted magnetic signatures between the sites as well as within the samples. The NRM signatures in small scale shatter cones and larger scale shatter cones indicated shock demagnetization (SDM). The peculiar signatures of the site with MSJS may be both SDM and shock magnetization (SRM). We characterized the complexity and distinct magnetic signatures of impact fractured rocks. The results suggest that the size of the shatter cones and structures may reflect the magnetic signatures of both intensity and directions. Also, the dimensional scale of shatter cones is indicative parameters for randomization of the magnetic vector orientations. Such variations may

  11. Processing of the marine magnetic anomalies of the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico (GOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Andreina; Dyment, Jérôme; Thébault, Erwan

    2015-04-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies are useful to better understand the structure and age of the seafloor and constrain its nature and formation. In this work, we applied a dedicated processing of the NGDC marine magnetic measurements over the Caribbean region. The number of available surveys amounts to 516 representing 2.612.994 data points between epochs 1958 and 2012. The pre-processing was done by survey. First, data associated to velocities lesser than 5 knots were rejected. Then, the data were corrected for the main internal field using the CM4 model for epochs ranging between 1960 and 2002,5 and the IGRF-11 model outside the time range of the CM4 model. A visual inspection of the anomalies allowed us to identify, to remove evident outliers and to define a priority order for each survey. We evaluated the magnetic heading effect and corrected the data for it although statistics analysis suggested that this correction brings only a marginal improvement. The cross-overs differences were estimated using the x2sys package (Wessel, 2010) and then corrected using a Matlab code. The statistics confirmed the importance of this processing and improved the internal crossovers, with in particular a clear reduction of extreme values. This processing allows us to present a marine magnetic anomaly map of the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico to 0.18 degree spatial resolution and to discuss the magnetic signature of some of the striking structures of the area.

  12. Towards developing an analytical procedure of defining the equatorial electrojet for correcting satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay; Hinze, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the total magnetic intensity MAGSAT data has identified and characterized the variability of ionospheric current effects as reflected in the geomagnetic field as a function of longitude, elevation, and time (daily as well as monthly variations). This analysis verifies previous observations in POGO data and provides important boundary conditions for theoretical studies of ionospheric currents. Furthermore, the observations have led to a procedure to remove these temporal perturbations from lithospheric MAGSAT magnetic anomaly data based on 'along-the-dip-latitude' averages from dawn and dusk data sets grouped according to longitudes, time (months), and elevation. Using this method, high-resolution lithospheric magnetic anomaly maps have been prepared of the earth over a plus or minus 50 deg latitude band. These maps have proven useful in the study of the structures, nature, and processes of the lithosphere.

  13. The prediction of oceanic lithospheric magnetic anomalies from magnetisation estimates, using vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterton, S.; Gubbins, D.; Ivers, D.; Müller, D.; Winch, D.

    2009-12-01

    High resolution lithospheric magnetic field anomaly maps derived from satellite data now offer immense opportunities to interpret crustal magnetic properties such as susceptibility, depth to Curie isotherm, magnetisation type and intensity. We present a method in which a vector spherical harmonic formulation allows the natural separation of 3 types of lithospheric magnetisation: one responsible for the observed potential field external to the crust, one responsible for the field inside the Earth that is not observed, and a toroidal magnetisation associated with a radial electric current responsible for a non-potential field. The latter two constitute the annihilator in the inverse problem for magnetisation using magnetic field data. Starting from a model of vertically integrated lithospheric magnetisation based on geology, we compute all 3 types of magnetisation and discuss implications of the 2 annihilators for inversion studies. We adopt a forward-modelling approach in which lithospheric magnetisation is estimated independently of satellite data, with particular emphasis on the oceans. Induced and remanent contributions are determined separately. Remanent magnetisation is derived from a combination of magnetic crustal thickness, a remanence intensity-age profile superimposed onto a geomagnetic polarity timescale and a digital age grid of the ocean floor, and magnetisation directions derived from the implementation of updated plate reconstruction models. Induced magnetisation is derived from a combination of magnetic crustal thickness and standard magnetic susceptibilities associated with major geological units. We present comparisons between magnetic anomalies predicted from magnetisation estimates and lithospheric magnetic field models.

  14. Magnetic anomalies on Io and their relationship to the spatial distribution of volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicely, J.; Everett, M. E.; Sparks, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of terrestrial magnetic anomalies has long proved useful for constraining crustal structure and dynamics. Here, we study Jupiter's moon, Io, using magnetics. We conduct forward modeling to make predictions of the crustal magnetic anomaly distribution on Io. Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system due to tidal heating from its Laplace resonance with Europa and Ganymede, causing extensive sulfur and silicate volcanism. We assume the magnetic susceptibility, which controls the measured magnetic signal, is controlled by temperature. Continuous overturn of the crust controls the vertical temperature profile, and local volcanic centers give the lateral temperature structure. As non-magnetic sulfur volcanism occurs at cool temperatures beneath the Curie point, it should not greatly affect the planetary magnetism and consequently is ignored in this paper. We assume that the average crustal temperatures are determined by a model of continuous burial by newly erupted material (O'Reilly and Davies 1981, Geophysical Research Letters), which put the Curie isotherm at great depth. We use a cylindrically symmetric model of the thermal evolution of the crust around an isolated volcanic center to obtain the local deviations in the thickness of the magnetizable layer. The crustal rocks are presumed to be mafic or ultramafic in composition, based on their spectral signatures, the temperature of the silicate volcanic eruptions, and their rheology as inferred from flow structures. Analysis of the 1997 Pillan eruption suggests a composition similar to lunar mare basalt or komatiite. The magnetic and thermal properties of lunar mare basalt have been well studied since the Apollo missions. Unaltered terrestrial ultramafics have been studied sufficiently to constrain their properties. A common technique of discretizing the magnetized material into prisms and summing the magnetic field of each prism as per Blakely (1995) was used to obtain an estimate of the crustal

  15. Influence of calculation error of total field anomaly in strongly magnetic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoyu; Yao, Changli; Zheng, Yuanman; Li, Zelin

    2016-04-01

    An assumption made in many magnetic interpretation techniques is that ΔTact (total field anomaly - the measurement given by total field magnetometers, after we remove the main geomagnetic field, T0) can be approximated mathematically by ΔTpro (the projection of anomalous field vector in the direction of the earth's normal field). In order to meet the demand for high-precision processing of magnetic prospecting, the approximate error E between ΔTact and ΔTpro is studied in this research. Generally speaking, the error E is extremely small when anomalies not greater than about 0.2T0. However, the errorE may be large in highly magnetic environments. This leads to significant effects on subsequent quantitative inference. Therefore, we investigate the error E through numerical experiments of high-susceptibility bodies. A systematic error analysis was made by using a 2-D elliptic cylinder model. Error analysis show that the magnitude of ΔTact is usually larger than that of ΔTpro. This imply that a theoretical anomaly computed without accounting for the error E overestimate the anomaly associated with the body. It is demonstrated through numerical experiments that the error E is obvious and should not be ignored. It is also shown that the curves of ΔTpro and the error E had a certain symmetry when the directions of magnetization and geomagnetic field changed. To be more specific, the Emax (the maximum of the error E) appeared above the center of the magnetic body when the magnetic parameters are determined. Some other characteristics about the error Eare discovered. For instance, the curve of Emax with respect to the latitude was symmetrical on both sides of magnetic equator, and the extremum of the Emax can always be found in the mid-latitudes, and so on. It is also demonstrated that the error Ehas great influence on magnetic processing transformation and inversion results. It is conclude that when the bodies have highly magnetic susceptibilities, the error E can

  16. The prediction of lithospheric magnetic anomalies using the inversion of magnetisation data for vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterton, S.; Gubbins, D.; Hemant, K.; Ivers, D.; Muller, D.; Winch, D.

    2009-04-01

    High resolution lithospheric magnetic field anomaly maps derived from satellite data now offer immense opportunities to interpret anomalies in terms of crustal magnetic properties such as susceptibility, magnetic crustal thickness, magnetisation type and intensity. We present a new method in which the magnetic field at satellite altitude is found by solving an inverse problem using our magnetisation estimates as data. This avoids the need for magnetisation estimates on a uniform grid and allows proper estimation of error propagation. A vector spherical harmonic formulation allows proper estimation of the annihilators, those parts of the magnetisation that produce internal and non-potential fields. These yield zero potential field at satellite altitude for perfect data (i.e. perfect and complete magnetisation estimates) but will contaminate the satellite field when the magnetisation estimates are inaccurate and incomplete. A major limitation in the interpretation of such anomalies is the inherent difficulty in separating and evaluating the relative contributions of induced and remanent magnetisation using standard inversion techniques. This is particularly relevant over oceanic regions, where lithospheric anomalies contain a significant remanence signature. Furthermore, it is difficult to separate the core field from the crustal contribution, particularly over continents, where magnetisation estimates are poorly constrained. We approach the scale-separation problem by forward modelling the satellite field using separate estimates of lithospheric magnetisation that do not depend on satellite data, with particular emphasis on the oceans. Induced and remanent contributions are determined separately. Remanent magnetisation is derived from a combination of magnetic crustal thickness, a remanence-age profile superimposed onto a geomagnetic polarity timescale, and magnetisation directions derived from the implementation of updated plate reconstruction models. Induced

  17. Martian meteorites and Martian magnetic anomalies: A new perspective from NWA 7034

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Scorzelli, R. B.; Munayco, P.; Agee, C.; Quesnel, Y.; Cournède, C.; Geissman, J.

    2014-07-01

    We present the magnetic properties of the Noachian Martian breccia NWA 7034. Among the 25 unpaired Martian meteorites studied to date, NWA 7034 has a unique magnetic mineralogy. It contains about 15 wt % of iron oxides as magnetite that has experienced cation substitution and partial alteration to maghemite, with about a quarter of the oxides being pure maghemite. It also contains oxyhydroxides in the form of superparamagnetic goethite. The presence of maghemite and goethite makes NWA 7034 the most oxidized Martian meteorite. The overall magnetic assemblage is partly linked to near-surface hydrothermal alteration. The high concentration of magnetic phases with high laboratory unblocking temperatures makes NWA 7034 a plausible analogue source lithology for the strong magnetization of the Martian Noachian crust. Near-surface hydrothermal alteration can enhance the remanence of Martian rocks and account for local, high magnetic anomalies of shallow source.

  18. Magnetic Anomalies and Rock Magnetic Properties Related to Deep Crustal Rocks of the Athabasca Granulite Terrane, Northern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. L.; Williams, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Athabasca granulite terrane in northernmost Saskatchewan, Canada is an exceptional exposure of lower crustal rocks having experienced several high temperature events (ca 800C) during a prolonged period of deep-crustal residence (ca 1.0 GPa) followed by uplift and exhumation. With little alteration since 1.8 Ga these rocks allow us to study ancient lower crustal lithologies. Aeromagnetic anomalies over this region are distinct and complex, and along with other geophysical measurements, define the Snowbird Tectonic zone, stretching NE-SW across northwestern Canada, separating the Churchill province into the Hearne (mid-crustal rocks, amphibolite facies) from the Rae (lower crust rocks, granulite facies). Distinct magnetic highs and lows appear to relate roughly to specific rock units, and are cut by mapped shear zones. Over fifty samples from this region, collected from the major rock types, mafic granulites, felsic granulites, granites, and dike swarms, as well as from regions of both high and low magnetic anomalies, are being used to investigate magnetic properties. The intention is to investigate what is magnetic in the lower crust and how it produces the anomalies observed from satellite measurements. The samples studied reveal a wide range of magnetic properties with natural remanent magnetization ranging from an isolated high of 38 A/m to lows of 1 mA/m. Susceptibilities also range over several orders of magnitude, from 1 to 1 x10-4 SI. Magnetite is identified in nearly all samples using both low and high temperature measurements, but concentrations are generally very low. Hysteresis properties on 41 samples reveal nearly equal numbers of samples represented by PSD and MD grains, with a few samples (N=6) plotting in or close to the SD region. Low temperature measurements indicate that most samples contain magnetite, showing a marked Verway transition around 120K. Also identified in nearly half of the samples is pyrrhotite, noted by low temperature

  19. Rock magnetic characterization of faulted sediments with associated magnetic anomalies in the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, M.R.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Minor, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Variations in rock magnetic properties are responsible for the many linear, short-wavelength, low-amplitude magnetic anomalies that are spatially associated with faults that cut Neogene basin sediments in the Rio Grande rift, including the San Ysidro normal fault, which is well exposed in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. Magnetic-susceptibility measurements from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of the Santa Fe Group and prerift Eocene and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks document large variations of magnetic properties juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault. Mean volume magnetic susceptibilities generally increase upsection through eight map units: from 1.7 to 2.2E-4 in the prerift Eocene and Cretaceous rocks to 9.9E-4-1.2E-3 in three members of the Miocene Zia Formation of the Santa Fe Group to 1.5E-3-3.5E-3 in three members of the Miocene-Pleistocene Arroyo Ojito Formation of the Santa Fe Group. Rock magnetic measurements and petrography indicate that the amount of detrital magnetite and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite within the Santa Fe Group sediments are the predominant controls of their magnetic property variations. Magnetic susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size within the members of the Arroyo Ojito Formation (deposited in fluvial environments) but within members of the Zia Formation (deposited in mostly eolian environments) reaches highest values in fine to medium sands. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite is spatially associated with calcite cementation in the Santa Fe Group. Both oxidation and cementation probably reflect past flow of groundwater through permeable zones. Magnetic models for geologic cross sections that incorporate mean magnetic susceptibilities for the different stratigraphic units mimic the aeromagnetic profiles across the San Ysidro fault and demonstrate that the stratigraphic level of dominant magnetic contrast changes with

  20. The satellite magnetic anomaly of Ahaggar - Evidence for African Plate motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Brown, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Ahaggar volcanic province of North Central Africa is considered a region of excess heat flow (hot spot) and hence elevated Curie isotherm. Using a modified version of the Parker FFT potential field representation, magnetic signals were calculated at Magsat altitudes for models in which the African Plate is both fixed and moving. The moving-plate model extends the Curie isotherm anomaly in the direction of plate motion and provides a satisfactory match to vertical component anomaly data when the magnitude of plate velocity is 0.75 cm/yr. Although the signal levels are marginal for the scalar component anomalies of this region, the same model provides an adequate match to this data set and is clearly preferable to a fixed-plate model.

  1. Modeling of the Central Magnetic Anomaly at Haughton Impact Structure, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, Y.; Gattacceca, J.; Osinski, G. R.; Rochette, P.

    2011-12-01

    Located on Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, the 23-km diameter Haughton impact structure is one of the best-preserved medium-size complex impact structures on Earth. The impact occurred ~39 Ma ago into a target formation composed of an ~2-km thick sequence of Lower Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the Arctic Platform overlying Precambrian metamorphic basement of the Canadian Shield (Osinski et al., 2005). Clast-rich impact melt rocks line the crater and impact-induced hydrothermal activity took place, but since then no significant geological event has affected the area. In the 1980s, ground magnetic and gravity measurements were carried out within the central part of the crater (Pohl et al., 1988). A significant anomaly was discovered and coarsely modeled by a source body of simple geometry. More recently, an airborne magnetic survey delivered additional data that covered the whole crater but no modeling was done (Glass et al., 2002). Here, we present the results of a new ground magnetic survey accompanied by rock magnetic property measurements made on all samples of the crater. This has provided additional constraints to investigate the origin of this central magnetic anomaly. By conducting modeling, we have been able to reveal the geometry and volume of the source body as well as its magnetization properties. Our results suggest that the necessary magnetization intensity to account for this anomaly is too large to be associated with uplifted pre-impact target rocks. Therefore, we suggest that hydrothermal alteration could have enhanced the magnetization of the central part of this crater. References : Osinski, G. R. et al. 2005. MPS, 40:1759-1776 ; Pohl, J. et al. 1988. Meteoritics, 23:235-238 ; Glass, B. J. et al. 2002, Abstract #2008. 33th LPSC

  2. Central magnetic anomalies of Nectarian-aged lunar impact basins: Probable evidence for an early core dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Lon L.

    2011-02-01

    A re-examination of all available low-altitude LP magnetometer data confirms that magnetic anomalies are present in at least four Nectarian-aged lunar basins: Moscoviense, Mendel-Rydberg, Humboldtianum, and Crisium. In three of the four cases, a single main anomaly is present near the basin center while, in the case of Crisium, anomalies are distributed in a semi-circular arc about the basin center. These distributions, together with a lack of other anomalies near the basins, indicate that the sources of the anomalies are genetically associated with the respective basin-forming events. These central basin anomalies are difficult to attribute to shock remanent magnetization of a shocked central uplift and most probably imply thermoremanent magnetization of impact melt rocks in a steady magnetizing field. Iterative forward modeling of the single strongest and most isolated anomaly, the northern Crisium anomaly, yields a paleomagnetic pole position at 81° ± 19°N, 143° ± 31°E, not far from the present rotational pole. Assuming no significant true polar wander since the Crisium impact, this position is consistent with that expected for a core dynamo magnetizing field. Further iterative forward modeling demonstrates that the remaining Crisium anomalies can be approximately simulated assuming a multiple source model with a single magnetization direction equal to that inferred for the northernmost anomaly. This result is most consistent with a steady, large-scale magnetizing field. The inferred mean magnetization intensity within the strongest basin sources is ˜1 A/m assuming a 1-km thickness for the source layer. Future low-altitude orbital and surface magnetometer measurements will more strongly constrain the depth and/or thicknesses of the sources.

  3. Initial Mapping of Mercury's Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Relationship to the Caloris Impact Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    78 low-altitude orbit passes of MESSENGER calibrated magnetometer data from August and September of 2014 have been applied to produce approximate maps of the crustal magnetic field covering latitudes of 50-80N and longitudes of 160-320E. Only anomalies with wavelengths < 215 km were mapped and amplitudes were adjusted for differences in spacecraft altitude using an equivalent source dipole technique. Maps of the radial field component show that the strongest large-scale anomalies are located in the western part of the mapped region just north and northeast of the 1550-km diameter Caloris impact basin centered at 164E, 30N. When adjusted to a common altitude of ~ 40 km, the strongest single anomaly (~170E, 60N; > 6 nT) lies over a smooth plains unit that extends north-northeastward from Caloris. A second anomaly (185E, 53N, > 5 nT) lies on the Odin Formation, interpreted as Caloris ejecta (e.g., Guest and Greeley, USGS, 1983). As previously reported by Johnson et al. (Science, 2015), a third anomaly (~ 212E, 61N, > 5 nT) also lies over a smooth plains unit, Suisse Planitia. Most smooth plains units on Mercury may have a volcanic origin (Denevi et al., JGR, 2013). However, as discussed by the latter authors, a subset of the smooth plains occur in an annulus around Caloris and could have an impact-related origin, involving fluidized basin ejecta deposition (Wilhelms, Icarus, 1976). A similar origin is widely accepted for the lunar Cayley smooth plains, which dominate the geology near the Apollo 16 landing site where the strongest surface magnetic fields were measured and which correlate best with orbital anomalies on the lunar near side (Halekas et al., JGR, 2001). Two of the remaining three anomalies (220E, 68N, > 4 nT; 234E, 77N, > 5 nT) lie over an older intermediate plains unit with an uncertain interpretation, possibly consisting of impact basin and crater ejecta as well as volcanic materials (Grolier and Boyce, USGS, 1984). In view of the proximity of the

  4. Magsat equivalent source anomalies over the southeastern United States - Implications for crustal magnetization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruder, M. E.; Alexander, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Magsat crustal anomaly field depicts a previously-unidentified long-wavelength negative anomaly centered over southeastern Georgia. Examination of Magsat ascending and descending passes clearly identifies the anomalous region, despite the high-frequency noise present in the data. Using ancillary seismic, electrical conductivity, Bouguer gravity, and aeromagnetic data, a preliminary model of crustal magnetization for the southern Appalachian region is presented. A lower crust characterized by a pervasive negative magnetization contrast extends from the New York-Alabama lineament southeast to the Fall Line. In southern Georgia and eastern Alabama (coincident with the Brunswick Terrane), the model calls for lower crustal magnetization contrast of -2.4 A/m; northern Georgia and the Carolinas are modeled with contrasts of -1.5 A/m. Large-scale blocks in the upper crust which correspond to the Blue Ridge, Charlotte belt, and Carolina Slate belt, are modeled with magnetization contrasts of -1.2 A/m, 1.2 A/m, and 1.2 A/m respectively. The model accurately reproduces the amplitude of the observed low in the equivalent source Magsat anomaly field calculated at 325 km altitude and is spatially consistent with the 400 km lowpass-filtered aeromagnetic map of the region.

  5. Magnetic anomalies concentrated near and within Mercury's impact basins: Early mapping and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.

    2016-06-01

    Ninety-five low-altitude passes of MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging magnetometer data from February, March, and April of 2015 have been applied to produce an approximate map of the crustal magnetic field at a constant altitude of 40 km covering latitudes of 35°-75°N and longitudes of 90°-270°E. Anomalies are concentrated near and within the Caloris impact basin. A smaller concentration occurs over and around Sobkou Planitia and an associated older large impact basin. The strongest anomalies are found within Caloris and are distributed in a semicircular arc that is roughly concentric with the basin rim. They imply the existence of a core dynamo at the time when Caloris formed (˜3.9 Gyr ago). Anomalies over high-reflectance volcanic plains are relatively weak while anomalies over low-reflectance material that has been reworked by impact processes are relatively strong. The latter characteristics are qualitatively consistent with the ejecta deposit model for anomaly sources.

  6. Gravity and magnetic anomalies of the Cyprus arc and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergün, M.; Okay, S.; Sari, C.; Oral, E. Z.

    2003-04-01

    In present day, eastern Mediterranean is controlled by the collision of the African and Eurasian plates and displacements of Arabian, Anatolian and Aegean micro-plates. The boundary between African and Eurasian plates is delineated by the Hellenic arc and Pliny-Strabo trench in the west and the Cyprus arc and a diffuse fault system of the Eastern Anatolian Fault zone in the east. The available gravity and magnetic data from the easternmost Mediterranean allow to subdivide this basin into three provinces: the northeastern Mediterranean north of the Cyprus Arc; the Levant Basin south of the Cyprus Arc and east of the line that roughly continues the Suez rift trend toward the Gulf of Antalya, between Cyprus and Anaximander Mountains; and the Mediterranean Ridge, Herodotus Basin west of this line. High anomalies observed in Cyprus and the sea region at the south is prominent in the gravity data. The Bouguer gravity anomaly reaches its maximum values over Cyprus, where it is most probably caused by high dense Troodos ophiolites. The uplifted oceanic crust causes high Bouguer anomaly also seen in the vicinity of Eratosthenes Seamount. Another result obtained from gravity data is that the crust under Herodotos and Rhodes basins is somehow oceanic and Anaximander, Eratosthenes and Cyprus are continental fragments. There are no linear magnetic anomalies in the Mediterranean. But there are magnetic anomalies over the Eratosthenes seamount and as well as from Cyprus to the Antalya basin due to the ophiolitic bodies. In Cyprus, the last compressional deformations were defined near the Miocene/Pliocene boundary. The extensional deformation associated with the Antalya basin appears to be separated by a zone of the Florence rise and Anaximander Mountains affected by differential tectonic movements. Eratosthenes Seamount is a positive crustal feature in the process of collision with Cyprus along an active margin; there is clearly a potential tectonic relationship to the onland

  7. Magnetic Properties of Quaternary Deposits, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska -- Implications for Aeromagnetic Anomalies of Upper Cook Inlet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Haeussler, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    We measured magnetic susceptibilities of exposed Quaternary deposits on several beach cliffs and river banks on the Kenai Peninsula near Soldotna, Alaska. Data, descriptions, and photos from nine sites are included in this report. The mean susceptibility for Quaternary materials in this region is approximately 2.5 x 10-3 SI units. This is sufficiently magnetic to produce subtle aeromagnetic anomalies such as those observed to correlate with topographic features in the region of the measurements. The highest susceptibilities measured (greater than 20 x 10-3 SI units) may help, at least in part, to explain moderate amplitude aeromagnetic anomalies observed elsewhere in Cook Inlet, particularly those relating to structures showing Quaternary movement. Comparison of measured beach cliff susceptibility and susceptibility predicted from idealized formulas and two-dimensional cliff models suggests that measured susceptibilies underestimate true bulk susceptibility by 20 percent to 50 percent in this region.

  8. Bangui Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Bangui anomaly is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic anomalies and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this anomaly. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough anomaly with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT anomaly at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough anomalies of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic anomalies, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT anomaly (figure 2). This elliptically shaped anomaly is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui anomaly is composed of three segments; there are two positive anomalies lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.

  9. Identification of magnetic anomalies based on ground magnetic data analysis using multifractal modelling: a case study in Qoja-Kandi, East Azerbaijan Province, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, E.; Feizi, F.; Karbalaei Ramezanali, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Ground magnetic anomaly separation using the reduction-to-the-pole (RTP) technique and the fractal concentration-area (C-A) method has been applied to the Qoja-Kandi prospecting area in northwestern Iran. The geophysical survey resulting in the ground magnetic data was conducted for magnetic element exploration. Firstly, the RTP technique was applied to recognize underground magnetic anomalies. RTP anomalies were classified into different populations based on the current method. For this reason, drilling point area determination by the RTP technique was complicated for magnetic anomalies, which are in the center and north of the studied area. Next, the C-A method was applied to the RTP magnetic anomalies (RTP-MA) to demonstrate magnetic susceptibility concentrations. This identification was appropriate for increasing the resolution of the drilling point area determination and decreasing the drilling risk issue, due to the economic costs of underground prospecting. In this study, the results of C-A modelling on the RTP-MA are compared with 8 borehole data. The results show that there is a good correlation between anomalies derived via the C-A method and the log report of boreholes. Two boreholes were drilled in magnetic susceptibility concentrations, based on multifractal modelling data analyses, between 63 533.1 and 66 296 nT. Drilling results showed appropriate magnetite thickness with grades greater than 20 % Fe. The total associated with anomalies containing andesite units hosts iron mineralization.

  10. Remanent magnetization and 3-dimensional density model of the Kentucky anomaly region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.; Estes, R. H.; Myers, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the Kentucky body was developed to fit surface gravity and long wavelength aeromagnetic data. Magnetization and density parameters for the model are much like those of Mayhew et al (1982). The magnetic anomaly due to the model at satellite altitude is shown to be much too small by itself to account for the anomaly measured by Magsat. It is demonstrated that the source region for the satellite anomaly is considerably more extensive than the Kentucky body sensu stricto. The extended source region is modeled first using prismatic model sources and then using dipole array sources. Magnetization directions for the source region found by inversion of various combinations of scalar and vector data are found to be close to the main field direction, implying the lack of a strong remanent component. It is shown by simulation that in a case (such as this) where the geometry of the source is known, if a strong remanent component is present its direction is readily detectable, but by scalar data as readily as vector data.