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1

Magnetic anomaly pattern of the Marsili Basin (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy): Ultrafast oceanic spreading or not?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Marsili Basin is a ~100x70 km flat and deep (3000-3500 m) basin located in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea, encircling the huge 16x50 km (and ~3000 m high) Marsili seamount. Though results from ODP Site 650 had proven more than twenty years ago the oceanic nature of the Marsili Basin, oceanic-type linear magnetic anomalies above the basin floor were clearly documented only in the last few years. Nicolosi et al. (2006) reported on spectral analysis of both airborne and shipborne magnetic maps from the Marsili Basin, and showed the occurrence of six magnetic anomaly stripes covering the flat basin floor, symmetrically arranged with respect to a central positive anomaly located above the Marsili seamount. By assuming that the two 17 km wide lateral normal polarity stripes formed during the Olduvai chron (1.77-1.95 Ma), Nicolosi et al. (2006) suggested that the Marsili Basin opened at the ultrafast full-spreading rate of ~19 cm/yr between 2.1 and 1.6 Ma. They also proposed that the normally magnetized Marsili seamount formed during the Brunhes chron (after 0.78 Ma), when slower spreading (coupled with huge magmatic inflation) resumed, after ~1 Myr of spreading cessation. The spreading model by Nicolosi et al. (2006) has been recently questioned by Cocchi et al. (2009), who argued that filtering had created fictitious anomaly stripes. Cocchi et al. (2009) also gathered new high-resolution shipborne magnetic anomaly data from the Marsili seamount and surrounding basin area. They found two tiny positive magnetic anomaly stripes flanking the Marsili seamount in the north, which they interpreted as due to spreading occurring during the Jaramillo subchron (0.99-1.07 Ma). Consequently, they calculated a post-1.95 Ma initial spreading rate of 3.4 cm/yr (instead of 19 cm/yr), and supported a decreasing yet continuous spreading until Present. Here we discuss the whole magnetic residual evidence from the Marsili Basin. First, we show that magnetic anomaly stripes are also apparent in the original (unfiltered) magnetic anomaly maps of the basin. The new data of Cocchi et al. (2009) do not cover the peripheral Marsili Basin edges yielding the positive anomaly stripes correlated with the Olduvai subchron, thus cannot question the ultrafast (19 cm/yr) spreading episode documented by Nicolosi et al. (2006). Second, we have a much simpler interpretation of the new magnetic anomaly data reported by Cocchi et al. (2009). In fact, the two tiny positive anomaly stripes perfectly correspond to two grabens (throwing the sea floor by 120-600 m) developed in the basin floor bordering the northern seamount sector. Magnetic modelling shows that a tectonic graben developed in a reversely magnetized crust yields a positive magnetic anomaly, with dimensions and intensity comparable to the two tiny anomaly stripes observed at the northern edge of the Marsili seamount.

Speranza, F.; Nicolosi, I.; Chiappini, M.

2011-12-01

2

Magnetic and gravity anomalies of the slow-spreading system in the Gulf of Aden  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spreading system in the Gulf of Aden between Somalia, NE Africa, and Arabia has an ENE-WSW trend and its half spreading rate is about 1.0 cm/yr (e.g., Jestin et al., 1994). Previous studies (e.g., Tamsett and Searle, 1988) provided the general morphology of the spreading system. To reveal detailed morphology and tectonics of the spreading system in the Gulf of Aden, geophysical investigation was conducted along the spreading system between 45°30OE and 50°20OE by the R/V Hakuho-maru from December 2000 to January 2001. Bathymetric data were collected using an echo sounder SEA BEAM 2120 aboard R/V Hakuho-maru. Magnetic and gravity data were collected by towed proton magnetometer and shipboard gravimeter, respectively. The strike of the spreading centers east of 46°30OE is N65°W. The topographic expression of the spreading centers east of N46°30OE is an axial rift valley offset by transform faults siilar to that observed at slow spreading centers in other areas. The bathymetric feature of the spreading centers between 45°50OE and 46°30OE with a strike N80°E is N65°W trending en-echelon basins. The spreading center west of 45°50OE with a strike E-W is bouned by linear ridges and its bathymetric expression is N65°W trending en-echelon ridges. The axial rift valley west of N46°30OE is not offset by any prominent transform faults. Negative magnetic anomaly is dominant over the axial valleys. Its amplitude is about 500 nT and the wavelength is about 30 km. Prominent linear negative magnetic anomaly, which is more than 1000 nT, exists west of N46°30OE. The strike of the linear magnetic anomaly correlates with that of axial valleys west of N46°30OE. Mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly of the spreading centers increases eastward. This trend correlates with the eastward deepening of spreading centers.

Nakanishi, M.; Fujimoto, H.; Tamaki, K.; Okino, K.

2002-12-01

3

Ultrafast oceanic spreading of the Marsili Basin, southern Tyrrhenian Sea: Evidence from magnetic anomaly analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spectral analysis of both shipborne and airborne magnetic maps of the southern Tyrrhenian Sea reveals seven subparallel positive-negative magnetic anomaly stripes over the flat-lying deep floor of the Marsili oceanic basin. This represents the first evidence of oceanic magnetic anomalies in the Tyrrhenian Sea. The central positive stripe is along the Marsili seamount, a superinflated spreading ridge located at the basin axis. The stratigraphy of Ocean Drilling Program Site 650 and K/Ar ages from the Marsili seamount suggest that the Marsili Basin opened at the remarkable full-spreading rate of ˜19 cm/ yr between ca. 1.6 and 2.1 Ma about the Olduvai subchron. This is the highest spreading rate ever documented, including that observed at the Cocos-Pacific plate boundary. Renewed but slow spreading during the Brunhes chron (after 0.78 Ma), coupled with huge magmatic inflation, gave rise to the Marsili volcano. Our new data and interpretation show that backarc spreading of the Tyrrhenian Sea was episodic, with sudden rapid pulses punctuating relatively long periods of tectonic quiescence.

Nicolosi, Iacopo; Speranza, Fabio; Chiappini, Massimo

2006-09-01

4

Evidence for spreading center jumps from fine-scale bathymetry and magnetic anomalies near the Galapagos Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence, in the form of recognizable patterns of bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, is presented that small spreading-center jumps (tens of kilometres) occur. With the effect of jumps postulated on the basis of magnetic anomalies removed, striking correlations in the 5- to 50-km-wavelength bathymetry across the present Cocos-Nazca (Galapagos) spreading center are apparent. This suggests that the asymmetric accretion observed on

Richard Hey

1979-01-01

5

Strong post-midnight Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly and Equatorial spread F Observations during magnetically quiet period  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Post sunset equatorial ionospheric irregularities, especially during magnetically active periods, have been a subject of many studies. The most prominent irregularities often observed right after sunset are the resurgence of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) and equatorial spread F (ESF). It is well understood and documented that pre-reversal enhancement, due to the ionospheric conductivity gradient at the dusk, is one of the prime triggering mechanisms for the post-sunset irregularities in the equatorial region. However, less attention has been given to the equatorial irregularities (EIA and ESF) that often occur in post-midnight, especially during magnetically quiet periods. It has been suggested that the primary process responsible for the dramatic post-midnight ESF during magnetically active periods is the change in magnitude and direction of the usual equatorial electric field. Earlier studies speculated that during magnetically active post-midnight periods the change in electric field direction from westward to eastward for a short intervals cause an upward E × B drift, resulting in increased h'F and decreased electron densities at the magnetic equator. Individual scans of Jicamarca vertical drift also often observe significant upward drift during post-midnight periods. We present a case of post-midnight strong equatorial ionospheric anomaly during a magnetically quiet (Kp < 3) period using TOPEX altimeter TEC data. Simultaneously, the ionosonde station at S.J. Campos (23.2°S, 45.9°W; dip lat. 17.6°S) observed strong ESF and unusual h'F height rise during post-midnight period, where TOPEX detected strong EIA. At the same time ROCSAT-1 and DMSP satellites also clearly show existence of EIA during post-midnight period at their orbiting altitude. The former satellite also detected post-midnight in situ density irregularities (such as bubbles) at the same time as strong EIA and ESF. The questions here are what triggers these post-midnight equatorial ionospheric irregularities? Are these post-midnight EIAs related to dusk side pre-reversal EIA? If so, what causes the post-midnight ESF and bubble formation? If, as suggested before, the electric field shifted direction from westward to eastward during post-midnight period, how does this happen and what is the physics behind this direction shift?

Moldwin, M. B.; Yizengaw, E.; Sahai, Y.

2008-12-01

6

Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies in the Perth Abyssal Plain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

seafloor within the Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP), offshore Western Australia, is the only section of crust that directly records the early spreading history between India and Australia during the Mesozoic breakup of Gondwana. However, this early spreading has been poorly constrained due to an absence of data, including marine magnetic anomalies and data constraining the crustal nature of key tectonic features. Here, we present new magnetic anomaly data from the PAP that shows that the crust in the western part of the basin was part of the Indian Plate—the conjugate flank to the oceanic crust immediately offshore the Perth margin, Australia. We identify a sequence of M2 and older anomalies in the west PAP within crust that initially moved with the Indian Plate, formed at intermediate half-spreading rates (35 mm/yr) consistent with the conjugate sequence on the Australian Plate. More speculatively, we reinterpret the youngest anomalies in the east PAP, finding that the M0-age crust initially formed on the Indian Plate was transferred to the Australian Plate by a westward jump or propagation of the spreading ridge shortly after M0 time. Samples dredged from the Gulden Draak and Batavia Knolls (at the western edge of the PAP) reveal that these bathymetric features are continental fragments rather than igneous plateaus related to Broken Ridge. These microcontinents rifted away from Australia with Greater India during initial breakup at ~130 Ma, then rifted from India following the cessation of spreading in the PAP (~101-103 Ma).

Williams, Simon E.; Whittaker, Joanne M.; Granot, Roi; Müller, Dietmar R.

2013-07-01

7

3-D thermal modeling of magnetic anomalies along slow-spreading centers: influence of offsets between segments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Along-axis magnetic observations show that the amplitude of the axial magnetic anomaly is twice as high at segment ends than at segment centers. In a previous work we have modeled numerically this variation in the case of aligned segments and shown that it results from the thermal structure of the segments which, in turn, bears a direct influence on the presence of serpentinized peridotites at segment ends and on the variation of Fe-Ti content along segments (Gac et al., EUG 1999). This thermal structure is first modeled by imposing a hot zone beneath the segment center, which simulates the adiabatic ascent of hot mantle, and whose dimensions are determined to fit best geophysical temperature-dependent observations. We now consider the case of offset segments. The amplitudes of magnetic anomalies along-axis and along off-axis isochrons are different from the values observed for aligned segments. In order to evaluate this effect, we have modeled the magnetization distribution of the lithosphere for different offset lengths (0 to 40 km), taking into account the thermal structure of the segments, the magnetic properties of the temperature-dependent lithologies, and the off-axis thermal evolution of the lithosphere with increasing time. Magnetic anomaly amplitudes are then computed from the modeled magnetization distribution. In agreement with the observations these amplitudes show different variations along isochrons, in relation with the offset length. In the case of aligned segments, the absolute values of anomalies were higher at segment ends along-axis and along both positive and negative isochrons. On the other hand, as the offset between segments increases, the thermal structure becomes cooler at segment ends, the crust becoming thinner, or even absent. The magnetic anomaly at off-axis segment ends is shown to be mainly due to the presence - and abundance - of serpentinized peridotites, the variation in Fe-Ti content playing a relative minor role. This results in anomalies having a greater absolute value at off-axis segment ends, along positive isochrons, while their absolute values are smaller at segment ends along negative isochrons. Gac, S., J. Dyment, C. Tisseau and J. Goslin. Axial magnetic anomalies over slow-spreading ridge segments: insights from numerical 3-D thermal and physical modeling. Geophysical Journal International, in press.

Gac, S.; Dyment, J.; Tisseau, C.; Goslin, J.

2003-04-01

8

Magnetic and gravity anomalies of the slow-spreading system in the Gulf of Aden  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spreading system in the Gulf of Aden between Somalia, NE Africa, and Arabia has an ENE-WSW trend and its half spreading rate is about 1.0 cm\\/yr (e.g., Jestin et al., 1994). Previous studies (e.g., Tamsett and Searle, 1988) provided the general morphology of the spreading system. To reveal detailed morphology and tectonics of the spreading system in the Gulf

M. Nakanishi; H. Fujimoto; K. Tamaki; K. Okino

2002-01-01

9

Magnetic Anomalies in the Red Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine magnetic profiles over the Red Sea between 18 degrees N and 25 degrees N latitudes confirm previous hypotheses that strongly magnetic rocks underlie the axial trough. The symmetrical nature of the anomalies and their close correspondence to seafloor spreading magnetic models support a rifting origin for the trough. The dominant magnetic anomaly trends strike about N 35 degrees W

J. D. Phillips

1970-01-01

10

Updated interpretation of magnetic anomalies and seafloor spreading stages in the South China Sea - Implications for the Tertiary tectonics of Southeast Asia  

Microsoft Academic Search

An updated interpretation of the magnetic data of the South China Sea is presented, and its implications for the evolution of the South China Sea spreading ridge are discussed. A new identification of magnetic lineations in the basin is described. The kinematic parameters of spreading are then computed from the fit of the magnetic isochrons, and the characteristics of the

Anne Briais; Philippe Patriat; Paul Tapponnier

1993-01-01

11

New magnetic anomaly map in East Asia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic data provides basic information for geologic and geophysical interpretation. From 2004 to 2010 we have collected 57 magnetic cruises by using different research vessels. In this study we attempt to compile the newly collected and existing magnetic data including land, marine and aeromagnetic data in East Asia area, which can provide us a general overview of the tectonic framework of the study area. Based on newly compiled map, several magnetic features can be identified in the new magnetic map. (1) The NE-SW trending high positive magnetic anomaly zone presenting in southwest Taiwan is still apparently. (2) A sharp boundary, named Zhongnan Fault, separates South China Sea into east and southwest sub-basin. The magnetic patterns in the southwest sub-basin differ from in east, not only in amplitude, but also in the trending of the spreading. (3) Between Gagua ridge and Luzon-Okinawa Fracture Zone, the magnetic lineations reveals NW-SE direction. This indicates that the spreading direction was NE-SW in this area. (4) Strong positive magnetic anomalies over the Taiwan-Sinzi, Yushan, Yandang, and Zhemin Ridges suggest the existence of remnant volcanic arcs. High positive magnetic anomalies located beneath Ryukyu arc and Ryukyu Trench implies a high magnetized material of the subducted Philippine Sea Plate.

Doo, W.

2011-12-01

12

Pacific plate apparent polar wander between 67 Ma and 44 Ma determined from the analysis of the skewness of both vector and scalar magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pacific plate apparent polar wander between 67 Ma and 44 Ma determined from the analysis of the skewness of both vector and scalar magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading The apparent polar wander (APW) path for the Pacific plate is important to the study of Pacific plate motions and their relation to circum-Pacific tectonics. It can be used to discriminate between alternative plate motion circuits, determine the motion of Pacific hotspots relative to the paleomagnetic axis, and test the fixed hotspot hypothesis. The pioneering investigations of Jean Francheteau and his colleagues of Pacific plate APW through the analysis of magnetic anomalies over seamounts helped to demonstrate that the Pacific plate has had substantial northward motion relative to the spin axis since Cretaceous time. We also investigate the APW of the Pacific plate through analysis of magnetic anomalies. Instead of anomalies over seamounts, however, we investigate the skewness (asymmetry) of magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading. In prior work, skewness analysis of shipboard magnetic profiles has been used to determine Pacific paleomagnetic poles for chron 25r (57 Ma B.P.; Petronotis et al., 1994), chron 27r to 31n (62 to 69 Ma B.P.; Acton and Gordon, 1991) and chron 32n (72 Ma B.P.; Petronotis and Gordon, 1999). Recently, vector aeromagnetic data from low paleolatitudes, combined with shipboard profiles from low paleolatitudes, were used to determine a paleomagnetic pole with compact confidence limits for anomaly 12r (32 Ma B.P.; Horner-Johnson and Gordon, 2010). Here we use the low-paleolatitude shipboard- and vector aero-magnetic profiles to determine new paleomagnetic poles for the Pacific plate. A new feature of our analysis is a correction for the spreading-rate dependence of anomalous skewness (Koivisto et al. 2011). We estimate anomalous skewness as a function of spreading rate for each anomaly by creating many synthetic profiles using the model of Dyment and Arkani-Hamed (1995) and by experimentally determining the phase shift that causes the resulting synthetic magnetic anomaly to best match a profile produced from a "standard" model for anomalies due to seafloor spreading that assumes simple vertical reversal boundaries (Boswell et al., 2011). Thus, we solve for only two adjustable parameters, the latitude and the longitude of the paleomagnetic pole. We focus on preliminary results from the skewness of crossings of magnetic anomalies 20r (44 Ma B.P.), 24r (55 Ma B.P.) and 30n/31n (67 Ma B.P.) between the Galapagos and Murray fracture zones on the Pacific plate. We choose this region of the Pacific plate because numerical experiments, similar to those conducted by Acton and Gordon (1991), show that these data contribute much more information about the location of paleomagnetic poles than do those from any other region of similar size. Implications for Pacific plate tectonics, motion between hotspots, and true polar wander will be discussed.

Zheng, L.; Gordon, R. G.; Horner-Johnson, B. C.

2011-12-01

13

Implications for the South Atlantic early breakup and seafloor spreading from joint interpretation of magnetic anomaly maps and seaward-dipping reflector sequences (SDRS) visible in conjugated reflection seismic sections  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The late history of the South Atlantic passive margin evolution is investigated in the view of interlaced magnetic anomalies related to seafloor spreading lineations and anomalies caused by seaward-dipping reflector sequences (SDRS). Our identification of previously unknown pre-M5n lineations in marine magnetic data offshore Argentina now makes the lineation pattern more complete and most importantly comparable and nearly symmetrical to the conjugated area offshore South Africa. Therefore, we can now compare several sets of published South Atlantic reconstruction poles to our new pre-M5n lineations off Argentina and their equivalents off South Africa. The analysis of the symmetry of SDRS and particularly of their along-margin extension further constrains the choice of possible reconstruction poles for the earliest opening phases. The interpretation of pre-M5n lineations also defines the exact time (M9r) of the termination of excess breakup related volcanic activity and the transition to "normal" seafloor spreading. This is compared to absolute radiometric ages from Parana/Etendeka flood basalts. The volcanic activity related to the southernmost volcanic margin segments falls approximately into the same time window as the continental flood basalt activity. Unfortunately, more detailed conclusions suffer seriously from an ongoing discussion about the absolute ages of the pre-M0r lineations in different versions of polarity timescales. New models for the magnetic response of SDRS reveal a high variability within the wedges on either side of the Atlantic and between the conjugated margins. Former identifications of anomaly M11r off Cape Town have already been questioned and can now be shown to be caused by structural or magnetization variations within SDRS.

Schreckenberger, Bernd; Koopmann, Hannes; Franke, Dieter; Schnabel, Michael

2013-04-01

14

An Interpretation of the Seafloor Spreading History of the West Enderby Basin between Initial Breakup of Gondwana and Anomaly C34  

Microsoft Academic Search

The seafloor spreading evolution in the Southern Indian Ocean is key to understanding the initial breakup of Gondwana. We summarize the structural lineaments deduced from the GEOSAT 10?Hz sampled raw altimetry data as well as satellite derived gravity anomaly map and the magnetic anomaly lineation trends from vector magnetic anomalies in the West Enderby Basin, the Southern Indian Ocean. The

Yoshifumi Nogi; Kumiko Nishi; Nobukazu Seama; Yoichi Fukuda

2004-01-01

15

Equatorial Pacific magnetic anomalies identified from vector aeromagnetic data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has long been challenging to identify magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading in the equatorial Pacific. Here we show that Project Magnet vector aeromagnetic profiles from the equatorial Pacific record magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading much more clearly than do shipboard total intensity profiles. The anomalies are reliably recorded at wavelengths between ~20 and ~150 km in the vertical and east components, which have high coherence, differ in phase by ~90°, and resemble synthetic magnetic anomaly profiles. From an analysis of a single near-equatorial vector aeromagnetic profile we infer that the magnetic lineations strike ~8°-10° counter-clockwise of north and that magnetic anomaly 7 is located ~400 km further east than previously estimated. The newly estimated location of anomaly 6 is consistent with a tentative estimate by Wilson from a low-amplitude shipboard magnetic profile. Because the skewness of profiles over the seafloor formed near the paleoequator changes rapidly with paleolatitude and paleostrike, a skewness analysis of these data may provide useful bounds on the location of Pacific Plate paleomagnetic poles, and indicate that this seafloor has had little, if any, northward motion relative to the spin axis since it formed.

Horner-Johnson, Benjamin C.; Gordon, Richard G.

2003-11-01

16

Magnetic anomalies, layered intrusions and Mars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of remanence-controlled magnetic anomalies on Earth provide possibilities to interpret the nature of crustal rocks that cause the large remanent anomalies on Mars. What types of conditions on Earth can create large remanent magnetic anomalies? Such an anomaly, extending for 20 km centered over a norite layer in the Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) Intrusion, shows a minimum ?13000 nT below background

S. A. McEnroe; J. R. Skilbrei; P. Robinson; F. Heidelbach; F. Langenhorst; L. L. Brown

2004-01-01

17

New continental margin magnetic anomalies of East Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past decade, Australian, Norwegian and Russian marine surveys have collected integrated seismic, gravity and magnetic data in the southern Indian Ocean. The more than 350,000 line-km of new airborne and marine magnetic observations for the East Antarctic continental margin have been compiled into an improved definition of crustal magnetic anomaly patterns. This compilation provides important new constraints on the breakup processes and igneous activity related to the formation of the passive margin of East Antarctica. The eastern sector of the map from Bruce Rise in the west to the D'Urville Sea in the east is largely dominated by seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies. The 'Adélie Rift Block' of highly stretched and extensively faulted continental crust is associated with a smooth anomaly fabric. Abrupt magnetic anomaly changes along the oceanic-continent transition in the Cooperation Sea including the Enderby Basin Anomaly extend for more than 1680 km from the Kerguelen Plateau towards the Cosmonaut Sea. Three sectors of the East Antarctic continental margin exhibit pronounced disparities in the anomaly patterns that strongly suggest different modes of seafloor formation. Strong positive seafloor magnetic anomalies mark the southern margin of the Kerguelen Plateau, the Maud Rise and adjacent areas in the Riiser-Larsen Sea. The new compilation suggests that at least 300 km of the Enderby Basin and Shackleton Basin may be part of the Cretaceous Kerguelen Volcanic Province and possibly maps an abandoned 'fossil' spreading center in the central Enderby Basin. The majority of the published age models for the Enderby Basin and "Australian sector" of the East Antarctic margin are not in agreement with the structural grain of magnetic anomalies in the newly compiled map.

Golynsky, A. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kazankov, A. Ju.; Jokat, W.; Masolov, V. N.; von Frese, R. R. B.

2013-02-01

18

A revised identification of the oldest sea-floor spreading anomalies between Australia and Antarctica  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose that magnetic anomalies south of Australia and along the conjugate margin of Antarctica that were originally identified as anomalies 19 to 22 may be anomalies 20 to 34. The original anomaly identification has two troublesome aspects: (1) it does not account for an ``extra'' anomaly between anomalies 20 and 21, and (2) it provides no explanation for the

Steven C. Cande; John C. Mutter

1982-01-01

19

An impactor origin for lunar magnetic anomalies.  

PubMed

The Moon possesses strong magnetic anomalies that are enigmatic given the weak magnetism of lunar rocks. We show that the most prominent grouping of anomalies can be explained by highly magnetic extralunar materials from the projectile that formed the largest and oldest impact crater on the Moon: the South Pole-Aitken basin. The distribution of projectile materials from a model oblique impact coincides with the distribution of magnetic anomalies surrounding this basin, and the magnetic properties of these materials can account for the intensity of the observed anomalies if they were magnetized in a core dynamo field. Distal ejecta from this event can explain the origin of isolated magnetic anomalies far from this basin. PMID:22403388

Wieczorek, Mark A; Weiss, Benjamin P; Stewart, Sarah T

2012-03-01

20

Magnetic Anomalies over the Osbourn Trough in the Southwest Pacific Cretaceous Quiet Zone  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed surveys of magnetic anomalies over ocean crust that formed during long intervals of predominantly one polarity and that formed at moderate to fast spreading rates, such as anomaly 5 in the Northeast Pacific, often display a pattern of small scale, linear anomalies that reflect a mixture of short polarity events and\\/or intensity fluctuations of the paleomagnetic field. These tiny

S. C. Cande; J. Stock; R. Clayton; M. Gurnis

2004-01-01

21

Global magnetic anomaly and aurora of Neptune  

SciTech Connect

The large offset and tilt of Neptune's dipole magnetic field combine to create a global magnetic anomaly, analogous to but much more important than Earth's South Atlantic Anomaly. Energetic particle precipitation loss within the Neptune anomaly creates atmospheric drift shadows within which particle fluxes are greatly reduced. The energetic particle dropout observed by Voyager near closest approach occurred near the predicted times when Voyager passed within the atmospheric drift shadow. Extremely soft, structured bursts of ions and electrons within the drift shadow may result from plasma wave-induced pitch angle scattering of trapped particles confined near the magnetic equator. The dropout does not necessarily imply that Voyager passed through an Earth-like discrete auroral zone, as earlier reported. The ion and electron fluxes observed within the dropout period correspond to particles that must precipitate to Neptune's atmosphere within the anomaly region. This anomaly precipitation can account for a major portion of the ultraviolet emissions previously identified as Neptune aurora.

Cheng, A.F. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (USA))

1990-09-01

22

Junction magnetic anomaly north of Waikato River  

Microsoft Academic Search

A linear magnetic anomaly is traced northwards from Waikato through North Auckland and Northland until it meets the Tasman Sea west of Kaitaia. The anomaly, which has amplitudes up to 700 gammas and half-widths of 5–15 km, is believed to be due to serpentinite and probably represents the extension of the ultramafic belt which separates the principal facies of the

Trevor Hatherton; R. H. Sibson

1970-01-01

23

Gulf of Aden axial magnetic anomaly and the Curie temperature isotherm  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main features of magnetic anomalies over ocean ridges have been explained1 as a corollary of seafloor spreading and geomagnetic reversals. Oceanic crust is formed in a narrow region, becoming magnetized in the direction of the Earth's magnetic field as its temperature falls through the Curie point of the magnetic minerals present. The Gulf of Aden was one of the

D. Tamsett; R. W. Girdler

1982-01-01

24

Understanding Magnetic Anomalies and Their Significance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes a laboratory exercise testing the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis of plate tectonics. Includes 14 questions with explanations using graphs and charts. Provides a historical account of the current plate tectonic and magnetic anomaly theory. (MVL)|

Shea, James H.

1988-01-01

25

Hematite vs. magnetite as the signature for planetary magnetic anomalies?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crustal magnetic anomalies are the result of adjacent geologic units having contrasting magnetization. This magnetization arises from induction and\\/or remanence. In a planetary context we now know that Mars has significant crustal magnetic anomalies due to remanent magnetization, while on the Earth both remanence and induction can contribute to the magnetic anomaly, because of the presence of the Earth’s magnetic

Günther Kletetschka; Peter J Wasilewski; Patrick T Taylor

2000-01-01

26

Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental breakup  

SciTech Connect

Continental lithosphere magnetic anomalies mapped by the Magsat satellite are related to tectonic features associated with regional compositional variations of the crust and upper mantle and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. These continental-scale anomaly patterns when corrected for varying observation elevation and the global change in the direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field show remarkable correlation of regional lithospheric magnetic sources across rifted continental margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans.

von Frese, R.R.B.; Hinze, W.J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C.R.

1986-01-01

27

Magnetic Anomalies in the South of Corad Rise, the Southern Indian Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seafloor age estimated from magnetic anomalies in the Southern Indian Ocean are vital to understanding the fragmentation process of the Gondwana, but the seafloor age still remain less well-defined because of the sparse observations in this area. To understand the seafloor spreading history related to the Gondwana breakup, total intensity and vector geomagnetic field measurements as well as swath bathymetry mapping were conducted during the R/V Hakuho-maru cruise KH-07-4 Leg3 in the Southern Indian Ocean between Cape Town, South Africa, and off Lützow-Holm Bay, Antarctica. Magnetic anomaly data have been collected along WNW-ESE trending structures of unknown origin inferred from satellite gravity anomalies just to the south of Conrad Rise. We have also collected magnetic anomaly data along NNE-SSW trending lineaments from satellite gravity anomaly data between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lützow-Holm Bay. Magnetic anomalies with amplitude of about 500 nT, originating from normal and reversed magnetization of oceanic crust, are detected along the WNW-ESE trending structures just to the south of Conrad Rise. These magnetic anomalies possibly belong to Mesozoic magnetic anomaly sequence and this shows the part of the oceanic crust just to the south of the Conrad Rise formed before the long Cretaceous normal polarity superchron although magnetic anomaly C34 has been identified just to the north of the Conrad Rise. Magnetic anomalies with amplitude of about 300 nT are also observed along the NNE-SSW trending lineaments between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lützow-Holm Bay, and most likely indicate Mesozoic magnetic anomaly sequence. These suggest the extinct spreading axes in the south of Conrad Rise and complicated seafloor spreading history in this area.

Nogi, Y.; Ikehara, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kameo, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kita, S.

2008-12-01

28

Deeptow magnetic survey of the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone: Implications for the marine magnetic anomaly timescale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results of a recently completed near-bottom magnetic survey of the Pacific Jurassic quiet zone located in Pigafetta Basin in the vicinity of ODP Hole 801C. A total of ~1550 km of tracklines were completed during 5 lowerings of the DSL120 sidescan sonar system of the National Deep Submergence Facility equipped with two magnetometer systems. The nominal altitude of the vehicle was 100 m above the seafloor with the average sediment thickness ~300 meters. We collected simultaneous vector magnetic data from a digital Honeywell HMR2300 magnetoresistor sensor and absolute total field using a Marine Magnetics Overhauser sensor provided by KORDI. The survey had four primary goals: 1) to investigate the presence or absence of magnetic lineations related to seafloor spreading around ODP Hole 801C, 2) to extend the magnetic anomaly mapping south to the Rough-Smooth (RS) boundary, thought to be the limit of the oldest Pacific crust, 3) to extend and confirm correlations of previously collected deeptow results, and 4) to investigate the M33-M34 sequence which can be clearly correlated with the timescale but also shows a period of rapid field reversal. The survey around Hole 801C was navigated within a transponder net whereas the remainder of the surveys were navigated using acoustic layback and bottom-lock doppler. From our results, we confirm that anomalies in the M33-M34 sequence are highly-lineated and well-correlated between adjacent lines with a high reversal rate. We found that anomalies older than M36 become harder to correlate to about M40 where there may be a possible change in trend of the anomaly strike. The anomaly record appears to become more linear again as Hole 801C is approached. Around Hole 801C the anomalies show a clear lineation with a strike direction of 25 degrees, although the correlation is not as consistent as the younger anomaly sequence. The decrease in anomaly amplitude that is seen from M21 through the M36 sequence appears to be low through anomaly M40 and then increases to a higher value thereafter with an average amplitude of 200 nT at deeptow altitude. South of Hole 801C towards the RS boundary we find that magnetic anomalies continue with short-wavelength anomalies superimposed on a longer wavelength anomalies making them difficult to correlate. High amplitude anomalies mark the RS boundary itself. In summary, we find evidence for seafloor spreading anomalies throughout the survey area although there are areas where correlation is difficult.

Tivey, M. A.; Sager, W. W.; Lee, S.

2003-12-01

29

The magnetic signature of hydrothermal systems in slow spreading environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Slow spreading mid-ocean ridges like the Mid-Atlantic Ridge host a remarkable diversity of hydrothermal systems including vent systems located on the neovolcanic axis, large axial volcanoes, in transform faults and nontransform offsets, and associated with low-angle detachment faults, now recognized as a major tectonic feature of slow spreading environments. Hydrothermal systems are hosted in various lithologies from basalt to serpentinized peridotite and exposed lower oceanic crust. The substantial variations of hydrothermal processes active in these environments have important implications for the magnetic structure of oceanic crust and upper mantle. Hydrothermal processes can both destroy the magnetic minerals in basalt, diabase, and gabbro and create magnetic minerals by serpentinization of ultramafic rocks and deposition of magnetic minerals. We report on the diversity of magnetic anomaly signatures over the vent systems at slow spreading ridges and show that the lateral scale of hydrothermal alteration is fundamentally a local phenomenon. This highly focused process leads to magnetic anomalies on the scale of individual vent fields, typically a few hundreds of meters or less in size. To detect such features, high-resolution, near-bottom magnetic surveys are required rather than sea surface surveys. High-resolution surveys are now more tractable with deep-towed systems, dynamically positioned ships, and with the recent development of autonomous underwater vehicles, which allow detailed mapping of the seafloor on a scale relevant to hydrothermal activity. By understanding these present-day active hydrothermal systems, we can explore for yet to be discovered buried deposits preserved off-axis, both to determine past history of hydrothermal activity and for resource assessment.

Tivey, Maurice A.; Dyment, Jérôme

30

Central anomaly magnetization high: constraints on the volcanic construction and architecture of seismic layer 2A at a fast-spreading mid-ocean ridge, the EPR at 9°30'-50'N  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The central anomaly magnetization high (CAMH) is a zone of high crustal magnetization centered on the axis of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and many other segments of the global mid-ocean ridge (MOR). The CAMH is thought to reflect the presence of recently emplaced and highly magnetic lavas. Forward models show that the complicated character of the near-bottom CAMH can be successfully reproduced by the convolution of a lava deposition distribution with a lava magnetization function that describes the variation in lava magnetization intensity with age. This lava magnetization function is the product of geomagnetic paleofield intensity, which has increased by a factor of 2 over the last 40 kyr, and low-temperature alteration which decreases the remanence of lava with exposure to seawater. The success of the forward modeling justifies the inverse approach: deconvolution of the magnetic data for lava distribution and integration of that distribution for magnetic layer thickness. This approach is tested on two near-bottom magnetic profiles AL2767 and AL2771, collected using Alvin across the EPR axis at 9°31'N and 9°50'N. Our analysis of these data produces an estimate of the relative thickness of the magnetic lava layer which is remarkably consistent with existing multichannel estimates of layer 2A thickness from lines CDP31 and CDP27. The similarity between magnetic layer and seismic layer 2A at the 9°-10°N segment of the EPR crest provides independent support to the notion that seismic layer 2A in young oceanic crust represents the highly magnetic lava layer, and that the velocity gradient at the base of layer 2A is related to the increasing number of higher-velocity dikes with depth in the lava-dike transition zone. The near-bottom magnetic anomaly character of the CAMH is a powerful indicator of the emplacement history of upper crust at MORs which allows prediction of the relative thickness and architecture of the extrusive lavas independent of other constraints.

Schouten, Hans; Tivey, Maurice A.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Cochran, James R.

1999-05-01

31

Plasma structure over dayside lunar magnetic anomalies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well-known that the Moon has neither global intrinsic magnetic field nor thick atmosphere. Different from the Earth’s case where the intrinsic global magnetic field prevents the solar wind from penetrating into the magnetosphere, solar wind directly impacts the lunar surface. Since the discovery of the lunar crustal magnetic field in 1960s, several papers have been published concerning the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar magnetic anomalies including both numerical simulations and observation by lunar orbiters. MAG/ER on Lunar Prospector found heating of the solar wind electrons presumably due to the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar magnetic anomalies and the existence of the mini-magnetosphere was suggested. However, the detailed mechanism of the interaction has been unclear mainly due to the lack of the in-situ observed low energy ion data. MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (MAP-PACE) on Kaguya (SELENE) completed its ˜1.5-year observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon on 10 June 2009. MAP-PACE made observations at a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude for about 1 year between January 2008 and December 2008. During the last 5 months, the orbit was lowered to ˜50km-altitude between January 2009 and April 2009, and some orbits had further lower perilune altitude of ˜10km after April 2009. When Kaguya flew over strong magnetic anomalies, deceleration of the solar wind ions, acceleration of the solar wind electrons, and ions reflected by magnetic anomalies were observed. The deceleration of the solar wind ions was observed for both two major solar wind ion components: protons and alpha particles. Deceleration of the solar wind had the same ? E/q (? E : deceleration energy, q: charge) for both protons and alpha particles. In addition, the acceleration energy of the electrons was the same as the deceleration energy of the ions. It indicates the existence of DC electric field over Kaguya spacecraft. Since the gyro-radius of the electrons was smaller than the size of the magnetic anomalies, incident electrons were mirror reflected back. On the other hand, the gyro-radius of the ions was much larger than the size of the magnetic anomalies. Therefore the incident ions could penetrate deeper into the magnetic anomalies. As a result, DC electric field was generated over dayside magnetic anomalies. The reflected ions were observed in much larger area than the area where strong magnetic field was observed. Mass profile of the reflected ions showed existence of reflected alpha particles as expected from the magnetic mirror reflection. However, the energy of the reflected alpha particles was found to be lower than that of the alpha particles in the incident solar wind. In addition, the reflected protons also had lower energy and higher temperature than those of the incident solar wind protons. It clearly indicates the existence of a non-adiabatic interaction between solar wind ions and lunar magnetic anomalies.

Saito, Y.; Nishino, M. N.; Yamamoto, T.; Uemura, K.; Yokota, S.; Asamura, K.; Tsunakawa, H.; Kaguya Map Team

2010-12-01

32

New magnetic anomaly map of the East Antarctic continental margin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Marine magnetic survey coverage of the southern part of Indian Ocean is to a certain extent limited for defining the magnetic pattern of the continental margin of East Antarctica. The USA research vessels collected the bulk of the marine magnetic data in the beginning of 1960's. During the succeeding years Australian, German, Japanese, Russian and other international scientific programs made major contributions to the network of marine magnetic data. Since the beginning of new century only two nations (Russian and Australian) have acquired the marine magnetic data in the southern part of Indian Ocean. The marine surveys in the Cosmonaut Sea, the western part of the Cooperation Sea in the Davis and Mawson Seas were accomplished by the PMGRE in 2000-2009 field seasons. The marine magnetic data collected during two seasons (2001-2002) within the AASOPP Project which was established in early 2000 to define the outer limits of the continental shelf offshore of the Australian Antarctic Territory (AAT) covered the full length of the AAT from 40OE to 160OE. The new magnetic anomaly map of the East Antarctic continental margin incorporates all available data acquired by the international community since the IGY 1957-58 through to 2009. Results of the compilation do not radically alter recent models describing first-order motions between the Antarctic, Australian and Indian plates, but they help to resolve uncertainties in early break-up history of opening between these plates. The timing and direction of early seafloor spreading in the area off the Antarctic margin, once conjugate to part of the Southern Greater Indian margin and to Australian margin, along the largely unknown region of the Enderby Basin, Davis Sea and Mawson Sea has been analyzed by many authors using different data sets. It is highly likely that spreading in the Enderby Basin occurred around the same time as the well documented M-sequence (anomalies M10 to M0) off the Perth Basin, Western Australia (Powell et al. 1988). The history of the early spreading is complicated further by the likelihood of one or several ridge jumps in which most early seafloor crust was transferred to the Antarctic plate and the Elan Bank micro-continent was isolated from the Indian continent (Muller et al. 2001). Additionally, a large amount of the seafloor crust is now probably overprinted by igneous activity associated with the Kerguelen Plume, which began forming the Kerguelen LIP from about 120-110 Ma. However all available results of interpretations do not match to the magnetic anomaly pattern which can be distinguished by the newly compiled map. Our observations suggest that this is especially correct to the Enderby Basin and to lesser degree for the region that was conjugate to Australia. The prominent magnetic anomaly boundary signal and sharp basement step correlated with the MacRobertson Coast Anomaly or the Enderby Basin Anomaly (Golynsky et al., 2007) is not observed elsewhere in the Enderby Basin, Princess Elizabeth Trough or Davis Sea. In the central Enderby Basin there some evidences for an abandoned ‘fossil' spreading centre that might continue to the west of the Kerguelen Plateau, east of Gunnerus Ridge. The estimated timing of its extinction corresponding to the early surface expression of the Kerguelen Plume at the Southern Kerguelen Plateau around 120 Ma and the subsequent formation of the Elan Bank microcontinent. Alternatively, the ridge jump occurred only in the central Enderby basin, due to the proximity of the Kerguelen plateau, whereas seafloor spreading continued in the western Enderby basin and conjugate south of Sri Lanka basin.

Golynsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Sergey; Kazankov, Andrey

2010-05-01

33

Magnetic resonance imaging in obstructive Müllerian anomalies.  

PubMed

Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a very rare congenital anomaly of the urogenital tract involving Müllerian ducts and Wolffian structures. It is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic modality for demonstrating anatomic variation and associated complications. PMID:24082660

Sen, Kamal Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Dhivya; Kanagaraj, Vikrant

2013-04-01

34

Geomagnetic storm effects in equatorial ionization anomaly and equatorial spread-F over a low latitude station  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Equatorial spread-F and Equatorial Ionization Anomaly EIA are very important geophysical phenomena These two important processes are very much associated with the geomagnetic disturbances geomagnetic storms of varying magnitude Equatorial belt of strong spread-F extends right through the Appleton anomaly crest latitudes during high sunspot years Intense scintillations do occur in presence of the plasma density irregularities that are associated with the spread-F these may disrupt trans-ionospheric radio communication Steep rise of the F-layer in the post sun set period and strong ionization anomaly that develops subsequently associated with the equatorial spread -F In view of the important effects on radio communications it is important therefore to study the effects of the geomagnetic storm on ionization anomaly and on the occurrence of spread-F Data over Ahmedabad 23 1 oN 72 4 oE dip 33 and at Kodaikanal 10 2 oN 77 5 oE dip 5 are analyzed for the study of geomagnetic storm effects of high medium and low solar activity periods Ionospheric data for more than 120 geomagnetic storms covering different solar epochs 1989-1991 1994-1996 and for the 1999-2001 of varying magnitude have been analyzed A total of about 60 storms Dst - 50 nT of different strength occurred during the period of 1999-2001 only About 55 of storms were found to develop through a multi-step growth in the ring current that is a multi-step decrease in Dst in the main phase of the storms About 35 magnetic storms were linked with magnetic clouds About 60 of intense and

Sharma, S.; Chandra, H.; Sinha, H. S. S.

35

The Chiral Magnetic Effect and Axial Anomalies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We give an elementary derivation of the chiral magnetic effect based on a strong magnetic field lowest-Landau-level projection in conjunction with the well-known axial anomalies in two- and four-dimensional space-time. The argument is general, based on a Schur decomposition of the Dirac operator. In the dimensionally reduced theory, the chiral magnetic effect is directly related to the relativistic form of the Peierls instability, leading to a spiral form of the condensate, the chiral magnetic spiral. We then discuss the competition between spin projection, due to a strong magnetic field, and chirality projection, due to an instanton, for light fermions in QCD and QED. The resulting asymmetric distortion of the zero modes and near-zero modes is another aspect of the chiral magnetic effect.

Ba?ar, Gökçe; Dunne, Gerald V.

36

Matching Martian Magnetic Anomalies and Snc Magnetic Properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the origin of Martian magnetic anomalies is a major challenge for Martian studies, both in terms of planetary geodynamics and of magnetic petrology. Present models require a crustal magnetization of 15-30 A\\/m with a thickness of 20-50 km [e.g. 1]. SNC meteorites are the only material available to make a magnetominer- alogical model for this crustal magnetization. Here will

P. Rochette; V. Sautter; F. Brunet; V. Chevrier; J. P. Lorand

2002-01-01

37

Marine magnetic anomalies in the NE Indian Ocean: the Wharton and Central Indian basins revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The North-eastern Indian Ocean has recently received a renewed interest. The disastrous earthquakes and tsunamis of Dec. 2004 off Sumatra have triggered a large international effort including several oceanographic cruises. The Ninetyeast Ridge, a long submarine ridge which extends NS on more than 4000 km, has been the focus of a recent cruise aiming to study the interaction of a hotspot with the oceanic lithosphere and spreading centres. Both the study of the seismogenic zone under Sumatra and the Ninetyeast Ridge formation require accurate determination of the age and structure of the oceanic lithosphere in the Wharton and Central Indian Basins. First we delineate tectonic elements such as the Sunda Trench, the Ninetyeast Ridge, and the fracture zones of the Wharton and Central Indian basins from a recent version of the free-air gravity anomaly deduced from satellite altimetry and available multibeam bathymetric data. We use all available magnetic data to identify magnetic anomalies and depict seafloor spreading isochrons in order to build a tectonic map of the Wharton Basin. To do so, we apply the analytic signal method to unambiguously determine the location of the magnetic picks. The new tectonic map shows more refinements than previous ones, as expected from a larger data set. The fossil ridge in the Wharton Basin is clearly defined; spreading ceased at anomaly 18 young (38.5 Ma), and, perhaps, as late as anomaly 15 (35 Ma). Symmetric anomalies are observed on both flanks of the fossil ridge up to anomaly 24 (54 Ma), preceded by a slight reorganization of the spreading compartments between anomalies 28 and 25 (64 - 56 Ma) and a more stable phase of spreading between anomalies 34 and 29 (83 - 64 Ma). Earlier, a major change of spreading direction is clearly seen in the bending fracture zones; interpolating in the Cretaceous Quiet Zone between anomaly 34 in the Wharton Basin and anomaly M0 off Australia leads to an age of ~100 Ma for this reorganization. Anomalies 20 to 34 are clearly identified in the western part of the Central Indian Basin. The interpretation is more difficult in the compartments located immediately west of the Ninetyeast Ridge, where multiple ridge jumps have been proposed to explain complex anomaly patterns. In a different way, we recognize a continuous sequence of anomalies 20 to 34, although the anomalies 25 to 29 seem to be wider and display complex boundaries.

Jacob, J.; Dyment, J.; Yatheesh, V.; Bhattacharya, G. C.

2009-04-01

38

Mesozoic Sequence Magnetic Anomalies in the South of Corad Rise, the Southern Indian Ocean  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern Indian Ocean is key area for understanding the fragmentation process of the Gondwana. However, tectonic history in the Southern Indian Ocean still remains less well-defined because of the sparse observations in this area. The R/V Hakuho-maru cruise KH-07-4 Leg3 were conducted to understand the tectonic history related to the Gondwana breakup in the Southern Indian Ocean between Cape Town, South Africa, and off Lutzow-Holm Bay, Antarctica. Total intensity and vector geomagnetic field measurements as well as swath bathymetry mapping were collected during the cruise. Magnetic anomaly data have been collected along WNW-ESE trending inferred from satellite gravity anomalies just to the south of Conrad Rise. We have also collected magnetic anomaly data along NNE-SSW trending lineaments from satellite gravity anomaly data between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. Magnetic anomalies with amplitude of about 500 nT, originating from normal and reversed magnetization of oceanic crust are detected along the WNW-ESE trending structures just to the south of Conrad Rise. Those magnetic anomalies most likely indicate Mesozoic magnetic anomaly sequence, Mesozoic sequence magnetic anomalies with amplitude of about 300 nT are also observed along the NNE-SSW trending lineaments between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. Oceanic crusts formed during Cretaceous normal polarity superchron are found in both profiles, although magnetic anomaly C34 has been identified just to the north of the Conrad Rise. These suggest the extinct spreading axes in the south of Conrad Rise and the two different seafloor spreading systems were active around Cretaceous normal polarity superchron between the south of the Conrad Rise and off Lutzow-Holm Bay. These provide new constraints for the fragmentation process of the Gondwana.

Nogi, Y.; Ikehara, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kameo, K.; Katsuki, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kita, S.

2009-04-01

39

Band Iron Formations and Satellite Magnetic Anomalies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Band Iron Formations (BIF) are mainly Precambrian (2.5-1.8 Ga) sedimentary deposits and are composed of alternating layers of iron rich material and silica (chert). Precambrian BIF mark growth in the level of free oxygen in the atmosphere and the ocean which happened about 2.2 Ga. Distribution of main BIF includes Hamersley Range, Australia; Transvaal-Griquatown, South Africa; Minas Gerais, Brazil; Labrador Trough, Canada, and Kursk-Krivoi Rog (Russia). Together these five very large BIF deposits constitute about 90 percent of Earth's total estimated BIF (5.76*10 14 ). On each continent these ancient rocks usually metamorphosed and crystallized include what are variously described as hematite-quartzites, banded iron formations, banded jaspers or calico-rocks. West African, Hudson Bay and Western Australian Satellite Magnetic Anomalies coincide with distribution BIF deposits. The Kursk Satellite Magnetic Anomaly (KMA) (about 22 nT at the altitude=400km, centered at 51o N, 37o E) also was identified by ground and aeromagnetic observations and is recognized as one of the largest magnetic anomaly on the Earth. Magnetic modeling shows that immense Precambrian iron ore deposits (iron bands) of Voronezh uplift are the main source of KMA. Magnetic properties of 10000 BIF samples outcropped in the KMA area have been measured and analyzed (Krutikhovskaya et al., 1964) Rockmag BIF dataset is presented at: http://core2.gsfc.nasa.gov/MPDB/datasets.html. Mean NRM value is about 42 A/M, Qn about 1.4. Demagnetization tests suggest that hard and stable NRM component is caused by hematite occurring in BIF in different forms and grain sizes. Hematite deposits discovered on Mars in western equatorial area with layered topography of Aram Chaos and Sinus Meridiani could be of hydrothermal origin and may be formed similar to hematite precipitated in BIF on Earth.

Nazarova, K. A.; Wasilewski, P.

2005-05-01

40

Seafloor Spreading Anomalies in the MAGSAT Field of the North Atlantic.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We show that a simple magnetization model for the crust of the North Atlantic Basin will explain the major anomalous of the Magsat intermediate-wavelength magnetic field over the basin. Our seafloor spreading model incorporates anomalous skewness and enha...

J. L. LaBrecque C. A. Raymond

1985-01-01

41

Marine Magnetic Anomalies and the Symmetry of the Conjugated Rifted Margins of the South Atlantic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The breakup of the South Atlantic commenced in the Early Cretaceous north of the Falkland Plateau and propagated rapidly northward. Seaward-dipping reflector sequences (SDRS) along most parts of the margins indicate that they are of volcanic origin. A distinct magnetic anomaly (anomaly G) is associated with the SDRS on the Argentine margin. Detailed modeling of new magnetic data acquired together with multi-channel seismic data shows that variations in the style of SDRS emplacement correspond to distinct variations in the amplitude of anomaly G. There is also a corresponding magnetic anomaly off South Africa which in contrast to the Argentine side has a much stronger amplitude representing a major asymmetry between both margins. On the other hand, there are indications that on both sides of the Atlantic anomaly G decays towards the South. This can be seen most distinctly in a newly compiled map of magnetic anomalies off Cape Town. On the assumption that SDRS are the probable source of anomaly G off Argentina we propose a similar origin for this anomaly off South Africa. Therefore, the distinct and symmetric change in the appearance of anomaly G along both margins indicates a corresponding variation in style and intensity of volcanism during breakup. The new magnetic data also enabled us to identify the formerly unknown Mesozoic lineations M4 to M10 (127 Ma to 132 Ma) in the Argentine Basin. Together with a reinterpretation of the corresponding lineations off Cape Town we determined new spreading rates that indicate that the initial (pre M2) seafloor-spreading was faster than the later phases. The lineations in the Argentine Basin run obliquely to anomaly G indicating that the opening of the South Atlantic propagated northward. An estimation for the propagation rate will be given but local variations of the process seem to exist.

Schreckenberger, B.; Hinz, K.; Franke, D.; Neben, S.; Roeser, H. A.

2002-12-01

42

Age of the North Atlantic Ocean from Magnetic Anomalies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Magnetic anomaly lineations have been identified in the North Atlantic. These lineations correlate with the magnetic time scale describing magnetic polarity reversals for the past 71 my. The results indicate that approximately 70% of the total drift betwe...

W. C. Pitman M. Talwani J. R. Heirtzler

1971-01-01

43

Diffuse Oceanic Plate Boundaries, Plate Non-Rigidity, True Polar Wander, and Motion Between Hotspots: Results From Investigations of Marine Magnetic Anomalies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marine magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading record reversals of Earth's magnetic field and the orientation of the paleomagnetic field. They can be used to make precise estimates of relative plate motion and of the apparent polar wander of oceanic plates. In this talk I will present the results of several studies that include analyses of marine magnetic anomalies. A

R. G. Gordon

2009-01-01

44

Geomagnetic storm effects in equatorial ionization anomaly and equatorial spread-F over a low latitude station  

Microsoft Academic Search

Equatorial spread-F and Equatorial Ionization Anomaly EIA are very important geophysical phenomena These two important processes are very much associated with the geomagnetic disturbances geomagnetic storms of varying magnitude Equatorial belt of strong spread-F extends right through the Appleton anomaly crest latitudes during high sunspot years Intense scintillations do occur in presence of the plasma density irregularities that are associated

S. Sharma; H. Chandra; H. S. S. Sinha

2006-01-01

45

The Inversion of Magnetic Anomalies in the Presence of Topography  

Microsoft Academic Search

The inversion of magnetic anomalies in terms of an irregular layer of magnetized material is studied, and an efficient procedure for constructing solutions is developed. Even when magnetic orientation and layer thickness are known, the solution is not unique because of the existence of a magnetization (called the magnetic annihilator) that produces no observable magnetic field. We consider an example

R. L. Parker; S. P. Huestis

1974-01-01

46

Remote energetic neutral atom imaging of electric potential over a lunar magnetic anomaly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract<p label="1">The formation of electric potential over lunar <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> regions is essential for understanding fundamental lunar science, for understanding the lunar environment, and for planning human exploration on the Moon. A large positive electric potential was predicted and detected from single point measurements. Here, we demonstrate a remote imaging technique of electric potential mapping at the lunar surface, making use of a new concept involving hydrogen neutral atoms derived from solar wind. We apply the technique to a lunar <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> region using an existing dataset of the neutral atom energy spectrometer SARA/CENA on Chandrayaan-1. Electrostatic potential larger than +135 V inside the Gerasimovic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is confirmed. This structure is found <span class="hlt">spreading</span> all over the <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> region. The widely <span class="hlt">spread</span> electric potential can influence the local plasma and dust environment near the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Lue, C.; Wurz, P.; Vorburger, A.; Bhardwaj, A.; Asamura, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">47</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSMGP53A..02C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> over the Osbourn Trough in the Southwest Pacific Cretaceous Quiet Zone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detailed surveys of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over ocean crust that formed during long intervals of predominantly one polarity and that formed at moderate to fast <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates, such as <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 5 in the Northeast Pacific, often display a pattern of small scale, linear <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that reflect a mixture of short polarity events and/or intensity fluctuations of the paleomagnetic field. These tiny wiggles have been mapped in many regions of the ocean representing large portions of the last 180 Ma including the Jurassic Quiet Zones. However, they have not been reported in the Cretaceous Quiet Zones. Although the lack of tiny wiggles in the Cretaceous Quiet Zones might reflect a difference in field behavior during the Cretaceous Long Normal Polarity Interval, it more likely reflects the lack of good surveys in areas where tiny wiggles are most likely to be preserved. The Southwest Pacific Cretaceous Quiet Zone, with its fast <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates and high paleo-latitude, is ideally located for preserving small scale <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Recent data collected on transits of the R/VIB Nathaniel B. Palmer reveal a linear pattern of moderate amplitude (+ - 100 nT), short wavelength (10-30 km) <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> straddling the Osbourn Trough, an east-west striking fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center east of the Tonga-Kermadec Trench. Although the age of the Osbourn Trough is uncertain, it is likely to have formed around 95 or 100 MA, in the middle of the Cretaceous Long Normal Period. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles straddling the Osbourn Trough document a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern that is very similar in appearance to classic tiny wiggles; that is, they are not as strongly linear as would be expected for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> generated by true reversals, but they are definitely linear and have a unique pattern. They most likely represent a record of paleointensity fluctuations at this time and will help in unraveling the tectonics of this enigmatic region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cande, S. C.; Stock, J.; Clayton, R.; Gurnis, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">48</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD724827"> <span id="translatedtitle">Even More on the Direct Interpretation of <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Emilia and Bodvarsson and Bott and Huttom have recently discussed the description of relatively short wavelength (2 km) <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> intensity fluctuations of the sea floor, based on sophisticated methods of interpretation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. B. van den Akker C. G. A. Harrison J. D. Mudie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">49</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006epsc.conf..175G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Current thinking about Jupiter's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Repeated imaging of Jupiter's aurora has shown that the northern main oval has a distorted 'kidney bean' shape in the general range of 90-150o System III longitude, which appears unchanged since 1994. While it is more difficult to observe the conjugate regions in the southern aurora, no corresponding distortion appears in the south. Recent improved accuracy in locating the auroral footprint emission of Io has provided new information about the geometry of Jupiter's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in this and other areas. The persistent pattern of the main oval implies a disturbance of the local <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field, and the increased latitudinal separation of the locus of the Io footprint from the main oval implies a locally weaker field strength. The most recent images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) allow us to complement previous observations with the location of the auroral footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede in the region of interest. Their footpaths vary in parallel and form a kink in the 90-150° S3 sector which strongly suggests the presence of a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in this region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grodent, D.; Gerard, J.-C.; Gustin, J.; Clarke, J. T.; Connerney, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">50</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JAP...101b4108B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector using magnetoelectric composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study reports the low frequency magnetoelectric (ME) response of the sintered composites comprising of a piezoelectric phase Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) and magnetostrictive phases NiFe1.9Mn0.1O4 (NFM) and Ni0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4 (NZF) with varying ferrite contents of 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mol %. It was found that the ME coefficient for the PZT-NZF samples shows considerably less scattering as a function of frequency and the composition 0.8PZT-0.2NZF exhibited a flat response in the range of 10-100 Hz with a magnitude of 220 mV/cm Oe. This composition was used to design the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detector mounted in front of a global positioning system (GPS) controlled vehicle. The results from the vehicle test clearly demonstrate the feasibility of using sintered ME composites for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field detection in the noisy environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bergs, Richard; Islam, Rashed A.; Vickers, Michael; Stephanou, Harry; Priya, Shashank</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">51</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFMGP21A0035D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Axial versus older <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitude variations: Evidence for a common origin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the oceans have been used to reconstruct the plate tectonic history of the ocean basins for almost 40 years. Although the use of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> isochrons for the implicit dating of ocean floor remains of primeval importance, the use of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements to better understand the fundamental processes of mid-ocean ridge accretion is becoming more and more important. With the increased data density, the higher precision of the observations, both in positioning and sensitivity, as well as the availability of data at different scales and different altitudes relative to the ocean floor, an entire new spectrum of applications of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is opening up. In this contribution, we compare recent observations of Ravilly et al. (JGR, 1998), along the axis of the mid-Atlantic Ridge, with those made many years ago off axis in the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> quiet zone (85 - 118 Ma). Ravilly et al. observed that along segments of the mid-Atlantic Ridge, between 20 and 40 N, the axial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is higher by a factor of about 2 near the segments ends as compared to the segment centres. The preferred explanation is that both variations in the Fe-Ti content resulting from shallow magma fractionation and serpentinisation of shallow mantle rocks near the segment ends are responsible for this variation. One question is then if this signature persists as the crust generating the axial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> becomes older and moves away from the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis by seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>. The best region to look for such a signature off axis is the Cretaceous <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> quiet zone, because there the signal is not contaminated by large reversals in the Earth's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. Collette et al. (1984) observed such an increase in effective <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> near the ends of segments, which expresses itself as distinctly positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the fossil fracture zone valleys, when the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are reduced to the pole. Hence, we conclude that both observations are consistent and that the processes responsible for the amplitude variations are restricted to the axial region. Hydrothermal processes off axis may be responsible for additional changes in the total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure of the oceanic crust, but the fundamental '<span class="hlt">magnetic</span>' segmentation is preserved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dyment, J.; Roest, W. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">52</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7064270"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and tectonic fabric of marginal basins North of New Zealand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detailed airborne <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> studies conducted over the region of the S. W. Pacific marginal basins extending from the Solomon Islands to New Zealand suggest that three major phases of basin formation and island arc development have occurred in this region. Development of the Tasman Sea took place during the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene. Development of the basins to the east of the Tasman Sea occurred predominantly during the Oligocene as well as during the Upper Miocene to Recent. The South Fuji Basin, consisting of the Kupe and Minerva Abyssal Plains, is marked by the presence of possibly two RRR triple junction <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers that were active between the times of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 13 to 7 (36--25.5 m.y.). The Kupe Abyssal Plain shows the presence of residual <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 7 to 13 of the eastern limb of the proposed <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center. The western limb appears to have been subducted beneath the present site of the Three Kings Rise. This seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> phase (calculated half-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate of 35 mm/yr) was coincident with the overthrusting phase of the New Caledonia ultramafic rocks. During that period, active volcanism along the then continuous Solomons-New Hebrides-Fiji-Lau Island arc was taking place. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from 1 to 4 (0--8 m.y. B. P.) are seen to extend along a clearly defined lineation pattern over the North Fuji Basin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Malahoff, A.; Feden, R.H.; Fleming, H.S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-05-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">53</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5684S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deflection of solar wind protons over <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Moon has no any significant atmosphere and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. So it has considered lake a passive absorber of incoming plasma. The latest observation revealed that the significant deflected proton fluxes exist over <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at lunar surface. Such deflection implies that the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may act as magnetosphere-like obstacles (mini-magnetospheres), modifying the upstream plasma. We described the possible deflection mechanisms and their relations to solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sadovski, Andrei M.; Skalsky, Alexander A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">54</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20871460"> <span id="translatedtitle">Axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of QED in a strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field and noncommutative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Adler-Bell-Jackiw (ABJ) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of a 3+1 dimensional QED is calculated in the presence of a strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. It is shown that in the regime with the lowest Landau level (LLL) dominance a dimensional reduction from D=4 to D=2 dimensions occurs in the longitudinal sector of the low energy effective field theory. In the chiral limit, the resulting <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is therefore comparable with the axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of a two-dimensional massless Schwinger model. It is further shown that the U{sub A}(1) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of QED in a strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field is closely related to the nonplanar axial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of a conventional noncommutative U(1) gauge theory.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sadooghi, N. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), School of Physics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari Salim, A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">55</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.9074F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Near-seafloor <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field observations at the Mariana Trough back-arc <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We surveyed the Mariana Trough back-arc basin in the western Pacific with the Japanese submersible Shinkai 6500 to understand detailed crustal formation process at the 17° N segment [Fujiwara et al., 2008]. The 17° N segment is suggested to be in vigorous magmatic stage. Sheet lava flows, suggesting a high rate of eruption, occupy the seafloor of the segment even the slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> with a full-rate of ~3 cm/yr [Deschamps et al., 2005; Asada et al., 2007]. The objective of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field measurements is to investigate <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of lava flows at the seafloor. Near-seafloor observations provide us high-resolution <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that is valuable for the studies of the detailed <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> structure of ocean crust and paleointensity recorded in the ocean crust. <span class="hlt">Magnetization</span> intensities relate to age of lava, therefore deep-sea <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data may provide geophysical evidence for discussion of relative age differences of the lava flows. Three submersible dives were made in the axial valley situated in the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center. One of the dives traversed the axial valley a distance of ~2 km from the center of the valley toward off-axis, roughly parallel to the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction. We observed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with large-amplitude (up to 5000 nT) and short-wavelength (several tens of meters). We evaluated fine-scale across-axis <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure along the dive path from the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. High <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> intensity (up to 50 A/m) was estimated at the center of the axial valley, and therefore the lava flows in the area was likely young in age. The <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> intensity decreased toward the off-axis. The result suggests the seafloor age increases toward the off-axis. However the detailed variation of the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> distribution does not show simple seafloor age increment in proportion to distance from the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center. It implies the complexity of the crustal formation process. There is no clear correlation between the distribution of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> intensity along the dive path, that is the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction, and a compiled dataset of paleointensity variation [e.g. Sint-800: Guyodo and Valet, 1999]. A possible explanation is that eruption of lava flows at the segment was not focused on the fixed volcanic axis, but was dispersed rather broad volcanic zone because of enhanced magmatic activity. And/or new sheet lava flows traveled a long distance and overlapped old lava flows, and the lavas overprinted the seafloor <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. As the result, the sequential records of the paleointensity variation in the ocean crust of the slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate were disrupted.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fujiwara, Toshiya; Asada, Miho; Umino, Susumu; Koike, Yuki; Kanamatsu, Toshiya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">56</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54532704"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uncertainty in <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> directions derived from planetary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in view of numerical experiments with coalesced <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from Earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Martian <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> vectors and paleopole locations determined by different investigators using different methodologies are contradictory. I suggest that one of the reasons for this is that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are assumed to be caused by a homogeneously <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> source may actually be due to coalescence of multiple crustal sources that may be <span class="hlt">magnetically</span> coherently or incoherently <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> and whose coalescence</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Ravat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">57</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.1013R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Matching Martian <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Snc <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Properties</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Understanding the origin of Martian <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is a major challenge for Martian studies, both in terms of planetary geodynamics and of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> petrology. Present models require a crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of 15-30 A/m with a thickness of 20-50 km [e.g. 1]. SNC meteorites are the only material available to make a magnetominer- alogical model for this crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. Here will be presented a synthesis based on 16 independant SNCs, with all the falls and non Antarctic finds except NWA480. Titanomagnetite is the major <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> carrier only in the four Nakhlites, Los Angeles, ALH75005 and Chassigny. Due to high titanium substitution, the Curie point based on high temperature <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements or microprobe analysis is only about 150C in the nakhlites and Los Angeles. High coercivity pyrrhotite is the major car- rier in the other eight basaltic shergottites measured. We estimate in-situ NRM for SNCs Noachian equivalent by using saturation remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> and use the proposed upper bound of 5% for NRM/IRM in case of TRM in an Earth-like field for magnetite or pyrrhotite Taking the lower bound of 15 A/m for crustal NRM and a density of 3 leads to a minimum Mrs of 10-1 Am2/kg. Only Los Angeles, NWA817 and 1068, i.e. the most <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> Nakhlites and basaltic shergottites, are above this threshold. ALH84001, the only SNC with the right age, is two orders of magnitude below, like Chassigny, while lherzolitic ALH75005 is one order of magnitude below. This confirms the contention that <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sources are rather mafic than ultramafic rocks. Titanomagnetite is the preferred candi-date mineral in the litterature but the Curie point of 150C found on SNCs is at odd with a Curie depth of 20-50 km during NRM acquisition. Although fundamental drawbacks exist in the use of SNCs to put forward a magnetomineralogical model for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, sulfides appear as a serious alternative to oxydes in the martian case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rochette, P.; Sautter, V.; Brunet, F.; Chevrier, V.; Lorand, J. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">58</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMGP21A0772G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using fracture zones <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to unravel the long-term behavior of the geomagnetic field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles oriented along the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction have been used to study paleointensity variations of the geomagnetic field. These data-sets have confirmed the link between crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> and past geomagnetic field variations. An additional set of globally distributed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, oriented perpendicular to the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> flow-line direction, are located above oceanic fracture zones. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have never been used to study the geomagnetic field nor has their origin been systematically studied. Here we present the first attempt to use these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to study the long-term behavior of the geomagnetic field in the Cretaceous normal polarity superchron. We use archival data and new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and bathymetry data acquired on geophysical cruise MGLN44MV aboard the R/V Melville on the Pioneer and the Murray fracture zones, North Pacific. These Fracture zones straddle the fast-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> Pacific Cretaceous Quiet Zone (KQZ) and provide a relatively simple setting to test the feasibility of our approach. We use data from 150 crossings that cover a time-span of 27 million years (110 to 83 Ma). The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> demonstrate a remarkable uniform shape and size for thousands of kilometers implying that they were generated by spatially and temporally uniform processes. Two dimensional inversion solutions together with 3D forward models suggest that remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> governs the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signal. These models also imply that enhanced <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>, primarily situated within the uplifted regions adjacent to fracture zones, is responsible for the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The actual mechanism that creates these <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> highs is not known, yet the inference of remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> allows us to use the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to explore the behavior of the geomagnetic field. The nearly uniform amplitude of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> suggests that the strength of the geomagnetic field remained relatively constant over most of the superchron. If a change in the geodynamo behavior is linked with changes in frequency of reversals then this change should have taken place after (and probably before) the superchron. Initial analysis of crossings located on crust younger then the KQZ suggests that in-fact, the Cenozoic field had similar strength as the superchron.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Granot, R.; Cande, S.; Gee, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">59</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P41C1627B"> <span id="translatedtitle">ARTEMIS spacecraft observations of lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at low altitude</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ARTEMIS is the first spacecraft mission to make dual-spacecraft measurements of particles and fields from orbit around the Moon. The spacecraft is well-suited to investigate the interaction of lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with the solar wind and terrestrial magnetospheric plasma, with frequent periapsis passes within 50 km of the surface, and occasional passes lower than 30 km. In the second half of 2011 ARTEMIS passes within a few tens of km from the surface, in the vicinity of an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We will present ARTEMIS observations from one (or possibly more) of these low altitude passes near <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and offer interpretation of the observations of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> (FGM) and electric (EFI) field as well as suprathermal charged particles (ESA). We will place the ARTEMIS observations in context with previous observational and theoretical work dealing with the influence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on their local plasma environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brain, D. A.; Ames, W. F.; Poppe, A.; Halekas, J. S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Glassmeier, K.; McFadden, J. P.; Angelopoulos, V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">60</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PCE....36.1318E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over archaeological targets in urban environments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> prospecting is one of the most widely used methods for investigating archaeological sites in the world. It is often applied before and during various types of industrial development and in agricultural areas. In Israel, most potential archaeological targets are located in urban settings, which substantially complicate their geophysical signatures. Noise from natural factors such as the inclined <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (about 44°) complex geological structure of the sites, and uneven terrain relief as well as artificial sources such as modern iron-containing objects, power lines and underground communications can confound the interpretation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. For the quantitative analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from ancient targets in Israel nonconventional procedures (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2001) were applied. In this paper the effects of power lines on the quantitative analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicative of archaeological objects are investigated. The method was tested on two typical models of physical-archaeological ancient remains by using different distances to the power line.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eppelbaum, Lev V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">61</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUSMGP13A..02G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spherical Cap Harmonic Modeling of the Antarctic <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the last decade the Antarctic Digital <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Project (ADMAP) produced a representation of the Antarctic crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. All the ground, marine and aeromagnetic data collected south of 60°S since the IGY 1957-58 were compiled and reprocessed to produce a regional crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map with a 5-km grid interval. Satellite-altitude crustal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the CHAMP (400 km) and Ørsted (700 km altitude) missions were also processed and used to fill in regional gaps in the near-surface survey coverage. In this paper, we report on our efforts to develop a Spherical Cap Harmonic (SCH) model of the multi-altitude crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> observations. The purpose of our work is to produce a regional model that will depict the crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> anywhere between the surface and satellite altitude with an accuracy not achieved by global-Earth models. The new SCH model synthesizes almost 50 years of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> survey observations to facilitate our future studies of the Antarctic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gaya-Pique, L. R.; Kim, H.; von Frese, R. R.; Chiappini, M.; Taylor, P. T.; Golynsky, A. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">62</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMGP21C0788H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Antipodal to Large Impact Basins on the Moon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The high resolution lunar-wide <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map derived from Lunar Prospector (LP) vector magnetometer data has revealed weak <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the nearside large impact basins flooded by mare basalts. Strong <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> features are observed over most of the Nectarian and Pre-Nectarian aged lunar highlands. In particular, regions antipodal to some of the largest basin-forming impact craters show strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> concentrations. Of the 43 basins investigated here, antipodal regions of 11 basins show these anomalous features with strengths in excess of 5-25 nT at LP's mapping altitude (30 km). These distinct anomalous concentrations were previously known to occur only at the antipodes of Imbrium, Orientale, Serenitatis and Crisium basins. The mean <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> strength within each antipodal region when plotted against increasing age of the antipodes shows two age groupings with similar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> behavior. The first age grouping - (Imbrium, Orientale, Serenitatis and Crisium) is of Imbrium to Late Nectarian in age. This grouping is correlative with the peak <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field enhancement between 3.6 and 3.9 Gyr, inferred from paleomagnetic data from the returned Apollo samples. The second age grouping ( Lorentz, Coulomb-Sarton, Tranquillitatis, Cognitum and Insularum) is of Mid to Early Pre-Nectarian age. This grouping has not been correlated to any known global <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field enhancement event, and needs further investigation to ascertain the origin of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The present work supports the antipodal hypothesis as one of the possible mechanisms to explain the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the antipode of the impact basin. The absence of appreciable <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the 32 other antipodes, however, indicates the importance of other processes, and superposition effects, that have operated on the Moon during its history.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hemant, K.; Purucker, M. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">63</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.T12C0930K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of Marine <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Vector <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Southern Ayu Trough, Southern Philippine Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Ayu Trough is a divergent margin, located at the boundary of the Philippine Sea and the Caroline Plates. Previous attempts to resolve the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineations of this region using total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field have not been successful because it represents a case of east-west <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center situated near the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> equator. The difficulty is compounded by the fact that the Ayu Trough is an ultra-slow-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> center, which exhibits a complex history of evolution. As an attempt to get around the inherent ambiguity of total field measurement, a shipboard three-component magnetometer was employed during our recent cruise to the Ayu Trough along with proton precession magnetometer. This study examines the vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data collected in the south part of the Ayu Trough and compares them with tectonic features identified from other geophysical measurements. First, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field due to the ship was removed from the measured field. We then subtracted the International Geomagnetic Reference Field and the diurnal variation recorded at Guam observatory from our measurement. The amplitude of the north-south component <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is substantially less than that of other <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which suggests that the general strike of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineations in this region is north-south. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> boundary and their strike were estimated by assuming that the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sources are two-dimensional. On the basis of its tectonic structure and interpretation of the total field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern, the Ayu Trough can be divided into two sections with distance from the axis: the exterior (> 100 km from the axis) which shows evidence of rifted margin and the interior (< 100 km from the axis) which exhibits the characteristics of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>. The vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> appears to be useful in determining major boundaries, such as those between the exterior and interior sections in our area. Within the interior section of the Ayu Trough, however, the discrimination of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> boundaries was less successful. The lack of consistency of estimated strikes between track lines suggests that the seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> within the interior section of Ayu Trough did not occur as two-dimensional process, but instead was three-dimensional.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, S.; Lee, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">64</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983JGR....88.3403M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of a Vine-Matthews <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Lineation from a submersible: The source and character of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report here the first attempt to map directly the boundary of a Vine-Matthews <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> stripe on the seafloor. Our objectives are to study the processes of oceanic crustal accretion as recorded in the reversal transition zone and to investigate the formation of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source of Vine-Matthews <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Our deep-tow and ALVIN-based <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> studies focus on the Matuyama/Brunhes reversal transition on the flanks of the East Pacific Rise near 21°N. While the sea level <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are less than average in clarity for the East Pacific Rise, a `three-dimensional' inversion of deep-tow data reveals a sharp, strike-linear polarity transition less than 1.8 km wide (Macdonald et al., 1980a). These measurements have been augmented by mounting a vertical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradiometer on ALVIN and making 280 reliable polarity determinations along and across the polarity transition zone. Even on long traverses across both sides of the boundary, we find that nearly every <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> target has the correct polarity, i.e., the same polarity as the regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineation. This homogeneity in polarity of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineations is surprising. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> polarity transition in the outcropping volcanic section is sharp and linear along strike, delineated in some cases by a clear geologic contact of opposing flow fronts of different ages. Several weakly <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> outcrops mapped within the transition zone may have erupted during the time in which the geomagnetic field was reversing. The reversal boundary mapped on the seafloor from ALVIN is displaced 250 m to 500 m NW away from the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis relative to the position of the average boundary as derived from inversion of the deep-tow and sea level <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data. This offset provides a means for estimating the spillover of lava flows away from the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis during the time the crust was formed. The combination of deep-tow and ALVIN measurements suggests that circa 0.7 m.y. ago the crustal accretion zone (<span class="hlt">magnetized</span> volcanic, intrusive, and plutonic rocks) was 2000-2800 m wide, while the zone of recent volcanism alone was only 1000-2000 m wide. The determination for the most recent reversal agrees well with submersible observations at the present <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center where the zone of recent volcanism (neovolcanic zone) varies between 600 and 2000 m in width. This very orderly picture for the formation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineations and crustal accretion processes appears to conflict with complex Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> results from the Atlantic. We suggest that the crustal generating processes and resulting <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure vary significantly with <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate. On the slow-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> Mid-Atlantic Ridge, major episodes of volcanism are likely to be infrequent (˜104 years), the magma chamber may be non-steady state, and the neovolcanic zone shifts or varies in width considerably. This sporadic, start and stop <span class="hlt">spreading</span> process will contribute to a highly heterogeneous and complex crustal and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure as seen in DSDP holes. In addition, significant faulting and tilting may disrupt slow-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> crust. For intermediate- to fast-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers, more frequent volcanism (˜50-600 years), a nearly steady state magma chamber, and a narrow, stable neovolcanic zone will create a less complex <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and crustal structure both as seen from ALVIN and as inferred from clear sea level <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Pacific.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">MacDonald, Ken C.; Miller, Stephen P.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Atwater, Tanya M.; Shure, Loren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">65</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ApJ...719.1144L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Seismic Discrimination of Thermal and <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Sunspot Umbrae</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Efforts to model sunspots based on helioseismic signatures need to discriminate between the effects of (1) a strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field that introduces time-irreversible, vantage-dependent phase shifts, apparently connected to fast- and slow-mode coupling and wave absorption and (2) a thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that includes cool gas extending an indefinite depth beneath the photosphere. Helioseismic observations of sunspots show travel times considerably reduced with respect to equivalent quiet-Sun signatures. Simulations by Moradi & Cally of waves skipping across sunspots with photospheric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields of order 3 kG show travel times that respond strongly to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field and relatively weakly to the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by itself. We note that waves propagating vertically in a vertical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field are relatively insensitive to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field, while remaining highly responsive to the attendant thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Travel-time measurements for waves with large skip distances into the centers of axially symmetric sunspots are therefore a crucial resource for discrimination of the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> beneath sunspot umbrae from the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. One-dimensional models of sunspot umbrae based on compressible-radiative-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span>-convective simulations such as by Rempel et al. can be fashioned to fit observed helioseismic travel-time spectra in the centers of sunspot umbrae. These models are based on cooling of the upper 2-4 Mm of the umbral subphotosphere with no significant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> beneath 4.5 Mm. The travel-time reductions characteristic of these models are primarily a consequence of a Wilson depression resulting from a strong downward buoyancy of the cooled umbral medium.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lindsey, C.; Cally, P. S.; Rempel, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21457099"> <span id="translatedtitle">SEISMIC DISCRIMINATION OF THERMAL AND <span class="hlt">MAGNETIC</span> <span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> IN SUNSPOT UMBRAE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Efforts to model sunspots based on helioseismic signatures need to discriminate between the effects of (1) a strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field that introduces time-irreversible, vantage-dependent phase shifts, apparently connected to fast- and slow-mode coupling and wave absorption and (2) a thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that includes cool gas extending an indefinite depth beneath the photosphere. Helioseismic observations of sunspots show travel times considerably reduced with respect to equivalent quiet-Sun signatures. Simulations by Moradi and Cally of waves skipping across sunspots with photospheric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields of order 3 kG show travel times that respond strongly to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field and relatively weakly to the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by itself. We note that waves propagating vertically in a vertical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field are relatively insensitive to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field, while remaining highly responsive to the attendant thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Travel-time measurements for waves with large skip distances into the centers of axially symmetric sunspots are therefore a crucial resource for discrimination of the thermal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> beneath sunspot umbrae from the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. One-dimensional models of sunspot umbrae based on compressible-radiative-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span>-convective simulations such as by Rempel et al. can be fashioned to fit observed helioseismic travel-time spectra in the centers of sunspot umbrae. These models are based on cooling of the upper 2-4 Mm of the umbral subphotosphere with no significant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> beneath 4.5 Mm. The travel-time reductions characteristic of these models are primarily a consequence of a Wilson depression resulting from a strong downward buoyancy of the cooled umbral medium.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lindsey, C. [NorthWest Research Associates, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Cally, P. S. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria (Australia); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive CG1, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003GeoJI.154..706R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magmatism at the west Iberia non-volcanic rifted continental margin: evidence from analyses of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss the magmatic development of the west Iberia non-volcanic rifted continental margin in the North Atlantic Ocean. So-called `non-volcanic' rifted continental margins are characterized by a lack of syn-rift magmatism and are considered to be largely amagmatic. However, this is clearly an oversimplification since seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> itself is a magmatic process and it is implausible that seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> begins instantaneously. We concentrate our attention on the recently described zone of exhumed continental mantle (ZECM) to investigate what magmatic processes accompanied the breakup of the continental lithosphere and the subsequent formation of the ZECM leading to the onset of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>. We use <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> supplemented by the interpretations of multichannel seismic reflection profiles and wide-angle seismic experiments presented elsewhere. Forward and inverse modelling of a sea-surface <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> chart and of surface and deep-towed magnetometer profiles shows that <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within the ZECM differ in trend, amplitude and source type from those in the adjacent oceanic crust and thinned continental crust. The ZECM <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> appear to be caused by elongated source bodies within 8 km of the top of the acoustic basement aligned parallel to the margin. We interpret such bodies as syn-extensional intrusions that increase in volume oceanward. They eventually merge in the vicinity of a margin-parallel, basement peridotite ridge to give rise to a continuous crust that records reversals in the Earth's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field from the time of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> M4(N)-M5(R), i.e. to mark the onset of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>. We find no evidence for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> formed by seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>, at either slow or ultraslow rates, before M5(R) (128 Ma).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Russell, S. M.; Whitmarsh, R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhyB..351....1K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Damage <span class="hlt">spreading</span> in a periodic nanoarray of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> posts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the dynamics of <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> of a nanoscopic array, formed by monodomain <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> posts, by means of the Pardavi-Horvath algorithm. The damage <span class="hlt">spreading</span> technique is applied to check the stability of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure of the array in the presence of an applied oscillating <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of low frequency. As a space of parameters, we consider the plane (?,Ha), where ? is the distribution width of the coercive fields of the array posts and Ha is the amplitude of the applied oscillating field. Within this plane an area is found, where local damages of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure <span class="hlt">spread</span>. We check also the possibility of collective flippings (avalanches) of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> moments of the post. We found no avalanches at any point of the (?,Ha) plane.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaczanowski, A.; Kulakowski, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60425489"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving the effect of reducing <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to pole in low <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> latitude area by using directional high cut filter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper reports that transfer function for reduction to pole can be used to reduce directional oblique <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to vertical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in frequency (or wavenumber) domain. Random noises in real <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data in low latitude area greatly distort the result of reducing <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to pole, thus causing difficulty in quantitative inversion or qualitative interpretation. Consequently we apply</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. Jiansheng; W. Jialin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3778608"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> resonance imaging in obstructive M?llerian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a very rare congenital <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the urogenital tract involving Müllerian ducts and Wolffian structures. It is characterized by the triad of didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive diagnostic modality for demonstrating anatomic variation and associated complications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sen, Kamal Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Dhivya; Kanagaraj, Vikrant</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70023769"> <span id="translatedtitle">New digital <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> database for North America</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Consejo de Recursos Minerales of Mexico (CRM) are compiling an upgraded digital <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> database and map for North America. This trinational project is expected to be completed by late 2002.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Finn, C. A.; Pilkington, M.; Cuevas, A.; Hernandez, I.; Urrutia, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.P23C1272H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral and <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Studies of Lesser-Known Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and Albedo <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The origin of the lunar swirls is an outstanding puzzle in lunar geoscience. In addition, the swirls lie at the intersection of broader issues in planetary science, including planetary <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> (e.g., the origin of the <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust via core dynamo versus impact processes) and the relative importance of solar wind exposure versus micrometeoroid bombardment in producing the optical effects of space weathering. Many of the unusual high-albedo features known as lunar swirls are associated with crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and many of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are found near the antipodes of major impact basins. The leading hypotheses that have been advanced for the formation of the swirls are: (a) regolith disturbance caused by the relatively recent impact of a comet coma, cometary fragments or cometary meteor swarms; and (b) atypical space weathering as a result of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> shielding the surface from solar wind ion bombardment. Apollo subsatellite instruments, whose coverage was limited to equatorial and mid-latitudes, first revealed the existence of lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The Lunar Prospector (LP) mission provided global data and has led to the discovery of additional regions of <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust. We have conducted a series of studies on lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and albedo <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using LP magnetometer data and Clementine multispectral images. Three of these <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have only been recently identified. Newly discovered <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> near the craters Abel, Stofler, and Hartwig do not appear to harbor unusual albedo markings. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> near Rima Sirsalis has long been known from Apollo data. A small sinuous swirl to the northwest may be related to the Sirsalis <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> or could be a southern extension of Reiner Gamma. Our examination of images for Rima Sirsalis has led to the identification of an additional loop-shaped marking on Oceanus Procellarum and some possible anomalous bright patches in the nearby highlands. Our new LP maps of scalar field strength show that previously identified swirls near Hopmann, Firsov, and in western Mare Moscoviense do coincide with <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. On the basis of this work, our preliminary finding is that most, perhaps all, swirl-like albedo patterns are co-located with crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, but not all <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exhibit unusual albedo patterns. Plots of Clementine color ratio versus reflectance for small areas show spectral trends that are consistent with a lesser degree of maturation for surfaces within the high-reflectance portions of swirls compared with the normal background, which is consistent with either mode of formation discussed above. Additional analysis of Clementine spectral data, combined with new observations from LRO and other spacecraft can help to further characterize these enigmatic features.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hawke, B. R.; Blewett, D. T.; Coman, E. I.; Purucker, M. E.; Gillis-Davis, J. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16484488"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plasma acceleration above martian <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Auroras are caused by accelerated charged particles precipitating along <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field lines into a planetary atmosphere, the auroral brightness being roughly proportional to the precipitating particle energy flux. The Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms experiment on the Mars Express spacecraft has made a detailed study of acceleration processes on the nightside of Mars. We observed accelerated electrons and ions in the deep nightside high-altitude region of Mars that map geographically to interface/cleft regions associated with martian crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> regions. By integrating electron and ion acceleration energy down to the upper atmosphere, we saw energy fluxes in the range of 1 to 50 milliwatts per square meter per second. These conditions are similar to those producing bright discrete auroras above Earth. Discrete auroras at Mars are therefore expected to be associated with plasma acceleration in diverging <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> flux tubes above crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> regions, the auroras being distributed geographically in a complex pattern by the many multipole <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field lines extending into space. PMID:16484488</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lundin, R; Winningham, D; Barabash, S; Frahm, R; Holmström, M; Sauvaud, J-A; Fedorov, A; Asamura, K; Coates, A J; Soobiah, Y; Hsieh, K C; Grande, M; Koskinen, H; Kallio, E; Kozyra, J; Woch, J; Fraenz, M; Brain, D; Luhmann, J; McKenna-Lawler, S; Orsini, R S; Brandt, P; Wurz, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-02-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42048399"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> properties of anorthosites: A forgotten source for planetary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Anorthosites, igneous rocks very rich in plagioclase, rarely considered to be strongly <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>, are common on Earth, and the Moon, and inferred to be on other planets. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> properties of anorthosites could be important in investigating associated mineral deposits and in studying <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, especially on Mars. Here we investigate three late Proterozoic anorthosites in Rogaland, Norway, for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Laurie L. Brown; Suzanne A. McEnroe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70012575"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> detected by the Apollo substatellite magnetometers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Properties of lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> thus far deduced from Apollo subsatellite magnetometer data are reviewed using two of the most accurate presently available <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps - one covering a portion of the lunar near side and the other a part of the far side. The largest single <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> found within the region of coverage on the near-side map correlates exactly with a conspicuous, light-colored marking in western Oceanus Procellarum called Reiner Gamma. This feature is interpreted as an unusual deposit of ejecta from secondary craters of the large nearby primary impact crater Cavalerius. An age for Cavalerius (and, by implication, for Reiner Gamma) of 3.2 ?? 0.2 ?? 109 y is estimated. The main (30 ?? 60 km) Reiner Gamma deposit is nearly uniformly <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> in a single direction, with a minimum mean <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> intensity of ???7 ?? 10-2 G cm3/g (assuming a density of 3 g/cm3), or about 700 times the stable <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> component of the most <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> returned samples. Additional medium-amplitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist over the Fra Mauro Formation (Imbrium basin ejecta emplaced ???3.9 ?? 109 y ago) where it has not been flooded by mare basalt flows, but are nearly absent over the maria and over the craters Copernicus, Kepler, and Reiner and their encircling ejecta mantles. The mean altitude of the far-side <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gap is much higher than that of the near-side map and the surface geology is more complex, so individual <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sources have not yet been identified. However, it is clear that a concentration of especially strong sources exists in the vicinity of the craters Van de Graaff and Aitken. Numerical modeling of the associated fields reveals that the source locations do not correspond with the larger primary impact craters of the region and, by analogy with Reiner Gamma, may be less conspicuous secondary crater ejecta deposits. The reason for a special concentration of strong sources in the Van de Graaff-Aitken region is unknown, but may be indirectly related to the existence of strongly modified crustal terrain which also occurs in the same region. The inferred directions of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> for the several sources of the largest <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are highly inclined with respect to one another, but are generally depleted in the north-south direction. The north-south depletion of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> intensity appears to continue across the far-side within the region of coverage. The mechanism of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> and the origin of the <span class="hlt">magnetizing</span> field remain unresolved, but the uniformity with which the Reiner Gamma deposit is apparently <span class="hlt">magnetized</span>, and the north-south depletion of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> intensity across a substantial portion of the far side, seem to require the existence of an ambient field, perhaps of global or larger extent. The very different inferred directions of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> possessed by nearly adjacent sources of the Van de Graaff-Aitken <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and the depletion in their north-south component of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>, do not favor an internally generated dipolar field oriented parallel to the present spin axis. A variably oriented interplanetary <span class="hlt">magnetizing</span> field that was intrinsically strong or locally amplified by unknown surface processes is least inconsistent with the data. ?? 1979.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hood, L. L.; Coleman, Jr. , P. J.; Russell, C. T.; Wilhelms, D. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRE..116.2002B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar swirls: Examining crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and space weathering trends</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have used multispectral images from Clementine and data from Lunar Prospector's magnetometer to conduct a survey of lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, prominent lunar swirls, and lesser known swirl markings to provide new information on the nature of swirls and their association with <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We find that all swirls and swirl-like albedo patterns are associated with areas of <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust, but not all areas of <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust are colocated with swirl-like albedo <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. All observed swirls exhibit spectral characteristics similar to immature material and generally have slightly lower FeO values compared with their surroundings as determined with a multispectral iron-mapping method. We discuss these results in relation to the various hypotheses for swirl formation. The comet impact hypothesis for lunar swirls would not predict a difference in the spectrally determined FeO content between swirls and nearby ordinary surfaces. The compositional difference could be explained as a consequence of (1) <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> shielding of the surface from the solar wind, which could produce anomalous space weathering (little darkening with limited reddening) and potentially alter the predictions of the multispectral iron-mapping algorithm while the compositional contrast could be enhanced by delivery of lower-FeO ejecta from outside the swirl; and (2) accumulation of fine plagioclase-rich dust moving under the influence of electric fields induced by solar wind interactions with a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Therefore, we cannot at present clearly distinguish between the solar wind shielding and electrostatic dust accumulation models for swirl formation. We describe future measurements that could contribute to solution of the puzzle of swirl origin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blewett, David T.; Coman, Ecaterina I.; Hawke, B. Ray; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Purucker, Michael E.; Hughes, Christopher G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSM.P31A..04R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlated <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> West of the Isidis Basin, Mars and Implications for Plains <span class="hlt">Magnetism</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of Mars reflects strong crustal <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> resulting from an ancient internal field. The crustal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern parallels the geologic dichotomy in that most of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> detected by the Mars Global Surveyor are located within the persumably older southern highlands while the northern lowlands has weak or no <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signature at satellite atltiudes. We have analyzed a section of the dichotomy boundary whose geology has been studied extensively in order to examine the implications of correlations between gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the regional distribution of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sources. The study area contains some of the strongest <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed outside the area of high-amplitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> found within the Terrae Cimmeria and Sirenum sector of the southern highlands. Several strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the area of the Ismenius quadrangle are associated with a mapped normal fault, but the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity peaks and troughs are out of phase. The isostatic gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicate higher density bodies flanking the mapped normal fault. If we assume common sources of both the gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and a coherent direction of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> within a spatially variable source layer, we acheive the best fit to both the gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields using a low inclination for the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> direction (~30 degrees), in general agreement with published paleopole estimates for Mars. This solution requires a continuous <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source layer extending north beneath the plains to avoid a large edge effect <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>; this layer produces near-zero field away from the fault. An alternate model assumes that the gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correspond to areas of demagnetization of a preexisting continuous <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source layer. This model fits best for an inclination near -45 degrees and does not require a source layer in the northern plains. Candidate geologic processes that could have produced such source distributions in the study area include extension and volcanic intrusion focused near the dichotomy boundary, and hydrothermal alteration which created, destroyed, or reduced the <span class="hlt">magnetism</span>. The product of layer thickness and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity implied by these models is roughly 5-10 times less than inferred in the highly <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> region of the southern highlands, indicating significantly different genesis or evolution of the crust occurred in that region as compared to the rest of Mars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raymond, C. A.; Smrekar, S. E.; McGill, G. E.; Dimitriou, A. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52772766"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contributions of Cretaceous Quiet Zone natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> to Magsat <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the southwest Indian Ocean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Magsat <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Southwest Indian Ocean are modeled using a combination of induced plus viscous remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (IM\\/VRM) and natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (NRM). Two broad, roughly parallel, SW to NE trending triple-peaked positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> dominate the region, one lying south of Africa and the other north of Antarctica. Although these <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> peaks generally correspond with the Agulhas</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lawrence G. Fullerton; Herbert V. Frey; James H. Roark; Herman H. Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20080553"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> ion source with a coaxial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> filter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> filter consisting of a pair of permanent <span class="hlt">magnets</span> to the multicusp source reduces the energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> utilizes a cylindrical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leung, K.N.; Lee, Y.H.Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/details.jsp?query_id=0&page=0&ostiID=873116"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> ion source with a coaxial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> filter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> filter consisting of a pair of permanent <span class="hlt">magnets</span> to the multicusp source reduces the energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> utilizes a cylindrical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy <span class="hlt">spread</span> in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette (Berkeley, CA)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6173617"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> have a diverse impact on many aspects of physical phenomena. The role of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in determining physical structure from the amplitude for decay to the foundations of superstring theory will be reviewed. 36 refs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bardeen, W.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.geologie.ens.fr/~rooke/NCRpdf4web/ChamotRooke&al-1987.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Shikoku Basin: a new interpretation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Kaiko surveys over the Nankai Trough made available new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and structural data for the northern Shikoku Basin. A survey of the oceanic lithosphere subducting below Southwest Japan along the central Nankai Trough revealed the existence of several north-south basement troughs. They are probably transform faults related to a north-south <span class="hlt">spreading</span> system. We examine the possibility of a late phase</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nicolas Chamot-Rooke; Vincent Renard; Xavier Le Pichon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ufo&id=EJ588347"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">|This theme issue on <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Online-Offline, 1999</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005A%26A...432L..21C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The calcium isotopic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> CP stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chemically peculiar stars in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sequence can show the same isotopic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in calcium previously discovered for mercury-manganese stars in the non-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sequence. In extreme cases, the dominant isotope is the exotic 48Ca. Measurements of Ca II lines arising from 3d-4p transitions reveal the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by showing shifts up to 0.2 Å for the extreme cases - too large to be measurement errors. We report measurements of miscellaneous objects, including two metal-poor stars, two apparently normal F-stars, an Am-star, and the N-star U Ant. Demonstrable <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are apparent only for the Ap stars. The largest shifts are found in rapidly oscillating Ap stars and in one weakly <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> Ap star, HD 133792. We note the possible relevance of these shifts for the GAIA mission. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla and Paranal, Chile (ESO programme Nos. 65.L-0316, 68.D-0254 and 266.D-5655).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cowley, C. R.; Hubrig, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFM.T11A1226K"> <span id="translatedtitle">New Map and Grid of Compiled <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> from the Arctic Ocean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> compilations provide a unique view of the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> history of the world's oceans and allow the correlation of prominent features on conjugate landmasses. For the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans the state-of-the-art has been represented by the GSC-Atlantic compilation (Verhoef et al,1996). Unfortunately, the deep Arctic Ocean field in this compilation was compromised by the use of only older 1975-1978 US Navy data in the Canada Basin and the use of heavily filtered small scale contour charts for the regions surveyed by the FSU. As a follow-on to the GSC-A compilation, researchers from VNIIOkeangeologia, (St.-Petersburg, Russia) and the Naval Research Laboratory (Washington, DC) embarked on a program funded by CRDF to retrieve and combine their libraries of both historical and recent aeromagnetic data. Over 1,000,000 line kilometers of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> profiles were totally reprocessed, adjusted and leveled using both software supplied by GSC-A (Verhoef et al, 1995) and original software developed by the Russian and US researchers (Korneva, Kovacs). Data includes the 1990-1992 Russian Makarov-De Long Islands Geotransect and the 1992-1996 NRL Arctic aeromagnetic data sets for the Canada Basin. The recent (1997-99) US <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data sets over Chukchi Cap and the Eurasian Basin were used for the navigational correction of historic Russian <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles. The final VNIIO/NRL <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> grid (5x5 km) was leveled, adjusted and merged with the GSC-A compilation in those regions with no new data. We announce the imminent release of this data set and hope the resulting <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map and grid of the Arctic Ocean will prove to be significantly more detailed and reliable, both for regional studies and for the planning of new detailed surveys.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kovacs, L. S.; Glebovsky, V. Y.; Maschenkov, S. P.; Brozena, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009M%26PS...44..131K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> zones of Mars: Deformation-controlled origin of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intense <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over Martian surface suggest preservation of large volumes of very old crust (>3 Gyr) that formed in the presence of a global <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. The global distribution of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensities observed above the Martian crust suggests a division into three zones. Zone 1 is where the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signature is negligible or of relatively low intensity at Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) satellite mapping altitude (400 km). Zone 2 is the region of intermediate crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> amplitudes and zone 3 is where the highest <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensities are measured. Crater demagnetization near zone 3 reveals the presence of rocks with both high <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity and coercivity. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> analyses of terrestrial rocks show that compositional banding in orogenic zones significantly enhances both <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> coercivity and thermal remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (TRM) efficiency. Such enhancement offers a novel explanation for the anomalously large intensities inferred of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sources on Mars. We propose that both large <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> coercivity and intensity near the South Pole is indicative of the presence of a large degree of deformation. Associated compositional zoning creates conditions for large scale <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> anisotropy allowing <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals to acquire <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> more efficiently, thereby causing the distinct <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signatures in zone 3, expressed by intense <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We use a simple model to verify the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> enhancement. We hypothesize that <span class="hlt">magnetically</span> enhanced zone would reside over the down welling plume at the time of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> acquisition.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kletetschka, G.; Lillis, R.; Ness, N. F.; Acuña, M. H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Wasilewski, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44880230"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interpretation of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the Omaha Oil Field, Gallatin County, Illinois</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 40 nanoTesla (nT) <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> identified in an aeromagnetic survey over southern Illinois contours as a localized <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> high on the west flank of a regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> low. This <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is generally coincident with the Omaha Oil Field in northwest Gallatin County, Illinois. It was initially assumed that cultural sources of steel associated with this oil field were</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mark A. Sparlin; R. D. Lewis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMGP31A..01M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving the <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map of the United States</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have improved <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the United States using National Uranium Reconnaissance & Evaluations (NURE) aeromagnetic surveys collected during the 1970s. Previous versions of these data processed using IGRF/DGRF do not mesh well at the survey boundaries because of leveling artifacts. Similarly, the U.S. component of the North American <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map has long wavelength errors caused by warping of hundreds of state and local aeromagnetic surveys during the merging process. The main difference in our processing that has allowed us to retain proper base levels is the use of the temporally continuous main field Comprehensive Model (CM4) by Sabaka et al. (2004, GJI, 159, 521-547). The advantage of using the NURE surveys is that most of these surveys have time information and diurnal variation observed with basestation magnetometers is removed from them. Furthermore, we have cleaned the NURE data by removing many spurious values through visual inspection. Some NURE surveys did not have total field values or time information. For these surveys, we reintroduced the IGRF for their approximate date and removed the core field determined by CM4. We compare the results of our processing and improvements with the U.S. aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data prepared by different merging techniques. The improved map is more suitable for regional geologic and geodynamic interpretations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McIndoo, M.; Shaw, A.; Batir, J.; Ravat, D.; Milligan, P.; Kucks, R. P.; Hill, P.; Hildenbrand, T. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20905444"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetoresistance and <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in CeB{sub 6}</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High precision magnetoresistance (MR) {delta}{rho}/{rho}(H,T) and <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> M(H,T) measurements have been carried out for well known and typical strongly correlated electron system-cerium hexaboride. The detailed measurements have been fulfilled on single crystalline samples of CeB{sub 6} over a wide temperature range T>=1.8K in <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields up to 70kOe. It was shown that the MR <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> heavy fermion compound under investigation can be consistently interpreted in the frameworks of a simple relation between resistivity and <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>-{delta}{rho}/{rho}{approx}M{sup 2} obtained by Yosida [Phys. Rev. 107(1957)396]. A local <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility {chi}{sub loc}(T,H)=(1/H*(d({delta}{rho}/{rho})/dH)){sup 1/2} was deduced directly from the MR {delta}{rho}(H,T) measurements and compared with the experimental data of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> M(H,T). The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility dependences {chi}{sub loc}(T,H) and {chi}(T,H) obtained in this study for CeB{sub 6} allow us to analyze the complicated H-T <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> phase diagram of this so-called dense Kondo-system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bogach, A.V. [Low Temperatures and Cryogenic Engineering Department, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov street, 38, 119991, GSP-1, Moscow (Russian Federation) and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii street, 9, Dolgoprudnii, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: alex@lt.gpi.ru; Glushkov, V.V. [Low Temperatures and Cryogenic Engineering Department, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov street, 38, 119991, GSP-1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii street, 9, Dolgoprudnii, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Demishev, S.V. [Low Temperatures and Cryogenic Engineering Department, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov street, 38, 119991, GSP-1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii street, 9, Dolgoprudnii, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Samarin, N.A. [Low Temperatures and Cryogenic Engineering Department, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov street, 38, 119991, GSP-1, Moscow (Russian Federation); Paderno, Yu.B. [Department of Refractory Materials, Institute for Problems of Materials Science of Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Krzhizhanovskii street, 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Dukhnenko, A.V.; Shitsevalova, N.Yu. [Department of Refractory Materials, Institute for Problems of Materials Science of Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Krzhizhanovskii street, 3, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Sluchanko, N.E. [Low Temperatures and Cryogenic Engineering Department, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov street, 38, 119991, GSP-1, Moscow (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-09-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.6072M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exsolution lamellae and other microstructures in oxides as an influence on <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Earth are being measured with increasing accuracy over a wide range of length scales and elevations, from near surface to satellites. Crustal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which are deviations from Earth's planetary field, reflect the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals, the geographic locations where these minerals were <span class="hlt">magnetized</span>, and the intensity of the planetary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field at the time of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> are also influenced by the geometry of the geological bodies, their fabric, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and mineralogical properties of the rocks, and any subsequent change, such as metamorphism or alteration following initial <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. <span class="hlt">Magnetism</span> of the continental crust is commonly described in terms of bulk ferrimagnetism of crustal minerals, and most <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are attributed to induced <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. Remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> proved crucial for dating the ocean floor, yet the contribution of remanence to continental <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is still underestimated. In the study of the mineral sources of continental <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, we have explored the nature of different exsolution intergrowths and microstructures, which enhance the remanent component, either by providing additional <span class="hlt">magnetizations</span>, such as lamellar <span class="hlt">magnetism</span>, or by enhancing stability due to fine-scale intergrowths. Here we show that lamellar <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> is responsible for numerous remanent continental <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> may differ depending on whether multi-domain magnetite coexists with one or more lamellar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> phases, or whether the rock only contains lamellar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> phases. Due to its high thermal and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> stability, lamellar <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> can be an important contributor to deep-seated <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Earth, and to <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on other planets, like Mars. Understanding of the fundamental nature and stability of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals in direct relation to their geological setting will continue to expand in importance with the growing demand for mineral exploration by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> methods.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">McEnroe, S. A.; Fabian, K.; Robinson, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMGP11D0881G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolution Of The Alpha Ride, The Arctic Ocean, On The Basis Of The Geohistorical Analysis Of The <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the Amerasian Basin has been created owing to a joint reprocessing of the Russian and American aeromagnetic data [Glebovsky, Kovacs at all., 2000]. This model produced the base for the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data interpretation on the more qualitative level. As a result three series of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>-type <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have been identified within the area of the Alpha Ridge and the adjacent part of the Canada Basin [Gurevich et all, 2003]. Their sources were formed from three <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers (SC). Two <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers: the western and the eastern, are situated at the axial part of the Alpha Ridge, the third one - the southern, is located on the southern slope of the Alpha Ridge and on the adjacent part of the Canada Basin. The triple junction of these SC had been located in the central part of the recent Alpha Ridge. The geohistorical analysis of these <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is fulfilled using an original computer programs. In consequence of this analysis: the geochronological characteristics are specified; the kinematic characteristics of the oceanic floor movement are determined and the main stages of the area evolution are found. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> M16r (140 Ma), which signify the position of all three SC, and pair <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> M20r (146.5 Ma) and M23r (151.5 Ma) are identified enough sure for all three SC and pair <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> M30r (157.5 Ma) - fore the eastern and the southern SC. Finite and differential Euler poles of the lithospheric plates rotation were calculated for all three SC from best-fit pair <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. All the poles are concentrated around the Nares strait and at the northeastern part of the Ellesmere island. Angle and linear <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates were calculated using Euler poles. The calculation has showed that all three SC had low <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates. Three stages of the area evolution are found on the basis of the plate tectonic reconstruction for the periods 146.5, 151.5 and 157.5 Ma ago. The first stage, slightly earlier 157.5 Ma ago: the initiation of the oceanic crust formation to the north-west from the recent shelf of the Prince Patrick island. The second stage, from about 157.5 Ma ago: SC had advanced to the north-east; the oceanic crust was forming from one SC. The third stage, from slightly earlier 151.5 Ma ago to 140 Ma ago: the oceanic floor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> from three SC took place, 140 Ma ago <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ceased in this area. During the third stage the triple junction of the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers was not stable and changed from type "ridge - ridge - ridge" to type " ridge - ridge - transform". The intraplate volcano-tectonic activity of the oceanic floor that created the Alpha Ridge was t8he fourth stage of the area evolution The kinematic characteristics of the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> imply of crustal compression in the north of the Greenland and in the north-east of the Ellesmere island and of crustal stretching in the area of the Queen Elizabeth Islands, that agrees with their geological structure. The main stages of the Amerasian Basin evolution correspond by age to unconformities that A. Embry determined in the Mesozoic strata of the Sverdrup Basin [Embry, 1991]. The work has been supported by the Russian Foundation for basic Research (Grant 01-05-65481).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gurevich, N. I.; Merkouriev, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ExG....40...17I"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetization</span> structure of Aogashima Island using vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obtained by a helicopter-borne magnetometer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On Aogashima Island, a volcanic island located in the southernmost part of the Izu Seven Islands Chain, vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were obtained in a helicopter-borne <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> survey. The purpose of this study was to understand the volcanic structure of Aogashima Island in order to mitigate future disasters. Commonly, to obtain the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure of a volcanic island, total intensity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (TIA) have been used, even though they have intrinsic errors that have not been evaluated correctly. Because the total intensity <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (TIA) is not a physical value, it does not satisfy Maxwell's Equations, Laplace's Equation, etc., and so TIA is not suitable for any physical analyses. In addition, it has been conventionally assumed that TIA is the same as the projected total intensity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vector (PTA) for analyses of TIA. However, the effect of the intrinsic error (?T=TIA-PTA) on the analysis results has not been taken into account. To avoid such an effect, vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were measured so that a reliable analysis of Aogashima Island <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> could be carried out. In this study, we evaluated the error in TIA and used vector <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to avoid this erroneous effect, in the process obtaining reliable analysis results for 3D, vector <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> distributions. An area of less than 1 A/m <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> was found in the south-west part of Aogashima Island at the depth of 1-2km. Taking the location of fumarolic activity into consideration, the lower-<span class="hlt">magnetization</span> area was expected to be the source of that fumarolic activity of Aogashima Island.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Isezaski, Nobuhiro; Matsuo, Jun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMGP23D..03D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Compilations in the Indian Ocean for Plate Tectonics and Beyond (Invited)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The French territories in the western and southern parts of the Indian Ocean (i.e. Reunion and Mayotte islands, islands in the Mozambique Channel, Kerguelen and Crozet archipelagos, Saint Paul and Amsterdam islands…) have triggered significant scientific activities, including marine geophysics, by French scientists in this area. French marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data in this ocean span more than four decades, with records as old as 1966 and as recent as early 2009. Similarly, Indian scientists have collected a large amount of geophysical data in the northern Indian Ocean, with a focus on the Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal, the Central Indian Basin, and surrounding areas. To take advantage of the obvious complementarity of the French and Indian data sets for plate tectonics studies, we have conducted two projects funded by the Indo-French Centre for the Promotion of Advanced Research, the first one regarding the Arabian and eastern Somali basins, the second one the Central Indian, Madagascar and Crozet basins. These projects have been complemented by more localized work over the Mascarene Basin and Wharton basins, both characterized by an abandoned <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre. The purpose of this presentation is to show how such a compilation is being used to conduct plate tectonic studies, from the identification of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to their unambiguous picking using the analytic signal, the construction of isochrons and tectonic chart, and the paleogeographic reconstructions. Beyond this classical use, the compiled data can be used to produce <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> grids and maps in areas with sufficient data coverage: such grids may help to improve and/or complement future versions of the World Digital <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map (WDMAM).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dyment, J.; Bhattacharya, G. C.; Vadakkeyakath, Y.; Bissessur, D.; Jacob, J.; Kattoju, K. R.; Ramprasad, T.; Royer, J.; Patriat, P.; Chaubey, A. K.; Srinivas, K.; Choi, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983MarGR...5..421V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cross-over analysis of Marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using cross-over analysis the reduction of total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity values to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was studied in an area with ship-tracks which have been made over a period of several years. Under these circumstances the secular variation becomes important. At first we used the old IGRF 1975. This reference field does not correct the secular variation accurately. In the period 1969 1980 the mean values of the differences of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at crossing rise to more than 150 nT. The recently adopted reference fields DGRF 1965, DGRF 1970, DGRF 1975 and PGRF 1975 correct the secular variation much better. The mean values now only rise to about 50 nT over the same period. A reduction using a regional determined by filtering along the track removes the secular variation completely. The latter reduction has the disadvantage that the standard deviations of the mean values at the intersections increase, because the regional depends on the orientation of the track line. Calculation of average secular variation in subareas of 4×4 degrees yields a decrease from the northeast to the southwest.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Verhoef, J.; Scholten, R. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995JGR...10020059H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The OCEAN study area: Tectonic history from <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data and seismic reflectivity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The OCEAN experiment is a detailed geophysical study of a region of the Cape Verde basin. A dense network of new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity profiles has enabled us to constrain the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate history of the region and the location of fracture zones. The main features on the gravity profiles are lineated perpendicular to the seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> lineations. Significant along-axis variability in <span class="hlt">spreading</span> history suggests that the Mid-Atlantic Ridge behaved as a series of loosely coupled segments within which <span class="hlt">spreading</span> was fundamentally asymmetric. Such variability is associated with a minor jump in the ridge axis which changes the offset and expression of one of the fracture zones. Deep seismic reflection and refraction lines were oriented parallel and perpendicular to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineations; seismic reflections occur at all levels within the crust, decreasing in amplitude and coherence below the level of the Moho. Analysis of the subbasement reflectivity provides compelling evidence that at least two major sets of dipping structure are present and are imaged separately on the two perpendicular sets of seismic profiles. Dipping reflections on flow line ("dip") profiles, which are interpreted as faults due to their association with offsets in the basement surface, appear to strike parallel to the paleoridge axis. The majority of reflections that may be identified as faults dip toward the west, and although basement topography suggests that east dipping faults are also present, no reflections may be interpreted unambiguously as such. East dipping reflections observed only in the middle to lower crust have a more obscure origin. Dipping reflections seen on isochron ("strike") profiles show clear contrasts in strength, lateral coherence, depth, and dip population; a number of these strike parallel to flow lines. Comparing reflection and refraction data shows that both the layer 2/layer 3 boundary and the Moho are marked by a change in the character of reflections and suggests that they may represent important structural, as well as seismological, boundaries within the oceanic lithosphere.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Henstock, Timothy J.; White, Robert S.; McBride, John H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JAESc..15..161O"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of east and southeast Asia andtheir linear features</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of east and southeast Asia was produced by compiling manydata sets collected by air-borne and ship-borne surveys. In order to tie between adjoining areas, DGRF-RGRF removal and a linear shift were applied to each data set. Linear features are detected from the map as a special reference to suggest possible crustal structures. They can be classified into several provinces where they have similar trends. The trends suggest histories of origin and their subsequent deformations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Okubo, Yasukuni; Ishihara, Takemi; Daigo, Maria Joy N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48940799"> <span id="translatedtitle">EMAG2: A 2–arc min resolution Earth <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A global Earth <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from satellite, ship, and airborne <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements. EMAG2 is a significant update of our previous candidate grid for the World Digital <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2 arc min, and the altitude has been reduced from 5 km to 4 km above</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Maus; U. Barckhausen; H. Berkenbosch; N. Bournas; J. Brozena; V. Childers; F. Dostaler; J. D. Fairhead; C. Finn; R. R. B. von Frese; C. Gaina; S. Golynsky; R. Kucks; H. Lühr; P. Milligan; S. Mogren; R. D. Müller; O. Olesen; M. Pilkington; R. Saltus; B. Schreckenberger; E. Thébault; F. Caratori Tontini</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JGRB..11012103H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geological modeling of the new CHAMP <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps using a geographical information system technique</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reliable global crustal field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps produced from <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements of the CHAMP satellite mission now allow for quantitative geological studies of crustal structure and composition. We have developed a GIS based forward modeling technique to model these <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps. On the basis of the geologic and tectonic maps of the world, laboratory susceptibility values of the occurring rock types, and the seismic thickness of the crust, a vertically integrated susceptibility grid is generated in the GIS system. In addition, a remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> grid is computed for the oceanic crust using a digital isochron map of the ocean floor and rotation models of the paleoplates. Combining the global VIS and remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> grids, the vertical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is computed at satellite altitude and compared with the corresponding CHAMP <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map. Over the oceans, induced and remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> explains well the prominent observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Cretaceous quiet zones. We also find a good agreement between predicted and observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the continents. Remaining discrepancies between the predicted and observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be used to adjust poorly known boundaries and the composition of the buried Precambrian provinces, until the recomputed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> fit the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated on Greenland, the West African Craton, Bangui in central Africa, and the Kolyma-Omolon Block in Siberia. We conclude that quantitative information on the lateral extent, the composition and the thickness of the lower crust within a Precambrian province can thus be inferred from the new satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hemant, K.; Maus, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012cosp...39..526F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atypical nighttime <span class="hlt">spread</span>-F structure observed near the southern crest of the ionospheric equatorial ionization <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An atypical nighttime <span class="hlt">spread</span>-F structure is observed at or above the F-layer, near the crest of the ionospheric equatorial ionization <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region (EIA). This ionospheric atypical <span class="hlt">spread</span>-F phenomenon was observed using two closed spaced (~115 km) ionospheric soundings stations located in Sao Jose dos Campos (23.21 S, 45.97 W) and Cachoeira Paulista (22.70 S, 45.01W), Brazil, in a low-latitude station (near the southern crest of the EIA region), during nighttime, low solar activity, and quiet geomagnetic conditions. This structure, in the initial phase, appears as a faint <span class="hlt">spread</span>-F trace above or at the F2-layer peak height. After a few minutes, it develops into a strong <span class="hlt">spread</span>-F trace, and afterwards, it moves to altitudes below to the F2-layer peak heights. Finally, the atypical nighttime F-layer trace structure may remain for a while between the F-layer bottom side and peak height or can move to an altitude above the F-layer peak height, and then it disappears. In order to have a comprehensive view of the ionospheric environment characterizing the phenomenon under study, complementary GPS data were used to investigate the ionosphere environment conditions, during both events. The 6 GPS stations used in this study are distributed from near the equatorial region to low latitudes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fagundes, Paulo Roberto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ExG....43...36S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of ULF <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> before moderate earthquakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> covering a wide range of frequencies from ultra low frequency (ULF), very low frequency (VLF) up to very high frequency (VHF) have been observed before earthquakes. However, the ULF range emissions provide a greater source of information regarding the earthquake precursor. One of the main techniques of investigating such a precursor is by using a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sensor. In this paper, we have carried out a study of spectral density (<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field intensity) and polarization ratio methods to extract earthquake precursory signatures of the ULF data for moderate earthquakes (magnitude Mb=3.7-4.8), using a three-component induction coil magnetometer installed at Shivaji University, Kolhapur (16.40°N, 74.15°E), India. We have applied a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure to calculate the spectral density of the ULF time series. We have found enhancement in ULF <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field intensity 3 to 5 days before the main shock and this specific enhancement appeared +/-3h around the main shock time in the 1-5Hz frequency range. We have examined ULF variations with polarization values and Kp index data. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> field intensity of ULF data can give important information about earthquake preparation processes and it can be involved in the development of earthquake prediction methodology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sharma, Ashok K.; Patil, Amol V.; Haridas, Rangnath N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003ApJ...599..615Q"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flare-related <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> with a Sign Reversal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we report a significant <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, specifically an apparent sign reversal of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> polarities in small areas of Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetograms during the impulsive phase of an X5.6 flare on 2001 April 6. Three flare kernels were observed to emit >=50 keV hard X-rays, which are located in strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields of order +/-1000-1500 G. We find that the apparent sign reversal began and persisted for a few minutes in all three kernels, in precise temporal and spatial correspondence with the hard X-ray sources. We search for a combination of instrumental and flare-induced line profile effects that can account for this behavior. Our studies provide a viable scenario that the observed transient sign reversal is likely to be produced by distorted measurements when the Ni I 6768 Å line comes into emission or strong central reversal as a result of nonthermal beam impact on the atmosphere in regions of strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qiu, Jiong; Gary, Dale E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....4432K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Martian <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in light of fundamental properties of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> material</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The intense remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of the Mars crust must be due to one or more of a very few candidate minerals. The most efficient <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals capable of producing stable <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> on Mars are dispersed magnetite and pyrrhotite grains of less than 100 nm in diameter and dispersed (exsolved) hematite regardless of grain size. Larger magnetite and pyrrhotite grains (greater than 1000 nm) have large intrinsic demagnetizing fields causing low values of acquired remanence. Hematite has 2 orders of magnitude lower demagnetizing field, allowing preservation of SD -like behavior for grain diameters reaching 0.2 mm. The larger amplitude of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars relates either to larger volume or large <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> density of the rocks that were <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> in a uniform direction. The nature of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source could include intrusive and/or metamorphic rocks with predominantly coarse-grained granular texture. We analyzed hematite ilmenite series of exsolved minerals commonly found in deep crustal rocks on Earth. Finely exsolved titanohematite within ferrian ilmenite host and titanohematite with fine ferrian ilmenite exsolution both have sufficiently strong <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> to explain <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars. We also analyzed the mineral acquisition properties for magnetite and hematite, and found grain size regions that may allow amplification of the preexisting <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> without the presence of the ambient <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. This amplification depends on the nature of the thermal gradient across the Curie isotherm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kletetschka, G.; Ness, N. F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Wasilewski, J. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6553E..14K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Underwater <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradiometer for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection, localization, and tracking</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">GE Security and the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City (NSWC-PC) have collaborated to develop a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradiometer, called the Real-time Tracking Gradiometer or RTG that is mounted inside an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV). The RTG is part of a buried mine hunting platform being developed by the United States Navy. The RTG has been successfully used to make test runs on mine-like targets buried off the coast of Florida. We will present a general description of the system and latest results describing system performance. This system can be also potentially used for other applications including those in the area of Homeland Security.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar, S.; Sulzberger, G.; Bono, J.; Skvoretz, D.; Allen, G. I.; Clem, T. R.; Ebbert, M.; Bennett, S. L.; Ostrom, R. K.; Tzouris, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAESc..77...12G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distribution of the crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and geological structure in Xinjiang, China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based on the high-order crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field model NGDC-720-V3, we investigate the distribution of crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the decay characteristics of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, and the relationship between the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and geological structure in Xinjiang, China. Topography of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> layer basement is studied through Curie isothermal surface using the power spectrum method. It is found that south Tarim Basin, Junggar Basin, and Turpan–Hami Basin have strong positive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, whereas west Kunlun Mountain, Altun Mountain, Tianshan Mountain, and Altai Mountain have weak or negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> well reflects the regional tectonic structure, i.e., three alternating mountains intervened by two basins. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on the ground surface in Tarim Basin is well corresponding to the mafic dykes. The decay of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with altitude indicates that Xinjiang is a large massif composed of several <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> blocks with different sizes in different directions. The Curie surface presents a feature of being shallow under mountains whereas being deep under basins, roughly having an anti-mirror correspondence with the Moho depth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gao, Guoming; Kang, Guofa; Bai, Chunhua; Li, Guangquan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52490352"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-wavelength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> correlations of Africa and Europe</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Preliminary MAGSAT scalar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data were compiled for comparison with long-wavelength-pass filtered free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and regional heat-flow and tectonic data. To facilitate the correlation analysis at satellite elevations over a spherical-Earth, equivalent point source inversion was used to differentially reduce the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the radial pole at 350 km elevation, and to upward continue the first</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. R. B. Vonfrese; W. J. Hinze; R. Olivier</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://paleomag.geology.ucdavis.edu/research/acton/Publications/1992-Petronotis-GJI-anomalous-skewness.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Determining palaeomagnetic poles and anomalous skewness from marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> skewness data from a single plate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">SUMMARY We present a method for simultaneously determining palaeomagnetic poles and anomalous skewness from the observed skewness of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from a single plate. Skewness is esimated by visual comparison of phase-shifted observed <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> profiles with an ideal zero-phase synthetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> calculated for sea-floor formed and observed in a vertical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. We assume that each crossing of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Katerina E. Petronotis; Richard G. Gordon; Gary D. Acton</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/496576"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in EuO/nonmagnetic insulator multilayered films</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ferromagnetic EuO multilayered films (MLs) were fabricated with nonmagnetic oxides such as MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The EuO MLs showed increased Curie temperature (T{sub c}) and metal insulator transition temperature (T{sub mi}) than the bulk values due to oxygen deficiency. However, {sup 151}Eu M{umlt o}ssbauer spectra did not exhibit such an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in T{sub c}. It suggests a field induced <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> component in the MLs. Significant increase of coercive force (H{sub c}) with decreasing EuO layer thickness was observed only in EuO/MgO MLs. It was suggested that this increase was originated from a kind of interface effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sohma, M.; Kawaguchi, K.; Oosawa, Y. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, 1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRA..117.9214H"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> flux rope formation within a magnetosheath hot flow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report observations on 1 March 2004 by the Cluster spacecraft of a hot flow <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (HFA) encountered in the dayside magnetosheath near Earth's bow shock. Embedded within the HFA was a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> flux rope with a diameter of a few thousand km, which was moving sunward and was presumably expanding. The pristine upstream solar wind seen by the ACE spacecraft contains an interplanetary current sheet favorable for the HFA formation, but shows no flux rope signatures. The properties of the flux rope, such as its slow speed, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field variations, and the absence of magnetospheric electrons, are not likely to be due to magnetopause flux transfer events. These results suggest that the flux rope was created in the magnetosheath, rather than in the solar wind, in the foreshock, or on the magnetopause, through <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reconnection initiated in the course of the HFA development. Interestingly, energetic (˜100 keV) electron fluxes were enhanced in and around this HFA-associated flux rope. The observations indicate that reconnection can occur within the magnetosheath part of HFAs and that such reconnection may play a role in electron acceleration, which is a common feature of HFAs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hasegawa, H.; Zhang, H.; Lin, Y.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Schwartz, S. J.; Lavraud, B.; Zong, Q.-G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/je/je0505/2005JE002405/2005JE002405.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlations between <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and surface geology antipodal to lunar impact basins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previous work has shown that the strongest concentrations of lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are located antipodal to four large, similarly aged impact basins (Orientale, Serenitatis, Imbrium, and Crisium). Here, we report results of a correlation study between <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> clusters and geology in areas antipodal to Imbrium, Orientale, and Crisium. Unusual geologic terranes, interpreted to be of seismic or ejecta</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. C. Richmond; L. L. Hood; D. L. Mitchell; R. P. Lin; M. H. Acuña; A. B. Binder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52691909"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with an albedo feature near Airy crater in the lunar nearside highlands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe a strong crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, recently identified in Lunar Prospector magnetometer data, that is associated with a previously unreported albedo feature near the crater Airy in the lunar nearside highlands. Other workers have demonstrated a correlation between <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the enigmatic bright markings known as lunar swirls. We have used Earth-based telescopic spectra and Clementine multispectral images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. T. Blewett; B. R. Hawke; N. C. Richmond; C. G. Hughes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60670898"> <span id="translatedtitle">Feasibility of detecting artificial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in hydrofractured rock by superconducting gradiometer-SQUID systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study of the signal physics of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection by superconducting gradiometer-SQUID systems to determine the feasibility of possible applications to the geothermal energy program is described. The system would make full use of the incredible sensitivity of the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) which can be in the range of 10¹¹ Oe. In addition to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Overton; W. C. Jr</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55160352"> <span id="translatedtitle">A method of obtaining solutions with only positive dipole moments on inversion of satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A method has been developed to obtain solutions with positive <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> on inversion of satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Starting with an initial guess of positive values, the dipole moments are updated through an iterative process under the condition that the calculated fields reproduce the observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the sense of least squares. Application of the method is illustrated through inversions of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. P. Singh; N. Basavaiah; M. Rajaram; G. Geetharamanan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMGP43B1060T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface mapping of three components of the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field: Preliminary results</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mapping of the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gives a crucial constraint on the crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> structure of the Moon. High spatial resolution of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map requires low altitude mapping. We have developed a new method for mapping three components of the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field on the lunar surface using <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field observations by a satellite magnetometer. This surface mapping method was applied to the datasets of several lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions observed by Lunar Prospector and Kaguya. We will report their preliminary results. The radial component of the crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field (Br) on the surface can be obtained from the satellite observations at various altitudes through the inversion of a boundary value problem (Tsunakawa et al., in press). In our method, surface Br values are mapped at almost equal interval points, called generalized spiral points. Two horizontal components are calculated at each point from Br values at the adjacent points. Thus we can map the surface values of three components and total intensity of the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field (Tsunakawa et al., in prep.). We have applied the method to several strong <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions (e.g. Reiner Gamma) observed by Lunar Prospector and Kaguya. Since the observation altitudes are mostly 15-45 km, spatial resolutions are estimated to be 0.5-1 degree. Preliminary results show strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields with intensity peaks of more than 500 nT on the lunar surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsunakawa, H.; Takahashi, F.; Shimizu, H.; Shibuya, H.; Matsushima, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....9397P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kopylów <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> - new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data in the south-east part of Poland.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">From many years a lot of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> surface measurements have been executed in order to supplement the database and create a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> map of Poland. The margin zone of East European Craton was under research since 1998 to 2002. In comparison with "<span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> map of Poland"(K. Karaczun et al. 1978) which is obligatory till today, more details of known features and some new <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were occurred. One of them is the positive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of Kopylów (594nT), which lies at the Wlodzimierz fault line. The main purpose of research is to find geological origin of that <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. It is a part of widespread <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, with its extension in the Ukraine area. From the north-west it is closed by an oblong negative <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, which occurred in place of prior gradient zone. Those <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is closely connected with presence of Udal fault. Wlodzimierz and Udal faults surrounds Rejowiec Anticline.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polechonska, O.; Kosobudzka, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002EGSGA..27.6101K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Upper Lithospheric Sources of <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and Gravity <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of The Fennoscandian Shield</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> total intensity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (DGRF-65), Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (d=2670 kg/m3) and geological units from 3400 Ma to present of the Fennoscandian Shield have been digitally compiled and printed as maps 1:2 000 000. Insert maps 1:15,000,000 com- pare <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> components in different source scales: pseudogravimetric <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> ver- sus Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, DGRF-65 <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> versus pseudomagnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> vertical derivative versus second derivative of Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Data on bulk density, total magnetisation and lithology of samples have been presented as scatter diagrams and distribution maps of the average petrophysical properties in space and time. In sample level, the bulk density correlates with the lithology and, together with mag- netisation, establishes four principal populations of petrophysical properties. The av- erage properties, calculated for 5 km x 5 km cells, correlate only weakly with av- erage Bouguer-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, revealing major deep seated sources of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Pseudogravimetric and Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correlate only locally with each other. The correlation is negative in the area of felsic Palaeoproterozoic rocks in W- and NW-parts of the Shield. In 2D models the sources of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are explained by lateral variation of density in upper and lower crust. Smoothly varying regional components are explained by boundaries of the lower crust, the upper mantle and the astenosphere. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are explained by lateral variation of magnetisation in the upper crust. Re- gional components are due to the lateral variation of magnetisation in the lower crust and the boundaries of lower crust and mantle and the Curie isotherm of magnetite.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Korhonen, J. V.; Koistinen, T.; Working Group For Fennoscandian Geophysical Maps</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PEPI..224...11O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> investigation of possible sources of the Bangui <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Bangui <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (BMA) is the largest lithospheric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> on Earth at low latitudes. Previous studies investigated its geological source using constraints from satellite and ground <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field measurements, as well as from surface <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility measurements on rocks from the Panafrican Mobile Belt Zone (PMBZ). Here we combine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field data modelling and rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> property measurements (susceptibility and natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>, NRM) on many samples from this PMBZ and the surrounding formations. It reveals that NRM is a significant component of the total <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (Mt) of the BMA source, which reaches 4.3 A/m with maximum thicknesses of 38 and 54 km beneath the western and eastern parts of the BMA. Only the isolated and relatively thin banded iron formations and some migmatites show such Mt values. Thus we suggest that the thick BMA source may be composed either by overlapped slices of such metamorphic rocks, or by an iron-rich mafic source, or by a combination of these two geological structures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ouabego, M.; Quesnel, Y.; Rochette, P.; Demory, F.; Fozing, E. M.; Njanko, T.; Hippolyte, J.-C.; Affaton, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGRA..112.7311K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> activity linked generation of nighttime equatorial <span class="hlt">spread</span> F irregularities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results derived from a statistical study of the generation of equatorial <span class="hlt">spread</span> F (ESF) irregularities as a result of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> activity based on spaced receiver ionospheric scintillation data recorded at a dip equatorial station is reported here. For a study of this nature it is essential to establish whether the observed scintillations are caused by freshly generated irregularities or by irregularities generated earlier, which later drift onto the signal path. It has been observed in the past that the maximum cross-correlation between the spaced receiver signals is significantly less than 1 during the initial phase of development of ESF irregularities due to the presence of perturbation electric fields associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability that produces equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs), whereas in the later phase, when these perturbation electric fields die down, the correlation between the two signals increases rapidly. This feature is used in the present study to identify freshly generated ESF irregularities associated with EPBs using spaced receiver scintillation data. <span class="hlt">Magnetically</span> disturbed days are chosen by using three hourly geomagnetic activity index ap, daily index Ap, and also AE index to study the cases of prompt penetration of high-latitude electric field to the equatorial ionosphere. Disturbed time statistical occurrence pattern of freshly generated irregularities shows seasonal variation for all three types of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> disturbances: disturbance dynamo, prompt penetration, combination of disturbance dynamo and prompt penetration. However, it is found that fresh generation of the irregularities due to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> activity is most likely to occur around midnight hours in all seasons. Suppression of generation of irregularities immediately after sunset due to inhibition of the growth of the R-T instability on the bottomside of the equatorial F region is clearly seen in vernal equinox (March and April) and solstice months but is not observed for autumnal equinox (September and October).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kakad, B.; Jeeva, K.; Nair, K. U.; Bhattacharyya, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989PEPI...54..332V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Definitive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reference field (DGRF) evaluation based on marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When compiling <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data that have been collected over several decades, the accuracy of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reference fields that are used to reduce the data to a common datum-level becomes an important factor. Definitive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reference fields have been defined at 5-year intervals. In this study we evaluated these reference fields by applying them to marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data that have been collected off the Canadian east coast in the period 1963-1984. For 35-50° N, the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the period 1970-1975 were found to be ~ 50 nT higher than those obtained in other periods. A cross-over analysis performed on the whole data set yielded ~ 60 000 cross points and confirmed these results. As the source of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are unvarying, we conclude from these observations that the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reference fields in this part of the world do not accurately correct for the time-varying component of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. This has serious consequences for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data compilations; when not treated in a generally accepted fashion, these inaccuracies could lead to user-defined corrections to the reference fields, which would be a step in the wrong direction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Verhoef, J.; Macnab, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jz/v069/i002/JZ069i002p00309/JZ069i002p00309.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Negative Total-Intensity <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Southeast of South Australia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The total <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> vector of two <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with Tertiary basalt intrusions in the southeast of South Australia is determined to have a very steep reverse dip given by D ---- 0 ø, relative to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> north, and I ---- 60 ø. It was assumed that the intrusions are in a vertical plane and the direction of remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. MUMME</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1964-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRA..117.7208V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energetic neutral atom observations of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the lunar surface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SARA, the Sub-KeV Atom Analyzer, on board Chandrayaan-1 recorded the first image of a minimagnetosphere above a lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> using energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). It was shown that this magnetosphere, which is located near the Gerasimovich crater, is able to reduce the solar wind ion flux impinging onto the lunar surface by more than 50%. Following this first observation, we investigated all <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are in the SARA data set. We searched for a possible correlation between the solar wind plasma parameters (dynamic pressure, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field), the local <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field, and the reduction in the reflected hydrogen ENA flux (henceforth called shielding efficiency). Having analyzed all observations by SARA, we discovered that the Gerasimovich <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is topologically a very simple, large-scale <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure, which is favorable for this kind of investigation. Most other <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the lunar surface have more small-scale features in their <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field structure, which complicates the interpretation of the observed data. We find a clear correlation between the plasma parameters and the shielding efficiency for the Gerasimovich case. For the other observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> only about half of the cases showed such a correlation. We therefore conclude that the solar wind ions-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> interaction is in general more complex than in the Gerasimovich case.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Futaana, Y.; Holmström, M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Asamura, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.V11A2253K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exploring the strength of newly formed oceanic lithosphere and its correlation with <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate and ridge depth <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have developed a moving window admittance technique to determine the relationship between free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and bathymetry as a function of wavelength over the world's ocean basins and their margins. Preliminary results from the Western Pacific Ocean show that the technique resolves the effective elastic thickness (Te), a proxy for long-term (>106 yr) strength, of the oceanic lithosphere to better than ±3 km for Te<20 km over horizontal distances of a few tens of km. In this paper we explore Te results over the global mid-ocean ridge system, show that Te at newly formed lithosphere varies from essentially 0 km to almost 10 km, and explore the correlation between variations in Te, <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate, and ridge crest depth to investigate the origins of this variation. We show that for the zero age ridge depth most commonly used in cooling plate models, 2500 m, the median Te is 3.0 km with a median absolute deviation of 1.3 km. Overall, Te increases with increased depth and decreases as <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate increases, but back-arc basins and some sections of the Antarctic-Pacific ridge depart from this trend. We also examine the effect of using a theoretical admittance function customised for the ridge environment compared to the standard admittance function for oceanic lithosphere and test for a long wavelength admittance (>500 km), believed to originate in the mantle, and thus indicative of dynamic support through upwelling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kalnins, L. M.; Watts, A. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005GeoRL..3224205K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mini-magnetosphere over the Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region on the Moon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show presence of a mini-magnetosphere above the Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (RGA) region in the solar wind, using Lunar Prospector magnetometer (MAG) measurement data. RGA is one of the strongest <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the Moon. Two <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are found from six MAG datasets at 17-40 km altitudes in the lunar wake or the geomagnetic tail lobe and are well explained by a two-dipole model. When RGA was exposed to the solar wind plasma, two MAG datasets were obtained at 27-29 km altitudes. Although the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> survived against the plasma pressure, they were heavily distorted in comparison with the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of the two-dipole model. Flow directions and dynamic pressures of the solar wind plasma at those periods indicate that the distortions were caused by forming a mini-magnetosphere over the RGA region in the solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurata, M.; Tsunakawa, H.; Saito, Y.; Shibuya, H.; Matsushima, M.; Shimizu, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10627825H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Initial mapping and interpretation of lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using Lunar Prospector magnetometer data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Maps of relatively strong crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> detected at low altitudes with the magnetometer instrument on Lunar Prospector are presented. On the lunar nearside, relatively strong <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are mapped over the Reiner Gamma Formation on western Oceanus Procellarum and over the Rima Sirsalis rille on the southwestern border of Oceanus Procellarum. The main Rima Sirsalis <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not correlate well with the rille itself but is centered over an Imbrian-aged smooth plains unit interpreted as primary or secondary basin ejecta. The stronger Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correlate with the locations of both the main Reiner Gamma albedo marking and its northeastward extension. Both the Rima Sirsalis and the Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are extended in directions approximately radial to the center of the Imbrium basin. This alignment suggests that Imbrium basin ejecta materials (lying in many cases beneath the visible mare surface) are the sources of the nearside <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. If so, then the albedo markings associated with the stronger Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be consistent with a model involving <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> shielding of freshly exposed mare materials from the solar wind ion bombardment. Two regions of extensive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are mapped in regions centered on the Ingenii basin on the south central farside and near the crater Gerasimovic on the southeastern farside. These regions are approximately antipodal to the Imbrium and Crisium basins, respectively. The Imbrium antipode <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> group is the most areally extensive on the Moon, while the largest <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the Crisium antipode group is the strongest detected by the Lunar Prospector magnetometer. A consideration of the expected antipodal effects of basin-forming impacts as well as a combination of sample data and orbital measurements on the nearside leads to the conclusion that the most probable sources of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in these two regions are ejecta materials from the respective impacts. In both regions the strongest individual <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> correlate with swirl-like albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma class visible on available orbital photography.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hood, L. L.; Zakharian, A.; Halekas, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.; Acuña, M. H.; Binder, A. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22654139"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> resonance and computed tomographic features of 4 cases of canine congenital thoracic vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> resonance and computed tomography features of 4 cases of canine congenital vertebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (CVAs) are discussed. Two of the cases represent unusual presentations for such <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that commonly affect screw-tail or toy breeds. Moreover, the combination of CVAs and a congenital peritoneo-pericardial diaphragmatic hernia has never before been imaged. PMID:22654139</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berlanda, Michele; Zotti, Alessandro; Brandazza, Giada; Poser, Helen; Calò, Pietro; Bernardini, Marco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1215532K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the Fennoscandian Shield on a 2km resolution grid</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Joint <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> grid of the Fennoscandian Shield was released 2002, smoothed and used as data for the WDMAM2007. In comparison with MF5 this grid showed superior characteristics to other sets. The data will be released as a 2 km resolution grid for the WDMAM2011 with eventual updates of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> levels.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Korhonen, Juha V.; Aaro, Sven; Reidar Skilbrei, Jan; All, Tarmo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41339620"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forward Modeling of Gravity, Gravity Gradients, and <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> due to Complex Bodies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">On the basis of the results of improved analytical expression of computation of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to a homogeneous polyhedral body composed of polygonal facets, and applying the forward theory with the coordinate transformation of vectors and tensors, we deduced both the analytical expressions for gravity gradient tensors and for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of a polygon, and obtained new analytical expressions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luo Yao; Yao Changli</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51735119"> <span id="translatedtitle">Subduction-zone <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and implications for hydrated forearc mantle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Continental mantle in subduction zones is hydrated by release of water from the underlying oceanic plate. Magnetite is a significant byproduct of mantle hydration, and forearc mantle, cooled by subduction, should contribute to long-wavelength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> above subduction zones. We test this hypothesis with a quantitative model of the Cascadia convergent margin, based on gravity and aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and constrained</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richard J. Blakely; Thomas M. Brocher; Ray E. Wells</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jz/v070/i016/JZ070i016p04013/JZ070i016p04013.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crustal Structure of the Mid-Ocean Ridges 3. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fifty-eight <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles, of varying length, were used in a study of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern over the mid-Atlantic ridge between 60øN and 42øS. It was found that there is a basic pattern to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. A large <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is everywhere asso- ciated with the axis of the ridge. This <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is continuous over all latitudes except for off-</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">James R. Heirtzler; Xavier Le Pichon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1965-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/details.jsp?query_id=0&page=0&ostiID=6386208"> <span id="translatedtitle">Apparatus and method for detecting a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> detection apparatus detects <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields, signals, and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The SQUID <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> therein.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-05-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.P23A0227K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the solar wind: Possible existence of mini-magnetosphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been suggested that lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields are interacted with the solar wind plasma to form the mini-magnetosphere on the lunar surface. From the Lunar Prospector (LP) observations of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields, Lin et al.(1998) pointed out that a mini-magnetosphere was formed in the solar wind downstream of the strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Imbrium antipode region. Harnett et al.(2000, 2002) demonstrated the presence of lunar mini-magnetospheres with MHD and particle simulations. If the mini-magnetosphere exists on the lunar surface and deflects solar wind particles, its role of barrier could produce a high-albedo region around the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. In this study, we mainly investigate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields in the solar wind using the LP MAG low-altitude (15-40 km) data of level1. We detected lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> after preprocessing of the level1 data, using Hood's (1981) technique. In the present study, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were mapped from the data sets in the tail lobe, the moon wake and the solar wind, and were compared with each other. We preliminarily analyzed three typical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions (Crisium antipode region, Descartes region, and Reiner Gamma region), and all of these three regions show clear <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> even in the solar wind. We further carried out the detailed analysis of Reiner Gamma region. Its contour pattern of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field intensities in the tail lobe or the wake is almost symmetrical with respect to the north-south line. However, such symmetry is obviously distorted in the solar wind to show some elongation toward the downstream of the solar wind. Also, the form of distortion seems to be changed when the solar wind conditions (dynamic pressure, the angle of incidence, and so on) are different. These results may support existence of the mini-magnetosphere in Reiner Gamma region. We will discuss the possible mini-magnetosphere comparing the LP MAG data with the ACE data of the solar wind.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kurata, M.; Tsunakawa, H.; Saito, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994JGR....99.7161H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on the tectonic development of the eastern Gulf of Mexico provided by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Boundaries between oceanic and transitional crust in the eastern Gulf of Mexico have been delineated using detailed, accurately navigated, high-quality aeromagnetic data. These data indicate that considerably more oceanic crust may be present than previously suggested by other geophysical data, especially seismic reflection data. The N-S extent of oceanic crust substantially increases westward from approximately 280 km near 87 deg W to roughly 390 km near 90 deg W, indicating the proximity (less than 10 deg) of the pole of rotation. Variations in the amount of oceanic crust together with discontinuities in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns, interpreted as the traces of fossil transform faults or fracture zones, have been used to obtain a rough estimate of the location of the pole of rotation (24 deg N, 81.5 deg W) for the seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> phase of opening. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data have been used to develop a model for the opening of the Gulf and to identify some geometrical relationships between its conjugate continental margins. Based upon the estimated pole position, the eastern Gulf is interpreted to have opened in an approximately NNE-SSW direction with the counterclockwise rotation of Yucatan away from North America. The seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> phase of movement accounts for about 25 deg of the counterclockwise motion of Yucatan. Rotating the Yucatan block clockwise by this amount to restore it to its predrift position places the Campeche Bank adjacent to the Mississippi Trough-Louisiana shelf. Further clockwise rotation of Yucatan by an additional 30-35 deg about this pole restores extended crust to its original thickness and is consistent with rotations of Yucatan predicted from paleomagnetic data from Chiapas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hall, Stuart A.; Najmuddin, Ilyas J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50343742"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> guidance system for mine countermeasures using autonomous underwater vehicles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> guidance system that, with support from the Office of Naval Research, is being developed for fully autonomous detection, localization and classification of ferrous mines in Very Shallow Water\\/Surf Zone (VSW\\/SZ) environments. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> guidance system's hardware configurations and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> target signature processing methods specifically have been developed for autonomous guidance of small, maneuverable sensing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roy Wiegert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013E%26PSL.367..116Q"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of the central <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at the Haughton impact structure, Canada</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 23km-diameter well-preserved Haughton impact structure shows a rather unique combination of a positive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> with a negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the center of its central uplift. Using a new ground <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> dataset and several modeling approaches, we investigate the properties and geometry of its central <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> source. Our results confirm that a km-sized <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> body with a narrow near-surface extension is necessary to account for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Additional measurements of rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties of samples of all lithologies encountered in and outside the crater show that the target sedimentary rocks and the vast majority of the Precambrian basement rocks cannot be the source of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. While in larger impact structures such <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are often explained by magmatic mafic intrusions or highly <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> glass lenses in the impact melt rocks, we propose that impact-generated hydrothermal activity enhanced the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of the highly-porous unmelted uplifted basement rocks. Such a process may be considered for the interpretation of the geophysical signature of planetary impact craters.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Quesnel, Yoann; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Osinski, Gordon R.; Rochette, Pierre</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMGP43B0856T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deep-tow Study of <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) is a region of low-amplitude, short-wavelength, difficult-to-correlate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> located on Jurassic seafloor and thought to represent a time of decreased field strength and rapid reversals. We collected new deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data over the Pacific JQZ that complement 2 deep-tow profiles reported in Sager et al. (J. Geophys. Res., vol.103, p. 5269, 1998). Our primary goals were to extend the correlation of deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> farther back in time, crossing ODP Site 801 (where Jurassic ocean crust has been drilled and cored), to evaluate the correlation of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and to refine the Jurassic geomagnetic polarity reversal time scale developed by Sager et al. (1998). These new data include: (1) closely spaced lines around M34 and Site 801, (2) two long lines extending from the previous survey, across Site 801 to the southeast, and (3) one line between the previous lines in the area of difficult-to-correlate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Systematic changes in <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes occur along the deep-tow lines, perhaps indicating changes in field strength. From northwest to southeast (i.e., increasing in age) <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes and wavelengths decrease, become nearly constant, and then increase slightly. The zone of smallest, shortest wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> corresponds to a period of ~4 m.y. that appears to have an abrupt end. Comparing <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> between lines, correlations were excellent on the closely-spaced profiles over M34 and around Hole 801C. Correlation over supposedly older seafloor to the south of Site 801 was also good. However, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> correlation in the region between M34 and Site 801 was difficult. As with other studies of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles, it is impossible to uniquely determine which <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are caused by reversals and which are not. Many of the larger <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are likely caused by changes in polarity, whereas smaller <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be intensity fluctuations. The new deep-tow data, being closer to the source than the previous lines, show more short-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in some areas, particularly the area where <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes are least. This observation suggests that many of these short-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may result from intensity fluctuations. To construct a reversal time scale, we limit short wavelengths by modeling <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles upward continued to mid-water depth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tominaga, M.; Sager, W. W.; Tivey, M. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jz/v069/i006/JZ069i006p01093/JZ069i006p01093.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for Connection between Heat Flow and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fourteen crossings of the crest of the mid-Atlantic ridge between 30 ø and 6øS revealed the presence of a continuous <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> characteristic of the crest of the ridge. Nearly all values of geothermal heat flow greater than 2.0 zcal\\/cmsec lie within 100 km of the apex of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The continuity of the ridge is interrupted prob-</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Victor Vacquier; R. P. von Herzen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1964-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8759E..47C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calibration of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient tensor measurement array in <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection based on <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient tensor has become more and more important in civil and military applications. Compared with methods based on <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> total field or components measurement, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient tensor has some unique advantages. Usually, a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient tensor measurement array is constituted by four three-axis magnetometers. The prominent problem of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient tensor measurement array is the misalignment of sensors. In order to measure the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient tensor accurately, it is quite essential to calibrate the measurement array. The calibration method, which is proposed in this paper, is divided into two steps. In the first step, each sensor of the measurement array should be calibrated, whose error is mainly caused by constant biases, scale factor deviations and nonorthogonality of sensor axes. The error of measurement array is mainly caused by the misalignment of sensors, so that triplets' deviation in sensors array coordinates is calibrated in the second step. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, simulation was taken and the result shows that the proposed method improves the measurement accuracy of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient tensor greatly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Jinfei; Zhang, Qi; Pan, Mengchun; Weng, Feibing; Chen, Dixiang; Pang, Hongfeng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P41C1629H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modification of solar wind flux by the Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Moon possess regions of localized surface <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field called <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The albedo of the lunar surface at some of these <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is much higher than the surrounding region. These high albedo regions are referred to as lunar swirls. One of the proposed methods for swirl formation is through the deflection of charged particles that can weather the surface by the anomalous <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. I will present results from particle tracking studies for the Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Launching of thousands of solar wind protons produces noticeable deflection by the anomalous <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in a manner consistent with the high albedo regions. I will also present particle and energy flux calculations at the surface and infer how the spatial variation in particle and energy flux would modulate the space weathering of the surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harnett, E. M.; Kramer, G. Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUSMGP13A..04G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diffuse Oceanic Plate Boundaries, Plate Non-Rigidity, True Polar Wander, and Motion Between Hotspots: Results From Investigations of Marine <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> record reversals of Earth's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field and the orientation of the paleomagnetic field. They can be used to make precise estimates of relative plate motion and of the apparent polar wander of oceanic plates. In this talk I will present the results of several studies that include analyses of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. A new set of geologically current relative plate angular velocities, termed MORVEL, has been determined in part from 1696 rates of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> estimated from marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (DeMets, Gordon, & Argus 2009). The MORVEL set of angular velocities supersede those of NUVEL-1A (DeMets et al. 1994). A new feature of MORVEL is the assumed existence of many diffuse oceanic plate boundaries, such as that between the Indian and Capricorn plates. An important result from MORVEL is that several plate circuits fail closure, that is, the relative plate angular velocities summed around the circuit differ significantly from zero as would be expected if all the plates are rigid. Thus, it appears that at least some plates are not rigid. The most dramatic example of plate circuit non-closure is for the Pacific-Nazca-Cocos plate circuit, which encloses the Galapagos triple junction and fails to close by a stunning 14 ± 5 mm/yr (95% confidence limits). Part of the observed non-rigidity is likely due to predictable horizontal thermal contraction as oceanic lithosphere cools and subsides (Kumar & Gordon 2009). I will present simple illustrations of the velocity field within a plate expected from horizontal thermal contraction and speculate on how it may relate to observed plate circuit non-closures. The shapes of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> contain valuable information about the location of the paleomagnetic pole, especially for the Pacific plate for which oriented rock samples are scarce. Particularly useful are Pacific-Farallon <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> crossings near the paleo-equator. I use results from <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 12r (32 Ma, Horner-Johnson & Gordon 2009) to illustrate the value of these data. The results show that the hotspots in the Pacific basin have moved in unison with those in the Indian and Atlantic basins relative to the spin axis, a process most simply interpreted as true polar wander. Plate reconstructions based on fits of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are used to place limits of 0 to 10 mm/yr on the rate that hotspots in the Pacific basin move relative to hotspots in other basins over the past 50 Ma (Koivisto, Andrews, & Gordon, 2009).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gordon, R. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.2578L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lithospheric sources of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Aldan shield and Alpha Ridge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Regional <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> Aldan Shield is dated to ancient greenstone belt of the earth's crust. Belt is characterized by high depth forming sequences. Rocks of the upper and middle part of the section contain ferruginous quartzite. Geomagnetic and density sections allowed to estimate the power density and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> crustal heterogeneities. The methodology of constructing the cuts is the spectral-spatial representation of the fields, convertible into the underlying <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and density cuts. According to satellite data confirms the presence of regional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within the Aldan shield, at an altitude of 100 km, it is about 100 nT. The presence of the Central Aldan crast-mantle fault depth of 50-80 km defines metallogenic situation of the region. The structure of the Aldan Shield detects rotational structure. Regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> arc tangent frame Central Aldan region. May suggest that such behavior of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is caused by of the ancient (Pre-Cambrian) fireplace mantle (the nucleus). Studies have shown that lithospheric sources Aldan shield on satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (?T) a Russia are located at depths of 30 to 35 and 40 to 70 km. They are confined to vertical zone deconsolidated at depths of about 30 and 40 - 70 km. By <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (?T) a Russian in the crust of the Aldan shield a depth of 15 - 17 km and 25 - 30 km depth revealed magnetite zone, the formation of which is due to the processes of regional metamorphism of ancient crust. Studies have shown the limits of the depth distribution of magnetite zones, mosaic developed within the crust of the Aldan shield after repeated activation of the processes of regional metamorphism.Alpha Ridge in the Arctic Ocean is one of the largest igneous provinces in the world. Tectonic history of the Arctic while not significantly deciphered. Deep structure of the Earth's crust are poorly understood Linearly elongated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> Alpha Ridge clearly seen at the height of the satellite. At an altitude of 100 km reach values of 100 - 120 nT, with gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the reduction of Faye in the central part is only 0 - 20 mg, to the periphery of the ridge rising to values of 40-50 mg. The maximum values of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are confined to the Alpha Ridge of the span latitudes 84 - 85N.Deep density and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sections along the latitudinal profiles by satellite measurements showed the following. Lithospheric sources of satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> Alpha Ridge located at a depth of about 40 km and are confined to vertical zone centered deconsolidated at depths 30 - 40 km. Higher in the section allocated powerful lens decompressed at a depth of 9 - 18 km.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Litvinova, Tamara; Petrova, Alevtina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApGeo...9..468M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interpretation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by horizontal and vertical derivatives of the analytic signal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are often disturbed by the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> direction, so we can't directly use the original <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to estimate the exact location and geometry of the source. The 2D analytic signal is insensitive to <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> direction. In this paper, we present an automatic method based on the analytic signal horizontal and vertical derivatives to interpret the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We derive a linear equation using the analytic signal properties and we obtain the 2D <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> body location parameters without giving a priori information. Then we compute the source structural index (expressing the geometry) by the estimated location parameters. The proposed method is demonstrated on synthetic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with noise. For different models, the proposed technique can both successfully estimate the location parameters and the structural index of the sources and is insensitive to noise. Lastly, we apply it to real <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from China and obtain the distribution of unexploited iron ore. The inversion results are consistent with the parameters of known ore bodies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ma, Guo-Qing; Du, Xiao-Juan; Li, Li-Li; Meng, Ling-Shun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JESS..118..405S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of offshore Krishna-Godavari basin, eastern continental margin of India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data acquired from offshore Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, eastern continental margin of India (ECMI), brought out a prominent NE-SW trending feature, which could be explained by a buried structural high formed by volcanic activity. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> feature is also associated with a distinct negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> similar to the one associated with 85°E Ridge. The gravity low could be attributed to a flexure at the Moho boundary, which could in turn be filled with the volcanic material. Inversion of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was also carried out to establish the similarity of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the two geological features (structural high on the margin and the 85°E Ridge) and their interpretations. In both cases, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were caused dominantly by the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> contrast between the volcanic material and the surrounding oceanic crust, whereas the low gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are by the flexures of the order of 3-4 km at Moho boundary beneath them. The analysis suggests that both structural high present in offshore Krishna-Godavari basin and the 85°E Ridge have been emplaced on relatively older oceanic crust by a common volcanic process, but at discrete times, and that several of the gravity lows in the Bay of Bengal can be attributed to flexures on the Moho, each created due to the load of volcanic material.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swamy, K. V.; Radhakrishna Murthy, I. V.; Krishna, K. S.; Murthy, K. S. R.; Subrahmanyam, A. S.; Malleswara Rao, M. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70011277"> <span id="translatedtitle">Statistical averaging of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the aging of oceanic crust.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Visual comparison of Mesozoic and Cenozoic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the North Pacific suggests that older <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> contain less short-wavelength information than younger <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in this area. To test this observation, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles from the North Pacific are examined from crust of three ages: 0-2.1, 29.3-33.1, and 64.9-70.3Ma. For each time period, at least nine profiles were analyzed by 1) calculating the power density spectrum of each profile, 2) averaging the spectra together, and 3) computing a 'recording filter' for each time period by assuming a hypothetical seafloor model. The model assumes that the top of the source is acoustic basement, the source thickness is 0.5km, and the time scale of geomagnetic reversals is according to Ness et al. (1980). The calculated power density spectra of the three recording filters are complex in shape but show an increase of attenuation of short-wavelength information as the crust ages. These results are interpreted using a multilayer model for marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in which the upper layer, corresponding to pillow basalt of seismic layer 2A, acts as a source of noise to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. As the ocean crust ages, this noisy contribution by the pillow basalts becomes less significant to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Consequently, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sources below layer 2A must be faithful recorders of geomagnetic reversals.-AuthorPacific power density spectrum</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blakely, R. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JGR...10215463C"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Southeast Indian Ridge between 88°E and 118°E: Gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and crustal accretion at intermediate <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridges characterized by a deep axial valley and fast <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridges characterized by an axial bathymetric high have been extensively studied, the transition between these two modes of axial morphology is not well understood. We conducted a geophysical survey of the intermediate <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate Southeast Indian Ridge between 88°E and 118°E, a 2300-km-long section of the ridge located between the Amsterdam hot spot and the Australian-Antarctic Discordance where satellite gravity data suggest that the Southeast Indian Ridge (SEIR) undergoes a change from an axial high in the west to an axial valley in the east. A basic change in axial morphology is found near 103°30'E in the shipboard data; the axis to the west is marked by an axial high, while a valley is found to the east. Although a well-developed axial high, characteristic of the East Pacific Rise (EPR), is occasionally present, the more common observation is a rifted high that is lower and pervasively faulted, sometimes with significant (>50 m throw) faults within a kilometer of the axis. A shallow axial valley (<700 m deep) is observed from 104°E to 114°E with a sudden change to a deep (>1200 m deep) valley across a transform at 114°E. The changes in axial morphology along the SEIR are accompanied by a 500 m increase in near-axis ridge flank depth from 2800 m near 88°E to 3300 m near 114°E and by a 50 mGal increase in the regional level of mantle Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the same distance. The regional changes in depth and mantle Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (MBA) gravity can be both explained by a 1.7-2.4 km change in crustal thickness or by a mantle temperature change of 50°C-90°C. In reality, melt supply (crustal thickness) and mantle temperature are linked, so that changes in both may occur simultaneously and these estimates serve as upper bounds. The along-axis MBA gradient is not uniform. Pronounced steps in the regional level of the MBA gravity occur at 103°30'E-104°E and at 114°E-116°E and correspond to the changes in the nature of the axial morphology and in the amplitude of abyssal hill morphology suggesting that the different forms of morphology do not grade into each other but rather represent distinctly different forms of axial structure and tectonics with a sharp transition between them. The change from an axial high to an axial valley requires a threshold effect in which the strength of the lithosphere changes quickly. The presence or absence of a quasi-steady state magma chamber may provide such a mechanism. The different forms of axial morphology are also associated with different intrasegment MBA gravity patterns. Segments with an axial high have an MBA low located at a depth minimum near the center of the segment. At EPR-like segments, the MBA low is about 10 mGal with along-axis gradients of 0.15-0.25 mGal/km, similar to those observed at the EPR. Rifted highs have a shallower low and lower gradients suggesting an attenuated composite magma chamber and a reduced and perhaps episodic melt supply. Segments with a shallow axial valley have very flat along-axis MBA profiles with little correspondence between axial depth and axial MBA gravity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cochran, James R.; SempéRé, Jean-Christophe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGP21B0996R"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Within Lunar Impact Basins: Constraints on the History of the Lunar Dynamo</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previous work has shown that lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> has a combination of origins including shock remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> in transient <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields and thermoremanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> in a steady core dynamo <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field (e.g., Hood and Artemieva, Icarus, 2008; Richmond and Hood, JGR, 2008; Garrick-Bethell et al., Science, 2009; Hood, Icarus, 2011). In particular, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within the interiors of lunar impact basins and large craters provide a potentially valuable means of constraining the history of the former dynamo (Halekas et al., MAPS, 2003; Hood, 2011). These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> likely have a thermoremanent origin owing to high subsurface temperatures reached at the time of impact and therefore require a long-lived, steady <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field to explain their <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. Central <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have previously been confirmed to be present using Lunar Prospector magnetometer (LP MAG) data within several Nectarian-aged basins (Moscoviense, Mendel-Rydberg, Crisium, and Humboldtianum), implying that a dynamo existed during this lunar epoch (Hood, 2011). Here, we further analyze low altitude LP MAG data for several additional basins, ranging in age from Nectarian to Imbrian. Results indicate that <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a probable basin-related origin are present within at least two additional Nectarian-aged basins (Serenitatis and Humorum) and one Imbrian-aged basin (Schrodinger). No discernible <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are present within the largest Imbrian-aged basins, Imbrium and Orientale. While there is uncertainty regarding the age of the Schrodinger basin, it has been reported to be slightly more recent than Imbrium (Wilhelms, 1984). Our initial interpretation is therefore that a dynamo likely existed during the Imbrian epoch. The absence of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> within Imbrium and Orientale can be explained by insufficient conditions for acquisition of strong <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (e.g., inadequate concentrations of efficient remanence carriers) following these relatively large impacts.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richmond, N. C.; Hood, L. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1412169V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct Observations of <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on the Lunar Surface under Varying Solar Wind Conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In contrast to Earth, the Moon does not have a global dipolar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. Since the first lunar landing with Apollo 11, we know, though, that localised <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields exist on the lunar surface. Measurements conducted by the Lunar Prospector magnetometer and electron reflectometer suggested that these localised <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields are able to deflect the impinging solar wind in favourable cases (Lin et al., Science 1998). Magnetohydrodynamic simulations support the implication that mini-magnetospheres are formed above the locations of strong localised <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields and can hold off the impinging solar wind (Harnett and Winglee, JGR 2002). Analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field data from Lunar Prospector of the Reiner Gamma <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region showed that the distortion of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> strongly depends on the impinging solar wind parameters, which was interpreted that the size and shape of the mini-magnetosphere changed with the solar wind parametes (Kurata et al., GRL 2005). Wieser et al., GRL 2010 showed that SARA, the Sub-KeV Atom Analyzer on board Chandrayaan-1, is able to detect an ENA image of the mini-magnetosphere in the measured energetic neutral atom flux. Here we analysed all orbits where CENA, the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer, recorded data when a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was in CENA's field-of-view. Our goal was to determine if 1) a signature of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is always visible in the ENA signal and if 2) there is a correlation between the solar wind dynamic pressure, the solar wind <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field, the local <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field strength and the reduction in the reflected ENA flux. Our results show that for the simplest case, i.e., the Gerasimovich <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, there is indeed a clear correlation between the shielding efficiency, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure. For the other observed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, for which the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields are not only weaker but also spatially more variable than that of the Gerasimovich <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, only in about half of the cases such a correlation was found. We therefore conclude that the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> interaction is in general quite complex and that data with higher spatial resolution and more detailed modelling is required to understand this process better.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Futaana, Y.; Holmström, M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dhanya, M. B.; Sridharan, R.; Asamura, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MeScT..24g5005Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of CHAMP <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> contamination and measurement timing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) mission ended after more than ten years in space on 19 September 2010. For achieving a high measurement accuracy of the magnetometers on CHAMP, detailed analyses of spacecraft <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> characteristics in orbit are required. A decade of continuous magnetometer and housekeeping data are a good basis for evaluating some of the effects of variable spacecraft <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields on the ambient field determination. It was found that some perturbations of FGM (FluxGate vector Magnetometer) or OVM (OVerhauser scalar Magnetometer) measurements are caused by stray fields induced by the power system, the ASC (advanced stellar compass) instrument or magneto-torquer currents. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> effect of solar currents on FGM measurements varies with the local time of the orbit and amounts to 0.2 nT. In cases when one head of the ASC instrument was blinded by the sun, sometimes transient drops in instrument current strength occur, which were accompanied by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> disturbance signals (?0.3 nT) in FGM measurements. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> residual contamination of OVM data by the torquer currents was of order 0.1 nT but still detectable. An improved torquer correction matrix is derived which eliminates this effect. In-flight scalar calibration parameters revealed some of the effects of timing <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Time lags between FGM and OVM readings are misinterpreted by the scalar calibration as variations of the angles between some of the sensor axes. The resulting amplitudes of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> presented here lie in the range of some 0.1 nT, but they are systematic in nature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yin, Fan; Lühr, Hermann; Rauberg, Jan; Michaelis, Ingo; Cai, Hongtao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42008129"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> signatures of equatorial <span class="hlt">spread</span> F as observed by the CHAMP satellite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> observations on board the CHAMP satellite are used for the first comprehensive study of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signatures of the postsunset equatorial <span class="hlt">spread</span> F (ESF) events. This is derived from a continuous database covering the years 2001-2004. On the basis of an extended survey, the global distribution of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signatures is derived. We find a distinct seasonal\\/longitudinal variation of the occurrence</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Stolle; H. Lühr; M. Rother; G. Balasis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1215440L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Mediterranean in satellite and hydromagnetic measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Observation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field using Champ satellite and compilation of digital maps of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for altitudes 100 km and 400 km opens up new possibilities for a more reliable investigation of regional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed after airborne- and hydromagnetic surveys. For studying regional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Mediterranean Sea basin, observed values of geomagnetic field measured along extended tacks for years 1966-1967 on a non-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> schooner "Zarya" and data of geomagnetic measurements obtained by Champ satellite for the altitudes 100 km and 400 km were used as source materials. For parameter estimation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field structure, the method of spectral-spatial analysis (SSAN) was used. For comparison with seismic and geological sections, the method of conversion of spectral-spatial representation of geomagnetic field into a deep geomagnetic section was used. Along two near-latitude profiles of a geomagnetic survey crossing the Northern and Southern Mediterranean Sea, deep geomagnetic sections are constructed. They allowed studying lateral and vertical distribution regularities of rock <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> in the Earth's crust. Survey error, detail sampling, and great profile length allowed studying mantle <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 5 km to 800 km long in a depth interval from 1 to 50 km to a precision of 10-15%. This allowed estimating features of the largest heterogeneities in deep structure of the middle and lower crust of the Mediterranean. Comparison of geomagnetic sections with seismic data allowed distinguishing large <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> heterogeneities corresponding to position of deep seismic boundaries in the Earth's crust. An estimation of velocity, density, and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> rock characteristics for the middle and lower Earth's crust of the West Mediterranean and Central Basin is made. A comparison of three regional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> distinguished after hydromagnetic survey profiles with <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obtained by Champ satellite for heights 100 km and 400 km is carried out. Intensity of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at a height of 100 km is more than 10 nT. At the ocean level, intensity of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> amounts to 250-300 nT in the Tyrrhenian Sea area and African-Sicilian threshold and approximately to 200 nT in the Phoenician Sea. In geomagnetic sections, regional <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are confined to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> heterogeneities in a depth interval from 17 to 25 km; they correspond to seismic discontinuity boundaries inside the basement. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at a height of 400 km in the Tyrrhenian Sea area of 2-3 nT intensity is confined to a weakly <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> horizon at a depth of 30-38 km. At the African-Sicilian threshold, where Moho discontinuity is at a depth of 38-40 km, an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of 3-3.5 nT intensity is confined to a more <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> heterogeneity located at the same depth of 30-39 km. In the Phoenician Sea, a 1-1.3 nT <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is confined to a near-vertical <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> heterogeneity submerging to a depth of more than 30 km. These results enable to specify geophysical modeling of the Mediterranean lithosphere taking into account lateral and vertical distribution regularities of rock <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. Interpretation of magnetometric data from hydromagnetic and satellite measurements in association with seismic materials allowed revealing structural features of the Earth's crust, extended the possibilities for forecast of thermal conditions, composition, and state of deep matter.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Litvinova, Tamara; Petrova, Alevtina; Demina, Irina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995JGR...100.3789W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Models of the development of the West Iberia rifted continental margin at 40 deg 30 min N deduced from surface and deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ocean-continent transition (OCT) on nonvolcanic continental margins is important in that it contains evidence concerning the breakup of the continents and the onset of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>. The nature of the OCT off western Iberia has recently been attracting attention following seismic and other geophysical studies there and drilling of acoustic basement by Leg 149 of the Ocean Drilling Program. Here we concentrate on the interpretation of a new digital <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> for the Iberia Abyssal Plain between 39.5 deg and 42.2 deg N. The most striking <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a trough which exists immediately east of, and locally parallel to, <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> J and is closely coincident with a basement peridotite ridge. We conclude from modeling surface <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and a deep-tow magnetometer profile that seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> began about 129.9 m.y. ago (Barremian) at a rate of 10.0 mm/yr, consistent with drilling and seismostratigraphic results from the southern Iberia Abyssal Plain.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whitmarsh, Robert B.; Miles, Peter R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41299707"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Basement Structure Around Vizianagaram, Visakhapatnam and Srikakulam Districts of Andhra Pradesh, India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A systematic regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> survey was carried out in the districts of Vizianagaram, Visakhapatnam and Srikakulam in Andhra pradesh, India comprising an area of 15, 000 sq. km of eastern migmatite zone of Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are very noisy, varying between ?1300 nT and +700 nT in amplitude and correlate very poorly with the surface geology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. V. Radhakrishna Murthy; P. Rama Rao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54396005"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperfine Structure Separation, Nuclear <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Moment, and Hyperfine Structure <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> of CESIUM131</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The atomic-beam <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>-resonance method was used to obtain the ; hyperfine structure separation DELTA \\/sub nu \\/, the nuclear <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> dipole ; momert mu \\/sub I\\/, and the hyperfine structure <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> DELTA , of Cs¹³¹. ; Independent values of mu \\/sub I\\/ and DELTA nu \\/ were obtained by observing one ; of the DELTA F = plus or minus</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richard Dixon Worley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1963-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/43795854"> <span id="translatedtitle">Considerations of variations in ionospheric field effects in mapping equatorial lithospheric Magsat <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The longitudinal, seasonal, and altitude-dependent variability of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in equatorial latitudes is investigated to determine the effect of these variabilities on the isolation of lithospheric Magsat <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It was found that the amplitudes of the dawn dip-latitude averages were small compared to the dusk averages, and that they were of the opposite sign. The longitudinal variation in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Ravat; W. J. Hinze</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v073/i006/JB073i006p02119/JB073i006p02119.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Marine <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, Geomagnetic Field Reversals, and Motions of the Ocean Floor and Continents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper summarizes the results of the three previous papers in this series, which have shown the presence of a pattern of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, bilaterally symmetric about the crest of the ridge in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. By assuming that the pattern is caused by a sequence of normally and reversely <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> blocks that have been produced by</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. R. Heirtzler; G. O. Dickson; E. M. Herron; W. C. Pitman; X. Le Pichon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1968-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/415620"> <span id="translatedtitle">Weak extremely-low-frequency <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field-induced regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the planarian, Dugesia tigrina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors recently reported that cephalic regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina was significantly delayed in populations exposed continuously to combined parallel DC and AC <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields. This effect was consistent with hypotheses suggesting an underlying resonance phenomenon. The authors report here, in a parallel series of investigations on the same model system, that the incidence of regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> presenting as tumor-like protuberances also increases significantly (P < .001) in association with exposure to weak 60 Hz <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields, with peak intensities ranging between 1.0 and 80.0 {micro}T. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> often culminate in the complete disaggregation of the organism. Similar to regeneration rate effects, the incidence of regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is specifically dependent upon the planaria possessing a fixed orientation with respect to the applied <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field vectors. However, unlike the regeneration rate effects, the AC <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field alone, in the absence of any measurable DC field, is capable of producing these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Moreover, the incidence of regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> follows a clear dose-response relationship as a function of AC <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field intensity, with the threshold for induced electric field intensity estimated at 5 {micro} V/m. The addition of either 51.1 or 78.4 {micro}T DC <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields, applied in parallel combination with the AC field, enhances the appearance of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> relative to the 60 Hz AC field alone, but only at certain AC field intensities. Thus, whereas the previous study of regeneration rate effects appeared to involve exclusively resonance interactions, the regeneration <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> reported here appear to result primarily from Faraday induction coupling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R. [Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/0760868887944488.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A gradient method for interpreting <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to horizontal circular cylinders, infinite dykes and vertical steps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new method of interpreting <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of arbitrarily-magnetised horizontal circular cylinders, dipping dykes and\\u000a vertical steps is presented. The method makes use of both horizontal and vertical gradients of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of the model\\u000a under consideration, rather than the observed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Vertical and horizontal gradients are calculated from the\\u000a observed <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and plotted one against the other</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. V. Radhakrishna Murthy; C. Visweswara Rao; G. Gopala Krishna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/jb0705/2005JB003975/2005JB003975.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetotelluric measurements across the Beattie <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the Southern Cape Conductive Belt, South Africa</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Beattie <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (BMA) and the Southern Cape Conductive Belt (SCCB), two of Earth's largest continental geophysical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, extend across the southern African continent in an east-west direction. To resolve structural details of the SCCB, a high-resolution magnetotelluric study was conducted in March 2004, along a 150-km-long N-S profile across the Karoo Basin in South Africa. A two-dimensional conductivity</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">U. Weckmann; O. Ritter; A. Jung; T. Branch; M. de Wit</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.P31A1700D"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Smoking Gun: Remanent <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on Mars and the Formation of the Crustal Dichotomy via Giant Impact</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The formation of large-scale crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Southern Highlands of Mars is equivocal. Though some are indeed elongated primarily in the east-west direction, initial map projections exacerbated their linear nature, leading to the hypothesis that the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are equivalent to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> stripes due to <span class="hlt">spreading</span> of Earth's sea floor and hence to the proposal of plate tectonics on Mars. This interpretation, however, is inconsistent with Martian geology. For instance, a plate-tectonics model predicts the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> should be formed in thin, oceanic crust at low elevation, but instead they are found in the thick crust of the Highlands, not in the thin crust of the Northern Lowlands. Indeed, the formation of this Crustal Dichotomy is also equivocal, with models ranging from a giant impact (or multiple smaller impacts) near either the current north or south poles, to plate tectonics-like processes, to mantle convection, either eroding the crust in the northern hemisphere or thickening the crust in the south. Recently, the idea of a giant impact in the north has been resurrected, with the proposal that the Dichotomy results from the formation of an elliptical basin by a giant impact very early in Martian history. While it may be tempting to suggest that the current, generally demagnetized state of the Northern Lowlands may be related to this impact, this linkage makes implicit assumptions about the timing of dynamo shut-off on Mars, and it neglects other demagnetization mechanisms possibly operating in the Lowlands after such an impact (e.g., later hydrothermal processing). More direct <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> evidence for the giant impact hypothesis would come if the remanent <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> in Southern Highlands were relatable in a unique way to the putative impact. Here, we show that the positions of many of the dominant elongated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars are consistent with the first ring of a multi-ring basin. The best match comes from an ellipse ~2200 km wider than the inferred boundary of the basin. This distance is the square root of 2 minus 1 of the long axis, and root-2 spacing is characteristic of the inward dipping normal faults in multi-ring basins. The constant distance of our predicted ring, as opposed to variable spacing due to the elliptical nature of the basin, is also consistent with the idea that multi-ring basins form from stress release during inward collapse of the transient crater. Because of the size of the basin, the second ring would be found in the antipodal region, where its formation is dubious and where seismic focusing from the impact has been proposed to explain the generally absent <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the south polar region. The observation that the elongated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars mark the first ring around a basin both provides an explanation for the formation of many of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and supports the hypothesis that the Crustal Dichotomy of Mars is the product of a giant impact that formed an elliptical basin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dombard, A. J.; Johnson, C. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SSRv..154..219T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Field Observation and Initial Global Mapping of Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> by MAP-LMAG Onboard SELENE (Kaguya)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field around the Moon has been successfully observed at a nominal altitude of ˜100 km by the lunar magnetometer (LMAG) on the SELENE (Kaguya) spacecraft in a polar orbit since October 29, 2007. The LMAG mission has three main objectives: (1) mapping the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the Moon, (2) measuring the electromagnetic and plasma environment around the Moon and (3) estimating the electrical conductivity structure of the Moon. Here we review the instrumentation and calibration of LMAG and report the initial global mapping of the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at the nominal altitude. We have applied a new de-trending technique of the Bayesian procedure to multiple-orbit datasets observed in the tail lobe and in the lunar wake. Based on the nominal observation of 14 months, global maps of lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are obtained with 95% coverage of the lunar surface. After altitude normalization and interpolation of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field by an inverse boundary value problem, we obtained full-coverage maps of the vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field at 100 km altitude and the radial component distribution on the surface. Relatively strong <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are identified in several basin-antipode regions and several near-basin and near-crater regions, while the youngest basin on the Moon, the Orientale basin, has no <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. These features well agree with characteristics of previous maps based on the Lunar Prospector observation. Relatively weak <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are distributed over most of the lunar surface. The surface radial-component distribution estimated from the inverse boundary value problem in the present study shows a good correlation with the radial component distribution at 30 km altitude by Lunar Prospector. Thus these weak <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the lunar surface are not artifacts but likely to be originated from the lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetism</span>, suggesting possible existence of an ancient global <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field such as a dynamo field of the early Moon. The possibility of the early lunar dynamo and the mechanism of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> acquisition will be investigated by a further study using the low-altitude data of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field by Kaguya.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Matsuoka, Ayako; Nakazawa, Satoru; Otake, Hisashi; Iijima, Yuichi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/u824577170382540.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and gradients for spatial arbitrary posture regular body</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the interaction computation for 3D gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to arbitrarily shaped homogenous <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> polyhedron\\u000a model composed of triangular facets, there are many difficult points, such as mass computing, absence of a mature computer\\u000a technique in 3D geological body modeling, inconvenient human-computer interaction, hard program coding, etc.. Based on the\\u000a formulae of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field due to horizontal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dongming Hong; Changli Yao; Yuanman Zheng; Wei Guo; Yao Luo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v079/i014/JB079i014p02014/JB079i014p02014.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A New Method for Modeling Marine Gravity and <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">irregular crustal model as observed on a plane above the material. It is shown how the method can be used to invert the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field data to obtain a <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> model, but the model so obtained is not unique. The normal restrictions placed on the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> models lead to a family of solutions with one degree of freedom. This paper</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robert L. Parker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18687508"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of forest soils in the Upper Silesia-Northern Moravia region.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previous investigations revealed a strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> due to soil <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> enhancement in the industrialized cross-border area of Upper Silesia (Poland) and Northern Moravia (Czech Republic). Since industrial and urban dusts contain <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> particles, this soil <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> enhancement is assumed to be of anthropogenic origin, caused by a high concentration of atmospherically deposited <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> particles, accumulated in topsoil layers. This assumption is proved by investigations of vertical profiles of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility along a transect crossing the border area of the two countries. The results show that the population of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals in the organic horizon is different from that in the mineral horizons. The vertical distribution of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility and thermomagnetic analysis suggests negligible lithogenic contribution. The observed relationship between <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility and some heavy metals, confirmed by micromorphological observations and microchemical analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> particles separated from the organic horizons of forest topsoil, has proved the usefulness of soil magnetometry for pollution study. PMID:18687508</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Magiera, Tadeusz; Kapicka, Ales; Petrovský, Eduard; Strzyszcz, Zygmunt; Fialová, Hana; Rachwa?, Marzena</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-06</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007GeoRL..3424206B"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with an albedo feature near Airy crater in the lunar nearside highlands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe a strong crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, recently identified in Lunar Prospector magnetometer data, that is associated with a previously unreported albedo feature near the crater Airy in the lunar nearside highlands. Other workers have demonstrated a correlation between <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the enigmatic bright markings known as lunar swirls. We have used Earth-based telescopic spectra and Clementine multispectral images to investigate the compositional and optical maturity characteristics of the Airy swirl. The Airy albedo feature does not exhibit the complex sinuous structure of well-known swirls such as the Reiner Gamma Formation, but does possess a bright loop and central dark lane. Another strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, in the Apollo 16/Descartes region, corresponds to a simple diffuse bright albedo spot. On this basis we suggest that a continuum of swirl morphologies exists on the Moon, with the Airy feature representing an intermediate or incipient swirl form.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blewett, D. T.; Hawke, B. R.; Richmond, N. C.; Hughes, C. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JGR...10614601H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mapping and modeling of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the northern polar region of Mars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vector crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field maps of the northern polar zone (60°N to 90°N) are constructed from selected Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer data obtained during the period from May 28 to September 13, 1998. Two medium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (amplitudes >50 nT at 170 km altitude) are mapped in locations consistent with earlier studies. No visible surface features correlate with the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, suggesting that the sources lie beneath the visible veneer of polar deposits and volcanic lava flows. If so, then they formed prior to the immediate end of the heavy bombardment (upper Hesperian) period. Modeling of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> vector field components combined with independent constraints on the depth to the Curie isotherm yields lower limits on bulk <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> intensities (0.4-0.9 A/m) that are significantly greater than those measured for Martian (SNC) meteorite samples. Rocks that contain substantially more titanomagnetite than SNC meteorites, or that contain <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> phases in addition to titanomagnetite, possibly resulting from hydrothermal alteration, are therefore suggested. Alternatively, remanence acquisition in a field of Earthlike intensity (~50 ?T), rather than in the relatively weak inferred paleointensities for SNC meteorites (~1-10 ?T), would also help to explain the relatively strong inferred remanent <span class="hlt">magnetizations</span>. The approximate south paleomagnetic pole positions corresponding to these two <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sources are located in a region between Olympus Mons and the present north rotational pole. This region is adjacent to the approximate location predicted by Melosh [1980] for the paleopole prior to the formation of the Tharsis gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hood, L. L.; Zakharian, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EP%26S...64...83S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simultaneous observation of the electron acceleration and ion deceleration over lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">At ˜25 km altitude over <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the Moon, the deceleration of the solar wind ions, acceleration of the solar wind electrons parallel to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field, and heating of the ions reflected by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were simultaneously observed by MAP-PACE on Kaguya. Deceleration of the solar wind ions was observed for two major solar wind ion compositions: protons and alpha particles. Deceleration of the solar wind had the same ?E/q (?E: deceleration energy, q: charge) for both protons and alpha particles. In addition, the acceleration energy of the electrons was almost the same as the deceleration energy of the ions. This indicates the existence of an anti-moonward electric field over the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> above the altitude of Kaguya. The reflected ions were observed in a much larger area than the area where <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field enhancement was observed. These reflected ions had a higher temperature and lower bulk velocity than the incident solar wind ions. This suggests the existence of a non-adiabatic dissipative interaction between solar wind ions and lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> below Kaguya.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saito, Y.; Nishino, M. N.; Fujimoto, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Yokota, S.; Tsunakawa, H.; Shibuya, H.; Matsushima, M.; Shimizu, H.; Takahashi, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.5268K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modelling of the solar wind interaction with a lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at macro and micro scales</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent lunar missions have shown that the solar wind interaction with the Moon is complex and scientifically more interesting than anticipated before, as shown by new in situ plasma, neutral atom and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field observations. Especially, an unexpectedly high fraction of the incident solar wind protons is reflected from the surface, and an even larger fraction by the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This effect has been observed both by measuring deviated solar wind ion flow near the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and by observing decreased flux of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms, H-ENAs, from the surface region of strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These "macro scale" processes affect the properties of plasma near the lunar surface. Consequently, also physical processes at "micro scales" within the Debye sheath layer, where the electric potential of the surface and near surface region are controlled by photoelectrons and solar wind particles, are affected. In this work we study the solar wind interaction with a lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by two numerical kinetic simulation models: (1) a 3D hybrid model (HYB-<span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>) to study macro scale processes and (2) a full kinetic 1D and 2D Particle-in-cell (PIC) model to study micro scale processes. In the hybrid model ions are modelled as particles while electrons form a charge neutralizing massless fluid. The hybrid model also includes energetic neutral hydrogen atoms, H-ENAs, which are formed in charge exchange processes on the lunar surface when solar wind protons hit against it. In the PIC simulations both ions and electrons are modelled as particles. In the presentation we discuss, based on these models, properties of plasma near the lunar surface, its modification by a lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the reflected flux of ions and H-ENAs, which serves as messengers for the interaction processes at the surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kallio, Esa; Jarvinen, Riku; Dyadechkin, Sergey; Alho, Markku; Wurz, Peter; Barabash, Stas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52437949"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calibration of PreM25 Marine <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Polarity Composite of ýLate Callovian Through Kimmeridgian</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ammonite-zoned successions have yielded a composite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> polarity pattern ýspanning latest Callovian (lamberti ammonite Zone) through Late Kimmeridgian ýý(acanthicum Zone) that confirms marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> M37 through to M24 ýinterpreted by deep-tow and other <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> surveys in the western Pacific. This pattern ýwas constructed after thermal demagnetization of over 1000 samples from over 30 ýsections in Poland, British Isles, France</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. A. Przybylski; J. G. Ogg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ChPhB..18..462Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">GENERAL: Hawking radiation from the charged and <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> BTZ black hole via covariant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper discusses Hawking radiation from the charged and <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole from the viewpoint of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, initiated by Robinson and Wilczek recently. It reconstructs the electromagnetic field tensor and the Lagrangian of the field corresponding to the source with electric and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> charges to redefine an equivalent charge and gauge potential. It employs the covariant <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation method to determine the compensating fluxes of charge flow and energy-momentum tensor, which are shown to match with those of the 2-dimensional blackbody radiation at the Hawking temperature exactly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Yang, Shu-Zheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........45F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> properties of mantle xenoliths and implications for long wavelength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Unaltered peridotite xenoliths are broadly representative of the lithospheric mantle in both oceanic and continental domains. These peridotites are mainly lherzolites and harzburgites. Other rock types such as dunites, wehrlites and pyroxenites are generally not volumetrically significant. The respective contributions of rock-forming minerals to induced and remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> in these rocks are currently poorly constrained. This information can be used to assess the significance of long-wavelength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It can also provide insights, as an alternate approach to the spinel-olivine-pyroxene oxybarometer, into several important petrologic parameters of the lithospheric mantle including fO2. Forty-nine representative, uncontaminated and non-serpentinized xenoliths have been <span class="hlt">magnetically</span> investigated. These specimens display contrasting remanent <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties (NRM, Mr, Ms) depending on their tectonic settings, specifically oceanic hot-spot, continental mantle plume, island arc, and craton. The main paramagnetic silicates (olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, etc...) typically account for most of the peridotite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties. The low-field bulk <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility of pristine, unaltered mantle xenoliths is ? 500 +/- 60 x 10-6 [SI] and displays limited variability. The total contribution of paramagnetic silicates to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility (Kpara-silicates) can be determined from the high-field slope of a saturated hysteresis experiment. Kpara-silicates can also be calculated by adding the respective contributions of individual silicates based on their modes, chemical composition, and the Bohr magneton numbers of individual cations. Silicates account for between 56 and 97% (average ? 85%) of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility depending on rock composition. When present, the contribution of chrome spinel, which is paramagnetic in the absence of late-stage exsolution products, remains around 1%. Plagioclase-, spinel- and garnet-lherzolites share similar low-field <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties. The remaining contribution to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility arises from variable amounts of primary magnetite (and pyrrhotite to a minor extent). These mineral phases, although present in tens to hundreds of ppm only, contribute significantly to the rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties because they have large intrinsic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibilities (? 1 to 4 [SI] for magnetite). Stoichiometric magnetite has been identified as microscopic exsolutions in the lattice of olivine and accounts for 2 to 43% (average ? 8%) of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility. Whether these pseudo-single domain magnetite grains are in equilibrium with other rock-forming minerals or not is still being investigated. Pyrrhotite (up to 600 ppm in some rare specimens), although detectable in low-temperature <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> experiments, does not significantly contribute to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility. The contribution of ferromagnetic minerals, such as magnetite and pyrrhotite, to remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (Mr) is significant and varies greatly (over 250x between specimens) with tectonic setting. The fact that all specimens contain primary magnetite suggests that these assemblages equilibrated at least at or above the wustite-magnetite (WM) oxygen buffer and near the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) oxygen buffer. The amount of magnetite present in the mantle peridotite assemblage seems to correlate with tectonic setting and may be linked to fO2 in the mantle. The timing of magnetite exsolution in olivine is still poorly understood and may depend on degree of partial melting, rate of cooling to ambient lithospheric temperature, or mantle metasomatic processes due to introduction of hydrous fluids.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Friedman, Sarah A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5667897"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chemical remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of oceanic crust</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of chemical remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (CRM) of oceanic crust on the anomalous skewness of sea-floor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are investigated. Considering a realistic constraint that the actual <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> at <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> M0 is reversed, the CRM of layer 2A basalts fails to explain the anomalous skewness of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The CRM of the deeper layers does contribute to the anomalous skewness of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 33/34, but the major contribution comes from thermal remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Verhoef, J. (Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada)); Arkani-Hamed, J. (McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003GGG.....4.1108W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geodynamic evolution of the Galápagos hot spot system (Central East Pacific) over the past 20 m.y.: Constraints from morphology, geochemistry, and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report results of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data from the Nazca Plate and of geochemical (major element and Sr-Nd-Pb-isotope) analyses of rocks dredged from the Galápagos hot spot tracks (Cocos, Carnegie, Malpelo and Coiba Ridges and adjacent seamounts) in the Central East Pacific. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicate that the Malpelo and Carnegie Ridges were once attached and that seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> separated the two ridges between 14.5 Ma and 9.5 Ma. The variations in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic composition show that three of the mantle components currently observed at the Galápagos (Central, Southern, and Eastern) existed in the hot spot for at least 20 m.y., whereas the Northern Galápagos mantle component has been present for at least ˜15 Ma. Our data are consistent with the existence of a compositionally zoned/striped Galápagos plume since ˜20 Ma. Combined constraints from the morphology of the hot spot tracks, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> record, and the isotope geochemistry of the rock samples provide new insights into the hot spot-ridge geometry and interaction of the Galápagos hot spot with the Cocos-Nazca <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center (CNS) over the past 20 m.y. At 19.5 Ma a ridge jump moved the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis to the northern edge of the hot spot. Between 19.5 and 14.5 Ma, the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis was located above the center of the hot spot. At 14.5 Ma, a new ridge jump moved the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis to the south, splitting the paleo-Carnegie Ridge into the present Carnegie and Malpelo Ridges. The repeated ridge jumps reflect capture of the northwardly drifting <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center by the Galápagos hot spot. At 11-12 Ma an offset of the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis lay above the plume center. <span class="hlt">Spreading</span> between the Carnegie and Malpelo Ridges continued until 9.5 Ma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Werner, R.; Hoernle, K.; Barckhausen, U.; Hauff, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4510709W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plasma environment near lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and its effects on surface processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In-situ observations and modeling work have indicated the interactions between the solar wind and lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. These interactions will alter the near-surface plasma environment in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions and may have effects on the formation of unusual albedo features - the ‘lunar swirls’, and possibly also on the production (or loss) of volatiles (e.g. hydroxyl) as well as electrostatic dust transport. These interactions are complicated by the complex geometries of the lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields. Here we present a series of laboratory investigations of the plasma interactions with <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> dipole fields above an insulating surface for understanding fundamental physical processes and surface electric fields. We investigated moderate strength dipole fields in which the electrons were <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> while the ions were unmagnetized. The dipole field was oriented parallel, oblique and normal to the surface. Several physical processes have been identified, including <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> shielding and focusing, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> mirror reflection as well as non-monotonic sheaths. Potential distributions on the surface were complex with enhanced surface charging and electric fields. Our experimental results indicate that plasma environment near the lunar surface can be greatly modified in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions and may thus alter the surface processes. The latest results with a flowing plasma will also be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Xu; Howes, C.; Horányi, M.; Robertson, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54258767"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field cooling and <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fluids near melting point</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> process of ferrofluids with carrier fluids of water, paraffin, and alkylnaphtalene was investigated in a temperature range from 77 to 300 K as functions of the freezing rate and the intensity of cooling <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields. A uniaxial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> anisotropy is induced by field cooling in frozen ferrofluids. This induced anisotropy which is caused by the formation of clustering</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Miyajima; N. Inaba; S. Taketomi; M. Sakurai; S. Chikazumi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.5848M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Insight into Mars' Paleodynamo by Modeling Gravity and <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Southern Highlands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the analysis I model crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> near the Tyrrhenus Mons and Syrtis Major volcanoes and the heavily cratered highlands between Arabia Terra and the Hellas impact basin. I first map the gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in each region to identify the locations of anomalous crustal density. The gravity data are inverted to determine the depth and thickness of the layer, which are used as inputs to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> inversion to reduce the inherent non-uniqueness in the horizontal position of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sources. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are modeled where there is a gravity minimum or maximum in close proximity to a peak in the total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. Geologic processes such as magmatism, cratering, and serpentinization produce gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. All three components of the low altitude and mapping altitude <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field data are inverted using the same conjugate gradient iterative technique used by Langlais et al. (2004) and Langlais and Purucker (2007). The resulting paleopoles span a range of latitudes for sources below Noachian and Hesperian aged crusts. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> sources that favor low latitude paleopoles are generally located below or immediately adjacent to Noachian surface units, and sources that favor middle to high latitude paleopoles are located below or immediately adjacent to Hesperian features. The cluster of paleopoles near the geographical pole associated with younger units is strong evidence that the dynamo was active during the Hesperian. Opposite polarities of paleomagnetic poles clustered in the same region are strong evidence for reversals of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in the Noachian and Hesperian. The paleopole distributions determined support the case for true polar wander, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reversals, and a dynamo that remained active into the Hesperian.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Milbury, C.; Schubert, G.; Raymond, C. A.; Smrekar, S. E.; Langlais, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/514749"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns related to hydrocarbon fields in northern West Siberia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study of the features of gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields in the vicinity of oil and gas reservoirs in West Siberia demonstrated a spatial relationship with the hydrocarbon deposits. The relevant <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> cover approximately 900,000 km{sup 2} in northern West Siberia. Amplitude and frequency were investigated initially using double Fourier spectrum (DFS) analysis. This was followed by (1) application of transformations, filtering, and moving windows analysis; (2) compilation of maps of regional and local <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and potential field derivatives; and (3) investigation of the distribution of parameters in areas of known deposits. Hydrocarbon deposits are located mostly at the slopes of positive regional gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> which are interpreted as relating to deep riftogenic structures. At the same time, it is established that the location of hydrocarbon depositions coincides commonly with local gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minima generated by lows in basement density and <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. All known hydrocarbon deposits in northern West Siberia are in areas characterized by comparatively high gradients of constituent of gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with a wavelength of about 90--100 km. These newly revealed links between reservoirs and potential field parameters may be a means to predict new discoveries in poorly explored territories and seas, primarily in Russia`s Arctic shelf.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Piskarev, A.L.; Tchernyshev, M.Yu. [VNIIOkeangeologia, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LTP....36..210N"> <span id="translatedtitle">The evidence of a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Zn-doped LSCO cuprates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The low-temperature heat capacity in pure (y=0) and Zn-doped La1.84Sr0.16Cu1-yZnyO4 samples (y=0.033 and 0.06) have been performed in the temperature interval 1.8-60 K by the method of high-precision pulsed differential calorimetry, providing measurements under the equilibrium conditions in contrast to commonly used differential scanning calorimeters. For these systems a new heat capacity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was observed in the nonsuperconducting state, which is related with Zn impurities and has the form of single wide peak. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> does not show a phonon character as it strongly shifts towards higher temperatures with increasing Zn content, as is characteristic for a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> increases almost linearly with the impurity concentration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nadareishvili, M. M.; Kvavadze, K. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.P31B1398T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Initial Global Mmapping of the Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> by MAP-LMAG on SELENE (KAGUYA): Implication for the Lunar Crustal <span class="hlt">Magnetism</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field around the Moon has been successfully observed at a nominal altitude of 100 km by the lunar magnetometer (MAP-LMAG) on the SELENE (KAGUYA) spacecraft in a polar orbit since October 29, 2007. Here we report the initial global mapping of the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> based on the observations during November 2007 to June 2008. Since the solar activity has been very low during the observation, an effect of the external field fluctuation is small enough to detect a weak signal of the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at ~100 km altitude. Distinctly identified are several <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the Descartes <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the Stöfler <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the Crisium antipode <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the Serenitatis antipode <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. However other <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed at lower altitudes by the Lunar Prospector spacecraft are less clearly or hardly recognized in the present mapping result. Hence there is a significant difference in altitude dependence of the magnitude among the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, in particular, for the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> clusters at the northern edge of the South Pole-Aitken basin. This indicates that <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> sources in the lunar crust have considerably different configurations such as depth and horizontal inhomogeneity of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsunakawa, H.; Shibuya, H.; Takahashi, F.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, M.; Saito, Y.; Yokota, S.; Asamura, K.; Matsuoka, A.; Nishino, M. N.; Tanaka, T.; Nagai, T.; Terasawa, T.; Yamamoto, T. I.; Fujimoto, M.; Mukai, T.; Nakazawa, S.; Otake, H.; Iijima, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49601409"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over archaeological targets in urban environments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> prospecting is one of the most widely used methods for investigating archaeological sites in the world. It is often applied before and during various types of industrial development and in agricultural areas. In Israel, most potential archaeological targets are located in urban settings, which substantially complicate their geophysical signatures. Noise from natural factors such as the inclined <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (about</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lev V. Eppelbaum</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012CG.....39..135S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magan: A new approach to the analysis and interpretation of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The identification of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is an important phase of plate tectonic modeling, but is limited by the lack of professional software, either free or commercial, which may help in the accomplishment of this task, and by the practice of performing approximations that may prevent in some instances a correct interpretation of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data. Although basic forward-modeling and inversion algorithms that may be incorporated in the core of gravity or <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> application software have been published since the late 1950s, most research groups have implemented their own tools independently from each other, and apart from a few cases such computer programs are not publicly accessible. Here a new methodology of analysis of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data is described, which allows a quantitative correlation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from different profiles and a statistical determination of relative plate velocities. The method is implemented through a new free software package, Magan, available for the MS Windows environment. The program is especially designed to work with NGDC GEODAS ship-track and aeromagnetic data, but allows the import of any ASCII text file containing <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data. The basic forward-modeling algorithms included in the Magan core are based on well-known techniques of potential field geophysics, modified to take into account specific requirements of marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data analysis and plate tectonic modeling. Such a kernel is flanked by a friendly graphical user interface (GUI), which helps and speeds up the interpretation of the ship-track data. In particular, the program allows one to (1) draw and edit flow lines where <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data can be projected, (2) calculate more accurately modeled <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> through the use of apparent polar wander paths and single block parameters, (3) generate age-distance and time-velocity graphs, and (4) generate crossing point files that can be subsequently used to build <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> isochrons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schettino, Antonio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUSMGP21A..04G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Low Altitude <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Compilation in Argentina: its Comparison with Satellite Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Six <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data sets have been merged to produce an integrated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map that covers part of the Argentine margin and adjacent onshore terrain in an area centered at 42° S, 60° W. One of the main features of the map is a high intensity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that is abruptly interrupted at a line along which the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineations related to the volcanic activity during margin formation either end or are shifted to the east. The line stands out as a first order northwest-trending <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> discontinuity, the Colorado discontinuity. Part of the Cretaceous Quiet Zone (KQZ) is covered by the data. The upward continuation of a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data compilation to satellite altitudes is generally difficult to achieve in a reliable way because of possible biases or losses in the long and intermediate wavelength components of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due in part to reference field removal. Using DGRF values for the regional field for those surveys for which we had the measured field and epoch allowed us to "level" surveys for which we only had the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The analysis was made by trial and error, using third order trends in the data and looking for the disappearance of anomalous features. We performed 300 and 400 km upward continuations and verified that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that ends at the Colorado discontinuity is preserved at those altitudes, as well as the KQZ positive <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Comparison with new satellite data at http://www.dsri.dk/multimagsatellites/ yields encouraging results, given the relatively small coverage of our data. Two Champ and one SAC-C/Oersted-2 passes from July 20, 2001 (in steady northward IMF periods) cross our map area. One of the Champ passes is almost parallel and very near the central meridian of our map, and its <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> match ours reasonably well, both in amplitude and phase. The other two tracks do not have a complete overlap with our data, but the agreement is still acceptable, in spite of the 715 km altitude for the SAC-C track.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ghidella, M. E.; Kohn, J.; Gianibelli, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMGP11D0868A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paleomagnetic and Rock <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Signature of Upper Oceanic Crust Generated by Superfast Seafloor <span class="hlt">Spreading</span>: Results from ODP Leg 206</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 206, Site 1256 (6.736° N, 91.934° W) was cored deep into a 15-Ma section of oceanic crust that is part of the Cocos Plate formed by superfast <span class="hlt">spreading</span> (>200 mm/yr) at the East Pacific Rise. Three holes penetrated through 250 m of sediment and into igneous basement, with the two deepest holes, Holes 1256C and D, reaching 88.5 and 502 m sub-basement, respectively. The igneous section consists of an uppermost massive ponded flow that is >70 m thick, underlain by thin flows (<3 m thick), massive flows (>3 m thick; some of which may be dikes), pillows, and hyaloclastites. The uppermost units, particularly the massive ponded flow, record an anomalously steep paleomagnetic direction for this near equatorial site and commonly retain only a few percent of their natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (NRM) after being demagnetized in peak alternating fields (AF) of only 20 mT. The steep direction appears to be the characteristic remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (ChRM) as it can be separated from an even steeper drilling overprint. Units below this have shallow inclinations and retain 5% to 15% of their NRM after 20 mT AF, both characteristics being more typical of what would be expected for near equatorial oceanic basalts. Rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> results based on hysteresis, FORC, and thermomagnetic measurements indicate that there are insignificant differences in the paleomagnetic carriers for the units with steep and shallow inclinations. In both cases, pseudo-single domain titanomagnetite and titanomaghemite are the main carriers. This supports the interpretation that the uppermost basalts were extruded in a weak transitional or excursional field. Given that the site was cored 5 km east of the transition zone between marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 5Bn.2n and 5Br, the massive ponded lava most likely recorded this transitional field after traveling ˜5 km from the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Acton, G.; Wilson, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://epic.awi.de/Publications/Polarforsch1997_3_4.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map of the Weddell Sea Region: a N ew Compilation of the Russian Data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary: This paper describes a 1 : 2 500 000 scale aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map produced by the joint efforts of VNIIOkeangeologia, Polar Marine Geological Research Expedition (PMGRE) and the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWl) for the Weddell Sea region covering 1 850 000 km' of West Antarctica. Extensive regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> survey flights with Iine-spacing of about</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexander V Golynsky; Valery N. Masolov; Wilfried Jokat</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA499240"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Guidance System for Mine Countermeasures Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> guidance system that, with support from the Office of Naval Research, is being developed for fully autonomous detection, localization and classification of ferrous mines in Very Shallow Water/Surf Zone (VSW/SZ) envi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Wiegert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pitcoinc.com/wall_mon.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Using <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Flux Density To Identify <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> In Pipe Wall Thickness</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In making seamless pipe, there are certain inherent wall thickness <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and defects associated with the manufacturing processes. Similarly, both seamless and welded pipe that has been in use for a period of time develop areas of reduced wall thickness during their in-service life. By taking advantage of continued improvement in technology and relying on the basic principles of <span class="hlt">magnetism</span>,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">William Walters; David Steely</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53411165"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mobile <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection using a field-compensated high-Tc single layer SQUID gradiometer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-Tc single layer SQUID gradiometers are useful for measuring small localized <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields in the presence of much larger background interference. Such sensors have been used extensively for eddy-current non-destructive evaluation and biomagnetic measurements, where the sensor is stationary or scanned in a straight line. However for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection (MAD) and geophysical exploration it is necessary that gradiometers can</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. T. Keenan; K. R. Blay; E. J. Romans</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRA..113.9201G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Auroral evidence of a localized <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in Jupiter's northern hemisphere</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze more than 1000 HST/Advanced Camera for Survey images of the ultraviolet auroral emissions appearing in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter. The auroral footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede form individual footpaths, which are fitted with three reference contours. The satellite footprints provide a convenient mapping between the northern Jovian ionosphere and the equatorial plane in the middle magnetosphere, independent of any <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field model. The VIP4 <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field model is in relatively good agreement with the observed footprint of Io. However, in the auroral kink sector, between the 80° and 150° System III meridians, the model significantly departs from the observation. One possible way to improve the agreement between the VIP4 model and the observed footprints is to include a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. We suggest that this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is characterized by a weakening of the surface <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in the kink sector and by an added localized tilted dipole field. This dipole rotates with the planet at a depth of 0.245 RJ below the surface, and its magnitude is set to ˜1% of Jupiter's dipole moment. The <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has a very limited influence on the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field intensity in the equatorial plane between the orbits of Io and Ganymede. However, it is sufficient to bend the field lines near the high-latitude atmosphere and to reproduce the observed satellite ultraviolet footpaths. JUNO's in situ measurements will determine the structure of Jupiter's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in detail to expand on these results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grodent, Denis; Bonfond, Bertrand; GéRard, Jean-Claude; Radioti, Aikaterini; Gustin, Jacques; Clarke, John T.; Nichols, Jonathan; Connerney, John E. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009APS..MARZ31003M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and relaxation mechanisms in ferrofluids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">From a fundamental physics perspective, it is proposed that blocking of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> nanoparticles and freezing of a carrier fluid would affect the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> and relaxation processes in ferrofluids. To verify this hypothesis, we have conducted systematic DC <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> and AC susceptibility studies in different ferrofluids composed of Fe3O4 and CoFe2O4 nanoparticles suspended in hexane and dodecane, which respectively have freezing temperatures below (178K) and above (264K) the blocking temperature of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> nanoparticles (˜200K). Experimental results reveal that the particle blocking and carrier fluid freezing effects play key roles in the formation of glass-like relaxation peaks in ferrofluids, which remained largely unexplained in previous studies. It is also shown that the nature of these peaks is strongly affected by varying particle size and carrier fluid medium. Quantitative fits of the frequency dependent AC susceptibility to the Vogel-Fulcher model, ?=?oexp[Ea/k(T-To)], clearly indicate that the blocking of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> nanoparticles in the frozen state significantly affects the interparticle dipole-dipole interaction, causing characteristic spin-glass-like dynamics. A clear correlation between the blocking and freezing temperatures emerges from our studies for the first time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morales, M. B.; Phan, M. H.; Frey, N. A.; Pal, S.; Srikanth, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.6000S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interaction between Solar Wind and Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> observed by Kaguya MAP-PACE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is known that Moon has neither global intrinsic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field nor thick atmosphere. Different from the Earth's case where the intrinsic global <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field prevents the solar wind from penetrating into the magnetosphere, solar wind directly impacts the lunar surface. Since the discovery of the lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in 1960s, several papers have been published concerning the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. MAG/ER on Lunar Prospector found heating of the solar wind electrons presumably due to the interaction between the solar wind and the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the existence of the mini-magnetosphere was suggested. However, the detailed mechanism of the interaction has been unclear mainly due to the lack of the in-situ observed data of low energy ions. <span class="hlt">MAgnetic</span> field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (MAP-PACE) on Kaguya (SELENE) completed its ˜1.5-year observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon on 10 June, 2009. Kaguya was launched on 14 September 2007 by H2A launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. Kaguya was inserted into a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude and continued observation for nearly 1.5 years till it impacted the Moon on 10 June 2009. During the last 5 months, the orbit was lowered to ˜50km-altitude between January 2009 and April 2009, and some orbits had further lower perilune altitude of ˜10km after April 2009. MAP-PACE consisted of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). All the sensors performed quite well as expected from the laboratory experiment carried out before launch. Since each sensor had hemispherical field of view, two electron sensors and two ion sensors that were installed on the spacecraft panels opposite to each other could cover full 3-dimensional phase space of low energy electrons and ions. One of the ion sensors IMA was an energy mass spectrometer. IMA measured mass identified ion energy spectra that had never been obtained at 100km altitude polar orbit around the Moon. When Kaguya flew over South Pole Aitken region, where strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist, solar wind ions reflected by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were observed. These ions had much higher flux than the solar wind protons scattered at the lunar surface. The <span class="hlt">magnetically</span> reflected ions had nearly the same energy as the incident solar wind ions while the solar wind protons scattered at the lunar surface had slightly lower energy than the incident solar wind ions. At 100km altitude, when the reflected ions were observed, the simultaneously measured electrons were often heated and the incident solar wind ions were sometimes slightly decelerated. At ~50km altitude, when the reflected ions were observed, proton scattering at the lunar surface clearly disappeared. It suggests that there exists an area on the lunar surface where solar wind does not impact. At ~10km altitude, the interaction between the solar wind ions and the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was remarkable with clear deceleration of the incident solar wind ions and heating of the reflected ions as well as significant heating of the electrons. Calculating velocity moments including density, velocity, temperature of the ions and electrons, we have found that there exists 100km scale regions over strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> where plasma parameters are quite different from the outside. Solar wind ions observed at 10km altitude show several different behaviors such as deceleration without heating and heating in a limited region inside the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that may be caused by the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field structure. The deceleration of the solar wind has the same ?E/q (?E : deceleration energy, q: charge) for different species, which constraints the possible mechanisms of the interaction between solar wind and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Asamura, Kazushi; Nishino, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tadateru; Uemura, Kota; Tsunakawa, Hideo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD700524"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Moment and Hfs <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> for He3.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new high-precision measurement of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> moment ratio mu sub He3/mu sub p by an NMR technique is reported. An accuracy of 0.1 ppm was achieved which represents an improvement by a factor of 10 relative to an earlier determination. With this new va...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. L. Williams V. W. Hughes</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvD..86b5012N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fluids, <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and the chiral <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> effect: A group-theoretic formulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is possible to formulate fluid dynamics in terms of group-valued variables. This is particularly suited to the cases where the fluid has non-Abelian charges and is coupled to non-Abelian gauge fields. We explore this formulation further in this paper. An action for a fluid of relativistic particles (with and without spin) is given in terms of the Lorentz and Poincaré (or de Sitter) groups. Considering the case of particles with flavor symmetries, a general fluid action which also incorporates all flavor <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is given. The chiral <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and chiral vorticity effects as well as the consequences of the mixed gauge-gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nair, V. P.; Ray, Rashmi; Roy, Shubho</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JGRE..110.4015B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lunar optical maturity investigations: A possible recent impact crater and a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have used maps of the OMAT optical maturity parameter, along with other Clementine UV-Vis image products, to study two interesting lunar features related to albedo and optical maturity. Examination of the region of a small crater whose formation has been suggested to be a candidate for the flash photographed in 1953 by Stuart demonstrates that the candidate crater is not unusually fresh compared to other small craters in the vicinity. Therefore it is unlikely that the formation of this impact crater generated the observed flash. An area of unusually high albedo in the Descartes highlands is also known to be a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. It has been proposed that the presence of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has prevented the solar wind from reaching the surface for billions of years and therefore that the area has not undergone normal space weathering and preserved a high albedo. The high albedo is caused only by maturity differences with the surroundings, not by an exotic composition. The fact that the albedo <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> has not darkened or reddened to the extent expected may be the result of the surface texture as revealed in 3.8-cm radar images. We suggest that the fresh appearance is largely caused by overlapping ejecta from two nearby craters and continual exposure of immature material by the erosion of 1- to 10-cm-sized fragments within the deposit. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> shielding mechanism, if operative, probably plays only a minor role in producing the Descartes albedo <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blewett, David T.; Hawke, B. Ray; Lucey, Paul G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JGRA..108.1193W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dependence of the equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and of equatorial <span class="hlt">spread</span> F on the maximum prereversal E × B drift velocity measured at solar maximum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The relation of equatorial bubbles to the equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is important because scintillation that is most disruptive to transionospheric RF propagation occurs when it passes through the intersection of the two. However, measurement of the relation between the two and of the electric field from which both arise is difficult because of large separations in space and time. This first attempt to perform these measurements employs a latitudinal array of ionospheric sounders spanning 0° to 40° dip latitude (DLAT) in the Western American sector. Measured on each day of a solar maximum year are the following: (1) the maximum electron density of the postsunset equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, Ne, at 16° and at 20.3° DLAT at 2100 LT, the time when the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> crest is at its maximum latitude; (2) equatorial <span class="hlt">spread</span> F (ESF), detected by the occurrence of macroscopic bubbles and of bottomside <span class="hlt">spread</span> F (BSSF), the latter recorded at levels of none, weak and strong; (3) Kp averaged over the 6 hours before sunset. Ne and ESF are considered functions of the maximum prereversal F layer drift E × B drift velocity measured by the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar also during solar maximum and at the same longitude. Parameters are averaged over two levels of Kp for the three seasons, the E months (March, April, September, and October), D months (November-February), and J months (May-August) to yield the following results: (1) Ne measured at 16°, at 20.3° DLAT or at the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> crest are linearly dependent on maximum E × B drift velocity. (2) Occurrence of each level of ESF increases with Ne approximately linearly during the E and J months but not during the D months. (3) ESF occurrence is dependent on and increases approximately linearly with maximum E × B drift velocity during the E and J months. During the D months this dependence is absent. Except for the D months, these results indicate that scintillation increases with maximum prereversal E × B drift velocity: at L-band at the bubble-<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> intersection because bubble occurrence increases, Ne increases, and the latitudinal extent of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> increases; and at VHF/UHF near the equator because the occurrence of strong BSSF increases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whalen, J. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003MarGR..24..207S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field of the volcanic district of the Bay of Naples, Italy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We here present and discuss the results of the analysis and qualitative interpretation of two <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> surveys performed in the Bay of Naples in 1998 and 2000. A map of the Bay of Naples based on the data acquired during these surveys has already been published by the Italian CNR-IAMC Research Institute. We re-processed the same data to produce maps of the pole reduced, analytic signal and horizontal derivative data and correlated them with the bathymetry and the gravimetric data of the area. The analysis shows strong <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the NW and NE volcanic areas of the Bay of Naples, while the central area seems <span class="hlt">magnetically</span> quiet. In the Phlegrean area the maps clearly show the southern rim of the Phlegrean caldera and demonstrate that while the Magnaghi Canyon is correlated to gravimetric highs and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structures, and can therefore be interpreted as an active lineament, most of Dohrn Canyon is not characterized by volcanic activity and does not correlate to any gravimetric or <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structures. An important round-shaped <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is for the first time identified in the central slope of the gulf between the two canyons, probably correlated to a large buried volcanic edifice. In the Vesuvian area some intense circular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, aligned in the NNW SSE direction, are localized in the Torre del Greco and Torre Annunziata offshore, related to the submerged part of Vesuvius and possibly connected to buried vents.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Secomandi, M.; Paoletti, V.; Aiello, G.; Fedi, M.; Marsella, E.; Ruggieri, S.; D'Argenio, B.; Rapolla, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyC..477...51C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Double <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in heat capacity and dc and ac <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> in a superconducting Pb-porous glass nanocomposite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Studies of ac and dc <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> and heat capacity in a superconducting lead-porous glass nanocomposite were carried out. Double <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were found on their temperature dependences at different <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. The positions of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of heat capacity and ac and dc <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> correlated with each other. The additional, low-temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> shifted remarkably with increasing <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. The FC and FCW curves observed upon cooling and warming, respectively, showed thermal hysteresis at the second step. The peak effect on <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> loops was seen above 6 K. The low-temperature <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the ac and dc <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> were treated as a manifestation of transformation in the vortex system which is triggered by superconductivity in confined lead islands.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ciou, Y. S.; Tien, C.; Charnaya, E. V.; Xing, D. Y.; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.; Pirozerskii, A. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42036478"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comments on 'Anisotropic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility in the continental lower crust and its implication for the shape of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>' by G. Florio et al</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In their letter Lorio et al. (1993) recently explored the likelihood that the deflection with respect to present day <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> North of dipolar lower crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are caused by an induced <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> deflected by strong anisotropy of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility (AMS) rather than the usual explanation of an ancient natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of a rotated body. Such an alternative would</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Rochette</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AN....332..974Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Results of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field observations of stars with helium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with the 6-m telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present new longitudinal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field observations of hot CP stars with helium <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> obtained on 6-m telescope at years 2010 and 2011. The survey includes more than 30 objects. For 8 stars <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field was detected for the first time. For 2 previously known <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> stars HD 36485 and HD 35298 circular polarized spectra were obtained at different phases of the period. Both stars show lines with non-usual complicated distribution of Stokes V which is changing strongly during their rotation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yakunin, I.; Romanyuk, I.; Kudryavtsev, D.; Semenko, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985GeoRL..12..697P"> <span id="translatedtitle">The satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of Ahaggar - Evidence for African Plate motion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Ahaggar volcanic province of North Central Africa is considered a region of excess heat flow (hot spot) and hence elevated Curie isotherm. Using a modified version of the Parker FFT potential field representation, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signals were calculated at Magsat altitudes for models in which the African Plate is both fixed and moving. The moving-plate model extends the Curie isotherm <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the direction of plate motion and provides a satisfactory match to vertical component <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data when the magnitude of plate velocity is 0.75 cm/yr. Although the signal levels are marginal for the scalar component <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of this region, the same model provides an adequate match to this data set and is clearly preferable to a fixed-plate model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillips, R. J.; Brown, C. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....1663E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Cyprus arc and tectonic implications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In present day, eastern Mediterranean is controlled by the collision of the African and Eurasian plates and displacements of Arabian, Anatolian and Aegean micro-plates. The boundary between African and Eurasian plates is delineated by the Hellenic arc and Pliny-Strabo trench in the west and the Cyprus arc and a diffuse fault system of the Eastern Anatolian Fault zone in the east. The available gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data from the easternmost Mediterranean allow to subdivide this basin into three provinces: the northeastern Mediterranean north of the Cyprus Arc; the Levant Basin south of the Cyprus Arc and east of the line that roughly continues the Suez rift trend toward the Gulf of Antalya, between Cyprus and Anaximander Mountains; and the Mediterranean Ridge, Herodotus Basin west of this line. High <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed in Cyprus and the sea region at the south is prominent in the gravity data. The Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> reaches its maximum values over Cyprus, where it is most probably caused by high dense Troodos ophiolites. The uplifted oceanic crust causes high Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> also seen in the vicinity of Eratosthenes Seamount. Another result obtained from gravity data is that the crust under Herodotos and Rhodes basins is somehow oceanic and Anaximander, Eratosthenes and Cyprus are continental fragments. There are no linear <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Mediterranean. But there are <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Eratosthenes seamount and as well as from Cyprus to the Antalya basin due to the ophiolitic bodies. In Cyprus, the last compressional deformations were defined near the Miocene/Pliocene boundary. The extensional deformation associated with the Antalya basin appears to be separated by a zone of the Florence rise and Anaximander Mountains affected by differential tectonic movements. Eratosthenes Seamount is a positive crustal feature in the process of collision with Cyprus along an active margin; there is clearly a potential tectonic relationship to the onland geology of Cyprus. Eratosthenes is in the process of actively being underthrust both northwards and southwards under opposing margins.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ergün, M.; Okay, S.; Sari, C.; Oral, E. Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA....13580S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The North West African Margin <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> revisited : implications for the initial evolution of the Central Atlantic Ocean</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Due to the lack of data from the North West African margin, the Mesozïc evolution of the Central Atlantic is still controversial. Existing plate kinematics (Le Pichon et al, 1977), Wissmann and Roger (1982), Olivet et al, 1984, Klitgord and Schouten, 1986) reconstructions do not explain the characteristics of the S1 <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, nor the the presence and geometry of salt basins on the margins off NW Marocco and off Mauritania. We present a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> compilation detailing the correspondance between the different conjugated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that exist on each side of the Central Atlantic : the East Coast (ECMA), Brunswick (BMA) and Blake Spur (BSMA) <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> on the American side, and the S1 and West African Coast (WACMA) <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the African side. In addition, using all available, academic, seismic data, we mapped the ocenawards extension of the salt province of the 200 Ma old Seine Abyssal Plain basin, off Marocco, which is considered as autochtonous.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sahabi, M.; Olivet, J.-L.; Aslanian, D.; Patriat, M.; Géli, L.; Matias, L.; Réhault, J.-P.; Malod, J.; Bouabdelli, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/5451747"> <span id="translatedtitle">Why no <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is visible over most of the continent–ocean boundary in the global crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is generally believed that an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> should be expected over the continent–ocean (C–O) boundary in the global <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> maps. However, such maps prepared at satellite altitude do not show an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over most of the C–O boundary. We address this issue by a forward modelling technique. We use a Geographic Information System (GIS) technique to integrate information of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar Hemant; Stefan Maus</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SuScT..24h5019K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mobile <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection using a field-compensated high-Tc single layer SQUID gradiometer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-Tc single layer SQUID gradiometers are useful for measuring small localized <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields in the presence of much larger background interference. Such sensors have been used extensively for eddy-current non-destructive evaluation and biomagnetic measurements, where the sensor is stationary or scanned in a straight line. However for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection (MAD) and geophysical exploration it is necessary that gradiometers can undergo rotation and vibration in the Earth's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field without degrading their sensitivity. We describe a portable system that uses background field cancellation techniques to allow a gradiometer's orientation to change during <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> mapping applications without compromising its sensitivity. We describe the system setup and demonstrate its capability to detect a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> target whilst undergoing random motion in a laboratory environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keenan, S. T.; Blay, K. R.; Romans, E. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MART19015D"> <span id="translatedtitle">On the origin of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in nearly ferromagnetic alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility of the Ni-Rh and Ni-Cu alloys shows an <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> near the transition from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. In order to contribute to understand this phenomenon, we have studied the electronic and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties of the Ni1-xCux alloy by means of first principles calculations. The ground state properties were obtained using the Full-Potential Linear Augmented Plane Waves method. The alloying was modeled using the self-consistent virtual crystal approximation. The spin <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility is calculated from the total energy as a function of the spin moment, obtained using the Fixed Spin Moment methodology. We found that the calculations predict correctly the reduction of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> moment with the Cu concentration and that the critical concentration where the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> moment goes to zero is xc = 0.5, in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The calculated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility is in good agreement with the experimental data in the whole range of concentrations for the Ni1-xCux alloy, in particular the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> present at x 0.4 is reproduced by the calculations. This research was supported by Conacyt-M'exico under Grant No. 83604.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">de Coss, Romeo; Aguayo, Aarón; Ortiz-Chi, Filiberto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1215444G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Circum-Arctic mapping project: new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map of the Arctic (to 60 degrees N)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An international effort to compile Circum-Arctic geophysical and bedrock data has been conducted by several national agencies (Russia-VSEGEI and VNIIO, Sweden-SGU, Finland-GTK, Denmark-GEUS, USA-USGS, Canada-GSC, Germany-BGR and Norway-NGU) since 2005. This project aims to produce an atlas that will comprise geological and geophysical digital maps at a scale of 1: 5 million scale for the Arctic region limited by the 60 degree North latitude. New published and classified <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gridded data from each participant group were gathered and converted to a common datum (WGS84) and format. The Greenland region <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> grid (Verhoef et al., 1996) has been updated with new aeromagnetic surveys performed in West Greenland between 1992-2001 (Rasmussen, 2002), and in the Nares Strait area (Damaske & Oakey, 2006; Oakey & Damaske, 2006). The oceanic area east of Greenland (NE Atlantic) contains most of the aeromagnetic data used in the Verhoef et al., (1996)'s compilation (pre-1990) plus new aeromagnetic surveys over offshore Norway collected up to 2007 (Olesen et al., 1997; Olesen et al., 2007; Gernigon et al., 2008). The gridded data has been upward continued to 1 km above ground or sea-level and trimmed around the areas of major overlaps. The Alaska USGS aeromagnetic compilation has been used as the "master grid" for merging the major gridded data sets together and the downward continued lithospheric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field model MF6 derived from satellite data (Maus et al., 2008) has been used as a regional reference surface. We have used a blending function over the area of overlap in order to smooth the transition from one grid to the other (GridKnit, GEOSOFT). The resulting grid has been re-sampled to a 2 km grid cell. In order to construct the final Circum-Arctic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> grid (CAMP-M) we have adopted the approach used by several research groups for compiling the World Digital <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map (WDMAM) and used near-surface <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data for the short wavelength component of the compilation and the satellite derived <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the long wavelength (Hemant et al., 2007; Maus et al., 2007). MF6 extends to spherical harmonics degree 120 (333 km wavelength) and therefore it is able to provide consistent long wavelength information between 300 and 400 km. This information is mainly related to regional deeper and/or thicker portions of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sources within the crust. We have prepared two versions for the CAMP-M <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> grid. The first one combines short wavelength components of regional grids (less than 400 km) with long wavelengths (400 km) of the MF6 model. The second one combines short wavelengths of regional datasets (obtained by filtering with a cosine squared taper to remove the wavelengths in the waveband between 307 and 333 km and larger, with the MF6 model (to degree 120). We have selected Model 1 as the new Circum-Arctic <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gaina, Carmen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18449124"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cerium-derived <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and transport properties of amorphous Ce-Cu alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of the bulk <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties and transport coefficients of the amorphous alloys Ce26Cu74 and Ce72Cu28 were used to investigate the influence of structural disorder and alloy composition on the Kondo effect in concentrated cerium systems. Incoherent Kondo scattering from the Ce 4f states split by the local ``crystal'' fields is manifested for both alloys by pronounced <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Greening; H. Schröder; W. Felsch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvL.109r1602S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Berry Curvature, Triangle <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, and the Chiral <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Effect in Fermi Liquids</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In a three-dimensional Fermi liquid, quasiparticles near the Fermi surface may possess a Berry curvature. We show that if the Berry curvature has a nonvanishing flux through the Fermi surface, the particle number associated with this Fermi surface has a triangle <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in external electromagnetic fields. We show how Landau’s Fermi liquid theory should be modified to take into account the Berry curvature. We show that the “chiral <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> effect” also emerges from the Berry curvature flux.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Son, Dam Thanh; Yamamoto, Naoki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/j7535124252246t6.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of the marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> quiet zones in the Labrador and Greenland Seas</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The central part of the northern Labrador Sea is a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> quiet zone, and is flanked by regions exhibiting well developed linear <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> older than <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 24. The quiet zone dies out progressively to the south, where it becomes possible to correlate <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> between adjacent profiles. A 45 degree change in <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction at <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 25 time was accompanied</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. D. Roots; S. P. Srivastava</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMGP24A..04G"> <span id="translatedtitle">True Polar Wander and Hotspot Fixity: A Paleomagnetic Investigation of the Skewness of <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> 12r (32 Ma B.P.) on the Pacific Plate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prior studies have shown that Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots have moved in approximate unison relative to the spin axis since 65 Ma B.P. [Morgan, 1981; Gordon and Cape, 1981; Gordon, 1982] and since 56 Ma B.P. [Petronotis et al., 1994], which is most simply interpreted as true polar wander. In contrast, Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots give conflicting results for 72 Ma B.P. and for 81 Ma B.P., which may indicate motion between Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots [Tarduno and Cottrell, 1997; Petronotis et al., 1999; Tarduno et al., 2003]. Thus it is important to estimate Pacific plate apparent polar wander (APW) for more time intervals. From such estimates the APW of Pacific hotspots can be inferred and compared with that of Indo-Atlantic hotspots [e.g., Besse and Courtillot 2002]. Here we present a study of the skewness of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 12r between the Galapagos and Clipperton and between the Clipperton and Clarion fracture zones. We chose this region for several reasons: First, numerical experiments, like those conducted by Acton and Gordon [1991], indicate that <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles between the Galapagos and Clarion fracture zones should contain the most information about the Pacific plate paleomagnetic pole for chron C12r (32 Ma B.P.). Second, in these two <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate corridors, <span class="hlt">spreading</span> half rates range from 72 to 86 mm/a and therefore have negligible anomalous skewness, given that they exceed ?50 mm/a [Roest et al., 1992; Dyment et al. 1994]. Third, vector aeromagnetic profiles are available for analysis. One of the challenges to interpreting <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in low latitudes where the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> strike nearly north-south is the very low amplitude of the signal relative to the noise, the latter of which can be especially intense near the present <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> equator due to the amplification of diurnal variation by the equatorial electrojet. Previously we showed that vector aeromagnetic profiles record low-latitude Pacific plate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> with much greater clarity than do shipboard profiles in the same region [Horner-Johnson and Gordon, 2003]. The pole that we obtain has compact 95% confidence limits. We reduce the profiles to this pole and show that the appearance of the reduced-to-the-pole profiles is sensitive to the assumed pole position. The new pole shows that Pacific hotspots have moved significantly relative to the spin axis during the formation of the Hawaiian island and seamount chain, and is consistent with Pacific hotspots having moved in approximate unison with Indo-Atlantic hotspots relative to the spin axis since 32 Ma B.P.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gordon, R. G.; Horner-Johnson, B. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38..419S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interaction between solar wind and lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> observed by MAP-PACE on Kaguya</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is well known that the Moon has neither global intrinsic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field nor thick atmosphere. Different from the Earth's case where the intrinsic global <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field prevents the solar wind from penetrating into the magnetosphere, solar wind directly impacts the lunar surface. <span class="hlt">MAgnetic</span> field and Plasma experiment -Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment (MAP-PACE) on Kaguya (SELENE) completed its 1.5-year observation of the low energy charged particles around the Moon on 10 June 2009. Kaguya was launched on 14 September 2007 by H2A launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. Kaguya was inserted into a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude and continued observation for nearly 1.5 years till it impacted the Moon on 10 June 2009. During the last 5 months, the orbit was lowered to 50km-altitude between January 2009 and April 2009, and some orbits had further lower perilune altitude of 10km after April 2009. MAP-PACE consisted of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). Since each sensor had hemispherical field of view, two electron sensors and two ion sensors that were installed on the spacecraft panels opposite to each other could cover full 3-dimensional phase space of low energy electrons and ions. One of the ion sensors IMA was an energy mass spectrometer. IMA measured mass identified ion energy spectra that had never been obtained at 100km altitude polar orbit around the Moon. When Kaguya flew over South Pole Aitken region, where strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> exist, solar wind ions reflected by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were observed. These ions had much higher flux than the solar wind protons scattered at the lunar surface. The <span class="hlt">magnetically</span> reflected ions had nearly the same energy as the incident solar wind ions while the solar wind protons scattered at the lunar surface had slightly lower energy than the incident solar wind ions. At 100km altitude, when the reflected ions were observed, the simultaneously measured electrons were often heated and the incident solar wind ions were sometimes slightly decelerated. At 50km altitude, when the reflected ions were observed, proton scattering at the lunar surface clearly disappeared. It suggests that there exists an area on the lunar surface where solar wind does not impact. At 10km altitude, the interaction between the solar wind ions and the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was remarkable with clear deceleration of the incident solar wind ions and heating of the reflected ions as well as significant heating of the electrons. Calculating velocity moments including density, velocity, temperature of the ions and electrons, we have found that there exists 100km scale regions over strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> where plasma parameters are quite different from the outside. Solar wind ions observed at 10km altitude show several different behaviors such as deceleration without heating and heating in a limited region inside the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that may be caused by the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field structure. The deceleration of the solar wind has the same ?E/q (?E : deceleration energy, q: charge) for different species, which constraints the possible mechanisms of the interaction between solar wind and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Asamura, Kazushi; Nishino, Masaki N.; Yamamoto, Tadateru I.; Tsunakawa, Hideo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFM.P23C1269T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary global mapping of lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at nominal and low altitudes by MAP-LMAG onboard SELENE (KAGUYA)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field around the Moon has been successfully observed at nominal and lower altitudes by the lunar magnetometer (LMAG) on the SELENE (KAGUYA) spacecraft in a polar orbit from October 29, 2007 to June 10, 2009. Since the solar activity has been very low during the observation, relatively weak <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be observed even at a nominal altitude of about 100 km. In this paper we report preliminary results of the global mapping in the constancy and optional phases and compare the results with previous global maps (e.g. Richmond and Hood, 2008; Mitchell et al., 2008). The nominal altitude was 70-120 km (mostly 100 +/- 10 km) in the constancy phase (November, 2007 to December, 2008). Based on dataset in the tail lobe and in the lunar wake, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fields without altitude correction were mapped on 1 x 1 degree bins with 95 % coverage of the lunar surface. We also obtained full-coverage maps of the vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field at a constant altitude of 100 km after altitude normalization and interpolation of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field by the inverse boundary value problem, the EPR method by Toyoshima et al. (2008). After the constancy phase, we subsequently conducted the optional phase in 2009 to observe the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field and plasma at lower altitudes. The altitude was mostly 50-70 km during January to March, and then further lowered by 20-50 km with a pericenter above the South-Pole Aitken basin. We obtained global maps of 1 x 1 degree bins at the low altitudes with 84 % coverage. We also applied our detrending method to the low-altitude dataset of the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field by the Lunar Prospector (LP). and compared them with our maps. As a result, characteristic features in the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> distribution are consistent with each other. The results in the present study indicate that statistically significant <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are distributed over almost the whole lunar surface. Relatively strong <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are identified in several basin, basin-antipode and near-crater regions, while the youngest basin on the Moon, the Orientale basin, has no <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The basin-forming impact model can explain formation of the basin-antipode <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the amplified interplanetary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field (e.g. Mitchell et al., 2008). However, some basins and their antipode regions show <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and thus it seems difficult to induce significant <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> due to the interplanetary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in both regions. These suggest that the early lunar dynamo or the early geodynamo before the Orientale basin formation is preferable as a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field source of the lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> to the interplanetary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsunakawa, H.; Shibuya, H.; Takahashi, F.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, M.; Matsuoka, A.; Nakazawa, S.; Otake, H.; Iijima, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFMGP41A0253H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rock <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Properties, <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, and Intrabasin Faulting: Santa Fe Group Basin Fill, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Faults that offset sediment and influence their deposition in extensional basins are key in containing the areal extent of critical alluvial aquifers in the U.S. desert southwest. Past interpretation of regional aeromagnetic surveys have regarded basin sediments as nonmagnetic, but new high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in the Albuquerque basin, located within the Rio Grande rift, reveal widespread, low-amplitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with intrabasin faults. We measured <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties of Cenozoic Santa Fe Group basin-fill sediments adjacent to the well-exposed Jemez fault in the northern Albuquerque basin to assess sediment capacity to generate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. We made field measurement of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility (MS) at 152 sites, coupled with collection of three ground-magnetometer profiles across the Jemez fault. Santa Fe Group MS varies greatly through a composite ~300-m-thick stratigraphic section, from 1.3 E-2 to 1.0 E-4 (SI vol). Santa Fe MS generally increases with larger sediment grain size, although MS may vary >10X within a grain-size class (e.g., fine sand). Maximum MS was measured in a pebbly sandstone with detrital magnetite concentrated in heavy mineral laminations. For each ground-magnetometer profile, average MS values calculated from nearby hanging-wall and footwall sites match the sense of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>-field change across the fault. To better understand the cause of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> variations, laboratory measurements of MS, anhysteritic remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (ARM), and isothermal remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (IRM) were conducted on 44 representative samples. A strong correlation between ARM and MS indicates that magnetite exerts the principal control on MS. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> proxies show that both magnetite/hematite ratio and effective <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> grain size increase with increasing MS and sediment grain size. Our study indicates that the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> associated with the Jemez fault can be explained by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> contrast from tectonic juxtaposition of different Santa Fe Group lithologies at shallow depth. These results predict that <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> contrasts at faults should be greatest where coarse- and fine-grained Santa Fe sediments are juxtaposed. Identification of such juxtapositions in the subsurface give locations of important heterogeneities in the ground water flow system of the Albuquerque basin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hudson, M. R.; Grauch, V. J.; Minor, S. A.; Caine, J. S.; Hudson, A. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1041866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Helical <span class="hlt">Magnetism</span> and Structural <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in Triangular lattice alpha-SrCr2O4</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">{alpha}-SrCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} has a triangular planar lattice of d{sup 3} Cr{sup 3+} made from edge sharing CrO{sub 6} octahedra; the plane shows a very small orthorhombic distortion from hexagonal symmetry. With a Weiss temperature of -596 K and a three-dimensional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> ordering temperature of 43 K, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> system is quasi-two-dimensional and frustrated. Neutron powder diffraction shows that the ordered state is an incommensurate helical <span class="hlt">magnet</span>, with an in-plane propagation vector of k = (0, 0.3217(8), 0). Temperature dependent synchrotron powder diffraction characterization of the structure shows an increase in the inter-plane spacing on cooling below 100 K and an inflection in the cell parameters at the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> ordering temperature. These <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicate the presence of a moderate degree of magnetostructural coupling.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S Dutton; E Climent-Pascual; P Stephens; J Hodges; A Huq; C Broholm; R Cava</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998E%26PSL.158..143V"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Lower Cretaceous, syn-extensional magmatic source for a linear belt of positive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: the Pacific Margin <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (PMA), western Palmer Land, Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ar-Ar laserprobe dating suggests that in western Palmer Land, plutons associated with a curvilinear belt of positive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Peninsula, the Pacific Margin <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (PMA), are Early Cretaceous in age. The new ages, combined with published structural and geochemical studies, suggest that highly <span class="hlt">magnetically</span> susceptible gabbroic to tonalitic-granodioritic rocks, the probable source of the Palmer Land segment of the PMA, were generated during Early Cretaceous extension when mantle-derived basaltic magma intruded mafic lower to middle crust. Continued extension uplifted newly generated, lower to middle crust through the Curie Isotherm (ca. 600°C) forming the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The PMA broadly tracks an arc-parallel band in western Palmer Land where crustal extension and uplift of lower crust were greatest. The close spatial relationship between the PMA and Early Cretaceous, syn-extensional plutons suggests that <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> area can be used as a crude proxy for the volume of a related plutonic complex; the areal extent of the PMA indicates that a significant proportion of the arc crust was newly generated during the Early Cretaceous in western Palmer Land.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vaughan, A. P. M.; Wareham, C. D.; Johnson, A. C.; Kelley, S. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998E%26PSL.161..243G"> <span id="translatedtitle">A different pattern of ridge segmentation and mantle Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along the ultra-slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> Southwest Indian Ridge (15°30'E to 25°E)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of a recent bathymetric and geophysical investigation of a ˜650 km-long portion of the very slowly opening (16 mm/yr full rate) Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) between 15°30'E and 25°E are presented. Bathymetry and mantle Bouguer gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (MBA), caused by variations in crustal thickness and/or crustal and upper mantle densities, show different characteristics from those observed at faster <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers like the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) (20-30 mm/yr full rate). With the exception of the Du Toit Transform, none of the ridge-axis discontinuities have offsets greater than 10 km and few of the discontinuities have clearly defined off-axis traces. The MBA patterns associated with individual segments are much more complex than the simple circular bull's eyes lows reported along the MAR. While the short wavelength ridge segment length is comparable to that of the MAR, there is little correlation with MBA amplitude and segment length and axial relief. Furthermore, an eastward propagating magma source and an ˜84 km-long zone of oblique <span class="hlt">spreading</span> appears to define a fundamental boundary along the SWIR between two 250-300 km-long sections characterized by distinctly different axial morphology and gravity signatures. We interpret these results to indicate a long-wavelength segmentation pattern of the underlying upwelling mantle. Melt separates from the upwelling mantle at the base of the lithosphere and is channeled to the surface along dikes. Fissure eruptions within the rift valley build linear ridges defining a short-wavelength spatial pattern of ridge segmentation that is not directly related to the segmentation pattern of the upwelling mantle. Our results and interpretation are quite different than that predicted by extending current models of the faster <span class="hlt">spreading</span> MAR to these ultra-slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grindlay, Nancy R.; Madsen, John A.; Rommevaux-Jestin, Celine; Sclater, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2009GC002471"> <span id="translatedtitle">EMAG2: A 2-arc min resolution Earth <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A global Earth <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from satellite, ship, and airborne <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements. EMAG2 is a significant update of our previous candidate grid for the World Digital <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2 arc min, and the altitude has been reduced from 5 km to 4 km above the geoid. Additional grid and track line data have been included, both over land and the oceans. Wherever available, the original shipborne and airborne data were used instead of precompiled oceanic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> grids. Interpolation between sparse track lines in the oceans was improved by directional gridding and extrapolation, based on an oceanic crustal age model. The longest wavelengths (>330 km) were replaced with the latest CHAMP satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field model MF6. EMAG2 is available at http://geomag.org/models/EMAG2 and for permanent archive at http://earthref.org/ cgi-bin/er.cgi?s=erda.cgi?n=970. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Maus, S.; Barckhausen, U.; Berkenbosch, H.; Bournas, N.; Brozena, J.; Childers, V.; Dostaler, F.; Fairhead, J. D.; Finn, C.; Von Frese, R. R. B.; Gaina, C.; Golynsky, S.; Kucks, R.; Luhr, H.; Milligan, P.; Mogren, S.; Muller, R. D.; Olesen, O.; Pilkington, M.; Saltus, R.; Schreckenberger, B.; Thebault, E.; Tontini, F. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PEPI..148..149K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grain size dependent potential for self generation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars via thermoremanent <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> acquisition and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> interaction of hematite and magnetite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Early in the history of planetary evolution portions of Martian crust became <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> by dynamo-generated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. A lateral distribution of the secondary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field generated by crustal remanent sources containing <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> carriers of certain grain size and mineralogy is able to produce an ambient <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of larger intensity than preexisting dynamo. This ambient field is capable of <span class="hlt">magnetizing</span> portions of deeper crust that cools through its blocking temperatures in an absence of dynamo. We consider both magnetite (Fe3O4) and hematite (?-Fe2O3) as minerals contributing to the overall <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>. Analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals of various grain size and concentration reveals that magnetite grains less than 0.01 mm in size, and hematite grains larger than 0.01 mm in size can become effective <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source capable of <span class="hlt">magnetizing</span> <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals contained in surrounding volume. Preexisting crustal remanence (for example ˜250 A/m relates to 25% of multi-domain hematite) can trigger a self-<span class="hlt">magnetizing</span> process that can continue in the absence of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> dynamo and continue strengthening and/or weakening <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars. Thickness of the primary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> layer and concentration of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> carriers allow specification of the temperature gradient required to trigger a self-<span class="hlt">magnetization</span> process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kletetschka, Gunther; Ness, Norman F.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Wasilewski, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMGP11D0882I"> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of CM3 Model in Compilation of Marine <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Data of North Pacific</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data available from the NGDC have a long time span of data collection from 1950s to 2002, and external <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields generally have not been removed from the data. Based on satellite and observatory data, Sabaka et al. (2002) developed a new comprehensive model, CM3, which defines not only the main field but also quiet time external <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields for the period from 1960 to 2002. In this study, the CM3 model was utilized in the compilation of the NGDC marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data set in the Pacific area east of 140 E of the northern hemisphere. The whole data set amounts to about 6.3 million records with a total line length of about 2.5 million nautical miles. Before applying the CM3 model, the data set was edited. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were recalculated by subtracting DGRF reference fields from observed total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity values, then bad data were removed by checking all the cross-over errors (COEs) > 300 nT. This data editing reduced total number of data records by 0.5 % (or 1% of track line length), and 10 (including 4 cruises before 1960) out of 870 cruises were excluded from the data set. In order to clarify the effect of CM3 model, two types of new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were calculated by replacing the DGRF model by: (case 1) only the CM3 main field model and (case 2) both of the main and external field models. Cross-over analysis reveals that the standard deviation (SD) of COEs reduced from about 60 nT for the DGRF model to about 58 nT for the CM3 main field model. The secular variation of main field before 1970 and after 1995 is significantly different between the DGRF and CM3 models in the areas east of 160 W and north of 50 N. Utilization of the CM3 main field model is particularly effective in these areas. Application of CM3 external field model further reduces the SD of COEs to about 50 nT. The external fields have large amplitudes in the area south of 20 N and west of 180, where the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> equator passes. Removal of the external fields has a marked effect on reducing COEs particularly in this area: the SD of COEs reduced by about 15 nT. Application of CM3 main and external field models to data collected from various kind of research cruises makes a good compilation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map promising, although there are still many data sparse areas.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ishihara, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMSH13B1939S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Spreading</span> of X-lines in Three Dimensions during <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Reconnection with a Guide Field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Naturally occurring <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reconnection often begins in a spatially localized region and <span class="hlt">spreads</span> in the out-of-plane direction as time progresses. This has been studied by a number of authors for magnetotail applications such as substorms and bursty bulk flows, for which the out-of-plane (guide) field is typically small. However, this same behavior has been observed in laboratory experiments, in two-ribbon solar flares (such as the Bastille Day flare), and at the dayside of the magnetopause. In each of these settings, a significant guide field is present. Without a guide field, it was shown that the reconnection <span class="hlt">spreading</span> is controlled by the species that carries the current. However, laboratory experiments with a large guide field (Katz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 104, 255004, 2010) revealed that the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> takes place in both directions at the Alfven speed based on the guide <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. We present three-dimensional two-fluid numerical simulations to address the condition on the guide field at which the nature of the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> switches from being caused by the current carriers to being caused by Alfven waves. Applications for the corona will be discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8596S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Recognition of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Ground Conductivity Meter soil surveys: a high-resolution field experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ground conductivity measurements are widely used in soil surveys, where the objective is to map an element or property, which gives a strong conductive signal compared to the surroundings. It can be used in mapping of soil contamination, mineral exploration and soil mapping, where properties like porosity, clay-content and salinity of groundwater are explored. However, interpretations get poor, when too many variables, e.g. metals, affect the measurements. To improve interpretation of the GCM dataset, we investigated confounding signals from buried metals as <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> by a magnetometer. The small field test site in Illerup Ådal, Denmark (2 ha) was situated on peat and clayey soil, where buried metal was expected due to previous archaeological investigations. Both GCM and magnetometer measurements were on-the-go behind an ATV and logged together with DGPS positioning. Instruments were a DUALEM-21 and a Geometrics G-858 Caesium magnetometer. Data were collected in separately runs, since close proximity of the instruments can affect the magnetometer data. Data were collected on 12 lines, which were spaced 5 m apart. The frequency of readings was 4 times s-1 at a speed of approximately 12 km h-1. A 1D multi-layer model was used for the inversion of EM data, providing detailed information of the resistivity structure in the upper 2-3 m of the soil. All 12 lines were driven in both directions during sampling of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data, to check if measurements are influenced by the direction of the magnetometer. Time for collecting both datasets was 90 minutes. The combined dataset showed one area (200 m2) with a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, which correlated with a relatively low apparent resistivity (approximately 27 Ohm m), while the adjacent areas had a higher apparent resistivity (>50 Ohm m). The inversion model showed that a relatively low resistivity (20-30 Ohm m) was present at all depths in the area with the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. However, the model showed even lower resistivity in other areas of the site (10-20 Ohm m) in all of the modelled layers. Therefore, this area would easily be interpreted wrong in GCM surveys, since it does not appear as an outlier in the EMI dataset. By making a combined survey with both EMI and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility measurements, it is possible to identify small areas with high <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Here caution should be taken in interpretation of GCM survey in relation to the element or property of interest.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Søe, Niels Emil; Bjergsted Pedersen, Jesper; Auken, Esben; Humlekrog Greve, Mogens; Nørgaard, Henrik; Tjelldén, Anna K. E.; Munch Kristiansen, Søren</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGP34A..05S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Bayonnaise Knoll caldera obtained from a deep-sea <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> exploration by AUV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geophysical surveys near the seafloor are very effective methods in order to investigate fine structures of the oceanic crust. Such surveys have increased in researches and developments of the seafloor, and will be more and more necessary in the future. For example, seabed resources like hydrothermal deposits have recently focused attention behind the international situation for natural resources like a competition of resources development. In order to estimate accurate abundance of those resources, the above detailed investigations should be needed because of low resolution of geophysical surveys on the sea and low efficiency of exploratory drilling. From such a viewpoint, we have been developing a measurement system for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> explorations using an AUV and a deep-tow system. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> exploration system consists of two 3-axis flux-gate magnetometers, one/two Overhauser magnetometer(s), an optical fiber gyro, a main unit (control, communication, recording), and an onboard unit. These devices except for the onboard unit are installed in pressure cases (depth limit: 6000m). Thus this system can measure three components and total intensity of the geomagnetic field in the deep sea. In 2009, the first test of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> exploration system was carried out in the Kumano Basin using AUV Urashima and towing vehicle Yokosuka Deep-Tow during the R/V Yokosuka YK09-09 cruise. In this test, we sank a small <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> target to the seafloor, and examined how the system worked. As a result, we successfully detected <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the target to confirm the expected performance of that in the sea. In 2010, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> exploration system was further tested in the Bayonnaise Knoll area both using a titanium towing frame during the R/V Bosei-maru cruise and using AUV Urashima during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the performance of the system in an actual hydrothermal deposit area for practical applications of that. The Bayonnaise Knoll is a submarine caldera with an outer rim of 2.5-3 km and a floor of 840-920 m, which is located in the Izu-Ogasawara arc. A large hydrothermal deposit, Hakurei deposit, lies in the southeast part of the caldera. In the R/V Bosei-maru cruise, we observed three components of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at depths of 400-570 m along SE-NW and WE tracks across the caldera. In the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise, we observed three components and total intensity of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at altitudes of 60-100 m around the Hakurei deposit and at depth of 500 m above the caldera. The analysis of these data is now energetically pushed forward. A 3D gridded data set of the vector <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the latter cruise was made by solving the Laplace's equation in the areas where observation data were not available, which is the unique procedure for analysis of the vector <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Several <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> solutions have been so far obtained by successive approximation and inversion methods. We will here present the measurement of the geomagnetic field and analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> structure in Bayonnaise Knoll caldera. Note that this study has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Tectp.585...68G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Bahia Esperanza: A window of magmatic arc intrusions and glacier erosion over the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bahia Esperanza, constituting the NE tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, is made up of Paleozoic clastic sedimentary rocks overlain by a Jurassic volcano-sedimentary series and intruded by Cretaceous gabbros and diorites. The area is located along the southern part of the Pacific Margin <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> belt.Field <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> researches during February 2010 contribute to determining the deep geometry of the intermediate and basic intrusive rocks. Moreover, the new field data help constrain the regional Pacific Margin <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, characterized up to now only by aeromagnetic and marine data. Field <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility measurements of intrusive intermediate and basic rocks, responsible for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, ranges from 0.5 × 10? 3 SI in diorites to values between 0.75 × 10? 3 SI and 1.3 × 10? 3 SI in gabbros. In addition, a significant remanent <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> should also have contributed to the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is characterized by a westward increase from 100 nT up to 750 nT, associated with large intrusive diorite bodies. They probably underlie most of the western slopes of Mount Flora. Gabbros in the Nobby Nunatak determine local residual rough <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that extend northwards and westwards, pointing to the irregular geometry of the top of the basic rocks bodies below the Pirámide Peak Glacier. However, the southern and eastern boundaries with the Buenos Aires Glacier are sharp related to deep glacier incision. As a result of the glacier dynamics, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are also detected north of the Nobby Nunatak due to the extension of the anomalous body and the presence of gabbro blocks in the moraines.The Bahia Esperanza region is a key area where onshore field geological and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> research allows us to constrain the shape of the crustal igneous intrusions and the basement glacier geometry, providing accurate data that complete regional aeromagnetic research.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; Pedrera, Antonio; Ghidella, Marta; Montes, Manuel; Nozal, Francisco; Rodríguez-Fernandez, Luis Roberto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49709516"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of forest soils on an area of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and geochemical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in north-eastern Poland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Kolno Plateau located in NE Poland is an area of wide soil geochemical and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> whose origin has not been reliably recognized up to now. Field measurements of surface <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility (?) as well as 34 vertical topsoil profiles (25cm) were performed in small forests as they were more or less regularly distributed in the whole area of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tadeusz Magiera; Micha? Jankowski; Marcin ?witoniak; Marzena Rachwa?</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a 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Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60106584"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detection of a thin sheet <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by squid-gradiometer systems: possibility of hydrofracture azimuth determination</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study of the signal physics of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> detection was carried out by superconducting gradiometer and magnetometer loop systems with SQUID sensors for possible application to the LASL geothermal energy program. In particular, the crack produced by hydrofracture of a deep HDR geothermal borehole would be filled with a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> material such as ferrofluid. When polarized by the earth's</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Overton; W. C. Jr</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v080/i032/JB080i032p04461/JB080i032p04461.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over Yellowstone National Park: Mapping of Curie point isothermal surface for geothermal reconnaissance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The bottom of the <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust determined from the spectral analysis of residual <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> is generally interpreted as the level of the Curie point isotherm. This paper studies the spatial variation of the Curie point isotherm level in Yellowstone National Park with the help of aeromagnetic data. A very shallow isothermal surface at a depth of only 5-6 km</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. K. Bhattacharyya; Lei-kuang Leu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JAG....58..202M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Soil <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> mapping using a caesium magnetometer: Limits in the low <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> amplitude case</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Caesium magnetometers are new tools for soil property mapping with a decimetric resolution [Mathé, V., Lévêque, F., 2003. High resolution <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> survey for soil monitoring: detection of drainage and soil tillage effects. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 212 (1 2), 241 251]. However, when the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are only a few nanoteslas (nT), the geologic and pedogenic signal must first be isolated from <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> disturbances for this method to be useful. This paper investigates the instrumental artifacts and environmental disturbances to adapt the survey protocol to slightly <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> soils. Among the possible instrumental sources of disturbances listed and quantified, the most significant are: 1) The battery effect upon sensors 2 m away (classic protocol, about ± 0.15 nT) while increasing this distance up to 10 m cancelled it; 2) The noise level of magnetometers and sensors, which, according to tests on two magnetometers and three sensors, rarely and randomly exceeds 0.1 nT, but seems to increase with the electronic component age. Among the environmental disturbances, temporal variations such as diurnal variation or fluctuations linked to the moving of metallic masses play a major role, although the pseudogradient or base-station methods have commonly cancelled them. The efficiency of the latter is strongly dependent on the source nature. However, the ground currents and electromagnetic fields propagating in soils cause more problems. As a first step to better understand such disturbance sources, uncommon <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signal variations supposedly due to electromagnetic wave conversions and likely linked to the railway traffic are presented. Based on previous results, an adapted protocol using one magnetometer and two caesium sensors (0.3 and 1.6 m above the surface) is proposed to increase the signal / noise ratio. At first, to maintain an accurate horizontal and vertical location of the sensors, the latter are affixed to a wooden handcart running on plastic rails. Rails adapt to micro-topography, thereby decreasing strongly the soil sensors distance variations. <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> due to topography rarely exceed 0.1 nT. Finally, a method to remove diurnal variations from high-resolution <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> maps is proposed. Parallel profiles performed successively are adjusted by a cross-profile. Assuming that the temporal variations during each profile are negligible (less than 0.05 nT), this technique, contrary to the pseudogradient, preserves both the decimetric and the metric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (gain of more than 1 nT).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mathé, Vivien; Lévêque, François; Mathé, Pierre-Etienne; Chevallier, Claude; Pons, Yves</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....3397G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> properties of magnetite at high pressure and implications for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Earth and other planets</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have developed a system that measures <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties of samples under high pressures (in excess of 30 GPa) in a diamond anvil cell. For magnetite, which is the most abundant <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> mineral in the Earth's crust, we find that hysteresis parameters vary <15 percent below 0.6 to 1.0 GPa, while at higher pressures, significant increases occur in bulk coercivity (Hc) and the ratio of saturation remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (Mrs) to saturation <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (Ms). The net effect of pressure is to displace magnetite toward a truer single domain state with both higher Mrs/Ms and Hc. In other words, subject to identical external field conditions, a magnetite grain at high pressure will have a higher <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity (and higher Curie point) than a magnetite grain of equivalent mass at low pressure. Our data suggest that magnetite can account for geomagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> related to some subduction zones and to meteorite impact sites on Earth (such as Vredefort which has some of the highest known Koenigsberger ratios on the planet), as well as <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signatures observed on some planetary bodies like Mars.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gilder, S.; Legoff, M.; Peyronneau, J.; Chervin, J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4165770"> <span id="translatedtitle">A test of the geocentric axial dipole hypothesis from an analysis of the skewness of the central marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A new, global set of palaeomagnetic observations was obtained from analysis of the symmetry of the shape of 203 crossings of the Central marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> observed above seafloor, formed during the Brunhes normal polarity chron (0-0.78 Ma). The data indicate that the time-averaged field can be described best by a dominant geocentric axial dipole component, whose position</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gary D. Acton; Katerina E. Petronotis; Cheryl D. Cape; Sue Rotto Ilg; Richard G. Gordon; Phil C. Bryan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44254274"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gulf Coast-East Coast <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Gulf Coast-East Coast <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may be explained</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David J. Hall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52583197"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gulf Coast-East Coast <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> I: Root of the main, crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Gulf Coast-East Coast <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100 km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may be</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David J. Hall</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.T43C1654R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of The Reelfoot <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> and Age of the Reelfoot Thrust Fault</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A distinctive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> delimits seismicity associated with the Reelfoot thrust fault and is modeled as an intrusive body with <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility one order of magnitude higher then susceptibility of the Precambrian basement. The analysis requires that the overlying Paleozoic sediments (susceptibility close to 0 SI) be vertically offset approximately 2 km at the eastern limit of Reelfoot fault seismicity. This basement uplift corresponds to estimates of erosion of Paleozoic sediments from the top of the Pascola Arch uplift. Several susceptibility models based on a uniform basement with a step and two adjacent basement blocks of different susceptibilities were tested but were found inadequate. The available depth-to-basement maps are poorly constrained by borehole and seismic reflection data surrounding the Reelfoot fault but suggest Precambrian basement depths of about 3 km. Most of the present-day seismicity of the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is situated on this fault segment and separates into two dipping tabular clusters. The association of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> edge, seismicity, and antiformal subcrop and basement structure of the Pascola Arch suggests that the Reelfoot fault is a late Paleozoic thrust fault that was active in the core of the Pascola Arch, with uplift possibly driven by igneous intrusion. This hypothesis can serve as a framework for developing fine scale seismic tomographic experiments for imaging structures within the Paleozoic sediments and crystalline upper crust within the New Madrid Seismic Zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rabak, I.; Langston, C. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGP33B..02M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Long-Wavelength <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> and Tectonic Divisions of the Tasmanides, Eastern Australia.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aeromagnetic data over eastern Australia reveal a pattern of domains defined by systematic and uniform regional highs and lows, emphasised by low-pass filtering, over which are superimposed shorter (<20 km) wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> whose disposition is clearly related to mappable geology and its inferred subsurface continuation. Long baseline levelling accomplished through Geoscience Australia's AWAGS program has served to clarify the definition of these <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> domains, and to confirm that they are not an artefact of grid merging. Geothermal and teleseismic data indicate that neither variation in Curie depth nor upper mantle magnetisation can produce the pattern of long-wavelength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> domains. Hence, domain-wide variations in magnetisation at the middle crustal (> 10 km depth) level are presumably the cause of these long-wavelength features. Although reversed polarity remanence, possibly carried by laminar hematite, could contribute to deeply sourced negative <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, the correspondence of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> low domains with the Proterozoic Curnamona Craton and the Ordovician Macquarie Arc, and of a high domain with the western Lachlan Orogen floored by Cambrian ocean crust, suggests that the control may be simply stark contrasts in lower to middle crustal susceptibility. Implicit in this analysis is a division of the domains by middle crust type into two categories, continental versus oceanic, with implications for the tectonic evolution of the Tasmanides. Contrary to previous interpretations, the Macquarie Arc was apparently built on a sliver of continental crust, and the Thomson Orogen is a compound feature, in which oceanic crust was accreted to an arc likewise floored by continental material.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Musgrave, R. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1512353E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial Correlation of Airborne <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> with Reservoir Temperatures of Geothermal Fields, Western Anatolia, Turkey</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geothermal areas in Western Anatolia are remarkably located throughout Büyük Menderes Graben (BMG) and Gediz Graben (GG). These E-W trending grabens have been subjected to N-E stretching since Miocene. Except for these major outcomes of the extensional forces, NE-SW oriented and relatively short grabens take place in Western Anatolia as well. Among them, BMG and GG are remarkable with topographic escarpments that reveal footwall of steeply-dipping active normal faults. They manifest themselves via numerous earthquakes and geothermal activity (fluid discharges from springs and wells). Geothermal discharges are aligned along the rims of E-W trending normal faults trending over detachment faults. Concerning BMG, geothermal manifestations extend along the northern sector of the graben. Geothermal reservoirs inside BMG are the limestone and conglomerate units within Neogene sediments and the marble-quartzite units within The Menderes Massif rocks. The main high and low enthalpy geothermal fields along BMG and their reservoir temperatures are as follows: K?z?ldere (242°C), Germencik (232°C), Ayd?n-Il?cabas? (101°C), Y?lmazköy (142°C), Salavatl? (171°C), Söke (26°C), Pamukkale (36°C), Karahay?t (59°C), Gölemezli (101°C) and Yenice (70°C). Through GG, reservoir temperatures decrease from east to west. Geothermal reservoirs inside GG are metamorphics and granodiorite of the Menderes Massif rocks. The Neogene sediments act as cap rock of the geothermal reservoirs. Geothermal fields inside the graben and their reservoir temperatures are as follows: Ala?ehir (215°C), Salihli (155°C), Urganl? (85°C), Kur?unlu (135°C), Caferbey (150°C), Sart (100°C). In order to investigate the spatial correlation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the reservoir temperatures of geothermal fields in the region, we analysed airborne <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data which were collected by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) of Turkey. Airborne <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data were taken at about 70-m intervals along the profiles and the profile interval was set as 1-2 km. Necessary corrections including the IGRF correction were carried out by MTA. After removing the horizontal planar trend and regional background, a reduction to the pole process was performed to residual <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data. The pole reduced <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity values vary in the range of -368 and 395 nT in the image map. In general, relatively high amplitude <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> zones indicate the geothermal fields having higher reservoir temperatures than 200°C in the region. On the other hand, moderate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity values point geothermal fields having lower reservoir temperatures than 200°C. It can be inferred that higher and moderate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity values in the region are positively and spatially in accordance with higher and lower geothermal reservoir temperatures relative to 200°C. Consequently, obtained results were discussed in terms of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity, geothermal heat source and geothermal reservoir temperatures. Keywords: <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>, Reservoir Temperatures, Geothermal Fields, Western Anatolia, Turkey</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ertekin, Can; Ekinci, Yunus Levent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA....11324D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Contrasted fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers off Baja California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In April 2002, R/V L Atalante collected swath-bathymetry, surface and deep tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>, gravity and seismic data in order to investigate the existence, characteristics and age of the Guadalupe and Magdalena fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers that were postulated off Baja California (eastern Pacific Ocean). The new data confirm the existence of these extinct <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers and better define the location and orientation of the Magdalena Ridge segments. The two fossil ridges exhibit very different characters. The Guadalupe fossil axis displays a deep N-S axial valley with a 2D geometry, and regular abyssal hills and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on its flanks. According to surface and deep tow <span class="hlt">magnetics</span>, seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> stopped at 12 Ma (<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 5A). Conversely, the Magdalena fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> system exhibits a complex bathymetric structure, with a series of ridge segments and conjugate fan-shaped abyssal hills, troughs and volcanic highs, and <span class="hlt">spreading</span> discontinuities with various orientation. The surface and deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetics</span> indicate an age younger than or equal to 12 Ma, 5A being the youngest unambiguously identified <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The morphological and structural difference between the two fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centers is striking. We interpret the fan-shaped abyssal hills and the various structural direction of the Magdalena <span class="hlt">spreading</span> system as the result of a continuous clockwise change in <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction of about 18deg./Ma, for a total of 45deg. between <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 5B and 5A. <span class="hlt">Spreading</span> finally ceased when the seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction became parallel to the margin. We believe that then, a new strike-slip plate boundary initiated along the western margin of Baja California. The Guadalupe ridge gradually slowed down with a minor 10deg. reorientation prior to extinction at chron 5A. This observation suggests that a Magdalena plate and a Guadalupe plate started to behave independently at about 14.5 Ma, with the Shirley FZ (27.6N) acting as a plate boundary. Whether there were time enough for a slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center to establish on the now-subducted part of the Shirley FZ is unknown. Either such a subducted fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center or the subducted broken fracture zone could create an asthenospheric windows which would be at the origin of the peculiar volcanic rocks observed on land in Baja California.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dyment, J.; Michaud, F.; Royer, J. Y.; Bourgois, J.; Sichler, B.; Bandy, W.; Mortera, C.; Sosson, M.; Pontoise, B.; Calmus, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52769559"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unique thermoremanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of multidomain sized hematite: Implications for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intense <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> remanence (100-1000 A\\/m) associated with MD hematite and\\/or titanohematite and associated with high Koenigsberger ratios (40-1000) indicate that <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> remanence may dominate the total <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> if these minerals are volumetrically significant. Titanohematite behaves similarly to hematite and, thus, the grain size dependence of TRM acquisition in hematite is considered as a generalization. The transition between truly MD behavior</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Kletetschka; P. J. Wasilewski; P. T. Taylor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://bowie.gsfc.nasa.gov/terr_mag/epslhematite.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unique thermoremanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of multidomain sized hematite: Implications for <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intense <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> remanence (100–1000 A\\/m) associated with MD hematite and\\/or titanohematite and associated with high Koenigsberger ratios (40–1000) indicate that <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> remanence may dominate the total <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> if these minerals are volumetrically significant. Titanohematite behaves similarly to hematite and, thus, the grain size dependence of TRM acquisition in hematite is considered as a generalization. The transition between truly MD behavior</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gunther Kletetschka; Peter J. Wasilewski; Patrick T. Taylor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/897563"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetization</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of Nb3Al strands and instability of Nb3Al Rutherford cables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of this Nb{sub 3}Al strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B{sub c2} {approx} 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamada, Ryuji; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, Akihiro; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39832684"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chaotic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> patterns in marginal seas and small ocean basins have similar origin to structural <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> quiet zones in deep oceans</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The empirical observation is made that marginal seas which have <span class="hlt">spread</span> orthogonal to their margins have clearly defined lineated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns, while marginal seas which have <span class="hlt">spread</span> at acute angles to their margins have chaotic or subdued <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. D. Roots</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53988191"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spectral and <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Studies of Lesser-Known Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and Albedo <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The origin of the lunar swirls is an outstanding puzzle in lunar geoscience. In addition, the swirls lie at the intersection of broader issues in planetary science, including planetary <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> (e.g., the origin of the <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust via core dynamo versus impact processes) and the relative importance of solar wind exposure versus micrometeoroid bombardment in producing the optical effects of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. R. Hawke; D. T. Blewett; E. I. Coman; M. E. Purucker; J. J. Gillis-Davis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Tectp.585..113G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deciphering tectonic phases of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf, West Antarctica, from a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> grid</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE), with Pine Island Bay (PIB) in the eastern embayment, is a key location to understanding tectonic processes of the Pacific margin of West Antarctica. PIB has for a long time been suggested to contain the crustal boundary between the Thurston Island block and the Marie Byrd Land block. Plate tectonic reconstructions have shown that the initial rifting and breakup of New Zealand from West Antarctica occurred between Chatham Rise and the eastern Marie Byrd Land at the ASE. Recent concepts have discussed the possibility of PIB being the site of one of the eastern branches of the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). About 30,000 km of aeromagnetic data - collected opportunistically by ship-based helicopter flights - and tracks of ship-borne <span class="hlt">magnetics</span> were recorded over the ASE shelf during two RV Polarstern expeditions in 2006 and 2010. Grid processing, Euler deconvolution and 2D modelling were applied for the analysis of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns, identification of structural lineaments and characterisation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source bodies. The grid clearly outlines the boundary zone between the inner shelf with outcropping basement rocks and the sedimentary basins of the middle to outer shelf. Distinct zones of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> patterns and lineaments can be associated with at least three tectonic phases from (1) magmatic emplacement zones of Cretaceous rifting and breakup (100-85 Ma), to (2) a southern distributed plate boundary zone of the Bellingshausen Plate (80-61 Ma) and (3) activities of the WARS indicated by NNE-SSW trending lineaments (55-30 Ma?). The analysis and interpretation are also used for constraining the directions of some of the flow paths of past grounded ice streams across the shelf.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gohl, Karsten; Denk, Astrid; Eagles, Graeme; Wobbe, Florian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52693038"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two Time-Scales of Pulsation of the Iceland Plume Inferred From <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the North-Atlantic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have shown previously [Abelson and Agnon, EPSL, 1997, 2001] that small offsets 2nd-order MOR segments, oblique to <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction, may indicate a strong influence of a nearby hotspot. We term this anomalous plan-view-geometry of the ridge axis as a planform <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (PA). The PA-hypothesis was successfully tested on the ridge-plume system around Iceland, where ancient planforms of the Kolbeinsey</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Abelson; A. Agnon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFMGP21A0987T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of the crust of the Pannonian Basin, Hungary using low-altitude CHAMP horizontal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Pannonian Basin is a deep intracontinental basin that formed as part of the Alpine orogeny. It is some 600 by 500 km in area and centered on Hungary. This region was chosen since it has one of the thinnest continental crusts in Europe and is the location of complex tectonic structures. In order to study the nature of the crustal basement we used the long-wavelength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> acquired by the CHAMP satellite. The SWARM constellation, scheduled to be launched next year, will have two lower altitude satellites flying abreast, with a separation of between ca. 150 to 200 km. to record the horizontal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient. Since the CHAMP satellite has been in orbit for eight years and has obtained an extensive range of data, both vertically and horizontally there is a large enough data base to compute the horizontal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradients over the Pannonian Basin region using these many CHAMP orbits. We computed a satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map, using the spherical-cap method of Haines (1985), the technique of Alsdorf et al. (1994) and from spherical harmonic coefficients of MF6 (Maus et al., 2008) employing recent and lowest altitude CHAMP data. We then computed the horizontal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradients (Kis and Puszta, 2006) in order to determine how these component data will improve our interpretation and to preview what the SWARM mission will reveal with reference to the horizontal gradient <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The gradient amplitude of an 1000 km northeast-southwest profile through our horizontal component <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map varied from 0 to 0.025 nT/km with twin positive <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (0.025 and 0.023 nT/km) separated by a sharp V-shaped <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> gradient to 0 nT/km between the two highs. Horizontal gradients indicate major <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> boundaries in the crust (Dole and Jordan, 1978 and Cordell and Grauch, 1985). Our gradient <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> was modeled with a two-dimensional body and this <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> indicates a lateral variation of some 200 km. The model correlates with a 200 km area of crustal thinning in the southwestern Pannonian Basin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor, P. T.; Kis, K. I.; Puszta, S.; Wittman, G.; Kim, H.; Toronyi, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1341847"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detection of <span class="hlt">spread</span> of malignant lymphoma to the liver by low field strength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance imaging.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The accuracy of spin lattice relaxation time (T1) measurement obtained with a low field strength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance imager for the detection of <span class="hlt">spread</span> of malignant lymphoma to the liver was assessed. The results of histological examination obtained at open liver biopsy were compared with liver T1 values in 27 patients with lymphoma. The normal range for T1 was established by scanning 61 healthy volunteers. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> resonance imaging was highly sensitive in detecting hepatic lymphoma, all seven patients with liver lymphoma proved by biopsy having considerably higher T1 values. Specificity was less good. Five out of 20 patients with no histological evidence of hepatic lymphoma had abnormal T1 values. this level of sensitivity is considerably better than that reported for other imaging methods and contrasts with the results of one previous study using a different <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance system. Low field strength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance imaging may prove to be a useful screening test in patients with lymphoma. The presence of a normal liver T1 seems to be a reliable guide to the absence of hepatic disease. Images FIG 1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richards, M A; Webb, J A; Reznek, R H; Davies, G; Jewell, S E; Shand, W S; Wrigley, P F; Lister, T A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010E%26PSL.289..433O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxfordian magnetostratigraphy of Britain and its correlation to Tethyan regions and Pacific marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A suite of 11 sections through the Oxfordian (Upper Jurassic) strata in the Dorset and Yorkshire regions of England and the Isle of Skye in Scotland yielded <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> polarity patterns directly calibrated to the ammonite biostratigraphy of the Boreal and the Subboreal faunal provinces. The sections include the leading candidate for the global stratotype (GSSP) for the Callovian-Oxfordian stage boundary. The mean Oxfordian paleomagnetic pole derived from the Dorset and Yorkshire sections is 71.3°N, 172.6°E ( ?p = 4.2°, ?m = 6.1°). The integrated magneto-biostratigraphic scale is consistent with results from the Sub-Mediterranean faunal province and extends the polarity pattern to the base of the Oxfordian. After adjusting for the estimated durations of ammonite subzones from cycle stratigraphy, the magnetostratigraphy confirms models for marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> M30 through to M37, including some of the short-duration features recorded by deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> surveys in the western Pacific. The Callovian-Oxfordian boundary (base of Quenstedtoceras mariae Zone) occurs in a normal-polarity zone that is correlated to the youngest part of polarity chron M37n of this extension to the M-sequence.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ogg, James G.; Coe, Angela L.; Przybylski, Piotr A.; Wright, John K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16384262"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> below the ferromagnetic Curie temperature in Yb14MnSb11.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Yb14MnSb11 is an unusual ferromagnet with a Curie temperature of 52 +/- 1 K. Recent optical, Hall, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>, and thermodynamic measurements indicate that Yb14MnSb11 may be a rare example of an underscreened Kondo lattice. We report the first experimental observation of a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in this system at around 47 K, a few degrees below T(c). Systematic investigations of the ac and dc susceptibilities of Yb14MnSb11 single crystals reveal features associated with possible spin reorientation at this temperature. This new <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is extremely sensitive to the applied measurement field and is absent in temperature-dependent dc <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> data for fields above 50 Oe. The origin of this could be due to decoupling of two distinct <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sublattices associated with MnSb4 tetrahedra. PMID:16384262</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srinath, S; Poddar, P; Srikanth, H; Sales, B C; Mandrus, D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhRvL..95v7205S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of a New <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> below the Ferromagnetic Curie Temperature in Yb14MnSb11</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Yb14MnSb11 is an unusual ferromagnet with a Curie temperature of 52±1K. Recent optical, Hall, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>, and thermodynamic measurements indicate that Yb14MnSb11 may be a rare example of an underscreened Kondo lattice. We report the first experimental observation of a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in this system at around 47 K, a few degrees below Tc. Systematic investigations of the ac and dc susceptibilities of Yb14MnSb11 single crystals reveal features associated with possible spin reorientation at this temperature. This new <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is extremely sensitive to the applied measurement field and is absent in temperature-dependent dc <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> data for fields above 50 Oe. The origin of this could be due to decoupling of two distinct <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sublattices associated with MnSb4 tetrahedra.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srinath, S.; Poddar, P.; Srikanth, H.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41997815"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-dimensional MHD simulation of the solar wind interaction with <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on the surface of the Moon</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind interaction with the <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> regions on the surface of the Moon suggest ``mini-magnetospheres'' can form around the regions on the Moon when the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> field strength is above 10 nT at 100 km above the surface (for a surface field strength of 290 nT) and when the solar wind ion density is</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erika M. Harnett; Robert Winglee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhLB..704..193B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>: Constituent quark loops and QCD effects</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> moment can be estimated by computing constituent quark loops. Such an estimate is very sensitive to the numerical values of the constituent quark masses. These can be fixed by computing the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the muon <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> within the same model. In this Letter, we demonstrate the stability of this framework against first-order perturbative QCD corrections.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boughezal, Radja; Melnikov, Kirill</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMGP13C0781Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Research for Key Techniques of Geophysical Recognition System of Hydrocarbon-induced <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Based on Hydrocarbon Seepage Theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hydrocarbon seepage effects can cause <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> alteration zones in near surface, and the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> induced by the alteration zones can thus be used to locate oil-gas potential regions. In order to reduce the inaccuracy and multi-resolution of the hydrocarbon <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> recognized only by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data, and to meet the requirement of integrated management and sythetic analysis of multi-source geoscientfic data, it is necessary to construct a recognition system that integrates the functions of data management, real-time processing, synthetic evaluation, and geologic mapping. In this paper research for the key techniques of the system is discussed. Image processing methods can be applied to potential field images so as to make it easier for visual interpretation and geological understanding. For gravity or <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> images, the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with identical frequency-domain characteristics but different spatial distribution will reflect differently in texture and relevant textural statistics. Texture is a description of structural arrangements and spatial variation of a dataset or an image, and has been applied in many research fields. Textural analysis is a procedure that extracts textural features by image processing methods and thus obtains a quantitative or qualitative description of texture. When the two kinds of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> have no distinct difference in amplitude or overlap in frequency spectrum, they may be distinguishable due to their texture, which can be considered as textural contrast. Therefore, for the recognition system we propose a new “<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> spots” recognition method based on image processing techniques. The method can be divided into 3 major steps: firstly, separate local <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> caused by shallow, relatively small sources from the total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field, and then pre-process the local <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data by image processing methods such that <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> can be expressed as points, lines and polygons with spatial correlation, which includes histogram-equalization based image display, object recognition and extraction; then, mine the spatial characteristics and correlations of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using textural statistics and analysis, and study the features of known anomalous objects (closures, hydrocarbon-bearing structures, igneous rocks, etc.) in the same research area; finally, classify the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, cluster them according to their similarity, and predict hydrocarbon induced “<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> spots” combined with geologic, drilling and rock core data. The system uses the ArcGIS as the secondary development platform, inherits the basic functions of the ArcGIS, and develops two main sepecial functional modules, the module for conventional potential-field data processing methods and the module for feature extraction and enhancement based on image processing and analysis techniques. The system can be applied to realize the geophysical detection and recognition of near-surface hydrocarbon seepage <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, provide technical support for locating oil-gas potential regions, and promote geophysical data processing and interpretation to advance more efficiently.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, L.; Hao, T.; Zhao, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55897297"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> lineations in the Pacific Jurassic quiet zone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of low amplitude (<100 gammas) are present in the Jurassic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> quiet zone of the western Pacific Ocean. These small <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are lineated and can be correlated among the Phoenix, Hawaiian and Japanese lineation patterns. Thus, they represent seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> that recorded some sort of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field phenomena prior to <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> M25 at 153 m.y. B.P. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Steven C. Cande; Roger L. Larson; John L. Labrecque</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006APS..MARZ20009S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in low field ac and dc <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements in Yb14MnSb11</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Yb14MnSb11 is the first known example of a ferromagnetic Kondo lattice compound in the underscreened limit. Recent optical, Hall, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>, and thermodynamic measurements indicate that Yb14MnSb11 may be a rare example of an underscreened Kondo lattice. This heavily doped <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> semiconductor is ferromagnetic below 52 ±1 K. We report the first experimental observation of a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in this system at around 47 K, a few degrees below the Curie temperature. Systematic investigations of the AC and DC susceptibilities of Yb14MnSb11 single crystals reveal features associated with possible spin re-orientation at this temperature. This new <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is extremely sensitive to the applied field and is absent in DC <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> measurements for fields above 50 Oe. The origin of this could be related to a change in <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> anisotropy caused by the decoupling of energetically close FM and AFM sub-lattices.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srinath, S.; Pankaj, P.; Srikanth, H.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6357151"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gulf Coast-East Coast <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Gulf Coast-East Coast <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hall, D.J. (Total Minatome Corporation, Houston, TX (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRE..116.4008K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of lunar swirls at Mare Ingenii: A model for space weathering at <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analysis of spectra from the Clementine ultraviolet-visible and near-infrared cameras of small, immature craters and surface soils both on and adjacent to the lunar swirls at Mare Ingenii has yielded the following conclusions about space weathering at a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. (1) Despite having spectral characteristics of immaturity, the lunar swirls are not freshly exposed surfaces. (2) The swirl surfaces are regions of retarded weathering, while immediately adjacent regions experience accelerated weathering. (3) Weathering in the off-swirl regions darkens and flattens the spectrum with little to no reddening, which suggests that the production of larger (>40 nm) nanophase iron dominates in these locations as a result of charged particle sorting by the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. Preliminary analysis of two other lunar swirl regions, Reiner Gamma and Mare Marginis, is consistent with our observations at Mare Ingenii. Our results indicate that sputtering/vapor deposition, implanted solar wind hydrogen, and agglutination share responsibility for creating the range in npFe0 particle sizes responsible for the spectral effects of space weathering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kramer, Georgiana Y.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Harnett, Erika M.; Hawke, Bernard Ray; Noble, Sarah K.; Blewett, David T.; McCord, Thomas B.; Giguere, Thomas A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3666966"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary experience with cardiovascular <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance in evaluation of fetal cardiovascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The cardiovascular system is the part of the fetal anatomy that most frequently suffers from congenital pathology. This study shows our preliminary experience with fetal cardiovascular <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance (CMR) to evaluate congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. Methods Between January 2006 and June 2011, Prenatal routine obstetric ultrasound (US), echocardiography and CMR data from 68 pregnant women carrying fetuses with congenital cardiovascular <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were compared with postnatal diagnoses (postnatal imagings, surgery and autopsy). All prenatal CMR was performed at 1.5?T. Imaging sequences included steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequences, real-time SSFP and single-shot turbo spin echo (SSTSE) sequences. The images were analyzed with an anatomic segmental approach by two radiologists. Results Fetal CMR yielded the same diagnosis as postnatal findings in 79% (54/68) of patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of routine obstetric US for cardiac <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was 46% (31/68). The diagnostic sensitivity of fetal echocardiographic examination by a fetal cardiac specialist was 82% (56/68). In 2 (3%) of 68 cases, diagnoses with both echocardiography and CMR were incorrect when compared with postnatal diagnosis. In ten (15%) cases, diagnosis at echocardiography was incorrect and that at CMR was correct. In twelve (18%) cases, diagnosis at echocardiography was correct and that at CMR was incorrect. Ten cases missed or misdiagnosed by echocardiography but correctly diagnosed by fetal CMR included asplenia syndrome (n?=?2), interrupted inferior vena cava of polysplenia syndrome (n?=?1), tricuspid incompetence (n?=?1), double outlet right ventricle (n?=?2), double aortic arch (n?=?1), right pulmonary artery hypoplasia (n?=?1), right-sided aortic arch of tetralogy of Fallot (n?=?1) and hypoplastic left heart syndrome of a twin fetus (n?=?1). Conclusion Fetal CMR is a promising diagnostic tool for assessment of congenital cardiovascular abnormalities, especially in situations that limit echocardiography.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMGP43B0814J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Three-Dimensional Mapping of <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Strata From Aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: The Deformed Neroly Formation South of Mt. Diablo, Northern California</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We apply direct inversion of aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to analyze the subsurface 3D shape of the highly <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> Miocene Neroly Formation, which consists largely of medium to coarse-grained andesitic sandstones containing abundant magnetite. The Neroly Formation is widespread in the eastern San Francisco Bay region, and locally is tightly folded and disrupted by faulting in the compressional regime related to the left-stepping (restraining) connection between the strike-slip Greenville and Concord Faults. The inversion technique is based on the conversion of the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> produced by a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> layer to their equivalent <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> potential (psuedogravity) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, manipulation of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to produce <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that would result from a half-space with a variable-depth top having the shape of the top surface of the layer, and then inverting these pseudogravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> for the shape of that top surface. Assumptions include a constant layer thickness, uniform <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> which implies a constant pseudodensity contrast, and a surface that is single-valued (no recumbent folds or strata repeated with depth). Constraints on 3D position are applied where the layer crops out or is at a depth known from well or other information. Application of this inversion technique to aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over the Neroly Formation yields a complex top surface characterized by elongate overlapping troughs and structural highs, including the well-known Tassajara anticline and adjacent Sycamore Valley syncline. Troughs are true synclinal lows whereas the structural highs may be fold crests, steep truncated strata, and/or fault duplicated strata. The strongest deformation is confined to within ~7 km of the near-vertical overturned Neroly beds that crop out along the NE margin of the valley, and is characterized by four laterally overlapping, margin parallel structural highs and intervening troughs, each between 10 and 20 km in length. A fifth possible structural high lies farther SW. Separation between the highs increases southwestward across strike away from the valley margin. The gross structure implied by the inferred shape of the Neroly layer is that of a 7 km wide, NW oriented doubly- plunging synform with internal, high-amplitude 'wrinkles'. The technique shows promise for application to deformed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> layers in other regions. Elsewhere in California these include the Purisima Formation of the Hollister Valley and Santa Cruz Mountains, the Etchegoin Formation along the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, and the Coastal Belt of the Franciscan Complex.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jachens, R. C.; Simpson, R. W.; Graymer, R. W.; Wentworth, C. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFMGP52A..02R"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Preliminary Full Spectrum <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Database of the United States With Improved Long Wavelengths for Studying Continental Dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Under an initiative started by Thomas G. Hildenbrand of the U. S. Geological Survey, we have improved the long-wavelength (50-2500 km) content of the regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> compilation for the conterminous United States by utilizing a nearly homogeneous set of National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> surveys flown from 1975 to 1981. The surveys were flown in quadrangles of 2° of longitude by 1° of latitude with E-W flight-lines spaced 4.8 to 9.6 km, N-S tie-lines variably spaced, and a nominal terrain clearance of 122 m. Many of the surveys used base-station magnetometers to remove external field variations. NURE surveys were originally processed with IGRF core-field models, which left behind non- uniform residual trends in the data and discontinuities at survey boundaries. In this study, in place of the IGRF/DGRF, we used a spatially and temporally continuous model of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field known as the Comprehensive Model (CM), which allowed us to avoid discontinuities at survey boundaries. The CM simultaneously models the core <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field and long-wavelength ionospheric and magnetospheric fields, along with their induced components in the earth. Because of the availability of base-stations for removing external fields, we removed only the core-derived geomagnetic field based on CM4 (spherical harmonic degree 13) for our compilation. The NURE data have short-wavelength (less than 30 km) noise due to cultural sources, base-station offsets, and residual external field effects. It is possible to reduce and even remove these defects by identifying and editing them and by applying leveling and micro-leveling. There are also many high resolution individual surveys over the U.S. which could be incorporated into the improved NURE database; however, this could take a few years. Therefore, we have created a preliminary full spectrum <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> database by combining short-wavelength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the North American <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Map (NAMAM) and long-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from NURE using a Gaussian filter centered at 50-km wavelength. We call this product the NURE-NAMAM2008 <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> database. NURE- NAMAM2008 is useful for analyzing geodynamic aspects of the crustal and mantle <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field that require precise long-wavelength information; e.g., estimating Curie-temperature depths and constraining lithospheric temperatures. Preliminary studies show that the corrected long-wavelength components in NURE- NAMAM2008 lead to more realistic Curie depths for the average western U.S. crust.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ravat, D.; Sabaka, T.; Elshayat, A.; Aref, A.; Elawadi, E.; Kucks, R.; Hill, P.; Phillips, J.; Finn, C.; Bouligand, C.; Blakely, R. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ssed.gsfc.nasa.gov/gunther/gunther/2007Schmidtetal.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> properties and potential field modeling of the Peculiar Knob metamorphosed iron formation, South Australia: An analog for the source of the intense Martian <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">an extremely intense (? 120 A m? 1) remanence, directed steeply upward. This ancient remanence reinforces the local Earth's field (inclination ? 63). A simple geological model, constrained by drilling and physical property measurements, explains both the observed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, consistent with the Poisson theorem. Koenigsberger ratios (Qs) of 10 and greater, as found here, are rare in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Phillip W. Schmidt; Suzanne A. McEnroe; David A. Clark; Peter Robinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1130/G23470A.1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, crustal strength, and the location of the northern Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The northern Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt in Canada and Alaska is at the boundary between the broad continental margin mobile belt and the stable North American craton. The fold-and-thrust belt is marked by several significant changes in geometry: cratonward extensions in the central Yukon Territory and northeastern Alaska are separated by marginward re-entrants. These geometric features of the Cordilleran mobile belt are controlled by relations between lithospheric strength and compressional tectonic forces developed along the continental margin. Regional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> indicate deep thermal and compositional characteristics that contribute to variations in crustal strength. Our detailed analysis of one such <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the North Slope deep <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> high, helps to explain the geometry of the fold-and-thrust front in northern Alaska. This large <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is inferred to reflect voluminous mafic magmatism in an old (Devonian?) extensional domain. The presence of massive amounts of malic material in the lower crust implies geochemical depletion of the underlying upper mantle, which serves to strengthen the lithosphere against thermal erosion by upper mantle convection. We infer that deep-source <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> highs are an important indicator of strong lower crust and upper mantle. This stronger lithosphere forms buttresses that play an important role in the structural development of the northern Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saltus, R. W.; Hudson, T. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012espc.conf..339K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modelling of the solar wind interaction with the Moon: <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region and Debye sheath layer near the surface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The recent lunar missions have shown that the solar wind interaction with the Moon is more complex than anticipated before and scientifically highly interesting, as shown by new in situ plasma, neutral atom and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field observations. Especially, an unexpectedly high fraction of the incident solar wind protons is reflected from the surface, and even larger fraction at the location of lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. This effect has been observed both by measuring deviated solar wind flow near the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and by observing decreased flux of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms, H-ENAs, from the surface region of strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> [1, 2, 3]. These global scale processes affect the properties of plasma near the lunar surface. Consequently, also physical processes at much smaller spatial scale, within the Debye sheath layer, where the electric potential of the surface and near surface region are controlled by photoelectrons and solar wind particles, are affected. In this work we use two numerical kinetic simulation models developed to study the solar wind interaction with the Moon: (1) a local 3-D hybrid model (HYBMoon) to study a plasma region near lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and (2) a full kinetic 1-D electrostatic Particle-In-Cell PIC model (HYB-es) to study the Debye layer a few meters above the surface. Both models are part of the HYB planetary plasma modelling platform developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. In the hybrid model ions are modelled as particles while electrons form a charge neutralizing massless fluid. In the PIC simulation both ions and electrons are modelled as particles. In the presentation we will show results based on these models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kallio, E.; Jarvinen, R.; Dyadechkin, S.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Rantala, A.; Alho, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994E%26PSL.125..211B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> in the Laxmi Basin, northeastern Arabian Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Main <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data from the Laxmi Basin for the first time reveal the presence of fairly correlatable NNW-trending <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineations. These <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineations are symmetric about a central negative <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the axis of symmetry coincides with a characteristic short-wavelength free-air gravity low. The <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are interpreted as representing a two-limbed seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> sequence which can be equated to the A28-A33 interval of the geomagnetic polarity reversal timescale. These results suggest that the Laxmi Basin is underlain by an oceanic crust. Evidence of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> in this basin possibly implies a pre-A27 <span class="hlt">spreading</span> episode in the evolutionary history of the Arabian Sea.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhattacharya, G. C.; Chaubey, A. K.; Murty, G. P. S.; Srinivas, K.; Sarma, K. V. L. N. S.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Krishna, K. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20850156"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> resonance imaging of retropharyngeal lymph node metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Patterns of <span class="hlt">spread</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: To investigate the incidence, distribution, and <span class="hlt">spread</span> pattern of retropharyngeal lymph node (RLN) involvement in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by using <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: The MR images of 275 patients with newly diagnosed NPC were reviewed retrospectively. Nodes were classified as metastatic based on size criteria, the presence of nodal necrosis, and extracapsular <span class="hlt">spread</span>. Results: Retropharyngeal lymph node involvement was detected in 175 (63.6%) patients. Metastatic RLNs were seen at the following levels: occipital bone, 24 (9.6%) nodes; C1, 157 (62.5%) nodes; C1/2, 40 (15.9%) nodes; C2, 27 (10.8%) nodes; C2/3, 1 (0.4%) node; and C3, 2 (0.8%) nodes. The incidence of RLN involvement was equal to the incidence of cervical lymph node involvement (81.4% vs. 81.4%) in 215 patients with nodal metastases. A significantly higher incidence of metastatic RLNs was observed in the presence of oropharynx, prestyloid parapharyngeal space, post-styloid parapharyngeal space, longus colli muscle, medial pterygoid muscle, levator muscle of velum palatini, tensor muscle of velum palatini, Level II node, Level III node, and Level V node involvement. A significantly lower incidence of metastatic RLNs was found in T1, N0, and Stage I disease. Conversely, no significant difference in the incidence of metastatic RLNs was observed between T1, 2, and, 3; N2 and N3; or Stage II, III, and IV disease. Conclusions: There is an orderly decrease in the incidence of metastatic lateral RLNs from the C1 to C3 level. Metastatic RLNs associate well with involvement of certain structures in early stage primary tumors and lymph node metastases of the upper jugular chain (Level II, Level III nodes) and the posterior triangle (Level V nodes). Both RLNs and cervical Level II nodes appear to be the first-echelon nodes in NPC.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu Lizhi [Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang Guoyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie Chuangmiao [Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu Xuewen [Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Cui Chunyan [Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li Li [Imaging Diagnosis and Interventional Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: lililixj@hotmail.com</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMGP41B0823C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rock <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and Remanence Properties of Synthetic Martian Basaltic Intrusions: Implications for Mars crustal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two basalts deemed relevant to the crust of Mars were synthesized to examine contrasts in rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and remanence properties following identical thermal histories and oxygen fugacity conditions. The composition denoted T-type is rich in Al and poor in Fe, reflecting constraints provided by thermal emission spectroscopy that the Martian crust is somewhat terrestrial in character. The M-type composition is poor in Al and rich in Fe, reflecting the composition of basaltic liquid in equilibrium with Martian meteorite phase assemblages. The two compositions are identical with respect to MgO, SiO2, and TiO2. Batches of each composition were cooled from > 1200 °C to 1070 °C at 4 °C/h and annealed at 1070°C for 100 h, then quenched. Samples were then held at 650°C for periods ranging from 21 to 158 days under quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) fO2 buffer conditions, then quenched. The experimental conditions are germane to shallow igneous intrusions, which might be a significant volumetric fraction of the Martian crust and potential carriers of crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, and provide an important contrast to a previous set of fast-cooled (3-230 °C/h) basalts our group performed on the same two compositions. M-type samples contain Fe-Ti-Al-Mg oxide grains 40-50 ?m in diameter with skeletal morphologies. T-type samples contain equant euhedral Fe-Ti-Al-Mg oxides with grain diameters ranging from 15-30 ?m as well as elongated anhedral ilmenite grains. For M-type samples both the starting material and the samples annealed at 650 °C have narrow multidomain hysteresis loops and similar hysteresis parameters. T-type starting materials and samples annealed at 650 °C have pseudo single domain (PSD) hysteresis loops, but the annealed samples plot lower and to the right within the PSD field on a Day plot, indicating coarser <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> grains. Alternating field demagnetization of anhysteretic remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (ARM) shows median destructive fields < 10 mT. M-type samples exhibited higher <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility and intensity of remanence than T-type samples. Both M-type and T-type samples carry an intense natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (NRM). The NRM is inferred to be a thermoremanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (TRM) acquired during quenching and air-cooling after the 650 °C anneal. NRM values range from 7.0 to 61.7 mAm2/kg for M-type samples and 1.3 to 22.8 mAm2/kg for T-type samples, values comparable to those observed in rapidly cooled synthetic basalts of the same chemical composition. However, the slow-cooled samples have a much “softer” coercivity spectrum. The multi-domain <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> mineral assemblage suggests that while intrusions generated by slow-cooled basaltic melts are capable of carrying intense TRMs they may be less stable over geologic time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cuomo, D. M.; Petrochilos, L.; Brachfeld, S. A.; Bowles, J. A.; Hammer, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995PhRvB..52..637W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spin-charge separation in the t-J model: <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and transport <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A real spin-charge separation scheme is found based on a saddle-point state of the t-J model. In the one-dimensional (1D) case, such a saddle-point reproduces the correct asymptotic correlations at the strong-coupling fixed point of the model. In the two-dimensional (2D) case, the transverse gauge field confining spinon and holon is shown to be gapped at finite doping so that a spin-charge deconfinement is obtained for its first time in 2D. The gap in the gauge fluctuation disappears at half-filling limit, where a long-range antiferromagnetic order is recovered at zero temperature and spinons become confined. The most interesting features of spin dynamics and transport are exhibited at finite doping where exotic residual couplings between spin and charge degrees of freedom lead to systematic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with regard to a Fermi-liquid system. In spin dynamics, a commensurate antiferromagnetic fluctuation with a small, doping-dependent energy scale is found, which is characterized in momentum space by a Gaussian peak at (?/a,?/a) with a doping-dependent width (~ ?? , ? is the doping concentration). This commensurate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fluctuation contributes a non-Korringa behavior for the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate. There also exists a characteristic temperature scale below thich a pseudogap behavior appears in the spin dynamics. Furthermore, an incommensurate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fluctuation is also obtained at a finite energy regime. In the transport, a strong-range phase intereference leads to an effective holon Lagrangian which can give rise to a series of interesting phenomena including linear-T resistivity and a T2 Hall angle. We discuss the striking similarities of these theoretical features with those found in the high-Tc cuprates and give a consistent picture for the latter. Electronic properties like Fermi surface and superconducting pairing in this framework are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weng, Z. Y.; Sheng, D. N.; Ting, C. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6465695"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the Nuevo Leon <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The broad dipolar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I Power Plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3 to 3.5 km over the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 by 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analyzed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed tham to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in-situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. the suite of igneous rocks was probably passively emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotitic-gabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6 to 11 km in an area beneath the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goldstein, N.E.; Wilt, M.J.; Corrigan, D.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ExG....44..114C"> <span id="translatedtitle">New methods for interpretation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> vector and gradient tensor data II: application to the Mount Leyshon <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, Queensland, Australia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Acquisition of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> gradient tensor data is anticipated to become routine in the near future. In the meantime, modern ultrahigh resolution conventional <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data can be used, with certain important caveats, to calculate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> vector components and gradient tensor elements from total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity (TMI) or TMI gradient surveys. An accompanying paper presented new methods for inverting gradient tensor data to obtain source parameters for several elementary, but useful, models. These include point dipole (sphere), vertical line of dipoles (narrow vertical pipe), line of dipoles (horizontal cylinder), thin dipping sheet, and contact models. A key simplification is the use of eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors of the tensor. The normalised source strength (NSS), calculated from the eigenvalues, is a particularly useful rotational invariant that peaks directly over 3D compact sources, 2D compact sources, thin sheets, and contacts, independent of magnetisation direction. Source locations can be inverted directly from the NSS and its vector gradient. Some of these new methods have been applied to analysis of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signature of the Early Permian Mount Leyshon gold-mineralised system, Queensland. The Mount Leyshon <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is a prominent TMI low that is produced by rock units with strong reversed remanence acquired during the Late Palaeozoic Reverse Superchron. The inferred <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> moment for the source zone of the Mount Leyshon <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is ~1010Am2. Its direction is consistent with petrophysical measurements. Given estimated magnetisation from samples and geological information, this suggests a volume of ~1.5km×1.5km×2km (vertical). The inferred depth of the centre of magnetisation is ~900m below surface, suggesting that the depth extent of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> zone is ~1800m. Some of the deeper, undrilled portion of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> zone could be a mafic intrusion similar to the nearby coeval Fenian Diorite, representing part of the parent magma chamber beneath the Mount Leyshon Intrusive Complex.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clark, David A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.T13A1130P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calibration of Pre-M25 Marine <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Polarity Composite of ýLate Callovian Through Kimmeridgian</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ammonite-zoned successions have yielded a composite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> polarity pattern ýspanning latest Callovian (lamberti ammonite Zone) through Late Kimmeridgian ýý(acanthicum Zone) that confirms marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> M37 through to M24 ýinterpreted by deep-tow and other <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> surveys in the western Pacific. This pattern ýwas constructed after thermal demagnetization of over 1000 samples from over 30 ýsections in Poland, British Isles, France and Spain. Polish sections include thick ýammonite-zoned limestone formations of the Krakow-Czestochowa-Wielun Upland and ýHoly-Cross Mountains. British limestone and clay formations were investigated in ýEngland (Dorset and Yorkshire) and in Scotland (the Isle of Skye). The sections include ýcandidates for the global stratotypes for the Callovian-Oxfordian and Oxfordian-ýKimmeridgian stage boundaries. All British and most of the Polish-French-Spanish ýsections are calibrated to ammonite biostratigraphy at the subzone level (Boreal-ýSubboreal realm and Sub-Mediterranean realm, respectively) and to regional sequence ýstratigraphy. The independent Boreal-Subboreal and Sub-Mediterranean composites of ýmagnetic polarity are consistent, and the main features of the modeled pre-M25 marine ýmagnetics can be calibrated. ý The Callovian-Oxfordian boundary (base of Quenstedtoceras mariae Zone) occurs in a ýnarrow normal-polarity subzone correlated to polarity subchron M36a of the western ýPacific <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> polarity pattern. The beginning of the Middle and the Late Oxfordian ýsubstages as defined in the Sub-Mediterranean province in Poland correspond ýapproximately to M33 and M29 of the Pacific M-sequence. The placement of the ýOxfordian- Kimmeridgian boundary in the Sub-Boreal ammonite zonation (base of ýPictonia baylei Zone) is at the beginning of the M27r polarity zone. This is significantly ýolder than the traditional placement of the Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian boundary in the ýSub-Mediterranean zonation (base of Sutneria platynota Zone) near the base of the M25r ýpolarity zone.ý This project is a collaboration with A. Wierzbowski, M. Lewandowski, E. Glowniak, J. ýGutowski, P. Ziolkowski, M. Sidorczuk, and Z. Zlonkiewicz (Poland); A. Coe and J. ýWright, (England); and N. Nowaczyk (Germany)ý</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Przybylski, P. A.; Ogg, J. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60226655"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary interpretation of mid-crustal reflections from the vicinity of the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, eastern Tennessee</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seismic data acquired across part of the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> reveal 30 km of highly reflective crust from 4.5 to 16 km depth (1.6 to 5.0 sec) beneath the Alleghenian allochthon. At the southeast end of the SE-NW oriented seismic line, the reflections range from essentially horizontal to gently west-dipping at about 30 degrees. The dominant west-dipping reflections are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. L. Hopkins; J. K. Costain</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v083/iB12/JB083iB12p05923/JB083iB12p05923.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electrokinetic and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with dilatant regions in a layered earth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">According to the dilatancy-diffusion earthquake model, there will be fluid motion into a dilatant zone prior to an earthquake. One possible consequence of this fluid motion is the generation of an electric potential <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by means of electrokinetic processes. A surface electric potential <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> will not be produced unless there is a boundary separating regions of differing streaming potential coefficient</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">David V. Fitterman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRB..113.7110T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> study of the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone and implications for the geomagnetic polarity reversal timescale and geomagnetic field behavior</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) is a region of low-amplitude <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> whose distinctive character may be related to geomagnetic field behavior. We collected deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles in Pigafetta Basin (western Pacific) where previous deep-tow data partially covered the JQZ sequence. Our goals were to extend the survey through the JQZ, examine <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> correlations, and refine a preliminary geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) model. We collected a series of closely spaced profiles over <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> M34 and Ocean Drilling Program Hole 801C to examine <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> correlation in detail, one profile in between previous profiles, and two long profiles extending the survey deeper into the JQZ. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> features can be readily correlated except in a region of low-amplitude, short-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the middle of the survey area ("low-amplitude zone" or LAZ). The small multiprofile surveys demonstrate <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> linearity, implying that surrounding <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are also linear and likely result from crustal recording of geomagnetic field changes. We constructed a GPTS model assuming that most <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> result from polarity reversals. The polarity timescale is similar to the polarity sequences from previous studies, but its global significance is uncertain because of problems correlating <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the LAZ and the ambiguous nature of the small JQZ <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Overall <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitude decreases with age into the LAZ and then increases again, implying low geomagnetic field strength, perhaps related to a rapidly reversing field. Other factors that may contribute to the LAZ are interference of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> over narrow, crustal polarity zones and poorly understood local tectonic complexities.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tominaga, Masako; Sager, William W.; Tivey, Maurice A.; Lee, Sang-Mook</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA134922"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rediscovery and Analysis of the Cultural Significance of <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> River Miles 93.0-93.7 and 98.2-99.5 Apalachicola River, Florida.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In July 1983 representatives of the Mobile District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, State of Florida Division of Archives, History and Records Management and a consultant archeologist investigated 6 clusters of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Apalachicola River,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">N. O. Wright</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40281581"> <span id="translatedtitle">Earth analog for Martian <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: remanence properties of hemo-ilmenite norites in the Bjerkreim-Sokndal intrusion, Rogaland, Norway</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To explain the very large remanent <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> on Mars, which no longer has a global <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field, it is important to evaluate rocks on Earth with the necessary properties of high natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (NRM) and coercivity. Here, we describe a possible analog from the 230-km2 930 Ma Bjerkreim-Sokndal layered intrusion (BKS) in Rogaland, Norway. In the layered series</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. A. McEnroe; L. L. Brown; Peter Robinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JGRB..112.3102S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> properties and potential field modeling of the Peculiar Knob metamorphosed iron formation, South Australia: An analog for the source of the intense Martian <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> property measurements show that the strongly metamorphosed Peculiar Knob iron formation (IF), South Australia, is coarse-grained, high-grade hematite with variable amounts of magnetite and maghemite. This body exhibits a relatively low <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility (<0.3 SI) that cannot explain the associated intense <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, 30,000 nT, in terms of induced <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> alone. Peculiar Knob IF possesses an extremely intense (˜120 A m-1) remanence, directed steeply upward. This ancient remanence reinforces the local Earth's field (inclination -63°). A simple geological model, constrained by drilling and physical property measurements, explains both the observed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, consistent with the Poisson theorem. Koenigsberger ratios (Qs) of 10 and greater, as found here, are rare in nature. We postulate that acquisition of a thermoremanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (TRM) by the ore during postmetamorphic cooling from above the Curie/Néel temperature accounts for the intense remanence and high Qs. Although the hematite is in the multidomain size range, the coercivity is higher than expected. Also, the natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (NRM) values are less than 10% of the expected value for a saturated TRM of hematite. On the basis of reflected light, scanning electron microscope observations, and rock <span class="hlt">magnetism</span>, we propose that the common fine intergrowths of a very small amount of magnetite and/or maghemite within the hematite host are responsible for the relatively high coercivity and contribute to the NRM. These intergrowths are not normal exsolution lamellae and were likely present at high temperature. This study suggests that coarse-grained hematite-rich bodies that carry TRM and have been subjected to high-grade (>680°C) metamorphism may be possible sources for some of the prominent Martian <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmidt, Phillip W.; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Clark, David A.; Robinson, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48935905"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> study of the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone and implications for the geomagnetic polarity reversal timescale and geomagnetic field behavior</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Jurassic Quiet Zone (JQZ) is a region of low-amplitude <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> whose distinctive character may be related to geomagnetic field behavior. We collected deep-tow <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profiles in Pigafetta Basin (western Pacific) where previous deep-tow data partially covered the JQZ sequence. Our goals were to extend the survey through the JQZ, examine <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> correlations, and refine a preliminary geomagnetic polarity</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Masako Tominaga; William W. Sager; Maurice A. Tivey; Sang-Mook Lee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40844855"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> profile and inferred seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> in Foul Bay, Red Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A profile taken across the aeromagnetic coverage of Foul Bay and the adjacent north Benas Bay indicates seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>. The best synthetic-to-observed profile fit was for <span class="hlt">spreading</span> to have occurred, along NNE axis, between 22 and 5 Ma ago at a rate of 0.5 cm\\/yr. In this interval extensive basic volcanicity was occurring in eastern Egypt. A nearly continuous <span class="hlt">spreading</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. M. Khattab</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/82372"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spin-charge separation in the {ital t}-{ital J} model: <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and transport <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A real spin-charge separation scheme is found based on a saddle-point state of the {ital t}-{ital J} model. In the one-dimensional (1D) case, such a saddle-point reproduces the correct asymptotic correlations at the strong-coupling fixed point of the model. In the two-dimensional (2D) case, the transverse gauge field confining spinon and holon is shown to be gapped at {ital finite} {ital doping} so that a spin-charge deconfinement is obtained for its first time in 2D. The gap in the gauge fluctuation disappears at half-filling limit, where a long-range antiferromagnetic order is recovered at zero temperature and spinons become confined. The most interesting features of spin dynamics and transport are exhibited at finite doping where exotic {ital residual} couplings between spin and charge degrees of freedom lead to systematic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with regard to a Fermi-liquid system. In spin dynamics, a commensurate antiferromagnetic fluctuation with a small, doping-dependent energy scale is found, which is characterized in momentum space by a Gaussian peak at ({pi}/{ital a},{pi}/{ital a}) with a doping-dependent width. This commensurate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fluctuation contributes a non-Korringa behavior for the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate. There also exists a characteristic temperature scale below thich a pseudogap behavior appears in the spin dynamics. Furthermore, an incommensurate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fluctuation is also obtained at a {ital finite} energy regime. In the transport, a strong-range phase intereference leads to an effective holon Lagrangian which can give rise to a series of interesting phenomena including linear-{ital T} resistivity and a {ital T}{sup 2} Hall angle. We discuss the striking similarities of these theoretical features with those found in the high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} cuprates and give a consistent picture for the latter. Electronic properties like Fermi surface and superconducting pairing in this framework are also discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Weng, Z.Y.; Sheng, D.N.; Ting, C.S. [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-5506 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/836904"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ANOMALIES</span> IN THE APPLIED <span class="hlt">MAGNETIC</span> FIELDS ON DIII-D AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR THE UNDERSTANDING OF STABILITY EXPERIMENTS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Small non-axisymmetric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields are known to cause serious loss of stability in tokamaks leading to loss of confinement and abrupt termination of plasma current (disruptions). The best known examples are the locked mode and the resistive wall mode. Understanding of the underlying field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (departures in the hardware-related fields from ideal toroidal and poloidal fields on a single axis) and the interaction of the plasma with them is crucial to tokamak development. Results of both locked mode experiments and resistive wall mode experiments done in DIII-D tokamak plasmas have been interpreted to indicate the presence of a significant anomalous field. New measurements of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the hardware systems have been made on DIII-D. The measured field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to the plasma shaping coils in DIII-D are smaller than previously reported. Additional evaluations of systematic errors have been made. New measurements of the anomalous fields of the ohmic heating and toroidal coils have been added. Such detailed in situ measurements of the fields of a tokamak are unique. The anomalous fields from all of the coils are one third of the values indicated from the stability experiments. These results indicate limitations in the understanding of the interaction of the plasma with the external field. They indicate that it may not be possible to deduce the anomalous fields in a tokamak from plasma experiments and that we may not have the basis needed to project the error field requirements of future tokamaks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">LUXON,J.L; SCHAFFER,M.J; JACKSON,G.L; LEUER,J.A; NAGY,A; SCOVILLE,J.T; STRAIT,E.J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001LPI....32.2142H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling and Paleomagnetic Pole Positions for Two <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Northern Polar Region of Mars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An analysis of MGS magnetometer data from the northern polar region yields estimates for paleomagnetic pole positions for two <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are located in a region north of Olympus Mons and south of the present rotational pole.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hood, L. L.; Zakharian, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41998547"> <span id="translatedtitle">A closer look at remanence-dominated aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: Rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> mineralogy of the Russell Belt microcline-sillimanite gneiss, northwest Adirondack Mountains, New York</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A large, distinct negative aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of over 2000 nT associated with microcline-sillimanite-quartz gneisses in the Russell area, northwest Adirondack Mountains, was previously shown to be remanence-dominated, although the carriers of remanence were not well documented. Russell Belt gneisses have a strong natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> with steep remanence directions, D=263°, I=-58°, an average intensity of 3.6 A\\/m, and typical susceptibilities</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Suzanne A. McEnroe; Laurie L. Brown</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006ihy..workE.148S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Satellite Measured Electron Intensities during Intense <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Storm at Equatorial <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Region over Indian Sector (P56)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ramanselva_iig@rediffmail.com The GPS data obtained from IGS data base corresponding to the quiet and disturbed period of the ionosphere at Equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region in the Indian sector (IISC and HYDE) have shown a remarkable increase in total electron content during storm time on 29th Oct 2003 (Ap= 400, during main phase). The analysis extended for the other regions around the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region (IISC, HYDE, YIBL, KUNM, BAHR and POL2) have revealed similar enhancements during such period. The locations include the crest of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region to the trough in the Indian longitude as well as extended in east and west of the temperate latitude. The ground-based magnetometer corresponding to the equatorward edge of <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region has shown an exceptional agreement in time of IMF, H-field and Dst reversals with the time of the estimated peak TEC. Nevertheless the time of H-field’s reversal maximum seems to subtly delay about a few minutes due to the longitudinal differences with respect to IST. The electron intensity during disturbed time is shown to increase by 46.5% that of the quiet time values measured at <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> crest region at the reversal time of Dst. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field reversal with the corresponding reversal of IMF coinciding with peak value of TEC confirms that the electric field penetrations at low latitude region are an instantaneous process. The latitudinal changes of TEC are shown to decrease from crest region to trough much more steeply on quiet times compared to the storm time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Selvamurugan, R.; et al.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AdSpR..51...61T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> control on night-time enhancement in TEC near the crest of the Equatorial Ionization <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ionospheric Total Electron Content (TECs), derived by dual frequency signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) recorded near the Indian equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region, Bhopal (23.2°N, 77.4°E, Geomagnetic 14.2°N) were analyzed for the period of January, 2005 to February, 2008. The work deals with monthly, diurnal, solar and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> activity variations on night-time enhancement in TEC. From a total of 157 night-time enhancements, 75 occur during pre-midnight and 82 post-midnight hours. The occurrence of night-time enhancement in TEC is utmost during summer months, followed by equinox and winter months. The occurrence of night-time enhancement in TEC decreases with increase in solar and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> activities. We observed that peak size and half amplitude duration are positively correlated, while time of occurrence of night-time enhancement in TEC and time of peak enhancement are negatively correlated with solar activity. The peak size, half amplitude duration, time of peak enhancement and time of occurrence of night-time enhancement in TEC shows negative correlation with <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> activity. The results have been compared with the earlier ones and discussed in terms of possible source mechanism responsible for the enhancement at <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> crest region.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Trivedi, Richa; Jain, Sudhir; Jain, Amit; Gwal, A. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6135982"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary interpretation of mid-crustal reflections from the vicinity of the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>, eastern Tennessee</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Seismic data acquired across part of the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> reveal 30 km of highly reflective crust from 4.5 to 16 km depth (1.6 to 5.0 sec) beneath the Alleghenian allochthon. At the southeast end of the SE-NW oriented seismic line, the reflections range from essentially horizontal to gently west-dipping at about 30 degrees. The dominant west-dipping reflections are interspersed with short east-dipping events on the southeastern part of the line. Near the center of the line, the west-dipping reflections reverse dip to form a broad, open synformal geometry. The NW end of the line is characterized by a zone of low reflectivity. The reflection geometries can be viewed as resulting from extensional block faulting, where the region has been down-faulted to the west. In some places,the west-dipping reflections appear to connect to the short east-dipping reflections to form open, asymmetric antiforms. Coupled with the presence of the syncline on the northwestern part of the line,the reflection geometry can be interpreted as originating in a compressional setting. Alternatively, the west-dipping reflections might represent unusually well preserved compositional layering, sills, or a regional scale metamorphic fabric. Additional models can be proposed to explain the data, but all must account for the excellent preservation of the seismic features. These data are used with potential field data in an effort to determine whether the cause of the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> is similar to that associated with the Central North American Rift System and/or the Grenville Front <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hopkins, D.L.; Costain, J.K. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6899559"> <span id="translatedtitle">Middle proterozoic tectonic activity in west Texas and eastern New Mexico and analysis of gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Precambrian history of west Texas and eastern New Mexico is complex, consisting of four events: Early Proterozoic orogenic activity (16309-1800 Ma), formation of the western granite-rhyolite province (WGRP) (1340-1410 Ma), Grenville age tectonics (1116-1232 Ma), and middle Proterozoic extension possibly related to mid-continent rifting (1086-1109 Ma). Pre-Grenville tectonics, Grenville tectonics, and mid-continent rifting are represented in this area by the Abilene gravity minimum (AGM) and bimodal igneous rocks, which are probably younger. We have used gravity modeling and the comparison of gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> with rock types reported from wells penetrating Precambrian basement to study the AGM and middle Proterozoic extension in this area. The AGM is an east-northeast-trending, 600 km long, gravity low, which extends from the Texas-Oklahoma border through the central basin platform (CBP) to the Delaware basin. This feature appears to predate formation of the mafic body in the CBP (1163 Ma) and is most likely related to Pre-Grenville tectonics, possibly representing a continental margin arc batholith. Evidence of middle Proterozoic extension is found in the form of igneous bodies in the CBP, the Van Horn uplift, the Franklin Mountains, and the Sacramento Mountains. Analysis of gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> shows that paired gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> highs are related to mafic intrusions in the upper crust. Mapping of middle Proterozoic igneous rocks and the paired <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> outlines a 530 km diameter area of distributed east-west-oriented extension. The Debaca-Swisher terrain of shallow marine and clastic sedimentary rocks is age correlative with middle Proterozoic extension. These rocks may represent the lithology of possible Proterozoic exploration targets. Proterozoic structures were reactivated during the Paleozoic, affecting both the structure and deposition in the Permian basin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R. (Univ. of Texas, El Paso (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42038387"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Spreading</span> and intermittent structure of the upstream boundary of planetary <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> foreshocks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fast particles in the electron foreshocks propagate along the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field lines, so that the effect of low frequency <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fluctuations is to create both a broadening and a fine structure of the foreshock upstream boundary. This is studied by means of a 3-D numerical simulation of turbulent <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields. Applications to Venus, Earth, and Mars <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> foreshocks are</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Zimbardo; P. Veltri</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.P51C0669S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paleomagnetic Pole Locations of Lunar Swirl Albedo <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: A possible Pre- existence of Ancient Lunar dynamo</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nature and the origin of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields responsible of lunar remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> are highly debated. There are two possible <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> processes; either the crustal field was generated by an ancient lunar dynamo or it was generated by external transient fields impact. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that the lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field was generated by a paleo lunar dynamo process. Magnetometer data obtained by Lunar Prospector showed high swirl albedo over certain regions were inverted to determine paleomagnetic pole locations. These selected formations seem to have an Imbrian age. The mostly lie antipodal to large impact basins such as Descartes Formation, Mare Marginis, Mare Ingenii and Gerasimovich. The Reiner Gamma and Airy crater have not previously associated with antipodal impact basins. The modeling of these <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> shows a clustered paleomagnetic pole positions within a radius of 35 degrees centered at (30S, 225E). This result supports the hypothesis of a now extincted paleo lunar dynamo that may have probably <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> rocks of lunar crust. The scattered positions of the other obtained paleomagnetic pole locations suggest that the lunar remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> were since modified by subsequent impact events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sherif, B. M.; Mohamed, H.; Yves, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v075/i035/JB075i035p07412/JB075i035p07412.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Northeast Atlantic between the Canary and Cape Verde Islands</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">During 1968 about 7500 km of new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data were recorded by the USNS J. W. Gibbs between the Canary and Cape Verde islands, from the continental shelf to approximately 30øW. These data, together with an equal amount of data from other sources, reveal major <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> features. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> boundary between relatively undisturbed and disturbed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> zones is delineated near</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peter A. Rona; J. Brakl; J. R. Heirtzler</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhRvB..65f4418N"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the spin-chain system Sr3Cu1-xZnxIrO6</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the results of ac and dc <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (M) and heat-capacity (C) measurements on the solid solution Sr3Cu1-xZnxIrO6. While the Zn end member is known to form in a rhombohedral pseudo-one-dimensional K4CdCl6 structure with an antiferromagnetic ordering temperature of (TN=)19 K, the Cu end member has been reported to form in a monoclinically distorted form with a Curie temperature of (TC=)19 K. The <span class="hlt">magnetism</span> of the Zn compound is found to be robust to synthetic conditions and is broadly consistent with the behavior known in the literature. However, we find a lower <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> ordering temperature (To) for the Cu compound with a slight variation in heat treatment conditions, thereby suggesting that To is sensitive to synthetic conditions. However, the Cu sample exhibits spin-glass-like behavior at low temperatures, judged by a frequency dependence of ac <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility and a broadening of the C <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> at the onset of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> ordering, in sharp contrast to earlier proposals. We attempt to relate it to differences in crystallographic details. Small applications of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field (H), however, drive this system to ferromagnetism unlike in Zn compound as inferred from the M data. Small substitutions for Cu/Zn (x=0.75 or 0.25) significantly depress <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> ordering; in other words, To varies nonmonotonically with x (To~6,3, and 4 K for x=0.25, 0.5, and 0.67, respectively). These findings imply interesting x-T-H <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> phase diagram for this compound. In addition, we conclude that the present solid-state solution may be well suited for future studies to probe <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> competition phenomena in a chain system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Niazi, Asad; Sampathkumaran, E. V.; Paulose, P. L.; Eckert, D.; Handstein, A.; Müller, K.-H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56372504"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spherical earth gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> analysis by equivalent point source inversion</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation potential field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of potential field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates potential field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. R. B. von Frese; W. J. Hinze; L. W. Braile</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54740654"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lithospheric interpretation and modeling of satellite elevation gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation potential field data analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat Earth methods of potential field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical Earth problem relates potential field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformation of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. R. B. Vonfrese</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a002600/a002695/index.html"> <span id="translatedtitle">SST <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> + Wind <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://nsdl.org/nsdl_dds/services/ddsws1-1/service_explorer.jsp">NSDL National Science Digital Library</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sea surface temperature (SST) <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and sea surface wind <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> show the development of the 2002-2003 El Nino based on data from NASAs Aqua and QuikSCAT spacecraft. The wind data has been processed using the Variational Analysis Method (VAM).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shirah, Greg; Allen, Jesse; Adamec, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-02-03</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMGP42A..02H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> characteristics of faulted sediments with <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: A case study from the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico (Invited)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-resolution airborne surveys in the Rio Grande rift have documented abundant short-wavelength, low-amplitude <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> generated at faults within basin sediments. We present a rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> study bearing on the source of a10-20-nT linear <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over the San Ysidro normal fault, which is well exposed in outcrop in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> susceptibility (MS) values (SI vol) from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of Santa Fe Group and pre-rift sedimentary rocks juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault have lognormal distributions with well-defined means. These averages generally increase up section through eight map units: from 1.7E-4 to 2.2E-4 in the pre-rift Cretaceous and Eocene rocks, from 9.9E-4 to 1.2E-3 in three units of the Miocene Zia and Cerro Conejo Formations of the Santa Fe Group, and from 1.5E-3 to 3.5E-3 in three units of the Miocene-Pliocene Arroyo Ojito and Ceja Formations of the Santa Fe Group. Remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> is not important; Koenigsberger ratios are less than 0.3 for Santa Fe Group samples. Rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> parameters (e.g., ARM/MS and S ratios) and petrography indicate that detrital magnetite content and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite are the predominant controls of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> property variations within the Santa Fe Group sediments. Magnetite is present in rounded detrital grains (including both homogeneous and subdivided types) and as fine inclusions in volcanic rock fragments. Santa Fe Group sediments with highest <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility have greatest <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>-grain size as indicated by lowest ARM/MS ratios. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size to pebbly sand within the fluvial Arroyo Ojito Formation. In contrast, MS reaches highest values in fine to medium sands in eolian Zia Formation. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite and resultant lower MS is spatially associated with calcite cementation in the Santa Fe Group; both oxidation and cementation probably reflect past flow of ground water through permeable horizons. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> models of geologic cross sections that incorporate mean MS for the different stratigraphic units successfully mimic the aeromagnetic profiles across the San Ysidro fault. These models demonstrate multiple levels of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> contrasts due to fault juxtaposition of stratigraphic units, with contributions to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> that vary along strike due to uneven erosion and dip of strata. Sediment provenance, depositional facies, and post-depositional preservation and alteration of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals are all factors that contribute to producing aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in faulted basin sediments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hudson, M. R.; Grauch, V. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6830235"> <span id="translatedtitle">New resistance <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in the superconducting fluctuation region of disordered Cu-Zr alloys with dilute <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> impurities</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In disordered superconducting Cu-Zr alloys with dilute <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> impurities, we have observed a new type of resistance <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> which gives rise to strongly increased scattering of conduction electrons in a narrow temperature range above {ital T}{sub {ital c}} and appears to be due to interaction between superconducting fluctuations and spin. For a given level of impurities this phenomenon is peaked around Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}, but is observable from 36 to 60 at.% Zr. When the Cr impurity concentration is varied in Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}, a resistance peak can be observed for 100--600 ppm Cr with a maximum peak height of about 6% of the measured resistance. The effect is destroyed by a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of some tenths of a tesla.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lindqvist, P.; Nordstroem, A.; Rapp, O. (Department of Solid State Physics, The Royal Institute of Technology, S-10044 Stockholm (Sweden))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-06-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010GeoJI.182..652S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inversion of the amplitude of the two-dimensional analytic signal of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> by the particle swarm optimization technique</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amplitude of the 2-D analytic signal of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> profile is independent of the directions of the Earth's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field vector and remnant <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of the causative source. It exhibits peaks corresponding to the locations of the corners of a causative source, modelled by say a polygon. It also exhibits a peak corresponding to different idealized source geometries related to the structural indices. This amplitude is computed from the first-order horizontal and vertical derivatives of the observed <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and is relatively less noisy than second-order derivatives. The amplitude can also be computed directly from the measured derivatives. Particle swarm optimization (PSO)-a global optimization technique is applied to interpret this amplitude in terms of the horizontal location and depth, constant (related to <span class="hlt">magnetization</span>) and various source geometries through structural indices. Applicability of the proposed technique is evaluated through the analyses of simulated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (noise-free and corrupted with 20 per cent random noise) over different types of source geometries, namely, a thin dyke and a contact with high accuracy in parameter estimation. Studies on the choices of search parameter space reveal that a relatively wide search space can be assigned. Practical applicability of the proposed technique has been demonstrated through three <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> profiles digitized from published literature. The results of PSO, Euler deconvolution, enhanced local wavenumber and drill hole are comparable. PSO results also seem to be more stable than other techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srivastava, Shalivahan; Agarwal, B. N. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003NucFu..43.1813L"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the applied <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields in DIII-D and their implications for the understanding of stability experiments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Small non-axisymmetric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields are known to cause serious loss of stability in tokamaks, leading to loss of confinement and abrupt termination of plasma current (disruptions). The best known examples are the locked mode and the resistive wall mode. Understanding of the underlying field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (departures in the hardware-related fields from ideal toroidal and poloidal fields on a single axis) and the interaction of the plasma with them is crucial to tokamak development. Results of both locked mode experiments (Scoville J.T. and La Haye R.J. 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 250) and resistive wall mode experiments (Garofalo A.M., La Haye R.J. and Scoville J.T. 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 1335) done in DIII-D tokamak plasmas have been interpreted to indicate the presence of a significant anomalous field. New measurements of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the hardware systems have been made in DIII-D. The measured field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to the plasma shaping coils in DIII-D are smaller than previously reported (La Haye R.J. and Scoville J.T. 1991 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61 2146). Additional evaluations of systematic errors have been made. New measurements of the anomalous fields of the Ohmic heating and toroidal coils have been added. Such detailed in situ measurements of the fields of a tokamak are unique. The anomalous fields from all the coils are one-third the values indicated from the stability experiments (Garofalo et al 2002, Scoville and La Haye 2003). These results indicate limitations in the understanding of the interaction of the plasma with the external field. They indicate that it may not be possible to deduce the anomalous fields in a tokamak from plasma experiments and that we may not have the basis needed to project the error field requirements of future tokamaks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luxon, J. L.; Schaffer, M. J.; Jackson, G. L.; Leuer, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Scoville, J. T.; Strait, E. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JGRB..114.3102K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geoid and gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> data of conjugate regions of Bay of Bengal and Enderby Basin: New constraints on breakup and early <span class="hlt">spreading</span> history between India and Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Timing of breakup of the Indian continent from eastern Gondwanaland and evolution of the lithosphere in the Bay of Bengal still remain as ambiguous issues. Geoid and free-air gravity data of Bay of Bengal and Enderby Basin are integrated with shipborne geophysical data to investigate the early evolution of the eastern Indian Ocean. Geoid and gravity data of the Bay of Bengal reveal five N36°W fracture zones (FZs) and five isolated NE-SW structural rises between the Eastern Continental Margin of India (ECMI) and the 85°E Ridge/86°E FZ. The FZs meet the 86°E FZ at an angle of ˜39°. The rises are associated with low-gravity and geoid <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and are oriented nearly orthogonal to the FZs trend. The geoid and gravity data of the western Enderby Basin reveal a major Kerguelen FZ and five N4°E FZs. The FZs discretely converge to the Kerguelen FZ at an angle of ˜37°. We interpret the FZs identified in Bay of Bengal and western Enderby Basin as conjugate FZs that trace the early Cretaceous rifting of south ECMI from Enderby Land. Structural rises between the FZs of Bay of Bengal may either represent fossil ridge segments, possibly have extinct during the early evolution of the Bay of Bengal lithosphere or may have formed later by the volcanic activity accreted the 85°E Ridge. Two different gravity signatures (short-wavelength high-amplitude negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and relatively broader low-amplitude negative gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>) are observed on south and north segments of the ECMI, respectively. The location of continent-ocean boundary (COB) is at relatively far distance (100-200 km) from the coastline on north ECMI than that (50-100 km) on the south segment. On the basis of geoid, gravity, and seismic character and orientation of conjugate FZs in Bay of Bengal and western Enderby Basin, we believe that transform motion occurred between south ECMI and Enderby Land at the time of breakup, which might have facilitated the rifting process in the north between combined north ECMI-Elan Bank and MacRobertson Land and in the south between southwest Sri Lanka and Gunnerus Ridge region of East Antarctica. Approximately during the period between the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> M1 and M0 and soon after detachment of the Elan Bank from north ECMI, the rifting process possibly had reorganized in order to establish the process along the entire eastern margins of India and Sri Lanka.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krishna, K. S.; Michael, Laju; Bhattacharyya, R.; Majumdar, T. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jz/v069/i024/JZ069i024p05363/JZ069i024p05363.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> North of Puerto Rico: Trend Removal with Orthogonal Polynomials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> intensity data for the vicinity of the Puerto Rico trench and the outer ridge are presented. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field over the trench is unusually smooth and does not show the effect of local sources. A seventh-degree orthogonal polynomial was removed from along the survey lines to reduce the effects of both low-frequency <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> time varia- tions and the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerald D. van Voorhis; Thomas M. Davis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1964-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998E%26PSL.160..463S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Reykjanes Ridge: structure and tectonics of a hot-spot-influenced, slow-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge, from multibeam bathymetry, gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> investigations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a comprehensive morphological, gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> survey of the oblique- and slow-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> Reykjanes Ridge near the Iceland mantle plume. The survey extends from 57.9°N to 62.1°N and from the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis to between 30 km (3 Ma) and 100 km (10 Ma) off-axis; it includes 100 km of one arm of a diachronous `V-shaped' or `chevron' ridge. Observed isochrons are extremely linear and 28° oblique to the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> normal with no significant offsets. Along-axis there are ubiquitous, en-echelon axial volcanic ridges (AVRs), sub-normal to the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction, with average spacing of 14 km and overlap of about one third of their lengths. Relict AVRs occur off-axis, but are most obvious where there has been least axial faulting, suggesting that elsewhere they are rapidly eroded tectonically. AVRs maintain similar plan views but have reduced heights nearer Iceland. They are flanked by normal faults sub-parallel to the ridge axis, the innermost of which occur slightly closer to the axis towards Iceland, suggesting a gradual reduction of the effective lithospheric thickness there. Generally, the amplitude of faulting decreases towards Iceland. We interpret this pattern of AVRs and faults as the response of the lithosphere to oblique <span class="hlt">spreading</span>, as suggested by theory and physical modelling. An axial, 10-15 km wide zone of high acoustic backscatter marks the most recent volcanic activity. The zone's width is independent of the presence of a median valley, so axial volcanism is not primarily delimited by median valley walls, but is probably controlled by the lateral distance that the oblique AVRs can propagate into off-axis lithosphere. The mantle Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (MBA) exhibits little mid- to short-wavelength variation above a few milliGals, and along-axis variations are small compared with other parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Nevertheless, there are small axial deeps and MBA highs spaced some 130 km along-axis that may represent subdued third-order segment boundaries. They lack coherent off-axis traces and cannot be linked to Oligocene fracture zones on the ridge flanks. The surveyed chevron ridge is morphologically discontinuous, comprising several parallel bands of closely spaced, elevated blocks. These reflect the surrounding tectonic fabric but have higher fault scarps. There is no evidence for off-axis volcanism or greater abundance of seamounts on the chevron. Free-air gravity over it is greater than expected from the observed bathymetry, suggesting compensation via regional rather than pointwise isostasy. Most of the observed variation along the ridge can be ascribed to varying distance from the mantle plume, reflecting changes in mantle temperature and consequently in crustal thickness and lithospheric strength. However, a second-order variation is superimposed. In particular, between 59°30'N and 61°30'N there is a minimum of large-scale faulting and crustal magnetisation, maximum density of seamounts, and maximum axial free-air gravity high. To the north the scale of faulting increases slightly, seamounts are less common, and there is a relative axial free-air low. We interpret the 59°30'N to 61°30'N region as where the latest chevron ridge intersects the Reykjanes Ridge axis, and suggest that the morphological changes that culminate there reflect a local temperature high associated with a transient pulse of high plume output at its apex.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Searle, R. C.; Keeton, J. A.; Owens, R. B.; White, R. S.; Mecklenburgh, R.; Parsons, B.; Lee, S. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/443848"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> resonance imaging of cerebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in subjects with resistance to thyroid hormone</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the human thyroid receptor beta gene on chromosome 3. Individuals with RTH have an increased incidence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this study was to search for developmental brain malformations associated with RTH. Forty-three subjects (20 affected males [AM], 23 affected females [AF]) with resistance to thyroid hormone and 32 unaffected first degree relatives (18 unaffected males [UM], 14 unaffected females [UF]) underwent MRI brain scans with a volumetric acquisition that provided 90 contiguous 2 mm thick sagittal images. Films of six contiguous images beginning at a standard sagittal position lateral to the insula were analyzed by an investigator who was blind with respect to subject characteristics. The presence of extra or missing gyri in the parietal bank of the Sylvian fissure (multimodal association cortex) and multiple Heschl`s transverse gyri (primary auditory cortex) were noted. There was a significantly increased frequency of anomalous Sylvian fissures in the left hemisphere in males with RTH (AM: 70%; AF: 30%; UM: 28% UF: 28%). Also, there was an increased frequency of anomalous Sylvian fissures on the left combined with multiple Heschl`s gyri in either hemisphere in males with RTH (AM: 50%; AF: 9%; UM: 6%; UF: 0%). However, RTH subjects with <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> did not have an increased frequency of ADHD as compared with RTH subjects with no <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Abnormal thyroid hormone action in the male fetus early during brain development may be associated with grossly observable cerebral <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the left hemisphere. The effects of mutations in the thyroid receptor beta gene provide a model system for studying the complex interaction of genetic and non-genetic factors on brain and behavioral development. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leonard, C.M. [Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hauser, P.; Weintraub, B.D. [National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)]|[Baltimore VA Medical Center, MD (United States)] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-06-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012CG.....48....1H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Extracting <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> based on an improved BEMD method: A case study in the Pangxidong Area, South China</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In bidimensional empirical mode decomposition, an appropriate stoppage criterion for the sifting process is important. To solve the problem of unstable convergence, a stepwise stop criterion was presented based on the Cauchy-type criterion. In one sifting process, a squared deviation of two successive residual components is first calculated. Then, an absolute value of the difference between two continuous deviations is calculated. The sifting process will stop when the difference value is less than the a priori value. A comparison of correlation coefficients of the final results decomposed from experimental models demonstrated that those intrinsic mode functions obtained by the stepwise stop criterion meet the requirements of orthogonality, and the mode mixing effect among them is depressed effectively. With the help of the proposed criterion, an example is given for extracting <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Pangxidong area, Guangdong Province, South China. The residual components of the first and second order of bidimensional intrinsic mode functions revealed a spatial relationship between ore deposits and <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hou, Weisheng; Yang, Zhijun; Zhou, Yongzhang; Zhang, Liping; Wu, Wenlong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53981338"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kopylów <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> - new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data in the south-east part of Poland</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">From many years a lot of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> surface measurements have been executed in order to supplement the database and create a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> map of Poland. The margin zone of East European Craton was under research since 1998 to 2002. In comparison with \\</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O. Polechonska; I. Kosobudzka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5558840"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and discordant lineations beneath the Niger Delta: Implications for new fracture zones and multiple sea-floor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> directions in the meso-Atlantic' Gulf of Guinea cul-de-sac</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An aeromagnetic contour map compiled over shallow water and onshore portions of the Nigerian continental margin, shows several elongate, long-wavelength <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> closures with some alternating polarity, separated by steep gradient, NE lineations. The lineations are interpreted as new fracture zones or extensions of previously mapped ones. The NE trend in the western delta region is concordant with the fracture zone trends of the deeper Gulf of Guinea. Aeromagnetic lineations of the SE Niger Delta Basin however, discordantly trend ENE. Their termination against the former, is interpreted as evidence of early sea-floor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> in a ENE-WSW direction in addition to the well documented NE-SW <span class="hlt">spreading</span> of the Gulf of Guinea and the rest of the meso-Atlantic sea-floor; The geophysical crustal structure indicate the existence of two Early Cretaceous triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta Basin. The two triple-junctions further support the hypothesis that the African continent was a multi-plate system (in the Niger Delta region) during the early opening of the Atlantic.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Babalola, O.O.; Gipson, M. Jr. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23544961"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fetal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance imaging and neurosonography in congenital neurological <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: supplementary diagnostic and postnatal prognostic value.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Objective: To compare the diagnostic conclusions between fetal neurosonography and MRI in the cases of congenital neurological abnormalities, and with postnatal clinical and imaging evaluation, when available. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent a fetal MRI study for suspected congenital neurological <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. The diagnoses obtained by neurosonography and MRI were collected and compared. Both of them were compared with the final diagnosis when available by necropsy or postnatal evaluation. Postnatal imaging tests were performed only when clinically indicated. Results: The indications for the fetal MRI examination were: fetal ventriculomegaly, posterior fossa <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, suspected midline defects, small-for-gestational-age cephalic biometry and confirmed congenital CMV infection. There was a good degree of agreement beyond chance between both techniques (kappa test?=?0.76). Conclusions: Both imaging modalities give a high-diagnostic performance with a good degree of agreement between them, when made by specialized staff. Fetal MRI is a valuable complementary tool to detailed neurosonography which allows an evaluation of the normal brain maturation from the second trimester. It also offers a higher diagnostic performance for some congenital abnormalities such as cortical development or acquired lesions. PMID:23544961</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Garcia-Flores, Jose; Recio, Manuel; Uriel, Monserrat; Cañamares, Marina; Cruceyra, Mireia; Tamarit, Inés; Carrascoso, Javier; Espada, Mercedes; Sáinz de la Cuesta, Ricardo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006E%26PSL.248..599B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rock-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and remanence properties of synthetic Fe-rich basalts: Implications for Mars crustal <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We characterized the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> mineral assemblage and remanence properties of a set of synthetic samples patterned on the meteorite-derived basalt composition A *, which contains 18.9% total FeO. Basalts were synthesized at conditions that track 4 oxygen fugacity ( fO 2) buffer curves, from 3.4 log units below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) buffer to 5 log units above QFM, and 6 cooling rates from 10 5 to 3 °C/h. The resulting array of samples was characterized using <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> hysteresis loops, temperature dependence of saturation <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> and saturation remanence (10 to 1000 K), and the acquisition and demagnetization of anhysteretic remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (ARM) and thermoremanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> (TRM). The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> mineral assemblage characteristics are strongly dependent on fO 2. Samples synthesized at the iron-wüstite (IW) buffer have a very low concentration of remanence-carrying grains, which are likely near the superparamagnetic-stable-single-domain boundary. Samples synthesized at the QFM and nickel-nickel oxide (NNO) buffers contain a slightly higher concentration of remanence-carrying grains, which are stable-single-domain to fine pseudo-single-domain particles, respectively. Samples synthesized at the manganese oxide (MNO) buffer contain the highest concentration of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> grains, which are up to 100 ?m in diameter. The dominant Fe-Ti oxide produced is an Mg- and Al-bearing titanomagnetite with 2.4-2.7 Fe cations per formula unit. The Curie temperatures of the QFM samples are consistent with their electron-microprobe derived compositions. Those of the NNO sample set are very slightly elevated with respect to their electron microprobe derived compositions. The Curie temperatures of the MNO samples are elevated up to 200 °C above what they should be for their composition. We attribute the Curie temperature elevation to high-temperature nonstoichiometry of the titanomagnetite. The IW sample set acquired very weak TRMs with intensities of 0.02 to 0.5 A/m. This intensity of remanence is a factor of 50-500 too low to generate the observed 1000 nT <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> detected on Mars by the Mars Global Surveyor MAG-ER experiment. The QFM, NNO, and MNO samples acquired TRMs up to 40 A/m in a 10-?T applied field, and up to 200 A/m in a 50-?T field, with little or no dependence on cooling rate. Our results suggest that Fe-rich melts that crystallize extensive titanomagnetite can generate an intensely <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> layer in the Martian crust, even if the remanence was acquired in a weak field. The QFM sample set can easily account for the observed 1000-nT Mars <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, even in a <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> layer as thin as 15-30 km.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brachfeld, Stefanie A.; Hammer, Julia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70015661"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tectonic history of the north portion of the San Andreas fault system, California, inferred from gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Geologic and geophysical data for the San Andreas fault system north of San Francisco suggest that the eastern boundary of the Pacific plate migrated eastward from its presumed original position at the base of the continental slope to its present position along the San Andreas transform fault by means of a series of eastward jumps of the Mendocino triple junction. These eastward jumps total a distance of about 150 km since 29 Ma. Correlation of right-laterally displaced gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that now have components at San Francisco and on the shelf north of Point Arena indicates that the presently active strand of the San Andreas fault north of the San Francisco peninsula formed recently at about 5 Ma when the triple junction jumped eastward a minimum of 100 km to its present location at the north end of the San Andreas fault. -from Authors</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Griscom, A.; Jachens, R. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRB..115.9101H"> <span id="translatedtitle">True polar wander since 32 Ma B.P.: A paleomagnetic investigation of the skewness of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 12r on the Pacific plate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We test the fixed hot spot and fixed spin axis hypotheses through a paleomagnetic investigation of the skewness of crossings of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 12r (32 Ma B.P.) between the Galapagos and Clarion fracture zones on the Pacific plate. We focus on this region for three reasons. First, numerical experiments show that these crossings, of all those available from the Pacific plate, should contain the most information about the location of the 32 Ma B.P. paleomagnetic pole for the Pacific plate. Second, many of the available crossings are from vector aeromagnetic profiles, which have superior signal-to-noise ratios. Third, the rate of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> recorded in these crossings exceeds the threshold (half rate of 50 mm a-1) above which anomalous skewness is negligible. The new pole (83.5°N, 44.6°E) has compact 95% confidence limits (ellipse with major semiaxis length of 3.1° toward 84° clockwise from north and minor semiaxis length of 1.2°) and is not subject to the biases inherent in other methods for estimating Pacific plate paleomagnetic poles. The pole differs significantly by ?5° from the pole predicted if the Pacific hot spots have been fixed with respect to the spin axis, thus demonstrating, for the first time from paleomagnetic data, that Pacific hot spots have moved relative to the spin axis since the formation of the elbow in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain. The pole is consistent, however, with previously published paleomagnetic poles in a reference frame fixed relative to Indo-Atlantic hot spots. Thus, the new results require no motion between Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hot spots since 32 Ma B.P. Instead, superimposed on whatever motion occurs between hot spots, as expected for true polar wander.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Horner-Johnson, Benjamin C.; Gordon, Richard G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6888236"> <span id="translatedtitle">A source for the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in eastern Tennessee: Felsic intrusions concealed beneath the Paleozoic shelf strata</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several vibroseis industry seismic lines have been reprocessed and recorrelated to obtain images from the deep crust. These lines straddle the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and intersect it at approximately right angles. Beneath the Paleozoic shelf rocks within the crystalline crust a distinct wedge-shaped geometry appears in the data that opens up to the northeast and tapers to an apex near the steepest part of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Two parallel reflection seismic profiles indicate that the wedge-shaped feature extends for at least 25 km in a NE-SW direction along the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The data image a geometry that is bounded above by the Paleozoic rocks of the Cumberland plateau and Valley and Ridge provinces, and below by a west dipping contact between the interpreted felsic intrusion and adjacent rocks. The intrusion exhibits overall low reflectivity with faintly visible subhorizontal reflections. The crust southeast and beneath the body is characterized by high reflectivity and a strong west-dipping fabric. The contrast between the wedge and adjacent crust could result from the emplacement of the body following events that produced the west-dipping fabric. The gravity signature requires a negative density contrast between the interpreted felsic wedge and the adjacent crust, the density of the wedge being lower. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signature can be interpreted to indicate that the wedge has a higher susceptibility than adjacent crust. The potential field data are consistent with the interpretation of a granitic wedge that is accompanied by a contact aureole of even higher <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility. The authors propose that felsic intrusions, possibly with contact aureoles, are responsible for at least part of the strong New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The striking linearity of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> suggests tectonic control on the emplacement of the intrusions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hopkins, D.L.; Costain, J.K. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Zietz, I. (George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Inst. of Geography and Geology)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1003440"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of a New <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Below the Ferromagnetic Curie Temperature in Yb<sub>14</sub>MnSb<sub>11</sub></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} is an unusual ferromagnet with a Curie temperature of 52 {+-} 1 K. Recent optical, Hall, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>, and thermodynamic measurements indicate that Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} may be a rare example of an underscreened Kondo lattice. We report the first experimental observation of a new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in this system at around 47 K, a few degrees below T{sub c}. Systematic investigations of the ac and dc susceptibilities of Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} single crystals reveal features associated with possible spin reorientation at this temperature. This new <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is extremely sensitive to the applied measurement field and is absent in temperature-dependent dc <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> data for fields above 50 Oe. The origin of this could be due to decoupling of two distinct <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sublattices associated with MnSb{sub 4} tetrahedra.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Srinath, S. [University of South Florida, Tampa; Poddar, P. [University of South Florida, Tampa; Srikanth, H. [University of South Florida, Tampa; Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.earthbyte.org/people/dietmar/Pdf/Gaina_etal_India_Ant_breakup_GJI2007.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Breakup and early seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> between India and Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a tectonic interpretation of the breakup and early seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> between India and Antarctica based on improved coverage of potential field and seismic data off the east Antarctic margin between the Gunnerus Ridge and the Bruce Rise. We have identified a series of ENE trending Mesozoic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from chron M9o (~130.2 Ma) to M2o (~124.1 Ma) in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carmen Gaina; R. Dietmar Müller; Belinda Brown; Takemi Ishihara; Sergey Ivanov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005PhRvB..72e4436C"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> at the compensation temperature in the zero-<span class="hlt">magnetization</span> ferromagnet (Sm,Gd) Al2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The unusual zero-<span class="hlt">magnetization</span> ferromagnet ( Sm1-x Gdx ) Al2 (SGA) with x=0.01 and 0.02 is investigated by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>, and magnetotransport and calorimetric measurements. Striking features observed around the compensation temperature Tcomp are an exchange bias in a single-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span>-lattice compound such as SGA attributable to the anisotropy of the coupling between the spin and orbital moments; an anomalous Hall effect due to the asymmetric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> scattering of the conduction electrons; and a field-induced specific heat transition at Tcomp ascribable to the field-induced switching of the spin and orbital moments in a polarized conduction electron sea. The observations reveal the richness of physics in the SGA compound system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, X. H.; Wang, K. Q.; Hor, P. H.; Xue, Y. Y.; Chu, C. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41982427"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> antipodal to lunar impact basins - Two-dimensional model calculations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A quantitative theoretical investigation into the formation of large-scale <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields and related crustal <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> is conducted with respect to lunar basin-forming impacts. Two-dimensional models are developed to describe the partially ionized vapor cloud that results from the impacts on a lunar-sized body. Field-generation mechanisms are considered for the case of fields formed within the plasma cloud related to thermal</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. L. Hood; Z. Huang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60411705"> <span id="translatedtitle">A source for the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> in eastern Tennessee: Felsic intrusions concealed beneath the Paleozoic shelf strata</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Several vibroseis industry seismic lines have been reprocessed and recorrelated to obtain images from the deep crust. These lines straddle the New York-Alabama <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and intersect it at approximately right angles. Beneath the Paleozoic shelf rocks within the crystalline crust a distinct wedge-shaped geometry appears in the data that opens up to the northeast and tapers to an apex</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. L. Hopkins; J. K. Costain; I. Zietz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40847819"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Reykjanes Ridge: structure and tectonics of a hot-spot-influenced, slow-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge, from multibeam bathymetry, gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> investigations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a comprehensive morphological, gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> survey of the oblique- and slow-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> Reykjanes Ridge near the Iceland mantle plume. The survey extends from 57.9°N to 62.1°N and from the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis to between 30 km (3 Ma) and 100 km (10 Ma) off-axis; it includes 100 km of one arm of a diachronous `V-shaped' or `chevron' ridge. Observed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. C Searle; J. A Keeton; R. B Owens; R. S White; R Mecklenburgh; B Parsons; S. M Lee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tecto.2008.09.006"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Mackenzie River <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada-Evidence for Early Proterozoic magmatic arc crust at the edge of the North American craton</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We characterize the nature of the source of the high-amplitude, long-wavelength, Mackenzie River <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> (MRA), Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, based on <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field data collected at three different altitudes: 300??m, 3.5??km and 400??km. The MRA is the largest amplitude (13??nT) satellite <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over Canada. Within the extent of the MRA, source depth estimates (8-12??km) from Euler deconvolution of low-altitude aeromagnetic data show coincidence with basement depths interpreted from reflection seismic data. Inversion of high-altitude (3.5??km) aeromagnetic data produces an average <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of 2.5??A/m within a 15- to 35-km deep layer, a value typical of magmatic arc complexes. Early Proterozoic magmatic arc rocks have been sampled to the southeast of the MRA, within the Fort Simpson <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. The MRA is one of several broad-scale <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> highs that occur along the inboard margin of the Cordillera in Canada and Alaska, which are coincident with geometric changes in the thrust front transition from the mobile belt to stable cratonic North America. The inferred early Proterozoic magmatic arc complex along the western edge of the North American craton likely influenced later tectonic evolution, by acting as a buttress along the inboard margin of the Cordilleran fold-and-thrust belt. Crown Copyright ?? 2008.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pilkington, M.; Saltus, R. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011GeoJI.184.1113G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the Earth's total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in Germany - the first complete homogenous data set reveals new opportunities for multiscale geoscientific studies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> of the Earth's total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field reveal important information about crustal structures. For the first time, a homogenous map of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the Earth's total <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field for the whole of Germany is available. The map is based on 50 shipborne, airborne and ground surveys, which were conducted between 1960 and 1990 and complemented by 17 new surveys after German reunification. The map, with a grid spacing of 100 m, consistently images the entire <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> pattern in Germany at an altitude of 1000 m a.s.l. related to the DGRF 1980, epoch 1980.0. Because of these reference parameters and consideration of new data, the resolution of this map is higher than any previously published map. The homogenized and complete data set enables the distinction of different <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and - by observing their vector character - the identification of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sources from different stages of the geological history. Since the map images the superposition of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from different depths and therefore combines long- and short-wavelength spectrums within one data set, it offers new insights into crustal structures. Not only regional tectonic units, such as the Variscan terranes in south and central Germany, or the extent of old Scandinavian crust under North Germany, as a relict of the collision between Baltica and Avalonia are imaged, but also details of local structures such as the volcanic areas of the Vogelsberg and the Eifel region. Therefore, the new data set can be used for work on modern topics in geosciences that cover both fundamental and applied research - for example, the structural and petrophysical characterization of the crust, its rheology and geodynamic evolution, or even hydrocarbon exploration. The gridded data is available as an electronic supplement to this paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gabriel, Gerald; Vogel, Detlef; Scheibe, Reiner; Lindner, Harald; Pucher, Rudolf; Wonik, Thomas; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD721258"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Northeast Atlantic Between the Canary and Cape Verde Islands.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During 1968 about 7500 km of new <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data were recorded by the USNS J. W. GIBBS between the Canary and Cape Verde Islands, from the continental shelf to approximately 30 degrees W. These data, together with an equal amount of data from other sources,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. R. Heirtzler J. Brakl P. A. Rona</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/jb/v087/iB05/JB087iB05p04109/JB087iB05p04109.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and tectonic fabric of marginal basins North of New Zealand</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detailed airborne <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> studies conducted over the region of the S. W. Pacific marginal basins extending from the Solomon Islands to New Zealand suggest that three major phases of basin formation and island arc development have occurred in this region. Development of the Tasman Sea took place during the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene. Development of the basins to the east of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexander Malahoff; Robert H. Feden; Henry S. Fleming</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://courses.washington.edu/ess502/BlakelyGeology2005.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Subduction-zone <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and implications for hydrated forearc mantle</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Continental mantle in subduction zones is hydrated by release of water from the un- derlying oceanic plate. Magnetite is a significant byproduct of mantle hydration, and fore- arc mantle, cooled by subduction, should contribute to long-wavelength <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> anom- alies above subduction zones. We test this hypothesis with a quantitative model of the Cascadia convergent margin, based on gravity and aeromagnetic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richard J. Blakely; Thomas M. Brocher; Ray E. Wells</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRA..117.9105P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> cusp regions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields. These <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 11/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRE..118.1265H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of strong lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: Further mapping and examinations of LROC imagery in regions antipodal to young large impact basins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The existence of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> signatures and landform modification antipodal to young lunar impact basins is investigated further by (a) producing more detailed regional crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field maps at low altitudes using Lunar Prospector magnetometer data; and (b) examining Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide Angle Camera imagery. Of the eight youngest lunar basins, five are found to have concentrations of relatively strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> centered within 10° of their antipodes. This includes the polar Schrödinger basin, which is one of the three youngest basins and has not previously been investigated in this context. Unusual terrain is also extensively present near the antipodes of the two largest basins (Orientale and Imbrium) while less pronounced manifestations of this terrain may be present near the antipodes of Serenitatis and Schrödinger. The area near the Imbrium antipode is characterized by enhanced surface thorium abundances, which may be a consequence of antipodal deposition of ejecta from Imbrium. The remaining three basins either have antipodal regions that have been heavily modified by later events (Hertzsprung and Bailly) or are not clearly recognized to be a true basin (Sikorsky-Rittenhouse). The most probable source of the Descartes <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, which is the strongest isolated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, is the hilly and furrowed Descartes terrain near the Apollo 16 landing site, which has been inferred to consist of basin ejecta, probably from Imbrium according to one recent sample study. A model for the origin of both the modified landforms and the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> signatures near lunar basin antipodes involving shock effects of converging ejecta impacts is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hood, Lon L.; Richmond, Nicola C.; Spudis, Paul D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003GeoJI.153..586G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gorringe Ridge gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are compatible with thrusting at a crustal scale</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The main features of the deep structure of the Gorringe Ridge are analysed on the basis of gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements, as well as seismic profiles, drill holes, rock dredges, submersible observations and seismicity data. The gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> models of the Gettysburg and Ormonde seamounts, which form the Gorringe Ridge, suggest that the Moho is approximately flat and the upper part of the ridge corresponds to a northwestwards vergent fold. This structure is the result of a northwestward vergent thrust that deformed the oceanic crust, with a minimum slip of approximately 20 km. The activity of the thrust probably started 20 Myr, and produced the recent stages of seamount uplift. The seamount is mainly composed of gabbros of the oceanic crust, serpentinized rocks and alkaline basalts. The large antiform, located in the hangingwall of the thrust, is probably deformed by minor faults. This oceanic ridge is a consequence of the oblique convergence between the African Plate and the overlapping Eurasian Plate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Maldonado, A.; Schreider, A. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53294945"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Nuclear <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Dipole Moments of the Stable Isotopes of Europium and the Hyperfine Structure <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nuclear <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> dipole moment of 151Eu and the ratio of the moments of 151Eu and 153Eu have been measured by the new method of resonance in three loops in a short atomic beam. The results are: mu(151Eu) = 3.419 ± 0.004 n.m.; mu(151Eu)\\/mu(153Eu) = 2.2686 ± 0.0015. The result, taken together with the ratio of the hyperfine structures of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. M. Pichanick; P. G. H. Sandars; G. K. Woodgate</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1960-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47626733"> <span id="translatedtitle">Collapse of the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> ordering and structural <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the U<img src=\\</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">:   We report specific heat and neutron diffraction measurements of seven samples in the solid solution system UxLa1-xS. All samples have the simple fcc NaCl crystal structure. Both specific heat and neutron diffraction confirm the suggestion\\u000a from the earlier <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements that the ferromagnetism disappears abruptly at 0.57. Near there is a doubling of the electronic contribution to the specific</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Bourdarot; A. Bombardi; P. Burlet; R. Calemczuk; G. H. Lander; F. Lapierre; J. P. Sanchez; K. Mattenberger; O. Vogt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1969-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008GeoJI.174..825D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Toward a minimum change model for recent plate motions: calibrating seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates for outward displacement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> distances derived from reconstructions of more than 7000 crossings of young <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along seven plate boundaries to study outward displacement, a source of systematic bias in estimates of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates, which is caused by a combination of processes that shift <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> polarity transition zones away from their idealized locations. Linear regressions of 81 independent sequences of seafloor opening distances as a function of their <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reversal ages for <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> younger than C3n.1 (4.19 Ma) yield 75 positively valued intercepts for zero seafloor age, confirming the ubiquitous outward shift of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> reversals reported by previous authors. Grouping these data into 29 locally consistent clusters yields better constrained zero-age intercepts that are uniformly positive and average 2.2 +/- 0.3 km globally. These values, which are 1-3 km at most locations and are significantly larger (3-5 km) along the well-surveyed Reykjanes and Carlsberg ridges, agree well with published <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> polarity zone transition widths, which are estimated directly from near-bottom seafloor <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> measurements. Significant variations in outward displacement along the Southeast Indian Ridge are strongly correlated with changes in axial morphology and axial depth; however, a similar correlation is not observed along other ridges. Forward <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> modelling suggests that variations in outward displacement can be explained by differences in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> source layers that are assumed to characterize different <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centres. If not corrected for outward displacement, the implied systematic upward biases in seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates, which are averaged over the width of <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> 1-the youngest reversal that is used for plate reconstructions-range from 6 mm yr-1 along the Reykjanes Ridge, where outward displacement is 4-5 km, to 3 mm yr-1 along ridges where outward displacement approximates the global average of 2 km.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DeMets, C.; Wilson, D. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRB..117.4101K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tectonics of the Ninetyeast Ridge derived from <span class="hlt">spreading</span> records in adjacent oceanic basins and age constraints of the ridge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Analysis of new and existing geophysical data for the Central Indian and Wharton Basins of the Indian Ocean were used to understand the formation and evolution of the Ninetyeast Ridge (NER), especially its relationship to the Kerguelen hot spot and the Wharton <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge. Satellite gravity data and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 34 through 19 define crustal isochrons and show fracture zones striking ˜N5°E. One of these, at 89°E, crosses the ˜N10°E trending NER, impacting the NER morphology. From 77 to 43 Ma the NER lengthened at a rate of ˜118 km/Myr, twice that of the ˜48-58 km/Myr accretion rate of adjacent oceanic crust. This difference can be explained by southward jumps of the Wharton <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge toward the hot spot, which transferred portions of crust from the Antarctic plate to the Indian plate, lengthening the NER. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> document a small number of large <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge jumps in the ocean crust immediately to the west of the NER, especially two leaving observable 65 and 42 Ma fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridges. In contrast, complex <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> progressions and morphology imply that smaller <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge jumps occurred at more frequent intervals beneath the NER. Comparison of the NER dates and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> ages implies that the hot spot first emplaced NER volcanoes on the Indian plate at a distance from the Wharton Ridge, but as the northward drifting <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge approached the hot spot, the two interacted, keeping later NER volcanism near the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge crest by <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center jumps.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Krishna, Kolluru S.; Abraham, Honey; Sager, William W.; Pringle, Malcolm S.; Frey, Frederick; Gopala Rao, Dasari; Levchenko, Oleg V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5965833"> <span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> near T sub c in superconducting UPt sub 3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report observation of a peak in the r.f. susceptibility of a single crystal of the heavy fermion superconductor UPt{sub 3}. The peak occurs close to but below T{sub c} {equals} 0.53 K. In addition our measurements in the low temperature limit (T < 0.5 T{sub c}) yield the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field penetration depth in UPt{sub 3}. We obtain a T{sup 4} power law for the penetration depth parallel to the c-axis of the crystal. Based on existing calculations of the penetration depth in anisotropic superconductors we identify the order-parameter in UPt{sub 3} as an odd-parity axial state. 19 refs., 3 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shivaram, B.S.; Gannon, J.J. Jr. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (USA)); Hinks, D.G. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70014354"> <span id="translatedtitle">Geologic structure of the northern New Caledonia ridge, as inferred from <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bathymetric, gravity, and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data collected in the southwest Pacific Ocean over the northern New Caledonia ridge show that the main geological units known from the island of New Caledonia extend northward from this island, beneath the Grand Lagon Nord, the Grand Passage, and the d'Entrecasteaux reefs. These data support the model of tectonic evolution of the New Caledonia region proposed by Kroenke (1984). Differences in structure, geophysical signatures and morphology evident between areas north and those south of the Grand Passage, together with the nearness of the Le Noroit massif west of the Grand Passage, suggest that contemporaneously with Eocene to early Oligocene subduction along the western New Caledonia margin, an arc-ridge collision may have occurred near the northern termination of this subduction zone. -from Authors</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Collot, J. Y.; Rigolot, P.; Missegue, F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010E%26PSL.289..417P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxfordian magnetostratigraphy of Poland and its correlation to Sub-Mediterranean ammonite zones and marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A nearly continuous magnetostratigraphic polarity pattern was compiled from several ammonite-zoned carbonate successions of southern Poland and from a composite magnetostratigraphy from the Iberian Range of Spain. The array of sections spans the middle two-thirds of the Oxfordian within the Sub-Mediterranean Province (Cordatum through Bifurcatus ammonite zones). The average paleopole calculated from eight of these Polish sections is at 78.5°N, 184.9°E ( ?p = 2.6°, ?m = 3.5°). The Sub-Mediterranean polarity pattern is consistent with an independent polarity pattern derived from the Boreal-realm sections of the British Isles, and improves the inter-correlation between these faunal realms. Cycle stratigraphy published for these ammonite subzones from southern France enabled temporal scaling of the polarity pattern, thereby facilitating correlation to marine <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> M28 through M33 as modeled from deep-tow magnetometer surveys in the Western Pacific. The bases of the Middle and Upper Oxfordian substages as defined in the Sub-Mediterranean zonation in Poland correspond approximately to chrons M33 and M29 of that Pacific M-sequence model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Przybylski, P. A.; G?owniak, E.; Ogg, J. G.; Zió?kowski, P.; Sidorczuk, M.; Gutowski, J.; Lewandowski, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.T31A2147S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Opening of the Amerasian Basin: A model based on sea-floor morphology, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and paleomagnetic data</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are numerous models for the origins of the Amerasia Basin. The model we present here is based on sea-floor morphology, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> signatures and evidence derived from dredge hauls which indicate that the Arctic Alaska block traveled to its present location from a location close to the Canadian and Lomonosov margins. This location is further east than is called for by the conventional “windshield wiper” model. The paleomagnetic database that relates directly to the origins of the Arctic Ocean consists of a study of Cretaceous sediments (135Ma) from the northern coastal region of Alaska (Kuparuk oil field drill core) and younger sediments (100Ma) from the west end of the Arctic coastal plain (Utukok River area) plus volcanic rocks from the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic belt (67-90Ma). The pole positions derived from the sedimentary sequences from Alaska require a model involving both rotation and translation. We have also incorporated paleomagnetic paleolatitudes derived from borehole cores (no declination control), and inferred paleolatitudes based on the pervasive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> overprint found throughout Arctic Alaska. These data sets are also consistent with the translation plus rotation model presented. In most models the location of Chukotka is depicted as being more or less fixed with respect to Arctic Alaska, but the paleomagnetic poles determined for the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic suites are hard to reconcile with the paleogeography proposed here if Chukotka remains firmly attached to Arctic Alaska. The Chukotka data require that the volcanic belt was erupted at more northerly latitudes than its present location, thus it appears to have moved somewhat independently from Alaska. Looking to the future it would seem that the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic belt should be a prime target for paleomagnetic work. It is relatively accessible, and in contrast to the bulk of the sedimentary sections sampled in Northern Alaska, these rocks have proven to be good paleomagnetic recorders.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stone, D. B.; Brumley, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NHESS..13..597C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of seismo-electric <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> using <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data in Taiwan</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Parkinson vectors derived from 3-component geomagnetic data via the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> transfer function are discussed with respect to epicentre locations and hypocentre depths of 16 earthquakes (M ? 5.5) in Taiwan during a period of 2002-2005. To find out whether electric conductivity changes would happen particularly in the seismoactive depth ranges, i.e. in the vicinity of the earthquake foci, the frequency dependent penetration depth of the electromagnetic waves (skin effect) is taken into account. The background distributions involving the general conductivity structure and the coast effect at 20 particular depths are constructed using the Parkinson vectors during the entire study period. The background distributions are subtracted from the time-varying monitor distributions, which are computed using the Parkinson vectors within the 15-day moving window, to remove responses of the coast effect and underlying conductivity structure. Anomalous depth sections are identified by deviating distributions and agree with the hypocentre depths of 15 thrust and/or strike-slip earthquakes with only one exception of a normal fault event.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, C. H.; Hsu, H. L.; Wen, S.; Yeh, T. K.; Chang, F. Y.; Wang, C. H.; Liu, J. Y.; Sun, Y. Y.; Hattori, K.; Yen, H. Y.; Han, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18193080"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effective action for fermions moving in external gravitational and gauge fields is analyzed in terms of the corresponding external field propagator. The central object in our approach is the covariant energy-momentum tensor which is extracted from the regular part of the propagator at short distances. It is shown that the Lorentz <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>, the conformal <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> and the gauge <span class="hlt">anomaly</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Leutwyler; S. Mallik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUSMGP14A..04F"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Field <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> Recorded Prior to the M=7.6 Chi-Chi Earthquake in Taiwan, Inferred Ground Currents, and the Electrical Conductivity of Rocks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">During seven weeks before the M=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan on Sept. 21, 1999 and during the month-long aftershock sequence, strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> were recorded by two ground stations LY and TT close to the 100 km long, N-S trending fault line that broke during the Chi-Chi event. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> occurred in hour-long pulses and reached total field intensities of 200 nT (above a 5 nT background). They imply powerful E-W trending ground currents of the order of 500,000 Amp. Assuming the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> to arise from a linear source, the signal strength at satellite altitudes of 300-700 km is estimated to be of the order of 3.3 - 1.5 pT, respectively. Modeling the ground conductor we find current densities of the order of 0.1 mAmp per square meter. We report on a laboratory study to measure the electrical conductivity of igneous rocks placed under stress. We find that the increase in conductivity is due to electronic charge carriers, which are positive holes (p-holes), e.g. defect electrons in the valence band of the otherwise insulating minerals. The current densities obtained from the rock deformation experiments are of the same order of magnitude as those inferred from modeling the Chi-Chi ground conductor.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Freund, F. T.; Yen, H.; Chen, C.; Bellavia, D.; Hall, C.; Takeuchi, A.; Lau, B. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.8812B"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Gop Basin - A Possible Imprint of Early Oceanic <span class="hlt">Spreading</span> Between Greater Seychelles and India</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Arabian and its conjugate Eastern Somali basins were formed by the seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> at the Carlsberg Ridge since Early Tertiary (<span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 28n; ~62.5 Ma). The reconstruction model at <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 28n suggested existence of a wide swath of deep offshore region (Gop and Laxmi basins) between the Laxmi Ridge and the India-Pakistan continental shelf. In the present study we focus on the Gop Basin, where the important constraints about the early geodynamic evolution of the Arabian Sea appear to exist. The nature of the crust underlying this basin remains a matter of debate, with views varying from volcanics-intruded thinned continental crust to oceanic crust formed by a now extinct <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre. Our interpretation of an updated compilation of marine geophysical data supports the oceanic nature of the crust underlying the Gop Basin, where the Palitana Ridge represents the extinct <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre related to an episode of early oceanic <span class="hlt">spreading</span> between Greater Seychelles (Seychelles-Laxmi Ridge block) and India. Our <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> modelling shows that the well correlatable, prominent but short sequence of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Gop Basin does not allow a unique identification; it can be reasonably explained either as A31r - A25r (~69 - 56 Ma) or as A29r - A25r (~65 - 56 Ma) sequence. Both the models suggest that <span class="hlt">spreading</span> in the Gop Basin was significantly affected by the nearby onset of the Reunion hotspot at ~65 Ma, which formed the Deccan Traps on the adjacent western Indian mainland.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bhattacharya, G. C.; Yatheesh, V.; Dyment, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995MarGR..17..361M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Asymmetric seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> and short ridge jumps in the Australian-Antarctic discordance</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The crenulated geometry of the Southeast Indian ridge within the Australian-Antarctic discordance is formed by numerous <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge segments that are offset, alternately to the north and south, by transform faults. Suggested causes for these offsets, which largely developed since ~ 20 Ma, include asymmetric seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span>, ridge jumps, and propagating rifts that have transferred seafloor from one flank of the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge to the other. Each of these processes has operated at different times in different locations of the discordance; here we document an instance where a small (~ 20 km), young (< 0.2 Ma), southward ridge jump has contributed to the observed asymmetry. When aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from the Project Investigator-1 survey are superposed on gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> computed from Geosat GM and ERM data, we find that in segment B4 of the discordance (between 125° and 126° E), the roughly east-west-trending gravity low, correlated with the axial valley, is 20 25 km south of the ridge axis position inferred from the center of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 1. Elsewhere in the discordance, the inferred locations of the ridge axis from <span class="hlt">magnetics</span> and gravity are in excellent agreement. Ship track data confirm these observations: portions of Moana Wave track crossing the ridge in B4 show that a topographic valley correlated with the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> low lies south of the center of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 1; while other ship track data that cross the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridge in segments B3 and B5 demonstrate good agreement between the axial valley, the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> low, and the central <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span>. Based on these observations, we speculate that the ridge axis in B4 has recently jumped to the south, from a ridge location closer to the center of the young normally <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust, to that of the gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> low. The position of the gravity low essentially at the edge of normally <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust requires a very recent (< 0.2 Ma) arrival of the ridge in this new location. Because this ridge jump is so young, it may be a promising location for future detailed studies of the dynamics, kinematics, and thermal effects of ridge jumps.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marks, Karen M.; Stock, Joann M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.T31A2124S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the western Arctic ocean and its margins provide an imperfect window to a complex, multi-stage tectonic history (Invited)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Numerous scenarios are still in play for the tectonic development of the western Arctic. A wide range of kinematic models have been proposed for the opening of the Canadian basin. These models feature different combinations and geometries of extensional and transform motion and have informal descriptive names including the so-called ‘windshield wiper’, ‘railroad tracks’, ‘squeegee’, and ‘saloon door’ options. Another controversial issue is the timing and role of the gigantic Alpha-Mendeleev large igneous province relative to the tectonic stages. In our opinion, many current Arctic models have not adequately dealt with the mass and thermal fluxes implied by this huge province. Available data are extremely sparse for the circum-Arctic, although current political and economic interests are fueling accelerated data collection. Recent compilations of gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data are currently the best bets for synoptic imaging, however imprecise, of crustal composition and structure. Modeling and interpretation of regional geophysical <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> provide some of the only available tests for scenario evaluation in the absence of more direct determinations of crustal structure and composition. Our goal in this talk is to review the key geophysical features of the western Arctic and relate these elements to the expectations of competing tectonic models. These key geophysical features include (1) contrasting Arctic domains of overall <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> “thickness” and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> “fabric” (the domains correlate generally with broad tectonic categories); (2) cryptic sub-linear <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Canada basin (interpreted by some authors to be oceanic stripes); (3) a subtle but persistent gravity trough in the central Canada basin (inferred by some authors to represent an extensional trough); (4) spectacular “shelf edge” free-air gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> along the Canadian and Alaskan passive margins that show significant along-strike variation (which can be interpreted to reflect relative amount of magmatic activity); (5) complex and chaotic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> texture and fabric in the Alpha-Mendeleev large igneous province (perhaps reflecting pre-intrusive structural features and trends); and (6) large-amplitude, long-wavelength “deep <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> highs” including well-studied examples in northern Alaska and north-western Canada (inferred to represent deep crustal elements that influence overall strength of the crust/upper mantle). The overall complexity of the Arctic geophysical <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> fabric is indicative of significant variation in crustal composition and reflects a complicated, multi-stage tectonic development. It seems very likely that the best tectonic solutions for the circum-Arctic will include sub-elements of many current end-member models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saltus, R. W.; Miller, E. L.; Gaina, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53412468"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lineations in the <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Quiet Zone of the North-west Atlantic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A <span class="hlt">MAGNETIC</span> and seismic reflection survey in the <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Quiet Zone shows that basement topography and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are lineated parallel to the boundary of the quiet zone. Two narrow zones of reversed polarity are identified. The results imply that the zone boundary is an isochron separating a period of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> in which rapid geomagnetic reversals occurred from a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. L. Barrett; C. E. Keen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23957566"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> resonance imaging for assessment of parametrial tumour <span class="hlt">spread</span> and regression patterns in adaptive cervix cancer radiotherapy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Purpose. To investigate the impact of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> resonance imaging (MRI)-morphologic differences in parametrial infiltration on tumour response during primary radiochemotherapy in cervical cancer. Material and methods. Eighty-five consecutive cervical cancer patients with FIGO stages IIB (n = 59) and IIIB (n = 26), treated by external beam radiotherapy (± chemotherapy) and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy, underwent T2-weighted MRI at the time of diagnosis and at the time of brachytherapy. MRI patterns of parametrial tumour infiltration at the time of diagnosis were assessed with regard to predominant morphology and maximum extent of parametrial tumour infiltration and were stratified into five tumour groups (TG): 1) expansive with spiculae; 2) expansive with spiculae and infiltrating parts; 3) infiltrative into the inner third of the parametrial space (PM); 4) infiltrative into the middle third of the PM; and 5) infiltrative into the outer third of the PM. MRI at the time of brachytherapy was used for identifying presence (residual vs. no residual disease) and signal intensity (high vs. intermediate) of residual disease within the PM. Left and right PM of each patient were evaluated separately at both time points. The impact of the TG on tumour remission status within the PM was analysed using ?(2)-test and logistic regression analysis. Results. In total, 170 PM were analysed. The TG 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 were present in 12%, 11%, 35%, 25% and 12% of the cases, respectively. Five percent of the PM were tumour-free. Residual tumour in the PM was identified in 19%, 68%, 88%, 90% and 85% of the PM for the TG 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The TG 3-5 had significantly higher rates of residual tumour in the PM in comparison to TG 1 + 2 (88% vs. 43%, p < 0.01). Conclusion. MRI-morphologic features of PM infiltration appear to allow for prediction of tumour response during external beam radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A predominantly infiltrative tumour <span class="hlt">spread</span> at the time of diagnosis resulted in a significantly higher rate of residual tumour in the PM at the time of brachytherapy in comparison to a predominantly expansive tumour <span class="hlt">spread</span>. PMID:23957566</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmid, Maximilian P; Fidarova, Elena; Pötter, Richard; Petric, Primoz; Bauer, Veronika; Woehs, Veronika; Georg, Petra; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Dörr, Wolfgang; Dimopoulos, Johannes C A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38.4223D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Space Weather and Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results of the Satellite <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> Project, which aims to improve the methods of safeguarding satellites in the Earth's magnetosphere from the negative effects of the space environment, are presented. <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> data from the "Kosmos" series satellites in the period 1971-1999 are com-bined in one database, together with similar information on other spacecrafts. This database contains, beyond the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> information, various characteristics of the space weather: geo-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> activity indices (Ap, AE and Dst), fluxes and fluencies of electrons and protons at different energies, high energy cosmic ray variations and other solar, interplanetary and solar wind data. A comparative analysis of the distribution of each of these parameters relative to satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> was carried out for the total number of <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (about 6000 events), and separately for high ( 5000 events) and low (about 800 events) altitude orbit satellites. No relation was found between low and high altitude satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Daily numbers of satel-lite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, averaged by a superposed epoch method around sudden storm commencements and proton event onsets for high (?1500 km) and low (¡1500 km) altitude orbits revealed a big difference in a behavior. Satellites were divided on several groups according to the orbital char-acteristics (altitude and inclination). The relation of satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the environmental parameters was found to be different for various orbits that should be taken into account under developing of the <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models. The preliminary <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> frequency models are presented. Keywords: Space weather; Satellite <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>; Energetic particles; <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> storms</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dorman, Lev; Iucci, N.; Levitin, A. E.; Belov, A. V.; Eroshenko, E. A.; Ptitsyna, N. G.; Villoresi, G.; Chizhenkov, G. V.; Gromova, L. I.; Parisi, M.; Tyasto, M. I.; Yanke, V. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15002875"> <span id="translatedtitle">Conspicuous histomorphological <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the hippocampal formation of rats exposed prenatally to a complex sequenced <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field within the nanoTesla range.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The brains of adult rats, exposed prenatally to one of four intensities (between 10 nanoTesla and 1.2 microTesla) of either a frequency-modulated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field or a complex sequenced field designed to affect brain development, were examined histologically. Although from each intensity some rats that had been exposed to the complex sequenced <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field showed minor <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, those exposed to intensities between 30 nT and 180 nT exhibited conspicuous anomalous organizations of cells within the hippocampal formation. In other studies, rats that had been exposed during their entire prenatal development to the complex sequenced field displayed significantly more activity in the open field and poorer spatial memory during maze learning. Photomicrographs are shown of one conspicuous morphological <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> within the right hippocampus of an adult rat exposed prenatally to the complex sequenced <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field with intensities between .3 mG and .5 mG (30 nT to 50 nT). The results suggest that complex <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields, whose temporal structures approach the time constants of normal biochemical processes, can permanently alter the development of the brain. PMID:15002875</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">St-Pierre, Linda S; Persinger, Michael A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52130296"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and Gravity Fields over the Red Sea</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Strong <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> associated with the axial trough of the Red Sea are considered to be related to a second phase of opening. Lack of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> expression of the first and wider separation is attributed to initial thinning and necking of the continental crust and, possibly, to a slow rate of <span class="hlt">spreading</span>. The rise of the mantle during this first</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. D. Allan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRE..116.0G18K"> <span id="translatedtitle">M3 spectral analysis of lunar swirls and the link between optical maturation and surface hydroxyl formation at <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the lunar swirls using data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3). The improved spectral and spatial resolution of M3 over previous spectral imaging data facilitates distinction of subtle spectral differences, and provides new information about the nature of these enigmatic features. We characterized spectral features of the swirls, interswirl regions (dark lanes), and surrounding terrain for each of three focus regions: Reiner Gamma, Gerasimovich, and Mare Ingenii. We used Principle Component Analysis to identify spectrally distinct surfaces at each focus region, and characterize the spectral features that distinguish them. We compared spectra from small, recent impact craters with the mature soils into which they penetrated to examine differences in maturation trends on- and off-swirl. Fresh, on-swirl crater spectra are higher albedo, exhibit a wider range in albedos and have well-preserved mafic absorption features compared with fresh off-swirl craters. Albedoand mafic absorptions are still evident in undisturbed, on-swirl surface soils, suggesting the maturation process is retarded. The spectral continuum is more concave compared with off-swirl spectra; a result of the limited spectral reddening being mostly constrained to wavelengths less than ˜1500 nm. Off-swirl spectra show very little reddening or change in continuum shape across the entire M3 spectral range. Off-swirl spectra are dark, have attenuated absorption features, and the narrow range in off-swirl albedos suggests off-swirl regions mature rapidly. Spectral parameter maps depicting the relative OH surface abundance for each of our three swirl focus regions were created using the depth of the hydroxyl absorption feature at 2.82 ?m. For each of the studied regions, the 2.82 ?m absorption feature is significantly weaker on-swirl than off-swirl, indicating the swirls are depleted in OH relative to their surroundings. The spectral characteristics of the swirls and adjacent terrains from all three focus regions support the hypothesis that the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> deflect solar wind ions away from the swirls and onto off-swirl surfaces. Nanophase iron (npFe0) is largely responsible for the spectral characteristics we attribute to space weathering and maturation, and is created by vaporization/deposition by micrometeorite impacts and sputtering/reduction by solar wind ions. On the swirls, the decreased proton flux slows the spectral effects of space weathering (relative to nonswirl regions) by limiting the npFe0 production mechanism almost exclusively to micrometeoroid impact vaporization/deposition. Immediately adjacent to the swirls, maturation is accelerated by the increased flux of protons deflected from the swirls.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kramer, Georgiana Y.; Besse, Sebastien; Dhingra, Deepak; Nettles, Jeffrey; Klima, Rachel; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Clark, Roger N.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Head, James W., III; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Pieters, Carlé M.; Boardman, Joseph; McCord, Thomas B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1785/0120000906"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Emerson Lake Body: A link between the Landers and Hector Mine earthquakes, southern California, as inferred from gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> data indicate a mafic crustal heterogeneity that lies between the Hector Mine 16 October 1999 (Mw 7.1) and Landers 28 June 1992 (Mw 7.3) epicenters. The aftershocks and ruptures of these two events avoided the interior of the body. Two- and three-dimensional modeling of the potential-field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> shows that the source, here named the Emerson Lake body (ELB), extends to a depth of approximately 15 km. The source of the gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> is most likely Jurassic diorite because exposures of these rocks coincide with both gravity and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> highs west of Emerson Lake. Seismic tomography also shows higher velocities within the region of the ELB. We propose that the ELB was an important influence on the rupture geometry of the Landers and Hector Mine ruptures and that the ELB may have played a role in transferring of stress from the Landers earthquake to the Hector Mine hypocenter. Seismicity before the Landers earthquake also tended to avoid the ELB, suggesting that the ELB affects how strain is distributed in this part of the Mojave Desert. Thus, faults within the body should have limited rupture sizes and lower seismic hazard than faults bounding or outside this mafic crustal heterogeneity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54804024"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relation of MAGSAT and gravity <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> to the main tectonic provinces of South America</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> of the South American continent are generally more positive and variable than the oceanic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. There is better correlation between the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the major tectonic elements of the continents than between the <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and the main tectonic elements of the adjacent oceanic areas. Oceanic areas generally show no direct correlation to the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. Precambrian continental</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. W. Yuan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFMGP33D1604H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rock <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> and Geologic Characteristics of Faulted Sediments With Associated Aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> in the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and geologic characteristics of basin sediments that generate aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are little studied. Variations in rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties are responsible for the many linear, short-wavelength, low- amplitude <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> that are spatially associated with faults cutting Neogene basin sediments in the Rio Grande rift, including the San Ysidro normal fault that is well exposed in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> susceptibility (MS) values from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of Santa Fe Group and pre-rift sedimentary rocks juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault have lognormal distributions with well-defined means that generally increase up section through eight map units: from 1.7 to 2.2E-4 in the pre-rift Cretaceous and Eocene rocks, from 9.9E-4 to 1.2E-3 in three members of the Miocene Zia Formation of the Santa Fe Group, and from 1.5E-3 to 3.5E-3 in three members of the Miocene-Pleistocene Arroyo Ojito Formation of the Santa Fe Group. Natural remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> measurements from oriented Santa Fe Group samples indicate Koenigsberger ratios are less than 0.3. Rock <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> parameters (e.g., ARM/MS and S ratios) and petrography indicate that the amount of detrital magnetite and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite are the predominant controls of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> property variations within the Santa Fe Group sediments. Magnetite is present in rounded detrital grains that in reflected-light petrography include both homogeneous and subdivided types, indicating likely plutonic and volcanic provenances, respectively. Santa Fe Group sediments with highest <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibility have greatest <span class="hlt">magnetic</span>-grain size as indicated by lowest ARM/MS ratios. <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size to pebbly sand within the Arroyo Ojito Formation (deposited in fluvial environments) but within the Zia Formation (deposited in mostly eolian environments) reaches highest values in fine to medium sands. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite, decreasing MS, is spatially associated with calcite cementation in the Santa Fe Group; both oxidation and cementation probably reflect past flow of ground water through permeable horizons. Forward <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> models of geologic cross sections that incorporate mean <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> susceptibilities for the different stratigraphic units successfully mimic the aeromagnetic profiles across the San Ysidro fault. These models demonstrate that the stratigraphic juxtaposition of units having maximum <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> contrast changes with different exposure levels into the fault. This study highlights several geologic factors such as sediment provenance, depositional facies, as well as post-depositional preservation and alteration of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> minerals as responsible for producing aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in faulted basin sediments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hudson, M. R.; Grauch, V.; Minor, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012espc.conf..150W"> <span id="translatedtitle">The solar wind interactions with lunar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>: A case study of the Chang'E-2 plasma data near the Serenitatis antipode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first and preliminary results on the near-Moon plasma environment, based on the spectrogram data obtained with the Solar Wind Ion Detector (SWID) onboard Chang'E-2 from 4 lunar orbits on 10-11 Oct 2010. These orbits, at a constant altitude of ~100 km, approach gradually the Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (LMA) at the Serenitatis antipode. The data reveal tentatively a region with decrement in proton density and enhancement in temperature. The near coincidence of this region with the Serenitatis antipode probably suggests the presence of a mini-magnetosphere associated with the LMA, which effectively shields and heats the incident Solar Wind (SW) protons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, X.-Q.; Cui, J.; Wang, X.-D.; Liu, J.-J.; Zhang, H.-B.; Zuo, W.; Su, Y.; Wen, W.-B.; Rème, H.; Dandouras, I.; Aoustin, C.; Li, C.-L.; Ouyang, Z.-Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" 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onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AdSpR..50.1600W"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Solar Wind interactions with Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span>: A case study of the Chang'E-2 plasma data near the Serenitatis antipode</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we present the first and preliminary results on the near-Moon plasma environment, based on the spectrogram data obtained with the Solar Wind Ion Detector (SWID) onboard Chang'E-2 from four lunar orbits on 10-11 Oct 2010. These orbits, at a constant altitude of ˜100 km, approach gradually the Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (LMA) at the Serenitatis antipode. The data reveal tentatively a region with decrement in proton density and enhancement in temperature. The near coincidence of this region with the Serenitatis antipode probably suggests the presence of a minimagnetosphere associated with the LMA, which effectively shields and heats the incident Solar Wind (SW) protons.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, X.-Q.; Cui, J.; Wang, X.-D.; Liu, J.-J.; Zhang, H.-B.; Zuo, W.; Su, Y.; Wen, W.-B.; Rème, H.; Dandouras, I.; Aoustin, C.; Wang, M.; Tan, X.; Shen, J.; Wang, F.; Fu, Q.; Li, C.-L.; Ouyang, Z.-Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48913240"> <span id="translatedtitle">Size, shape, orientation, speed, and duration of GPS equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> scintillations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">GPS L1 C\\/A signal scintillation data were collected at the equatorial <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> over a period of three months using five receivers spaced on <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> east-west and north-south axes to examine the speed, orientation, shape, width, and duration of GPS scintillation fade patterns. The nighttime speeds were primarily eastward in the range of 100–200 m\\/s with a significant <span class="hlt">spread</span> to both</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. M. Kintner; B. M. Ledvina; E. R. de Paula; I. J. Kantor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18237829"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is shown that in certain parity-violating theories in 4k+2 dimensions, general covariance is spoiled by <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> at the one-loop level. This occurs when Weyl fermions of spin-1\\/2 or -3\\/2 or self-dual antisymmetric tensor fields are coupled to gravity. (For Dirac fermions there is no trouble.) The conditions for <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> cancellation between fields of different spin is investigated. In six</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luis Alvarez-Gaumé; Edward Witten</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.T12C0933S"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Spreading</span> History of a Segment of the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone in the South Atlantic Ocean separates crust that records the entire Cenozoic history of South America-Africa <span class="hlt">spreading</span> (on the north) from crust on the south that experienced a more complicated plate motion history including major ridge jumps, an additional plate (Malvinas), and plate reorganizations in early Cenozoic time. The Nathaniel B. Palmer cruise 01-02 in April 2001 measured gravity, <span class="hlt">magnetics</span>, and swath bathymetry on a transit from Cape Town to Punta Arenas, including a survey line in Cenozoic crust on the north side of, and parallel to, the Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone. The objectives were to test previous models of Cenozoic plate motions for this region, and to examine the structure of the Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone by collection of limited single-channel seismic data. From 5° W to 3° W longitude, several seismic lines with accompanying SeaBeam data across the northern flank of the fracture zone reveal it to be a wide zone characterized by multiple parallel southward-facing fault scarps whose strike is 70-80° E of N. From chron 12 time to chron 6 time, the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> history for this segment of the ridge was relatively simple, with slightly asymmetric <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rates (more crust accreted to South America than to Africa), as has been previously noted for this part of the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Between chron 5c and chron 2a, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> are complex and disrupted, suggesting possible small-scale ridge jumps and continued asymmetric <span class="hlt">spreading</span>. The modern ridge axis is 40 km east of the topographic high ("ridge crest"). The zones of disrupted <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> may be due to the effects of pseudofault traces in the same <span class="hlt">spreading</span> corridor, visible in satellite gravity data in younger seafloor north of the transit. We recorded late Cretaceous and younger <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> (chrons 34y to 18) on the Africa plate to improve the distribution of known <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> locations in this part of the South Atlantic. The observations are in excellent agreement with previous plate rotation models for Africa-South America motion (e.g. Cande et al. 1988) and conjugate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> positions from the South America plate. Members of the NBP0102 science party: H. Ai, J. Clinton, R. Decesari, A. Jacobs, M. Kumar, B. Lane, J. Parra, B. Smith, N. Villaume, Z. Yan. >http://www.gps.caltech.edu/ ~jstock/Ge211.html</a></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stock, J. M.; Clayton, R. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFM.T52A0909G"> <span id="translatedtitle">The SHEBA Ridge : a Particular <span class="hlt">Spreading</span> Center or an End-member of the Slow <span class="hlt">Spreading</span> Processes ?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze multibeam bathymetry, acoustic imagery, <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and gravity data collected during the Encens-Sheba cruise of the NO Marion Dufresne. The survey covered the axis and the flanks up to the continental margins of the Sheba Ridge between 52oE and 54o30'E, at the oriental extremity of the Aden gulf. The full <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate in this young oceanic basin is about 2 cmy since the continental rifting. Three second-order segments, one presenting an anomalously shallow axis, characterize this part of the Sheba ridge. The new bathymetry data reveal a particular fabric on the flanks and at the axis for the long (120 km) and shallow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> center. The flanks, like the ridge axis, are marked by large, more or less circular, volcanic domes. They are built by a few large volcanoes (5-10 km diameter) and by several smaller (1-2 km diameter) edifices. Many of these volcanoes present a well-developed caldera. These volcanic constructions are well developed in the southern part of the axis. Close to the axis, the higher reliefs culminate at a depth of 1000 m. Tectonic scarps limit a deep axial valley at the extremities of this long segment. The deformation, diffuse at the ends, becomes more focused toward the center of this segment and is arranged in an hourglass pattern. A negative mantle Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> elongated in the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> direction marks this segment. The differences in MBA (~70 mgals) and in depth (more than 2 km) between the center and the ends of this segment are the largest, highest of the slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> ridges. Acoustic imagery, axial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and mantle Bouguer <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> generally permit to precise the location of the <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axis. In this segment, if the axial area is clearly defined, the neovolcanic zone is more difficult to localize. This suggests a diffuse volcanism at the center of the segment at the origin of the numerous small volcanoes. The other segments of the Sheba ridge present a more typical slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> axial valley. The discontinuities display large nodal basins, the deeper and larger being located at the intersection between the ridge axis and the Socotra fracture zone. These new geophysical data in this region raise new questions. One is whether this particular segment of the Sheba ridge is the expression of a specific <span class="hlt">spreading</span> process or it corresponds to an end-member of the slow <span class="hlt">spreading</span> processes (2-3 cmy). A second is whether the most well developed volcanic domes in the southern part of the ridge are due to off axis volcanism or to asymmetric <span class="hlt">spreading</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">GENTE, P.; LEROY, S.; BLAIS, A.; d'ACREMONT, E.; PATRIAT, P.; FLEURY, J.; MAIA, M.; PERROT, J.; FOURNIER, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.1332M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The correlation of the geomagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> recorded at Muntele Rosu (Romania) Seismic Observatory with earthquake occurrence and solar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> storms (2000 - 2009)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The paper is based on geomagnetic records made at Muntele Rosu Observatory (Romania), during the time interval from 2000 to date. The working data are represented by the geomagnetic field as recorded at Muntele Rosu Observatory and manual corrected emphasizing the missing data and by the seismic data, taken from the seismic bulletins of the National Institute for Earth Physics, for Vrancea source zone. First of all, in this paper we want to correct some conclusions given by previous studies that have associated <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> due to the missing data or to the solar <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> storms with the occurrence of Vrancea intermediate depth earthquakes, in the period 2000-2005. Because the investigated period is of 5 years, covering almost half of a complete solar cycle, the solar-terrestrial perturbations have fluctuated from extremely small values to extremely large values, providing a very good medium to observe the correlation of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signals with solar perturbations. In order to discriminate local and global phenomena, the local geomagnetic data are compared with data provided by the INTERMAGNET Project, from 2 stations located outside the epicentral region, considered as reference stations (Surlari-SUA, Romania and Tihany-THY-Hungaria) and with the global geomagnetic indexes. The largest intermediate depth earthquake occurred in this time interval had the moment magnitude Mw=6.3 (2004) and the largest crustal event had the moment magnitude Mw=4.4 (2008) offering us the opportunity to investigate possible connections between the geomagnetic field behavior and the local crustal and sub crustal seismicity. That's why in the present paper we will also analyze these events and the corresponding geomagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Otilia Placinta, Anca; Petruta Constantin, Angela; Septimiu Moldovan, Adrian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007GeoJI.170..151G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Breakup and early seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> between India and Antarctica</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a tectonic interpretation of the breakup and early seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> between India and Antarctica based on improved coverage of potential field and seismic data off the east Antarctic margin between the Gunnerus Ridge and the Bruce Rise. We have identified a series of ENE trending Mesozoic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> from chron M9o (~130.2 Ma) to M2o (~124.1 Ma) in the Enderby Basin, and M9o to M4o (~126.7 Ma) in the Princess Elizabeth Trough and Davis Sea Basin, indicating that India-Antarctica and India-Australia breakups were roughly contemporaneous. We present evidence for an abandoned <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre south of the Elan Bank microcontinent; the estimated timing of its extinction corresponds to the early surface expression of the Kerguelen Plume at the Southern Kerguelen Plateau around 120 Ma. We observe an increase in <span class="hlt">spreading</span> rate from west to east, between chron M9 and M4 (38-54 mm yr-1), along the Antarctic margin and suggest the tectono-magmatic segmentation of oceanic crust has been influenced by inherited crustal structure, the kinematics of Gondwanaland breakup and the proximity to the Kerguelen hotspot. A high-amplitude, E-W oriented <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> lineation named the Mac Robertson Coast <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> (MCA), coinciding with a landwards step-down in basement observed in seismic reflection data, is tentatively interpreted as the boundary between continental/transitional zone and oceanic crust. The exposure of lower crustal rocks along the coast suggests that this margin formed in a metamorphic core complex extension mode with a high strength ratio between upper and lower crust, which typically occurs above anomalously hot mantle. Together with the existence of the MCA zone this observation suggests that a mantle temperature <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> predated the early surface outpouring/steady state magmatic production of the Kerguelen LIP. An alternative model suggests that the northward ridge jump was limited to the Elan Bank region, whereas seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> continued in the West Enderby Basin and its Sri Lankan conjugate margin. In this case, the MCA <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> could be interpreted as the southern arm of a ridge propagator that stopped around 120 Ma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gaina, Carmen; Müller, R. Dietmar; Brown, Belinda; Ishihara, Takemi; Ivanov, Sergey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.8876D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large-scale lithospheric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in Europe as revealed by recorded geomagnetic storms at the observatory network</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of the Earth, which extends in space as magnetosphere, is in permanent interaction with the solar electromagnetic, particle and <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> flux outputs, i.e. the solar radiation, the solar wind, and, respectively, the heliospheric <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field. The variable current systems that develop as a result of these interactions create the so-called field of geomagnetic variations which, in turn, induces a response of the Earth's internal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> and conductive structures. In this study, the geomagnetic variations at storm timescales (minutes - days) provided by the network of European geomagnetic observatories have been used for modeling the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structure of the European lithosphere. Large-scale <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> structures in the lithosphere are evidenced by means of a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> induction model applied to geomagnetic observatory data recorded during several intense geomagnetic storm intervals (Dst<-200 nT) in the time period 2001-2005. The <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> induction model assumes that the induced field is a linear combination of the components of the inducing field. As the inducing external source, the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field of the ring current at each observatory location was used, inferred from the Dst geomagnetic index (minute). The lateral distribution of the lithosphere <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> properties as described by the coefficients of the mentioned linear combination was derived and a comparison with distributions resulted in case of other variable sources (e.g. Sq) is discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dobrica, Venera; Demetrescu, Crisan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998SPIE.3392...23J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Multiprobe in-situ measurement of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in a minefield via a distributed network of miniaturized low-power integrated sensor systems for detection of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Based on technologies developed for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Free-Flying-Magnetometer (FFM) concept, we propose to modify the present design of FFMs for detection of mines and arsenals with large <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signature. The result will be an integrated miniature sensor system capable of identifying local <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> caused by a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> dipole moment. Proposed integrated sensor system is in line with the JPL technology road-map for development of autonomous, intelligent, networked, integrated systems with a broad range of applications. In addition, advanced sensitive <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> sensors (e.g., silicon micromachined magnetometer, laser pumped helium magnetometer) are being developed for future NASA space plasma probes. It is envisioned that a fleet of these Integrated Sensor Systems (ISS) units will be dispersed on a mine-field via an aerial vehicle (a low-flying airplane or helicopter). The number of such sensor systems in each fleet and the corresponding in-situ probe-grid cell size is based on the strength of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the target and ISS measurement resolution of <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field vector. After a specified time, ISS units will transmit the measured <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field and attitude data to an air-borne platform for further data processing. The cycle of data acquisition and transmission will be continued until batteries run out. Data analysis will allow a local deformation of the Earth's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field vector by a <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> dipole moment to be detected. Each ISS unit consists of miniaturized sensitive 3- axis magnetometer, high resolution analog-to-digital converter (ADC), Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based data subsystem, Li-batteries and power regulation circuitry, memory, S-band transmitter, single-patch antenna, and a sun angle sensor. ISS unit is packaged with non-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> components and the electronic design implements low-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span> signature circuits. Care is undertaken to guarantee no corruption of magnetometer sensitivity as a result of its close proximity with the electronics and packaging materials. Accurate calibration of the magnetometer response in advance will allow removing the effects of unwanted disturbances. Improvements of the magnetometer performance in the areas of the orthogonality, drift, and temperature coefficient of offset and scale factor are required.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Javadi, Hamid H.; Bendrihem, David; Blaes, B.; Boykins, Kobe; Cardone, John; Cruzan, C.; Gibbs, J.; Goodman, W.; Lieneweg, U.; Michalik, H.; Narvaez, P.; Perrone, D.; Rademacher, Joel D.; Snare, R.; Spencer, Howard; Sue, Miles; Weese, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18073309"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical current of the ionization waves and <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> of the positive column in an axial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Influences of an axial <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field on the ionization wave and the positive column in rare gas discharges are studied experimentally. The upper critical current I(c) for the appearance of ionization waves in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field B is newly found. As B is gradually increased, the value of I(c) increases slightly from the Pupp's value, and after passing a prominent</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Sato</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cytology&id=ED018056"> <span id="translatedtitle">DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S <span class="hlt">ANOMALY</span>, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011EP%26S...63..111K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhancement of co-seismic piezomagnetic signals near the edges of <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> in the Earth's crust</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A scheme is proposed for calculating the piezomagnetic fields that accompany the propagation of seismic waves through a non-uniformly <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust. Examples of the calculations are provided. Generally, the calculation of the co-seismic piezomagnetic fields involves laborious three-dimensional volume integrals, even if the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> structure is two-dimensional. However, the calculation can be simplified by taking the Fourier transform of spatial distributions of the field into consideration. As an example, we have performed calculations for both the non-uniformly and uniformly <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust with an intensity of 10 A/m. The incident seismic wave is considered to consist of Rayleigh waves with an amplitude of 5 cm. The amplitudes of the piezomagnetic signals arising from uniformly <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust are up to 0.2 nT, whereas those arising from non-uniformly <span class="hlt">magnetized</span> crust are as large as 0.5 nT. This result indicates that the piezomagnetic field may be a plausible mechanism of generating co-seismic changes in the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field with detectable amplitudes for large earthquakes, provided that the observation site is located near the <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> boundaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamazaki, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982Geo....10..461W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Along-strike amplitude variations of oceanic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> stripes: Are they related to low-temperature hydrothermal circulation?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A coincidence has been noticed, in two detailed geophysical surveys in the North Atlantic, between the occurrence of relatively low amplitude sea-floor-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and sparsely sedimented basement highs. Uniformly covered basement on the same isochron a few tens of kilometres away is associated with relatively high amplitude <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>. It is proposed that the relatively low <span class="hlt">magnetic-anomaly</span> amplitudes are associated with basement highs that have persisted for millions of years as chimneys surrounded but not covered by blanketing sediments, through which hydrothermal flow vented to the sea floor. Low-temperature alteration associated with the hydrothermal circulation has substantially reduced the remanent <span class="hlt">magnetization</span> of the penetrated basalts, thereby leading to reduced <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> amplitudes. This hypothesis provides an alternative explanation to that of Schouten and Denham for the different along-strike amplitudes of some North Atlantic <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span>, which they explained in terms of variations in the width of the crustal emplacement zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whitmarsh, R. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012LPI....43.1735H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Insights into Lunar Swirl Morphology and <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> Source Geometry: Models for the Reiner Gamma and Airy <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We use Lunar Prospector and Clementine data along with our own equivalent source models to support the solar wind deflection model for swirl formation and to show how <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field direction influences small-scale swirl morphology.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hemingway, D.; Garrick-Bethell, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53622245"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of Lunar <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomalies</span> with Albedo Markings of the Reiner Gamma Class: Implications for the Role of Solar Wind Hydrogen in the Optical Maturation of Exposed Silicate Surfaces in the Inner Solar System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the last eight months of the Lunar Prospector mission (Dec. 1998 - July 1999), the spacecraft was placed in a relatively low-altitude (15-30 km periapsis) near-polar orbit that has allowed higher-resolution mapping of crustal <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> fields. Results confirm and extend earlier results from Apollo data. In particular, the strongest local <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> tend to correlate in location with unusual,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">L. L. Hood; R. A. Yingst; D. L. Mitchell; R. P. Lin; M. Acuna; A. B. Binder</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.earth.28.1.539"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Spreading</span> volcanoes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As volcanoes grow, they become ever heavier. Unlike mountains exhumed by erosion of rocks that generally were lithified at depth, volcanoes typically are built of poorly consolidated rocks that may be further weakened by hydrothermal alteration. The substrates upon which volcanoes rest, moreover, are often sediments lithified by no more than the weight of the volcanic overburden. It is not surprising, therefore, that volcanic deformation includes-and in the long term is often dominated by-<span class="hlt">spreading</span> motions that translate subsidence near volcanic summits to outward horizontal displacements around the flanks and peripheries. We review examples of volcanic <span class="hlt">spreading</span> and go on to derive approximate expressions for the time volcanoes require to deform by <span class="hlt">spreading</span> on weak substrates. We also demonstrate that shear stresses that drive low-angle thrust faulting from beneath volcanic constructs have maxima at volcanic peripheries, just where such faults are seen to emerge. Finally, we establish a theoretical basis for experimentally derived scalings that delineate volcanoes that <span class="hlt">spread</span> from those that do not.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borgia, A.; Delaney, P. T.; Denlinger, R. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JKPS...62...59K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Parametric study of a variable-<span class="hlt">magnetic</span>-field-based energy-selection system for generating a <span class="hlt">spread</span>-out Bragg peak with a laser-accelerated proton beam</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laser-based proton beam acceleration, which produces broad energy spectra, is unsuitable for direct clinical use. Thus, employing an energy selection system is necessary. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a method whereby a variable <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field could be employed with an energy selection system to generate a <span class="hlt">spread</span>-out Bragg peak (SOBP). For energy selection, particle transport and dosimetric property measurements, the Geant4 toolkit was implemented. The energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated proton beam was acquired using a particle-in-cell simulation. The hole size and the position of the energy selection collimator were varied in order to determine the effects of those parameters on the dosimetric properties. To generate an SOBP, we changed the <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field in the energy selection system for each beam weighting factor during beam irradiation. The overall results of this study suggest that the use of an energy selection system with a variable <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field can effectively generate an SOBP suitable for proton radiation therapy applications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Dae-Hyun; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kang, Young Nam; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Pae, Ki-Hong; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUSMGP41A..04V"> <span id="translatedtitle">The impact of the October-November 2003 intense solar storm events on the atmospheric circulation in the Pacific Southern Hemisphere <span class="hlt">Magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">Anomaly</span> region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Evidences of the solar activity modulation of the Earth's climate have been observed on different time scales. The main solar activity mechanisms to control climate proposed to explain these observations are: (1) the variability of the total solar irradiance causing a change in the total energy input to the earth's atmosphere and consequent warming/cooling; (2) the variability of the solar ultraviolet emission and its effects on the stratospheric ozone and thermal structure; (3) the cosmic rays effects on the cloud coverage; and (4) high energy particle precipitation effects on mesospheric and stratospheric ozone in the auroral and/or southern hemisphere <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> regions during solar storm events. It is conceivable that these mechanisms contribute to varying extends on different regions. However, the precise roles of each process during extreme solar events have not yet been investigated. Here we show that the unusual atmospheric circulation conditions over the southern Pacific and Atlantic oceans, and South America on late October and early November 2003 could be related to the large solar storm events, the Halloween events. We observed the development of anti-cyclones in the South Pacific after the onset of the main proton events. We observed also changes in the position and intensity of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and in the South Pacific Convergence zone. This result reveals that effects on the atmospheric conditions, including cloud coverage and radiative flux in the atmosphere, in the southern hemisphere <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> region could be observed during extreme solar conditions. Previous studies suggested that the influence of solar activity on climate could be observed on decadal to millennia time scales. Our results demonstrate that the variability of the solar activity could have impact on southern hemisphere weather and climatic conditions. We anticipate our analysis to be a starting point for more sophisticated weather and climatic models. For example, the predictability of El Niño events could be tested, including its worldwide effects, based on space weather processes. Furthermore, the increase of the southern hemisphere temperature could be investigated based on changes of the Earth's <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> field configuration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vieira, L. A.; da Silva, L. A.; Guarnieri, F.; Echer, E.; Prestes, A.; Dal Lago, A.; da Silva, M. R.; Schuch, N.; Wrasse, C. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.V21A2315B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interaction between the nascent Reunion hotspot and the dying Mascarene <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Reunion hotspot is one of the best examples of a classical mantle plume which reached the lithosphere and formed continental flood basalt, the Deccan trapps, around 65 Ma, and then made an almost continuous trail as the Indian and African plates moved northward, building the Laccadives, Maldives, and Chagos Ridges between 60 Ma and 35 Ma on the fast Indian plate, then the Nazareth Bank after 35 Ma, Mauritius Island between 10 Ma and 8 Ma, and La Reunion Island since 2 Ma on the slower African plate (e.g. Duncan, 1988). Conversely, the Mascarene Basin is characterized by conjugate <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 34 to 27 separated by an extinct <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre. Seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> was therefore active between about 85 Ma, when Africa (including Madagascar) and India (including Seychelles) separated, up to 59 Ma, when the Carlsberg Ridge was fully open between Africa (including Madagascar and Seychelles) and India. The coincidence between the inception of the Reunion hotspot in the Indian lithosphere and the transfer of seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> from the Mascarene basin to the Carlsberg Ridge suggests that the latter is a consequence of the former. Recent cruises, including cruise Forever of R/V L’Atalante in 2006, have focused on the south-eastern part of the basin, around Reunion Island. Swath bathymetric data and dredges have revealed that the five gravity undulations located south of Reunion Island toward the fossil ridge are volcanic ridges lying on oceanic lithosphere dated 68-64 Ma by <span class="hlt">magnetic</span> <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> 30 and 29. The satellite gravity data reveal possible other similar undulations further south, on the north-eastern flank of a fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre dated by <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 28 (64-62 Ma). Conversely, no such undulation is observed on the intermediate area, where a more recent fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre is dated by <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 27 (62-60 Ma). If validated by future swath bathymetric data, this observation means that the volcanic ridges were built before <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 27, possibly between 65 Ma (the inception of the Reunion hotspot) and 62 Ma. A closer look to the satellite gravity <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> map reveals that the flanks of the whole Mascarene fossil <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre exhibit various features. Their distribution is however systematically asymmetric, with most of the larger and elongated features located on the eastern, Indian flank. Some of these elongated features are roughly parallel to the volcanic ridges surveyed south of Reunion Island, lie on oceanic lithosphere of the same age, and seem to abut the fossil axis. We propose that these structures are similar volcanic ridges and therefore that the Reunion hotspot interacted with most of the Mascarene <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre at the paroxysm of its activity, when it formed the Deccan trap. When the hotspot reduced its activity, the new Carlsberg Ridge opened in its closer vicinity. However, the connection between this new <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre and the Central Indian Ridge could not be established before <span class="hlt">anomaly</span> 26r (~60 Ma), and seafloor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> continued at a decreasing rate up to this time on the southernmost part of the Mascarene <span class="hlt">spreading</span> centre.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bissessur, P. D.; Dyment, J.; Deplus, C.; Patriat, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991GeoRL..18.1107B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aeromagnetic <span class="hlt">anomalies</span> and discordant lineations beneath the Niger Delta - Implications for new fracture zones and multiple sea-floor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> directions in the 'meso-Atlantic' Gulf of Guinea cul-de-sac</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An aeromagnetic map eliminating data gaps in the Nigerian continental margin is presented, and the implications of the mapped fracture zone structure and the interpretation of two triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta Basin for its early tectonic history are discussed. Sea-floor <span class="hlt">spreading</span> was found to occur in two different directions, and not only the well-documented NE-SW <span class="hlt">spreading</span> in the 'meso-Atlantic' ocean. The existence of two triple junctions located where the Niger Delta Basin abuts the southern ends of the Abakaliki and Anambra troughs is shown. The two newly interpreted triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta demonstrate the previously recognized structural complexity of the region, necessitating a review of models for its early tectonic history.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Babalola, Olufemi O.; Gipson, Mack, Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1"