Science.gov

Sample records for magnetic spreading anomalies

  1. Contribution of oceanic gabbros to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kikawa, E; Ozawa, K

    1992-10-30

    The contribution of oceanic gabbros, representative rocks for layer 3 of the oceanic crust, to sea-floor spreading magnetic anomalies has been controversial because of the large variation in magnetic properties. Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 118 contains a continuous 500.7-meter section of oceanic gabbro that allows the relations between magnetization and petrologic characteristics, such as the degree of metamorphism and the magmatic evolution, to be clarified. The data suggest that oceanic gabbros, together with the effects of metamorphism and of magmatic evolution, account for a significant part of the marine magnetic anomalies. PMID:17777035

  2. Investigation of spreading center ecolution by joint inversion of seafloor magnetic anomaly and tectonic fabric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    Spreading center segments that have experienced a complex tectonic history including rift propagation may have a complicated signature in bathymetric and magnetic anomaly data. To gain insight into the history of such regions, we have developed techniques in which both the magnetic anomaly patterns and seafloor fabric trends are predicted theoretically, and the combined predictions are compared numerically with the data to estimate best fitting parameters for the propagation history. Fitting functions are constructed to help determine which model best matches the digitized fabric and magnetic anomaly data. Such functions offer statistical criteria for choosing the best fit model. We use this approach to resolve the propagation history of the Cobb Offset along the Juan de Fuca ridge. In this example, the magnetic anomaly data prove more useful in defining the geometry of the propagation events, while the fabric, with its greater temporal resolution, is more useful for constraining the rate of propagation. It thus appears that joint inversion of magnetic and seafloor fabric data can be valuable in tectonic analyses.

  3. Early India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies in the Perth Abyssal Plain

    E-print Network

    Granot, Roi

    region of preserved seafloor that directly records the history of Early Cretaceous seafloor spreading between India and Australia. However, despite the clear importance of the seafloor spreading historyEarly India-Australia spreading history revealed by newly detected Mesozoic magnetic anomalies

  4. Magnetic anomalies and seafloor spreading rates in the northern South Atlantic.

    PubMed

    van Andel, T H; Moore, T C

    1970-04-25

    A geomagnetic profile across the northern South Atlantic yields spreading rates for the last 70 m.y. which vary from 1.6 to 2.0 cm/year. There is evidence for three regional discontinuities in the spreading history of the South Atlantic. PMID:16057239

  5. Opening of the Gulf of Mexico and the Nature of the Crust in the Deep Gulf: New Evidence from Seafloor Spreading Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harry, D. L.; Eskamani, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    The seafloor spreading history in the Gulf of Mexico is poorly constrained due to a lack of recognized seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies, a paucity of deep penetrating seismic data, and absence of drilling to constrain crystalline ocean floor composition and ages. We have identified lineated magnetic anomalies in the eastern Gulf on profiles collected during the Woods Hole R/V Farnella FRNL85-2 cruise that correlate with magnetic chrons M21R to M10. Forward modeling shows that these anomalies formed during creation of weakly magnetized new seafloor in the eastern Gulf between 149-134 Ma at an average half-spreading rate of 3.2 cm/yr. The oldest anomalies are located against stretched continental crust beneath the western Florida shelf on the east and the Yucatan shelf on the west. The youngest anomalies form a juxtaposed conjugate pair that mark the location of an extinct spreading ridge between Yucatan and Florida. Seismic velocities of the crust in the eastern Gulf and the amplitude of the magnetic anomalies are similar to the Iberian and Newfoundland rifted margins, where the early stages of continental breakup were accommodated by exhumation of subcontinental lithosphere rather than creation of new basaltic oceanic crust. We infer that the eastern Gulf of Mexico is underlain by exhumed sub-continental peridotitic mantle intruded by lesser volumes of basaltic igneous rocks generated by decompression melting of the asthenosphere during the late stages of opening of the Gulf. The long wavelength characteristics of the magnetic and gravity fields in the eastern Gulf, as well as the seismic velocity structure of the crust, differ from those in the central and western Gulf, which are more similar to typical magmatic rifted margins. This suggests that the character of the Gulf changes along strike, from a magmatic western portion to an amagmatic eastern portion. Paleogeographic restoration of the lineated magnetic anomaly pattern suggests a 4-phase model for opening of the Gulf. During phase 1 (Early Permian-Late Triassic), Yucatan and associated tectonic blocks that now comprise eastern Mexico were translated eastward from the Pacific realm into positions near the modern western Gulf. During phase 2 (Late Triassic-ca. 160 Ma) Yucatan and the South Florida block were translated southeastward relative to North America, rotating 6.7? counterclockwise about a pole located at 34?N, 74?W. This resulted in ca. 430 km of southeastward extension on the North American coastal plain, 120 km of southward extension on the northern Yucatan shelf, and displacement of the South Florida Block from a pre-rift position on the northwest Florida shelf to its modern position. During phase 3 (ca. 160-149 Ma), Yucatan rotated counterclockwise 46? relative to North America about a pole located at 27.6?N, 84.0?W. Phase 3 may have coincided with seafloor spreading in the central and western Gulf, but predated seafloor spreading in the eastern Gulf. During phase 4 (149-134 Ma), Yucatan moved southwestward relative to North America, rotating counterclockwise 2.2? about a pole located at 17.6?N, 74.2?W and completing opening of the Gulf.

  6. Marine Magnetic Anomalies, Oceanic Crust Magnetization, and Geomagnetic Time Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2005-12-01

    Since the classic paper of Vine and Matthews (Nature, 1963), marine magnetic anomalies are commonly used to date the ocean floor through comparison with the geomagnetic polarity time scale and proper identification of reversal sequences. As a consequence, the classical model of rectangular prisms bearing a normal / reversed magnetization has been dominant in the literature for more than 40 years. Although the model explains major characteristics of the sea-surface magnetic anomalies, it is contradicted by (1) recent advances on the geophysical and petrologic structure of the slow-spreading oceanic crust, and (2) the observation of short-term geomagnetic time variations, both of which are more complex than assumed in the classical model. Marine magnetic anomalies may also provide information on the magnetization of the oceanic crust as well as short-term temporal fluctuations of the geomagnetic field. The "anomalous skewness", a residual phase once the anomalies have been reduced to the pole, has been interpreted either in terms of geomagnetic field variations or crustal structure. The spreading-rate dependence of anomalous skewness rules out the geomagnetic hypothesis and supports a spreading-rate dependent magnetic structure of the oceanic crust, with a basaltic layer accounting for most of the anomalies at fast spreading rates and an increasing contribution of the deeper layers with decreasing spreading rate. The slow cooling of the lower crust and uppermost mantle and serpentinization, a low temperature alteration process which produces magnetite, are the likely cause of this contribution, also required to account for satellite magnetic anomalies over oceanic areas. Moreover, the "hook shape" of some sea-surface anomalies favors a time lag in the magnetization acquisition processes between upper and lower magnetic layers: extrusive basalt acquires a thermoremanent magnetization as soon as emplaced, whereas the underlying peridotite and olivine gabbro cool slowly and pass through serpentinization to bear a significant magnetization. Our analysis of the amplitude of Anomaly 25 shows a sharp threshold at the spreading rate of 30 km/Ma, which corresponds to the transition between oceanic lithosphere built at axial domes and axial valleys. The twice lower amplitudes are in agreement with a much disrupted and altered basaltic layer at slow rates and a significant contribution from the deeper layers. Oceanic lithosphere created at fast and slow spreading rates therefore exhibits contrasted magnetic structures. High resolution magnetic anomaly measurements carried out with deep tows and submersibles show that the magmatic (fast spreading and parts of the slow spreading) crust is a good recorder of short-term geomagnetic time variations, such as short polarity intervals, excursions, or paleointensity variations. Surface and deep-sea magnetic anomalies therefore help to confirm or infirm geomagnetic findings obtained by other means. Many excursions and paleointensity variations within Brunhes and Matuyama periods are confirmed, but the "saw tooth pattern" inferred from sediment cores - a possible candidate to explain the anomalous skewness - is not, which suggests a bias in the sedimentary approach.

  7. Magnetic Anomaly Lineations in the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Y.; Nakanishi, M.; Tamaki, K.; Fujimoto, H.; Huchon, P.; Leroy, S. D.; Styles, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present the magnetic anomaly lineations in the Gulf of Aden. The Gulf of Aden has slow spreading ridges between the Arabia Plate and Somalia Plate. The Arabian plate moves away from Somalia Plate in an NE direction, at a rate of about 2 cm/yr. Previous works indicates that seafloor spreading started about 20 Ma in the eastern part of the Gulf of Aden and propagated westward. The spreading axis has a E-W trend west of 46 E and that east of 46 E has a N60 W trend. We examined magnetic data acquired in the cruises by R/V L'Atalante in 1995, R/V Hakuho-maru from 2000 to 2001, R/V Maurice Ewing in 2001, and Shackleton in 1975 and 1979. We also used data obtained from National Geophysical Data Center, NOAA. We calculated magnetic anomalies using the latest Internation Geomagnetic Reference Field. Elongated negative magnetic anomalies, which amplitude are more than 500 nT, observed over the spreading centers. Most of the elongated anomalies are parallel with the spreading centers. The elongated magnetic anomalies west of 46 30'E have an E-W trend around the spreading centers. Several discontinuities in the magnetic anomaly contour map illustrate the position of the fracture zones concealed by sediments. We identified magnetic lineations from 43 E to 52 E. Most of magnetic lineations west and east of 46 30'E have N-E and N60-65 W strikes, respectively. The oldest lineations are C3r (5.48~5.74 Ma) between 43 10'E and 44 E and C5Ar (12.4~12.7 Ma) east of 44 E. Our identification of magnetic anomaly lineations indicates a symmetric seafloor spreading with a spreading rate of about 1.0 cm/yr, although Leroy et al. (2004) showed an asymmetric seafloor spreading of the Sheba Ridge, east of our study area. The kinematics of the Arabia plate changed about 5 Ma, but our results did not show any coeval change in spreading rates of the spreading system in the Gulf of Aden.

  8. Compiling all the world's magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Colin; Macnab, Ron; Maschenkov, Sergei

    When the ultimate textbook of geology is written, several thematic maps of the world will be cited as conclusive evidence of global tectonics. Examples would be the map of global seismicity that shows just how neatly the vast majority of earthquakes are confined to the plate margins [Simkin et al., 1989] and the map showing the ocean floor topography that has been created, mostly during the last 150 Ma of Earth's history [Smith and Sandwell, 1997]. Visionaries worked out the principles of plate tectonics on much more limited datasets, but extending the principles to understanding the geology of the most remote corners of the globe—and seeing world geology as a true global entity—demands global maps. The magnetic “stripes” of the ocean floor and their symmetry around spreading-axes can be demonstrated on a few profiles but, so far, only for the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans have complete magnetic anomaly maps been published [Verhoef et al., 1996]. The much more complex geology of the remaining 90% of Earth's history is preserved in the continents and uniquely revealed—even below extensive areas of younger cover—by continental magnetic anomaly maps. A magnetic anomaly map of the whole world would be a map of some significance alongside these others.

  9. Spreading rate dependence of gravity anomalies along oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Patricia M; Lin, Jian; Behn, Mark D; Montési, Laurent G J

    2007-07-12

    Mid-ocean ridge morphology and crustal accretion are known to depend on the spreading rate of the ridge. Slow-spreading mid-ocean-ridge segments exhibit significant crustal thinning towards transform and non-transform offsets, which is thought to arise from a three-dimensional process of buoyant mantle upwelling and melt migration focused beneath the centres of ridge segments. In contrast, fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are characterized by smaller, segment-scale variations in crustal thickness, which reflect more uniform mantle upwelling beneath the ridge axis. Here we present a systematic study of the residual mantle Bouguer gravity anomaly of 19 oceanic transform faults that reveals a strong correlation between gravity signature and spreading rate. Previous studies have shown that slow-slipping transform faults are marked by more positive gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments, but our analysis reveals that intermediate and fast-slipping transform faults exhibit more negative gravity anomalies than their adjacent ridge segments. This finding indicates that there is a mass deficit at intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults, which could reflect increased rock porosity, serpentinization of mantle peridotite, and/or crustal thickening. The most negative anomalies correspond to topographic highs flanking the transform faults, rather than to transform troughs (where deformation is probably focused and porosity and alteration are expected to be greatest), indicating that crustal thickening could be an important contributor to the negative gravity anomalies observed. This finding in turn suggests that three-dimensional magma accretion may occur near intermediate- and fast-slipping transform faults. PMID:17625563

  10. Satellite magnetic anomalies over subduction zones - The Aleutian Arc anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, S. C.; Frey, H.; Thomas, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Positive magnetic anomalies seen in MAGSAT average scalar anomaly data overlying some subduction zones can be explained in terms of the magnetization contrast between the cold subducted oceanic slab and the surrounding hotter, nonmagnetic mantle. Three-dimensional modeling studies show that peak anomaly amplitude and location depend on slab length and dip. A model for the Aleutian Arc anomaly matches the general trend of the observed MAGSAT anomaly if a slab thickness of 7 km and a relatively high (induced plus viscous) magnetization contrast of 4 A/m are used. A second source body along the present day continental margin is required to match the observed anomaly in detail, and may be modeled as a relic slab from subduction prior to 60 m.y. ago.

  11. Spectral Methods for Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, R. L.; Gee, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Spectral methods, that is, those based in the Fourier transform, have long been employed in the analysis of magnetic anomalies. For example, Schouten and MaCamy's Earth filter is used extensively to map patterns to the pole, and Parker's Fourier transform series facilitates forward modeling and provides an efficient algorithm for inversion of profiles and surveys. From a different, and perhaps less familiar perspective, magnetic anomalies can be represented as the realization of a stationary stochastic process and then statistical theory can be brought to bear. It is vital to incorporate the full 2-D power spectrum, even when discussing profile data. For example, early analysis of long profiles failed to discover the small-wavenumber peak in the power spectrum predicted by one-dimensional theory. The long-wavelength excess is the result of spatial aliasing, when energy leaks into the along-track spectrum from the cross-track components of the 2-D spectrum. Spectral techniques may be used to improve interpolation and downward continuation of survey data. They can also evaluate the reliability of sub-track magnetization models both across and and along strike. Along-strike profiles turn out to be surprisingly good indicators of the magnetization directly under them; there is high coherence between the magnetic anomaly and the magnetization over a wide band. In contrast, coherence is weak at long wavelengths on across-strike lines, which is naturally the favored orientation for most studies. When vector (or multiple level) measurements are available, cross-spectral analysis can reveal the wavenumber interval where the geophysical signal resides, and where noise dominates. One powerful diagnostic is that the phase spectrum between the vertical and along-path components of the field must be constant 90 degrees. To illustrate, it was found that on some very long Project Magnetic lines, only the lowest 10% of the wavenumber band contain useful geophysical signal. In this case the spectra and cross spectra show that the source of the noise is instability in the gyro platform. Spectral techniques should always be applied to vector data in order to avoid overinterpretation of short-wavelength features.

  12. Northern east Pacific rise: Magnetic anomaly and bathymetric framework

    SciTech Connect

    Klitgord, K.D.; Mammerickx, J.

    1982-08-10

    The oceanic crust in the eastern Pacific between 7/sup 0/N and 30/sup 0/N and east of 127/sup 0/W contains a fairly complete history of the spreading centers associated with the East Pacific Rise since 25 m.y. B.P. (late Oligocene). In this paper, we have summarized the seafloor spreading magnetic-anomaly data and the bathymetric data that reflect the record of this technique history. The well-defined magnetic lineations north of the Clarion fracture zone, in the mouth of the Gulf of California, and on the east flank of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) are carefully examined and used to provide a guide for interpreting the spreading pattern between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones, southward of the Rivera fracture zone over the Mathematician Ridge, and over the entire EPR east of the Mathematician Ridge between the Rivera and Siqueiros fracture zones. The bathymetric data provide a trace of the fracture zone pattern in each of the above mentioned areas. The fracture zone bathymetry and the seafloor spreading magnetc lineations on the EPR south of the Rivera fracture zone have a distinctive fanning pattern caused by close poles of rotation and plate boundary reorganizations. All these data provide a good record of the plate reorganizations in the middle Miocene at magnetic anomaly 5A time (12.5 to 11 m.y. B.P.), in the late Miocene at a magnetic anomaly 3'--4 time (6.5 m.y. B.P.), and in the Pliocene at magnetic anomaly 2'--3 time (3.5 m.y.B.P.). Several abandoned spreading centers, including the Mathematician Ridge, were left behind as a result of these reorganizations. The Mathematician Ridge is shown to be a set of ridges and trough whose origin is related to the tectonics activity associated with each of the above mentioned reorganizations since anomaly 5A.

  13. Satellite Magnetic Anomalies of Africa and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (principal investigators); Olivier, R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary MAGSAT scalar magnetic anomaly data of Africa, Europe, and adjacent marine areas were reduced to the pole assuming a constant inducing Earth's magnetic field of 60,000 nT. This process leads to a consistent anomaly data set free from marked variations in directional and intensity effects of the Earth's magnetic field over this extensive region. The resulting data are correlated with long wave length-pass filtered free-air gravity anomalies; regional heat flow, and tectonic data to investigate magatectonic elements and the region's geologic history. Magnetic anomalies are related to both ancient as well as more recent Cenozoic structural features.

  14. Regional magnetic anomaly constraints on continental rifting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Radially polarized MAGSAT anomalies of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic lithospheric sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. These major magnetic features apparently preserve their integrity until a superimposed metamorphoric event alters the magnitude and pattern of the anomalies. The longevity of continental scale magnetic anomalies contrasts markedly with that of regional gravity anomalies which tend to reflect predominantly isostatic adjustments associated with neo-tectonism. First observed as a result of NASA's magnetic satellite programs, these anomalies provide new and fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution and dynamics of the continents and oceans. Accordingly, satellite magnetic observations provide a further tool for investigating continental drift to compliment other lines of evidence in paleoclimatology, paleontology, paleomagnetism, and studies of the radiometric ages and geometric fit of the continents.

  15. Marine Magnetic Anomalies and the Reconstruction of the World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Until the middle of the 20th century little was known about magnetic anomalies in the oceans. Then it was discovered that there are relatively large anomalies in most of the oceans and they were unrelated to any geological structure known at that time. In the early 1950's large anomalies had been found over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and linear anomalies over the eastern continental shelf of North America and, shortly after that, off the west coast. A survey of the ridge south of Iceland showed that the anomalies were linear, parallel to the ridge axis, and symmetrical about the axis. Using the theory that the anomalies were caused by geomagnetic field reversals and seafloor spreading it was possible to greatly extend the time scale of geomagnetic reversals, to determine the velocity of seafloor spreading and estimate the time of opening of the North Atlantic. Lamont had a world-wide collection of marine magnetic profiles. These were used, systematically, to determine the positions of most of the land masses of the world since the beginnings of the world's present oceans.

  16. The source of marine magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The Vine-Matthews hypothesis (1963) is examined. This hypothesis suggests that oceanic rocks become polarized in the direction of the magnetic field at the time of their formation, thus recording the polarity history of the earth's magnetic field. This produces the lineated magnetic anomalies on either side of the midoceanic ridge crests. The strength of these magnetic anomalies is studied to determine the strength of magnetization. Indirect determinations of the magnetization intensity of the oceanic crust and direct observations of the oceanic crust are compared. It is found that the average magnetization of a 6-km thick oceanic crust is 1.18 A/m.

  17. The magnetic anomaly of the Ivreazone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, G.

    1979-01-01

    A magnetic field survey was made in the Ivreazone in 1969/70. The results were: significant anomaly of the vertical intensity is found. It follows the basic main part of the Ivrea-Verbano zone and continues to the south. The width of the anomaly is about 10 km, the maximum measures about +800 gamma. The model interpretation shows that possibly the anomaly belongs to an amphibolitic body, which in connection with the Ivrea-body was found by deep seismic sounding. Therefore, the magnetic anomaly provides further evidence for the conception that the Ivrea-body has to be regarded as a chip of earthmantle material pushed upward by tectonic processes.

  18. Global magnetic anomaly and aurora of Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.

    1990-01-01

    The large offset and tilt of Neptune's dipole magnetic field combine to create a global magnetic anomaly, analogous to but much more important than earth's South Atlantic Anomaly. Energetic particle precipitation loss within the Neptune anomaly creates 'atmospheric drift shadows' within which particle fluxes are greatly reduced. The energetic particle dropout observed by Voyager near closest approach occurred near the predicted times when Voyager passed within the atmospheric drift shadow. Extremely soft, structured bursts of ions and electrons within the drift shadow may result from plasma wave-induced pitch angle scattering of trapped particles confined near the magnetic equator. The dropout does not necessarily imply that Voyager passed through an earth-like discrete auroral zone, as earlier reported. The ion and electron fluxes observed within the dropout period correspond to particles that must precipitate to Neptune's atmosphere within the anomaly region. This anomaly precipitation can account for a major portion of the ultraviolet emissions previously identified as Neptune aurora.

  19. Understanding Magnetic Anomalies and Their Significance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise testing the Vine-Matthews-Morley hypothesis of plate tectonics. Includes 14 questions with explanations using graphs and charts. Provides a historical account of the current plate tectonic and magnetic anomaly theory. (MVL)

  20. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (principal investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Experimental and analytical data on magnetic mineralogy was provided as an aid to the interpretation of magnetic anomaly maps. An integrated program, ranging from the chemistry of materials from 100 or more km depth within the Earth, to an examination of the MAGSAT anomaly maps at about 400 km above the Earth's surface, was undertaken. Within this framework, a detailed picture of the pertinent mineralogical and magnetic relationships for the region of West Africa was provided. Efforts were directed toward: (1) examining the geochemistry, mineralogy, magnetic properties, and phases relations of magnetic oxides and metal alloys in rocks demonstrated to have originated in the lower crust of upper mantle, (2) examining the assumption that these rocks portray the nature of their source regions; and (3) examining the regional geology, tectonics, gravity field and the MAGSAT anomaly maps for West Africa.

  1. Continental magnetic anomaly constraints on continental reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Bentley, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies mapped by the MAGSAT satellite for North and South America, Europe, Africa, India, Australia and Antarctica and adjacent marine areas were adjusted to a common elevation of 400 km and differentially reduced to the radial pole of intensity 60,000 nT. These radially polarized anomalies are normalized for differential inclination, declination and intensity effects of the geomagnetic field, so that in principle they directly reflected the geometric and magnetic polarization attributes of sources which include regional petrologic variations of the crust and upper mantle, and crustal thickness and thermal perturbations. Continental anomalies demonstrate remarkably detailed correlation of regional magnetic sources across rifted margins when plotted on a reconstruction of Pangea. Accordingly, they suggest further fundamental constraints on the geologic evolution of the continents and their reconstructions.

  2. CHAMP Magnetic Anomalies of the Antarctic Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2003-01-01

    Regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations components and hence difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. In particular, the un-modeled effects of the strong auroral external fields and the complicated- behavior of the core field near the geomagnetic poles conspire to greatly reduce the crustal magnetic signal-to-noise ratio in the polar regions relative to the rest of the Earth. We can, however, use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric and core field components from the dynamic external field effects. To help isolate regional lithospheric from core field components, the correlations between CHAMP magnetic anomalies and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations can also be exploited.. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic observations for an improved magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Orsted and noisier Magsat observations, the CHAMP magnetic anomalies at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intracrustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic.

  3. Geological reasons for change in intensity of linear magnetic anomalies of the Kursk magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhavoronkin, I. A.; Kopayev, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    The geological reasons for fluctuations in the anomalous field intensity along the polar axes were examined. The Kursk magnetic anomaly is used as the basis for the study. A geological-geophysical section was constructed which used the results of the interpretation of gravimagnetic anomalies.

  4. Equivalent magnetization over the World's Ocean and the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, Jerome; Choi, Yujin; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Thébault, Erwan; Quesnel, Yoann; Roest, Walter; Lesur, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    As a by-product of our recent work to build a candidate model over the oceans for the second version of the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM), we derived global distributions of the equivalent magnetization in oceanic domains. In a first step, we use classic point source forward modeling on a spherical Earth to build a forward model of the marine magnetic anomalies at sea-surface. We estimate magnetization vectors using the age map of the ocean floor, the relative plate motions, the apparent polar wander path for Africa, and a geomagnetic reversal time scale. We assume two possible magnetized source geometry, involving both a 1 km-thick layer bearing a 10 A/m magnetization either on a regular spherical shell with a constant, 5 km-deep, bathymetry (simple geometry) or following the topography of the oceanic basement as defined by the bathymetry and sedimentary thickness (realistic geometry). Adding a present-day geomagnetic field model allows the computation of our initial magnetic anomaly model. In a second step, we adjust this model to the existing marine magnetic anomaly data, in order to make it consistent with these data. To do so, we extract synthetic magnetic along the ship tracks for which real data are available and we compare quantitatively the measured and computed anomalies on 100, 200 or 400 km-long sliding windows (depending the spreading rate). Among the possible comparison criteria, we discard the maximal range - too dependent on local values - and the correlation and coherency - the geographical adjustment between model and data being not accurate enough - to favor the standard deviation around the mean value. The ratio between the standard deviations of data and model on each sliding window represent an estimate of the magnetization ratio causing the anomalies, which we interpolate to adjust the initial magnetic anomaly model to the data and therefore compute a final model to be included in our WDMAM candidate over the oceanic regions lacking data. The above ratio, after division by the magnetization of 10 A/m used in the model, represents an estimate of the equivalent magnetization under the considered magnetized source geometry. The resulting distributions of equivalent magnetization are further discussed in terms of mid-ocean ridges, presence of hotspots and oceanic plateaus, and the age of the oceanic lithosphere. Global marine magnetic data sets and models represent a useful tool to assess first order magnetic properties of the oceanic lithosphere.

  5. Magmatic breakup as an explanation for magnetic anomalies at magma-poor rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, Adrien; Sauter, Daniel; Manatschal, Gianreto; Péron-Pinvidic, Gwenn; Munschy, Marc

    2011-08-01

    Continental breakup is usually marked by a sharp contact between continental and oceanic crust. However, in settings with low magma supply, this transition zone is much wider and exhibits a gradual change from continental crust, to exhumed blocks of continental mantle, to oceanic crust. Traditionally, the timing and location of continental breakup is defined by the first observation of a magnetic anomaly that is generated by magma erupted from the newly formed mid-ocean ridge. As the magma cools to form rock, it preserves a record of the Earth's magnetic field at that time. However, in the broad transitional zone at magma-poor rifted margins, the seafloor-spreading origin of magnetic anomalies is debated. Here we compare seismic and drill-hole data with measurements of the first magnetic anomaly--the J anomaly--formed in the Newfoundland-Iberia rift system. We find that the J anomaly is associated with locally high topography and thickened crust, probably resulting from voluminous magma both erupted at the surface and added beneath blocks of exhumed continental mantle. We therefore argue that the J anomaly did not form during seafloor spreading, but instead represents a pulse of magmatism that may have triggered continental breakup before seafloor spreading. Our findings imply that opening of this part of the North Atlantic may have occurred later than previously thought and may explain inconsistencies in some previous kinematic reconstructions.

  6. Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Frawley, James J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic component anomaly maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor s magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative anomaly pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these anomalies we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable anomaly pairs and from these we computed four North and 3 South poles with two at approximately 60 degrees north latitude. These results suggest that during the existence of the Martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals.

  7. Paleo-Pole Positions from Martian Magnetic Anomaly Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frawley, James J.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic component anomaly maps were made from five mapping cycles of the Mars Global Surveyor's magnetometer data. Our goal was to find and isolate positive and negative anomaly pairs which would indicate magnetization of a single source body. From these anomalies we could compute the direction of the magnetizing vector and subsequently the location of the magnetic pole existing at the time of magnetization. We found nine suitable anomaly pairs and from these we computed paleo-poles that were nearly equally divided between north, south and mid-latitudes. These results suggest that during the existence of the martian main magnetic field it experienced several reversals and excursions.

  8. Deep-tow study of magnetic anomalies in the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone 

    E-print Network

    Tominaga, Masako

    2006-10-30

    and correlatability of the JQZ magnetic anomalies implying that they are seafloor spreading lineations and (2) good correlations made new GPTS models extending back to 169.4 Ma; and (3) the origin of the JQZ may be a combination of rapid polarity reversals...

  9. A model of ocean basin crustal magnetization appropriate for satellite elevation anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Herman H.

    1987-01-01

    A model of ocean basin crustal magnetization measured at satellite altitudes is developed which will serve both as background to which anomalous magnetizations can be contrasted and as a beginning point for studies of tectonic modification of normal ocean crust. The model is based on published data concerned with the petrology and magnetization of the ocean crust and consists of viscous magnetization and induced magnetization estimated for individual crustal layers. Thermal remanent magnetization and chemical remanent magnetization are excluded from the model because seafloor spreading anomalies are too short in wavelength to be resolved at satellite altitudes. The exception to this generalization is found at the oceanic magnetic quiet zones where thermal remanent magnetization and chemical remanent magnetization must be considered along with viscous magnetization and induced magnetization.

  10. Magnetic Anomalies over the Osbourn Trough in the Southwest Pacific Cretaceous Quiet Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cande, S. C.; Stock, J.; Clayton, R.; Gurnis, M.

    2004-05-01

    Detailed surveys of magnetic anomalies over ocean crust that formed during long intervals of predominantly one polarity and that formed at moderate to fast spreading rates, such as anomaly 5 in the Northeast Pacific, often display a pattern of small scale, linear anomalies that reflect a mixture of short polarity events and/or intensity fluctuations of the paleomagnetic field. These tiny wiggles have been mapped in many regions of the ocean representing large portions of the last 180 Ma including the Jurassic Quiet Zones. However, they have not been reported in the Cretaceous Quiet Zones. Although the lack of tiny wiggles in the Cretaceous Quiet Zones might reflect a difference in field behavior during the Cretaceous Long Normal Polarity Interval, it more likely reflects the lack of good surveys in areas where tiny wiggles are most likely to be preserved. The Southwest Pacific Cretaceous Quiet Zone, with its fast spreading rates and high paleo-latitude, is ideally located for preserving small scale anomalies. Recent data collected on transits of the R/VIB Nathaniel B. Palmer reveal a linear pattern of moderate amplitude (+ - 100 nT), short wavelength (10-30 km) magnetic anomalies straddling the Osbourn Trough, an east-west striking fossil spreading center east of the Tonga-Kermadec Trench. Although the age of the Osbourn Trough is uncertain, it is likely to have formed around 95 or 100 MA, in the middle of the Cretaceous Long Normal Period. The magnetic profiles straddling the Osbourn Trough document a magnetic anomaly pattern that is very similar in appearance to classic tiny wiggles; that is, they are not as strongly linear as would be expected for anomalies generated by true reversals, but they are definitely linear and have a unique pattern. They most likely represent a record of paleointensity fluctuations at this time and will help in unraveling the tectonics of this enigmatic region.

  11. Improving the geological interpretation of magnetic and gravity satellite anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W. (principal investigators); Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Current limitations in the quantitative interpretation of satellite-elevation geopotential field data and magnetic anomaly data were investigated along with techniques to overcome them. A major result was the preparation of an improved scalar magnetic anomaly map of South America and adjacent marine areas directly from the original MAGSAT data. In addition, comparisons of South American and Euro-African data show a strong correlation of anomalies along the Atlantic rifted margins of the continents.

  12. Anomalies and Transport Coefficients: The Chiral Gravito-Magnetic Effect

    E-print Network

    Landsteiner, Karl; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Axial anomalies give rise to interesting new transport phenomena such as the "chiral magnetic effect". We discuss how the associated transport coefficients can be studied via Kubo formulas at weak and strong coupling, the latter via gauge gravity duality. We argue for a new "chiral gravito-magnetic" (or vortical) effect sensitive to the presence of mixed gauge-gravitational anomalies.

  13. Anomalies and Transport Coefficients: The Chiral Gravito-Magnetic Effect

    E-print Network

    Karl Landsteiner; Eugenio Megias; Francisco Pena-Benitez

    2011-10-17

    Axial anomalies give rise to interesting new transport phenomena such as the "chiral magnetic effect". We discuss how the associated transport coefficients can be studied via Kubo formulas at weak and strong coupling, the latter via gauge gravity duality. We argue for a new "chiral gravito-magnetic" (or vortical) effect sensitive to the presence of mixed gauge-gravitational anomalies.

  14. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (principal investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in developing predictive abilities to evaluate the potential stabilities of magnetic minerals in the Earth crust and mantle by: (1) computing oxidation state profiling as a function of temperature and pressure; (2) compiling data on basalts to establish validity of the oxidation state profiles; (3) determining Fe-Ni alloys in association with magnetitie as a function of temperature and oxidation state; and (4) acquiring large chemical data banks on the mineral ilmenite which decomposes to mineral spinel in the presence of high sulfur or carbonate environments in the lower crust upper mantle. In addition to acquiring these data which are related to constraining Curie isotherm depths, an excellent correlation was found between MAGSAT anomaly data and the geology of West Africa.

  15. Magnetic anomalies and tectonic fabric of marginal basins North of New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Malahoff, A.; Feden, R.H.; Fleming, H.S.

    1982-05-10

    Detailed airborne magnetic studies conducted over the region of the S. W. Pacific marginal basins extending from the Solomon Islands to New Zealand suggest that three major phases of basin formation and island arc development have occurred in this region. Development of the Tasman Sea took place during the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene. Development of the basins to the east of the Tasman Sea occurred predominantly during the Oligocene as well as during the Upper Miocene to Recent. The South Fuji Basin, consisting of the Kupe and Minerva Abyssal Plains, is marked by the presence of possibly two RRR triple junction spreading centers that were active between the times of anomalies 13 to 7 (36--25.5 m.y.). The Kupe Abyssal Plain shows the presence of residual magnetic anomalies 7 to 13 of the eastern limb of the proposed spreading center. The western limb appears to have been subducted beneath the present site of the Three Kings Rise. This seafloor spreading phase (calculated half-spreading rate of 35 mm/yr) was coincident with the overthrusting phase of the New Caledonia ultramafic rocks. During that period, active volcanism along the then continuous Solomons-New Hebrides-Fiji-Lau Island arc was taking place. Magnetic anomalies from 1 to 4 (0--8 m.y. B. P.) are seen to extend along a clearly defined lineation pattern over the North Fuji Basin.

  16. World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM) rev.2: Oceanic Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamoudi, M.; Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Thebault, E.; Quesnel, Y.; Roest, W. R.; Lesur, V.

    2012-12-01

    A large amount of aeromagnetic and marine magnetic data, complemented by satellite magnetic data, have been compiled and processed to produce the first World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM; [1]). In oceanic areas, the data coverage is, however, very sparse over remote parts of the Pacific, Indian, and Southern oceans. Two attempts have been proposed to fill the gaps in these areas. Model WDMAM1-B [1] do so by superimposing synthetic magnetic anomalies computed from the age map of [2] - derived from a self-consistent plate tectonic model (and indirectly from the marine magnetic data), but the result is dominated by the synthetic anomalies which amplitudes poorly fit that of the observations. Model EMAG-2 [3] interpolates between sparse marine magnetic data using directional gridding and extrapolation based on the age map of [4], but the result displays many artificially elongated features due to the improper interpolation of non linear anomaly (caused, for instance, by a seamount). We propose a new map based on the following steps: (a) more realistic forward modeling of the marine magnetic anomalies including remanent magnetization vectors which take into account the age and motion of the oceanic lithosphere, as proposed by [5] for satellite anomalies; (b) evaluation of the equivalent magnetization by comparison of the synthetic and observed anomalies along the ship tracks; and (c) adjustment of the synthetic anomaly maps using this equivalent magnetization prior merging with the observed anomalies. [1] Korhonen et al., map published by CCGM/CGMW (http://ccgm.free.fr/), 2007 [2] Müller et al., JGR, 1997 [3] Maus et al., G3, 2009 [4] Müller et al., G3, 2008 [5] Dyment and Arkani-Hamed, JGR, 1998

  17. The south-central United States magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W. (principal investigators); Starich, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The South-Central United States Magnetic Anomaly is the most prominent positive feature in the MAGSAT scalar magnetic field over North America. The anomaly correlates with increased crustal thickness, above average crustal velocity, negative free air gravity anomalies and an extensive zone of Middle Proterozoic anorogenic felsic basement rocks. Spherical dipole source inversion of the MAGSAT scalar data and subsequent calculation of reduced to pole and derivative maps provide constraints for a crustal magnetic model which corresponds geographically to the extensive Middle Proterozoic felsic rocks trending northeasterly across the United States. These felsic rocks contain insufficient magnetization or volume to produce the anomaly, but are rather indicative of a crustal zone which was disturbed during a Middle Proterozoic thermal event which enriched magnetic material deep in the crust.

  18. Study of gravity and magnetic anomalies using MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (principal investigators)

    1981-01-01

    The results of modeling satellite-elevation magnetic and gravity data using the constraints imposed by near surface data and seismic evidence shows that the magnetic minimum can be accounted for by either an intracrustal lithologic variation or by an upwarp of the Curie point isotherm. The long wavelength anomalies of the NOO's-vector magnetic survey of the conterminous U.S. were contoured and processed by various frequency filters to enhance particular characteristics. A preliminary inversion of the data was completed and the anomaly field calculated at 450 km from the equivalent magnet sources to compare with the POGO satellite data. Considerable progress was made in studing the satellite magnetic data of South America and adjacent marine areas. Preliminary versions of the 1 deg free-air gravity anomaly map (20 m gal contour interval) and the high cut (lambda approximately 8 deg) filtered anomaly maps are included.

  19. Alternative explanation for intermediate--wavelength magnetic anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Shure, L.; Parker, R.L.

    1981-12-10

    Harrison and Carle and others have examined very long profiles of the magnetic field and have calculated one-dimensional power spectra. In these they expect to see, but do not find, a minimum in power at intermediate wavelengths, between 65 and 150 km. Conventional one-dimensional models of the field predict very little power in this band, which lies between the spectral peaks arising from sources in the crust and the core. Mantle sources or high-intensity, long-wavelength magnetizations have been proposed to account for the observations. An alternative, more plausible explanation is that one-dimensional spectra of two-dimensional fields contain contributions from wavenumbers in the perpendicular (i.e., nonsampled) direction. Unless the seafloor spreading anomalies are perfectly lineated at right angles to the profile, some low-wavenumber energy must be attributed to this effect; we propose that such directional aliasing is a major factor in the power spectra. To support this idea we discuss theoretical models and analyze a large-scale marine survey.

  20. Sources of Magnetic Anomalies on Mars and Their Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Smrekar, S. E.; Stofan, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    The sources of intense magnetic anomalies on Mars are investigated with models including constraints from geology, gravity and topography. Implications of the derived sources for the early evolution of Mars are examined.

  1. Hematite Versus Magnetite as the Signature for Planetary Magnetic Anomalies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetshka, Gunther; Taylor, Patrick T.; Wasilewski, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies are the result of adjacent geologic units having contrasting magnetization. This magnetization arises from induction and/or remanence. In a planetary context we now know that Mars has significant crustal magnetic anomalies due to remanent magnetization, while the Earth has some anomalies where remanence can be shown to be important. This picture, however, is less clear because of the nature and the magnitude of the geomagnetic field which is responsible for superimposed induced magnetization. Induced magnetization assumes a magnetite source, because of its much greater magnetic susceptibility when compared with other magnetic minerals. We investigated the TRM (thermoremanent magnetization) acquisition of hematite, in weak magnetic fields up to 1 mT, to determine if the remanent and induced magnetization of hematite could compete with magnetite. TRM acquisition curves of magnetite and hematite show that multi-domain hematite reaches TRM saturation (0.3 - 0.4 A sq m/kg) in fields as low as 100 microT. However, multi-domain magnetite reaches only a few percent of its TRM saturation in a field of 100 microT (0.02 - 0.06 A sq m/kg). These results suggest that a mineral such as hematite and, perhaps, other minerals with significant remanence and minor induced magnetization may play an important role in providing requisite magnetization contrast. Perhaps, and especially for the Mars case, we should reevaluate where hematite and other minerals, with efficient remanence acquisition, exist in significant concentration, allowing a more comprehensive explanation of Martian anomalies and better insight into the role of remanent magnetization in terrestrial crustal magnetic anomalies.

  2. The south-central United States magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starich, P. J.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A positive magnetic anomaly, which dominates the MAGSAT scalar field over the south-central United States, results from the superposition of magnetic effects from several geologic sources and tectonic structures in the crust. The highly magnetic basement rocks of this region show good correlation with increased crustal thickness, above average crustal velocity and predominantly negative free-air gravity anomalies, all of which are useful constraints for modeling the magnetic sources. The positive anomaly is composed of two primary elements. The western-most segment is related to middle Proterozoic granite intrusions, rhyolite flows and interspersed metamorphic basement rocks in the Texas panhandle and eastern New Mexico. The anomaly and the magnetic crust are bounded to the west by the north-south striking Rio Grande Rift. The anomaly extends eastward over the Grenville age basement rocks of central Texas, and is terminated to the south and east by the buried extension of the Ouachita System. The northern segment of the anomaly extends eastward across Oklahoma and Arkansas to the Mississippi Embayment. It corresponds to a general positive magnetic region associated with the Wichita Mountains igneous complex in south-central Oklahoma and 1.2 to 1.5 Ga. felsic terrane to the north.

  3. A method of inversion of satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of finding a first approximation to a crustal magnetization distribution from inversion of satellite magnetic anomaly data is described. Magnetization is expressed as a Fourier Series in a segment of spherical shell. Input to this procedure is an equivalent source representation of the observed anomaly field. Instability of the inversion occurs when high frequency noise is present in the input data, or when the series is carried to an excessively high wave number. Preliminary results are given for the United States and adjacent areas.

  4. Ionospheric characteristics above Martian crustal magnetic anomalies Paul Withers,1

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    Ionospheric characteristics above Martian crustal magnetic anomalies Paul Withers,1 M. Mendillo,1 H effects upon otherwise global photochemical ionospheric processes. On Mars, unlike most other planets, the magnetic field has a short characteristic lengthscale, so its effects on the ionosphere will vary over

  5. Magsat magnetic anomaly contrast across Labrador Sea passive margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Lauren M.; Frey, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Many passive margins not complicated by nearby anomalous crustal structure have satellite elevation crustal magnetic anomaly contrasts across them that are recognizable in reduced-to-pole versions of the Magsat and POGO data. In the Labrador Sea region this contrast is particularly well developed with strong positive anomalies overlying the continental crust of Greenland and eastern Canada and prominent negative anomalies situated over the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. In this work, forward modeling of the large-scale crustal bodies in this region (continental, oceanic, passive margin, several anomalous structures) was used to show that the Magsat anomaly contrast is due simply to the change in crustal susceptibility and thickness at the continental/oceanic crustal transition. Because the thickness varies more than the average susceptibility from continental to oceanic crust, the strong anomaly contrast is essentially an edge effect due mostly to the change in crustal structure.

  6. First high-resolution near-seafloor survey of magnetic anomalies of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Xu, X.; Li, C.; Sun, Z.; Zhu, J.; Zhou, Z.; Qiu, N.

    2013-12-01

    We successfully conducted the first high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic survey of the Central, Southwest, and Northern Central Basins of the South China Sea (SCS) during two cruises on board Chinese R/V HaiYangLiuHao in October-November 2012 and March-April 2013, respectively. Measurements of magnetic field were made along four long survey lines, including (1) a NW-SE across-isochron profile transecting the Southwest Basin and covering all ages of the oceanic crust (Line CD); (2) a N-S across-isochron profile transecting the Central Basin (Line AB); and (3) two sub-parallel NE-SW across-isochron profiles transecting the Northern Central Basin of the SCS (Lines D and E). A three-axis magnetometer was mounted on a deep-tow vehicle, flying within 0.6 km above the seafloor. The position of the tow vehicle was provided by an ultra-short baseline navigation system along Lines D and E, while was estimated using shipboard GPS along Lines AB and CD. To investigate crustal magnetization, we first removed the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) of 2010 from the measured magnetic data, and then downward continued the resultant magnetic field data to a horizontal plane at a water depth of 4.5 km to correct for variation due to the fishing depth of the deep-tow vehicle. Finally, we calculated magnetic anomalies at various water depths after reduction-to-the-pole corrections. We also constructed polarity reversal block (PRB) models of crustal magnetization by matching peaks and troughs of the observed magnetic field anomaly. Our analysis yielded the following results: (1) The near-bottom magnetic anomaly showed peak-to-trough amplitudes of more than 2,500 nT, which are several times of the anomaly amplitudes at the sea surface, illustrating that deep-tow measurements acquired much higher spatial resolutions. (2) The deep-tow data revealed several distinctive magnetic anomalies with wavelengths of 5-15 km and amplitudes of several hundred nT. These short-wavelength anomalies were unrecognized in sea surface measurements. (3) Preliminary results showed that the study regions might have experienced several episodes of magnetic reversal events that were not recognized in existing models. (4) We are currently investigating the geomagnetic timing of these relatively short-duration events to determine the detailed spreading history of the sub-basins of the SCS. These high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic survey lines are located close to the planned drilling sites of IODP Expedition 349 scheduled for January-March 2014.

  7. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (principal investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The Curie Balance was brought to operational stage and is producing data of a preliminary nature. Substantial problems experienced in the assembly and initial operation of the instrument were, for the most part, rectified, but certain problems still exist. Relationships between the geology and the gravity and MAGSAT anomalies of West Africa are reexamined in the context of a partial reconstruction of Gondwanaland.

  8. SEISMIC DISCRIMINATION OF THERMAL AND MAGNETIC ANOMALIES IN SUNSPOT UMBRAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.; Cally, P. S.; Rempel, M.

    2010-08-20

    Efforts to model sunspots based on helioseismic signatures need to discriminate between the effects of (1) a strong magnetic field that introduces time-irreversible, vantage-dependent phase shifts, apparently connected to fast- and slow-mode coupling and wave absorption and (2) a thermal anomaly that includes cool gas extending an indefinite depth beneath the photosphere. Helioseismic observations of sunspots show travel times considerably reduced with respect to equivalent quiet-Sun signatures. Simulations by Moradi and Cally of waves skipping across sunspots with photospheric magnetic fields of order 3 kG show travel times that respond strongly to the magnetic field and relatively weakly to the thermal anomaly by itself. We note that waves propagating vertically in a vertical magnetic field are relatively insensitive to the magnetic field, while remaining highly responsive to the attendant thermal anomaly. Travel-time measurements for waves with large skip distances into the centers of axially symmetric sunspots are therefore a crucial resource for discrimination of the thermal anomaly beneath sunspot umbrae from the magnetic anomaly. One-dimensional models of sunspot umbrae based on compressible-radiative-magnetic-convective simulations such as by Rempel et al. can be fashioned to fit observed helioseismic travel-time spectra in the centers of sunspot umbrae. These models are based on cooling of the upper 2-4 Mm of the umbral subphotosphere with no significant anomaly beneath 4.5 Mm. The travel-time reductions characteristic of these models are primarily a consequence of a Wilson depression resulting from a strong downward buoyancy of the cooled umbral medium.

  9. Lunar magnetic anomaly concentrations at the antipodal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemant Singh, Kumar; Kuang, Weijia; Singh, Raghav

    2014-05-01

    The high resolution lunar-wide magnetic anomaly map derived from Lunar Prospector (LP) vector magnetometer data has revealed weak anomalies over the nearside large impact basins flooded by mare basalts. Stronger anomaly features are observed over many of the Nectarian and Pre-Nectarian aged lunar highlands. In particular, regions antipodal to some of the largest basin-forming impact craters show strong magnetic anomaly concentrations. Of the 43 basins investigated here, antipodal regions of 9 basins show these anomalous features with strengths in excess of 1-18 nT at LP's mapping altitude (30 km). These distinct anomalous concentrations were previously known to occur only at the antipodes of Imbrium, Orientale, Serenitatis, Crisium and Nectaris basins. The mean magnetic anomaly strength within each antipodal region, when plotted against increasing age of the antipodes, shows two age groupings with similar magnetic behavior. The first age grouping - (Imbrium, Orientale, Serenitatis, Crisium and Nectaris) is of Imbrium to Nectarian in age. This grouping is correlative with peak magnetic field enhancements between 3.6 and 3.9 Gyr, inferred from paleomagnetic data from the returned Apollo samples. The second age grouping (Lorentz, Coulomb-Sarton, Tranquillitatis and Cognitum) is of Mid to Early Pre-Nectarian age. This grouping has not been correlated to any known global magnetic field enhancement event, and needs further investigation to ascertain the origin of the anomalies. Although spatially adjacent, the magnetic field signatures of the Serenitatis and Imbrium antipodes exhibit distinct features, supporting the antipodal hypothesis. The absence of appreciable field enhancements at 34 other antipodes, however, indicates the importance of other processes, and superposition effects, that have operated on the Moon during its history.

  10. Lunar magnetic anomalies detected by the Apollo subsatellite magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Russell, C. T.; Wilhelms, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Properties of lunar crustal magnetization thus far deduced from Apollo subsatellite magnetometer data are reviewed using two of the most accurate available magnetic anomaly maps, one covering a portion of the lunar near side and the other a part of the far side. The largest single anomaly found within the region of coverage on the near-side map correlates exactly with a conspicuous light-colored marking in western Oceanus Procellarum called Reiner Gamma. This feature is interpreted as an unusual deposit of ejecta from secondary craters of the large nearby primary impact crater Cavalerius. The mean altitude of the far-side anomaly gap is much higher than that of the near side map and the surface geology is more complex; individual anomaly sources have therefore not yet been identified. The mechanism of magnetization and the origin of the magnetizing field remain unresolved, but the uniformity with which the Reiner Gamma deposit is apparently magnetized, and the north-south depletion of magnetization intensity across a substantial portion of the far side, seem to require the existence of an ambient field, perhaps of global or larger extent.

  11. Improved determination of vector lithospheric magnetic anomalies from MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay

    1993-01-01

    Scientific contributions made in developing new methods to isolate and map vector magnetic anomalies from measurements made by Magsat are described. In addition to the objective of the proposal, the isolation and mapping of equatorial vector lithospheric Magsat anomalies, isolation of polar ionospheric fields during the period were also studied. Significant progress was also made in isolation of polar delta(Z) component and scalar anomalies as well as integration and synthesis of various techniques of removing equatorial and polar ionospheric effects. The significant contributions of this research are: (1) development of empirical/analytical techniques in modeling ionospheric fields in Magsat data and their removal from uncorrected anomalies to obtain better estimates of lithospheric anomalies (this task was accomplished for equatorial delta(X), delta(Z), and delta(B) component and polar delta(Z) and delta(B) component measurements; (2) integration of important processing techniques developed during the last decade with the newly developed technologies of ionospheric field modeling into an optimum processing scheme; and (3) implementation of the above processing scheme to map the most robust magnetic anomalies of the lithosphere (components as well as scalar).

  12. Low energy spread ion source with a coaxial magnetic filter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as ion projection lithography (IPL) and radioactive ion beam production. The addition of a radially extending magnetic filter consisting of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. A coaxial multicusp ion source designed to further reduce the energy spread utilizes a cylindrical magnetic filter to achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution. The coaxial magnetic filter divides the source chamber into an outer annular discharge region in which the plasma is produced and a coaxial inner ion extraction region into which the ions radially diffuse but from which ionizing electrons are excluded. The energy spread in the coaxial source has been measured to be 0.6 eV. Unlike other ion sources, the coaxial source has the capability of adjusting the radial plasma potential distribution and therefore the transverse ion temperature (or beam emittance).

  13. Intermediate-wavelength magnetic anomalies over the central Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrecque, J. L.; Cande, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    A technique to extract the intermediate wavelength anomaly field from random ship tracks has been developed and is applied to extract the field from marine survey data of the central Pacific in the band pass of 4000-400 km. The technique minimizes the effects of external field sources, secular variation, and strike aliasing. The derived data field is compared to the equivalent MAGSAT data set, and it is shown that anomalies observed in both fields are correlatable to geologic features within the oceanic lithosphere but differ in amplitude by a factor of two. Likely sources for this discrepancy are identified. It is also shown that remanent magnetization of the central Pacific seamounts produces negative magnetic anomalies which are observed at satellite altitude.

  14. The next generation Antarctic digital magnetic anomaly map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    von Frese, R.R.B; Golynsky, A.V.; Kim, H.R.; Gaya-Piqué, L.; Thébault, E.; Chiappinii, M.; Ghidella, M.; Grunow, A.; ADMAP Working Group

    2007-01-01

    S (Golynsky et al., 2001). This map synthesized over 7.1 million line-kms of survey data available up through 1999 from marine, airborne and Magsat satellite observations. Since the production of the initial map, a large number of new marine and airborne surveys and improved magnetic observations from the Ørsted and CHAMP satellite missions have become available. In addition, an improved core field model for the Antarctic has been developed to better isolate crustal anomalies in these data. The next generation compilation also will likely represent the magnetic survey observations of the region in terms of a high-resolution spherical cap harmonic model. In this paper, we review the progress and problems of developing an improved magnetic anomaly map to facilitate studies of the Antarctic crustal magnetic field

  15. New magnetic anomaly map of East Antarctica and surrounding regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golynsky, A.; Blankenship, D.; Chiappini, M.; Damaske, D.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Golynsky, D.; Goncharov, A.; Ishihara, T.; Ivanov, S.; Jokat, W.; Kim, H.R.; König, M.; Masolov, V.; Nogi, Y.; Sand, M.; Studing, M.; ADMAP Working Group

    2007-01-01

    community over East Antarctica and surrounding regions, significantly upgrade the Antarctic Digital Magnetic Anomaly Project (ADMAP) compilation and lead to substantial improvements in magnetic anomaly pattern recognition. New data have been matched in one inverse operation by minimizing the data differences for the areas of overlap. The aeromagnetic data show many previously unknown magnetic patterns, lineaments and trends, defining the spatial extent of Ferrar volcanics and plutonic Granite Harbour Intrusives in the Transantarctic Mountains and previously unknown tectonic trends of the East Antarctic craton. Regional aeromagnetic investigations have successfully delineated Early Paleozoic inherited crustal features along the flanks of the West Antarctic Rift System and the southern boundary of the Archean Ruker Terrane in the Prince Charles Mountains. Magnetic records along the East Antarctic continental margin provide new constraints on the breakup of Gondwana.

  16. Approximating edges of source bodies from magnetic or gravity anomalies.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.; Simpson, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Cordell and Grauch (1982, 1985) discussed a technique to estimate the location of abrupt lateral changes in magnetization or mass density of upper crustal rocks. The final step of their procedure is to identify maxima on a contoured map of horizontal gradient magnitudes. Attempts to automate their final step. The method begins with gridded magnetic or gravity anomaly data and produces a plan view of inferred boundaries of magnetic or gravity sources. The method applies to both local surveys and to continent-wide compilations of magnetic and gravity data.-from Authors

  17. On the origin of the Bangui magnetic anomaly, central African empire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    1977-01-01

    A large magnetic anomaly was recognized in satellite magnetometer data over the Central African Empire in central Africa. They named this anomaly the Bangui magnetic anomaly due to its location near the capital city of Bangui, C.A.E. Because large crustal magnetic anomalies are uncommon, the origin of this anomaly has provoked some interest. The area of the anomaly was visited to make ground magnetic measurements, geologic observations, and in-situ magnetic susceptibility measurements. Some rock samples were also collected and chemically analyzed. The results of these investigations are presented.

  18. Automatic detection of UXO magnetic anomalies using extended Euler deconvolution

    E-print Network

    Automatic detection of UXO magnetic anomalies using extended Euler deconvolution Kristofer Davis1, whereas the gradient data have an SI of four. The developed extended Euler deconvolution method based extended Euler deconvolution, then the methodology of how we use it, and finally amplitude analysis

  19. Macquarie island and the cause of oceanic linear magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Varne, R; Gee, R D; Quilty, P G

    1969-10-10

    Macquarie Islands is formed of probably Pliocene oceanic crust. Intruded into pillow lavas is a belt of harzburgite and layered gabbro mnasses cut by dike swarms. Similar belt-like structures may cause the linear magnetic anomalies of the ocean. PMID:17731490

  20. MARINE MAGNETIC ANOMALIES (Copyright, 2001, David T. Sandwell)

    E-print Network

    Sandwell, David T.

    to form a thin magma lens. Beneath the lens is a mush-zone develops into a 3500-m thick gabbro layer.(JeffGee,personalcommunication) #12;4 dikes and gabbro layers provide some contribution to the magnetic anomaly measured on the ocean surface. Note that the reversals recorded in the gabbro layer are do not have sharp vertical boundaries

  1. New digital magnetic anomaly database for North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, C.A.; Pilkington, M.; Cuevas, A.; Hernandez, I.; Urrutia, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Consejo de Recursos Minerales of Mexico (CRM) are compiling an upgraded digital magnetic anomaly database and map for North America. This trinational project is expected to be completed by late 2002.

  2. Plasma acceleration above martian magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lundin, R; Winningham, D; Barabash, S; Frahm, R; Holmström, M; Sauvaud, J-A; Fedorov, A; Asamura, K; Coates, A J; Soobiah, Y; Hsieh, K C; Grande, M; Koskinen, H; Kallio, E; Kozyra, J; Woch, J; Fraenz, M; Brain, D; Luhmann, J; McKenna-Lawler, S; Orsini, R S; Brandt, P; Wurz, P

    2006-02-17

    Auroras are caused by accelerated charged particles precipitating along magnetic field lines into a planetary atmosphere, the auroral brightness being roughly proportional to the precipitating particle energy flux. The Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms experiment on the Mars Express spacecraft has made a detailed study of acceleration processes on the nightside of Mars. We observed accelerated electrons and ions in the deep nightside high-altitude region of Mars that map geographically to interface/cleft regions associated with martian crustal magnetization regions. By integrating electron and ion acceleration energy down to the upper atmosphere, we saw energy fluxes in the range of 1 to 50 milliwatts per square meter per second. These conditions are similar to those producing bright discrete auroras above Earth. Discrete auroras at Mars are therefore expected to be associated with plasma acceleration in diverging magnetic flux tubes above crustal magnetization regions, the auroras being distributed geographically in a complex pattern by the many multipole magnetic field lines extending into space. PMID:16484488

  3. High magnetic susceptibility granodiorite as a source of surface magnetic anomalies in the King George Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, S.; Nakamura, N.; Funaki, M.; Sakanaka, S.

    2012-12-01

    Change in plate motion produces convergence of the two oceanic lithospheres and the formation of volcanic island arcs above the subducted older and thicker plate. The association of calc-alkaline diorites to tonalites and granodiorites (ACG) is typical plutonic rocks of the volcanic arcs. In the many island arcs that surround the Pacific Ocean, ACG generally forms shallow level plutons and is closely associated with volcanic rocks. The Japan Arc setting had occurred the emplacement of the highly magnetic granitoid along the fore-arc basin before back-arc spreading at middle Miocene, showing a linear positive magnetic anomaly. Similar magnetic anomalies have also been exhibited along the Circum-Pacific Belt. Along East Antarctica, it is well known that the South Shetland Islands have been formed by back-arc spreading related to the subduction along the South Shetland trench during the late Cretaceous and middle Miocene. Moreover, geology in the South Shetland Islands consists of lava flows with subordinate pyroclastic deposits, intrusive dykes-sills, granitic plutons, displaying a typical subduction-related calc-alkaline volcanic association. However, there is little report on the presence of fore-arc granitoid. Here we report the distribution and structure of the granitic plutons around Marian Cove in the King George Island, South Shetland, East Antarctica by surface geological survey and magnetic anisotropic studies. Then we compare the distribution of granitic plutons with surface magnetic anomalies through our ship-borne and foot-borne magnetic surveys. The granitic plutons are distributed only shallow around the Marian cove in the King George Island, and the plutons had been intruded in the Sejong formation with pyroclastic deposits and basaltic/rhyoritic lavas, suggesting the post back-arc spreading. We sampled 8 plutons, 12 basaltic lavas and 6 andestic dykes, all located within four kilometer radius from the Korean Antarctic research station (King Sejong station) in the western side of King George Island. The plutonic rocks of diorite and granodiorite show high values of bulk magnetic susceptibility of c.a. 0.01-0.4 SI, appearing to be the source of positive magnetic anomaly. We also revealed the preferred petrofabric lineation directions at the sites using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). The AMS showed the plutonic rocks represent the vertical intrusion from the deep seated magma. Our optical microscope observation verified the maximum AMS orientation is parallel to the preferred alignment of framework-forming plagioclase, suggesting the alignment of euhedral magnetite grains along the long-axes of plagioclases. Our ship-borne and foot-borne surveys of geomagnetic filed anomaly agree well with the distribution of the plutonic rocks, revealing the possible origin of surface magnetic anomaly. These suggests that the plutons in this area may be included ACG, and this magnetic surveys is proposed to infer the availability to find out the presence of granitoid.

  4. Lunar magnetic anomalies detected by the Apollo substatellite magnetometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, L.L.; Coleman, P.J., Jr.; Russell, C.T.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    Properties of lunar crustal magnetization thus far deduced from Apollo subsatellite magnetometer data are reviewed using two of the most accurate presently available magnetic anomaly maps - one covering a portion of the lunar near side and the other a part of the far side. The largest single anomaly found within the region of coverage on the near-side map correlates exactly with a conspicuous, light-colored marking in western Oceanus Procellarum called Reiner Gamma. This feature is interpreted as an unusual deposit of ejecta from secondary craters of the large nearby primary impact crater Cavalerius. An age for Cavalerius (and, by implication, for Reiner Gamma) of 3.2 ?? 0.2 ?? 109 y is estimated. The main (30 ?? 60 km) Reiner Gamma deposit is nearly uniformly magnetized in a single direction, with a minimum mean magnetization intensity of ???7 ?? 10-2 G cm3/g (assuming a density of 3 g/cm3), or about 700 times the stable magnetization component of the most magnetic returned samples. Additional medium-amplitude anomalies exist over the Fra Mauro Formation (Imbrium basin ejecta emplaced ???3.9 ?? 109 y ago) where it has not been flooded by mare basalt flows, but are nearly absent over the maria and over the craters Copernicus, Kepler, and Reiner and their encircling ejecta mantles. The mean altitude of the far-side anomaly gap is much higher than that of the near-side map and the surface geology is more complex, so individual anomaly sources have not yet been identified. However, it is clear that a concentration of especially strong sources exists in the vicinity of the craters Van de Graaff and Aitken. Numerical modeling of the associated fields reveals that the source locations do not correspond with the larger primary impact craters of the region and, by analogy with Reiner Gamma, may be less conspicuous secondary crater ejecta deposits. The reason for a special concentration of strong sources in the Van de Graaff-Aitken region is unknown, but may be indirectly related to the existence of strongly modified crustal terrain which also occurs in the same region. The inferred directions of magnetization for the several sources of the largest anomalies are highly inclined with respect to one another, but are generally depleted in the north-south direction. The north-south depletion of magnetization intensity appears to continue across the far-side within the region of coverage. The mechanism of magnetization and the origin of the magnetizing field remain unresolved, but the uniformity with which the Reiner Gamma deposit is apparently magnetized, and the north-south depletion of magnetization intensity across a substantial portion of the far side, seem to require the existence of an ambient field, perhaps of global or larger extent. The very different inferred directions of magnetization possessed by nearly adjacent sources of the Van de Graaff-Aitken anomalies, and the depletion in their north-south component of magnetization, do not favor an internally generated dipolar field oriented parallel to the present spin axis. A variably oriented interplanetary magnetizing field that was intrinsically strong or locally amplified by unknown surface processes is least inconsistent with the data. ?? 1979.

  5. Magnetic anomalies in single crystalline Tb5Si3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Kartik K.; Mukherjee, K.; Paulose, P. L.; Sampathkumaran, E. V.; Xu, Y.; Löser, W.

    2012-03-01

    The polycrystalline form of the compound, Tb5Si3, crystallizing in Mn5Si3-type hexagonal structure, which was earlier believe to order antiferromagnetically below 69 K, has been recently reported by us to exhibit interesting magnetoresistance (MR) anomalies. In order to understand the magnetic anomalies of this compound better, we synthesized single crystals of this compound and subjected them to intense magnetization and MR studies. The results reveal that the magnetic behavior is strongly anisotropic as the easy axis is along a basal plane. There appear to be multiple magnetic features in the close vicinity of 70 K. In addition, there are multiple steps in isothermal magnetization (which could not be resolved in the data for polycrystalline data) for magnetic-field (H) along a basal plane. The sign of MR is positive in the magnetically ordered state, and, interestingly, the magnitude dramatically increases at the initial step for H parallel to basal plane, but decreases at subsequent steps as though the origin of these steps are different. However, for the perpendicular orientation (H?[0 0 0 1]), there is no evidence for any step either in M(H) or in MR(H). These results establish this compound is an interesting magnetic material.

  6. Spreading of Magnetic Reconnection X-lines in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassak, Paul; Shepherd, Lucas

    2012-03-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic reconnection often begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the out-of-plane direction in time. A number of authors have studied this problem for magnetotail applications such as substorms and bursty bulk flows, for which the out-of-plane (guide) field is typically small. However, spreading also occurs in laboratory experiments and two-ribbon solar flares (such as the Bastille Day flare), and is inferred to occur at the dayside magnetopause. The reconnection site in each of these settings is known or thought to have a significant guide field. With no guide field, it was shown that the reconnection spreading is controlled by the species that carries the current. However, laboratory experiments with a large guide field (Katz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 104, 255004, 2010) revealed that spreading takes place in both directions at the Alfven speed based on the guide field. This implies a qualitative change of behavior as the guide field varies. We present a scaling argument for the condition on the guide field at which the nature of the spreading switches from being caused by current carriers to Alfven waves. Further, we show results of three-dimensional two-fluid simulations that agree with the theory. We discuss applications to observations.

  7. Manifestation of the petrogeneration zones of Northern and the Bering seas in ground magnetic anomalies and anomalies of satellite Champ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Tamara; Krasinsky, Egor; Petrova, Alevtina; Demina, Irina

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this paper are showed results of studying of specificity of a deep structure of zones of petrogeneration Northern and the Bering seas on aeromagnetic and satellite magnetometric datas. Research lateral and vertical heterogeneitys an earth's crust of Northern sea is carried out on the basis of the analysis of measurements of satellite Champ at height of 100 km and the digital database created on materials of sea shooting of a geomagnetic field, executed on non-magnetic schooner "Zarya". On sea measurements in Northern sea through large oil fields and gas ( Frigg, Ekofisk, Forties trough, Leman, etc.). Geomagnetic sections for an interval of depths from 1 up to 30 km are constructed. It has allowed to study character of distribution of magnetization of breeds of a cover, horizontal lamination intracore layers of an earth's crust and to allocate in zones petrogeneration synvertical fluidoconduct zones the channels described by alternation of not magnetic and low-magnetic layers. They were showed on geomagnetic sections as permeable zones quasi- laminated structures with the lowered magnetic properties in an interval of depths from 8 up to 28 km. Comparison to a map of the magnetic anomalies measured at height of 100 km by satellite Champ, has shown, that areas of the greatest petrocongestions North Sea ????? at height of 100 km are dated for a zone of gradients and a minimum of northeast displacement of regional anomalies of western and east blocks of Northern sea. It corresponds to representations about an orientation of a fissuring zone and the increased size of a geothermal gradient North Sea rift and is corresponded position allocated on hydromagnetic structures deep fluidoconduct channels. Thus, distribution to water areas of deposits of deposits is emphasized not only low-magnetic areas in a thickness of a sedimentary cover where they are directly located, but also by not magnetic lenses in breeds of the base spreading it in intervals of depths of 8-11 km and 15-18 km. The oil-gas-bearing province of the Bering Sea occupies uniform sedimentary megabasin. On aeromagnetic measurements at height of 300 m are constructed geomagnetic sections in an interval of depths from 0.5 km up to 25 km crossing the basic zones possible petrocongestions with traps structural and of structural - stratigraphic types. Distribution of magnetization in an interval of development of potentially productive sandy layers on depths from 1 up to 5 km is received. The most perspective zones possible petrocongestions are allocated in Ilpinsky, Olutorsky and Olutorsko-Komandorsky sedimentary basins. The deep permeable zone with system of low-magnetic lenses in intervals of depths 8-10, 12, 18-20 km, dated to Pilgin zone possible petrocongestions was most brightly showed. Comparison of ground supervision to the data received by results of measurements from satellite Champ at height of 100 km, shows, that large oil-gas-bearing Vertuhovskaya, Karaginskaya, Pahachiskaya and Pilginskaya zones are dated for a minimum isometric satellite magnetic anomaly. At height of 400 km this minimum keeps the form that speaks about stability of a condition of the permeable zones supervising oil-gas-bearing.

  8. Tracking pigeons in a magnetic anomaly and in magnetically "quiet" terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffner, Ingo; Fuhrmann, Patrick; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2011-07-01

    Pigeons were released at two sites of equal distance from the loft, one within a magnetic anomaly, the other in magnetically quiet terrain, and their tracks were recorded with the help of GPS receivers. A comparison of the beginning of the tracks revealed striking differences: within the anomaly, the initial phase lasted longer, and the distance flown was longer, with the pigeons' headings considerably farther from the home direction. During the following departure phase, the birds were well homeward oriented at the magnetically quiet site, whereas they continued to be disoriented within the anomaly. Comparing the tracks in the anomaly with the underlying magnetic contours shows considerable differences between individuals, without a common pattern emerging. The differences in magnetic intensity along the pigeons' path do not differ from a random distribution of intensity differences around the release site, indicating that the magnetic contours do not directly affect the pigeons' routes. Within the anomaly, pigeons take longer until their flights are oriented, but 5 km from the release point, the birds, still within the anomaly, are also significantly oriented in the home direction. These findings support the assumption that magnetically anomalous conditions initially interfere with the pigeons' navigational processes, with birds showing rather individual responses in their attempts to overcome these problems.

  9. Apparatus for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by squid gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, Jr., William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  10. Evaluation of magnetic anomalies located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, R. Christopher; Athens, William P.; Saltus, Allen R., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents results of testing and assessment of eleven previously recorded magnetic anomalies located in Lower Bayou Teche, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Maintenance dredging of Lower Bayou Teche may impact several of the eight anomalies evaluated in this study. Objectives of the study were to conduct detailed surveys and assessments of eight previously located anomalies. These were Anomalies 8, 13, 24a, 29, 30, 31, 33, and 58. Three orther anomalies, Anomaly nos. 23, 24b, and 55 were also briefly examined. Methods used during survey included relocation of each anomaly with a magnetometer; informal magnetic and fathometer survey of each anomaly and its vicinity, physical search of the river bottom at each anomaly location; use of a metal detector to assess the depth of the magnetic source of each anomaly; probing of the river bottom to locate buried structures; and limited excavation with a jet probe to document the source, nature, and research potential of each of the eight anomalies. Two of the anomalies, Anomaly nos. 30 and 58 could not be relocated. Four of the anomalies apparently are associated with modern debris: Anomaly nos. 8, 13, 29, and 31. Anomaly no. 33 appears to be an isolated object. Evidence of structure was observed 14 to 15 ft below water surface, however, it occurs below the project impact zone. One archeological site, the Anomaly no. 23/24 Complex (Site 16SMY76) was defined. It consists of two wooden barges and some twentieth century bridge remains.

  11. Axial anomaly and magnetism of nuclear and quark matter

    E-print Network

    Son, D T

    2007-01-01

    We consider the response of the QCD ground state at finite baryon density to a strong magnetic field B. We point out the dominant role played by the coupling of neutral Goldstone bosons, such as pi^0, to the magnetic field via the axial triangle anomaly. We show that, in vacuum, above a value of B ~ m_pi^2/e, a metastable object appears - the pi^0 domain wall. Due to the axial anomaly, the wall carries a baryon number surface density proportional to B. As a result, for B ~ 10^{19} G a stack of parallel pi^0 domain walls is energetically more favorable than nuclear matter at the same density. Similarly, at higher densities, somewhat weaker magnetic fields of order B ~ 10^{17}-10^{18} G transform the color-superconducting ground state of QCD into new phases containing stacks of axial isoscalar (eta or eta') domain walls. We also show that a quark-matter state known as ``Goldstone current state,'' in which a gradient of a Goldstone field is spontaneously generated, is ferromagnetic due to the axial anomaly. We e...

  12. Solar wind plasma interaction with Gerasimovich lunar magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Shahab; Lue, Charles; Holmström, Mats; Poppe, Andrew R.; Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Delory, Gregory T.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of the first local hybrid simulations (particle ions and fluid electrons) for the solar wind plasma interaction with realistic lunar crustal fields. We use a three-dimensional hybrid model of plasma and an empirical model of the Gerasimovich magnetic anomaly based on Lunar Prospector observations. We examine the effects of low and high solar wind dynamic pressures on this interaction when the Gerasimovich magnetic anomaly is located at nearly 20° solar zenith angle. We find that for low solar wind dynamic pressure, the crustal fields mostly deflect the solar wind plasma, form a plasma void at very close distances to the Moon (below 20 km above the surface), and reflect nearly 5% of the solar wind in charged form. In contrast, during high solar wind dynamic pressure, the crustal fields are more compressed, the solar wind is less deflected, and the lunar surface is less shielded from impinging solar wind flux, but the solar wind ion reflection is more locally intensified (up to 25%) compared to low dynamic pressures. The difference is associated with an electrostatic potential that forms over the Gerasimovich magnetic anomaly as well as the effects of solar wind plasma on the crustal fields during low and high dynamic pressures. Finally, we show that an antimoonward Hall electric field is the dominant electric field for ˜3 km altitude and higher, and an ambipolar electric field has a noticeable contribution to the electric field at close distances (<3 km) to the Moon.

  13. The Russian contribution in WDMAM-2011 magnetic anomalies and anomalies of satellite Champ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livinova, Tamara; Glebovsky, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    In VSEGEI is created the renovated digital cartographical model of an anomalous magnetic field (AMF) of territory of Russia and adjacent aquatory of scale 1:2 500000 on the basis of the available base summary digital materials prepared at various times by two organizations: VSEGEI and VNIIOkeangeologia. For this purpose uniform technological rules which have provided satisfactory synthesis of digital data files of an anomalous magnetic field in scale 1:2 500000 have been developed and realized. As a result of processing digital data file AMF the divergences reached 200 ???, have been eliminated. For inclusion in WDMAM-2011 the Russian side the digital model counted on height 1 km on a grid 5?5?? is offered. Anomalous values are designed from normal field VSEGEI of an epoch of 1965. The magnetic grid (5x5 km) within the Russian continental shelf compiled in VNIIOkeangeologia was leveled, adjusted and merged with those created in VSEGEI on shore of Russian Federation. Data processing is made by software Geosoft. Russian magnetic database in the Arctic Ocean was created as a result of adjusting of all historical and recent magnetic data sets, collected several organizations during the period about 40 years. Within the deep part of the Arctic Ocean this information was leveled, adjusted and combined with all available US magnetic data sets under cooperative project between and US Naval Research Laboratory. A result of this compilation is presented by grid of magnetic anomalies (5x5 km) that was used in the CAMP-GM project.

  14. A magnetic anomaly of possible economic significance in southeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zietz, Isidore

    1964-01-01

    An aeromagnetic survey in southeastern Minnesota by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the State of Minnesota has revealed a high-amplitude, linear, and narrow magnetic feature that suggests a possible source of Precambrian iron-formation of economic value. For the past few years the U. S. Geological Survey has been conducting detailed geophysical studies of the midcontinent gravity anomaly--a broad, high-amplitude feature that extends from Lake Superior through the States of Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, and part of Kansas. As part of this study an aeromagnetic survey of the southern part of the State was made in cooperation with the State of Minnesota during the summer of 1963, in which a linear high-amplitude anomaly of the order of 4,000 gammas was discovered. Because of the high amplitude, the linearity, and the narrowness of the magnetic feature, it is believed the source may be Precambrian iron-formation of possible economic value. The anomalous area is in Fillmore County, approximately between the towns of Lanesboro and Peterson in the extreme southeastern part of the State. (See figures 1 and 2.) At the site of the anomaly, Cambrian sedimentary rocks occur in the valley of the Root River, and Ordovician rocks (nearly flat lying) mantle the upland areas. The uplands are largely covered by glacial deposits, which are relatively thin (Paul K. Sims, written communication, 1964). Depths to the Precambrian are estimated to range from 500 feet to 1,000 feet below the surface. The aeromagnetic map shown in figure 2 was compiled from continuous magnetic profiles made along east-west flight lines 1,000 feet above ground, and spaced approximately 1 mile apart. Contour intervals of 20, 100, and 500 gammas were used depending on the intensity. The instrument for the survey was a flux-gate type magnetometer (AN/ASQ-3A) which measures total-field variations. The contour map displays variations in magnetic pattern which are typical of shallow Precambrian rocks. Anomalies of the order of 1,000 gammas are shown along the east and west edges of the map. The outstanding feature is the previously mentioned linear positive anomaly that trends northeast and reaches a peak of 3,960 gammas. The positive anomaly is contoured from data on four consecutive profiles, but only two show high amplitudes. The high-amplitude anomalies along traverses 1 and 2 are shown in figure 3. Depth calculations suggest that the source of the anomaly lies about 1,000 feet below the surface. Assuming a dikelike source and magnetization resulting entirely from induction in the earth's field, several calculations were made in an attempt to fit the magnetic profile taken along the line AA' (see figs. 2 and 4), considered to be a typical cross-section of the magnetic anomaly. Comparisons are shown between observed and computed profiles. The fixed parameters used were (a) distance from detector to source of 2,000 ft; width of dike of 5,000 ft; dip of dike of 75?, 90?, 105? , and 120? , as shown. The best fit occurs when the dike is vertical or dips 75? to the southwest. For these cases, the susceptibility, k, is computed to be 0.016 c.g.s, units, and is comparable to k = 0.02+ calculated by Bath (1962) for the relatively unmetamorphosed iron-formation of the Main Megabi district in Minnesota where the induced magnetization was most likely the dominant magnetization. If the dominant magnetization for the anomaly in Fillmore County were remanent rather than induced, the economic importance of the anomaly would be greatly reduced. This anomaly seems sufficiently promising to warrant further geologic and geophysical investigation. Detailed ground magnetic and electrical studies would be useful to delineate the feature. In the final analysis, however, the presence of iron-formation can be determined only by the drill.

  15. The moon: sources of the crustal magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Hood, L L; Coleman, P J; Wilhelms, D E

    1979-04-01

    Previously unmapped Apollo 16 subsatellite magnetometer data collected at low altitudes over the lunar near side are presented. Medium-amplitude magnetic anomalies exist over the Fra Mauro and Cayley Formations (primary and secondary basin ejecta emplaced 3.8 to 4.0 billion years ago) but are nearly absent over the maria and over the craters Copernicus, Kepler, and Reiner and their encircling ejecta mantles. The largest observed anomaly (radial component approximately 21 gammas at an altitude of 20 kilometers) is exactly correlated with a conspicuous light-colored deposit on western Oceanus Procellarum known as Reiner gamma. Assuming that the Reiner gamma deposit is the source body and estimating its maximum average thickness as 10 meters, a minimum mean magnetization level of 5.2 +/- 2.4 x 10(-2) electromagnetic units per gram, or approximately 500 times the stable magnetization component of the most magnetic returned sample, is calculated. An age for its emplacement of magnetization of lunar crustal materials must have continued for a period exceeding 1 billion years. PMID:17816737

  16. Petrological Explanations for the Magnetic Anomalies Detected on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Rutherford, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The discovery of crustal magnetization in some locations on Mars, particularly the southern highlands, has major implications for the early evolution of Mars. The east-west-trending linear features in the southern highlands with alternating polarity may be the result of an early seafloor spreading process similar to that seen on Earth today. The larger magnetization of the martian crust compared to the Earth can be attributed to its higher Fe content and the proposed minerals associated with this magnetization are multidomain hematite and pyrrhotite. In this study, we discuss the petrological evolution of basalts on Earth and Mars and suggest processes that may enhance crystallization of magnetic minerals in the martian rocks, thereby accounting for their intense magnetic properties.

  17. Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  18. Improving the geological interpretation of magnetic and gravity satellite anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, William J.; Braile, Lawrence W.; Vonfrese, Ralph R. B.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the geologic component of observed satellite magnetic and gravity fields requires accurate isolation of the geologic component of the observations, theoretically sound and viable inversion techniques, and integration of collateral, constraining geologic and geophysical data. A number of significant contributions were made which make quantitative analysis more accurate. These include procedures for: screening and processing orbital data for lithospheric signals based on signal repeatability and wavelength analysis; producing accurate gridded anomaly values at constant elevations from the orbital data by three-dimensional least squares collocation; increasing the stability of equivalent point source inversion and criteria for the selection of the optimum damping parameter; enhancing inversion techniques through an iterative procedure based on the superposition theorem of potential fields; and modeling efficiently regional-scale lithospheric sources of satellite magnetic anomalies. In addition, these techniques were utilized to investigate regional anomaly sources of North and South America and India and to provide constraints to continental reconstruction. Since the inception of this research study, eleven papers were presented with associated published abstracts, three theses were completed, four papers were published or accepted for publication, and an additional manuscript was submitted for publication.

  19. The Stand Locations of Ancient People Depending On The Intensity of Local Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatokhin, I. T.; Khramov, A. V.; Shumilov, O. I.; Kasatkina, E. A.; Raspopov, O. M.

    For analysis 235 ancient people stands in the region of Kursk magnetic anomaly (one of the strongest anomaly all over the world) were chosen. All stands were dated by radiocarbon method and are placed in the State List of Archaeological Monuments of Belgorod Region. The oldest stands were radiocarbon dated to 70,000-50,000 years before present (kyr BP). All stands are located along the 300 km valley of Oskol river, having got a homogeneous climatic conditions. At the half of the valley the intensity of local magnetic field is rather low (0-1000 nT), so the region should be considered as the most comfort area for human occupation. The distribution of human occupation at this site looks as follows: 100% at 50-10 kyr BP, 94% at 6-4 kyr BP, 87% at 4-2 kyr BP, 83% at 3-2 kyr BP and 64% at 2-1 kyr BP. At ancient time humans preferred to occupy the sites with low magnetic field intensity. The spreading of human occupation outside of the comfort zone (more than 34%) began at Iron Age (2-1 kyr BP). Thus it may be concluded that in Palaeolithic age (50-10 kyr BP) humans avoided the area with enhanced level of local magnetic field. This seems to be connected to bad influence of the factor on human health, lower level of orientation on the surface, may be to different plant distribution features, and state of ancient people anxiety. The spreading of human occupation out of the comfort zone at rather recent time seems to be caused by social-economic activity.

  20. The last frontier? High-resolution, near-bottom measurements of the Hawaiian Jurassic magnetic anomaly sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, M.; Tominaga, M.; Sager, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Jurassic sequence of marine magnetic anomalies i.e. older than M29 remain the last part of the marine magnetic anomaly sequence of the geomagnetic polarity timescale (GPTS) that can be gleaned from the ocean crustal record. While Jurassic crust is present in several areas of the world's ocean basins, the oldest and arguably best preserved sequence is in the western Pacific where three lineations sets (Japanese, Hawaiian and Phoenix) converge on the oldest remaining ocean crust on the planet (i.e. crust that has not been subducted). The magnetic anomalies in these 3 lineation sets are marked by low amplitude, relatively indistinct anomalies (tiny wiggles) that collectively have been called the Jurassic quiet Zone (JQZ). Over the past 20 years we have been working on resolving the character and origin of these anomalies with various technologies to improve our resolution of this period. Following an aeromagnetic survey that revealed the possible presence of lineated anomalies older than M29 in the Japanese lineations, we conducted a deeptow magnetometer survey of the Japanese sequence in 1992. In 2002/03 we extended and confirmed this deeptow record with a deeptowed sidescan and magnetometer survey of the Japanese lineation sequence by tying in ODP Hole 801C and extending the anomaly sequence between M29 and M44. These surveys reveal remarkably fast reversals that are lineated and decrease in intensity back in time until M38, prior to which the sequence becomes somewhat confused (the LAZ or low amplitude zone) before recovering in both amplitude and lineated character around Hole 801C (M42). These results are partially supported by recently reported terrestrial magnetostratigraphy records that show the existence of reversals back to M38. A Jurassic GPTS was constructed from this Japanese anomaly sequence, but the overall global significance of the reversal sequence and systematic field intensity changes require confirmation from crustal records created at different spreading centers. In 2011, we undertook the next generation of near-bottom magnetic studies utilizing new autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) technology (Sentry) and concurrent deeptow and seismic profiling surveys of the Hawaiian anomaly sequence. Preliminary results show a similar anomaly record to the Japanese sequence: an overall decrease in anomaly amplitude from M19 to M38 and a period of low amplitude, which in turn is preceded by a return to stronger amplitude anomalies. The magnetic anomaly correlations between Hawaiian and Japanese sea-surface level profiles confirm the reversal record back in time, at least, to M38. At the mid-water and near-bottom AUV levels, the magnetic data clearly show the short-wavelength anomaly character of the M29-M38 sequence, indicating that the fast reversals observed in the Japanese lineations are also present in the Hawaiian lineation set. The strong similarity of overall anomaly patterns between Japanese and Hawaiian sequences supports the preliminary conclusion that geomagnetic field behavior during the Jurassic was dynamic, with fast reversals and changing intensity, and certainly not "quiet". Finally, AUV surveys provide measurements of the marine magnetic anomaly record whose resolution is limited only by the crustal recording process and crustal magnetic architecture rather than spatial resolution.

  1. Primordial Magnetic Fields, Right Electrons, and the Abelian Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M.; Shaposhnikov, M.; Joyce, M.

    1997-08-01

    In the standard model there are charges with Abelian anomaly only (e.g., right-handed electron number) which are effectively conserved in the early Universe until some time shortly before the electroweak scale. A state at finite chemical potential of such a charge, possibly arising due to asymmetries produced at the grand unified theory scale, is unstable to the generation of hypercharge magnetic field. Quite large magnetic fields ({approximately}10{sup 22} G at T{approximately}100 GeV with typical inhomogeneity scale {approximately}10{sup 6}/T) can be generated. These fields may be of cosmological interest, potentially acting as seeds for amplification to larger scale magnetic fields through nonlinear mechanisms. Previously derived bounds on exotic B{minus}L violating operators may also be evaded. {copyright} {ital 1997 } {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Absolute Magnetization Distribution on Back-arc Spreading Axis Hosting Hydrothermal Vents; Insight from Shinkai 6500 Magnetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Okino, K.; Honsho, C.; Mochizuki, N.; Szitkar, F.; Dyment, J.

    2013-12-01

    Near-bottom magnetic profiling using submersible, deep-tow, Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) make possible to conduct high-resolution surveys and depict detailed magnetic features reflecting, for instance, the presence of fresh lavas or hydrothermal alteration, or geomagnetic paleo-intensity variations. We conducted near-bottom three component magnetic measurements onboard submersible Shinkai 6500 in the Southern Mariana Trough, where five active hydrothermal vent fields (Snail, Yamanaka, Archean, Pica, and Urashima sites) have been found in both on- and off-axis areas of the active back-arc spreading center, to detect signals from hydrothermally altered rock and to distinguish old and new submarine lava flows. Fourteen dives were carried out at an altitude of 1-40 m during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-10 and YK10-11 cruises in 2010. We carefully corrected the effect of the induced and permanent magnetizations of the submersible by applying the correction method for the shipboard three-component magnetometer measurement modified for deep-sea measurement, and subtracted the IGRF values from the corrected data to obtain geomagnetic vector anomalies along the dive tracks. We then calculated the synthetic magnetic vector field produced by seafloor, assumed to be uniformly magnetized, using three dimensional forward modeling. Finally, values of the absolute magnetizations were estimated by using a linear transfer function in the Fourier domain from the observed and synthetic magnetic anomalies. The distribution of estimated absolute magnetization generally shows low values around the five hydrothermal vent sites. This result is consistent with the equivalent magnetization distribution obtained from previous AUV survey data. The areas of low magnetization are also consistent with hydrothermal deposits identified in video records. These results suggest that low magnetic signals are due to hydrothermal alteration zones where host rocks are demagnetized by hydrothermal circulation. The low magnetization zones around the off-axis vent sites are about ten times wider than those surrounding the on-axis sites, possibly reflecting the longer duration of hydrothermal circulation at these sites. Another interesting result is that the absolute magnetization shows extremely high intensities (>80 A/m) at the neo volcanic zones (NVZ) and relatively low intensities (<10 A/m) two to five kilometers away from the NVZ. These variations are quite consistent with those of the Natural Remanent Magnetization measured on basalt samples, suggesting that the low-temperature oxidation of host rock due to the reaction with seawater has completed within a few kilometers distance from the spreading axis. We conclude that the magnetization of the uppermost oceanic crust decreases with age due to the combination of the both hydrothermal rapid alteration and the low-temperature gradual alteration processes.

  3. Current disruption and its spreading in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg; Ji, Hantao

    2013-11-15

    Recent magnetic reconnection experiments (MRX) [Dorfman et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 233 (2013)] have disclosed current disruption in the absence of an externally imposed guide field. During current disruption in MRX, both the current density and the total observed out-of-reconnection-plane current drop simultaneous with a rise in out-of-reconnection-plane electric field. Here, we show that current disruption is an intrinsic property of the dynamic formation of an X-point configuration of magnetic field in magnetic reconnection, independent of the model used for plasma description and of the dimensionality (2D or 3D) of reconnection. An analytic expression for the current drop is derived from Ampere's Law. Its predictions are verified by 2D and 3D electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) simulations. Three dimensional EMHD simulations show that the current disruption due to localized magnetic reconnection spreads along the direction of the electron drift velocity with a speed which depends on the wave number of the perturbation. The implications of these results for MRX are discussed.

  4. Optimal processing of satellite-derived magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown how the concept of the power spectrum can be extended to two-dimensional spatial power spectra and how it can be used in determining optimal data processing methods for satellite-derived magnetic anomaly data and planning missions to obtain such data. The analysis techniques are applied to the data set and data-processing procedure described by Mayhew et al. (1980), a study that treats magnetic anomaly data for Australia and the surrounding ocean obtained by the polar orbit POGO series satellites. It is shown that the data-processing method used by Mayhew et al. is approximately equivalent to an invariant two-dimensional linear filter and that it is reasonably close to optimal with respect to accuracy, although some possible improvements are suggested. However, as is usual when filtering data, some real 'signal' is unavoidably removed along with the 'noise' resulting in errors that can be quite large. A method for reducing these errors by using additional data from a medium inclination orbit satellite (for example, 60 deg inclination) is proposed.

  5. High-resolution magnetic signature of active hydrothermal systems in the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masakazu; Okino, Kyoko; Honsho, Chie; Dyment, Jerome; Szitkar, Florent; Mochizuki, Nobutatsu; Asada, Miho

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution vector magnetic measurements were performed on five hydrothermal vent fields of the back-arc spreading region of the southern Mariana Trough using Shinkai 6500, a deep-sea manned submersible. A new 3-D forward scheme was applied that exploits the surrounding bathymetry and varying altitudes of the submersible to estimate absolute crustal magnetization. The results revealed that magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetizations show a reasonable correlation with natural remanent magnetizations of rock samples collected from the seafloor of the same region. The distribution of magnetic-anomaly-derived absolute magnetization suggests that all five andesite-hosted hydrothermal fields are associated with a lack of magnetization, as is generally observed at basalt-hosted hydrothermal sites. Furthermore, both the Pika and Urashima sites were found to have their own distinct low-magnetization zones, which could not be distinguished in magnetic anomaly data collected at higher altitudes by autonomous underwater vehicle due to their limited extension. The spatial extent of the resulting low magnetization is approximately 10 times wider at off-axis sites than at on-axis sites, possibly reflecting larger accumulations of nonmagnetic sulfides, stockwork zones, and/or alteration zones at the off-axis sites.

  6. Magnetic Anomalies on Io and Their Relationship to the Spatial Distribution of Volcanic Centers 

    E-print Network

    Knicely, Joshua

    2015-04-23

    Forward modeling of planetary-scale magnetic anomalies due to induced crustal magnetization of Io is developed. My approach involves finite difference modeling of a temporally- and spatially-averaged steady state geotherm superimposed by the thermal...

  7. An equivalent layer magnetization model for the United States derived from satellite altitude magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Long wavelength magnetic anomalies measured by the Pogo series satellites at altitudes 400-700 km over the United States and adjacent areas are inverted to an equivalent layer magnetization model based on an equal area dipole source array at the earth's surface. Minimum source spacing giving a stable solution and a physically meaningful magnetization distribution is 300 km, and a scheme is presented for effectively sampling the distribution on a grid twice as fine. The model expresses lateral variation in the vertical integral of magnetization and is a starting point for models of lateral variation in the form of the magnetization-depth curve in the magnetic crust. The magnetization model contours correlate with large-scale tectonic features, and in the western part of the country, probably reflect Curie isotherm undulations.

  8. On long-wavelength magnetic anomalies over Indian region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Carlo, L.; Rastogi, R. G.; Singh, B. P. (principal investigators)

    1983-01-01

    A data set composed of vector magnetic measurements obtained by MAGSAT and very accurate altitude determinations made using Sun sensors and star cameras was used to obtain data for very quiet days over the Indian region at 10 S to 40 N and 60 E to 110 E in an effort to determine the validity of quantitative estimates made from aeromagnetic data obtained by removing the core field. To further account for the external effects, the ring current contributions estimated using both X and Z variations were subtracted from the observed values. Before this, the core contribution was eliminated through a spherical harmonic expansion with terms up to N=13. Analysis of the residual measurements using Fast Fourier techniques indicates that the anomalies contain substantial power for wavelengths of about 1500 kms. Because the ring current effect has a spatial structure of this dimension over India, efforts are being made to exactly eliminate these two interfering effects from the data.

  9. Decay of natural remanent magnetization of oceanic basalt on the back-arc spreading axis of the southern Mariana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, N.; Nogi, Y.; Asada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Okino, K.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic anomaly high on the spreading axis is a well-known character of the magnetic anomalies in the ocean, which is possibly related to magnetization intensity reduction of oceanic basalt due to alteration (low-temperature oxidation of titanomagnetite). For a better understanding of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of oceanic basalt, we studied rock-magnetic property of basaltic rocks in the back-arc spreading axis in the southern Mariana Trough. One to four meter cores were drilled from the seafloor using a Boring Machine System (BMS) in the cruise of TAIGA project (Taiga10M). Block samples were also collected during the dives of SHINKAI6500 in the cruise YK10-11. One-inch specimens drilled from the samples were used for rock-magnetic measurements. NRM intensities of these specimens show a clear decrease within 2 km of the ridge axis. Progressive thermal demagnetizations of NRM show that dominant blocking-temperature components are 200-300 and 500-575 °C. Specimens from the ridge axis typically show low blocking-temperature components. On the other hand, specimens collected at 2-5 km distance from the ridge axis show both low and high blocking-temperature components. Alternating field demagnetizations of NRM, anhysteresis remanent magnetization (ARM) and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) indicate that low blocking-temperature components have lower coercivities (<40 mT) while high blocking-temperature components possibly correspond to higher coercivities. These data suggest that high blocking-temperature component is carried by titanomaghemite (or fine magnetite). On the basis of these results, the low blocking-temperature components are considered to be primary thermoremanent magnetization (TRM). The high blocking-temperature components are chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) acquired during low-temperature alteration which had completed within 2 km of the ridge axis. The NRM intensity shows a decrease within 2 km of the ridge axis, which is similar to a reported result from the East Pacific Rise. Similar spatial scales for the NRM reduction were observed for the ridges of different spreading rate suggesting that the low-temperature alteration of oceanic basalt may result from the geological structure around the ridge axis such as active hydrothermal circulation zone rather than the crust's aging which is discussed in previous studies.

  10. ANOMALIES MAGNETIQUES ET DATATION DES FONDS OCEANIQUES : QUARANTE ANS APRES VINE ET MATTHEWS

    E-print Network

    Dyment, Jérôme

    By interpreting the marine magnetic anomalies as resulting from seafloor spreading, Vine and Matthews (1963) gave@ipgp.jussieu.fr) Extended English Abstract MAGNETIC ANOMALIES AND AGE OF THE SEAFLOOR: FORTY YEARS AFTER VINE AND MATTHEWS, dating the seafloor using scalar sea-surface magnetic anomalies requires a magnetisation vector non

  11. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic characterization of magnetic anomalies in the Central Iberian Arc (Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalain, J.; Ayarza, P.; Martinez-Catalan, J. R.; Álvarez-Lobato, F.; Gómez-Barreiro, J.; Suárez Barrios, M.; Torres-López, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Central Iberian Arc is one of the four oroclines delineated by the European Variscan Belt. It is located in NW and Central Iberia and characterized by a conspicuous magnetic response. The most intense magnetic anomaly within this arc is the so called Eastern Galicia Magnetic Anomaly (EGMA; Aller et al., 1994), located in the northern part of Spain and associated to the Lugo-Sanabria dome, an extensional structure in the inner part of arc. The aeromagnetic map of the Iberian Peninsula (Ardizone et al., 1989; Miranda et al., 1989) shows that the EGMA continues to Central Spain and turns back to the Atlantic Ocean, as a broad positive anomaly, delineating a tight fold at the core of the Central Iberian Arc. The source of the EGMA seems to be magnetite-bearing migmatites and inhomogeneous granites formed during an extensive late Carboniferous thermal event triggered by Variscan crustal thickening. These rocks were modeled as a lens-shaped body up to 12 km thick with magnetic susceptibility values between 0.02and 0.03 SI units, that underlie the whole dome extension and continues toward the west of it (Ayarza and Martínez Catalán, 2007). However, this body crops out only in the deepest and northernmost part of the dome, in the Xistral Tectonic Window, and there, only its upper part is accessible. Migmatites and granitoids are abundant along the rest of the anomaly, but their magnetic susceptibility is low. Thus, the source of the magnetic anomaly should be buried there and its nature is unknown. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic studies in the outcropping rocks responsible for the EGMA have been carried out, adding new constraints to the origin of this anomaly. Rock magnetic analysis as progressive acquisition of IRM, hysteresis loops, thermomagnetic experiments and X-ray indicate that the ferromagnetic fraction is dominated by multidomain magnetite and titanohematite. It is remarkable the unusual high anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of these rocks, showing degree of anisotropy values 1.2magnetic fabric shows Variscan affinity, related to an extensional ductile detachment that bounds the Lugo-Sanabria dome to the west. The paleomagnetic analysis consisting in thermal and alternating field demagnetization allows isolating a stable paleomagnetic component with high coercivity and maximum unblocking temperatures of about 630°C, that systematically shows reversed polarity. This component has been interpreted as a remagnetization because its mean direction match those of the Iberian Peninsula after anticlockwise rotation related to the opening of the Bay of Biscay during the Early Cretaceous. All these data must be included in the models in order to place new constraints on the origin, position, and shape of the source and to asses whether all the broad magnetic anomaly at the core of the Central Iberian Arc has the same origin as the EGMA, or a deeper source contributes to it and to the rest of the anomaly.

  12. Magsat to CHAMP: Magnetic Satellite Explorations of Lithospheric Anomalies over Kursk, Bangui and the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.; Taylor, Patrick T.; vonFrese, R. R.; Kim, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    We compare crustal magnetic anomaly maps over the Kursk (Russia) and Bangui (Central African Republic) isolated anomalies and the Antarctic derived from the Magsat, \\Orsted and CHAMP satellite fields. We wish to demonstrate how progress in satellite magnetic missions has improved the recovery of the crustal magnetic field. The 6-month long Magsat mission of 25 years ago generated two major methods of processing satellite magnetic anomaly data for lithospheric studies. The first was a global perspective using spherical harmonics that emphasize the more regional and global lithospheric fields. However, these fields commonly do not resolve local anomaly features in any detail. Therefore a second procedure involved the use of the individual satellite orbit or track data to recover small-scale anomalies on a regional scale. We present results over prominent magnetic anomalies such as Kursk, Bangui and the large Antarctic continent that demonstrate how the various analysis methods affect the recovery of crustal anomalies. The more recent \\Orsted and CHAMP missions are successfully recording data with an improved accuracy and with full spatial and temporal coverage. We show and interpret the total magnetic intensity anomaly maps over these areas from all three satellite magnetometer data sets.

  13. Magnetic properties of asteroids from meteorite data — Implications for magnetic anomaly detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terho, Mauri; Pesonen, Lauri J.; Kukkonen, Ilmo T.

    1996-02-01

    Magnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that small bodies (e.g. asteroids) in the Solar System have small but distinct magnetic fields produced by the bulk remanent magnetisation (NRM) of the body. Here we report calculations of magnetic fields of small bodies, assuming that they can be approximated as homogeneously magnetised spheres with dipole moments derived from NRM data on known meteorites. The magnetic fields are compared with the field of the asteroid 951 Gaspra measured by spacecraft Galileo in 1991 (Kivelson et al., 1993). The result of this comparison suggests that the field of Gaspra could be caused by an L-, H- or E-chondritic or a pallasite body. The spectral reflectance data on Gaspra suggest, however, that it is a basaltic achondrite. The problem can be resolved if Gaspra is a differentiated body, its surface material being closer to that of basaltic achondrites, and the bulk closer to ordinary chondrites or pallasites. We also present magnetic anomaly profiles along the surface of Mars such as would be measured with a magnetometer installed on a Rover-type vehicle by assuming that the main sources of the surface anomalies are the NRMs of the boulders on the Martian surface. The NRM values are taken from the data measured on SNC meteorites. The results suggest large oscillations in magnetic field intensity at the Martian surface.

  14. Analyzing and modeling gravity and magnetic anomalies using the SPHERE program and Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (principal investigators)

    1981-01-01

    Computer codes were completed, tested, and documented for analyzing magnetic anomaly vector components by equivalent point dipole inversion. The codes are intended for use in inverting the magnetic anomaly due to a spherical prism in a horizontal geomagnetic field and for recomputing the anomaly in a vertical geomagnetic field. Modeling of potential fields at satellite elevations that are derived from three dimensional sources by program SPHERE was made significantly more efficient by improving the input routines. A preliminary model of the Andean subduction zone was used to compute the anomaly at satellite elevations using both actual geomagnetic parameters and vertical polarization. Program SPHERE is also being used to calculate satellite level magnetic and gravity anomalies from the Amazon River Aulacogen.

  15. Apparatus and method for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOEpatents

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1981-05-22

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  16. Magnetic Anomalies of the Fennoscandian Shield on a 2km resolution grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Juha V.; Aaro, Sven; Reidar Skilbrei, Jan; All, Tarmo

    2010-05-01

    Joint magnetic anomaly grid of the Fennoscandian Shield was released 2002, smoothed and used as data for the WDMAM2007. In comparison with MF5 this grid showed superior characteristics to other sets. The data will be released as a 2 km resolution grid for the WDMAM2011 with eventual updates of anomaly levels.

  17. Random crustal magnetization and its effect on coherence of short-wavelength marine magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Recent studies of DSDP samples from layer 2A of oceanic basement have found complex magnetic stratigraphies that seem incompatible with the frequent existence of linear short-wavelength anomalies caused by palaeomagnetic field behavior. Statistical models are developed for the lateral variation of the average magnetization of layer 2A: a Poisson series for reversals of the earth's field and a stairstep random series for discrete magnetic units. It is shown with the power-density spectra of these statistical models that lateral inhomogeneities must average out over distances of less than a few hundred meters. Specifically, individual magnetic units of the type seen at DSDP Site 332 cannot extend uniformly for distances greater than a few hundred meters. ?? 1979.

  18. Fluid and Particle simulations of the Interaction of the Solar Wind with Magnetic Anomalies

    E-print Network

    Harnett , Erika

    simulations of the Interaction of the Solar Wind with Magnetic Anomalies on the Surface of the Moon and Mars Simulations of the solar wind interacting with the Moon and Mars indicate that the presence of magnetic wind access to the surface of the Moon, suggesting that the regions of surface magnetization may

  19. Structure and segmentation of the eastern Gulf of Aden basin and the Sheba ridge from gravity, bathymetric and magnetic anomalies: implications for accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acremont, E.; Leroy, S.; Maia, M.; Gente, P.; Autin, J.

    2007-12-01

    The eastern Gulf of Aden is a key place for investigating seafloor spreading processes and the evolution in space and time of the margin and ridge segmentation. The rifting of the Gulf that separated Arabia from Somalia started around 35 Ma ago followed by oceanic accretion from at least17.6 Ma. Bathymetric, gravity and magnetic data from the Encens-Sheba cruise are used to study the structure and segmentation of the eastern part of the basin and ridge, which have strong implications for accretion processes. The segmentation of the first oceanic spreading centre, which is dated at least 17.6 Ma by the magnetic anomaly (A5d) identification, seems to be directly related to the structural geometry of the margins. Then, magmatic processes governed the evolution of the segmentation. The segmentation of the oceanic crust evolved, by eastward propagation of the western segment, from three segments (from an5d to an5) to two segments (from an5). At 6 Ma (an3a) a third segment appeared by duplication of the Socotra transform fault, maybe due to a regional kinematics change. The Encens-Sheba oceanic domain is divided in two distinct areas trending NE-SW perpendicular to the Sheba ridge. (1) The Eastern area is characterized by a shorter wavelength variation of the axial segmentation with two spreading segments 30 to 40 km long, and by a thin crust particularly on the northern and southern ends of its flanks. (2) The Western zone, whose axial segment is more than 120 km long, is characterized by a thick crust and/or a hot mantle and no axial rift valley. This abnormal volcanic activity for a slow spreading ridge is emphasized by bathymetric highs with 5-10 km wide volcanic edifices, and by a negative anomaly of the MBA. These different results support the presence of an off-axis thermal anomaly located below the southern flank of the Sheba ridge. The magnetic anomalies and spreading asymmetry reveal that the location of this thermal anomaly might be relatively recent (~ 10 Ma). We propose that at 10 Ma the ridge jumped southwards as attracted by this thermal anomaly, which explains the asymmetry observed between the 5c and 5 anomalies (16 to 10 Ma).

  20. Dynamics of turbulence spreading in magnetically confined plasmas . D. Grcan and P. H. Diamonda

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhihong

    Dynamics of turbulence spreading in magnetically confined plasmas Ö. D. Gürcan and P. H. Diamonda A dynamical theory of turbulence spreading and nonlocal interaction phenomena is presented. The basic model to dynamics on scales larger than a mode or integral scale eddy size, but smaller than the system size

  1. Forward modeling of total magnetic anomaly over a pseudo-2D underground ferromagnetic pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Yong; Liu, De-Jun; Pan, Qi; Zhang, Ying-Ying

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic anomalies are formed by the superposition of earth's magnetic field and the induced field of an underground ferromagnetic pipeline. To analyze the influence of all factors on the detected magnetic anomalies, a forward model is established in this paper. A numerical integration method, magnetic dipole reconstruction (MDR), for magnetic anomaly forward modeling is proposed, and a series of calculations is performed between model parameters of the pipeline, the geomagnetic field, the measuring trace, and total magnetic anomaly (TMA). The influence of model parameters on the shape, amplitude, and magnetic width is then analyzed. Results show that the shape of TMA curve is primarily influenced by the magnetic inclination and relative azimuth of the pipeline. The amplitude is linearly related to geomagnetic intensity and pipeline parameters including diameter, thickness, and susceptibility, and decreases in inverse proportion to increase in distance between the pipeline's axis and measurement plane; it decreases in a cosine manner with decrease in inclination and relative azimuth. The magnetic width is less affected by the geomagnetic intensity and pipeline parameters, but does increase with increase in distance between the pipeline's axis and measurement plane, and decreases with decreasing inclination and relative azimuth. The MDR method effectively simulates the distributions of TMA caused by various models of pseudo-2D underground ferrous pipeline. Magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) does not effectively estimate existence or orientation of pipeline that are deeply-buried, slender or with axes parallel to the earth's magnetic field in the low magnetic latitude area. Rough measurement of magnetic anomaly is necessary before the orientation of the underground pipeline is identified, followed by exact measurements along the perpendicular direction of the axis of pipeline to accurately locate underground pipeline.

  2. Calculation of gravity and magnetic anomalies along profiles with end corrections and inverse solutions for density and magnetization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cady, John W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program is presented which performs, for one or more bodies, along a profile perpendicular to strike, both forward calculations for the magnetic and gravity anomaly fields and independent gravity and magnetic inverse calculations for density and susceptibility or remanent magnetization.

  3. Effects of sporadic E-layer characteristics on spread-F generation in the nighttime ionosphere near a northern equatorial anomaly crest during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. C.; Chen, W. S.

    2015-06-01

    This study is to know how the characteristics of sporadic E-layer (Es-layer) affect the generation of spread-F in the nighttime ionosphere near the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly during solar minimum. The data of Es-layer parameters and spread-F are obtained from the Chungli ionograms of 1996. The Es-layer parameters include foEs (critical frequency of Es-layer), fbEs (blanketing frequency of Es-layer), and ?f (?foEs-fbEs). Results show that the nighttime variations of foEs and fbEs medians (?f medians) are different from (similar to) that of the occurrence probabilities of spread-F. Because the total number of Es-layer events is greater than that of spread-F events, the comparison between the medians of Es-layer parameters and the occurrence probabilities of spread-F might have a shortfall. Further, we categorize the Es-layer and spread-F events into each frequency interval of Es-layer parameters. For the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus foEs, an increasing trend is found in post-midnight of all three seasons. The increasing trend also exists in pre-midnight of the J-months and in post-midnight of all seasons, for the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus ?f. These demonstrate that the spread-F occurrence increases with increasing foEs and/or ?f. Moreover, the increasing trends indicate that polarization electric fields generated in Es-layer assist to produce spread-F, through the electrodynamical coupling of Es-layer and F-region. Regarding the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus fbEs, the significant trend only appears in post-midnight of the E-months. This implies that fbEs might not be a major factor for the spread-F formation.

  4. Lithologic mapping test for gravity and magnetic anomalies. A case study of gravity-magnetic anomaly profile in the eastern segment of the China-Mongolia border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Meng, Xiaohong; Chen, Zhaoxi; Liu, Guofeng; Zheng, Yuanman; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xingdong; Zheng, Wanqiu

    2015-06-01

    An inversion calculation is usually needed to map lithologies with gravity-magnetic anomalies. A lithological-physical property correspondence can be established by combining data of regional rock density and magnetic susceptibility to build topological equations. In this study, topological calculations were performed using inversion data and combined with physical property data to interpret and map lithologies. Gravity-magnetic profiles from the eastern segment of the China-Mongolia border were used (Jining-Bainaimiao-Ha'ernaode geological-composite geophysical profile) in this paper. Based on gravity-magnetic anomaly inversion, the rock density and magnetic susceptibility data of Bainaimiao and Jining were adopted for lithological inversion. Distribution characteristics of four major types of magmatic rocks within 50 km of the lower half space were obtained, and results of lithologic mapping and tectonic framework were analyzed. The position of convergence between the North China Plate and Siberian Plate was confirmed. Two tectonic stages were identified, namely, interplate squeezing and intraplate deformation. Regional gravity-magnetic field properties were analyzed to discuss the orientation and date of andesites and diorites in the northern part of the survey line. We believe that they have a northeast-southwest orientation similar to gravity-magnetic anomalies of Erenhot-Xilinhot. They resemble the igneous rock near Erenhot because they both indicate magmatic intrusion during the early Carboniferous.

  5. Surface vector mapping of magnetic anomalies over the Moon using Kaguya and Lunar Prospector observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    We have provided preliminary global maps of three components of the lunar magnetic anomaly on the surface applying the surface vector mapping (SVM) method. The data used in the present study consist of about 5 million observations of the lunar magnetic field at 10-45 km altitudes by Kaguya and Lunar Prospector. The lunar magnetic anomalies were mapped at 0.2° equi-distance points on the surface by the SVM method, showing the highest intensity of 718 nT in the Crisium antipodal region. Overall features on the SVM maps indicate that elongating magnetic anomalies are likely to be dominant on the Moon except for the young large basins with the impact demagnetization. Remarkable demagnetization features suggested by previous studies are also recognized at Hertzsprung and Kolorev craters on the farside. These features indicate that demagnetized areas extend to about 1-2 radii of the basins/craters. There are well-isolated central magnetic anomalies at four craters: Leibnitz, Aitken, Jules Verne, and Grimaldi craters. Their magnetic poles through the dipole source approximation suggest occurrence of the polar wander prior to 3.3-3.5 Ga. When compared with high-albedo markings at several magnetic anomalies such as the Reiner Gamma anomalies, three-dimensional structures of the magnetic field on/near the surface are well correlated with high-albedo areas. These results indicate that the global SVM maps are useful for the study of the lunar magnetic anomalies in comparison with various geological and geophysical data.

  6. Statistical averaging of marine magnetic anomalies and the aging of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Richard J.

    1983-03-01

    Visual comparison of Mesozoic and Cenozoic magnetic anomalies in the North Pacific suggests that older anomalies contain less short-wavelength information than younger anomalies in this area. To test this observation, magnetic profiles from the North Pacific are examined from crust of three ages: 0-2.1, 29.3-33.1, and 64.9-70.3 m.y, B.P. For each time period, at least nine profiles were analyzed by (1) calculating the power density spectrum of each profile, (2) averaging the spectra together, and (3) computing a `recording filter' for each time period by assuming a hypothetical seafloor model. The model assumes that the top of the source is acoustic basement, the source thickness is 0.5 km, and the time scale of geomagnetic reversals is according to Ness et al. (1980). The calculated power density spectra of the three recording filters are complex in shape but show an increase of attenuation of short-wavelength information as the crust ages. These results are interpreted using a multilayer model for marine magnetic anomalies in which the upper layer, corresponding to pillow basalt of seismic layer 2A, acts as a source of noise to the magnetic anomalies. As the ocean crust ages, this noisy contribution by the pillow basalts becomes less significant to the anomalies. Consequently, magnetic sources below layer 2A must be faithful recorders of geomagnetic reversals.

  7. Direct Observations of Magnetic Anomalies on the Lunar Surface under Varying Solar Wind Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Futaana, Y.; Holmström, M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dhanya, M. B.; Sridharan, R.; Asamura, K.

    2012-04-01

    In contrast to Earth, the Moon does not have a global dipolar magnetic field. Since the first lunar landing with Apollo 11, we know, though, that localised magnetic fields exist on the lunar surface. Measurements conducted by the Lunar Prospector magnetometer and electron reflectometer suggested that these localised magnetic fields are able to deflect the impinging solar wind in favourable cases (Lin et al., Science 1998). Magnetohydrodynamic simulations support the implication that mini-magnetospheres are formed above the locations of strong localised magnetic fields and can hold off the impinging solar wind (Harnett and Winglee, JGR 2002). Analysis of magnetic field data from Lunar Prospector of the Reiner Gamma anomaly region showed that the distortion of the magnetic field of this anomaly strongly depends on the impinging solar wind parameters, which was interpreted that the size and shape of the mini-magnetosphere changed with the solar wind parametes (Kurata et al., GRL 2005). Wieser et al., GRL 2010 showed that SARA, the Sub-KeV Atom Analyzer on board Chandrayaan-1, is able to detect an ENA image of the mini-magnetosphere in the measured energetic neutral atom flux. Here we analysed all orbits where CENA, the Chandrayaan-1 Energetic Neutral Analyzer, recorded data when a magnetic anomaly was in CENA's field-of-view. Our goal was to determine if 1) a signature of the magnetic anomaly is always visible in the ENA signal and if 2) there is a correlation between the solar wind dynamic pressure, the solar wind magnetic field, the local magnetic field strength and the reduction in the reflected ENA flux. Our results show that for the simplest case, i.e., the Gerasimovich anomaly, there is indeed a clear correlation between the shielding efficiency, the magnetic field strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure. For the other observed magnetic anomalies, for which the magnetic fields are not only weaker but also spatially more variable than that of the Gerasimovich anomaly, only in about half of the cases such a correlation was found. We therefore conclude that the magnetic anomaly interaction is in general quite complex and that data with higher spatial resolution and more detailed modelling is required to understand this process better.

  8. Characterization of CHAMP magnetic data anomalies: magnetic contamination and measurement timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Fan; Lühr, Hermann; Rauberg, Jan; Michaelis, Ingo; Cai, Hongtao

    2013-07-01

    The CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) mission ended after more than ten years in space on 19 September 2010. For achieving a high measurement accuracy of the magnetometers on CHAMP, detailed analyses of spacecraft magnetic characteristics in orbit are required. A decade of continuous magnetometer and housekeeping data are a good basis for evaluating some of the effects of variable spacecraft magnetic fields on the ambient field determination. It was found that some perturbations of FGM (FluxGate vector Magnetometer) or OVM (OVerhauser scalar Magnetometer) measurements are caused by stray fields induced by the power system, the ASC (advanced stellar compass) instrument or magneto-torquer currents. The magnetic effect of solar currents on FGM measurements varies with the local time of the orbit and amounts to 0.2 nT. In cases when one head of the ASC instrument was blinded by the sun, sometimes transient drops in instrument current strength occur, which were accompanied by magnetic disturbance signals (?0.3 nT) in FGM measurements. The magnetic residual contamination of OVM data by the torquer currents was of order 0.1 nT but still detectable. An improved torquer correction matrix is derived which eliminates this effect. In-flight scalar calibration parameters revealed some of the effects of timing anomalies. Time lags between FGM and OVM readings are misinterpreted by the scalar calibration as variations of the angles between some of the sensor axes. The resulting amplitudes of the anomalies presented here lie in the range of some 0.1 nT, but they are systematic in nature.

  9. Regional magnetic and gravity anomaly correlations of the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Ritis, R.; Ventura, G.; Chiappini, M.; Carluccio, R.; von Frese, R.

    2010-07-01

    The complex magnetic and gravity anomaly fields of the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea provide a record of the complicated properties and evolution of the underlying crust. Geologic interpretation of these anomalies is hindered by the effects of anomaly superposition and source ambiguity inherent to potential field analysis. A common approach to minimizing interpretational ambiguities is to consider analyses of anomaly correlations. Spectral correlation filters are used to separate positively and negatively correlated anomaly features based on the correlation coefficient given by the cosine of the phase difference between common wavenumber components. This procedure is applied to reduced-to-pole magnetic and first vertical derivative gravity anomalies for mapping correlative crustal magnetization and density contrasts. Adding and subtracting the standardized outputs of the filters yield summed (SLFI) and differenced (DLFI) local favorability indices that, respectively highlight positive and negative feature correlations in the anomaly data sets. Correlative maxima mainly reflect volcanic structures, and secondarily intrusive bodies and pre-Tortonian carbonates of the Maghrebian chain and the basement rocks of the Sardinia eastern margin. Correlative minima mostly mark sediment-filled peri-Tyrrhenian structural basins related to the Pliocene extensional tectonics, and intra-slope marine depressions related to post-Pliocene and still-active compressional tectonics off Northern Sicily. Prominent inverse anomaly correlations mainly reflect crustal features around the southern margin of the Tyrrhenian Sea that include higher density, lower magnetization pelagic-to-terrigenous and flysch-type nappes of the Sicilian-Maghrebian chain, as well as lower density, higher magnetization sediments filling depressions of the chain, and syn-rift sediments of Southeastern Sardinia.

  10. Reduced to pole long-wavelength magnetic anomalies of Africa and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivier, R.; Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    To facilitate analysis of the tectonic framework for Africa, Europe and adjacent marine areas, MAGSAT scalar anomaly data are differentially reduced to the pole and compared to regional geologic information and geophysical data including surface free-air gravity anomaly data upward continued to satellite elevation (350 km) on a spherical Earth. Comparative analysis shows magnetic anomalies correspond with both ancient as well as more recent Cenozoic structural features. Anomalies associated with ancient structures are primarily caused by intra-crustal lithologic variations such as the crustal disturbance associated with the Bangui anomaly in west-central Africa. Anomalies correlative with Cenozoic tectonic elements appear to be related to Curie isotherm perturbations. A possible example of the latter is the well-defined trend of magnetic minima that characterize the Alphine orogenic belt from the Atlas mountains to Eurasia. In contrast, a well-defined magnetic satellite minimum extends across the stable craton from Finland to the Ural mountains. Prominent magnetic maxima characterize the Arabian plate, Iceland, the Kursk region of the central Russian uplift, and generally the Precambrian shields of Africa.

  11. Reduced to Pole Long-wavelength Magnetic Anomalies of Africa and Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (principal investigators); Olivier, R.

    1984-01-01

    To facilitate analysis of the tectonic framework for Africa, Europe and adjacent marine areas, MAGSAT scalar anomaly data are differentially reduced to the pole and compared to regional geologic information and geophysical data including surface free-air gravity anomaly data upward continued to satellite elevation (350 km) on a spherical Earth. Comparative analysis shows magnetic anomalies correspond with both ancient as well as more recent Cenozoic structural features. Anomalies associated with ancient structures are primarily caused by intra-crustal lithologic variations such as the crustal disturbance associated with the Bangui anomaly in west-central Africa. Anomalies correlative with Cenozoic tectonic elements appear to be related to Curie isotherm perturbations. A possible example of the latter is the well-defined trend of magnetic minima that characterize the Alpine orogenic belt from the Atlas mountains to Eurasia. In contrast, a well-defined magnetic satellite minimum extends across the stable craton from Finland to the Ural mountains. Prominent magnetic maxima characterize the Arabian plate, Iceland, the Kursk region of the central Russian uplift, and generally the Precambrian shields of Africa.

  12. Application of Magsat lithospheric modeling in South America. Part 1: Processing and interpretation of magnetic and gravity anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (principal investigators); Keller, G. R.; Lidiak, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Scalar magnetic anomaly data from MAGSAT, reduced to vertical polarization and long wavelength pass filtered free air gravity anomaly data of South America and the Caribbean are compared to major crustal features. The continental shields generally are more magnetic than adjacent basins, oceans and orogenic belts. In contrast, the major aulacogens are characterized by negative anomalies. Spherical earth magnetic modeling of the Amazon River and Takatu aulacogens in northeastern South America indicates a less magnetic crust associated with the aulacogens. Spherical earth modeling of both positive gravity and negative magnetic anomalies observed over the Mississippi Embayment indicate the presence of a nonmagnetic zone of high density material within the lower crust associated with the aulacogen. The MAGSAT scalar magnetic anomaly data and available free air gravity anomalies over Euro-Africa indicate several similar relationships.

  13. Spherical earth gravity and magnetic anomaly analysis by equivalent point source inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Frese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    To facilitate geologic interpretation of satellite elevation potential field data, analysis techniques are developed and verified in the spherical domain that are commensurate with conventional flat earth methods of potential field interpretation. A powerful approach to the spherical earth problem relates potential field anomalies to a distribution of equivalent point sources by least squares matrix inversion. Linear transformations of the equivalent source field lead to corresponding geoidal anomalies, pseudo-anomalies, vector anomaly components, spatial derivatives, continuations, and differential magnetic pole reductions. A number of examples using 1 deg-averaged surface free-air gravity anomalies of POGO satellite magnetometer data for the United States, Mexico, and Central America illustrate the capabilities of the method.

  14. The mineralogy of global magnetic anomalies. [rock magnetic signatures and MAGSAT geological, and gravity correlations in West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E. (principal investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Problems with the Curie balance, which severely hindered the acquisition of data, were rectified. Chemical analytical activities are proceeding satisfactorily. The magnetization characteristics of metamorphic suites were analyzed and susceptibility data for a wide range of metamorphic and igneous rocks. These rock magnetic signatures are discussed as well as the relationships between geology, gravity and MAGSAT anomalies of West Africa.

  15. Weak extremely-low-frequency magnetic field-induced regeneration anomalies in the planarian, Dugesia tigrina

    SciTech Connect

    Jenrow, K.A.; Smith, C.H.; Liboff, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    The authors recently reported that cephalic regeneration in the planarian Dugesia tigrina was significantly delayed in populations exposed continuously to combined parallel DC and AC magnetic fields. This effect was consistent with hypotheses suggesting an underlying resonance phenomenon. The authors report here, in a parallel series of investigations on the same model system, that the incidence of regeneration anomalies presenting as tumor-like protuberances also increases significantly (P < .001) in association with exposure to weak 60 Hz magnetic fields, with peak intensities ranging between 1.0 and 80.0 {micro}T. These anomalies often culminate in the complete disaggregation of the organism. Similar to regeneration rate effects, the incidence of regeneration anomalies is specifically dependent upon the planaria possessing a fixed orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field vectors. However, unlike the regeneration rate effects, the AC magnetic field alone, in the absence of any measurable DC field, is capable of producing these anomalies. Moreover, the incidence of regeneration anomalies follows a clear dose-response relationship as a function of AC magnetic field intensity, with the threshold for induced electric field intensity estimated at 5 {micro} V/m. The addition of either 51.1 or 78.4 {micro}T DC magnetic fields, applied in parallel combination with the AC field, enhances the appearance of anomalies relative to the 60 Hz AC field alone, but only at certain AC field intensities. Thus, whereas the previous study of regeneration rate effects appeared to involve exclusively resonance interactions, the regeneration anomalies reported here appear to result primarily from Faraday induction coupling.

  16. Interaction of Solar Wind and Magnetic Anomalies - Modelling from Moon to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alho, Markku; Kallio, Esa; Wedlund, Cyril Simon; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The crustal magnetic anomalies on both the Moon and Mars strongly affect the local plasma environment. On the Moon, the impinging solar wind is decelerated or deflected when interacting with the magnetic field anomaly, visible in the lunar surface as energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions or as reflected protons, and may play a part in the space weathering of the lunar soil. At Mars, the crustal magnetic fields have been shown to be associated with, e.g., enhanced electron scale heights and modified convection of ionospheric plasma, resulting in the plasma environment being dominated by crustal magnetic fields up to altitudes of 400km. Our previous modelling work suggested that Hall currents are a dominant feature in a Moon-like magnetic anomaly interaction at scales at or below the proton inertial length. In this work we study the solar wind interaction with magnetic anomalies and compare the plasma environments of a Moon-like anomaly with a Mars-like anomaly by introducing an ionosphere and an exosphere to probe the transition from an atmosphere-less anomaly interaction to an ionospheric one. We utilize a 3D hybrid plasma model, in which ions are modelled as particles while electrons form a charge-neutralizing massless fluid. The hybrid model gives a full description of ion kinetics and associated plasma phenomena at the simulation region ranging from instabilities to possible reconnection. The model can thus be used to interpret both in-situ particle and field observations and remotely-sensed ENA emissions. A self-consistent ionosphere package for the model is additionally in development.

  17. Intermediate-wavelength magnetic anomaly field of the North Pacific and posible source distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrecque, J. L.; Cande, S. C.; Jarrard, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    A technique that eliminates external field sources and the effects of strike aliasing was used to extract from marine survey data the intermediate wavelength magnetic anomaly field for (B) in the North Pacific. A strong correlation exists between this field and the Magsat field although a directional sensitivity in the Magsat field can be detected. The intermediate wavelength field is correlated to tectonic features. Island arcs appear as positive anomalies of induced origin likely due to variations in crustal thickness. Seamount chains and oceanic plateaus also are manifested by strong anomalies. The primary contribution to many of these anomalies appears to be due to a remanent magnetization. The source parameters for the remainder of these features are presently unidentified ambiguous. Results indicate that the sea surface field is a valuable source of information for secular variation analysis and the resolution of intermediate wavelength source parameters.

  18. The intermediate wavelength magnetic anomaly field of the north Pacific and possible source distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrecque, J. L.; Cande, S. C.; Jarrard, R. D. (principal investigators)

    1983-01-01

    A technique that eliminates external field sources and the effects of strike aliasing was used to extract from marine survey data the intermediate wavelength magnetic anomaly field for (B) in the North Pacific. A strong correlation exists between this field and the MAGSAT field although a directional sensitivity in the MAGSAT field can be detected. The intermediate wavelength field is correlated to tectonic features. Island arcs appear as positive anomalies of induced origin likely due to variations in crustal thickness. Seamount chains and oceanic plateaus also are manifested by strong anomalies. The primary contribution to many of these anomalies appears to be due to a remanent magnetization. The source parameters for the remainder of these features are presently unidentified ambiguous. Results indicate that the sea surface field is a valuable source of information for secular variation analysis and the resolution of intermediate wavelength source parameters.

  19. MAGSAT investigation of crustal magnetic anomalies in the eastern Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sailor, R. V.; Lazarewicz, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies in a region of the eastern Indian Ocean were studied using data from NASA's MAGSAT mission. The investigation region (0 deg to 50 deg South, 75 to 125 deg East) contains several important tectonic features, including the Broken Ridge, Java Trench, Ninetyeast Ridge, and Southeast Indian Ridge. A large positive magnetic anomaly is associated with the Broken Ridge and smaller positive anomalies correlate with the Ninetyeast Ridge and western Australia. Individual profiles of scalar data (computed from vector components) were considered to determine the overall data quality and resolution capability. A set of MAGSAT ""Quiet-Time'' data was used to compute an equivalent source crustal magnetic anomaly map of the study region. Maps of crustal magnetization and magnetic susceptibility were computed from the equivalent source dipoles. Gravity data were used to help interpretation, and a map of the ratio of magnetization to density contrasts was computed using Poisson's relation. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of induced magnetization of a crustal layer having varying thickness and composition.

  20. Soil Magnetism and Magnetic Anomalies at the Marshall's Pen Archaeological Site, Mandeville, Jamaica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, E.; Sternberg, R. S.; Delle, J. A.; Lawrence, N. D.; McAdoo, B. G.; Savina, M. E.

    2002-05-01

    Marshall's Pen, a 1000-acre parcel of land in Mandeville, Jamaica, underlain by limestone bedrock and bauxite soils, served as a coffee plantation in the early 19th century. Two to three hundred slaves of African descent worked the plantation from AD 1802 until slavery was abolished in Jamaica in 1838. The goal of the archaeological program at Marshall's Pen is to complement what little is known about Jamaican slave society from the historical record. Geophysical prospection was conducted at Marshall's Pen by ten undergraduate students as part of a Keck Geology Consortium project in the summer of 1999. In the slaves' village consisting of living and domestic labor areas, G858 cesium vapor magnetometer readings were taken every 0.1 seconds along 49 profiles, each 50 m long and spaced 1 meter apart, and magnetic susceptibility readings were taken at 1-meter intervals. Seven significant magnetic anomalies (up to 100 nT peak-to-peak) were detected in the village. Two of these were found to be caused by a buried machete and an iron woodworking tool. Three anomalies were associated with a large area of black, burned soil. Archaeological testing in this area produced partially carbonized seeds, charcoal, ceramics that were smudged after manufacture, and cutlery; this evidence suggests a domestic kitchen area. In situ susceptibility readings were zero on bedrock and low on the bauxite soils. Susceptibility readings generally correlated with the magnetics, to values as high as 50 (x 10-6, volume specific SI) in the ``kitchen'' area, suggesting a source in the susceptibility contrast for these magnetic anomalies. Soil samples were collected from the bauxite outside the village, and from the village area in the summer of 2001; ten village sites were sampled away from the kitchen area, and four from the kitchen area. Five samples from each site were boxed, weighed, and measured for laboratory susceptibility measurements. Eleven samples outide the village had a geometric mean susceptibility of 144 (x 10-8, mass-specific SI); forty-nine samples from the ten village off-kitchen sites had a mean susceptibility of 105; twenty samples from the four village on-kitchen sites had a mean susceptibility of 821. One sample from a village off-kitchen site had a susceptibility of 1894 due to the head of a roofing nail included in the sample. Isothermal remanent magnetization experiments were carried out on one sample from most sites. Three samples from outside the village had ratios of IRM(0.1T)/IRM(1.0T) of 0.76, 0.5, and 0.74; ratios for ten samples from the village away from the kitchen were between 0.72-0.77; ratios for two samples from the village in the kitchen were more easily saturated with values of 0.90 and 1.0. The susceptibility and IRM results are consistent with reduction of hematite from sites outside the kitchen to magnetite or maghemite at sites within the kitchen area. The resulting higher susceptibilities could generate the magnetic anomalies in this area.

  1. Interpretations of gravity and magnetic anomalies in the Songliao Basin with Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changbo; Wang, Liangshu; Sun, Bin; Feng, Runhai; Wu, Yongjing

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the method of Wavelet Multi-scale Decomposition (WMD) combined with Power Spectrum Analysis (PSA) for the separation of regional gravity and magnetic anomalies. The Songliao Basin is situated between the Siberian Plate and the North China Plate, and its main structural trend of gravity and magnetic anomaly fields is NNE. The study area shows a significant feature of deep collage-type construction. According to the feature of gravity field, the region was divided into five sub-regions. The gravity and magnetic fields of the Songliao Basin were separated using WMD with a 4th order separation. The apparent depth of anomalies in each order was determined by Logarithmic PSA. Then, the shallow high-frequency anomalies were removed and the 2nd-4th order wavelet detail anomalies were used to study the basin's major faults. Twenty-six faults within the basement were recognized. The 4th order wavelet approximate anomalies were used for the inversion of the Moho discontinuity and the Curie isothermal surface.

  2. A Tale of Two Anomalies: Depletion, Dispersion, and the Connection between the Stellar Lithium Spread and Inflated Radii on the Pre-main Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Garrett; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate lithium depletion in standard stellar models (SSMs) and main sequence (MS) open clusters, and explore the origin of the Li dispersion in young, cool stars of equal mass, age, and composition. We first demonstrate that SSMs accurately predict the Li abundances of solar analogs at the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) within theoretical uncertainties. We then measure the rate of MS Li depletion by removing the [Fe/H]-dependent ZAMS Li pattern from three well-studied clusters, and comparing the detrended data. MS depletion is found to be mass-dependent, in the sense of more depletion at low mass. A dispersion in Li abundance at fixed T eff is nearly universal, and sets in by ~200 Myr. We discuss mass and age dispersion trends, and the pattern is mixed. We argue that metallicity impacts the ZAMS Li pattern, in agreement with theoretical expectations but contrary to the findings of some previous studies, and suggest Li as a test of cluster metallicity. Finally, we argue that a radius dispersion in stars of fixed mass and age, during the epoch of pre-MS Li destruction, is responsible for the spread in Li abundances and the correlation between rotation and Li in young cool stars, most well known in the Pleiades. We calculate stellar models, inflated to match observed radius anomalies in magnetically active systems, and the resulting range of Li abundances reproduces the observed patterns of young clusters. We discuss ramifications for pre-MS evolutionary tracks and age measurements of young clusters, and suggest an observational test.

  3. A tale of two anomalies: Depletion, dispersion, and the connection between the stellar lithium spread and inflated radii on the pre-main sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, Garrett; Pinsonneault, Marc H. E-mail: pinsono@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2014-07-20

    We investigate lithium depletion in standard stellar models (SSMs) and main sequence (MS) open clusters, and explore the origin of the Li dispersion in young, cool stars of equal mass, age, and composition. We first demonstrate that SSMs accurately predict the Li abundances of solar analogs at the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) within theoretical uncertainties. We then measure the rate of MS Li depletion by removing the [Fe/H]-dependent ZAMS Li pattern from three well-studied clusters, and comparing the detrended data. MS depletion is found to be mass-dependent, in the sense of more depletion at low mass. A dispersion in Li abundance at fixed T{sub eff} is nearly universal, and sets in by ?200 Myr. We discuss mass and age dispersion trends, and the pattern is mixed. We argue that metallicity impacts the ZAMS Li pattern, in agreement with theoretical expectations but contrary to the findings of some previous studies, and suggest Li as a test of cluster metallicity. Finally, we argue that a radius dispersion in stars of fixed mass and age, during the epoch of pre-MS Li destruction, is responsible for the spread in Li abundances and the correlation between rotation and Li in young cool stars, most well known in the Pleiades. We calculate stellar models, inflated to match observed radius anomalies in magnetically active systems, and the resulting range of Li abundances reproduces the observed patterns of young clusters. We discuss ramifications for pre-MS evolutionary tracks and age measurements of young clusters, and suggest an observational test.

  4. A review of problems and progress in studies of satellite magnetic anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.; Johnson, B. D.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    A review is conducted of studies performed during the Magsat project. The obtained data are considered, taking into account questions of data availability, aspects of orbit attitude determination, ionospheric noise, a field model, and an anomaly field presentation. Models for interpretation are discussed, giving attention to forward modeling, and equivalent layer inverse modeling. In an evaluation of rock property constraints, the magnetic bottom is discussed along with Curie points, metamorphism and magnetization, and the direction of magnetization.

  5. Wave phenomena at Moon: the solar wind-magnetic anomalies interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalsky, A. A.; Sadovski, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    One of the most interesting effect of solar wind interaction with Lunar surface is the formation of such called mini-magnetosphere above the anomalous magnetic regions. The anomalies magnetic field and forming magnetic field discontinuity (shock structure) may reflect solar ind ions and electrons. We perform the review of different mechanisms for the wave generation in plasma environment near such mini-magnetosphere regions.

  6. Gravity and magnetic anomaly modeling and correlation using the SPHERE program and Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braile, L. W.; Hinze, W. J. (principal investigators); Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The spherical Earth inversion, modeling, and contouring software were tested and modified for processing data in the Southern Hemisphere. Preliminary geologic/tectonic maps and selected cross sections for South and Central America and the Caribbean region are being compiled and as well as gravity and magnetic models for the major geological features of the area. A preliminary gravity model of the Andeas Beniff Zone was constructed so that the density columns east and west of the subducted plates are in approximate isostatic equilibrium. The magnetic anomaly for the corresponding magnetic model of the zone is being computed with the SPHERE program. A test tape containing global magnetic measurements was converted to a tape compatible with Purdue's CDC system. NOO data were screened for periods of high diurnal activity and reduced to anomaly form using the IGS-75 model. Magnetic intensity anomaly profiles were plotted on the conterminous U.S. map using the track lines as the anomaly base level. The transcontinental magnetic high seen in POGO and MAGSAT data is also represented in the NOO data.

  7. Magnetic anomalies in east Pacific using MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A. (principal investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Methods for solving problems encountered in separating the core field from the crustal field are summarized as well as those methods developed for inverting total magnetic field data to obtain source functions for oceanic areas. Accounting for magnetization contrasts and the magnetization values measured in rocks of marine origin are also discussed.

  8. Magnetic and gravity anomaly patterns related to hydrocarbon fields in northern West Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Piskarev, A.L.; Tchernyshev, M.Yu.

    1997-05-01

    A study of the features of gravity and magnetic fields in the vicinity of oil and gas reservoirs in West Siberia demonstrated a spatial relationship with the hydrocarbon deposits. The relevant magnetic and gravity anomalies cover approximately 900,000 km{sup 2} in northern West Siberia. Amplitude and frequency were investigated initially using double Fourier spectrum (DFS) analysis. This was followed by (1) application of transformations, filtering, and moving windows analysis; (2) compilation of maps of regional and local anomalies, and potential field derivatives; and (3) investigation of the distribution of parameters in areas of known deposits. Hydrocarbon deposits are located mostly at the slopes of positive regional gravity and magnetic anomalies which are interpreted as relating to deep riftogenic structures. At the same time, it is established that the location of hydrocarbon depositions coincides commonly with local gravity and magnetic minima generated by lows in basement density and magnetization. All known hydrocarbon deposits in northern West Siberia are in areas characterized by comparatively high gradients of constituent of gravity anomalies with a wavelength of about 90--100 km. These newly revealed links between reservoirs and potential field parameters may be a means to predict new discoveries in poorly explored territories and seas, primarily in Russia`s Arctic shelf.

  9. Low Temperature Magnetic Anomalies in Er5Si3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Niharika; Sampathkumaran, E. V.

    2011-07-01

    We present here the results of magnetic measurements on Er5Si3, a compound crystallizing in Mn5Si3 type hexagonal structure. The magnetic susceptibility and isothermal magnetization data reveal that there is a field induced transition near the critical field of 10 kOe below TN. The low field state (ground state) is antiferromagnetic as inferred from the peak in magnetic susceptibility and linear magnetization behavior with field below 10 kOe. It is interesting to note that the paramagnetic Curie temperature is positive with magnitude nearly same as that of TN, suggesting the existence of a strong ferromagnetic component. The saturation magnetization attains a value of 7?B/Er at 1.8 K.

  10. A Study of Magnetic Reconnection: From 2D Energy Release to 3D Spreading and Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Lucas S.

    Magnetic reconnection is a plasma process in which stored magnetic energy is converted into thermal and kinetic energies of the surrounding plasma. Oppositely directed magnetic field lines break and cross connect due to a dissipative mecha- nism. The now bent, reconnected field lines retreat from the X-line (the location of reconnection) at the Alfven speed due to the magnetic tension in the reconnected magnetic field, therefore generating outflows. This dissertation addresses three fundamental properties of magnetic reconnection. Solar flares are explosive events in the solar corona in which magnetic reconnection mediates the rapid release (on the order of minutes) of energy stored in magnetic fields into the surrounding plasma. The Sweet-Parker (collisional) model was the first self-consistent theory to explain magnetic reconnection, but is far too slow to explain observations. The formation of secondary islands make Sweet-Parker reconnection faster, but is it fast enough to explain energy release rates? Collisionless (Hall) reconnection leads to energy release rates fast enough to explain observations. Large-scale resistive Hall-Magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the transition from Sweet-Parker to Hall reconnection are presented; the first to separate secondary islands from collisionless effects. Three main results are described. There exists a regime with secondary islands but without collisionless effects entering, and the reconnection rate is faster than Sweet-Parker, but significantly slower than Hall reconnection. This implies that secondary islands do not cause the fastest reconnection rates. The onset of Hall reconnection ejects secondary islands from the vicinity of the X-line, implying that energy is released more rapidly during Hall reconnection. Early models of magnetic reconnection have treated reconnection as two- dimensional. However, naturally occurring magnetic reconnection often begins in a localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the plane of reconnection. Theoretical arguments and large-scale two fluid simulations are used to study the spreading of reconnection X-lines localized in the direction of the current as a function of the strength of the out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field. It is found that the mechanism causing the spreading is different for weak and strong guide fields. In the weak guide field limit, spreading is due to the motion of the current carriers. However, spreading for strong guide fields is bidirectional and is due to the excitation of Alfven waves along the guide field. In general, we suggest that the X-line spreads bidirectionally with a speed governed by the faster of the two mechanisms for each direction. A prediction of the strength of the guide field at which the spreading mechanism changes is formulated and verified with three-dimensional simulations. In the solar wind, magnetic reconnection exhausts measuring 600 [Gosling et al. (2007)] and 390 [Phan et al. (2006)] Earth radii in length have been observed. The authors assumed that the extended exhaust was caused by an extended X-line. If this is the case, what mechanism is responsible for these large scale structures? It has been suggested these structures are formed by a small X-line forming near the sun and spreading as the X-line convects away from the sun. Another possibility is the X-line is localized in a small region and the exhaust expands into the out-of-plane direction. Theoretical arguments and large-scale simulations are used to study localized (not spreading) magnetic reconnection, and its three-dimensional structure. Localized reconnection may also be vital to the formation of supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in the corona. Both solar wind and coronal applications are discussed.

  11. South Atlantic magnetic anomaly ionization: A review and a new focus on electrodynamic effects in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, M. A.; Batista, I. S.; Carrasco, A. J.; Brum, C. G. M.

    2005-12-01

    Satellite observations of enhanced energetic particle fluxes in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA) region have been supported by ground-based observations of enhanced ionization induced by particle precipitation in the ionosphere over this region. Past observations using a variety of instruments such as vertical sounding ionosondes, riometers and VLF receivers have provided evidences of the enhanced ionization due to energetic particle precipitation in the ionosphere over Brazil. The extra ionization at E-layer heights could produce enhanced ionospheric conductivity within and around the SAMA region. The energetic particle ionization source that is operative even under “quiet” conditions can undergo significant enhancements during magnetospheric storm disturbances, when the geographic region of enhanced ionospheric conductivity can extend to magnetic latitudes closer to the equator where the magnetic field line coupling of the E and F regions plays a key role in the electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere. Of particular interest are the sunset electrodynamic processes responsible for equatorial spread F/plasma bubble irregularity generation and related dynamics (zonal and vertical drifts, etc.). The SAMA represents a source of significant longitudinal variability in the global description of the equatorial spread F irregularity phenomenon. Recent results from digital ionosondes operated at Fortaleza and Cachoeira Paulista have provided evidence that enhanced ionization due to particle precipitation associated with magnetic disturbances, in the SAMA region, can indeed significantly influence the equatorial electrodynamic processes leading to plasma irregularity generation and dynamics. Disturbance magnetospheric electric fields that penetrate the equatorial latitudes during storm events seem to be intensified in the SAMA region based on ground-based and satellite-borne measurements. This paper will review our current understanding of the influence of SAMA on the equatorial electrodynamic processes from the perspective outlined above.

  12. Current disruption and its spreading in collisionless magnetic reconnection Neeraj Jain,1,2

    E-print Network

    Ji, Hantao

    observations in space and by laboratory experiments.12­15 In impulsive reconnection events, the current densityCurrent disruption and its spreading in collisionless magnetic reconnection Neeraj Jain,1,2 Jorg al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 233 (2013)] have disclosed current disruption in the absence

  13. Laboratory investigation of lunar surface electric potentials in magnetic anomaly regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, C. T.; Wang, X.; Deca, J.; Horányi, M.

    2015-06-01

    To gain insight into lunar surface charging in the magnetic anomaly regions, we present the results of laboratory experiments with a flowing plasma engulfing a magnetic dipole field above an insulating surface. When the dipole moment is perpendicular to the surface, large positive potentials (close to ion flow energies in eV) are measured on the surface in the dipole lobe regions, charged by the unmagnetized ions while the electrons are magnetically excluded. The potential decreases exponentially with distance from the surface on the ion (flow) Debye length scale. The surface potentials become much smaller when the dipole moment is parallel to the surface, likely due to collisionality. We discuss the implications of our laboratory results for the lunar surface charging in the magnetic anomaly regions, suggesting that the surface potential may be much higher than the generally expected several volts positive due to photoemission.

  14. Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil

    E-print Network

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    Gravity and magnetic anomalies and the deep structure of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, Brazil A. B profile across the Parnaiba cratonic basin in NorthEast Brazil. The purpose of this project is to acquire margin of Parnaíba Basin, Brazil. Geophysics 64: 337-356. Ussami N, Cogo de Sa N, Molina EC. 1993

  15. Hydrology in the Durius Valles Region: Evaluation of Possible Correlation with Volcanism and Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrol, Natalie A.; Marinangeli, Lucia; Grin, Edmond A.

    2000-01-01

    We envision the contribution of subglacial flows, hydrothermalism and sapping in the Durius Valles system and the consequences in term of climate on Mars in recent geological times. We evaluate the possible correlation of the hydrology with volcanism and magnetic anomalies.

  16. Controls on Martian hydrothermal systems: Application to valley network and magnetic anomaly formation

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Keith

    vents. There is also evidence for the past existence of hydrothermal systems on Mars (see Farmer [1996Controls on Martian hydrothermal systems: Application to valley network and magnetic anomaly December 2001; accepted 3 January 2002; published 3 May 2002. [1] Models of hydrothermal groundwater

  17. Two-dimensional MHD simulation of the solar wind interaction with magnetic field anomalies on the

    E-print Network

    Harnett , Erika

    Two-dimensional MHD simulation of the solar wind interaction with magnetic field anomalies on the surface of the Moon Erika M. Harnett and Robert Winglee Geophysics Program, University of Washington, Seattle Abstract. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind interaction

  18. Lunar Ion Transport Near Magnetic Anomalies: Possible Implications for Swirl Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. W.; Killen, R. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    The bright swirling features on the lunar surface in areas around the Moon but most prominently at Reiner Gamma, have intrigued scientists for many years. After Apollo and later Lunar Prospector (LP} mapped the Lunar magnetic fields from orbit, it was observed that these features are generally associated with crustal magnetic anomalies. This led researchers to propose a number of explanations for the swirls that invoke these fields. Prominent among these include magnetic shielding in the form of a mini-magnetosphere which impedes space weathering by the solar wind, magnetically controlled dust transport, and cometary or asteroidal impacts that would result in shock magnetization with concomitant formation ofthe swirls. In this presentation, we will consider another possibility, that the ambient magnetic and electric fields can transport and channel secondary ions produced by micrometeorite or solar wind ion impacts. In this scenario, ions that are created in these impacts are under the influence of these fields and can drift for significant distances before encountering the magnetic anomalies when their trajectories are disrupted and concentrated onto nearby areas. These ions may then be responsible for chemical alteration of the surface leading either to a brightening effect or a disruption of space weathering processes. To test this hypothesis we have run ion trajectory simulations that show ions from regions about the magnetic anomalies can be channeled into very small areas near the anomalies and although questions remain as to nature of the mechanisms that could lead to brightening of the surface it appears that the channeling effect is consistent with the existence of the swirls.

  19. Auroral evidence of a localized magnetic anomaly in Jupiter's northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodent, Denis; Bonfond, Bertrand; GéRard, Jean-Claude; Radioti, Aikaterini; Gustin, Jacques; Clarke, John T.; Nichols, Jonathan; Connerney, John E. P.

    2008-09-01

    We analyze more than 1000 HST/Advanced Camera for Survey images of the ultraviolet auroral emissions appearing in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter. The auroral footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede form individual footpaths, which are fitted with three reference contours. The satellite footprints provide a convenient mapping between the northern Jovian ionosphere and the equatorial plane in the middle magnetosphere, independent of any magnetic field model. The VIP4 magnetic field model is in relatively good agreement with the observed footprint of Io. However, in the auroral kink sector, between the 80° and 150° System III meridians, the model significantly departs from the observation. One possible way to improve the agreement between the VIP4 model and the observed footprints is to include a magnetic anomaly. We suggest that this anomaly is characterized by a weakening of the surface magnetic field in the kink sector and by an added localized tilted dipole field. This dipole rotates with the planet at a depth of 0.245 RJ below the surface, and its magnitude is set to ˜1% of Jupiter's dipole moment. The anomaly has a very limited influence on the magnetic field intensity in the equatorial plane between the orbits of Io and Ganymede. However, it is sufficient to bend the field lines near the high-latitude atmosphere and to reproduce the observed satellite ultraviolet footpaths. JUNO's in situ measurements will determine the structure of Jupiter's magnetic field in detail to expand on these results.

  20. Self-similar inverse cascade of magnetic helicity driven by the chiral anomaly

    E-print Network

    Hirono, Yuji; Yin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    For systems with charged chiral fermions, the imbalance of chirality in the presence of magnetic field generates an electric current - this is the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). We study the dynamical real-time evolution of electromagnetic fields coupled by the anomaly to the chiral charge density and the CME current by solving the Maxwell-Chern-Simons equations. We find that the CME induces the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity towards the large distances, and that at late times this cascade becomes self-similar, with universal exponents. We also find that in terms of gauge field topology the inverse cascade represents the transition from linked electric and magnetic fields (Hopfions) to the knotted configuration of magnetic field (Chandrasekhar-Kendall states). The magnetic reconnections are accompanied by the pulses of the CME current directed along the magnetic field lines. We devise an experimental signature of these phenomena in heavy ion collisions, and speculate about implications for condensed matt...

  1. Self-similar inverse cascade of magnetic helicity driven by the chiral anomaly

    E-print Network

    Yuji Hirono; Dmitri Kharzeev; Yi Yin

    2015-09-25

    For systems with charged chiral fermions, the imbalance of chirality in the presence of magnetic field generates an electric current - this is the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME). We study the dynamical real-time evolution of electromagnetic fields coupled by the anomaly to the chiral charge density and the CME current by solving the Maxwell-Chern-Simons equations. We find that the CME induces the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity towards the large distances, and that at late times this cascade becomes self-similar, with universal exponents. We also find that in terms of gauge field topology the inverse cascade represents the transition from linked electric and magnetic fields (Hopfions) to the knotted configuration of magnetic field (Chandrasekhar-Kendall states). The magnetic reconnections are accompanied by the pulses of the CME current directed along the magnetic field lines. We devise an experimental signature of these phenomena in heavy ion collisions, and speculate about implications for condensed matter systems.

  2. New Clues on the Source of the Central Magnetic Anomaly at Haughton Impact Structure, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesnel, Y.; Rochette, P.; Gattacceca, J.; Osinski, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The 23 km-diameter Haughton impact structure, located on Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, is one of the best-preserved medium-size complex impact structures on Earth. The impact occurred ~39 Ma ago into a target formation composed of an ~2-km thick sequence of Lower Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the Arctic Platform overlying Precambrian metamorphic basement of the Canadian Shield (Osinski et al., 2005). Clast-rich carbonate impact melt rocks fill the crater and impact-generated hydrothermal activity took place, but since then no significant geological event has affected the area. A 900 nT-amplitude magnetic anomaly with a wavelength of about 3 km is observed at the center of the crater (Pohl et al., 1988). Using high-resolution ground magnetic survey and magnetic property measurements on rock samples from inside and outside the structure, Quesnel et al. (2013) concluded that the source for this anomaly may correspond to uplifted and hydrothermally-aletered basement rocks. Hydrothermal activity can increase rock magnetization intensity by crystallization of magnetic minerals, such as magnetite and/or pyrrhotite. Here, we present the results of a new ground magnetic survey and electrical resistivity soundings conducted around the maximum of the magnetic anomaly. Drilling, with depths ranging from 5 m to 13 m was also conducted at three locations in the same area to ground truth the interpretation of geophysical data. The maximum of the magnetic anomaly is characterized by a ~50 m2 area of strong vertical magnetic gradient and low electrical resistivity, while the surroundings show weak gradient and large resistivity. Two drill holes into this localized area show about 6 m of sandy material with some more magnetic layers at about 5 m depth overlying a greenish impact melt breccia with very abundant and large clasts. Recovery in the first 9 meters is very poor, but down hole magnetic gradient measurement confirms the near 6 meter magnetic layer. A third hole was drilled outside the local area with strong magnetic gradients and shows, starting at 2 m depth a porous gray clast-rich impact melt rock that is very similar to the impact melt rock extensively cropping out in the crater. Therefore, the three drill holes confirm that the geophysical contrast at the crater center corresponds to a geological contrast and suggest a link with hydrothermal activity. The results of laboratory measurements (magnetic properties in particular) made on the drill cores will also be presented. References : Osinski, G. R. et al. 2005. MPS, 40:1759-1776 ; Pohl, J. et al. 1988. Meteoritics, 23:235-238 ; Quesnel, Y. et al. 2013. EPSL, 367:116-122.

  3. Processing of the marine magnetic anomalies of the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico (GOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Andreina; Dyment, Jérôme; Thébault, Erwan

    2015-04-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies are useful to better understand the structure and age of the seafloor and constrain its nature and formation. In this work, we applied a dedicated processing of the NGDC marine magnetic measurements over the Caribbean region. The number of available surveys amounts to 516 representing 2.612.994 data points between epochs 1958 and 2012. The pre-processing was done by survey. First, data associated to velocities lesser than 5 knots were rejected. Then, the data were corrected for the main internal field using the CM4 model for epochs ranging between 1960 and 2002,5 and the IGRF-11 model outside the time range of the CM4 model. A visual inspection of the anomalies allowed us to identify, to remove evident outliers and to define a priority order for each survey. We evaluated the magnetic heading effect and corrected the data for it although statistics analysis suggested that this correction brings only a marginal improvement. The cross-overs differences were estimated using the x2sys package (Wessel, 2010) and then corrected using a Matlab code. The statistics confirmed the importance of this processing and improved the internal crossovers, with in particular a clear reduction of extreme values. This processing allows us to present a marine magnetic anomaly map of the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico to 0.18 degree spatial resolution and to discuss the magnetic signature of some of the striking structures of the area.

  4. Towards developing an analytical procedure of defining the equatorial electrojet for correcting satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay; Hinze, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the total magnetic intensity MAGSAT data has identified and characterized the variability of ionospheric current effects as reflected in the geomagnetic field as a function of longitude, elevation, and time (daily as well as monthly variations). This analysis verifies previous observations in POGO data and provides important boundary conditions for theoretical studies of ionospheric currents. Furthermore, the observations have led to a procedure to remove these temporal perturbations from lithospheric MAGSAT magnetic anomaly data based on 'along-the-dip-latitude' averages from dawn and dusk data sets grouped according to longitudes, time (months), and elevation. Using this method, high-resolution lithospheric magnetic anomaly maps have been prepared of the earth over a plus or minus 50 deg latitude band. These maps have proven useful in the study of the structures, nature, and processes of the lithosphere.

  5. Elastic anomalies of YbIrGe in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Ishii, I.; Goto, H.; Kamikawa, S.; Fujita, T. K.; Katoh, K.

    2015-03-01

    The Yb-based heavy-fermion compound YbIrGe, which has the orthorhombic structure, shows the crystal electric field effect at high temperatures and antiferromagnetic orderings at TN = 2.4 K and Tm = 1.4 K. We previously found anomalous elastic softening in zero magnetic field originating from an indirect quadrupole interaction between the ground doublet and the excited doublets, and determined the crystal electric field level scheme: the ground doublet and an excited doublet at 138 K. To investigate the antiferromagnetic orderings at TN and Tm, we performed ultrasonic measurements under magnetic fields along the a-axis on YbIrGe single crystals. Temperature dependence of elastic modulus C11 exhibits elastic hardening below both TN and Tm at 0 T. As increasing the magnetic field along the a-axis, both TN and Tm decrease monotonically, suggesting that both transitions are antiferromagnetic ordering. TN closes around 2 T, and Tm disappears above 1 T. We clarified the magnetic field- temperature phase diagram along the a-axis.

  6. Magnetic anomalies on Io and their relationship to the spatial distribution of volcanic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicely, J.; Everett, M. E.; Sparks, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of terrestrial magnetic anomalies has long proved useful for constraining crustal structure and dynamics. Here, we study Jupiter's moon, Io, using magnetics. We conduct forward modeling to make predictions of the crustal magnetic anomaly distribution on Io. Io is the most volcanic body in the solar system due to tidal heating from its Laplace resonance with Europa and Ganymede, causing extensive sulfur and silicate volcanism. We assume the magnetic susceptibility, which controls the measured magnetic signal, is controlled by temperature. Continuous overturn of the crust controls the vertical temperature profile, and local volcanic centers give the lateral temperature structure. As non-magnetic sulfur volcanism occurs at cool temperatures beneath the Curie point, it should not greatly affect the planetary magnetism and consequently is ignored in this paper. We assume that the average crustal temperatures are determined by a model of continuous burial by newly erupted material (O'Reilly and Davies 1981, Geophysical Research Letters), which put the Curie isotherm at great depth. We use a cylindrically symmetric model of the thermal evolution of the crust around an isolated volcanic center to obtain the local deviations in the thickness of the magnetizable layer. The crustal rocks are presumed to be mafic or ultramafic in composition, based on their spectral signatures, the temperature of the silicate volcanic eruptions, and their rheology as inferred from flow structures. Analysis of the 1997 Pillan eruption suggests a composition similar to lunar mare basalt or komatiite. The magnetic and thermal properties of lunar mare basalt have been well studied since the Apollo missions. Unaltered terrestrial ultramafics have been studied sufficiently to constrain their properties. A common technique of discretizing the magnetized material into prisms and summing the magnetic field of each prism as per Blakely (1995) was used to obtain an estimate of the crustal magnetic anomalies of Io as they would be measured by a satellite. The mapping is displayed as zonal bands so that a Cartesian geometry may be used. Early results indicated an accuracy better than 2 nT is required to detect the magnetic anomalies generated by volcanic activity.

  7. The satellite magnetic anomaly of Ahaggar - Evidence for African Plate motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Brown, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Ahaggar volcanic province of North Central Africa is considered a region of excess heat flow (hot spot) and hence elevated Curie isotherm. Using a modified version of the Parker FFT potential field representation, magnetic signals were calculated at Magsat altitudes for models in which the African Plate is both fixed and moving. The moving-plate model extends the Curie isotherm anomaly in the direction of plate motion and provides a satisfactory match to vertical component anomaly data when the magnitude of plate velocity is 0.75 cm/yr. Although the signal levels are marginal for the scalar component anomalies of this region, the same model provides an adequate match to this data set and is clearly preferable to a fixed-plate model.

  8. The Spreading of X-lines in Three Dimensions during Magnetic Reconnection with a Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P.

    2011-12-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic reconnection often begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the out-of-plane direction as time progresses. This has been studied by a number of authors for magnetotail applications such as substorms and bursty bulk flows, for which the out-of-plane (guide) field is typically small. However, this same behavior has been observed in laboratory experiments, in two-ribbon solar flares (such as the Bastille Day flare), and at the dayside of the magnetopause. In each of these settings, a significant guide field is present. Without a guide field, it was shown that the reconnection spreading is controlled by the species that carries the current. However, laboratory experiments with a large guide field (Katz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 104, 255004, 2010) revealed that the spreading takes place in both directions at the Alfven speed based on the guide magnetic field. We present three-dimensional two-fluid numerical simulations to address the condition on the guide field at which the nature of the spreading switches from being caused by the current carriers to being caused by Alfven waves. Applications for the corona will be discussed.

  9. Magsat equivalent source anomalies over the southeastern United States - Implications for crustal magnetization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruder, M. E.; Alexander, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Magsat crustal anomaly field depicts a previously-unidentified long-wavelength negative anomaly centered over southeastern Georgia. Examination of Magsat ascending and descending passes clearly identifies the anomalous region, despite the high-frequency noise present in the data. Using ancillary seismic, electrical conductivity, Bouguer gravity, and aeromagnetic data, a preliminary model of crustal magnetization for the southern Appalachian region is presented. A lower crust characterized by a pervasive negative magnetization contrast extends from the New York-Alabama lineament southeast to the Fall Line. In southern Georgia and eastern Alabama (coincident with the Brunswick Terrane), the model calls for lower crustal magnetization contrast of -2.4 A/m; northern Georgia and the Carolinas are modeled with contrasts of -1.5 A/m. Large-scale blocks in the upper crust which correspond to the Blue Ridge, Charlotte belt, and Carolina Slate belt, are modeled with magnetization contrasts of -1.2 A/m, 1.2 A/m, and 1.2 A/m respectively. The model accurately reproduces the amplitude of the observed low in the equivalent source Magsat anomaly field calculated at 325 km altitude and is spatially consistent with the 400 km lowpass-filtered aeromagnetic map of the region.

  10. Current Role of Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neurologic Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Karen; Cassady, Christopher; Jones, Jeremy; Paldino, Michael; Mehollin-Ray, Amy; Guimaraes, Carolina; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used increasingly to image the fetus when important questions remain unanswered after ultrasonography, which might occur particularly with abnormal amniotic fluid volumes, difficult fetal lie or position, and maternal obesity. Ultrasonography also has limitations due to sound attenuation by bone, such as within the cranium and spine, and therefore MRI has a real advantage in delineating potentially complex neuroanatomical relationships. This article outlines current MRI protocols for evaluation of the fetal neural axis, describes indications for the use of MRI in the fetal brain and spine, and provides examples to illustrate the uses of available fetal sequences. PMID:26296481

  11. Gravity and magnetic anomalies of the Cyprus arc and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergün, M.; Okay, S.; Sari, C.; Oral, E. Z.

    2003-04-01

    In present day, eastern Mediterranean is controlled by the collision of the African and Eurasian plates and displacements of Arabian, Anatolian and Aegean micro-plates. The boundary between African and Eurasian plates is delineated by the Hellenic arc and Pliny-Strabo trench in the west and the Cyprus arc and a diffuse fault system of the Eastern Anatolian Fault zone in the east. The available gravity and magnetic data from the easternmost Mediterranean allow to subdivide this basin into three provinces: the northeastern Mediterranean north of the Cyprus Arc; the Levant Basin south of the Cyprus Arc and east of the line that roughly continues the Suez rift trend toward the Gulf of Antalya, between Cyprus and Anaximander Mountains; and the Mediterranean Ridge, Herodotus Basin west of this line. High anomalies observed in Cyprus and the sea region at the south is prominent in the gravity data. The Bouguer gravity anomaly reaches its maximum values over Cyprus, where it is most probably caused by high dense Troodos ophiolites. The uplifted oceanic crust causes high Bouguer anomaly also seen in the vicinity of Eratosthenes Seamount. Another result obtained from gravity data is that the crust under Herodotos and Rhodes basins is somehow oceanic and Anaximander, Eratosthenes and Cyprus are continental fragments. There are no linear magnetic anomalies in the Mediterranean. But there are magnetic anomalies over the Eratosthenes seamount and as well as from Cyprus to the Antalya basin due to the ophiolitic bodies. In Cyprus, the last compressional deformations were defined near the Miocene/Pliocene boundary. The extensional deformation associated with the Antalya basin appears to be separated by a zone of the Florence rise and Anaximander Mountains affected by differential tectonic movements. Eratosthenes Seamount is a positive crustal feature in the process of collision with Cyprus along an active margin; there is clearly a potential tectonic relationship to the onland geology of Cyprus. Eratosthenes is in the process of actively being underthrust both northwards and southwards under opposing margins.

  12. Identification of magnetic anomalies based on ground magnetic data analysis using multifractal modelling: a case study in Qoja-Kandi, East Azerbaijan Province, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, E.; Feizi, F.; Karbalaei Ramezanali, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Ground magnetic anomaly separation using the reduction-to-the-pole (RTP) technique and the fractal concentration-area (C-A) method has been applied to the Qoja-Kandi prospecting area in northwestern Iran. The geophysical survey resulting in the ground magnetic data was conducted for magnetic element exploration. Firstly, the RTP technique was applied to recognize underground magnetic anomalies. RTP anomalies were classified into different populations based on the current method. For this reason, drilling point area determination by the RTP technique was complicated for magnetic anomalies, which are in the center and north of the studied area. Next, the C-A method was applied to the RTP magnetic anomalies (RTP-MA) to demonstrate magnetic susceptibility concentrations. This identification was appropriate for increasing the resolution of the drilling point area determination and decreasing the drilling risk issue, due to the economic costs of underground prospecting. In this study, the results of C-A modelling on the RTP-MA are compared with 8 borehole data. The results show that there is a good correlation between anomalies derived via the C-A method and the log report of boreholes. Two boreholes were drilled in magnetic susceptibility concentrations, based on multifractal modelling data analyses, between 63 533.1 and 66 296 nT. Drilling results showed appropriate magnetite thickness with grades greater than 20 % Fe. The total associated with anomalies containing andesite units hosts iron mineralization.

  13. Magnetic Properties of Quaternary Deposits, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska -- Implications for Aeromagnetic Anomalies of Upper Cook Inlet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Haeussler, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    We measured magnetic susceptibilities of exposed Quaternary deposits on several beach cliffs and river banks on the Kenai Peninsula near Soldotna, Alaska. Data, descriptions, and photos from nine sites are included in this report. The mean susceptibility for Quaternary materials in this region is approximately 2.5 x 10-3 SI units. This is sufficiently magnetic to produce subtle aeromagnetic anomalies such as those observed to correlate with topographic features in the region of the measurements. The highest susceptibilities measured (greater than 20 x 10-3 SI units) may help, at least in part, to explain moderate amplitude aeromagnetic anomalies observed elsewhere in Cook Inlet, particularly those relating to structures showing Quaternary movement. Comparison of measured beach cliff susceptibility and susceptibility predicted from idealized formulas and two-dimensional cliff models suggests that measured susceptibilies underestimate true bulk susceptibility by 20 percent to 50 percent in this region.

  14. Circum-Arctic mapping project: new magnetic anomaly map of the Arctic (to 60 degrees N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    An international effort to compile Circum-Arctic geophysical and bedrock data has been conducted by several national agencies (Russia-VSEGEI and VNIIO, Sweden-SGU, Finland-GTK, Denmark-GEUS, USA-USGS, Canada-GSC, Germany-BGR and Norway-NGU) since 2005. This project aims to produce an atlas that will comprise geological and geophysical digital maps at a scale of 1: 5 million scale for the Arctic region limited by the 60 degree North latitude. New published and classified magnetic anomaly gridded data from each participant group were gathered and converted to a common datum (WGS84) and format. The Greenland region magnetic anomaly grid (Verhoef et al., 1996) has been updated with new aeromagnetic surveys performed in West Greenland between 1992-2001 (Rasmussen, 2002), and in the Nares Strait area (Damaske & Oakey, 2006; Oakey & Damaske, 2006). The oceanic area east of Greenland (NE Atlantic) contains most of the aeromagnetic data used in the Verhoef et al., (1996)'s compilation (pre-1990) plus new aeromagnetic surveys over offshore Norway collected up to 2007 (Olesen et al., 1997; Olesen et al., 2007; Gernigon et al., 2008). The gridded data has been upward continued to 1 km above ground or sea-level and trimmed around the areas of major overlaps. The Alaska USGS aeromagnetic compilation has been used as the "master grid" for merging the major gridded data sets together and the downward continued lithospheric magnetic field model MF6 derived from satellite data (Maus et al., 2008) has been used as a regional reference surface. We have used a blending function over the area of overlap in order to smooth the transition from one grid to the other (GridKnit, GEOSOFT). The resulting grid has been re-sampled to a 2 km grid cell. In order to construct the final Circum-Arctic magnetic anomaly grid (CAMP-M) we have adopted the approach used by several research groups for compiling the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM) and used near-surface magnetic data for the short wavelength component of the compilation and the satellite derived magnetic anomalies for the long wavelength (Hemant et al., 2007; Maus et al., 2007). MF6 extends to spherical harmonics degree 120 (333 km wavelength) and therefore it is able to provide consistent long wavelength information between 300 and 400 km. This information is mainly related to regional deeper and/or thicker portions of the magnetic sources within the crust. We have prepared two versions for the CAMP-M magnetic anomaly grid. The first one combines short wavelength components of regional grids (less than 400 km) with long wavelengths (400 km) of the MF6 model. The second one combines short wavelengths of regional datasets (obtained by filtering with a cosine squared taper to remove the wavelengths in the waveband between 307 and 333 km and larger, with the MF6 model (to degree 120). We have selected Model 1 as the new Circum-Arctic Magnetic Anomaly Map.

  15. Bangui Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    Bangui anomaly is the name given to one of the Earth s largest crustal magnetic anomalies and the largest over the African continent. It covers two-thirds of the Central African Republic and therefore the name derives from the capitol city-Bangui that is also near the center of this feature. From surface magnetic survey data Godivier and Le Donche (1962) were the first to describe this anomaly. Subsequently high-altitude world magnetic surveying by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office (Project Magnet) recorded a greater than 1000 nT dipolar, peak-to-trough anomaly with the major portion being negative (figure 1). Satellite observations (Cosmos 49) were first reported in 1964, these revealed a 40nT anomaly at 350 km altitude. Subsequently the higher altitude (417-499km) POGO (Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Observatory) satellite data recorded peak-to-trough anomalies of 20 nT these data were added to Cosmos 49 measurements by Regan et al. (1975) for a regional satellite altitude map. In October 1979, with the launch of Magsat, a satellite designed to measure crustal magnetic anomalies, a more uniform satellite altitude magnetic map was obtained. These data, computed at 375 km altitude recorded a -22 nT anomaly (figure 2). This elliptically shaped anomaly is approximately 760 by 1000 km and is centered at 6%, 18%. The Bangui anomaly is composed of three segments; there are two positive anomalies lobes north and south of a large central negative field. This displays the classic pattern of a magnetic anomalous body being magnetized by induction in a zero inclination field. This is not surprising since the magnetic equator passes near the center of this body.

  16. Remanent magnetization and 3-dimensional density model of the Kentucky anomaly region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.; Estes, R. H.; Myers, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the Kentucky body was developed to fit surface gravity and long wavelength aeromagnetic data. Magnetization and density parameters for the model are much like those of Mayhew et al (1982). The magnetic anomaly due to the model at satellite altitude is shown to be much too small by itself to account for the anomaly measured by Magsat. It is demonstrated that the source region for the satellite anomaly is considerably more extensive than the Kentucky body sensu stricto. The extended source region is modeled first using prismatic model sources and then using dipole array sources. Magnetization directions for the source region found by inversion of various combinations of scalar and vector data are found to be close to the main field direction, implying the lack of a strong remanent component. It is shown by simulation that in a case (such as this) where the geometry of the source is known, if a strong remanent component is present its direction is readily detectable, but by scalar data as readily as vector data.

  17. Spherical Earth analysis and modeling of lithospheric gravity and magnetic anomalies. Ph.D. Thesis - Purdue Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive approach to the lithospheric analysis of potential field anomalies in the spherical domain is provided. It has widespread application in the analysis and design of satellite gravity and magnetic surveys for geological investigation.

  18. Rock Magnetic Properties, Magnetic Anomalies, and Intrabasin Faulting: Santa Fe Group Basin Fill, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. R.; Grauch, V. J.; Minor, S. A.; Caine, J. S.; Hudson, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    Faults that offset sediment and influence their deposition in extensional basins are key in containing the areal extent of critical alluvial aquifers in the U.S. desert southwest. Past interpretation of regional aeromagnetic surveys have regarded basin sediments as nonmagnetic, but new high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in the Albuquerque basin, located within the Rio Grande rift, reveal widespread, low-amplitude anomalies associated with intrabasin faults. We measured magnetic properties of Cenozoic Santa Fe Group basin-fill sediments adjacent to the well-exposed Jemez fault in the northern Albuquerque basin to assess sediment capacity to generate magnetic anomalies. We made field measurement of magnetic susceptibility (MS) at 152 sites, coupled with collection of three ground-magnetometer profiles across the Jemez fault. Santa Fe Group MS varies greatly through a composite ~300-m-thick stratigraphic section, from 1.3 E-2 to 1.0 E-4 (SI vol). Santa Fe MS generally increases with larger sediment grain size, although MS may vary >10X within a grain-size class (e.g., fine sand). Maximum MS was measured in a pebbly sandstone with detrital magnetite concentrated in heavy mineral laminations. For each ground-magnetometer profile, average MS values calculated from nearby hanging-wall and footwall sites match the sense of magnetic-field change across the fault. To better understand the cause of magnetic variations, laboratory measurements of MS, anhysteritic remanent magnetization (ARM), and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) were conducted on 44 representative samples. A strong correlation between ARM and MS indicates that magnetite exerts the principal control on MS. Magnetic proxies show that both magnetite/hematite ratio and effective magnetic grain size increase with increasing MS and sediment grain size. Our study indicates that the magnetic anomaly associated with the Jemez fault can be explained by magnetic contrast from tectonic juxtaposition of different Santa Fe Group lithologies at shallow depth. These results predict that magnetic contrasts at faults should be greatest where coarse- and fine-grained Santa Fe sediments are juxtaposed. Identification of such juxtapositions in the subsurface give locations of important heterogeneities in the ground water flow system of the Albuquerque basin.

  19. Observation of dielectric and magnetic anomalies in multiferroic PbTi0.5Fe0.5O3 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Snehlata; Chakrabarti, S.; Palkar, V. R.

    2013-02-01

    PbTi0.5Fe0.5O3 (PTFO) is one of the rare materials exhibiting coexistence of ferromagnetic (Tc ˜350 °C) and ferroelectric (Tc ˜450 °C) ordering at room temperature. Interestingly we have detected two anomalies (dielectric anomaly near magnetic transition and magnetic anomaly near dielectric transition temperature) in this compound. The dielectric anomaly has been reported earlier in different multiferroic systems. However magnetic anomaly near ferroelectric transition is not yet reported in any multiferroic system. The anomalous behavior in magnetic component persisting near ferroelectric transition could be attributed to structural change and stress developed during transition process.

  20. Martian meteorites and Martian magnetic anomalies: a new perspective from NWA 7034 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Scozelli, R. B.; Munayco, P.; Agee, C. B.; Quesnel, Y.; Cournede, C.; Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetic anomalies observed above the Martian Noachian crust [1] require strong crustal remanent magnetization in the 15-60 A/m range over a thickness of 20-50 km [2,3]. The Martian rocks available for study in the form of meteorites do contain magnetic minerals (magnetite and/or pyrrhotite) but in too small amount to account for such strong remanent magnetizations [4]. Even though this contradiction was easily explained by the fact that Martian meteorites (mostly nakhlites and shergottites) are not representative of the Noachian Martian crust, we were left with no satisfactory candidate lithology to account for the Martian magnetic anomalies. The discovery in the Sahara of a new type of Martian meteorite (NWA 7034 [5] and subsequent paired stones which are hydrothermalized volcanic breccia) shed a new light on this question as it contains a much larger amount of ferromagnetic minerals than any other Martian meteorite. We present here a study of the magnetic properties of NWA 7034, together with a review of the magnetic properties of thirty other Martian meteorites. Magnetic measurements (including high and low temperature behavior and Mössbauer spectroscopy) show that NWA 7034 contains about 15 wt.% of magnetite with various degrees of substitution and maghemitization up to pure maghemite, in the pseudo-single domain size range. Pyrrhotite, a common mineral in other Martian meteorites is not detected. Although it is superparamagnetic and cannot carry remanent magnetization, nanophase goethite is present in significant amounts confirming that NWA 7034 is the most oxidized Martian meteorite studied so far, as already indicated by the presence of maghemite (this study) and pyrite [5]. These magnetic properties show that a kilometric layer of a lithology similar to NWA 7034 magnetized in a dynamo field would be enough to account for the strongest Martian magnetic anomalies. Although the petrogenesis of NWA 7034 is still debated, as the brecciation could be either of volcanic or impact origin [5,6,7], it appears that pervasive (and possibly shock-induced) hydrothermalism affecting the uppermost crust in the presence of a dynamo field during the Noachian is a viable scenario to account for the observed magnetic anomalies. Such a scenario is supported by the Noachian or even pre-Noachian age of NWA 7034 [8,9] and its chemical and mineralogical compositions that match the ones of the inferred Noachian crust [5]. The natural remanent magnetization of the NWA 7034 samples studied so far had been obliterated by the strong magnets used by meteorite hunters, but work is underway to obtain samples that may have kept their original Martian magnetization. References [1] Acuña M.H. et al. 1999. Science 284:790-793 [2] Langlais B. et al. 2004. JGR 109, doi: 10.1029/2003JE002048 [3] Quesnel Y. et al. 2007. Planet. Space Sci. 55:258-269 [4] Rochette P. et al. 2005 MAPS 40:529-540 [5] Agee C.B. et al. 2013. Science 339:780-785 [6] Hewins R.H. et al. 2013. 44th LPSC, abstract#2385 [7] Wittmann et al. 2013. 76th MetSoc meeting, abstract#5272 [8] Humayun et al. 2013. 76th MetSoc meeting, abstract#5198 [9] Nyquist et al. 2013. 76th MetSoc meeting, abstract#5318.

  1. Chapter 3: Circum-Arctic mapping project: New magnetic and gravity anomaly maps of the Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaina, C.; Werner, S.C.; Saltus, R.; Maus, S.; Aaro, S.; Damaske, D.; Forsberg, R.; Glebovsky, V.; Johnson, K.; Jonberger, J.; Koren, T.; Korhonen, J.; Litvinova, T.; Oakey, G.; Olesen, O.; Petrov, O.; Pilkington, M.; Rasmussen, T.; Schreckenberger, B.; Smelror, M.

    2011-01-01

    New Circum-Arctic maps of magnetic and gravity anomalies have been produced by merging regional gridded data. Satellite magnetic and gravity data were used for quality control of the long wavelengths of the new compilations. The new Circum-Arctic digital compilations of magnetic, gravity and some of their derivatives have been analyzed together with other freely available regional and global data and models in order to provide a consistent view of the tectonically complex Arctic basins and surrounding continents. Sharp, linear contrasts between deeply buried basement blocks with different magnetic properties and densities that can be identified on these maps can be used, together with other geological and geophysical information, to refine the tectonic boundaries of the Arctic domain. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  2. EMAG2: A 2-arc min resolution Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid compiled from satellite, airborne, and marine magnetic measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maus, S.; Barckhausen, U.; Berkenbosch, H.; Bournas, N.; Brozena, J.; Childers, V.; Dostaler, F.; Fairhead, J.D.; Finn, C.; von Frese, R.R.B; Gaina, C.; Golynsky, S.; Kucks, R.; Lu, Hai; Milligan, P.; Mogren, S.; Muller, R.D.; Olesen, O.; Pilkington, M.; Saltus, R.; Schreckenberger, B.; Thebault, E.; Tontini, F.C.

    2009-01-01

    A global Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) has been compiled from satellite, ship, and airborne magnetic measurements. EMAG2 is a significant update of our previous candidate grid for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. The resolution has been improved from 3 arc min to 2 arc min, and the altitude has been reduced from 5 km to 4 km above the geoid. Additional grid and track line data have been included, both over land and the oceans. Wherever available, the original shipborne and airborne data were used instead of precompiled oceanic magnetic grids. Interpolation between sparse track lines in the oceans was improved by directional gridding and extrapolation, based on an oceanic crustal age model. The longest wavelengths (>330 km) were replaced with the latest CHAMP satellite magnetic field model MF6. EMAG2 is available at http://geomag.org/models/EMAG2 and for permanent archive at http://earthref.org/ cgi-bin/er.cgi?s=erda.cgi?n=970. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Correlation between the Palaeozoic structures from West Iberian and Grand Banks margins using inversion of magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Elsa A.; Miranda, J. M.; Luis, J. F.; Galdeano, A.

    2000-05-01

    The Ibero-Armorican Arc (IAA) is a huge geological structure of Pre-Cambrian origin, tightened during hercynian times and deeply affected by the opening of the Atlantic Ocean and the Bay of Biscay. Its remnants now lie in Iberia, north-western France and the Canadian Grand Banks margins. The qualitative correlation between these three blocks has been attempted by several authors (e.g. Lefort, J.P., 1980. Un 'Fit' structural de l'Atlantique Nord: arguments geologiques pour correler les marqueurs geophysiques reconnus sur les deux marges. Mar. Geol. 37, 355-369; Lefort, J.P., 1983. A new geophysical criterion to correlate the Acadian and Hercynian orogenies of Western Europe and Eastern America. Mem. Geol. Soc. Am. 158, 3-18; Galdeano, A., Miranda, J.M., Matte, P., Mouge, P., Rossignol, C., 1990. Aeromagnetic data: A tool for studying the Variscan arc of Western Europe and its correlation with transatlantic structures. Tectonophysics 177, 293-305) using magnetic anomalies, mainly because they seem to preserve the hercynian zonation, in spite of the strong thermal and mechanical processes that took place during rifting and ocean spreading. In this paper, we present a new contribution to the study of the IAA structure based on the processing of a compilation of magnetic data from Iberia and Grand Banks margins. To interpret the magnetic signature, a Fourier-domain-based inversion technique was applied, considering a layer with a constant thickness of 10 km, and taking into account only the induced field. The digital terrain model was derived from ETOPO5 (ETOPO5, 1986. Relief map of the earth's surface. EOS 67, 121) and TerrainBase (TerrainBase, 1995. In: Row III, L.W., Hastings, D.A., Dunbar, P.K. (Eds.), Worldwide Digital Terrain Data, Documentation Manual, CD-ROM Release 1.0. GEODAS-NGDC Key to Geophysical Records. Documentation N. 30, April) databases. The pseudo-susceptibility distribution obtained was repositioned for the 156.5 Ma epoch, using the Srivastava and Verhoef [Srivastava, S.P., Verhoef, J., 1992. Evolution of Mesozoic sedimentary basins around the North Central Atlantic: a preliminary plate kinematic solution. In: Parnell, J. (Ed.), Basins on the Atlantic Seaboard: Petroleum Geology Sedimentology and Basin Evolution, Geological Society Special Publication No. 62, pp. 397-420] pole. Using this coherent magnetic framework, we can verify that the continuity between adjacent blocks is quite good, in terms of the amplitude, wavenumber and magnetic susceptibility pattern. If we accept that the magnetic properties can be taken as a marker of the hercynian zonation, as was verified in previous studies (Miranda, J.M., Galdeano, A., Rossignol, J.C., Mendes-Victor, L.A., 1989. Aeromagnetic anomalies in mainland Portugal and their tectonic implications. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 95, 161-177; Galdeano, A., Miranda, J.M., Matte, P., Mouge, P., Rossignol, C., 1990. Aeromagnetic data: A tool for studying the Variscan arc of Western Europe and its correlation with transatlantic structures. Tectonophysics 177, 293-305; Socias, I., 1994. Estudios de los Elementos del Campo Magnético en la España Peninsular a partir de Datos Aeromagmanéticos. Ph.D. thesis, University of Madrid), we can conclude that (1) the characteristic magnetic signature of Ossa Morena Zone is absent on the Iberian Margin and west of it; (2) no eastward continuation of the Collector Anomaly is found in Iberia; (3) only the inner zones of the Variscan Belt can be followed towards NW France; (4) there is a major (left lateral ?) strike-slip fault along the northern Portuguese shoreline that cuts the IAA and significantly displaces the once-contiguous variscan units.

  4. Congenital Variants and Anomalies of the Pancreas and Pancreatic Duct: Imaging by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography and Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Ay?e; Türko?lu, Mehmet Akif; Yener, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography. PMID:24265565

  5. Identification of magnetic anomalies based on ground magnetic data analysis using multifractal modeling: a case study in Qoja-Kandi, East Azerbaijan Province, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, E.; Feizi, F.; Karbalaei Ramezanali, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    Ground magnetic anomaly separation using reduction-to-the-pole (RTP) technique and the fractal concentration-area (C-A) method has been applied to the Qoja-Kandi prosepecting area in NW Iran. The geophysical survey that resulted in the ground magnetic data was conducted for magnetic elements exploration. Firstly, RTP technique was applied for recognizing underground magnetic anomalies. RTP anomalies was classified to different populations based on this method. For this reason, drilling points determination with RTP technique was complicated. Next, C-A method was applied on the RTP-Magnetic-Anomalies (RTP-MA) for demonstrating magnetic susceptibility concentration. This identification was appropriate for increasing the resolution of the drilling points determination and decreasing the drilling risk, due to the economic costs of underground prospecting. In this study, the results of C-A Modeling on the RTP-MA are compared with 8 borehole data. The results show there is good correlation between anomalies derived via C-A method and log report of boreholes. Two boreholes were drilled in magnetic susceptibility concentration, based on multifractal modeling data analyses, between 63 533.1 and 66 296 nT. Drilling results show appropriate magnetite thickness with the grades greater than 20 % Fe total. Also, anomalies associated with andesite units host iron mineralization.

  6. Analysis of vector magnetic anomalies over the Bayonnaise Knoll caldera obtained from a deep-sea magnetic exploration by AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K.; Isezaki, N.; Matsuo, J.; Harada, M.; Kasaya, T.

    2011-12-01

    Geophysical surveys near the seafloor are very effective methods in order to investigate fine structures of the oceanic crust. Such surveys have increased in researches and developments of the seafloor, and will be more and more necessary in the future. For example, seabed resources like hydrothermal deposits have recently focused attention behind the international situation for natural resources like a competition of resources development. In order to estimate accurate abundance of those resources, the above detailed investigations should be needed because of low resolution of geophysical surveys on the sea and low efficiency of exploratory drilling. From such a viewpoint, we have been developing a measurement system for magnetic explorations using an AUV and a deep-tow system. The magnetic exploration system consists of two 3-axis flux-gate magnetometers, one/two Overhauser magnetometer(s), an optical fiber gyro, a main unit (control, communication, recording), and an onboard unit. These devices except for the onboard unit are installed in pressure cases (depth limit: 6000m). Thus this system can measure three components and total intensity of the geomagnetic field in the deep sea. In 2009, the first test of the magnetic exploration system was carried out in the Kumano Basin using AUV Urashima and towing vehicle Yokosuka Deep-Tow during the R/V Yokosuka YK09-09 cruise. In this test, we sank a small magnetic target to the seafloor, and examined how the system worked. As a result, we successfully detected magnetic anomaly of the target to confirm the expected performance of that in the sea. In 2010, the magnetic exploration system was further tested in the Bayonnaise Knoll area both using a titanium towing frame during the R/V Bosei-maru cruise and using AUV Urashima during the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the performance of the system in an actual hydrothermal deposit area for practical applications of that. The Bayonnaise Knoll is a submarine caldera with an outer rim of 2.5-3 km and a floor of 840-920 m, which is located in the Izu-Ogasawara arc. A large hydrothermal deposit, Hakurei deposit, lies in the southeast part of the caldera. In the R/V Bosei-maru cruise, we observed three components of magnetic anomalies at depths of 400-570 m along SE-NW and WE tracks across the caldera. In the R/V Yokosuka YK10-17 cruise, we observed three components and total intensity of magnetic anomalies at altitudes of 60-100 m around the Hakurei deposit and at depth of 500 m above the caldera. The analysis of these data is now energetically pushed forward. A 3D gridded data set of the vector magnetic anomaly in the latter cruise was made by solving the Laplace's equation in the areas where observation data were not available, which is the unique procedure for analysis of the vector anomalies. Several magnetization solutions have been so far obtained by successive approximation and inversion methods. We will here present the measurement of the geomagnetic field and analysis of magnetization structure in Bayonnaise Knoll caldera. Note that this study has been supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  7. Magnetic anomalies in Bahia Esperanza: A window of magmatic arc intrusions and glacier erosion over the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; Pedrera, Antonio; Ghidella, Marta; Montes, Manuel; Nozal, Francisco; Rodríguez-Fernandez, Luis Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Bahia Esperanza, constituting the NE tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, is made up of Paleozoic clastic sedimentary rocks overlain by a Jurassic volcano-sedimentary series and intruded by Cretaceous gabbros and diorites. The area is located along the southern part of the Pacific Margin magnetic anomaly belt. Field magnetic researches during February 2010 contribute to determining the deep geometry of the intermediate and basic intrusive rocks. Moreover, the new field data help constrain the regional Pacific Margin Anomaly, characterized up to now only by aeromagnetic and marine data. Field magnetic susceptibility measurements of intrusive intermediate and basic rocks, responsible for magnetic anomalies, ranges from 0.5 × 10- 3 SI in diorites to values between 0.75 × 10- 3 SI and 1.3 × 10- 3 SI in gabbros. In addition, a significant remanent magnetism should also have contributed to the anomalies. The regional magnetic anomaly is characterized by a westward increase from 100 nT up to 750 nT, associated with large intrusive diorite bodies. They probably underlie most of the western slopes of Mount Flora. Gabbros in the Nobby Nunatak determine local residual rough anomalies that extend northwards and westwards, pointing to the irregular geometry of the top of the basic rocks bodies below the Pirámide Peak Glacier. However, the southern and eastern boundaries with the Buenos Aires Glacier are sharp related to deep glacier incision. As a result of the glacier dynamics, magnetic anomalies are also detected north of the Nobby Nunatak due to the extension of the anomalous body and the presence of gabbro blocks in the moraines. The Bahia Esperanza region is a key area where onshore field geological and magnetic research allows us to constrain the shape of the crustal igneous intrusions and the basement glacier geometry, providing accurate data that complete regional aeromagnetic research.

  8. An attempt to obtain a detailed declination chart from the United States magnetic anomaly map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    Modern declination charts of the United States show almost no details. It was hoped that declination details could be derived from the information contained in the existing magnetic anomaly map of the United States. This could be realized only if all of the survey data were corrected to a common epoch, at which time a main-field vector model was known, before the anomaly values were computed. Because this was not done, accurate declination values cannot be determined. In spite of this conclusion, declination values were computed using a common main-field model for the entire United States to see how well they compared with observed values. The computed detailed declination values were found to compare less favourably with observed values of declination than declination values computed from the IGRF 1985 model itself. -from Author

  9. Anisotropic Solar Wind Sputtering of the Lunar Surface Induced by Crustal Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Sarantos, M.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Saito, Y.; Nishino, M.

    2014-01-01

    The lunar exosphere is generated by several processes each of which generates neutral distributions with different spatial and temporal variability. Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface is a major process for many regolith-derived species and typically generates neutral distributions with a cosine dependence on solar zenith angle. Complicating this picture are remanent crustal magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, which decelerate and partially reflect the solar wind before it strikes the surface. We use Kaguya maps of solar wind reflection efficiencies, Lunar Prospector maps of crustal field strengths, and published neutral sputtering yields to calculate anisotropic solar wind sputtering maps. We feed these maps to a Monte Carlo neutral exospheric model to explore three-dimensional exospheric anisotropies and find that significant anisotropies should be present in the neutral exosphere depending on selenographic location and solar wind conditions. Better understanding of solar wind/crustal anomaly interactions could potentially improve our results.

  10. Investigations of medium wavelength magnetic anomalies in the eastern Pacific using Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A. (principal investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Three long total magnetic field profiles taken over ocean basins were analyzed. It is found that there is a significant signal in the wavelength range of 1500 to 150 km. This is too short a wavelength to be caused by the core field, which becomes insignificant at about a wavelength of 1500 km; this intermediate wavelength signal is not caused by a typical sea floor spreading process, which should give maximum power in the wavelength region about 50 km. It is shown that the external magnetic field contributes very little to this intermediate wavelength signal. Efforts to explain the cause of this signal have failed.

  11. Implications of Depth Determination from Second Moving Average Residual Magnetic Anomalies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essa, K. S.; Kletetschka, G.

    2014-12-01

    Mars total magnetic data obtained by Mars Global Surveyor mission from 400 km altitude were processed using a second moving average method (SMAM) to estimate the depth of the buried sources. Five profiles were chosen across major magnetic areas. Each profile was subjected to a separation technique using the SMAM. Second moving average residual anomalies (SMARA) were obtained from magnetic data using filters of successive spacing. The depth estimate is monitored by the standard deviation of the depths determined from all SMARA for various value of the shape factor (SF) that includes dike, cylinder, and sphere. The standard deviation along with depth estimate is considered to be a new criterion for determining the correct depth and shape of the buried structures on Mars.

  12. Influence of redox conditions on the intensity of Mars crustal magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachfeld, Stefanie; Shah, Deepa; First, Emily; Hammer, Julia; Bowles, Julie

    2015-10-01

    We evaluate the relationship between the intensity of remanent magnetization and fO2 in natural and synthetic Mars meteorites. The olivine-phyric shergottite meteorite Yamato 980459 (Y-980459) and a sulfur-free synthetic analog (Y-98*) of identical major element composition were analyzed to explore the rock magnetic and remanence properties of a basalt crystallized from a primitive melt, and to explore the role of magmatic and alteration environment fO2 on Mars crustal anomalies. The reducing conditions under which Y-980459 is estimated to have formed (QFM-2.5; Shearer et al. 2006) were replicated during the synthesis of Y-98*. Y-980459 contains pyrrhotite and chromite. Chromite is the only magnetic phase in Y-98*. The remanence-carrying capacity of Y-980459 is comparable to other shergottites that formed in the fO2 range of QFM-3 to QFM-1. The remanence-carrying capacity of these low fO2 basalts is 1-2 orders of magnitude too weak to account for the intense crustal anomalies observed in Mars's southern cratered highlands. Moderately oxidizing conditions of >QFM-1, which are more commonly observed in nakhlites and Noachian breccias, are key to generating either a primary igneous assemblage or secondary alteration assemblage capable of acquiring an intense remanent magnetization, regardless of the basalt character or thermal history. This suggests that if igneous rocks are responsible for the intensely magnetized crust, these oxidizing conditions must have existed in the magmatic plumbing systems of early Mars or must have existed in the crust during secondary processes that led to acquisition of a chemical remanent magnetization.

  13. Investigation of source location determination from Magsat magnetic anomalies: The Euler method approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of the Euler method of source location determination was investigated on several model situations pertinent to satellite-data scale situations as well as Magsat data of Europe. Our investigations enabled us to understand the end-member cases for which the Euler method will work with the present satellite magnetic data and also the cases for which the assumptions implicit in the Euler method will not be met by the present satellite magnetic data. These results have been presented in one invited lecture at the Indo-US workshop on Geomagnetism in Studies of the Earth's Interior in August 1994 in Pune, India, and at one presentation at the 21st General Assembly of the IUGG in July 1995 in Boulder, CO. A new method, called Anomaly Attenuation Rate (AAR) Method (based on the Euler method), was developed during this study. This method is scale-independent and is appropriate to locate centroids of semi-compact three dimensional sources of gravity and magnetic anomalies. The method was presented during 1996 Spring AGU meeting and a manuscript describing this method is being prepared for its submission to a high-ranking journal. The grant has resulted in 3 papers and presentations at national and international meetings and one manuscript of a paper (to be submitted shortly to a reputable journal).

  14. Adaptive cancellation of geomagnetic background noise for magnetic anomaly detection using coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dunge; Xu, Xin; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Wanhua; Liu, Xiaojun; Yu, Gang; Fang, Guangyou

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) is an effective method for the detection of ferromagnetic targets against background magnetic fields. Currently, the performance of MAD systems is mainly limited by the background geomagnetic noise. Several techniques have been developed to detect target signatures, such as the synchronous reference subtraction (SRS) method. In this paper, we propose an adaptive coherent noise suppression (ACNS) method. The proposed method is capable of evaluating and detecting weak anomaly signals buried in background geomagnetic noise. Tests with real-world recorded magnetic signals show that the ACNS method can excellently remove the background geomagnetic noise by about 21?dB or more in high background geomagnetic field environments. Additionally, as a general form of the SRS method, the ACNS method offers appreciable advantages over the existing algorithms. Compared to the SRS method, the ACNS algorithm can eliminate the false target signals and represents a noise suppressing capability improvement of 6.4?dB. The positive outcomes in terms of intelligibility make this method a potential candidate for application in MAD systems.

  15. The shallow structure of Klauea caldera from high-resolution Bouguer gravity and total magnetic anomaly mapping

    E-print Network

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    The shallow structure of Klauea caldera from high-resolution Bouguer gravity and total magnetic the summit caldera of Klauea Volcano, Hawai'i. Two significant and distinctive magnetic anomalies were identified within the caldera. One is interpreted to be associated with a long-lived prehistoric eruptive

  16. Planetary and Space Science 56 (2008) 941946 Density cavity observed over a strong lunar crustal magnetic anomaly in

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    2008-01-01

    atmosphere, and to first order behaves as a solid obstacle. In the solar wind, the Moon blocks and absorbs magnetic anomaly in the solar wind: A mini-magnetosphere? J.S. HalekasÃ, G.T. Delory, D.A. Brain, R.P. Lin of solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic fields found increased particle fluxes associated

  17. A least-squares minimization approach for model parameters estimate by using a new magnetic anomaly formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Ezz, E. R.; Essa, K. S.

    2015-09-01

    A new linear least-squares approach is proposed to interpret magnetic anomalies of the buried structures by using a new magnetic anomaly formula. This approach depends on solving different sets of algebraic linear equations in order to invert the depth (z), amplitude coefficient (K), and magnetization angle (?) of buried structures using magnetic data. The utility and validity of the new proposed approach has been demonstrated through various reliable synthetic data sets with and without noise. In addition, the method has been applied to field data sets from USA and India. The best-fitted anomaly has been delineated by estimating the root-mean squared (rms). Judging satisfaction of this approach is done by comparing the obtained results with other available geological or geophysical information.

  18. Monitoring the evolution of Deception Island volcano from magnetic anomaly data (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Manuel; Martos, Yasmina M.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Funaki, Minoru

    2014-12-01

    Deception Island is a young and active volcano located in the south-western part of Bransfield back-arc basin. During the last twenty years the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy has carried out geophysical surveys in the area. In addition, an unmanned aerial vehicle flight was conducted in 2011 at 800 m height on the northern half of Deception Island. Analysing and comparing magnetic grids obtained in different periods and tie point readings allow us to detect temporal changes and isolate signals of volcanic origin. Magnetic survey cruises performed in Deception Island's inner bay (1988, 1999 and 2008), and the study of its outer area's magnetic anomaly changes, point to a period of high variations concentrated between December 1989 and December 1999 that may be related to the two main recent periods of seismic activity (1992 and January 1999). From December 1999 to December 2008, there were no significant changes in seismic activity; nevertheless, our data show some magnetic alterations, which might signal the slow progress of a volcanic environment towards equilibrium. Interpreting these magnetic changes called for the construction of several forward models. Additionally, we put forth this kind of study as a suitable, economical and easy method for monitoring an active volcanic system whenever it is possible to measure the magnetic field with accurate positioning, and if the external field components are removed correctly.

  19. Can a primordial magnetic field originate large-scale anomalies in WMAP data?

    E-print Network

    Bernui, A

    2008-01-01

    Several accurate analyses of the CMB temperature maps from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) have revealed a set of anomalous results, at large angular scales, that appears inconsistent with the statistical isotropy expected in the concordance cosmological model $\\Lambda$CDM. Because these anomalies seem to indicate a preferred direction in the space, here we investigate the signatures that a primordial magnetic field, possibly present in the photon-baryon fluid during the decoupling era, could have produced in the large-angle modes of the observed CMB temperature fluctuations maps. To study these imprints we simulate Monte Carlo CMB maps, which are statistically anisotropic due to the correlations between CMB multipoles induced by the magnetic field. Our analyses reveal the presence of the North-South angular correlations asymmetry phenomenon in these Monte Carlo maps, and we use these information to establish the statistical significance of such phenomenon observed in WMAP maps. Moreover, beca...

  20. Magnetic anomaly analysis of the Ionian Sea: Is it the oldest in-situ ocean fragment of the world?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, F.; Minelli, L.; Pignatelli, A.; Chiappini, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that the Ionian Sea is characterized by thin (8-11 km) crystalline crust, thick (5-7 km) sedimentary cover, and low heat flow, typical for a Mesozoic (at least) basin. Yet seismic data have not yielded univocal interpretations, and a debate has developed on the oceanic vs. 'thinned continental' nature of the Ionian basin. Here we analyze the magnetic anomaly pattern of the Ionian Sea, and compare it to synthetic fields produced by a geopotential field generator, considering realistic crust geometry. The Ionian basin is mostly characterized by slightly negative magnetic residuals, and by a prominent positive (150 nT at sea level) 'B' anomaly at the northwestern basin margin. We first test continental crust models, considering a homogeneous crystalline crust with K=1x10-3, then a 5 km thick deep crustal layer of serpentinite (K=1x10-1). First model yields insignificant anomalies, while the second gives an anomaly pattern anti-correlated with the observed residuals. We subsequently test oceanic crust models, considering a 2 km thick 2A basaltic layer with K=5x10-3, magnetic remanence of 5 A/m, and a unique magnetic polarity (no typical oceanic magnetic anomaly stripes are apparent in the observed data set). Magnetic remanence directions were derived from Pangean-African paleopoles in the 290-190 Ma age window. Only reverse-polarity models reproduce the B anomaly, and among them the 220-230 Ma models best approximate magnetic features observed on the abyssal plain and at the western basin boundary. The Ionian Sea turns out to be the oldest preserved oceanic floor known so far. Reference Speranza, F., L. Minelli, A. Pignatelli, and M. Chiappini (2012), The Ionian Sea: The oldest in situ ocean fragment of the world?, J. Geophys. Res., 117, B12101, doi:10.1029/2012JB009475.

  1. Gravimetric and magnetic anomalies produced by dissolution-crystallization at the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandea, Mioara; Narteau, Clément; Panet, Isabelle; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-01

    Using the unique data sets provided by satellite observations, correlated temporal variations in gravity and magnetic fields over a large area extending from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean have been recently reported. On a timescale of few years to a decade, both field variations may be linked to changes at the top of the core. Here we propose that in addition to the topography generated by the convection in the mantle, the core-mantle boundary (CMB) may be in a dynamic equilibrium state, mainly controlled by a dissolution-crystallization process of the mantle silicate rocks in the liquid alloy of the core. Due to the resulting continuous changes in CMB topography, anomalies of hundreds of nGal and tens of nT yr-2 might be produced by the corresponding mass redistribution and the secondary flow generated by the associated pressure field. Numerical modeling and both gravimetric and magnetic anomaly magnitudes suggest a rate of centimeters per year and a large range of length scales for the changes in the topography at the CMB.

  2. A Review of Magnetic Anomaly Field Data for the Arctic Region: Geological Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; vonFrese, Ralph; Roman, Daniel; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its inaccessibility and hostile physical environment remote sensing data, both airborne and satellite measurements, has been the main source of geopotential data over the entire Arctic region. Ubiquitous and significant external fields, however, hinder crustal magnetic field studies. These potential field data have been used to derive tectonic models for the two major tectonic sectors of this region, the Amerasian and Eurasian Basins. The latter is dominated by the Nansen-Gakkel or Mid-Arctic Ocean Ridge and is relatively well known. The origin and nature of the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges, Chukchi Borderland and Canada Basin of the former are less well known and a subject of controversy. The Lomonosov Ridge divides these large provinces. In this report we will present a summary of the Arctic geopotential anomaly data derived from various sources by various groups in North America and Europe and show how these data help us unravel the last remaining major puzzle of the global plate tectonic framework. While Magnetic anomaly data represent the main focus of this study recently derived satellite gravity data (Laxon and McAdoo, 1998) are playing a major role in Arctic studies.

  3. A Review of Magnetic Anomaly Field Data for the Arctic Region: Geological Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; vonFrese, Ralph; Roman, Daniel; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its inaccessibility and hostile physical environment remote sensing data, both airborne and satellite measurements, has been the main source of geopotential data over the entire Arctic region. Ubiquitous and significant external fields, however, hinder crustal magnetic field studies These potential field data have been used to derive tectonic models for the two major tectonic sectors of this region, the Amerasian and Eurasian Basins. The latter is dominated by the Nansen-Gakkel or Mid-Arctic Ocean Ridge and is relatively well known. The origin and nature of the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges, Chukchi Borderland and Canada Basin of the former are less well known and a subject of controversy. The Lomonosov Ridge divides these large provinces. In this report we will present a summary of the Arctic geopotential anomaly data derived from various sources by various groups in North America and Europe and show how these data help us unravel the last remaining major puzzle of the global plate tectonic framework. While magnetic anomaly data represent the main focus of this study recently derived satellite gravity data are playing a major role in Arctic studies.

  4. Energy Detection Based on Undecimated Discrete Wavelet Transform and Its Application in Magnetic Anomaly Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xinhua; Pan, Zhongming; Zhang, Dasha; Zhou, Han; Chen, Min; Zhang, Wenna

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) is a passive approach for detection of a ferromagnetic target, and its performance is often limited by external noises. In consideration of one major noise source is the fractal noise (or called 1/f noise) with a power spectral density of 1/fa (0magnetic anomaly detection and UDWT are introduced in brief, while a possible detection system based on giant magneto-impedance (GMI) magnetic sensor is also given out. Then our proposed energy detection based on UDWT is described in detail, and the probabilities of false alarm and detection for given the detection threshold in theory are presented. It is noticeable that no a priori assumptions regarding the ferromagnetic target or the magnetic noise probability are necessary for our method, and different from the discrete wavelet transform (DWT), the UDWT is shift invariant. Finally, some simulations are performed and the results show that the detection performance of our proposed detector is better than that of the conventional energy detector even utilized in the Gaussian white noise, especially when the spectral parameter ? is less than 1.0. In addition, a real-world experiment was done to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method. PMID:25343484

  5. Spatial Correlation of Airborne Magnetic Anomalies with Reservoir Temperatures of Geothermal Fields, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertekin, Can; Ekinci, Yunus Levent

    2013-04-01

    Geothermal areas in Western Anatolia are remarkably located throughout Büyük Menderes Graben (BMG) and Gediz Graben (GG). These E-W trending grabens have been subjected to N-E stretching since Miocene. Except for these major outcomes of the extensional forces, NE-SW oriented and relatively short grabens take place in Western Anatolia as well. Among them, BMG and GG are remarkable with topographic escarpments that reveal footwall of steeply-dipping active normal faults. They manifest themselves via numerous earthquakes and geothermal activity (fluid discharges from springs and wells). Geothermal discharges are aligned along the rims of E-W trending normal faults trending over detachment faults. Concerning BMG, geothermal manifestations extend along the northern sector of the graben. Geothermal reservoirs inside BMG are the limestone and conglomerate units within Neogene sediments and the marble-quartzite units within The Menderes Massif rocks. The main high and low enthalpy geothermal fields along BMG and their reservoir temperatures are as follows: K?z?ldere (242°C), Germencik (232°C), Ayd?n-Il?cabas? (101°C), Y?lmazköy (142°C), Salavatl? (171°C), Söke (26°C), Pamukkale (36°C), Karahay?t (59°C), Gölemezli (101°C) and Yenice (70°C). Through GG, reservoir temperatures decrease from east to west. Geothermal reservoirs inside GG are metamorphics and granodiorite of the Menderes Massif rocks. The Neogene sediments act as cap rock of the geothermal reservoirs. Geothermal fields inside the graben and their reservoir temperatures are as follows: Ala?ehir (215°C), Salihli (155°C), Urganl? (85°C), Kur?unlu (135°C), Caferbey (150°C), Sart (100°C). In order to investigate the spatial correlation of magnetic anomalies and the reservoir temperatures of geothermal fields in the region, we analysed airborne magnetic data which were collected by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) of Turkey. Airborne magnetic data were taken at about 70-m intervals along the profiles and the profile interval was set as 1-2 km. Necessary corrections including the IGRF correction were carried out by MTA. After removing the horizontal planar trend and regional background, a reduction to the pole process was performed to residual magnetic data. The pole reduced magnetic intensity values vary in the range of -368 and 395 nT in the image map. In general, relatively high amplitude magnetic anomaly zones indicate the geothermal fields having higher reservoir temperatures than 200°C in the region. On the other hand, moderate magnetic intensity values point geothermal fields having lower reservoir temperatures than 200°C. It can be inferred that higher and moderate magnetic intensity values in the region are positively and spatially in accordance with higher and lower geothermal reservoir temperatures relative to 200°C. Consequently, obtained results were discussed in terms of magnetic intensity, geothermal heat source and geothermal reservoir temperatures. Keywords: Magnetic Anomalies, Reservoir Temperatures, Geothermal Fields, Western Anatolia, Turkey

  6. The analysis of ZTEM data across the Humble magnetic anomaly, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattel, Daniel; Witherly, Ken

    2015-09-01

    ZTEM data acquired across the Humble magnetic anomaly of almost 30 000 nT were analysed for the presence of a magnetic gradient response and the effects from elevated magnetic susceptibilities. Mag3D inversion of the magnetic data indicates magnetic susceptibility values as high as 2.0 (SI). The response of moving the receiver coil through the magnetic-field gradient peaks at 0.01 Hz and drops off strongly with frequency. Lacking information about the field strength at the base station precludes the comparison of amplitudes between computed gradient responses and the survey data, but the comparison of response shapes suggests that the gradient responses are too small to have a noticeable effect on the survey data. ZTEM responses were forward modelled with a 3D algorithm developed at the University of British Columbia Geophysical Inversion Facility (UBC-GIF) that takes into account electric conductivities ? and magnetic susceptibilities ?, in order to assess the impact of the elevated ?-values derived from the Mag3D inversion. Computing the ZTEM response for these ?-values combined with resistive half-spaces indicates that the response amplitudes and shapes strongly depend on the background resistivities. Ignoring the elevated ?-values during an inversion can result in patterns that resemble crop circles. The approximate conductivity structure of the survey area was derived with a UBC-GIF 3D ZTEM inversion, which models ? = 0. Forward-model results of these conductivities combined with the elevated ?-values derived from the Mag3D inversion indicate that the conductivities are underestimated with the ? = 0 assumption. For an environment such as Humble, with deep-seated zones of elevated ?-values, the shallow inverted conductivity structure appears to be reliable, but the deeper structure should be interpreted with caution.

  7. Magnetization anomaly of Nb3Al strands and instability of Nb3Al Rutherford cables

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Ryuji; Kikuchi, Akihiro; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-08-01

    Using a Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb{sub 3}Al strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large magnetization behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B{sub c2} {approx} 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the magnetization data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this magnetization anomaly, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect.

  8. Circum-Arctic Magnetic Anomalies - Challenges of Compilation and the Value of Regional Interpretation in a Frontier Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltus, R. W.; Gaina, C.; Brown, P. J.

    2007-12-01

    Important societal issues are driving increased attention to polar regions. The arctic, in particular, is the focus of scientific studies relating to climate change as well as resource exploration and territorial claims. The news and entertainment media are picking up on polar themes and driving interest within popular culture. Part of the attraction and mystique of the ends of the Earth lies in their relative inaccessibility and harsh environment. These same attributes make it difficult to conduct even basic scientific investigation, and therefore, the arctic remains a scientific frontier in many respects. Delineation of a robust tectonic framework for the top of the world is an essential prerequisite to resource assessment. The difficulty of making direct geologic observations beneath ice and sea requires remote measurement. Regional magnetic anomaly mapping provides important constraining information for the development of tectonic models for this structurally complex region. In addition to the obvious logistical challenges to detailed magnetic field measurement in the high arctic, noise and instability in the magnetic field itself at high latitudes presents difficulties. Nevertheless, regional magnetic anomaly data have been collected over the past 50 years for much of the arctic. The available surveys are diverse in vintage and survey design; the amplitude and frequency content of measured anomalies are widely variable. Availability of metadata and other documentation are also inconsistent for these surveys. This leads to significant challenges in constructing accurate regional magnetic anomaly maps. Preliminary maps from a new international cooperation effort (CAMP-GM, under the direction of Carmen Gaina, Geological Survey of Norway) provide the most consistent view yet of magnetic anomalies for the tectonically complex arctic basins and surrounding continents. Careful attention to digital compilation details allows the new grids to be mathematically filtered to assist in the regional characterization of magnetic domains and boundaries. The frequency content, amplitudes, and patterns of regional magnetic anomalies provide a window into the tectonic character and structure of the crust. Continental, oceanic, and various types of transitional crust each have a distinctive magnetic anomaly signature that can be used to define a fundamental tectonic framework of the circum-arctic. Interpretation can be extended by including additional data such as regional bathymetry (an indicator of crustal buoyancy and isostatic equilibrium) and free air gravity (an independent indicator of crustal density balance and composition). Used together with magnetic domains these data reveal a composite geodynamic subdivision of the arctic. This subdivision provides a framework for investigations of mineral and energy resource potential, tectonic reconstruction, and long-term climate dynamics.

  9. Deciphering tectonic phases of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf, West Antarctica, from a magnetic anomaly grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohl, Karsten; Denk, Astrid; Eagles, Graeme; Wobbe, Florian

    2013-02-01

    The Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE), with Pine Island Bay (PIB) in the eastern embayment, is a key location to understanding tectonic processes of the Pacific margin of West Antarctica. PIB has for a long time been suggested to contain the crustal boundary between the Thurston Island block and the Marie Byrd Land block. Plate tectonic reconstructions have shown that the initial rifting and breakup of New Zealand from West Antarctica occurred between Chatham Rise and the eastern Marie Byrd Land at the ASE. Recent concepts have discussed the possibility of PIB being the site of one of the eastern branches of the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). About 30,000 km of aeromagnetic data - collected opportunistically by ship-based helicopter flights - and tracks of ship-borne magnetics were recorded over the ASE shelf during two RV Polarstern expeditions in 2006 and 2010. Grid processing, Euler deconvolution and 2D modelling were applied for the analysis of magnetic anomaly patterns, identification of structural lineaments and characterisation of magnetic source bodies. The grid clearly outlines the boundary zone between the inner shelf with outcropping basement rocks and the sedimentary basins of the middle to outer shelf. Distinct zones of anomaly patterns and lineaments can be associated with at least three tectonic phases from (1) magmatic emplacement zones of Cretaceous rifting and breakup (100-85 Ma), to (2) a southern distributed plate boundary zone of the Bellingshausen Plate (80-61 Ma) and (3) activities of the WARS indicated by NNE-SSW trending lineaments (55-30 Ma?). The analysis and interpretation are also used for constraining the directions of some of the flow paths of past grounded ice streams across the shelf.

  10. Investigation of the crust of the Pannonian Basin, Hungary using low-altitude CHAMP horizontal magnetic gradient anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. T.; Kis, K. I.; Puszta, S.; Wittman, G.; Kim, H.; Toronyi, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Pannonian Basin is a deep intracontinental basin that formed as part of the Alpine orogeny. It is some 600 by 500 km in area and centered on Hungary. This region was chosen since it has one of the thinnest continental crusts in Europe and is the location of complex tectonic structures. In order to study the nature of the crustal basement we used the long-wavelength magnetic anomalies acquired by the CHAMP satellite. The SWARM constellation, scheduled to be launched next year, will have two lower altitude satellites flying abreast, with a separation of between ca. 150 to 200 km. to record the horizontal magnetic gradient. Since the CHAMP satellite has been in orbit for eight years and has obtained an extensive range of data, both vertically and horizontally there is a large enough data base to compute the horizontal magnetic gradients over the Pannonian Basin region using these many CHAMP orbits. We computed a satellite magnetic anomaly map, using the spherical-cap method of Haines (1985), the technique of Alsdorf et al. (1994) and from spherical harmonic coefficients of MF6 (Maus et al., 2008) employing recent and lowest altitude CHAMP data. We then computed the horizontal magnetic anomaly gradients (Kis and Puszta, 2006) in order to determine how these component data will improve our interpretation and to preview what the SWARM mission will reveal with reference to the horizontal gradient anomalies. The gradient amplitude of an 1000 km northeast-southwest profile through our horizontal component anomaly map varied from 0 to 0.025 nT/km with twin positive anomalies (0.025 and 0.023 nT/km) separated by a sharp V-shaped anomaly gradient to 0 nT/km between the two highs. Horizontal gradients indicate major magnetization boundaries in the crust (Dole and Jordan, 1978 and Cordell and Grauch, 1985). Our gradient anomaly was modeled with a two-dimensional body and this anomaly indicates a lateral variation of some 200 km. The model correlates with a 200 km area of crustal thinning in the southwestern Pannonian Basin.

  11. Investigation of the Crust of the Pannonian Basin, Hungary Using Low-Altitude CHAMP Horizontal Gradient Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Kis, Karoly I.; Puszta, Sandor; Wittmann, Geza; Kim, Hyung Rae; Toronyi, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Pannonian Basin is a deep intra-continental basin that formed as part of the Alpine orogeny. It is some 600 by 500 km in area and centered on Hungary. This area was chosen since it has one of the thinnest continental crusts in Europe and is the region of complex tectonic structures. In order to study the nature of the crustal basement we used the long-wavelength magnetic anomalies acquired by the CHAMP satellite. The SWARM constellation, scheduled to be launched next year, will have two lower altitude satellites flying abreast, with a separation of between ca. 150 to 200 km. to record the horizontal magnetic gradient. Since the CHAMP satellite has been in orbit for eight years and has obtained an extensive range of data, both vertically and horizontally there is a large enough data base to compute the horizontal magnetic gradients over the Pannonian Basin region using these many CHAMP orbits. We recomputed a satellite magnetic anomaly map, using the spherical-cap method of Haines (1985), the technique of Alsdorf et al. (1994) and from spherical harmonic coefficients of MF6 (Maus et aI., 2008) employing the latest and lowest altitude CHAMP data. We then computed the horizontal magnetic anomaly gradients (Kis and Puszta, 2006) in order to determine how these component data will improve our interpretation and to preview what the SW ARM mission will reveal with reference to the horizontal gradient anomalies. The gradient amplitude of an 1000 km northeast-southwest profile through our horizontal component anomaly map varied from 0 to 0.025 nT/km with twin positive anomalies (0.025 and 0.023 nT/km) separated by a sharp anomaly negative at o nT/km. Horizontal gradient indicate major magnetization boundaries in the crust (Dole and Jordan, 1978 and Cordell and Grauch, 1985). Our gradient anomaly was modeled with a twodimensional body and the anomaly, of some 200 km, correlates with a 200 km area of crustal thinning in the southwestern Pannonian Basin.

  12. Hybrid simulation of the interaction of solar wind protons with a concentrated lunar magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacalone, J.; Hood, L. L.

    2015-06-01

    Using a two-dimensional hybrid simulation, we study the physics of the interaction of the solar wind with a localized magnetic field concentration, or "magcon," on the Moon. Our simulation treats the solar wind protons kinetically and the electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid. This approach is necessary because the characteristic scale of the magcon is of the same order or smaller than the proton inertial length—the characteristic scale in the hybrid simulation. Specifically, we consider a case in which the incident solar wind flows exactly normal to the lunar surface, and the magcon is represented by a simple dipole whose moment is parallel to the surface, with a center just below it. We find that while the magcon causes the solar wind to be deflected and decelerated, it does not completely shield the lunar surface anywhere. However, protons which impact the surface in the center of the magnetic anomaly have energies well below the solar wind ram energy. Thus, in this region, any backscattered neutral particles resulting from the interaction of solar wind protons with the lunar regolith would have energies lower than that of the solar wind. Moreover, very few neutrals, if any, would emanate from within the magcon with energies comparable to the solar wind energy. This may explain recent observations of lunar energetic neutral atoms associated with a strong crustal magnetic anomaly. Our study also finds that a significant fraction of the incoming solar wind protons are reflected back into space before reaching the surface. These particles are reflected by a strong electrostatic field which results from the difference in the proton and electron inertia. The reflected particles are seen at very high altitudes above the Moon, over 200 km, and over a much broader spatial scale than the magcon, several hundred kilometers at least. Our simulation also revealed a second population of reflected particles which originate from the side of the magcon where the interplanetary and magcon magnetic fields are directed opposite to one another, leading to a magnetic topology much like magnetic reconnection. As previously reflected particles move through this region, they are deflected upward, away from the surface, forming a second component. Our simulation has a number of similarities to recent in situ spacecraft observations of reflected ions above and around magcons.

  13. A Hybrid Positive-and-Negative Curvature Approach for Detection of the Edges of Magnetic Anomalies, and Its Application in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lianghui; Gao, Rui; Meng, Xiaohong; Zhang, Guoli

    2015-10-01

    In work discussed in this paper the characteristics of both the most positive and most negative curvatures of a magnetic anomaly were analyzed, and a new approach for detection of the edges of magnetic anomalies is proposed. The new approach, called the hybrid positive-and-negative curvature approach, combines the most positive and most negative curvatures into one curvature by formula adjustments and weighted summation, combining the advantages of the two curvatures to improve edge detection. This approach is suitable for vertically magnetized or reduction-to-pole anomalies, which avoids the complexity of magnetic anomalies caused by oblique magnetization. Testing on synthetic vertically magnetized magnetic anomalies data demonstrated that the hybrid approach traces the edges of magnetic source bodies effectively, discriminates between high and low magnetism intuitively, and is better than approaches based solely on use of the most positive or most negative curvature. Testing on reduced-to-pole magnetic anomalies data around the ocean basin of the South China Sea showed that the hybrid approach enables better edge detection than the most positive or most negative curvatures. On the basis of the features of the reduced-to-pole magnetic anomalies and their hybrid curvature, we suggest the tectonic boundary between the southwestern subbasin and the eastern subbasin of the South China Sea ranges from the northeastern edge of the Zhongsha Islands in the southeast direction to the northeastern edge of the Reed Bank.

  14. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Deca, J; Divin, A; Lapenta, G; Lembège, B; Markidis, S; Horányi, M

    2014-04-18

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. PMID:24785022

  15. WINDII measurements of nightglow enhancements in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, R. H.; Bhatnagar, V. P.; Cogger, L. L.

    Enhancements of the O(¹D) 630 nm and O(¹S) 558 nm volume emission rates were detected by WINDII, the Wind Imaging Interferometer on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, UARS, as its limb-locked fields of view crossed the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly zone during periods of high geomagnetic activity. The enhancement attributed to electron precipitation is 20 R for the 630 nm red line and 3 R for the 558 nm green line, less than the natural variability of these nightglow emissions as seen from below. Nevertheless, statistical tests indicate with 95% confidence that the enhancements are significantly distinguishable from the natural variability. The red enhancement lies west of the green because eastward drifting trapped electrons move toward lower mirror altitudes in this region. These enhancements are energetically consistent with earlier measurements of electron fluxes in this region; we estimate the total precipitation energy deposition rate at a few megawatts.

  16. Investigating tectonic and bathymetric features of the Indian Ocean using MAGSAT magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarewicz, A. R.; Sailor, R. V. (principal investigators)

    1982-01-01

    MAGSAT Investigator-B tapes were preprocessed by (1) removing all data points with obvious erroneous values and location errors; (2) removing smaller spikes (typically 15 nT or more), and deleting data tracks with fewer than 20 points; and (3) removing a linear trend from each track. The remaining data were recorded on tape for use by the equivalent source mapping (ESMAP) program which uses a least squares algorithm to fit the magnetization parameter of the grid of equivalent source dipoles in the crust to satellite data acquired at different times and locations. ESMAP was implemented on the TASC computing system and modified to read preprocessed MAGSAT tapes and interface with TASC plotting software. Some verification of the software was accomplished. Gridded 1-degree mean values of gravity anomaly and sea surface undulation computed from SEASAT radar altimeter were obtained and brought on line.

  17. Geophysical Surveying of Shallow Magnetic Anomalies Using the iPhone Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opdyke, P.; Dudley, C.; Louie, J. N.

    2012-12-01

    This investigation examined whether the 3-axis Hall-effect magnetometer in the Apple iPhone 3GS can function as an effective shallow magnetic survey instrument. The xSensor Pro app from Crossbow Systems allows recoding of all three sensor components along with the GPS location, at a frequency of 1.0, 4.0, 16.0, and 32.0 Hz. If the iPhone proves successful in collecting useful magnetic data, then geophysicists and especially educators would have a new tool for high-density geophysical mapping. No-contract iPhones that can connect with WiFi can be obtained for about $400, allowing deployment of large numbers of instruments. iPhones with the xSensor Pro app surveyed in parallel with an Overhauser GEM system magnetometer (1 nT sensitivity) to test this idea. Anderson Bay, located on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, provided a rural survey location free from cultural interference. xSensor Pro, logged each component's intensity and the GPS location at a frequency of four measurements per second. Two Overhauser units functioned as a base unit and a roving unit. The roving unit collected total field at set points located with a handheld GPS. Comparing the total field computed from the iPhone components against that collected by the Overhauser establishes the level of anomalies that the iPhone can detect. iPhone total-field measurements commonly vary by 200 nT from point to point, so a spatial-temporal average over 25 seconds produces a smoothed signal for comparison. Preliminary analysis of the iPhone results show that the data do not accurately correlate to the total field collected by the Overhauser for any anomaly of less than 200 nT.

  18. Controls on Martian Hydrothermal Systems: Application to Valley Network and Magnetic Anomaly Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Keith P.; Grimm, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Models of hydrothermal groundwater circulation can quantify limits to the role of hydrothermal activity in Martian crustal processes. We present here the results of numerical simulations of convection in a porous medium due to the presence of a hot intruded magma chamber. The parameter space includes magma chamber depth, volume, aspect ratio, and host rock permeability and porosity. A primary goal of the models is the computation of surface discharge. Discharge increases approximately linearly with chamber volume, decreases weakly with depth (at low geothermal gradients), and is maximized for equant-shaped chambers. Discharge increases linearly with permeability until limited by the energy available from the intrusion. Changes in the average porosity are balanced by changes in flow velocity and therefore have little effect. Water/rock ratios of approximately 0.1, obtained by other workers from models based on the mineralogy of the Shergotty meteorite, imply minimum permeabilities of 10(exp -16) sq m2 during hydrothermal alteration. If substantial vapor volumes are required for soil alteration, the permeability must exceed 10(exp -15) sq m. The principal application of our model is to test the viability of hydrothermal circulation as the primary process responsible for the broad spatial correlation of Martian valley networks with magnetic anomalies. For host rock permeabilities as low as 10(exp -17) sq m and intrusion volumes as low as 50 cu km, the total discharge due to intrusions building that part of the southern highlands crust associated with magnetic anomalies spans a comparable range as the inferred discharge from the overlying valley networks.

  19. A revised spreading model of the West Philippine Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    The West Philippine Basin (WPB) occupies the western part of the Philippine Sea (PHS) plate. The WPB is generally considered to have opened from approximately 50 to 30 Ma at the CBF rift; however, the detailed spreading history of the WPB is not yet clear. In particular, the origin and age of the southern subbasin, the Palau Basin, are unknown. To better understand the initiation and early evolution of the Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara)-Mariana arc, knowing the configuration of the PHS plate at that time is necessary. In this study, we examine the spreading history of the WPB using newly acquired three-component magnetic anomaly and swath bathymetry data, as well as existing datasets. In the WPB south of the CBF rift, the observed magnetic anomalies correspond to Chron C16r to C21n (approximately 36 to 46 Ma). Prevailing models of the WPB reconstruction show a decrease in the spreading rate from 4.4 to 1.8 cm/year since C18n.2n (approximately 39.5 Ma). Our research, however, indicates that the change in the spreading rate is not required to correlate the observed magnetic anomalies to the geomagnetic polarity reversal timescale. The age of the spreading cessation in our interpretation, approximately 36 Ma, is several million years older than in previous estimates, and the spreading ceased progressively from southeast to northwest along the CBF rift. In the Palau Basin, seafloor fabrics and magnetic lineations trend N-S, which indicates E-W seafloor-spreading. Based on 40Ar/39Ar age, we suggest that the magnetic lineations correspond to polarity reversals from C18n.1n to C15r (approximately 38.5 to 35 Ma). The spreading of the Palau Basin may have been coeval with that of the WPB near the CBF rift, although their spreading directions are different.

  20. Rapid 3-D forward model of potential fields with application to the Palinuro Seamount magnetic anomaly (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratori Tontini, F.; Cocchi, L.; Carmisciano, C.

    2009-02-01

    We show a set of forward model equations in the Fourier domain for calculating the 3-D gravity and magnetic anomalies of a given 3-D distribution of density or magnetization. One property of the potential field equations is that they are given by convolution products, providing a very simple analytic expression in the Fourier domain. Under this assumption, the domain of the density or magnetization parameters is connected by a biunivoc relationship with the data space, and potential field anomalies can be seen as filtered versions of the corresponding density or magnetization distributions. A very fine spatial discretization can be obtained by using a large number of points within a unique 3-D grid, where both the source distributions and field data are defined. The main advantage of this formulation is that it dramatically reduces execution times, providing a very fast forward model tool useful for modeling anomalies at different altitudes. We use this method to evaluate an average magnetization of 8 A/m for the Palinuro Seamount in the Tyrrhenian Sea (southern Italy), thus performing a joint interpretation of morphological and newly acquired magnetic data.

  1. A possible 90 - 100 MYBP magnetic anomaly in the western-most Philippine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cho, Y.; Liang, C.; Lai, W.

    2012-12-01

    10 years ago, Tamaki's team offered the deep-towed magnetometer and my team provided the R/V Ocean Research No. 1. We jointly conducted a deep-towed magnetic survey in the western-most Philippine Sea (also called the Huatung Basin). The results show the magnetic age could be either as the previous reported 35- 45 MYBP or as the ambiguous 90 - 100 MYBP. 10 year later, a Taiwan-USA co-operation on the understanding of Taiwan Mountain Building processes (the TAIGER project) has shown that this area and the east contain a huge area of submarine volcanoes and at least in 4-5 regions showing the overlapping spreading ridges, similar like today's East Pacific Spreading Center of higher spreading rate. This is interpreted as the 45 MYBP when the Pacific Plate changed its motion from N to NW and the massive volcanic activity accompany the motion change. Before the change, it is possible to have the Kula Plate in the east and the Tethys Sea in the west crossing the Pacific and Indian oceans at about 90 - 100 MYBP. The Taiwan Central Range and China Fuzhian Massive Range support this idea. At about 45 - 65 MYBP, the Himalaya and Alps experienced the head-to-head collision and the mountains started to push up. In the mean time, the Kula Plate disappeared and the Tethys Sea diminished its size. These could trigger the Western Pacific trench-arc-backarc systems. The systems continue to evolve up to today. The Gagua Ridge, located along the E longitude 123 degree, act as a dam to prevent the sediment further deposits into the east side of the Philippine Sea. The new OBS refraction and earthquake data show the east side of the Philippine Sea is subducting into the west side, the western-most Philippine Sea. The previous magnetic lineation, fossil radiolarian and metamorphosed igneous ages found surround the basin support that the western-most Philippine Sea may be the last remaining Tethys Sea in the Pacific.

  2. Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly I: Root of the main, crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David J.

    1990-09-01

    The Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100 km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the anomaly may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the anomaly closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the anomaly is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the anomaly continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the anomaly is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.

  3. Geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 780 kyr obtained from near-seafloor magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Gee, J S; Cande, S C; Hildebrand, J A; Donnelly, K; Parker, R L

    2000-12-14

    Knowledge of past variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field provides an important constraint on models of the geodynamo. A record of absolute palaeointensity for the past 50 kyr has been compiled from archaeomagnetic and volcanic materials, and relative palaeointensities over the past 800 kyr have been obtained from sedimentary sequences. But a long-term record of geomagnetic intensity should also be carried by the thermoremanence of the oceanic crust Here we show that near-seafloor magnetic anomalies recorded over the southern East Pacific Rise are well correlated with independent estimates of geomagnetic intensity during the past 780 kyr. Moreover, the pattern of absolute palaeointensity of seafloor glass samples from the same area agrees with the well-documented dipole intensity pattern for the past 50 kyr. A comparison of palaeointensities derived from seafloor glass samples with global intensity variations thus allows us to estimate the ages of surficial lava flows in this region. The record of geomagnetic intensity preserved in the oceanic crust should provide a higher-time-resolution record of crustal accretion processes at mid-ocean ridges than has previously been obtainable. PMID:11130715

  4. Characterization of Lunar Swirls at Mare Ingenii: A Model for Space Weathering at Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Georgianna Y.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Harnett, Erika M.; Hawke, Bernard Ray; Noble, Sarah K.; Blewett, David T.; McCord, Thomas B.; Giguere, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of spectra from the Clementine ultraviolet-visible and near-infrared cameras of small, immature craters and surface soils both on and adjacent to the lunar swirls at Marc Ingenii has yielded the following conclusions about space weathering at a magnetic anomaly. (l) Despite having spectral characteristics of immaturity, the lunar swirls arc not freshly exposed surfaces. (2) The swirl surfaces arc regions of retarded weathering, while immediately adjacent regions experience accelerated weathering, (3) Weathering in the off-swirl regions darkens and flattens the spectrum with little to no reddening, which suggests that the production of larger (greater than 40 nm) nanophase iron dominates in these locations as a result of charged particle sorting by the magnetic field. Preliminaty analysis of two other lunar swirl regions, Reiner Gamma and Mare Marginis, is consistent with our observations at Mare Ingenii. Our results indicate that sputtering/vapor deposition, implanted solar wind hydrogen, and agglutination share responsibility for creating the range in npFe(sup 0) particle sizes responsible for the spectral effects of space weathering.

  5. Modelling the gravity and magnetic field anomalies of the Chicxulub crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aleman, C. Ortiz; Pilkington, M.; Hildebrand, A. R.; Roest, W. R.; Grieve, R. A. F.; Keating, P.

    1993-01-01

    The approximately 180-km-diameter Chicxulub crater lies buried by approximately 1 km of sediment on the northwestern corner of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Geophysical, stratigraphic and petrologic evidence support an impact origin for the structure and biostratigraphy suggests that a K/T age is possible for the impact. The crater's location is in agreement with constraints derived from proximal K/T impact-wave and ejecta deposits and its melt-rock is similar in composition to the K/T tektites. Radiometric dating of the melt rock reveals an age identical to that of the K/T tektites. The impact which produced the Chicxulub crater probably produced the K/T extinctions and understanding the now-buried crater will provide constraints on the impact's lethal effects. The outstanding preservation of the crater, the availability of detailed gravity and magnetic data sets, and the two-component target of carbonate/evaporites overlying silicate basement allow application of geophysical modeling techniques to explore the crater under most favorable circumstances. We have found that the main features of the gravity and magnetic field anomalies may be produced by the crater lithologies.

  6. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons typically have gyroradii larger than the magnetic anomaly scale size) and magnetic field strength. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement SWIFF (project 2633430, swiff.eu). Cut along the dipole axis of the lunar anomaly, showing the electron density structure.

  7. Negative magnetic anomaly over Mt. Resnik, a subaerially erupted volcanic peak beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.; Finn, C.; Morse, D.L.; Blankenship, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    Mt. Resnik is one of the previously reported 18 subaerially erupted volcanoes (in the West Antarctic rift system), which have high elevation and high bed relief beneath the WAIS in the Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey. Mt. Resnik lies 300 m below the surface of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS); it has 1.6 km topographic relief, and a conical form defined by radar ice-sounding of bed topography. It has an associated complex negative magnetic anomaly revealed by the CWA survey. We calculated and interpreted magnetic models fit to the Mt. Resnik anomaly as a volcanic source comprising both reversely and normally magnetized (in the present field direction) volcanic flows, 0.5-2.5-km thick, erupted subaerially during a time of magnetic field reversal. The Mt. Resnik 305-nT anomaly is part of an approximately 50- by 40-km positive anomaly complex extending about 30 km to the west of the Mt. Resnik peak, associated with an underlying source complex of about the same area, whose top is at the bed of the WAIS. The bed relief of this shallow source complex has a maximum of only about 400 m, whereas the modeled source is >3 km thick. From the spatial relationship we interpret that this source and Mt Resnik are approximately contemporaneous. Any subglacially (older?) erupted edifices comprising hyaloclastite or other volcanic debris, which formerly overlaid the source to the west, were removed by the moving WAIS into which they were injected as is the general case for the ???1000 volcanic centers at the base of the WAIS. The presence of the magnetic field reversal modeled for Mt. Resnik may represent the Bruhnes-Matayama reversal at 780 ka (or an earlier reversal). There are ???100 short-wavelength, steep-gradient, negative magnetic anomalies observed over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), or about 10% of the approximately 1000 short-wavelength, shallow-source, high-amplitude (50- >1000 nT) "volcanic" magnetic anomalies in the CWA survey. These negative anomalies indicate volcanic activity during a period of magnetic reversal and therefore must also be at least 780 ka. The spatial extent and volume of volcanism can now be reassessed for the 1.2 ?? 106 km2 region of the WAIS characterized by magnetic anomalies defining interpreted volcanic centers associated with the West Antarctic rift system. The CWA covers an area of 3.54 ?? 105 km2; forty-four percent of that area exhibits short-wavelength, high-amplitude anomalies indicative of volcanic centers and subvolcanic intrusions. This equates to an area of 0.51 ?? 105 km2 and a volume of 106 km3 beneath the ice-covered West Antarctic rift system, of sufficient extent to be classified as a large igneous province interpreted to be of Oligocene to recent age.

  8. Satellite magnetic anomalies of the Antarctic Wilkes Land impact basin inferred from regional gravity and terrain data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Frese, R. R. B.; Kim, H. R.; Leftwich, T. E.; Kim, J. W.; Golynsky, A. V.

    2013-02-01

    The GRACE gravity and subglacial terrain data of Wilkes Land are consistent with the presence of a mascon produced by giant impact perhaps at the end of the Permian. In contrast to the relatively extensive ice probing radar coverage, aeromagnetic data coverage is limited across the basin. However, Magsat, Ørsted, and CHAMP satellite magnetic observations reveal the thinned crust of the impact site to be associated with the largest satellite altitude crustal magnetic anomaly of Antarctica. The underlying region of enhanced magnetization is consistent with the GRACE gravity and BEDMAP terrain data and extends into south-central Australia in a reconstructed Gondwana. The strongly magnetized crust can reflect the impact's thermal enhancement of lower crustal viscous remanent magnetization as well as the production of positively magnetized melt rocks within the fractured crust.

  9. Investigation of feline brain anatomy for the detection of cortical spreading depression with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; James, M F; Bockhorst, K H; Smith, M I; Bradley, D P; Papadakis, N G; Carpenter, T A; Parsons, A A; Leslie, R A; Hall, L D; Huang, C L

    2001-05-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and peri-infarct depolarisation (PID) are related phenomena that have been associated with the human clinical syndromes of migraine (CSD), head injury and stroke (PID). Nevertheless the existence of CSD in man remains controversial, despite the detection of this phenomenon in the brains of most, if not all, other animal species investigated. This failure to unambiguously detect CSD clinically may be at least partly due to the anatomically complex, gyrencephalic structure of the human brain. This study was designed to establish conditions for the study of CSD in the brain of a gyrencephalic species using the noninvasive technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 3-dimensional (3D) gyrencephalic anatomy of the cat brain was examined to determine the imaging conditions necessary to detect CSD events. Orthogonal transverse, sagittal and horizontal T1-weighted image slices showed that the marginal and suprasylvian gyri were the most appropriate cortical structures to study CSD. This was in view of (1) their simple geometry: (2) their lengthy extent of grey matter orientated rostrocaudally in the cortex: (3) their separation by a sulcus across which CSD spread could be studied and (4) the discontinuity in the grey matter in these regions between the right and left hemispheres dorsal to the corpus callosum. The structure suggested by the T1-weighted images was corroborated by systematic diffusion tensor imaging to map the fractional anisotropy and diffusion trace. Thus a single horizontal image plane could visualise the neighbouring suprasylvian and marginal gyri of both cerebral hemispheres, whereas its complex shape and position ruled out the ectosylvian gyrus for CSD studies. With the horizontal imaging plane, CSD events were reproducibly detected by animating successive diffusion-weighted MR images following local KCl stimulation of the cortical surface. In single image frames, CSD detection and characterisation required image subtraction or statistical mapping methods that, nevertheless, yielded concordant results. In repeat experiments, CSD events were qualitatively similar in appearance whether elicited by sustained or transient KCl applications. Our experimental approach thus successfully describes cat brain anatomy in vivo, and elucidates the necessary conditions for the application of MRI methods to detect CSD propagation. PMID:11430693

  10. The role of hematite ilmenite solid solution in the production of magnetic anomalies in ground- and satellite-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Wasilewski, Peter J.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2002-03-01

    Remanent magnetization (RM) of rocks with hematite-ilmenite solid solution (HISS) minerals, at all crustal levels, may be an important contribution to magnetic anomalies measured by ground and satellite altitude surveys. The possibility that lower thermal gradient relatively deep in the crust can result in exsolution of HISS compositions with strong remanent magnetizations (RM) was studied for two bulk compositions within the HISS system. Samples from granulite-terrane around Wilson Lake, Labrador, Canada contains titanohematite with exsolved ferrian ilmenite lamellae. Other samples from the anorthosite-terrane of Allard Lake, Quebec, Canada contain ferrian ilmenite with exsolved titanohematite lamellae. In both cases, the final exsolved titanohematite has similar Ti content and carries dominant magnetic remanence with REM (=NRM/SIRM, where NRM is the natural remanent magnetization and SIRM is the saturation isothermal remanent magnetization) that is comparable to the Ti-free end member. The RM was acquired prior to exsolution and the ilmeno-hematite-rich rock possesses thermal remanent magnetization (TRM), whereas rocks with hemo-ilmenite possess chemical remanent magnetization (CRM). In both cases, we found fairly large homogeneous grains with low demagnetizing energy that acquired intense RM. The magnetism of the ilmeno-hematite solid solution phases is not significantly perturbed by the continuous reaction: ilmeno-hematite?titanohematite solid solution. Hence, the occurrence of HISS in rocks that cooled slowly in a low intensity magnetic field will have an intense magnetic signature characterized by a large REM.

  11. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon magnetic anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Wilt, M.J.; Corrigan, D.J.

    1982-10-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I Power Plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3 to 3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 by 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analyzed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed tham to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in-situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. the suite of igneous rocks was probably passively emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotitic-gabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6 to 11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  12. Analysis of the Nuevo Leon Magnetic Anomaly and its possible relation to the Cerro Prieto magmatic-hydrothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N.E.; Corrigan, D.J.; Wilt, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    The broad dipolar magnetic anomaly whose positive peak is centered near Ejido Nuevo Leon, some 5 km east of the Cerro Prieto I power plant, has long been suspected to have a genetic relationship to the thermal source of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system. This suspicion was reinforced after several deep geothermal wells, drilled to depths of 3-3.5 km over the anomaly, intersected an apparent dike-sill complex consisting mainly of diabase but with minor rhyodacite. A detailed fit of the observed magnetic field to a computer model indicates that the source may be approximated by a tabular block 4 x 6 km in area, 3.7 km in depth, 2.3 km thick, and dipping slightly to the north. Mafic dike chips from one well, NL-1, were analysed by means of electron microprobe analyses which showed them to contain a titanomagnetite that is paramagnetic at in situ temperature conditions. As the dike mineralogy does not account for the magnetic anomaly, the magnetic source is believed to be a deeper, magnetite-rich assemblage of peridotite-gabbro plutons. The suite of igneous rocks was probably emplaced at a shallow depth in response to crustal extension and thinning brought on by en echelon strike-slip faulting. The bottom of the magnetic source body, at an estimated depth of 6 km, is presumed to be at or near that of the Curie isotherm (575/sup 0/C) for magnetite, the principal ferromagnetic mineral in peridotiticgabbroic rocks. The geological model derived from the magnetic study is generally supported by other geophysical data. In particular, earthquake data suggest dike injection is occurring at depths of 6-11 km in an area beneath the magnetic source. Thus, it is possible that heat for the geothermal field is being maintained by continuing crustal extension and magmatic activity.

  13. Regional gravity and magnetic anomalies related to a Proterozoic carbonatite terrane in the eastern Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, K. M.; Ponce, D. A.; Miller, D. M.; Jernigan, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    One of the world's largest rare earth element carbonatite deposits is located at Mountain Pass in the eastern Mojave Desert, California. The 1.4 Ga carbonatite deposit is hosted by and intruded into 1.7 Ga gneiss and schist that occurs in a narrow north-northwest trending belt along the eastern parts of Clark Mountain Range, Mescal Range, and Ivanpah Mountains. The carbonatite is associated with an ultrapotassic intrusive suite that ranges from shonkinite through syenite and granite. Regional geophysical data reveal that the eastern Mojave carbonatite terrane occurs along the northeast edge of a prominent magnetic high and the western margin of a gravity high along the eastern Clark Mountain Range. To improve our understanding of the geophysical and structural framework of the eastern Mojave carbonatite terrane, we collected over 1900 gravity stations and over 600 physical rock property samples to augment existing geophysical data. Carbonatite intrusions typically have distinct gravity, magnetic, and radiometric signatures because these deposits are relatively dense, contain magnetite, and are enriched in thorium or uranium. However, our results show that the carbonatite is essentially nonmagnetic with an average susceptibility of 0.18 x 10-3 SI (n=31) and the associated ultrapotassic intrusive suite is very weakly magnetic with an average susceptibility of 2.0 x 10-3 SI (n=36). Although the carbonatite body is nonmagnetic, it occurs along a steep gradient of a prominent aeromagnetic anomaly. This anomaly may reflect moderately magnetic mafic intrusive rocks at depth. East of the ultrapotassic intrusive rocks, a prominent north trending magnetic anomaly occurs in the central part of Ivanpah Valley. Based on geologic mapping in the Ivanpah Mountains, this magnetic anomaly may reflect Paleoproterozoic mafic intrusive rocks related to the 1.7 Ga Ivanpah Orogeny. Physical property measurements indicate that exposed amphibolite along the eastern Ivanpah Mountains are moderately magnetic with an average susceptibility of 26.7 x 10-3 SI (n=15). The north trending gravity anomaly along the eastern part of the Clark Mountain Range probably reflects dense gneissic rocks of a similar age, rather than the suite of relatively lower density ultrapotassic intrusive rocks.

  14. Middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification by particle precipitation at the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Pinto, O., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence for a localized middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification at low latitudes (southern Brazilian coast) of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA), in association with enhanced geomagnetic activity, are presented in a unified way combining recent observational efforts and related numerical studies. They involve a distortion effect in the fair weather electric field at balloon altitudes. This effect is attributed to a local intensification of energetic electron precipitation through a related middle atmospheric ionization enhancement and is elucidated by numeric simulation. From the electric field measurements and the numeric simulation, the intensification of precipitation is considered to occur in fairly narrow regions at the observed low L values (around L = 1.13) of the SAMA, with horizontal extensions of the order of a few hundred kilometers. A physical mechanism that could be responsible for this sort of intensification is suggested. Furthermore, a comparison of the phenomenon of middle atmospheric electrodynamic modification at the SAMA with a similar one at auroral latitudes, in response to enhanced solar and geomagnetic activity, is also given.

  15. High-resolution Measurement Of Magnetic Anomalies With An Unmanned Airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzke, M.; Hofmeister, P.; Auster, H.; Hoerdt, A.; Glassmeier, K.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution magnetic mapping of areas is a suitable way to determine location, geometry and physical parameters of disturbing objects that cause magnetic anomalies. Areas are often difficult to walk and handheld measurements can become costly. It can also be dangerous to enter areas where ordnance is suspected. In these cases it may be advantageous to use an aircraft to perform the measurement. We use a 6.5 m long unmanned airship. Compared to helicopters or gyrocopters, an advantage is that the damage in case of hazards is almost negligible. We made considerable efforts to construct a system that is easy to control without intense training under moderate wind conditions (up to 2 m/s wind speed). The airship has a mass of 10 kg and is powered by four electric motors with a maximum total power of 4.8 kW. Two of the rotors are used to control the altitude of the ship; the other two can be used to control direction and speed. The required energy is provided by four 4S1P Lithium-Polymer battery packs. Batteries are designed to provide a maximum of 125 A at 14.8 V. They have a capacity of 0.3 kWh and can be recharged in 20 minutes. The airship carries a differential GPS receiver that measures the position of the airship at 100 Hz with a precision of 10 cm. The distance to the ground is measured with ultrasonic sensors. A fluxgate magnetometer measures the magnetic field with an accuracy of 1 nT, also at 100 Hz. The flight path does not follow a rigid measuring grid but is a random walk, with roughly constant altitude to achieve a mean sensor position of 2 m above the ground. Thus, near-surface disturbing bodies are well resolved if their distance from each other is greater than 4 m. First measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the system. Future applications will be mid-scale measurements which are too large or too cumbersome for handheld measurements, and too small to justify the use of a manned helicopter.

  16. Airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly signatures of serpentinite in relation to soil geochemistry, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, A.E.; Van Gosen, B. S.

    2009-01-01

    Serpentinized ultramafic rocks and associated soils in northern California are characterized by high concentrations of Cr and Ni, low levels of radioelements (K, Th, and U) and high amounts of ferrimagnetic minerals (primarily magnetite). Geophysical attributes over ultramafic rocks, which include airborne gamma-ray and magnetic anomaly data, are quantified and provide indirect measurements on the relative abundance of radioelements and magnetic minerals, respectively. Attributes are defined through a statistical modeling approach and the results are portrayed as probabilities in chart and map form. Two predictive models are presented, including one derived from the aeromagnetic anomaly data and one from a combination of the airborne K, Th and U gamma-ray data. Both models distinguish preferential values within the aerogeophysical data that coincide with mapped and potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks. The magnetic predictive model shows positive probabilities associated with magnetic anomaly highs and, to a lesser degree, anomaly lows, which accurately locate many known ultramafic outcrops, but more interestingly, locate potentially unmapped ultramafic rocks, possible extensions of ultramafic bodies that dip into the shallow subsurface, as well as prospective buried ultramafic rocks. The airborne radiometric model shows positive probabilities in association with anomalously low gamma radiation measurements over ultramafic rock, which is similar to that produced by gabbro, metavolcanic rock, and water bodies. All of these features share the characteristic of being depleted in K, Th and U. Gabbro is the only rock type in the study area that shares similar magnetic properties with the ultramafic rock. The aerogeophysical model results are compared to the distribution of ultramafic outcrops and to Cr, Ni, K, Th and U concentrations and magnetic susceptibility measurements from soil samples. Analysis of the soil data indicates high positive correlation between magnetic susceptibilities and concentration of Cr and Ni. Although the study focused on characterizing the geophysical properties of ultramafic rocks and associated soils, it has also yielded information on other rock types in addition to ultramafic rocks, which can also locally host naturally-occurring asbestos; specifically, gabbro and metavolcanic rocks.

  17. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lembège, Bertrand; Markidis, Stefano; Horányi, Mihály

    2014-05-01

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general picture of the interaction of a dipole model centred just below the lunar surface under various solar wind and plasma conditions and focus on the kinetic effects. It is shown that the configuration is dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is also unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement SWIFF (project 2633430, swiff.eu) and EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2011050747 (Curie supercomputer). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board, Grant No. 136/11. JD has received support through the HPC-Europa2 visitor programme (project HPC08SSG85) and the KuLeuven Junior Mobility Programme Special Research Fund.

  18. Global equivalent magnetization of the oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Hamoudi, M.; Lesur, V.; Thebault, E.

    2015-11-01

    As a by-product of the construction of a new World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map over oceanic areas, we use an original approach based on the global forward modeling of seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies and their comparison to the available marine magnetic data to derive the first map of the equivalent magnetization over the World's ocean. This map reveals consistent patterns related to the age of the oceanic lithosphere, the spreading rate at which it was formed, and the presence of mantle thermal anomalies which affects seafloor spreading and the resulting lithosphere. As for the age, the equivalent magnetization decreases significantly during the first 10-15 Myr after its formation, probably due to the alteration of crustal magnetic minerals under pervasive hydrothermal alteration, then increases regularly between 20 and 70 Ma, reflecting variations in the field strength or source effects such as the acquisition of a secondary magnetization. As for the spreading rate, the equivalent magnetization is twice as strong in areas formed at fast rate than in those formed at slow rate, with a threshold at ?40 km/Myr, in agreement with an independent global analysis of the amplitude of Anomaly 25. This result, combined with those from the study of the anomalous skewness of marine magnetic anomalies, allows building a unified model for the magnetic structure of normal oceanic lithosphere as a function of spreading rate. Finally, specific areas affected by thermal mantle anomalies at the time of their formation exhibit peculiar equivalent magnetization signatures, such as the cold Australian-Antarctic Discordance, marked by a lower magnetization, and several hotspots, marked by a high magnetization.

  19. Middle proterozoic tectonic activity in west Texas and eastern New Mexico and analysis of gravity and magnetic anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R. )

    1994-03-01

    The Precambrian history of west Texas and eastern New Mexico is complex, consisting of four events: Early Proterozoic orogenic activity (16309-1800 Ma), formation of the western granite-rhyolite province (WGRP) (1340-1410 Ma), Grenville age tectonics (1116-1232 Ma), and middle Proterozoic extension possibly related to mid-continent rifting (1086-1109 Ma). Pre-Grenville tectonics, Grenville tectonics, and mid-continent rifting are represented in this area by the Abilene gravity minimum (AGM) and bimodal igneous rocks, which are probably younger. We have used gravity modeling and the comparison of gravity and magnetic anomalies with rock types reported from wells penetrating Precambrian basement to study the AGM and middle Proterozoic extension in this area. The AGM is an east-northeast-trending, 600 km long, gravity low, which extends from the Texas-Oklahoma border through the central basin platform (CBP) to the Delaware basin. This feature appears to predate formation of the mafic body in the CBP (1163 Ma) and is most likely related to Pre-Grenville tectonics, possibly representing a continental margin arc batholith. Evidence of middle Proterozoic extension is found in the form of igneous bodies in the CBP, the Van Horn uplift, the Franklin Mountains, and the Sacramento Mountains. Analysis of gravity and magnetic anomalies shows that paired gravity and magnetic highs are related to mafic intrusions in the upper crust. Mapping of middle Proterozoic igneous rocks and the paired anomalies outlines a 530 km diameter area of distributed east-west-oriented extension. The Debaca-Swisher terrain of shallow marine and clastic sedimentary rocks is age correlative with middle Proterozoic extension. These rocks may represent the lithology of possible Proterozoic exploration targets. Proterozoic structures were reactivated during the Paleozoic, affecting both the structure and deposition in the Permian basin.

  20. An annular high-current electron beam with an energy spread in a coaxial magnetically insulated diode

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkov, A. A. Pegel, I. V.

    2013-11-15

    An elementary theory of an annular high-current electron beam in a uniform transport channel and a coaxial magnetically insulated diode is generalized to the case of counterpropagating electron beams with a spread over kinetic energies. Expressions for the sum of the absolute values of the forward and backward currents in a uniform transport channel and for the flux of the longitudinal component of the generalized momentum in a coaxial magnetically insulated diode as functions of the maximum electron kinetic energy are derived for different values of the relative width of the energy distribution function. It is shown that, in a diode with an expanding transport channel and a virtual cathode limiting the extracted current, counterpropagating particle flows are established between the cathode and the virtual cathode within a certain time interval after the beginning of electron emission. The accumulation of electrons in these flows is accompanied by an increase in their spread over kinetic energies and the simultaneous decrease in the maximum kinetic energy. The developed model agrees with the results of particle-in-cell simulations performed using the KARAT and OOPIC-Pro codes.

  1. Additions to Magnetic Trackline Archive For Improvements to Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2) and Improvements to Data Dissemination at NGDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B.; Jencks, J.; Barckhausen, U.; Ishihara, T.; Campagnoli, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is the primary archive of marine geophysical data worldwide. However, it has been challenging for scientist to discover and access data due to variable data formats, non-digital data holdings, and transitioning data discovery portals. In 2014, NGDC made a concerted effort to identify, ingest, and archive all publicly available magnetic trackline data for access via a new Trackline Geophysical Data web-based interface. Non-digital data were digitized and added to the Global Geophysical Database and are now available for download in a common MGD77 format. All ancillary and analog data are accessible via the same interface, without having to navigate through multiple directories or prompts. The result is over 16.5 million miles of magnetic trackline data are now available, both through NGDC's improved user interface and as a web service for incorporation into other portals. This allows the geoscience community unprecedented access to global geophysical magnetic trackline data from a secure long-term archive. The addition of 6.5 million miles of magnetic trackline data to the database, since the previous release of the Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid (EMAG2), will give NGDC the ability to improve the model coverage, especially in areas of low coverage, such as around the Eltanin Fracture Zone in the South Pacific. This poster will focus on some key data additions and how they will help us validate the accuracy of the ocean age model/directional gridding algorithm and improve the Earth Magnetic Anomaly Grid going forward.

  2. Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomaly inthe Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan: implications for a westward shift of the volcanic front after ~2.1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Oda, H.; Ishizuka, O.; Arai, K.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies in the southern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc reveal recent volcanic structures in a southwestward extension of the active volcanic front of the Ryukyu Arc. A line of bathymetric highs running subparallel to this recent volcanic front was observed ~20 km to the east. A set of small, sharply defined magnetic anomalies extends southward from this line of bathymetric highs to the islands Kume-jima and Aguni-jima, suggesting the former existence of an ancient volcanic front. The ages of volcanic rocks from these islands indicate that magmatic activity along the ancient volcanic front continued until at least ~2.1 Ma. The presence of magnetic anomalies between the two volcanic fronts suggests that the volcanic front has moved gradually westward. This shift can be explained by the termination of asthenospheric upwelling and/or the rapid retreat of the Ryukyu Trench after its change in subduction direction.

  3. Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomaly in the Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan: implications for a westward shift of the volcanic front after approximately 2.1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taichi; Oda, Hirokuni; Ishizuka, Osamu; Arai, Kohsaku

    2014-12-01

    Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies in the southern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc reveal recent volcanic structures in a southwestward extension of the active volcanic front of the Ryukyu Arc. A line of bathymetric highs running subparallel to this recent volcanic front was observed approximately 20 km to the east. A set of small, sharply defined magnetic anomalies extends southward from this line of bathymetric highs to the islands Kume-jima and Aguni-jima, suggesting the former existence of an ancient volcanic front. The ages of volcanic rocks from these islands indicate that magmatic activity along the ancient volcanic front continued until at least approximately 2.1 Ma. The presence of magnetic anomalies between the two volcanic fronts suggests that the volcanic front has moved gradually westward. This shift can be explained by the termination of asthenospheric upwelling and/or the rapid retreat of the Ryukyu Trench after its change in subduction direction.

  4. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I: processing procedures. [National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  5. Characterization and removal of errors due to local magnetic anomalies in directional drilling Nathan Hancock*

    E-print Network

    such as those produced by telluric currents and magnetic geologic units. We have developed method to quantify the error associated with magnetic geologic units, and correct the drilling process for this error's magnetic field in real time and correct the MWD data accordingly, could provide a method for drilling more

  6. Ocean-continent-transition at magma poor rifted margins, the magnetic signature of a magmatic breakup?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, A.; Sauter, D.; Manatschal, G.; Peron-Pinvidic, G.; Munschy, M.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic anomalies identified on the Zone of Exhumed Continental Mantle (ZECM) in the Iberia and Newfoundland margins have been interpreted as seafloor spreading anomalies. These magnetic anomalies do not lie on oceanic crust but within the transitional domain mainly composed of exhumed mantle intruded by magmatic bodies. The weakness of these anomalies, the absence of agreement about nature and depth of the sources and some inconsistencies between kinematic reconstructions and geological constraints suggest that these anomalies may not be standard seafloor spreading anomalies. Moreover, on both seaward edges of the ZECMs, seismic reflexion and refraction and ODP data show an unusual morphology characterized by a topographic high, a thicker crust and surface lava flows, all associated with a major sediment unconformity (dated at the Aptian/Albian transition). This structure called « outer high » corresponds with the main magnetic anomaly (the J anomaly) observed in the transitional area of both margins. Here we present an alternative model based on forward modelling of magnetic anomaly constrained by seismic refraction and drill hole data. We show that the magnetic anomaly profiles across the ZECMs can be explained without inversions of the Earth magnetic field. We use only positive magnetizations assuming that magmatic and tectonic processes related to the J anomaly occur during the quiet Cretaceous magnetic period. Thus, we propose that the J anomaly results from an excess magma event associated with the emplacement of underplated magmatic bodies and surface lava flows respectively below and above the pre-existing exhumed mantle. The unusual high and variable amplitude of the J anomaly is then explained by the repartition of the magmatic and volcanic material in the serpentinized bedrock. We propose that this magmatic event is at the origin of continental breakup that occurred at about 112 Ma leading to the transition from the exhumation phase to seafloor spreading.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral anomalies in subjects with resistance to thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, C.M.; Hauser, P.; Weintraub, B.D. |

    1995-06-19

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the human thyroid receptor beta gene on chromosome 3. Individuals with RTH have an increased incidence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this study was to search for developmental brain malformations associated with RTH. Forty-three subjects (20 affected males [AM], 23 affected females [AF]) with resistance to thyroid hormone and 32 unaffected first degree relatives (18 unaffected males [UM], 14 unaffected females [UF]) underwent MRI brain scans with a volumetric acquisition that provided 90 contiguous 2 mm thick sagittal images. Films of six contiguous images beginning at a standard sagittal position lateral to the insula were analyzed by an investigator who was blind with respect to subject characteristics. The presence of extra or missing gyri in the parietal bank of the Sylvian fissure (multimodal association cortex) and multiple Heschl`s transverse gyri (primary auditory cortex) were noted. There was a significantly increased frequency of anomalous Sylvian fissures in the left hemisphere in males with RTH (AM: 70%; AF: 30%; UM: 28% UF: 28%). Also, there was an increased frequency of anomalous Sylvian fissures on the left combined with multiple Heschl`s gyri in either hemisphere in males with RTH (AM: 50%; AF: 9%; UM: 6%; UF: 0%). However, RTH subjects with anomalies did not have an increased frequency of ADHD as compared with RTH subjects with no anomalies. Abnormal thyroid hormone action in the male fetus early during brain development may be associated with grossly observable cerebral anomalies of the left hemisphere. The effects of mutations in the thyroid receptor beta gene provide a model system for studying the complex interaction of genetic and non-genetic factors on brain and behavioral development. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Investigations of medium wavelength magnetic anomalies in the Eastern Pacific using MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A. (principal investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A paper which discusses a problem in representing the core magnetic field of the Earth using spherical harmonics was revised and accepted for publications. Page proofs of a second paper concerning off center dipole modelling of the Earth's magnetic field are presented.

  9. Magnetization Anomaly due to the Non-Coplanar Spin Structure in NiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higo, Tomoya; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2015-05-01

    The pyrite-type antiferromagnet NiS2 exhibits a non-coplanar antiferromagnetic (NAF) spin ordering with four spin sublattices in the temperature region between TN1 = 38 K and TN2 = 30 K, and forms a weak ferromagnetic phase below TN2. We have carried out detailed magnetization measurements using high-quality single crystals of NiS2 to reveal magnetic properties associated with the NAF spin structure. Our results obtained in the field cooling sequence under various magnetic fields ?0HFC reveal that the magnetic domains due to the NAF structure may be controlled through the field cooling procedure into the low-temperature weak ferromagnetic phase. Unusual ?0HFC dependence of the magnetic hysteresis found in the NAF ordered phase strongly suggests that the weak ferromagnetic moment comes from the domain wall.

  10. Spread-F during the magnetic storm of 22 January 2004 at low latitudes: Effect of IMF-Bz in relation to local sunset time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.; Chandra, H.; Janardhan, P.; Hoang, Thai Lan; Condori, Louis; Pant, T. K.; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.; Reinisch, B.

    2014-08-01

    The paper describes the results of spread-F at low latitude stations around the world during the magnetic storm starting at 0130 UT on 22 January 2004. The storm can be divided into two phases, first phase up to 1000 UT when interplanetary magnetic field IMF-Bz was highly fluctuating around a small positive value and the second phase after a sudden large southward turning of IMF-Bz at 1030 UT. The first phase produced strong spread-F at Jicamarca, Sao Luis, and Ascension Island and caused complete inhibition of spread-F at Thumba and Waltair in India. It generated weak spread-F at Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam and strong spread-F at Hainan and Chung Li. The strong spread-F at Hainan and Chung Li were caused by the positive IMF-Bz during the first phase of the storm and not by the negative pulse of IMF-Bz at 1000 UT.

  11. Low-temperature anomalies in the magnetic and thermal properties of molecular cryocrystals doped with oxygen impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiman, Yu. A.; Tretyak, S. M.; Je?owski, A.

    2000-09-01

    The magnetic properties of oxygen pair clusters are investigated theoretically for different cluster geometries which can be realized by doping molecular cryomatrices with oxygen. Anomalous temperature and pressure behavior of the magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, and entropy is predicted. It is proposed to use these anomalies for studying the parameters characterizing the oxygen clusters and the parameters of the host matrix: the effective spin-figure interaction constant D for the molecule in the matrix, the exchange parameter J, and the number of pair clusters Np, which can deviate markedly from the purely random value Np=6Nc2 (N is Avogadro's number, and c is the molar concentration of the impurity). The data on the magnetic susceptibility may be used to analyze the character of the positional and orientational short-range order in the solid solution. The value of D contains information about the orientational order parameter; the distance and angular dependence of the exchange interaction parameter are still subject to discussion in the literature. The temperature dependence of Np contains information about diffusion and clusterization processes in the system.

  12. Observation of a New Magnetic Anomaly Below the Ferromagnetic Curie Temperature in Yb14MnSb11

    SciTech Connect

    Srinath, S.; Poddar, P.; Srikanth, H.; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David

    2005-01-01

    Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} is an unusual ferromagnet with a Curie temperature of 52 {+-} 1 K. Recent optical, Hall, magnetic, and thermodynamic measurements indicate that Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} may be a rare example of an underscreened Kondo lattice. We report the first experimental observation of a new magnetic anomaly in this system at around 47 K, a few degrees below T{sub c}. Systematic investigations of the ac and dc susceptibilities of Yb{sub 14}MnSb{sub 11} single crystals reveal features associated with possible spin reorientation at this temperature. This new anomaly is extremely sensitive to the applied measurement field and is absent in temperature-dependent dc magnetization data for fields above 50 Oe. The origin of this could be due to decoupling of two distinct magnetic sublattices associated with MnSb{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  13. Voxel Spread Function (VSF) Method for Correction of Magnetic Field Inhomogeneity Effects in Quantitative Gradient-Echo-Based MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A; Sukstanskii, Alexander L; Luo, Jie; Wang, Xiaoqi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Macroscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities adversely affect different aspects of MRI images. In quantitative MRI when the goal is to quantify biological tissue parameters, they bias and often corrupt such measurements. The goal of this paper is to develop a method for correction of macroscopic field inhomogeneities that can be applied to a variety of quantitative gradient-echo-based MRI techniques. Methods We have re-analyzed a basic theory of gradient echo (GE) MRI signal formation in the presence of background field inhomogeneities and derived equations that allow for correction of magnetic field inhomogeneity effects based on the phase and magnitude of GE data. We verified our theory by mapping R2* relaxation rate in computer simulated, phantom, and in vivo human data collected with multi-GE sequences. Results The proposed technique takes into account voxel spread function (VSF) effects and allowed obtaining virtually free from artifacts R2* maps for all simulated, phantom and in vivo data except of the edge areas with very steep field gradients. Conclusion The VSF method, allowing quantification of tissue specific R2*-related tissue properties, has a potential to breed new MRI biomarkers serving as surrogates for tissue biological properties similar to R1 and R2 relaxation rate constants widely used in clinical and research MRI. PMID:23233445

  14. The Wallula fault and tectonic framework of south-central Washington, as interpreted from magnetic and gravity anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakely, Richard J.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Wells, Ray E.; Rohay, Alan C.

    2014-06-01

    The Yakima fold and thrust belt (YFTB) in central Washington has accommodated regional, mostly north-directed, deformation of the Cascadia backarc since prior to emplacement of Miocene flood basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). The YFTB consists of two structural domains. Northern folds of the YFTB strike eastward and terminate at the western margin of a 20-mGal negative gravity anomaly, the Pasco gravity low, straddling the North American continental margin. Southern folds of the YFTB strike southeastward, form part of the Olympic-Wallowa lineament (OWL), and pass south of the Pasco gravity low as the Wallula fault zone. An upper crustal model based on gravity and magnetic anomalies suggests that the Pasco gravity low is caused in part by an 8-km-deep Tertiary basin, the Pasco sub-basin, abutting the continental margin and concealed beneath CRBG. The Pasco sub-basin is crossed by north-northwest-striking magnetic anomalies caused by dikes of the 8.5 Ma Ice Harbor Member of the CRBG. At their northern end, dikes connect with the eastern terminus of the Saddle Mountains thrust of the YFTB. At their southern end, dikes are disrupted by the Wallula fault zone. The episode of NE-SW extension that promoted Ice Harbor dike injection apparently involved strike-slip displacement on the Saddle Mountains and Wallula faults. The amount of lateral shear on the OWL impacts the level of seismic hazard in the Cascadia region. Ice Harbor dikes, as mapped with aeromagnetic data, are dextrally offset by the Wallula fault zone a total of 6.9 km. Assuming that dike offsets are tectonic in origin, the Wallula fault zone has experienced an average dextral shear of 0.8 mm/y since dike emplacement 8.5 Ma, consistent with right-lateral stream offsets observed at other locations along the OWL. Southeastward, the Wallula fault transfers strain to the north-striking Hite fault, the possible location of the M 5.7 Milton-Freewater earthquake in 1936.

  15. Pattern of Tumour Spread of Common Primary Tumours as Seen on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Ohlmann-Knafo, Susanne; Pickuth, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Although some reports with computed tomography and bone scintigraphy are available in the literature, the distinct epidemiologic description of skeletal metastatic pattern of various tumors is still lacking. This study uses a novel approach to identify skeletal metastases from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to describe metastatic pattern in common malignancies. A retrospective analysis of 130 cancer patients (42 lung, 56 breast, 11 prostate cancers; 21 multiple myeloma) with vertebral metastases and without disseminated disease, and whom underwent a whole body 3Tesla MRI investigation (Discovery MR750w), was carried out. Multiple myeloma had the most commonly disseminated metastatic disease (95 %) compared to lung (28 %), breast (44 %) and prostate (71 %) cancers. Lung cancer was related to more frequent pedicle involvement compared to breast or prostate cancer (29, 9 and 0 %, p?

  16. Spherical-earth Gravity and Magnetic Anomaly Modeling by Gauss-legendre Quadrature Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Luca, A. J. (principal investigators)

    1981-01-01

    The anomalous potential of gravity and magnetic fields and their spatial derivatives on a spherical Earth for an arbitrary body represented by an equivalent point source distribution of gravity poles or magnetic dipoles were calculated. The distribution of equivalent point sources was determined directly from the coordinate limits of the source volume. Variable integration limits for an arbitrarily shaped body are derived from interpolation of points which approximate the body's surface envelope. The versatility of the method is enhanced by the ability to treat physical property variations within the source volume and to consider variable magnetic fields over the source and observation surface. A number of examples verify and illustrate the capabilities of the technique, including preliminary modeling of potential field signatures for Mississippi embayment crustal structure at satellite elevations.

  17. Calculation of gravity and magnetic anomalies of finite-length right polygonal prisms.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cady, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    An equation is derived for the vertical gravity field due to a homogeneous body with polygonal cross?section and finite strike?length. The equation can be separated into the two?dimensional (2-D) terms of Talwani et al. (1959) and exact terms for the contributions of the ends of the prism. Equations for the magnetic field due to a similar body were derived by Shuey and Pasquale (1973), who coined the term “two?and?a?half dimensional” (2 1/2-D) to describe the geometry. Magnetic intensities are expressed as a vector sum, from which the common dot product formulation can be obtained by binomial expansion.

  18. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Magnetic Cusp Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of magnetic and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal magnetic fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 1 1/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.

  19. Gravitational Anomaly and Transport

    E-print Network

    Landsteiner, Karl; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  20. Gravitational Anomaly and Transport

    E-print Network

    Karl Landsteiner; Eugenio Megias; Francisco Pena-Benitez

    2011-07-06

    Quantum anomalies give rise to new transport phenomena. In particular a magnetic field can induce an anomalous current via the chiral magnetic effect and a vortex in the relativistic fluid can also induce a current via the chiral vortical effect. The related transport coefficients can be calculated via Kubo formulas. We evaluate the Kubo formula for the anomalous vortical conductivity at weak coupling and show that it receives contributions proportional to the gravitational anomaly coefficient. The gravitational anomaly gives rise to an anomalous vortical effect even for an uncharged fluid.

  1. Formation of magnetic anomalies antipodal to lunar impact basins: Two-dimensional model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, L.L.; Huang, Z. )

    1991-06-10

    The production of large-scale magnetic fields and associated crustal magnetization in lunar basin-forming impacts is investigated theoretically. Two-dimensional numerical models of the partially ionized vapor cloud produced in such impacts show that the low-density periphery of the cloud expands thermally around the Moon and converges near the antipode in a time of the order of 400 to 500 s for silicate impactor velocities of 15 to 20 km/s. Fields external to the impact plasma cloud are produced by the magnetohydrodynamic interaction of the cloud with ambient magnetic fields and plasmas. For the most typical case in which the Moon is immersed in the solar wind plasma and its embedded magnetic field, an MHD shock wave forms upstream of the cloud periphery separating the shocked solar wind from the free-stream solar wind. For impacts occurring on the downstream (antisunward) hemisphere, convergence of the impact plasma cloud and associated MHD shock waves occurs on the upstream side and results in a large antipodal field amplification. For impacts occurring on the upstream (sunward) hemisphere, some antipodal field amplification is still expected due to the finite electrical conductivity of the lunar interior (requiring an induced external magnetic field) and the likely presence of some residual plasma in the wake of the impact plasma cloud. During the period of compressed antipodal field amplification, seismic compressional waves from the impact converge at the antipode resulting in transient shock pressures that have been calculated to be as large as 2 GPa (20 kbar).

  2. Positive holes in magnesium oxide - Correlation between magnetic, electric, and dielectric anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batllo, F.; Leroy, R. C.; Parvin, K.; Freund, F.; Freund, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    The present magnetic susceptibility investigation of high purity MgO single crystals notes an anomally at 800 K which is associated with increasing electrical conductivity, a rise in static dielectric constant from 9 to 150, and the appearance of a pronounced positive surface charge. These phenomena can be accounted for in terms of peroxy defects which represent self-trapped, spin-paired positive holes at Mg(2+) vacancy sites. The holes begin to decouple their spins above 600 K.

  3. Seeded growth of ferrite nanoparticles from Mn oxides: observation of anomalies in magnetic transitions.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyon-Min; Zink, Jeffrey I; Khashab, Niveen M

    2015-07-28

    A series of magnetically active ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared by using Mn oxide NPs as seeds. A Verwey transition is identified in Fe3O4 NPs with an average diameter of 14.5 nm at 96 K, where a sharp drop of magnetic susceptibility occurs. In MnFe2O4 NPs, a spin glass-like state is observed with the decrease in magnetization below the blocking temperature due to the disordered spins during the freezing process. From these MnFe2O4 NPs, MnFe2O4@Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O core-shell NPs are prepared by seeded growth. The structure of the core is cubic spinel (Fd3¯m), and the shell is composed of iron-manganese oxide (Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O) with a rock salt structure (Fm3¯m). Moiré fringes appear perpendicular to the ?110? directions on the cubic shape NPs through the plane-matched epitaxial growth. These fringes are due to the difference in the lattice spacings between MnFe2O4 and Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O. Exchange bias is observed in these MnFe2O4@Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O core-shell NPs with an enhanced coercivity, as well as the shift of hysteresis along the field direction. PMID:26123580

  4. Curie isotherm surfaces inferred from high-altitude magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Two-dimensional Curie depth models along two sections across the western United States are derived using an equivalent layer magnetization model derived from Magsat data, and the results are used to constrain finite element thermal models developed by Mayhew and Majer (1980). Regional heat flow variations predicted by the models compare favorably with those inferred from direct measurements. The methodology is applied to upward-continued aeromagnetic data, and the results are found to be in good agreement with previous Curie depth estimates and average measured heat flow.

  5. The reduction, verification and interpretation of MAGSAT magnetic data over Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, R. L. (principal investigator); Haines, G. V.; Vanbeek, G. J.; Walker, J. K.; Newitt, L. R.; Nandi, A.

    1982-01-01

    Correlations between the MAGSAT scalar anomaly map produced at the Earth Physics ranch and other geophysical and geological data reveal relationships between high magnetic field and some metamorphic grade shields, as well as between low magnetic field and shield regions of lower metamorphic grade. An intriguing contrast exists between the broad low anomaly field over the Nasen-Gakkel Ridge (a spreading plate margin) and the high anomaly field over Iceland (part of a spreading margin). Both regions have high heat flow, and presumably thin magnetic crust. This indicates that Iceland is quite anomalous in its magnetic character, and possible similarities with the Alpha Ridge are suggested. Interesting correlations exist between MAGSAT anomalies around the North Atlantic, after reconstructing the fit of continents into a prerifting configuration. These correlations suggest that several orogenies in that region have not completely destroyed an ancient magnetization formed in high grade Precambrian rocks.

  6. MAGSAT anomaly map and continental drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemouel, J. L. (principal investigator); Galdeano, A.; Ducruix, J.

    1981-01-01

    Anomaly maps of high quality are needed to display unambiguously the so called long wave length anomalies. The anomalies were analyzed in terms of continental drift and the nature of their sources is discussed. The map presented confirms the thinness of the oceanic magnetized layer. Continental magnetic anomalies are characterized by elongated structures generally of east-west trend. Paleomagnetic reconstruction shows that the anomalies found in India, Australia, and Antarctic exhibit a fair consistency with the African anomalies. It is also shown that anomalies are locked under the continents and have a fixed geometry.

  7. Origin of the northern Indus Fan and Murray Ridge, Northern Arabian Sea: interpretation from seismic and magnetic imaging

    E-print Network

    Clift, Peter

    deposited during the drift phase after the break-up of India­ Seychelles­Africa. A predrift sequence, magnetic anomalies and gravity field modeling indicate to be of continental character. The continental anomalies. From this study, thinned continental crust spreads between the northern Murray Ridge System

  8. Acoustic anomalies in UPt{3} at high magnetic fields and low temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, J. R.; Ketterson, J. B.; Hinks, D. G.; Dasgupta, D.; Sarma, B. K.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee

    2000-11-01

    Ultrasound velocity and attenuation measurements were performed on single crystals of the heavy fermion compound UPt{sub 3} in magnetic fields up to 33 T and at temperatures ranging from 2.4 K to below 0.1 K. With longitudinal sound propagated in the crystallographic basal plane, parallel to the applied field, the familiar elastic softening is observed at the metamagnetic transition field H-20.2 T. More complicated structure emerges at low temperatures, including quantum acoustic oscillations and a second velocity minimum at -21.6 T. A weak frequency dependence (dispersion) is observed in the velocity. The ultrasonic data are analyzed using the Landau-Khalatnikov formalism, from which temperature- and field-dependent relaxation times are deduced.

  9. Seafloor spreading in the Weddell Sea and southwest Atlantic since the Late Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, R. A.; Woollett, R. W.

    1993-06-01

    Geosat radar altimetry defines a pattern of closely spaced curvilinear gravity anomalies in the northern Weddell Sea and adjacent parts of the southwest Atlantic. These anomalies are caused by a fracture zone pattern resulting from seafloor spreading, mainly on the southern flank of a ridge system which now exists only to the east of the South Sandwich Trench. Flowlines derived from these anomalies are combined with isochrons resulting from an interpretation of all available magnetic anomaly profiles in the region, to produce a new tectonic summary chart. This chart reveals major changes in spreading direction during (i) the Cretaceous magnetic superchron, (ii) the latest Cretaceous/Paleocene (˜ 65 Ma) and (iii) the mid-Eocene (˜ 50 Ma). The latter two changes enclose a period of very slow spreading, and define a kink in the flowlines which is discernable throughout most of the Weddell Sea. Preliminary modelling indicates that trends from the western Weddell Sea to near the South Atlantic triple junction can be explained by the separation of just two plates. There is some disagreement between the observed flowlines and those predicted by rotations published for the South Atlantic and Southwest Indian Ridge, but abrupt changes in spreading direction and a slowing of rates are observed on all three branches of the South America-Africa-Antarctica plate system between the times of anomalies C31 and C21. This suggests that the lack of closure results from errors in the calculated rotations, and that the seafloor of the Weddell Sea and southwest Atlantic was created as a direct consequence of South America-Antarctica plate motion. The data do not support the existence of a Late Cretaceous Malvinas Plate within the Weddell Sea, although microplates in the northernmost Weddell Sea do appear to have formed briefly as a result of interactions between the former spreading ridge and a subduction zone located at the South Scotia Ridge.

  10. Evaluation of seismo-electric anomalies using magnetic data in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Hsu, H. L.; Wen, S.; Yeh, T. K.; Chang, F. Y.; Wang, C. H.; Liu, J. Y.; Sun, Y. Y.; Hattori, K.; Yen, H. Y.; Han, P.

    2013-03-01

    The Parkinson vectors derived from 3-component geomagnetic data via the magnetic transfer function are discussed with respect to epicentre locations and hypocentre depths of 16 earthquakes (M ? 5.5) in Taiwan during a period of 2002-2005. To find out whether electric conductivity changes would happen particularly in the seismoactive depth ranges, i.e. in the vicinity of the earthquake foci, the frequency dependent penetration depth of the electromagnetic waves (skin effect) is taken into account. The background distributions involving the general conductivity structure and the coast effect at 20 particular depths are constructed using the Parkinson vectors during the entire study period. The background distributions are subtracted from the time-varying monitor distributions, which are computed using the Parkinson vectors within the 15-day moving window, to remove responses of the coast effect and underlying conductivity structure. Anomalous depth sections are identified by deviating distributions and agree with the hypocentre depths of 15 thrust and/or strike-slip earthquakes with only one exception of a normal fault event.

  11. The association between cerebral developmental venous anomaly and concomitant cavernous malformation: an observational study using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Some studies reported that cerebral developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is often concurrent with cavernous malformation (CM). But there is lack of statistical evidence and study of bulk cases. The factors associated with concurrency are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of concomitant DVA and CM using observational data on Chinese patients and analyze the factors associated with the concurrency. Methods The records of all cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed between January 2001 and December 2012 in Beijing Tiantan Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. The DVA and CM cases were selected according to imaging reports that met diagnostic criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson chi-square statistic for binary variables and multivariable logistic regression analysis for predictors associated with the concurrent CM. Results We reviewed a total of 165,230 cranial MR images performed during the previous 12 year period, and identified 1,839 cases that met DVA radiographic criteria. There were 205 patients who presented concomitant CM among the 1,839 DVAs. The CM prevalence in DVA cases (11.1%) was significantly higher than that in the non-DVA cases (2.3%) (P<0.01). In the multivariate analysis, we found that DVAs with three or more medullary veins in the same MRI section (adjusted OR?=?2.37, 95% CI: 1.73-3.24), infratentorial DVAs (adjusted OR?=?1.71, 95% CI: 1.26-2.33) and multiple DVAs (adjusted OR?=?2.08, 95% CI: 1.04-4.16) have a higher likelihood of being concomitant with CM. Conclusions CM are prone to coexisting with DVA. There is a higher chance of concurrent CM with DVA when the DVA has three or more medullary veins in the same MRI scanning section, when the DVA is infratentorial, and when there are multiple DVAs. When diagnosing DVA cases, physicians should be alerted to the possibility of concurrent CM. PMID:24628866

  12. Crustal thickness and Vp/Vs estimates near the Brunswick magnetic anomaly using receiver functions from the SESAME array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. H.; Hawman, R. B.; Fischer, K. M.; Wagner, L. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment (SESAME) is designed to investigate lithospheric dynamics associated with the Paleozoic collision between the Suwanee terrane and Laurentia as well as subsequent Mesozoic rifting and passive margin formation. So far, we have deployed 63 broadband instruments along two N-S trending profiles across Georgia and northern Florida. A third NW-trending profile consisting of 19 stations extends across accreted terranes of the southern Appalachians from Augusta, GA to eastern TN. The N-S profiles are intended to provide constraints on variations in crustal structure across the Brunswick magnetic anomaly (BMA), a prominent magnetic low coinciding with south-dipping crustal-scale seismic reflectors evident on COCORP profiles in south Georgia. The seismic reflectivity is likely a consequence of suturing, but the BMA has been interpreted as an edge effect related to collision as well as an effect of mafic magmatism south of the suture zone. H-k stacking using 10 teleseismic receiver functions from station W27, located ~50-km north of the suture on the western N-S profile, suggests a crustal thickness (H) of 42-44 km and average crustal Vp/Vs (k) of 1.73-1.80. These estimates are in agreement with previous well-constrained stacking results from USNSN station GOGA, located ~70-km to the northeast, that suggest a crustal thickness of 41-43 km and average Vp/Vs 1.72-1.76. The proposed suture zone itself lies beneath sediments of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and receiver functions from stations in this region appear to be strongly affected by high-amplitude reverberations within the sedimentary column. Therefore, preliminary H-k stacking results from stations directly over the BMA may be unreliable. However, receiver functions from station W23 near the Inner Piedmont-Coastal Plain boundary (near the north, up-dip end of the suture zone) display variations in Ps delay time and amplitude with event back-azimuth. Receiver functions from the S-azimuth (South American trench) display a relatively weak Ps conversion at ~4 seconds, while receiver functions from the NW-azimuth (Aleutian trench) show a more complex signal with an arrival at ~4 s followed by a higher-amplitude arrival at ~6 seconds. This may be indicative of compositional heterogeneity across the suture, anisotropy within the crust or mantle, or complexity at the crust-mantle interface related to collision of the Suwanee terrane. Forthcoming data from additional stations will provide improved constraints on crustal structure across the BMA.

  13. A source-depth separation filter: Using the Euler method on the derivatives of total intensity magnetic anomaly data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravat, D.; Kirkham, K.; Hildenbrand, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    An overview is given on the benefits of applying the Euler method on derivatives of anomalies to enhance the location of shallow and deep sources. Used properly, the method is suitable for characterizing sources from all potential-field data and/or their derivative, as long as the data can be regarded mathematically as "continuous". Furthermore, the reasons why the use of the Euler method on derivatives of anomalies is particularly helpful in the analysis and interpretation of shallow features are explained.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging evidence for perineural spread of endometriosis to the lumbosacral plexus: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Siquara de Sousa, Ana C; Capek, Stepan; Howe, Benjamin M; Jentoft, Mark E; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    Sciatic nerve endometriosis (EM) is a rare presentation of retroperitoneal EM. The authors present 2 cases of catamenial sciatica diagnosed as sciatic nerve EM. They propose that both cases can be explained by perineural spread of EM from the uterus to the sacral plexus along the pelvic autonomie nerves and then further distally to the sciatic nerve or proximally to the spinal nerves. This explanation is supported by MRI evidence in both cases. As a proof of concept, the authors retrieved and analyzed the original MRI studies of a case reported in the literature and found a similar pattern of spread. They believe that the imaging evidence of their institutional cases together with the outside case is a very compelling indication for perineural spread as a mechanism of EM of the nerve. PMID:26323817

  15. Infrared phonon anomaly and magnetic excitations in single-crystal Cu3Bi(SeO3)2O2Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Martin, C.; Xi, X.; Berger, H.; Carr, G. L.; Tanner, D. B.

    2012-02-01

    Infrared reflection as a function of temperature has been measured on the anisotropic single-crystal Cu3Bi(SeO3)2O2Cl. The complex dielectric function and optical properties along all three crystal axes of the orthorhombic cell were obtained via Kramers-Kronig analysis and by fits to a Drude-Lorentz model. Below 110 K drastic anomalies in the phonon spectrum (e.g., new modes and splitting of existing modes) are observed along all three crystal axes. Transmission in the terahertz region as a function of temperature has revealed magnetic excitations originating below the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, Tc=24 K. The origin of the excitations in the magnetic state will be discussed in terms of their polarization and externally-applied magnetic field dependence.

  16. The opening of the South China Sea revisited with high-density magnetic tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, T.; Li, C.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic anomalies bear extremely rich information on Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the South China Sea(SCS). Through integrated analyses of magnetic, gravity and reflection seismic data, we define the continent-ocean boundary(COB) around the South China Sea continental margin, and find that the COB coincides very well with a transition zone from mostly positive to negative free-air gravity anomalies. This accurate outlining of the COB is critical for better tracing magnetic anomalies induced by the oceanic crust. Models with a single episode of seafloor spreading are inconsistent with the abrupt magnetic contrast between the East and Southwest Sub-basins.Previous efforts in dating the oceanic crust here are based primarily on very limited numbers of magnetic surveys. Here we take advantage of high-density digital magnetic tracks compiled from multiple surveys to enhance magnetic anomalies caused by the shallow basaltic layer via 2D band-pass filtering. This operation effectively reduces short-wavelength noises and suppresses long-wavelength background anomalies due mostly to deep magnetic sources in the lower crust and uppermost mantle. It is recognized that the likely oldest magnetic anomaly near the northern continental margin is C12 according to the magnetic time scale CK95. Near the southern continental margin, magnetic anomalies are less recognizable and the anomaly C12 appears to be missing. These differences show an asymmetrical opening style with respect to the relict spreading center, and the northern part appears to have slightly faster spreading rates than to the south. The magnetic anomalies C8(M1 and M2, ~26 Ma)represent important magnetic boundaries within the oceanic basin, and are possibly related to changes in spreading rates and magmatic intensities. The magnetic evidence for a previously proposed ridge jump after the anomaly C7 is not clear. To accurately estimate the depths to the top of the basalt layer used in magnetic modeling, we digitize contour maps of two-way seismic travel time from previous studies, and the sediment thicknesses are then estimated from a time-depth relationship built on logging data from ODP184. We then model filtered marine magnetic anomalies along key 2D profiles based on the Talwani modeling technique and the geomagnetic polarity time scale CK95. We confirm that the age of the East Sub-basin is about 32-16.5 Ma(from anomaly C12 to C5c), but the age of the Southwest Sub-basin is still ambiguous, being either 42-33 Ma or 24-16 Ma with different spreading rates. The estimated full spreading rates appear to vary markedly with time, primarily between 40-80 km/Ma. Interestingly, most post-spreading basaltic seamounts seem to have little contribution to observed magnetic anomalies. Given the current inevitable nonuniqueness in magnetic data interpretation, other techniques such as ocean drilling and deep-tow magnetic surveys are needed to better date the spreading of the South China Sea. Our current work is the first step toward a fully integrated interpretation on deep-tow, marine, airborne and satellite magnetic data.

  17. M3 spectral analysis of lunar swirls and the link between optical maturation and surface hydroxyl formation at magnetic anomalies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, G.Y.; Besse, S.; Dhingra, D.; Nettles, J.; Klima, R.; Garrick-Bethell, I.; Clark, R.N.; Combe, J.-P.; Head, J. W., III; Taylor, L.A.; Pieters, C.M.; Boardman, J.; McCord, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the lunar swirls using data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3). The improved spectral and spatial resolution of M3 over previous spectral imaging data facilitates distinction of subtle spectral differences, and provides new information about the nature of these enigmatic features. We characterized spectral features of the swirls, interswirl regions (dark lanes), and surrounding terrain for each of three focus regions: Reiner Gamma, Gerasimovich, and Mare Ingenii. We used Principle Component Analysis to identify spectrally distinct surfaces at each focus region, and characterize the spectral features that distinguish them. We compared spectra from small, recent impact craters with the mature soils into which they penetrated to examine differences in maturation trends on- and off-swirl. Fresh, on-swirl crater spectra are higher albedo, exhibit a wider range in albedos and have well-preserved mafic absorption features compared with fresh off-swirl craters. Albedoand mafic absorptions are still evident in undisturbed, on-swirl surface soils, suggesting the maturation process is retarded. The spectral continuum is more concave compared with off-swirl spectra; a result of the limited spectral reddening being mostly constrained to wavelengths less than ???1500 nm. Off-swirl spectra show very little reddening or change in continuum shape across the entire M3 spectral range. Off-swirl spectra are dark, have attenuated absorption features, and the narrow range in off-swirl albedos suggests off-swirl regions mature rapidly. Spectral parameter maps depicting the relative OH surface abundance for each of our three swirl focus regions were created using the depth of the hydroxyl absorption feature at 2.82 ??m. For each of the studied regions, the 2.82 ??m absorption feature is significantly weaker on-swirl than off-swirl, indicating the swirls are depleted in OH relative to their surroundings. The spectral characteristics of the swirls and adjacent terrains from all three focus regions support the hypothesis that the magnetic anomalies deflect solar wind ions away from the swirls and onto off-swirl surfaces. Nanophase iron (npFe0) is largely responsible for the spectral characteristics we attribute to space weathering and maturation, and is created by vaporization/deposition by micrometeorite impacts and sputtering/reduction by solar wind ions. On the swirls, the decreased proton flux slows the spectral effects of space weathering (relative to nonswirl regions) by limiting the npFe0 production mechanism almost exclusively to micrometeoroid impact vaporization/deposition. Immediately adjacent to the swirls, maturation is accelerated by the increased flux of protons deflected from the swirls. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Seafloor spreading and microcontinent formation during Mesozoic breakup between Australia and Greater India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S.; Whittaker, J.; Müller, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Perth Abyssal Plain (PAP) formed at the nexus of rifting and breakup between three major continents within Gondwana - India, Australia and Antarctica. Oceanic crust within the PAP records the history of Mesozoic seafloor spreading as India moved away from Australia. However, despite the clear importance of the seafloor spreading history of the PAP in constraining the relative motions of these continents during the early stages of breakup, little attention has been paid to the PAP, and particularly its western flank largely due to a lack of new data in collected in this region. We present new observations to constrain the evolution of the PAP, collected during voyage ss2011/v06 of the Southern Surveyor in late 2011. The new data comprise magnetic anomaly profile data, swath bathymetry, and dredge samples collected from 7 sites. The most significant dredge results were obtained from the Batavia Knoll (BK) and Gulden Draak Knoll (GDK), two prominent bathymetric features located >1000 km west of the Australian continental margin. Previous tectonic reconstructions typically treat these bathymetric features as igneous plateaus emplaced on older oceanic crust. However, dredges carried out on the western flanks of each of these knolls recovered continental basement rocks, revealing that both knolls are continental fragments. Estimates of the depths to magnetic sources for shiptrack profiles across the knolls provide evidence for variations in sediment thickness within the knolls. We use forward modeling of shiptrack magnetic profiles combined with gravity anomalies derived from satellite altimetry to make first-order estimates of the extent and spatial variation in thickness of the continental crust. New magnetic anomaly profiles provide evidence for previously unidentified M-series anomalies in the western part of the Perth Abyssal Plain, east of the BK and GDK. These observations both support a reconstruction model in which the microcontinents rifted away from Australia as part of greater India during initial breakup at ~130 Ma. Seafloor spreading in the PAP continued during the early part of the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (until approximately 108 Ma assuming a constant spreading rate inferred from the M-series anomalies). A westward jump in the Australia-India plate boundary led to cessation of spreading in the PAP and the rifting of the BK and GDK from Greater India. Satellite-derived gravity anomalies and swath bathymetry profiles provide evidence for ridge propagation events within the PAP ocean crust, occurring during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron. This series of westwards jumps of the India-Australia plate boundary suggests a strong influence of the Kerguelen hotspot, located beneath eastern greater India at this time.

  19. Autopsy on a dead spreading center: The Phoenix Ridge, Drake Passage, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, Roy; Balanyá, Juan Carlos; Maldonado, Andrés; Martínez, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Fernández, José; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; Galindo Zaldívar, Jesús; Jabaloy, Antonio; Barnolas, Antonio; Somoza, Luis; Hernández-Molina, Javier; Suriñach, Emma; Viseras, César

    2000-07-01

    New bathymetric and magnetic anomaly data from the Phoenix Ridge, Antarctica, show that extinction of all three remaining segments occurred at the time of magnetic chron C2A (3.3 ± 0.2 Ma), synchronous with a ridge-trench collision south of the Hero Fracture Zone. This implies that the ultimate cause of extinction was a change in plate boundary forces occasioned by this collision. Spreading rates slowed abruptly at the time of chron C4 (7.8 ± 0.3 Ma), probably as a result of extinction of the West Scotia Ridge, which would have led to an increase in slip rate and transpressional stress across the Shackleton Fracture Zone. Spectacular, high-relief ridges flanking the extinct spreading center, mapped for the first time using multibeam swath bathymetry, are interpreted as a consequence of a reduction in spreading rate, involving a temporary magma oversupply immediately prior to extinction.

  20. Holonomy anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Bagger, J.; Nemeschansky, D.; Yankielowicz, S.

    1985-05-01

    A new type of anomaly is discussed that afflicts certain non-linear sigma models with fermions. This anomaly is similar to the ordinary gauge and gravitational anomalies since it reflects a topological obstruction to the reparametrization invariance of the quantum effective action. Nonlinear sigma models are constructed based on homogeneous spaces G/H. Anomalies arising when the fermions are chiral are shown to be cancelled sometimes by Chern-Simons terms. Nonlinear sigma models are considered based on general Riemannian manifolds. 9 refs. (LEW)

  1. Magnetic anomalies and itinerant character of electrochemically Li-inserted Li[Li1/3Ti5/3]O4.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Jun

    2015-09-21

    Spinel oxides of Li[LiyTi2-y]O4 with 0 ?y? 1/3 exhibit two desirable features for solid state chemistry and condensed matter physics. One is a reversible lithium insertion/extraction reaction, in particular for Li[Li1/3Ti5/3]O4, and the other is a superconducting transition at Tc? 13 K for Li[Ti2]O4. To study the change in magnetic environments of the y = 1/3 compound with excess Li(x), we measured the magnetic susceptibility (?) for the Li1+x[Li1/3Ti5/3]O4 samples with 0 ?x? 0.95, which were prepared by an electrochemical Li insertion reaction into Li[Li1/3Ti5/3]O4. Even for the x = 0 sample, two magnetic anomalies were found at T (=63 K) and T (=21 K), despite the fact that all Ti ions should be in the 4+ state with S = 0. A comparative study of TiO2 and Li2TiO3 revealed that these magnetic anomalies are not impurity-induced effects but are caused by an intrinsic nature of Li[Li1/3Ti5/3]O4, probably due to either slight compositional deviation from stoichiometry or dislocations such as a Magnéli phase. For the x > 0 samples, the ? vs. temperature curve was found to consist of a temperature-independent Pauli-paramagnetic contribution and a Curie-Weiss contribution. Detailed analyses of ? clarified the systematic variations of the effective magnetic moment of Ti ions, effective mass of electrons in the conduction band, and density of states at the Fermi level with x, indicating that the Li(+) ions at the 16d site play a significant role in localizing d electrons of Ti(3+) ions. PMID:26256858

  2. Equatorial Spread F Statistics in the American Longitudes: Some Problems Relevant to ESF Description in the IRI Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, M. A.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.

    Ground based ionograms (followed by radio wave scintillation and satellite in situ measurements) provide the most abundant data base for generating equatorial spread F (ESF) irregularity occurrence statistics. For practical purposes it is necessary that the statistics of the spread F occurrence distribution (from ionograms) be based, separately, on the range spreading and frequency spreading components of the spread F. The well known features of spread F include its day-to-day, seasonal and solar cycle variations. There seems to exist general consensus on the geomagnetic declination-, longitude- and solar- control of seasonal occurrence of spread F, whereas solar flux seems to produce superimposed effects, including the solar activity cycle in its occurrence features. The day-to-day variability is certainly the least understood of all the known spread F variabilities. Empirical description of the spread F occurrence statistics in the IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) prediction scheme requires detailed examination of the available statistics not only over the magnetic equator but necessarily also over low latitudes extending to equatorial anomaly location. We have produced, and are continuing to improve upon, such statistics based on spread F data covering the solar activity minimum and maximum years for the two Brazilian stations, Fortaleza and Cachoeira Paulista. In this paper we present a comparative study of these results with the published statistics available by other technique and for other longitude sectors, and discuss the findings in terms of their implications for formulating an empirical description of the ESF for possible incorporation into the IRI model

  3. A Preliminary, Full Spectrum, Magnetic Anomaly Grid of the United States with Improved Long Wavelengths for Studying Continental Dynamics: A Website for Distribution of Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravat, D.; Finn, C.; Hill, P.; Kucks, R.; Phillips, J.; Blakely, R.; Bouligand, C.; Sabaka, T.; Elshayat, A.; Aref, A.; Elawadi, E.

    2009-01-01

    Under an initiative started by Thomas G. Hildenbrand of the U.S. Geological Survey, we have improved the long-wavelength (50-2,500 km) content of the regional magnetic anomaly compilation for the conterminous United States by utilizing a nearly homogeneous set of National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) magnetic surveys flown from 1975 to 1981. The surveys were flown in quadrangles of 2 deg of longitude by 1 deg of latitude with east-west flight lines spaced 4.8 to 9.6 km apart, north-south tie lines variably spaced, and a nominal terrain clearance of 122 m. Many of the surveys used base-station magnetometers to remove external field variations.

  4. Reliability of CHAMP Anomaly Continuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Taylor, Patrick T.; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad F.

    2003-01-01

    CHAMP is recording state-of-the-art magnetic and gravity field observations at altitudes ranging over roughly 300 - 550 km. However, anomaly continuation is severely limited by the non-uniqueness of the process and satellite anomaly errors. Indeed, our numerical anomaly simulations from satellite to airborne altitudes show that effective downward continuations of the CHAMP data are restricted to within approximately 50 km of the observation altitudes while upward continuations can be effective over a somewhat larger altitude range. The great unreliability of downward continuation requires that the satellite geopotential observations must be analyzed at satellite altitudes if the anomaly details are to be exploited most fully. Given current anomaly error levels, joint inversion of satellite and near- surface anomalies is the best approach for implementing satellite geopotential observations for subsurface studies. We demonstrate the power of this approach using a crustal model constrained by joint inversions of near-surface and satellite magnetic and gravity observations for Maude Rise, Antarctica, in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Our modeling suggests that the dominant satellite altitude magnetic anomalies are produced by crustal thickness variations and remanent magnetization of the normal polarity Cretaceous Quiet Zone.

  5. Extravasation into brain and subsequent spread beyond the ischemic core of a magnetic resonance contrast agent following a step-down infusion protocol in acute cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Limiting expansion of the ischemic core lesion by reinstating blood flow and protecting the penumbral cells is a priority in acute stroke treatment. However, at present, methods are not available for effective drug delivery to the ischemic penumbra. To address these issues this study compared the extravasation and subsequent interstitial spread of a magnetic resonance contrast agent (MRCA) beyond the ischemic core into the surrounding brain in a rat model of ischemia-reperfusion for bolus injection and step-down infusion (SDI) protocols. Methods Male Wistar rats underwent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion for 3 h followed by reperfusion. Perfusion-diffusion mismatched regions indicating the extent of spread were identified by measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) deficits by arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging and the extent of the ischemic core by mapping the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water with diffusion-weighted imaging. Vascular injury was assessed via MRCA, gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) penetration, by Look-Locker T1-weighted MR imaging after either a bolus injection (n?=?8) or SDI (n?=?6). Spatial and temporal expansion of the MRCA front during a 25 min imaging period was measured from images obtained at 2.5 min intervals. Results The mean ADC lesion was 20?±?7% of the hemispheric area whereas the CBF deficit area was 60?±?16%, with the difference between the areas suggesting the possible presence of a penumbra. The bolus injection led to MRCA enhancement with an area that initially spread into the ischemic core and then diminished over time. The SDI produced a gradual increase in the area of MRCA enhancement that slowly enlarged to occupy the core, eventually expanded beyond it into the surrounding tissue and then plateaued. The integrated area from SDI extravasation was significantly larger than that for the bolus (p?=?0.03). The total number of pixels covered by the SDI at its maximum was significantly larger than the pixels covered by bolus maximum (p?=?0.05). Conclusions These results demonstrate that the SDI protocol resulted in a spread of the MRCA beyond the ischemic core. Whether plasma-borne acute stroke therapeutics can be delivered to the ischemic penumbra in a similar way needs to be investigated. PMID:25276343

  6. Does the South Atlantic Anomaly influence the ionospheric Sq current system? Inferences from analysis of ground-based magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Stephan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-12-01

    We study if and how the South Atlantic Anomaly influences the ionospheric solar quiet (Sq) current system. Geomagnetically quiet days are processed for the years 1990 and 2011, and the Sq foci tracks are analyzed. The two datasets allow to investigate the influence of the observatory network and the solar activity on the Sq source determination. The computed tracks result in pronounced bands in the northern and southern hemisphere, which seem to neither follow the geographic nor the geomagnetic or dip equator. Remarkably, we observe a distinct scattering of the tracks over the South Atlantic Anomaly. This systematic scattering is due to a larger shift of the southern hemisphere focus northwards during the northern summer solstice and southwards during the southern summer solstice. The physical mechanism of this systematic effect remains unclear. The longitudinal variations of the Sq foci are believed to have their origin from an influence of non-migrating tides as reported in recent studies and the anomalous weak amplitude of the geomagnetic main field over the South Atlantic Anomaly.

  7. On the equatorial anomaly of the ionospheric total electron content near the northern anomaly crest region

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Cheng, K.; Chen, S. )

    1989-10-01

    Daily contour charts of the ionospheric total electron content in latitude versus local time coordinates have been used to study the behavior of the development of the equatorial anomaly around the northern anomaly crest region. The daily development of the equatorial anomaly shows quite large day-to-day variabilities not only on magnetically disturbed days but also on quiet days. The daily maximum anomaly crest moves poleward as the magnitude of the total electron content of the daily maximum anomaly crest increases. The increase of the equatorial electrojet strength also results in a poleward movement of the anomaly crest. No significant correlation exists between the anomaly crest and the magnetic {ital Ap} index. The monthly mean diurnal development of the equatorial anomaly shows a remarkable seasonal difference, with the anomaly largest in equinoxes and slightly larger in winter than in summer. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  8. Ages and magnetic structures of the South China Sea constrained by deep tow magnetic surveys and IODP Expedition 349

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Feng; Xu, Xing; Lin, Jian; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Jian; Yao, Yongjian; Zhao, Xixi; Liu, Qingsong; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Wang, Jian; Song, Taoran; Zhao, Junfeng; Qiu, Ning; Guan, Yongxian; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Williams, Trevor; Bao, Rui; Briais, Anne; Brown, Elizabeth A.; Chen, Yifeng; Clift, Peter D.; Colwell, Frederick S.; Dadd, Kelsie A.; Ding, Weiwei; Almeida, Iván. Hernández; Huang, Xiao-Long; Hyun, Sangmin; Jiang, Tao; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Li, Qianyu; Liu, Chuanlian; Liu, Zhifei; Nagai, Renata H.; Peleo-Alampay, Alyssa; Su, Xin; Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Trinh, Hai Son; Yeh, Yi-Ching; Zhang, Chuanlun; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Liang

    2014-12-01

    analyses of deep tow magnetic anomalies and International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349 cores show that initial seafloor spreading started around 33 Ma in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS), but varied slightly by 1-2 Myr along the northern continent-ocean boundary (COB). A southward ridge jump of ˜20 km occurred around 23.6 Ma in the East Subbasin; this timing also slightly varied along the ridge and was coeval to the onset of seafloor spreading in the Southwest Subbasin, which propagated for about 400 km southwestward from ˜23.6 to ˜21.5 Ma. The terminal age of seafloor spreading is ˜15 Ma in the East Subbasin and ˜16 Ma in the Southwest Subbasin. The full spreading rate in the East Subbasin varied largely from ˜20 to ˜80 km/Myr, but mostly decreased with time except for the period between ˜26.0 Ma and the ridge jump (˜23.6 Ma), within which the rate was the fastest at ˜70 km/Myr on average. The spreading rates are not correlated, in most cases, to magnetic anomaly amplitudes that reflect basement magnetization contrasts. Shipboard magnetic measurements reveal at least one magnetic reversal in the top 100 m of basaltic layers, in addition to large vertical intensity variations. These complexities are caused by late-stage lava flows that are magnetized in a different polarity from the primary basaltic layer emplaced during the main phase of crustal accretion. Deep tow magnetic modeling also reveals this smearing in basement magnetizations by incorporating a contamination coefficient of 0.5, which partly alleviates the problem of assuming a magnetic blocking model of constant thickness and uniform magnetization. The primary contribution to magnetic anomalies of the SCS is not in the top 100 m of the igneous basement.

  9. Antipodal Magnetic Anomalies on the Moon, Contributions from Impact Induced Currents Due to Positive Holes and Flexoelectric Phenomina and Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Freund, F.; Wasilewski, P. J.; Mikula, V.; Kohout, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Large impacts on the Moon generate large pressure pulses that penetrate the whole body. Several of these large impacts may have generated antipodal structure with anomalous magnetic intensity.These regions can be more than a thousand km across, with fields of the order of tens to hundreds of nT. This is the case of Orientale, Imbrium, Serenitatis, Crisium, and Nectaris impact basins. The production of large-scale magnetic fields and associated crustal magnetization due to lunar basin-forming impacts was hypothesized to have an origin in fields external to the impact plasma cloud that are produced by the magnetohydrodynamic interaction of the cloud with ambient magnetic fields and plasmas. During the period of compressed antipodal field amplification, seismic compressional waves from the impact converge at the antipode resulting in transient shock pressures that reach 2 GPa (20 kbar). This can produce conditions for shock magnetic acquisition of the crust antipodal to impact basins.

  10. General mechanism and dynamics of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies from 3-D particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lembège, Bertrand; Horányi, Mihály; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We present a general model of the solar wind interaction with a dipolar lunar crustal magnetic anomaly (LMA) using three-dimensional full-kinetic and electromagnetic simulations. We confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface, forming a so-called "minimagnetosphere," as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. We show that the LMA configuration is driven by electron motion because its scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. We identify a population of back-streaming ions, the deflection of magnetized electrons via the E × B drift motion, and the subsequent formation of a halo region of elevated density around the dipole source. Finally, it is shown that the presence and efficiency of the processes are heavily impacted by the upstream plasma conditions and, on their turn, influence the overall structure and evolution of the LMA system. Understanding the detailed physics of the solar wind interaction with LMAs, including magnetic shielding, particle dynamics and surface charging is vital to evaluate its implications for lunar exploration.

  11. Contrasting styles of seafloor spreading in the Woodlark Basin: Indications of rift-induced secondary mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MartíNez, Fernando; Taylor, Brian; Goodliffe, Andrew M.

    1999-06-01

    The Woodlark Basin in the southwest Pacific is a young ocean basin which began forming by ˜6 Ma following the rifting of continental and arc lithosphere. The N-S striking Moresby Transform divides the oceanic basin into eastern and western parts which have contrasting characteristics. Seafloor spreading west of Moresby Transform began after ˜2 Ma, and although spreading rates decrease to the west, the western basin has faster spreading characteristics than the eastern basin. These include (1) ˜500 m shallower seafloor; (2) Bouguer gravity anomalies that are >30 mGals lower; (3) magnetic anomaly and modeled seafloor magnetization amplitudes that are higher; (4) a spreading center with an axial high in contrast to the axial valleys of the eastern basin; (5) smoother seafloor fabric; and (6) exclusively nontransform spreading center offsets in contrast to the eastern basin, which has transform faults and fracture zones that extend across most of the basin. Overall depth contrasts and Bouguer anomalies can be matched by end-member models of thicker crust (˜2 km) or thinner lithosphere (<1/3) in the western basin. Correlated with these contrasts, the surrounding rifted margins abruptly thicken westward of the longitude of Moresby Transform. We examine alternative explanations for these contrasts and propose that rift-induced secondary mantle convection driven by thicker western margin lithosphere is most consistent with the observations. Although rift-induced convection has been cited as a cause for the voluminous excess magmatism at some rifted margins, the observations in the Woodlark Basin suggest that this mechanism may significantly affect the morphology, structure, and geophysical characteristics of young ocean basins in alternate ways which resemble increased spreading rate.

  12. DOWN'S ANOMALY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PENROSE, L.S.; SMITH, G.F.

    BOTH CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS AND MATHEMATICAL ELABORATIONS OF DOWN'S ANOMALY, KNOWN ALSO AS MONGOLISM, ARE PRESENTED IN THIS REFERENCE MANUAL FOR PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL. INFORMATION PROVIDED CONCERNS (1) HISTORICAL STUDIES, (2) PHYSICAL SIGNS, (3) BONES AND MUSCLES, (4) MENTAL DEVELOPMENT, (5) DERMATOGLYPHS, (6) HEMATOLOGY, (7)…

  13. Spread-F during the magnetic storm of 22 January 2004 at low latitudes: Effect of IMF-Bz in relation to local

    E-print Network

    Padmanabhan, Janardhan

    . 2 Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Sciences, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 3 Jicamarca Radio. It generated weak spread-F at Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam and strong spread-F at Hainan and Chung Li

  14. Presunrise spread F at Fortaleza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, J. W.; Abdu, M. A.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Cecile, J.-F.; Batista, I. S.

    1998-10-01

    At Fortaleza, Brazil, in the equatorial zone about 400 km south of the magnetic equator a presunrise (secondary) maximum of spread F occurrence is observed during sunspot minimum and, in particular, during December solstice. The spread F takes the form of patches of irregularities that are convecting eastwards at ~50 ms-1. Most of the patches are collocated with bottomside bulges of the ionosphere. Our measurements indicate that these bottomside bulges are unstable due to a gradient-drift instability that is slowly growing and produces the spread F. The bulges themselves seem to be evidence of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability proces.

  15. In search of chiral magnetic effect: separating flow-driven background effects and quantifying anomaly-induced charge separations

    E-print Network

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-01-01

    We report our recent progress on the search of Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) by developing new measurements as well as by hydrodynamic simulations of CME and background effects, with both approaches addressing the pressing issue of separating flow-driven background contributions and possible CME signal in current heavy ion collision measurements.

  16. The Wallula fault and tectonic framework of south-central Washington, as interpreted from magnetic and gravity anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, Richard J.; Sherrod, Brian; Weaver, Craig; Wells, Ray E.; Rohay, Alan C.

    2014-06-11

    Magnetic and gravity data, collected in south-central Washington near the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt (YFTB) are used to model upper crustal structure, the extent of the late Columbia River Basalt flow named the Ice Harbor member, the vertical conduits (dikes) that the Ice Harbor erupted from, and whether the dikes are offset or affected by faulting on the Wallula Fault zone.

  17. Equivalent magnetization over the World's Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyment, J.; Choi, Y.; Hamoudi, M.; Erwan, T.; Lesur, V.

    2014-12-01

    As a by-product of our recent work to build a candidate model over the oceans for the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map (WDMAM) version 2, we derived global distributions of the equivalent magnetization in oceanic domains. In a first step, we use classic point source forward modeling on a spherical Earth to build a forward model of the marine magnetic anomalies at sea-surface. We estimate magnetization vectors using the age map of the ocean floor, the relative plate motions, the apparent polar wander path for Africa, and a geomagnetic reversal time scale. As magnetized source geometry, we assume 1 km-thick layer bearing a 10 A/m magnetization following the topography of the oceanic basement as defined by the bathymetry and sedimentary thickness. Adding a present-day geomagnetic field model allows the computation of our initial magnetic anomaly model. In a second step, we adjust this model to the existing marine magnetic anomaly data, in order to make it consistent with these data. To do so, we extract synthetic magnetic along the ship tracks for which real data are available and we compare quantitatively the measured and computed anomalies on 100, 200 or 400 km-long sliding windows (depending the spreading rate). Among the possible comparison criteria, we discard the maximal range - too dependent on local values - and the correlation and coherency - the geographical adjustment between model and data being not accurate enough - to favor the standard deviation around the mean value. The ratio between the standard deviations of data and model on each sliding window represent an estimate of the magnetization ratio causing the anomalies, which we interpolate to adjust the initial magnetic anomaly model to the data and therefore compute a final model to be included in our WDMAM candidate over the oceanic regions lacking data. The above ratio, after division by the magnetization of 10 A/m used in the model, represents an estimate of the equivalent magnetization under the considered magnetized source geometry. The resulting distributions of equivalent magnetization are discussed in terms of mid-ocean ridges, presence of hotspots and oceanic plateaus, and the age of the oceanic lithosphere. Global marine magnetic data sets and models represent a useful tool to assess first order magnetic properties of the oceanic lithosphere.

  18. An Atlas of K-line Spectra for Cool Magnetic CP Stars: The Wing-Nib Anomaly (WNA)

    E-print Network

    C. R. Cowley; S. Hubrig; I. Kamp

    2005-12-11

    We present a short atlas illustrating the unusual Ca {\\sc ii} K-line profiles in upper main sequence stars with anomalous abundances. Slopes of the profiles for 10 cool, magnetic chemically peculiar (CP) stars change abruptly at the very core, forming a deep "nib." The nibs show the same or nearly the same radial velocity as the other atomic lines. The near wings are generally more shallow than in normal stars. In three magnetic CP stars, the K-lines are too weak to show this shape, though the nibs themselves are arguably present. The Ca {\\sc ii} H-lines also show deep nibs, but the profiles are complicated by the nearby, strong H$\\epsilon$ absorption. The K-line structure is nearly unchanged with phase in $\\beta$ CrB and $\\alpha$ Cir. Calculations, including NLTE, show that other possibilities in addition to chemical stratification may yield nib-like cores.

  19. Late Tertiary tectonic evolution of the seafloor spreading system off the coast of California between the Mendocino and Murray Fracture Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Laurie Skaer; Hey, Richard N.

    1991-10-01

    A forward modeling program of two-plate spreading on a sphere was utilized to reconstruct the late Tertiary tectonic evolutionary history of the seafloor spreading system off the coast of California between the Mendocino and Murray fracture zones. This analytical technique was applied to a unique set of magnetic anomaly data consisting principally of a new digital data set: the original Raff-Mason data from one of the most significant marine geophysical surveys: the 1955-1956 USCGS Pioneer survey. All the data, critical for the development of seafloor spreading and plate tectonic theory, were digitized (32 ° to 52°N); however, only the southern half was analyzed in this study. Investigation of the Raff-Mason data, supplemented by additional magnetic anomaly data, indicates that the primary mechanism for reorganization of this part of the Pacific-Farallon ridge, as the spreading center migrated toward and arrived at the North American trench, was rift propagation. The model presented here, containing a total of 21 propagation episodes from 36 Ma to 19.8 Ma (initiation time of the last propagator), shows generally excellent agreement with the isochrons identified from the magnetic anomaly pattern, although minor exceptions exist locally in complex areas. A step-by-step evolution of the model is presented in a series of reconstructions documenting the history of spreading between the Pacific plate and five smaller plates created from the breakup of the large ancestral Farallon plate. These plates include the Vancouver plate north of the Pioneer, the Farallon plate existing between the Murray and Pioneer transforms prior to the major reorganization at chron 10 (30.33 Ma), and the Arguello, Monterey, and Reyes microplates with northwest-southeast spreading existing after chron 10.

  20. Phanerozoic stratigraphy of Northwind Ridge, magnetic anomalies in the Canada Basin, and the geometry and timing of rifting in the Amerasia Basin, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, A.; Clark, D.L.; Phillips, R.L.; Srivastava, S.P.; Blome, C.D.; Gray, L.-B.; Haga, H.; Mamet, B.L.; McIntyre, D.J.; McNeil, D.H.; Mickey, M.B.; Mullen, M.W.; Murchey, B.I.; Ross, C.A.; Stevens, C.H.; Silberling, Norman J.; Wall, J.H.; Willard, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Cores from Northwind Ridge, a high-standing continental fragment in the Chukchi borderland of the oceanic Amerasia basin, Arctic Ocean, contain representatives of every Phanerozoic system except the Silurian and Devonian systems. Cambrian and Ordovician shallow-water marine carbonates in Northwind Ridge are similar to basement rocks beneath the Sverdrup basin of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Upper Mississippian(?) to Permian shelf carbonate and spicularite and Triassic turbidite and shelf lutite resemble coeval strata in the Sverdrup basin and the western Arctic Alaska basin (Hanna trough). These resemblances indicate that Triassic and older strata in southern Northwind Ridge were attached to both Arctic Canada and Arctic Alaska prior to the rifting that created the Amerasia basin. Late Jurassic marine lutite in Northwind Ridge was structurally isolated from coeval strata in the Sverdrup and Arctic Alaska basins by rift shoulder and grabens, and is interpreted to be a riftogenic deposit. This lutite may be the oldest deposit in the Canada basin. A cape of late Cenomanian or Turonian rhyodacite air-fall ash that lacks terrigenous material shows that Northwind Ridge was structurally isolated from the adjacent continental margins by earliest Late Cretaceous time. Closing Amerasia basin by conjoining seafloor magnetic anomalies beneath the Canada basin or by uniting the pre-Jurassic strata of Northwind Ridge with kindred sections in the Sverdrup basin and Hanna trough yield simular tectonic reconstructions. Together with the orientation and age of rift-marine structures, these data suggest that: 1) prior to opening of the Amerasia basin, both northern Alaska and continental ridges of the Chukchi borderland were part of North America, 2) the extension that created the Amerasia basin formed rift-margin graben beginning in Early Jurassic time and new oceanic crust probably beginning in Late Jurassic or early Neocomian time. Reconstruction of the Amerasia basin on the basis of the stratigraphy of Northwind Ridge and sea-floor magnetic anomalies in the Canada basin accounts in a general way for the major crustal elements of the Americasia basin, including the highstanding ridges of the Chukchi borderland, and supports S.W. Carye's hypothesis that the Amerasia basin is the product of anticlockwise rotational rifting of Arctic Alaska from North America.

  1. Spreading process of the northern Mariana Trough: Rifting-spreading transition at 22N

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    southward from incipient rifting to seafloor spreading within this region. This study aims to clarify of seafloor spreading after the transition. The new data set includes swath bathymetry with side- scan images is proved by seafloor-spreading fabric in the bathymetry, clear magnetic lineations, and the bull

  2. Interpretation of CHAMP Magnetic Anomaly Data over the Pannonian Basin Region Using Lower Altitude Horizontal Gradient Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, P. T.; Kis, K. I.; Wittmann, G.

    2013-01-01

    The ESA SWARM mission will have three earth orbiting magnetometer bearing satellites one in a high orbit and two side-by-side in lower orbits. These latter satellites will record a horizontal magnetic gradient. In order to determine how we can use these gradient measurements for interpretation of large geologic units we used ten years of CHAMP data to compute a horizontal gradient map over a section of southeastern Europe with our goal to interpret these data over the Pannonian Basin of Hungary.

  3. Tuning magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaomeng; Varma, V. B.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetofluidic spreading (MFS) is a phenomenon in which a uniform magnetic field is used to induce spreading of a ferrofluid core cladded by diamagnetic fluidic streams in a three-stream channel. Applications of MFS include micromixing, cell sorting and novel microfluidic lab-on-a-chip design. However, the relative importance of the parameters which govern MFS is still unclear, leading to non-optimal control of MFS. Hence, in this work, the effect of various key parameters on MFS was experimentally and numerically studied. Our multi-physics model, which combines magnetic and fluidic analysis, showed excellent agreement between theory and experiment. It was found that spreading was mainly due to cross-sectional convection induced by magnetic forces, and can be enhanced by tuning various parameters. Smaller flow rate ratio, higher magnetic field, higher core stream or lower cladding stream dynamic viscosity, and larger magnetic particle size can increase MFS. These results can be used to tune magnetofluidic spreading in microchannels.

  4. Seafloor spreading initiation in the Red Sea: constraints from geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocchi, Luca; Ligi, Marco; Bonatti, Enrico; Caratori Tontini, Fabio; Rasul, Najeeb

    2013-04-01

    Multibeam, magnetics, gravity and seismic reflection data from the two northernmost oceanic axial segments of the Red Sea, Thetis and Nereus, reveal that the initial accretion of oceanic crust in the central Red Sea occurs in discrete axial deeps. Thetis Deep is made by coalescence of three sub-basins that become shallower and narrower from south to north. The initial emplacement of oceanic crust, that occurred at South Thetis and Central Nereus roughly ~2.2 and ~2 Ma, respectively, is taking place today in the northern Thetis and southern Nereus tips. The "intertrough zones" that separate the Thetis axial "oceanic" cell from the Nereus cell to the north, and the Hadarba cell to the south, are devoid of magnetic anomalies and contain thick sediment sequences and relicts of continental crust. The Red Sea central depressed region broadens significantly in the inter-trough zones relative to the "oceanic" segments, indicating that deformation becomes focused in a narrow axial zone as soon as oceanic accretion starts. Magnetic anomalies suggests a south to north time progression of the initial emplacement of oceanic crust within the Thetis system, with a propagation rate of roughly 30 mm/a, significantly faster than the spreading rate (6.1 mm/a). Magnetic profiles from the northern part of Hadarba Deep (the "oceanic" segment immediately to the south of Thetis), indicate an initial oceanic accretion at ~3 Ma, confirming the south to north progression. Quantitative modelling of magnetic anomalies suggests that, at Thetis and Nereus, the oceanic spreading initiated by a strong pulse of "active" oceanic crust generation and rapid sea floor spreading. This initial burst of crust accretion is observed at the sub-basin scale of Thetis and Nereus deeps. Our results suggest that each initial discrete axial cell taps a different asthenospheric source and serves as nucleus for axial propagation of oceanic accretion, resulting in linear segments of spreading. Discrete oceanic initial crust accretion is observed also in the southern portion of the Red Sea. In fact, reprocessing of all sea-surface magnetic data from the Red Sea allowed to reconstruct the evolution of the entire divergent margin, showing a northward migration of the initial emplacement of the oceanic crust with an average propagation rate of ~22 mm/a. Although the impingement from below of the Afar mantle plume may have influenced the evolution of the Red Sea rift, independent along-axis centres of upwelling developed during the rifting stage, due to buoyancy-driven convection within the hot, low viscosity asthenosphere beneath the extending continental lithosphere.

  5. The Anatomy of the Pion Loop Hadronic Light by Light Scattering Contribution to the Muon Magnetic Anomaly

    E-print Network

    Mehran Zahiri Abyaneh

    2012-08-13

    This thesis investigates the Hadronic Light by Light (HLL) scattering contribution to the muon $g-2$, which is one of the most important low energy hadronic effects and consists mainly of the quark loop, the pion pole and the charged pion and kaon loops. In this work the charged pion loop has been investigated more closely. After reviewing the subject a preliminary introduction to Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT), Hidden Local Symmetry (HLS) model and the full Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) model is given, and they are used to calculate the pion loop HLL scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. The momentum regions where the contributions of the bare pion loop, the VMD model, and the HLS come from, have been studied, to understand why different models give very different results. The effects of pion polarizability and charge radius on the HLL scattering, which appear at order $p^4$ in ChPT, from $ L_9$ and $ L_{10}$ Lagrangian terms and their momentum regions have been studied.

  6. The Anatomy of the Pion Loop Hadronic Light by Light Scattering Contribution to the Muon Magnetic Anomaly

    E-print Network

    Abyaneh, Mehran Zahiri

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates the Hadronic Light by Light (HLL) scattering contribution to the muon $g-2$, which is one of the most important low energy hadronic effects and consists mainly of the quark loop, the pion pole and the charged pion and kaon loops. In this work the charged pion loop has been investigated more closely. After reviewing the subject a preliminary introduction to Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT), Hidden Local Symmetry (HLS) model and the full Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) model is given, and they are used to calculate the pion loop HLL scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. The momentum regions where the contributions of the bare pion loop, the VMD model, and the HLS come from, have been studied, to understand why different models give very different results. The effects of pion polarizability and charge radius on the HLL scattering, which appear at order $p^4$ in ChPT, from $ L_9$ and $ L_{10}$ Lagrangian terms and their momentum regions have been studied.

  7. Spreading Rate versus Magma Supply in the Region of Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 16.5° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmiotto, C.; Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.; Cann, J. R.; Dick, H. J.; Parnell-Turner, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The region of Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 16.5° N is a slow spreading center characterized by several detachment faults and oceanic core complexes. This area is ideal to study the relationship between the formation and the evolution of detachment faults, the role of magma supply during detachment faulting, and its effect on the magnetization of the crust at a slow-spreading center. In May-June 2013, during cruise KN210-05 on RV Knorr, we acquired multibeam bathymetry and sea surface magnetic anomaly data to understand the spreading history of a section of the MAR near 16.5° N. Multibeam data acquired using a SeaBeam 3012 system show that the ridge axis can be divided into a northern segment, characterized by a 4500-m deep axial valley, and a southern segment, which is characterized by a robust and continuous axial volcanic ridge which reaches to 3200 m water depth. Both segments are bordered to the west by active detachment faults. Magnetic data were acquired with a Marine Magnetics SeaSPY system, and inverted for crustal magnetization. The inversion assumes a constant thickness source layer of 0.5 km whose upper bound is bathymetry. Isochrons were identified from the magnetization map. We found that spreading rate is symmetric, and have calculated a total spreading rate in this area of ~24 km/Ma for the last 4 Ma. The central anomaly (Brunhes, 0-0.78 Ma) in the southern segment, however, has only half the predicted width of ~ 20 km and is located exclusively east of the axis. No Brunhes normal magnetization is recorded in the rift valley floor west of the axis, which is the hanging wall of the detachment. This observation confirms predictions from ';asymmetric' spreading at oceanic core complexes where slip along long-lived detachment faults take up extension on one (western) side and magmatic accretion occurs exclusively to the other (eastern) of the axis; the hanging wall, bounded by detachment fault and axis, should be as old as the core complex and its magnetization is therefore expected to be low due to its great age and likely pervasive hydrothermal alteration.

  8. Deep-tow magnetic anomaly study of the Pacific Jurassic Quiet Zone and implications for the geomagnetic polarity reversal timescale and

    E-print Network

    for the geomagnetic polarity reversal timescale and geomagnetic field behavior Masako Tominaga,1 William W. Sager,1 result from polarity reversals. The polarity timescale is similar to the polarity sequences from previous and the ambiguous nature of the small JQZ anomalies. Overall anomaly amplitude decreases with age into the LAZ

  9. ANOMALY STRUCTURE OF SUPERGRAVITY AND ANOMALY CANCELLATION

    SciTech Connect

    Butter, Daniel; Gaillard, Mary K.

    2009-06-10

    We display the full anomaly structure of supergravity, including new D-term contributions to the conformal anomaly. This expression has the super-Weyl and chiral U(1){sub K} transformation properties that are required for implementation of the Green-Schwarz mechanism for anomaly cancellation. We outline the procedure for full anomaly cancellation. Our results have implications for effective supergravity theories from the weakly coupled heterotic string theory.

  10. Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Interaction Mechanisms Under Varying Solar Wind Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lapenta, Giovanni; Lembège, Bertrand; Markidis, Stefano; Horányi, Mihály

    2015-04-01

    We present three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general picture of the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under various solar wind and plasma conditions, and focus afterwards on the ion and electron kinetic behavior of the system. It is shown that the configuration is dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. We identify a population of backstreaming ions, the deflection of magnetized electrons via the ExB-drift motion and the subsequent formation of a halo region of elevated density around the dipole source. Finally, it is shown that the presence and efficiency of the latter mechanisms are heavily impacted by the upstream plasma conditions and, on their turn, influence the overall structure and evolution of the LMA system. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement SWIFF (project 2633430, swiff.eu) and EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2011050747 (Curie) and 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board, Grant No. 136/11. JD has received support through the HPC-Europa2 visitor programme (project HPC08SSG85) and the KuLeuven Junior Mobility Programme Special Research Fund.

  11. Rifting to spreading in the southern Lau Basin: Variations within the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, M.; Okino, K.; Kodera, T.

    2010-11-01

    The Lau Basin and Havre Trough are back-arc basins related to Pacific-Australian plate convergence. Seafloor spreading occurs in the Lau Basin whereas the Havre Trough is in a rifting stage. At present, the spreading propagator's tip lies at the southern end of the Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) at 22°40'S. Studying this propagation process provides an opportunity to characterize the evolution of rifting to the initiation of seafloor spreading which is fundamental to back-arc basin development. New geophysical data of the southern Lau Basin reveals that as spreading propagates south, it evolves in a discrete style south of 22°40'S. The propagation axis lies along the eastern margin of the basin, where the well defined, linear VFR loses its identifying morphology. Topography in this eastern zone is characterized by grabens separated by short narrow ridges. High backscatter intensity indicates tectonic and magmatic activity in this eastern area. Mantle Bouguer anomalies (MBA) increase southwards from the VFR to form an elevated MBA area extending west from the currently active area. This indicates eastward migration of active rifting, during which the arc crust was extremely thinned. High magnetization is observed in a left-stepping pattern south of the VFR. We interpret this pattern as discrete segments that characterize the initiation of the spreading stage. There is no evidence of a single, continuous spreading axis like that which characterizes the central and northern Lau Basin. The magnetization highs are discrete and are observed in areas where deformation and magmatism are focused. They are offset relative to the VFR, though they generally follow the same north-south trend as the VFR.

  12. Crustal Magnetization and Magnetic Petrology in Basalts - What Can We Learn from Scientific Drillings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rock magnetic and magneto-mineralogical data from scientific drillings contribute to our understanding of the growth history and tectonic evolution of volcanic structures and allows for an improved interpretation of magnetic anomaly data. Such data are not only important for the magnetic structure of volcanic buildings and spreading ridges on Earth but may also provide basic data for the interpretation of extraterrestrial magnetic anomalies like on Mars. Crustal magnetization of basalts is well studied since decades and in general, the amplitude of magnetic anomalies is mainly related to the induced and remanent magnetization. Direct measurements of the magnetic field and measurements of magnetic properties of oceanic and continental crust have indicated that the crustal magnetization is very complex and depends on different factors like e.g. magma composition, cooling rate, age and hydrothermal alteration. Generally a high oxygen fugacity (above the NNO buffer) and a low Ti/(Ti+Fe) ratio of the basaltic melt are suggested as a precondition for high concentration of magnetic minerals and therefore high primary TRM. High temperature subsolidus reactions and hydrothermal alteration as e.g. observed in the strongly magnetic basalts from the Stardalur drill core, Iceland, seems to increase NRM intensity and magnetic susceptibility due to creation of small, secondary magnetite (Vahle et al. 2007). Probably the increase occurred after the extinction of the hydrothermal system because active high-temperature (>150 °C) geothermal areas like the Krafla caldera, NE-Iceland, often show distinct magnetic lows in aeromagnetic anomaly maps suggesting a destruction of magnetic minerals by hydrothermal activity (Oliva-Urcia et al. 2011). The destruction explains the significant magnetization loss, which is seen in many local magnetic anomaly lows within the oceanic crust and volcanic islands like Iceland or Hawaii. Borehole and core magnetic susceptibility measurements in combination with rock magnetic and magnetic mineralogy studies will be shown from scientific drillings from Hawaii and Iceland, which illustrate how vertical core sections can be used to deduce these processes. References Oliva-Urcia et al. (2011) Geophys J. Intern. 186, 1, 155-174. Vahle et al. (2007) Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 164, 119-141.

  13. Elevation of the petrous bone caused by hyperplasia of the occipital bone presenting as hemifacial spasm: diagnostic values of magnetic resonance imaging and three-dimensional computed tomographic images in a bone anomaly.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, A; Tanaka, T; Irie, Y; Yoshinaga, S; Tomonaga, M

    1990-12-01

    A case of elevation of the petrous bone due to hyperplasia of the occipital bone presenting as hemifacial spasm is reported. A 44-year-old man sought treatment for twitching of the buccal muscles on the right side that progressed rapidly in severity within 2 weeks of the onset. The anatomical details of the petrous and occipital bones were delineated clearly by computed tomographic scans of a bone window level. Details of the brain stem were shown by magnetic resonance images. The bone anomaly was displayed more realistically by three-dimensional computed tomographic reconstructions. The faithful representation of structures with these radiological studies should be mandatory, to prepare the surgical planning of such a complicated bone anomaly. PMID:2274120

  14. On the Radon-related mechanism of the seismo- and volcanogenic geomagnetic anomalies. Experiment and model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsarenko, A.; Grimalsky, V.; Bravo Osuna, A. G.; Koshevaya, S.; Yutsis, V.; Perez Enriquez, R.; Cruz Abeyro, J. A. L.

    2012-04-01

    Statistical study of the noise-like geomagnetic anomalies observed in Tlamacas station (volcano Popocatepel, Mexico), possibly linked to the ionization produced by intensive Radon release, are presented as an experimental part of the study. The magnetic field perturbations produced by charge spreading currents within the fair weather electric field are considered in the theoretical model. The electric charges are generated by the air ionization due to Radon emanation. The simulations demonstrated that the ionization of the air leads to the magnetic field perturbations of about 0.001 - 0.1 nT in ULF range 10-3 - 10-1 Hz. When the Radon emanation occurs in a region with terrain irregularities, magnetic field perturbations can be higher.

  15. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  16. Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Ion and Electron Dynamics Under Varying Solar Wind Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Lapenta, G.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general picture of the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under various solar wind and plasma conditions, and focus afterwards on the ion and electron kinetic behavior of the system. It is shown that the configuration is dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. The dominant LMA interaction mechanism is also highly dependent on the solar wind and IMF conditions. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is also unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement SWIFF (project 2633430, swiff.eu) and EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2011050747 (Curie) and 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board, Grant No. 136/11. JD has received support through the HPC-Europa2 visitor programme (project HPC08SSG85) and the KuLeuven Junior Mobility Programme Special Research Fund.

  17. Magnetization of the oceanic crust: TRM or CRM?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Labrecque, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    A model was proposed in which chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) acquired within the first 20 Ma of crustal evolution may account for 80% of the bulk natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of older basalts. The CRM of the crust is acquired as the original thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) is lost through low temperature alteration. The CRM intensity and direction are controlled by the post-emplacement polarity history. This model explains several independent observations concerning the magnetization of the oceanic crust. The model accounts for amplitude and skewness discrepancies observed in both the intermediate wavelength satellite field and the short wavelength sea surface magnetic anomaly pattern. It also explains the decay of magnetization away from the spreading axis, and the enhanced magnetization of the Cretaceous Quiet Zones while predicting other systematic variations with age in the bulk magnetization of the oceanic crust. The model also explains discrepancies in the anomaly skewness parameter observed for anomalies of Cretaceous age. Further studies indicate varying rates of TRM decay in very young crust which depicts the advance of low temperature alteration through the magnetized layer.

  18. The moon and the planets: A catalog of astronomical anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corliss, W. R.

    The Catalog of Anomalies is designed to collect and categorize all phenomena which cannot be explained readily by prevailing scientific theories. The present volume is concerned with astronomical anomalies. Anomalies in the earth's rotation are discussed along with earth satellite phenomena, and observations of earth from space. In the case of Mercury, the topics examined include the planet's orbital and spin anomalies, the geology and figure of Mercury, intrinsic radiation sources, anomalous telescope observations, anomalies observed during transits, and Mercury's anomalous magnetic field. Anomalies provided by the moon are related to the lunar orbit, lunar geology problems, lunar luminous phenomena, the motion of lunar satellites, anomalous telescopic and visual observations, lunar 'weather', lunar eclipse and occultation phenomena, and the enigma of lunar magnetism. Attention is also given to anomalies concerning Jupiter, Mars, Neptune, Pluto, Saturn, Uranus, and Venus.

  19. Magnetic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Baldwin, M.J.

    1983-12-31

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Examination of Global Seismic Tomography Images and Sea-Surface Magnetic Field Anomaly Profiles in the West Philippine Basin for the Large Clockwise Rotation of the Philippine Sea Plate during the Last 55 Million Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, H.; Lee, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Philippine Sea Plate is thought to have undergone a 90° clockwise rotation during the last 55 million years. However, evidences for such an argument are rather circumstantial. For instance, paleomagnetic measurements for the large rotation are derived largely from Halmahera, Indonesia which is quite close to the plate boundary. It is thus possible that this region may have undergone local deformation separate from the main parts of the Philippine Sea Plate. In this study, we examine the global seismic tomography images of the mantle beneath the Philippine Sea Plate and the marine magnetic field anomaly data at the sea surface from the West Philippine Basin to see whether they agree with the presumed motion of the Philippine Sea Plate. Our comparison between the plate reconstruction and global tomography suggests that the rotation of Philippine Sea Plate may not have been continuous but instead experienced a temporal break at around 32 Ma. The exact nature of this pause is uncertain, but it may be related to a sudden change in the configuration of subduction systems. A detail comparison with recent results from IODP Legs 350 and 351 is therefore necessary, including a search for a change in the depositional style of basin sediment. We also examined the detailed the shape of magnetic anomalies (such as skewness) and compare them with the previous model by allowing the magnetization to have direction corresponding to that during the opening of the West Philippine Basin. At this moment, it is too early to tell if the sudden change at around 32 Ma or other inferred breaks can be seen in the magnetic profiles as well.

  1. Learning about Poland Anomaly

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anomaly? Named after Sir Alfred Poland, Poland anomaly (PA) is described as an underdevelopment or absence of ... present at birth (congenital). For people born with PA, the breastbone portion (sternal) of the pectoralis is ...

  2. Lymphatic Anomalies Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic Anomaly; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis

  3. Peters' Anomaly – Anaesthetic Management

    PubMed Central

    M, Senthilkumar; V, Darlong; Punj, Jyotsna; Pandey, Ravinder

    2009-01-01

    Summary Peters' anomaly occurs as an isolated ocular abnormality, in association with other systemic abnormality or one component of a number of well-defined syndromes. We review our experience of anaesthetic management and systemic association of peters' anomaly. To the best of our knowledge there are no reports in the literature of Peters' anomaly with relevant to anaesthesia. PMID:20640218

  4. Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal Model of Deeptow Magnetic Survey in the Southwest Subbasin of South China Sea Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Sun, Z.; Lin, J.; Li, C. F.; Xu, X.

    2014-12-01

    South China Sea basin, which evolved from Cenozoic continental margin rifting and subsequent seafloor spreading, is a classic example of a marginal sea in Western Pacific. Since the early 1980's, several models have been proposed for the formation of this sea basin. The previous studies were based mainly on the distribution of magnetic anomaly lineation obtained from aerial and shipboard measurements. However, large water depth (over 4.5km) and thick sediment cover (up to 1km or more) make the magnetic anoamaly information not so well displayed in aerial and shipboard data. To better understand the evolution of the sea basin, we increased anomaly amplitudes by collecting magnetic data along deep-tow profiles over the magnetic lineations in the South China Sea oceanic area. The one across the southwest subsea basin was analyzed first. The total field magnetic measurements were processed through filtering, resampling, diurnal variation removal, continuation to a level datum, regional field correction, projection to a common azimuth, and deskewing. A magnetic polarity reversal timescale was constructed by matching deep-tow anomalies with a simple, rectangular block magnetization model with the expansion rate for oceanic crust. We analyzed the spreading duration, rate, asymmetry, and reversal events of Southwest subbasin, in reference to the recent GTS2012 geomagnetic polarity representative data and concluded that the Southwest subbasin opened from around 21.767 Ma and stopped around C5C at about 15.974Ma. The full spreading rate varied from 8 to 40 cm/yr. Spreading is usually asymmetric by showing alternate faster spreading rate in one slab than the other in different time periods. From the comparison, several small reversal were revealed in addition to the standard geomagnetic polarity. These findings helped to understand the evolution of the Southwest subbasin of South China Sea and will also help to establish new reversal discrimination.

  5. Anomalies in the polariton dynamics of a one-dimensional magnetic photonic crystal with antiferromagnetic interlayer ordering in an external DC electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, D. V.; Savchenko, A. S.; Tarasenko, S. V.; Shavrov, V. G.

    2010-02-15

    The effect of an external dc electric field on the electrodynamic properties of a one-dimensional magnetic photonic crystal (MPC) with antiferromagnetic interlayer ordering is analyzed within the effective-medium method with regard to the quadratic magneto-optical interaction. The magnetizations of adjacent tangentially magnetized ferromagnetic layers are antiparallel. In particular, the effect of a magnetic compensation point on the character of polariton dynamics in this type of MPCs is revealed.

  6. Analysis of spacecraft anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The anomalies from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the anomalies from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of anomalies were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed anomalies. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated anomalies. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.

  7. Lifshitz scale anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, Igal; Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron

    2015-02-01

    We analyse scale anomalies in Lifshitz field theories, formulated as the relative cohomology of the scaling operator with respect to foliation preserving diffeomorphisms. We construct a detailed framework that enables us to calculate the anomalies for any number of spatial dimensions, and for any value of the dynamical exponent. We derive selection rules, and establish the anomaly structure in diverse universal sectors. We present the complete cohomologies for various examples in one, two and three space dimensions for several values of the dynamical exponent. Our calculations indicate that all the Lifshitz scale anomalies are trivial descents, called B-type in the terminology of conformal anomalies. However, not all the trivial descents are cohomologically non-trivial. We compare the conformal anomalies to Lifshitz scale anomalies with a dynamical exponent equal to one.

  8. How Leaky Are Seafloor Spreading Center Axes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Martinez, F.; Haymon, R. M.; Nakamura, K.; Walker, S. L.; Ferrini, V.

    2013-12-01

    Some 500 active vent sites, both focused and diffuse, have now been located along spreading centers by either visual confirmation or instrumental detection of the discharging plume. Discovery of the large majority of these sites was made easier by high-volume discharge of particle-laden plumes. These observations led to estimates (as can be derived from the InterRidge Vents Database) of site frequency from ~0.5-5/100 km, generally increasing with spreading rate. Over the last decade, however, the increasing use of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP (mV)) (aka Eh) sensors capable of detecting minute concentrations of reduced hydrothermal chemicals (e.g., Fe+2, sulfides, Mn+2, H2, and others) suggests that these frequency estimates may be far too conservative. This hypothesis is consistent with earlier results from a few large-scale, high-resolution camera tows on some EPR segments. ORP data provide two important advantages for site identification not available with other commonly used continuously recording sensors: (1) detection of low-temperature, particle-scarce plumes, and (2) detection of reduced chemical species with very short residence times, thus increasing the location specificity of the discharge source. Here, we present high-resolution distributions of ORP anomalies observed in past plume surveys along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (19.5°-22.5°S) in 2004 and 2008, the Galápagos Spreading Center (94.6°-86°W) in 2005/6 and 2011, as well as new data (2011) from the East Pacific Rise (9°-10°N). Except for the 2011 GSC data (a standard CTD tow-yo), all data were collected during continuous horizontal tows of ORP sensors at various depths <~120 m above the seafloor. We used two approaches to verify that ORP anomalies were authentic hydrothermal signals and not (especially in the case of small anomalies) produced by some other transient chemical anomaly. First, on the 2008 ELSC and 2011 EPR tows we compared temperature (?T) and ORP (?ORP) data from the two deepest sensors on each tow. Although temperature anomalies (?T°C) rarely exceeded 0.1°C, all sensors showed a positive correlation between ?ORP and ?T (ELSC, 1569 & 1493 mV/°C, r2~0.4; EPR, 1760 & 986 mV/°C, r2~0.6). Second, comparison of tows conducted days and years apart regularly detected anomalies at the same locations. While an exact enumeration of all sites is impossible from water column data alone, we estimate ~20 sites along 115 km of the EPR (17.5/100 km), ~40 sites along 425 km of the ELSC (9.4/100 km), and ~50 sites along 900 km of the GSC (5.5/100km). Anomalies <~1 km apart are considered as from the same source. For the EPR and ELSC surveys, these frequencies are considerably higher than expected for ridges of similar spreading rate. The higher frequencies reported here more closely match results from visual vent-mapping along 128 km of the EPR at 9°-10°N and 17°-18°S.The lower site frequency along the GSC is consistent with plume data on other ridges influenced by hotspot thermal anomalies. The aggregate mass flux of discharges from numerous small sites is unknown, and could be significant; in any case, these sites may be vital oases for hydrothermal biota.

  9. Name: ____________________________________ Invasive Species Spread

    E-print Network

    Lega, Joceline

    how far the Cane Toad, Bufo marinus, has spread. It was originally introduced in 1930s to Gordonvale in slope-intercept form. 5) How far do you think the cane toads will go by the year 2025? 6) Using the data? #12;ANSWER KEY Below are pictures that indicate how far the Cane Toad, Bufo marinus, has spread

  10. New Constraints on the Age of the Opening of the South Atlantic Basin As Revealed By Recently Acquired Magnetic, Gravity and Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. A.; Bird, D. E.; Danque, H. A.; Grant, J. V.; McLean, D. J.; Towle, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed, high quality, marine total field magnetic data has been recently acquired over parts of the South Atlantic ocean off the southwestern margin of South Africa. These data display a pattern of well-defined, NW-SE striking linear magnetic anomalies along the margin that can be traced with confidence over distances > 150 km. The anomalies are interpreted to be M-series seafloor spreading anomalies M9 to M11, which are consistent with the initiation of seafloor spreading around 135 Ma (Late Valanginian). Corresponding M-series anomalies M9 and M10 have previously been reported for the conjugate South American margin offshore Argentina, however the presence of the M11 series SE of the Cape Lineament suggests an earlier opening of the southern South Atlantic basin than previously recognized. Breaks in the continuity of the linear anomaly pattern, observed in map view, have generally NE-SW trends and are considered sites of possible fracture zones. One such discontinuity, which we have termed the "Cape Lineament" (CL), marks a significant change in crustal character and Cretaceous depositional history, as revealed by gravity data and seismic reflection data respectively. Crust NW of CL appears to be characterized by greater thicknesses and the presence of seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs), whereas crust SE of CL has more "normal" oceanic thicknesses and SDRs that are either absent or more limited in areal extent. Although linear magnetic anomalies are observed both NW and SE of CL, anomalies to the SE display a better correlation with those predicted by our seafloor spreading model.

  11. Taussig-Bing Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.

    2009-01-01

    Taussig-Bing anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation that was first described in 1949 by Helen B. Taussig (1898–1986) and Richard J. Bing (1909–). Although substantial improvement has since been achieved in surgical results of the repair of the anomaly, management of the Taussig-Bing anomaly remains challenging. A history of the original description of the anomaly, the life stories of the individuals who first described it, and the current outcomes of its surgical management are reviewed herein. PMID:20069085

  12. Hot Flow Anomalies at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, David Gary; Boardsen, Scott A.; Moore, Tom; Barabash, S.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J.A.; Coates, A.J.; Zhang, T. L.; Sarantos, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-instrument study of a hot flow anomaly (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venusian foreshock, on 22 March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express Magnetometer and Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA) plasma observations. Centered on an interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity with inward convective motional electric fields on both sides, with a decreased core field strength, ion observations consistent with a flow deflection, and bounded by compressive heated edges, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFAs observed at other planets within the solar system.

  13. Congenital Anomalies in Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tract and genital organ anomalies) • Cardiologist (heart anomalies) • Nephrologist (kidney anomalies) • Plastic surgeon (facial anomalies) • Ophthalmologist (eye anomalies) • Otolaryngologist (ear anomalies) The treatment will depend on the number and severity of ...

  14. Table of hyperfine anomaly in atomic systems

    E-print Network

    Jonas R. Persson

    2011-10-27

    This table is a compilation of experimental values of magnetic hyperfine anomaly in atomic and ionic systems. The last extensive compilation was published in 1984 by Buttgenbach (Hyperfine Interactions 20, (1984) p 1) and the aim here is to make an up to date compilation. The literature search covers the period to January 2011.

  15. The anomaly data base of screwworm information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    Standard statistical processing of anomaly data in the screwworm eradication data system is possible from data compiled on magnetic tapes with the Univac 1108 computer. The format and organization of the data in the data base, which is also available on dedicated disc storage, are described.

  16. Characterization of potential sources of magnetic anomalies within the crust in a tectonically active region: Amphibolites and migmatites from Potrillo Maar, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, F. S.; Padovanni, E.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to characterize the oxide mineralogy and petrology of samples collected from Potrillo Maar, New Mexico with the goal of explaining the magnetic anamoly that is observed over this region from remote sensing. Potrillo Maar is a diatreme that has brought rocks from all depths in the crust to the surface almost instantaneously. The samples are therefore thought to be representative of the crust as it exists today below this portion of the Rio Grande Rift. It is generally believed that oxide minerals (magnetite, hematite, etc.) are responsible for the magnetic signature of the crust. The samples from Portillo Maar therefore offer a unique opportunity to examine the magnetic mineralogy of the entire crust. The results indicate that the magnetic anamoly observed over Rio Grande Rift may be consequence of the tectonic activity that caused mylonitization of the rocks and allowed the infiltration of oxidizing fluids.

  17. Conservation Anomaly in 2-d

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    What is an anomaly? Current Conservation Anomaly in 2-d QED: Schwinger model Current Matrix´alez University of California ­ Santa Cruz March 2015 1 / 23 #12;What is an anomaly? Current Conservation Anomaly, in other words quantum corrections break the symmetry. 2 / 23 #12;What is an anomaly? Current Conservation

  18. Isotopic Anomalies in CP Stars: Helium, Mercury, Platinum, and Calcium

    E-print Network

    Cowley, C R; Castelli, F

    2007-01-01

    We review the classical observational results for isotopic abundance variations for several elements in CP stars. We concentrate on the "newest" anomaly, in calcium. The cosmically very rare isotope, Ca-48 can rival and even dominate the more common, alpha nuclide, Ca-40. Relevant examples are found in the hot, non-magnetic HgMn stars, and the field horizontal-branch star, Feige 86. The calcium anomaly is also present in cool, magnetic stars, including the notorious HD 101065, Przybylski's star.

  19. Isotopic Anomalies in CP Stars: Helium, Mercury, Platinum, and Calcium

    E-print Network

    C. R. Cowley; S. Hubrig; F. Castelli

    2007-11-15

    We review the classical observational results for isotopic abundance variations for several elements in CP stars. We concentrate on the "newest" anomaly, in calcium. The cosmically very rare isotope, Ca-48 can rival and even dominate the more common, alpha nuclide, Ca-40. Relevant examples are found in the hot, non-magnetic HgMn stars, and the field horizontal-branch star, Feige 86. The calcium anomaly is also present in cool, magnetic stars, including the notorious HD 101065, Przybylski's star.

  20. Magnetic anomalies in self-assembled SrRuO3 -CoFe2O4 nanostructures studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yen-Chin; Chien, Chia-Hsien; Liu, Heng-Jui; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2015-03-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures with high interface-to-volume ratio usually possess interesting physical properties through the coupling between neighboring materials. In complex-oxide nanocomposites, the interplay of spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom especially provides various functionalities. Our recent study had shown photo-induced magnetization switching in a self-assembled system, CoFe2O4 (CFO)- SrRuO3(SRO), where the CFO nanopillars were embedded in the SRO matrix. Moreover, this system also has significant magnetoresistance behaviors. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy to investigate the magnetic coupling mechanisms in CFO-SRO nanostructures. Compared to the pure CFO films, the CFO nano-pillars under out-of-plane compressive strain show a slightly increase of A1g(Co)/A1g(Fe) intensity ratio, which corresponds to a migration of Co ions from O-site (oxygen octahedron) to T-site (oxygen tetrahedron). This behavior can be further tuned by external stimulus, such as magnetic fields and temperatures. A strong increase of A1g(Co)/A1g(Fe) ratio together with a discontinuous A1g frequency shift occur at the SRO magnetic transition temperature. This result indicated that the spin-orbital interaction in CFO can be modulated by the SRO magnetic orderings.

  1. Infrared phonon anomaly and magnetic excitations in single-crystal Cu3Bi(SeO3)2O2Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. H.; Stephens, P. W.; Martin, C.; Constable, E.; Lewis, R. A.; Berger, H.; Carr, G. L.; Tanner, D. B.

    2012-11-01

    Infrared reflection and transmission as a function of temperature have been measured on single crystals of Cu3Bi(SeO3)2O2Cl. The complex dielectric function and optical properties along all three principal axes of the orthorhombic cell were obtained via Kramers-Kronig analysis and by fits to a Drude-Lorentz model. Below 115 K, 16 additional modes [8(E?â)+6(E?b?)+2(E??)] appear in the phonon spectra; however, powder x-ray diffraction measurements do not detect a new structure at 85 K. Potential explanations for the new phonon modes are discussed. Transmission in the far infrared as a function of temperature has revealed magnetic excitations originating below the magnetic ordering temperature (Tc˜24 K). The origin of the excitations in the magnetically ordered state will be discussed in terms of their response to different polarizations of incident light, behavior in externally applied magnetic fields, and the anisotropic magnetic properties of Cu3Bi(SeO3)2O2Cl as determined by dc susceptibility measurements.

  2. Tan F. Wong: Spread Spectrum & CDMA 2. Intro. Spread Spectrum Introduction to Spread Spectrum

    E-print Network

    Wong, Tan F.

    Tan F. Wong: Spread Spectrum & CDMA 2. Intro. Spread Spectrum Chapter 2 Introduction to Spread Spectrum Communications As discussed in Chapter 0, a spread spectrum modulation produces a transmitted spectrum much wider than the minimum bandwidth required. There are many ways to generate spread spectrum

  3. Statistical Anomaly Detection for Monitoring of Human Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, K.; Fuse, T.

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of human dynamics has drawn attention to various areas. Due to the wide spread of positioning technologies that use GPS or public Wi-Fi, location information can be obtained with high spatial-temporal resolution as well as at low cost. By collecting set of individual location information in real time, monitoring of human dynamics is recently considered possible and is expected to lead to dynamic traffic control in the future. Although this monitoring focuses on detecting anomalous states of human dynamics, anomaly detection methods are developed ad hoc and not fully systematized. This research aims to define an anomaly detection problem of the human dynamics monitoring with gridded population data and develop an anomaly detection method based on the definition. According to the result of a review we have comprehensively conducted, we discussed the characteristics of the anomaly detection of human dynamics monitoring and categorized our problem to a semi-supervised anomaly detection problem that detects contextual anomalies behind time-series data. We developed an anomaly detection method based on a sticky HDP-HMM, which is able to estimate the number of hidden states according to input data. Results of the experiment with synthetic data showed that our proposed method has good fundamental performance with respect to the detection rate. Through the experiment with real gridded population data, an anomaly was detected when and where an actual social event had occurred.

  4. ION GNSS 2010, Session F1, Portland, Oregon, 21-24 September 2010 Page 1 of 9 Assessment of Indoor Magnetic Field Anomalies

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    Satellite Systems (GNSS) R&D projects since 1980, ranging from RTK positioning to indoor location. ABSTRACT estimate of magnetic heading indoor. 1 INTRODUCTION As signals from Global Navigation Satellite SystemsION GNSS 2010, Session F1, Portland, Oregon, 21-24 September 2010 Page 1 of 9 Assessment of Indoor

  5. Solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies J.S. Halekas *, D.A. Brain, R.P. Lin, D.L. Mitchell

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    - action region will be necessary in order to understand the physics of the Moon­solar wind interaction. At present, the Moon represents the only natural laboratory available to us to study solar wind interaction wind. To first order, solar wind magnetic fields pass relatively unim- peded through the Moon, while

  6. Anomalies on orbifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew G.; Georgi, Howard

    2001-03-16

    We discuss the form of the chiral anomaly on an S1/Z2 orbifold with chiral boundary conditions. We find that the 4-divergence of the higher-dimensional current evaluated at a given point in the extra dimension is proportional to the probability of finding the chiral zero mode there. Nevertheless the anomaly, appropriately defined as the five dimensional divergence of the current, lives entirely on the orbifold fixed planes and is independent of the shape of the zero mode. Therefore long distance four dimensional anomaly cancellation ensures the consistency of the higher dimensional orbifold theory.

  7. Comparative analysis of spread-F signature and GPS scintillation occurrences at Tucumán, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spogli, L.; Lucilla, A.; Pezzopane, M.; Romano, V.; Zuccheretti, E.; De Franceschi, G.; Cabrera, M.; Ezquer, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    A deep understanding of the temporal and spatial evolution of the ionosphere can be achieved by using a multi-instrument approach which provides complementary information. Bearing this in mind, we analyze data recorded from October 2010 to September 2011, during the ascending phase of the 24th solar cycle, from an Advanced Ionospheric Sounder-Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia ionosonde and a GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and Total Electron Content (TEC) monitor receiver, located in the same site at low latitude in the Southern American longitudinal sector (Tucumán, 26.9°S, 294.6°E, magnetic latitude 15.5°S, Argentina). Such site offers the opportunity to perform combined spread-F and GPS scintillation statistics of occurrence under the southern crest of the equatorial ionospheric anomaly. Spread-F signatures, classified into four types (strong range spread-F (SSF), range spread-F, frequency spread-F (FSF), and mixed spread-F), the phase and amplitude scintillation index (?? and S4, respectively), the TEC, and the rate of TEC parameter, marker of the TEC gradients, that can cause scintillation, are considered. The seasonal behavior results as follows: the occurrence of all four types of spread-F is higher in summer and lower in winter, while the occurrence of scintillation peaks at equinoxes in the postsunset sector and shows a minimum in winter. The correspondence between SSF and scintillation seems to be systematic, and a possible correlation between S4 and FSF peaks is envisaged at the terminator. Evidence that scintillation, unlike ESF, is recorded all-day long, allows to speculate also on the relationship between the features of the sporadic E irregularities and scintillation patterns. Our results indicate that the daytime amplitude scintillation is in correspondence with the appearance of a dense Es layer, with critical frequency above 4 MHz. The investigation focused also on two particular periods, from 12 to 16 March 2011 and from 23 to 29 September 2011, both characterized by the simultaneous presence of SSF signatures and scintillation phenomena, allowing to discuss the role of traveling ionospheric disturbances as a strong candidate causing ionospheric irregularities.

  8. Optimizing Hybrid Spreading in Metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Miller, Joel C.; Cox, Ingemar J.; Chain, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemic spreading phenomena are ubiquitous in nature and society. Examples include the spreading of diseases, information, and computer viruses. Epidemics can spread by local spreading, where infected nodes can only infect a limited set of direct target nodes and global spreading, where an infected node can infect every other node. In reality, many epidemics spread using a hybrid mixture of both types of spreading. In this study we develop a theoretical framework for studying hybrid epidemics, and examine the optimum balance between spreading mechanisms in terms of achieving the maximum outbreak size. We show the existence of critically hybrid epidemics where neither spreading mechanism alone can cause a noticeable spread but a combination of the two spreading mechanisms would produce an enormous outbreak. Our results provide new strategies for maximising beneficial epidemics and estimating the worst outcome of damaging hybrid epidemics. PMID:25923411

  9. Relation of MAGSAT and Gravity Anomalies to the Main Tectonic Provinces of South America. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic anomalies of the South American continent are generally more positive and variable than the oceanic anomalies. There is better correlation between the magnetic anomalies and the major tectonic elements of the continents than between the anomalies and the main tectonic elements of the adjacent oceanic areas. Oceanic areas generally show no direct correlation to the magnetic anomalies. Precambrian continental shields are mainly more magnetic than continental basins and orogenic belts. Shields differ markedly from major aulacogens which are generally characterized by negative magnetic anomalies and positive gravity anomalies. The Andean orogenic belt shows rather poor correlation with the magnetic anomalies. The magnetic data exhibit instead prominent east-west trends, which although consistent with some tectonic features, may be related to processing noise derived from data reduction procedures to correct for external magnetic field effects. The pattern over the Andes is sufficiently distinct from the generally north trending magnetic anomalies occurring in the adjacent Pacific Ocean to separate effectively the leading edge of the South American Plate from the Nazea Plate. Eastern South America is characterized by magnetic anomalies which commonly extend across the continental margin into the Atlantic Ocean.

  10. Magnetic order and lattice anomalies in the J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model system VOMoO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Bombardi, A.; Chapon, L.C.; Margiolaki, I.; Mazzoli, C.; Gonthier, S.; Duc, F.; Radaelli, P.G.

    2005-06-01

    High-resolution x-ray and neutron powder-diffraction measurements were performed on polycrystalline VOMoO{sub 4}. Below {approx_equal}40 K the system orders in a simple Neel antiferromagnetic state (propagation vector k-vector=0), indicating a dominant role of the nearest-neighbor interactions. The order is three dimensional but the reduced saturated magnetic moment m of 0.41 (1) {mu}{sub B}/V{sup 4+} at 2 K indicates strongly two-dimensional character and enhanced quantum fluctuations. On cooling, there is no evidence of a reduction of the crystal symmetry. However, neutron diffraction indicates an anomalous evolution of the lattice parameters, which can be related to the onset of magnetic correlations.

  11. Octahedral distortion induced magnetic anomalies in LaMn{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Kaustuv Elizabeth, Suja; Anil Kumar, P. S.; Bhadram, Venkata Srinu; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2014-07-28

    Single crystals of LaMn{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} belonging to the ferromagnetic-insulator and distorted perovskite class were grown using a four-mirror optical float zone furnace. The as-grown crystal crystallizes into an orthorhombic Pbnm structure. The spatially resolved 2D Raman scan reveals a strain-induced distribution of transition metal (TM)–oxygen (O) octahedral deformation in the as-grown crystal. A rigorous annealing process releases the strain, thereby generating homogeneous octahedral distortion. The octahedra tilt by reducing the bond angle TM-O-TM, resulting in a decline of the exchange energy in the annealed crystal. The critical behavior is investigated from the bulk magnetization. It is found that the ground state magnetic behavior assigned to the strain-free LaMn{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} crystal is of the 3D Heisenberg kind. Strain induces mean field-like interaction in some sites, and consequently, the critical exponents deviate from the 3D Heisenberg class in the as-grown crystal. The temperature-dependent Raman scattering study reveals strong spin-phonon coupling and the existence of two magnetic ground states in the same crystal.

  12. Correlation of Tectonic Provinces of South America and the Caribbean Region with MAGSAT Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lidiak, E. G.; Hinze, W. J.; Keller, G. R. (principal investigators); Yuan, D. W.; Longacre, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    Intensities of MAGSAT scalar magnetic anomaly data correlate with the main tectonic provinces of South America and the Caribbean region. Magnetic anomalies of the continents generally have higher amplitudes than oceanic anomalies. This is particularly evident in Central America and in the shield areas of South America. The Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico are underlain by prominent magnetic minima. Within these oceanic areas, linear magnetic highs correlate with topographic ridges which separate the Gulf of Mexico, the Colombian Basin, and the Venezuelan Basin. The boundaries of the Caribbean plate occur along magnetic gradients which are particularly sharp along the northern and western margins of the plate, but gradational along the southern margin where they merge with the Andean Cordillera. The anomalies along the western margin of the South American plate are also distinct and appear to be separate from those of the adjacent ocean basin. Eastern South America is characterized by magnetic anomalies which commonly extend into the Atlantic Ocean.

  13. Orbital studies of lunar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, M. G.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Limitations of present lunar magnetic maps are considered. Optimal processing of satellite derived magnetic anomaly data is also considered. Studies of coastal and core geomagnetism are discussed. Lunar remanent and induced lunar magnetization are included.

  14. Topography driven spreading.

    PubMed

    McHale, G; Shirtcliffe, N J; Aqil, S; Perry, C C; Newton, M I

    2004-07-16

    Roughening a hydrophobic surface enhances its nonwetting properties into superhydrophobicity. For liquids other than water, roughness can induce a complete rollup of a droplet. However, topographic effects can also enhance partial wetting by a given liquid into complete wetting to create superwetting. In this work, a model system of spreading droplets of a nonvolatile liquid on surfaces having lithographically produced pillars is used to show that superwetting also modifies the dynamics of spreading. The edge speed-dynamic contact angle relation is shown to obey a simple power law, and such power laws are shown to apply to naturally occurring surfaces. PMID:15323838

  15. Kinetics of Cell Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamaraux, F.; Fache, S.; Bruckert, F.; Fourcade, B.

    2005-04-01

    Cell spreading is a fundamental event where the contact area with a solid substrate increases because of actin polymerization. We propose in this Letter a physical model to study the growth of the contact area with time. This analysis is compared with experimental data using the ameoba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our model couples the stress, which builds up at the margin of the contact area when the cell spreads, to the biochemical processes of actin polymerization. This leads to a scaling analysis of experimental data with a characteristic time whose order of magnitude compares well with our experimental results.

  16. Spread F theories: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossakow, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    Our understanding of equatorial spread F (ESF) phenomena has increased dramatically over the past few years: notwithstanding the fact that it was discovered over four decades ago (BOOKER and WELLS, 1938) as diffuse echoes on ionograms. Much of this advancement in understanding comes from a combined theoretical and experimental approach to the problem. Advances in radar backscatter measurements, satellite and rocket in situ measurements, and theoretical and numerical simulation techniques have provided a clearer picture of the fundamental mechanisms causing ESF. The study of ESF phenomena has been both complicated and enriched by the fact that the attendant magnetic field aligned ionospheric irregularities span some 5-6 orders of magnitude in scale sizes. The present paper will deal with ESF theory and at that only those theories using plasma mechanisms as a basis. Experimental reviews of the subject can be found in other papers in this edition. An examination is made of the basic equatorial nighttime ionospheric F region geometry.

  17. Survey and Interpretation Geophysical of Magnetic Isochrones 4n.2 a 2A.3 (7.9 3.6 Ma) in the Central Part of the Rivera Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, D. A.; Mortera-Gutierrez, C. A.; Bandy, W. L.; Valle, S.

    2013-05-01

    This study shows the results of six campaigns marine geophysics BABRIP06 in 2006, MAMRIV07 in 2007, MAMRIV08 in 2008, GUAYRIV10 in 2010, BATIBAJA11 in 2011 and MAMRIV12 in 2012, in the abyssal plain in the East Pacific Rise (EPR), on board the UNAM vessel, B/O El Puma. The oceanographic campaigns single beam bathymetric data collected and marine magnetic data. The results allow analyze and study the magnetic texture in the central north of the Rivera plate associated with geological structures and behavior of the seafloor to the isochronous 5A. The systematic survey of the magnetic data provided high resolution on the guidelines of the magnetic anomalies associated with cortical spreading between 7.9 and 3.6 Ma, generated by the northern segment of the East Pacific Rise (EPR), between the Rivera and Tamayo Oceanic Transformants. Multibeam bathymetry data and the acoustic reflectivity of the six campaigns are correlated with the geometry of the magnetic anomalies and seismic reflection profiles to understand the processes that formed the highlight recreational ocean in this area. The main results in this study is the identification of continuous magnetic isochrones 4n.2 to 2A.3, magnetic anomalies associated with seamounts, the geometry of the isochrones associated with a propagator and magnetic anomaly identification of isochronous 3n.3 had not been demonstrated by other oceanographic surveys. Possibly oceanic spreading rate was slower during these epochs and the identification of a cross anomaly was due to a fracture zone that generated the propagator.

  18. Mars Crustal Remanent Magnetism: An Extinct Dynamo Leaves a Record of Field Reversals in the Heavily Cratered Highlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, John E.; Acuna, Mario H.; Ness, Norman F.; Wasilewski, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, in a highly elliptical polar orbit about Mars, obtained vector magnetic field measurements just above the surface of Mars (altitudes > 100 kilometers). Crustal magnetization, largely confined to the most ancient, heavily cratered Mars highlands, is frequently organized in east-west trending linear features, the largest of which extends over 2000 km. A representative set of survey passes are modeled using uniformly magnetized thin plates and a generalized inverse methodology. Crustal remanent magnetization exceeds that deduced for the largest terrestrial magnetic anomalies by more than an order of magnitude. Groups of quasi-parallel linear features of alternating magnetic polarity are found. They are reminiscent of similar magnetic features associated with sea floor spreading and crustal genesis on Earth but with a much larger spatial scale.

  19. How Is Mono Spread?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español ... Guy's Guide to Body Image How Is Mono Spread? KidsHealth > Teens > Q& ...

  20. Structural phase transition in La2/3Ba1/3MnO3 perovskite: Elastic, magnetic, and lattice anomalies and microscopic mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertman, E.; Syrkin, E.; Lykah, V.; Desnenko, V.; Beznosov, A.; Pal-Val, P.; Pal-Val, L.; Fedorchenko, A.; Khalyavin, D.; Feher, A.

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependences of the elastic and magnetic properties of polycrystalline perovskite manganite La2/3Ba1/3MnO3 were studied using ultrasonic and SQUID magnetometer techniques. The minimum of the temperature-dependent sound velocity v(T) and corresponding maximum of the decrement ?(T) were found in the vicinity of the structural phase transition R 3 ¯ c ? I m m a at Ts ˜ 200 K. Large alterations of v and ? indicate a structural phase transition of the soft mode type. A high sensitivity of dc magnetization to a low uniaxial pressure caused by the softening was found in the Ts region. A negative value of the linear thermal expansion coefficient along one of the crystallographic axis was found in the Imma phase near Ts. The proposed microscopic mechanism explains the appearance of the soft mode in the vicinity of the structural phase transition temperature associated with the displacement of the manganese atom from the center of the oxygen octahedron.

  1. Euro-african MAGSAT Anomaly-tectonic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Vonfrese, R. R. B. (principal investigators); Olivier, R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary satellite (MAGSAT) scalar magnetic anomaly data are compiled and differentially reduced to radial polarization by equivalent point source inversion for comparison with tectonic data of Africa, Europe and adjacent marine areas. A number of associations are evident to constrain analyses of the tectonic features and history of the region. The Precambrian shields of Africa and Europe exhibit varied magnetic signatures. All shields are not magnetic highs and, in fact, the Baltic shield is a marked minimum. The reduced-to-the-pole magnetic map shows a marked tendency for northeasterly striking anomalies in the eastern Atlantic and adjacent Africa, which is coincident to the track of several hot spots for the past 100 million years. However, there is little consistency in the sign of the magnetic anomalies and the track of the hot spots. Comparison of the radially polarized anomalies of Africa and Europe with other reduced-to-the-pole magnetic satellite anomaly maps of the Western Hemisphere support the reconstruction of the continents prior to the origin of the present-day Atlantic Ocean in the Mesozoic Era.

  2. Euro-African MAGSAT anomaly-tectonic observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinze, W. J.; Olivier, R.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary satellite (MAGSAT) scalar magnetic anomaly data are compiled and differentially reduced to radial polarization by equivalent point source inversion for comparison with tectonic data of Africa, Europe and adjacent marine areas. A number of associations are evident to constrain analyses of the tectonic features and history of the region. The Precambrian shields of Africa and Europe exhibit varied magnetic signatures. All shields are not magnetic highs and, in fact, the Baltic shield is a marked minimum. The reduced-to-the-pole magnetic map shows a marked tendency for northeasterly striking anomalies in the eastern Atlantic and adjacent Africa, which is coincident to the track of several hot spots for the past 100 million years. However, there is little consistency in the sign of the magnetic anomalies and the track of the hot spots. Comparison of the radially polarized anomalies of Africa and Europe with other reduced-to-the-pole magnetic satellite anomaly maps of the Western Hemisphere support the reconstruction of the continents prior to the origin of the present-day Atlantic Ocean in the Mesozoic Era.

  3. The extent of oceanization of the Egyptian northern Red Sea crust indicated by gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattab, M. M.

    1992-05-01

    A 50 mGal gravity minimum and a 200 nT total magnetic intensity anomaly in the northern Red Sea shelf near the port of Safaga and a 250 nT total intensity anomaly across the Brothers Island indicate a more advanced degree of oceanization of the Red Sea crust than proposed from the results of the latest seismic studies in the same area. The interpretation of this gravity and magnetic anomalies reveals and extremely thinned continental crust which transforms to a mixed continental-oceanic crust some 50 km from the coast line. This mixed crust is found to contain segregated basaltic bodies, normally and reversely magnetized by the ambient Earth's magnetic field. The magnetic anomaly over the Brothers Island is interpreted as related to a short 4 Ma old spreading axis. A review of the results of this investigation together with previous studies suggests three modes for the emplacement of the oceanic part of the Red Sea crust in the Egyptian Red Sea shelf. The calculated crustal model at the offshore Safaga is compared with refraction based models across Saudi Arabia and the western Atlantic.

  4. Astrometric solar system anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Anderson, John D

    2009-01-01

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations, or that one or more anomalies are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  5. Reaction spreading on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension ds, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension dl. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)˜tdl. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)˜e?t with ? proportional to ln, where is the average degree of the graph.

  6. Analysis and interpretation of MAGSAT anomalies over north Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Crustal anomaly detection with MAGSAT data is frustrated by inherent resolving power of the data and by contamination from external and core fields. Quality of the data might be tested by modeling specific tectonic features which produce anomalies that fall within proposed resolution and crustal amplitude capabilities of MAGSAT fields. To test this hypothesis, north African hotspots associated with Ahaggar, Tibesti and Darfur were modeled as magnetic induction anomalies. MAGSAT data were reduced by subtracting external and core fields to isolate scalar and vertical component crustal signals. Of the three volcanic areas, only the Ahaggar region had an associated anomaly of magnitude above error limits of the data. Hotspot hypothesis was tested for Ahaggar by seeing if predicted magnetic signal matched MAGSAT anomaly. Predicted model magnetic signal arising from surface topography of the uplift and the Curie isothermal surface was calculated at MAGSAT altitudes by Fourier transform technique modified to allow for variable magnetization. Curie isotherm surface was calculated using a method for temperature distribution in a moving plate above a fixed hotspot. Magnetic signal was calculated for a fixed plate as well as a number of plate velocities and directions.

  7. Ebstein's Anomaly, Left Ventricular Noncompaction, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Michael; Warner, Luke; Collins, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a congenital disorder characterized by apical displacement of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve. Ebstein's anomaly may be seen in association with other cardiac conditions, including patent foramen ovale, atrial septal defect, and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC). LVNC is characterized by increased trabeculation within the left ventricular apex. Echocardiography is often used to diagnose LVNC; however, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers superior characterization of the myocardium. We report a case of sudden cardiac death in a patient with Ebstein's anomaly with unrecognized LVNC noted on post mortem examination with screening documenting the presence of LVNC in one of the patient's twin sons. PMID:26240764

  8. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN) [London, TN; Dress, William B. (Camas, WA) [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  9. Geomagnetic field variations during magnetochron C33r time: evidence from magnetic wiggles in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic anomalies over the Central and South Atlantic Oceans correlate well with those predicted by seafloor spreading models for crustal ages 0 to 83 Ma. In addition to these large amplitude (300-500 nT) anomalies, there are many smaller (20-100 nT) features located between the polarity transitions. These small features have been observed over other ocean basins and are commonly referred to as magnetic wiggles. Careful examination of magnetochron C33r (79 - 83 Ma) anomalies over the Central and South Atlantic reveals several small amplitude features that can be observed over either side of the mid-ocean ridge in both regions. These same anomalies within magnetochron C33r have previously been reported in the North and South Pacific, and Indian Oceans. This widespread distribution of C33r wiggles suggests that they are produced by global geomagnetic variations rather than localized changes in magnetic properties of oceanic crustal layers. Differences in spreading rates in the various oceans, however, make it difficult to obtain an exact correspondence between each of the observed wiggles. For moderate to high spreading rates such as those in the S. Atlantic (~45 mm/yr) eight features (4 peaks and 4 troughs) are observed, whereas for slow spreading rates such as those in parts of the N. Pacific (~20 mm/yr) only four features (2 peaks and 2 troughs) are observed. The wiggles are interpreted here as features produced by changes in field intensity rather than polarity reversals. Amplitudes of anomalies associated with C33n-C33r and C33r-C34n polarity transitions have been used to estimate an “effective” susceptibility for the magnetized oceanic layer along individual profiles. Assuming a uniform but different effective susceptibility for each profile, magnetic anomaly data have been inverted to obtain corresponding magnetic field variations. Profiles with high spreading rates are assumed to provide a more complete record of the field variations. Field variations obtained for fast spreading profiles have been filtered so as to simulate their expression at slower spreading rates. These in turn have been compared with field variations calculated from slow spreading profiles so as to identify dominant features that can be observed in each region. Field variations for each region have been relocated to their original latitudinal position using corresponding paleomagnetic poles. The resulting distribution of field intensity variations has been used to characterize the behavior of the Earth’s field during C33r time. Results indicate a discernable but poorly defined increase in intensity with paleolatitude. Although such a latitudinal increase is consistent with that predicted by an axial dipole field suggesting that changes in the Earth’s dipole magnetic moment may be responsible for the observed wiggles, more data are required to better document field intensity variations with paleolatitude, and to examine other possible explanations.

  10. An analysis of ridge axis gravity roughness and spreading rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher; Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Fast and slow spreading ridges have radically different morphologic and gravimetric characteristics. In this study, altimeter measurements from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission are used to investigate spreading rate dependence of the ridge axis gravity field. Gravity roughness provides an estimate of the amplitude of the gravity anomaly and is robust to small errors in the location of the ridge axis. Gravity roughness as a weighted root mean square of the vertical deflection at 438 ridge crossings on the mid-ocean ridge system is computed. Ridge axis gravity anomalies show a decrease in amplitude with increasing spreading rate up to an intermediate rate of about 60-80 mm/yr and almost no change at higher rates; overall the roughness decreases by a factor of 10 between the lowest and highest rates. In addition to the amplitude decrease, the range of roughness values observed at a given spreading rate shows a similar order of magnitude decrease with transition between 60 and 80 mm/yr. The transition of ridge axis gravity is most apparent at three relatively unexplored locations on the Southeast Indian Ridge and the Pacific-Antarctic Rise; on these intermediate rate ridges the transition occurs abruptly across transform faults.

  11. Magnetic vector data from the western Caribbean reveal possible origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barckhausen, U.; Engels, U.

    2013-12-01

    During a cruise with RV Meteor in the spring of 2010, magnetic measurements were carried out in the central and western Caribbean with up to six magnetic sensors deployed at the same time. These were i) a towed gradiometer consisting of two Overhauser sensors, ii) two towed vector magnetometers, and iii) two shipboard oriented vector magnetometers. While the gradiometer data provide total field magnetic anomalies free from external variations, the vector data can be analyzed with different methods in the space and wavenumber domains. In the case of the towed vector data, attitude control is challenging whereas shipboard data require a very thorough compensation for the ship's magnetic field. The data were analyzed with the goal to gain insight into the origin of the basement rocks especially of the western Caribbean. Position and strike direction of magnetic anomalies in the Columbia basin possibly hold the key to distinguish between an origin of the crust in the Pacific ocean and an alternative in situ formation between the Americas. On six long profiles in the Columbia basin and adjacent regions we find consistently strike directions of the magnetic anomalies around N100°E which seems to be incompatible with a Pacific origin of the crust. Three Project Magnet aeromagnetic vector profiles crossing the research area at different angles were analyzed with the same method and yield very similar results. In our interpretation, the crust underlying the Columbia basin formed during the Cretaceous at a roughly E-W trending spreading center between the Americas. Since the crust likely formed during the Cretaceous Superchron (C 34), the strike direction we find in our data probably does not represent typical seafloor spreading anomalies. Instead we believe it is related to changes in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field which are known to have left correlated traces in oceanic crust formed during this period. The analysis methods we used are sensitive to intensity changes just as well as to polarity changes. We can demonstrate that the data quality is high and that the strike direction signal is clear and well correlated between the different profiles and that it is also consistent between towed, shipboard, and aeromagnetic sensors.

  12. Antler anomalies in tule elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogan, Peter J.P.; Jessup, David A.; Barrett, Reginald H.

    1988-01-01

    Antler anomalies were evident in tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) within 1 yr of reintroduction to Point Reyes, California (USA). These anomalies are consistent with previously described mineral deficiency-induced anomalies in cervids. The elk were judged deficient in copper. Low levels of copper in soils and vegetation at the release site, exacerbated by possible protein deficiency due to poor range conditions, are postulated as likely causes of the antler anomalies.

  13. Geochemical and geophysical anomalies in the western part of the Sheep Creek Range, Lander County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gott, Garland Bayard; Zablocki, Charles J.

    1968-01-01

    Extensive geochemical anomalies are present along the west side of the Sheep Creek Range in Lander County, Nev. Anomalous concentrations of zinc, arsenic, mercury, silver, copper, lead, and to some extent gold, molybdenum, and antimony occur in iron-rich material along fracture planes and in quartz veins in Paleozoic formations. A magnetic anomaly occurs over a pediment at the southern part of the range, close to one of the geochemical anomalies. Gravity and electrical resistivity measurements suggest that the magnetic anomaly is caused by an intrusive igneous mass rather than by a block of downfaulted basalt. A limited amount of shallow drilling would clarify the geochemical and geophysical data.

  14. Understanding Anomalies to Extract Vacuum Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Murad, P.A

    2004-02-04

    Recent Russian literature contains some interesting speculations of potentially wide applicability regarding the physical vacuum. These investigations examined and applied a theory to various anomalies to try and understand what these events may represent. Data were collected by Dmitriev to quantify these events and identify commonalties that indicate the anomalies might have a natural origin. Dyatlov created theories on the Polarized Inhomogeneous Physical Vacuum where he claimed that each anomaly possessed a distinct boundary separate from its surroundings. Within this inhomogeneous boundary, the theory suggests that the magnetic, electric, gravitic, and spin fields would be different from its surroundings. From these findings, he developed equations that resemble the London equations for a superconductor and are somewhat similar to those developed later by Puthoff. The importance of these events is that with additional understanding, they may offer a means for extracting energy from the physical vacuum. Moreover, one may speculate that these anomalies may represent a gravitational vortex or even a portal or a wormhole to look into potential travel within other dimensions.

  15. Axial anomaly and negative longitudinal magnetoresistance: theory vs. experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Pallab; Pixley, Jed

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally axial anomaly is associated with quantum mechanical violation of U(1) axial symmetry of relativistic Dirac/Weyl fermions in odd spatial dimensions, in the presence of electromagnetic gauge fields. Recently there has been considerable interest in both condensed matter and high energy physics communities in Nielsen and Ninomiya's original proposal that the axial anomaly can lead to a negative longitudinal magnetoresistance for condensed matter realization of Weyl fermions. In this talk I will show that the axial anomaly can arise in any generic three dimensional material placed under parallel electric and quantizing magnetic fields. However, the emergence of negative magnetoresistance depends crucially on the forward scattering nature of the underlying relaxation mechanism. Therefore, sufficiently clean and dilute three dimensional materials without magnetism or magnetic impurities can be promising candidates for observing this phenomenon. I will briefly discuss concrete experimental evidence of this enigmatic effect in quasi-2D layered materials.

  16. Impact of Sampling on Anomaly Detection

    E-print Network

    Chuah, Chen-Nee

    1 Impact of Sampling on Anomaly Detection DIMACS/DyDan Workshop on Internet Tomography Chen of Sampling on Anomaly Detection ­ Volume Anomaly Detection ­ Portscan Detection ­ Entropy-based Traffic Profiling Towards Accurate Measurements for Anomaly Detection ­ Filtered Sampling ­ Programmable

  17. Illusory spreading of watercolor

    PubMed Central

    Devinck, Frédéric; Hardy, Joseph L.; Delahunt, Peter B.; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The watercolor effect (WCE) is a phenomenon of long-range color assimilation occurring when a dark chromatic contour delineating a figure is flanked on the inside by a brighter chromatic contour; the brighter color spreads into the entire enclosed area. Here, we determined the optimal chromatic parameters and the cone signals supporting the WCE. To that end, we quantified the effect of color assimilation using hue cancellation as a function of hue, colorimetric purity, and cone modulation of inducing contours. When the inner and outer contours had chromaticities that were in opposite directions in color space, a stronger WCE was obtained as compared with other color directions. Additionally, equal colorimetric purity between the outer and inner contours was necessary to obtain a large effect compared with conditions in which the contours differed in colorimetric purity. However, there was no further increase in the magnitude of the effect when the colorimetric purity increased beyond a value corresponding to an equal vector length between the inner and outer contours. Finally, L–M-cone-modulated WCE was perceptually stronger than S-cone-modulated WCE for our conditions. This last result demonstrates that both L–M-cone and S-cone pathways are important for watercolor spreading. Our data suggest that the WCE depends critically upon the particular spatiochromatic arrangement in the display, with the relative chromatic contrast between the inducing contours being particularly important. PMID:16881793

  18. Deep Mantle Origin for the DUPAL Anomaly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, S.; Weis, D.

    2002-12-01

    Twenty years after the discovery of the Dupal Anomaly, its origin remains a geochemical and geophysical enigma. This anomaly is associated with the Southern Hemisphere oceanic mantle and is recognized by basalts with geochemical characteristics such as low 206Pb/204Pb and high 87Sr/86Sr. Both mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and ocean island basalts (OIB) are affected, despite originating from melting at different depths and of different mantle sources. We compile geochemical data for both MORB and OIB from the three major oceans to help constrain the physical distribution and chemical composition of the Dupal Anomaly. There is a clear decrease in 206Pb/204Pb and an increase in 87Sr/86Sr with more southerly latitude for Indian MORB and OIB; these correlations are less obvious in the Atlantic and non-existent in the Pacific. The average* 143Nd/144Nd for Pacific and Atlantic OIB is 0.5129, but is lower for Indian OIB (0.5128). Interestingly, Pacific, Atlantic and Indian OIB all have 176Hf/177Hf averages of 0.2830. Indian MORB also record this phenomenon of low Nd with normal Hf isotopic compositions (Chauvel and Blichert-Toft, EPSL, 2001). Hf isotopes appear, therefore, to be a valid isotopic proxy for measuring the presence and magnitude of the Dupal Anomaly at specific locations. Wen (EPSL, 2001) reported a low-velocity layer at the D'' boundary beneath the Indian Ocean from which the Dupal Anomaly may originate. This hypothesis may be consistent with our compilations demonstrating that the long-lived Dupal Anomaly does not appear to be either mixing efficiently into the upper mantle or spreading to other ocean basins through time. We suggest that the Dupal source could be continually tapped by upwelling Indian Ocean mantle plumes. Plumes would then emplace pockets of Dupal material into the upper mantle and other ascending plumes might further disperse this material into the shallow asthenosphere. This could explain both the presence of the Dupal signature in MORB and OIB and the geochemical similarities between some Indian Ocean mantle plumes, such as Kerguelen, and the Dupal signature. * To avoid sampling biases, data for each ocean island (or group) are averaged and these values are used to calculate the average for each ocean.

  19. Rifts in Spreading Wax Layers

    E-print Network

    Rolf Ragnarsson; J. Lewis Ford; Christian D. Santangelo; Eberhard Bodenschatz

    1995-10-19

    We report experimental results on the rift formation between two freezing wax plates. The plates were pulled apart with constant velocity, while floating on the melt, in a way akin to the tectonic plates of the earth's crust. At slow spreading rates, a rift, initially perpendicular to the spreading direction, was found to be stable, while above a critical spreading rate a "spiky" rift with fracture zones almost parallel to the spreading direction developed. At yet higher spreading rates a second transition from the spiky rift to a zig-zag pattern occurred. In this regime the rift can be characterized by a single angle which was found to be dependent on the spreading rate. We show that the oblique spreading angles agree with a simple geometrical model. The coarsening of the zig-zag pattern over time and the three-dimensional structure of the solidified crust are also discussed.

  20. South China Sea Tectonics and Magnetics: Constraints from IODP Expedition 349 and Deep-tow Magnetic Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Li, C. F.; Kulhanek, D. K.; Zhao, X.; Liu, Q.; Xu, X.; Sun, Z.; Zhu, J.

    2014-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest low-latitude marginal sea in the world. Its formation and evolution are linked to the complex continental-oceanic tectonic interaction of the Eurasian, Pacific, and Indo-Australian plates. Despite its relatively small size and short history, the SCS has undergone nearly a complete Wilson cycle from continental break-up to seafloor spreading to subduction. In January-March 2014, Expedition 349 of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) drilled five sites in the deep basin of the SCS. Three sites (U1431, U1433, and U1434) cored into oceanic basement near the fossil spreading center on the East and Southwest Subbasins, whereas Sites U1432 and U1435 are located near the northern continent/ocean boundary of the East Subbasin. Shipboard biostratigraphy based on microfossils preserved in sediment directly above or within basement suggests that the preliminary cessation age of spreading in both the East and Southwest Subbasins is around early Miocene (16-20 Ma); however, post-cruise radiometric dating is being conducted to directly date the basement basalt in these subbasins. Prior to the IODP drilling, high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic surveys were conducted in 2012 and 2013 in the SCS with survey lines passing near the five IODP drilling sites. The deep-tow surveys revealed detailed patterns of the SCS magnetic anomalies with amplitude and spatial resolutions several times better than that of traditional sea surface measurements. Preliminary results reveal several episodes of magnetic reversal events that were not recognized by sea surface measurements. Together the IODP drilling and deep-tow magnetic surveys provide critical constraints for investigating the processes of seafloor spreading in the SCS and evolution of a mid-ocean ridge from active spreading to termination.

  1. Algebraic versus Topologic Anomalies

    E-print Network

    V. Aldaya; M. Calixto; J. Guerrero

    1997-02-08

    Within the frame of a Group Approach to Quantization anomalies arise in a quite natural way. We present in this talk an analysis of the basic obstructions that can be found when we try to translate symmetries of the Newton equations to the Quantum Theory. They fall into two classes: algebraic and topologic according to the local or global character of the obstruction. We present here one explicit example of each.

  2. Anomaly for Model Building

    E-print Network

    Utpal Sarkar

    2006-06-19

    A simple algorithm to calculate the group theory factor entering in anomalies at four and six dimensions for SU(N) and SO(N) groups in terms of the Casimir invariants of their subgroups is presented. Explicit examples of some of the lower dimensional representations of $SU(n), n \\leq 5$ and SO(10) groups are presented, which could be used for model building in four and six dimensions.

  3. Interpretation of bathymetric and magnetic data from the easternmost segment of Australian-Antarctic Ridge, 156°-161°E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H.; Kim, S.; Park, S.

    2013-12-01

    From 2011 to 2013, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) conducted a series of geophysical and geochemical expeditions on the longest and easternmost segment of Australian-Antarctic Ridge, located at 61°-63°S, and 156°-161°E. This ridge segment plays an important role in constraining the tectonics of the Antarctic plate. Using IBRV ARAON, the detailed bathymetric data and eleven total magnetic profiles were collected. The studied ridge has spread NNW-SSE direction and tends to be shallower to the west and deeper to the east. The western side of the ridge (156°-157.50°E) shows a broad axial high and a plenty of seamounts as an indicative of massive volcanism. Near the center of the ridge (158°-159°E), a seamount chain is formed stretching toward the south from the ridge. Also, the symmetric seafloor fabric is clearly observed at the eastern portion (158.50°-160°E) of the seamount chain. From the topographic change along the ridge axis, the western part of the ridge appears to have a sufficient magma supply. On the contrary, the eastern side of the ridge (160°-161°E) is characterized by axial valley and relatively deeper depth. Nevertheless, the observed total magnetic field anomalies exhibit symmetric patterns across the ridge axis. Although there have not been enough magnetic survey lines, the spreading rates of the ridge are estimated as the half-spreading rate of 37.7 mm/y and 35.3 mm/y for the western portion of the ridge and 42.3 mm/y for the eastern portion. The studied ridge can be categorized as an intermediate spreading ridge, confirming previous studies based on the spreading rate of global ridge system. Here we will present the preliminary results on bathymetric changes along the ridge axis and its relationship with melt supply distribution, and detailed magnetic properties of the ridge constrained by the observed total field anomalies.

  4. Anomaly cancellation in K3 orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrucca, Claudio A.; Serone, Marco

    2000-01-01

    We study in detail the pattern of anomaly cancellation in D=6 Type IIB ZN orientifolds, occurring through a generalized Green-Schwarz mechanism involving several RR antisymmetric tensors and scalars fields. The starting point is a direct string theory computation of the inflow of anomaly arising from magnetic interaction of D-branes, O-planes and fixed points, which are encoded in topological one-loop partition functions in the RR odd spin-structure. All the RR anomalous couplings of these objects are then obtained by factorization. They are responsible for a spontaneous breaking of U(1) factors through a Higgs mechanism involving the corresponding hypermultiplets. Some of them are also related by supersymmetry to gauge couplings involving the NSNS scalars sitting in the tensor multiplets. We also comment on the possible occurrence of tensionless strings when these couplings diverge.

  5. MAGSAT anomaly field inversion and interpretation for the US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, M. A. (principal investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Long wavelength anomalies in the total magnetic field measured by MAGSAT over the United States and adjacent areas are inverted to an equivalent layer crustal magnetization distribution. The model is based on an equal area dipole grid at the Earth's surface. Model resolution, defined as the closest dipole spacing giving a solution having physical significance, is about 220 km for MAGSAT data in the elevation range 300-500 km. The magnetization contours correlate well with large scale tectonic provinces. A higher resolution (200 km) model based on relatively noise free synthetic "pseudodata" is also presented. Magnetic anomaly component data measured by MAGSAT is compared with synthetic anomaly component fields arising from an equivalent source dipole array at the Earth's surface generated from total field anomaly data alone. An excellent inverse correlation between apparent magnetization and heat flow in the western U.S. is demonstrated. A regional heat flow map which is presented and compared with published maps, predicts high heat flow in Nebraska and the Dakotas, suggesting the presence of a "blind" geothermal area of regional extent.

  6. Gold anomalies and magnetometer profile data, Ester Dome area, Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, D.L.; Forbes, Robert B.; Hawkins, D.B.

    1969-01-01

    Gold analysis of grab and auger samples of bedrock taken along the new Ester Dome Road reveals that this road cuts several mineralized zones characterized by anomalous concentrations of gold. The results of a magnetometer traverse along this road indicate that the negative magnetic anomalies along the traverse may be correlative with the gold anomalies. The presence of previously unreported gold anomalies indicates that additional prospecting may be warranted.

  7. Spreading convulsions, spreading depolarization and epileptogenesis in human cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Major, Sebastian; Pannek, Heinz-Wolfgang; Woitzik, Johannes; Scheel, Michael; Wiesenthal, Dirk; Martus, Peter; Winkler, Maren K.L.; Hartings, Jed A.; Fabricius, Martin; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Spreading depolarization of cells in cerebral grey matter is characterized by massive ion translocation, neuronal swelling and large changes in direct current-coupled voltage recording. The near-complete sustained depolarization above the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels initiates spreading depression of brain activity. In contrast, epileptic seizures show modest ion translocation and sustained depolarization below the inactivation threshold for action potential generating channels. Such modest sustained depolarization allows synchronous, highly frequent neuronal firing; ictal epileptic field potentials being its electrocorticographic and epileptic seizure its clinical correlate. Nevertheless, Leão in 1944 and Van Harreveld and Stamm in 1953 described in animals that silencing of brain activity induced by spreading depolarization changed during minimal electrical stimulations. Eventually, epileptic field potentials were recorded during the period that had originally seen spreading depression of activity. Such spreading convulsions are characterized by epileptic field potentials on the final shoulder of the large slow potential change of spreading depolarization. We here report on such spreading convulsions in monopolar subdural recordings in 2 of 25 consecutive aneurismal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients in vivo and neocortical slices from 12 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy in vitro. The in vitro results suggest that ?-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibition protects from spreading convulsions. Moreover, we describe arterial pulse artefacts mimicking epileptic field potentials in three patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage that ride on the slow potential peak. Twenty-one of the 25 subarachnoid haemorrhage patients (84%) had 656 spreading depolarizations in contrast to only three patients (12%) with 55 ictal epileptic events isolated from spreading depolarizations. Spreading depolarization frequency and depression periods per 24?h recording episodes showed an early and a delayed peak on Day 7. Patients surviving subarachnoid haemorrhage with poor outcome at 6 months showed significantly higher total and peak numbers of spreading depolarizations and significantly longer total and peak depression periods during the electrocorticographic monitoring than patients with good outcome. In a semi-structured telephone interview 3 years after the initial haemorrhage, 44% of the subarachnoid haemorrhage survivors had developed late post-haemorrhagic seizures requiring anti-convulsant medication. In those patients, peak spreading depolarization number had been significantly higher [15.1 (11.4–30.8) versus 7.0 (0.8–11.2) events per day, P?=?0.045]. In summary, monopolar recordings here provided unequivocal evidence of spreading convulsions in patients. Hence, practically all major pathological cortical network events in animals have now been observed in people. Early spreading depolarizations may indicate a risk for late post-haemorrhagic seizures. PMID:22120143

  8. Brain anomalies in velo-cardio-facial syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mitnick, R.J.; Bello, J.A.; Shprintzen, R.J.

    1994-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in 11 consecutively referred patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCF) showed anomalies in nine cases including small vermis, cysts adjacent to the frontal horns, and small posterior fossa. Focal signal hyperintensities in the white matter on long TR images were also noted. The nine patients showed a variety of behavioral abnormalities including mild development delay, learning disabilities, and characteristic personality traits typical of this common multiple anomaly syndrome which has been related to a microdeletion at 22q11. Analysis of the behavorial findings showed no specific pattern related to the brain anomalies, and the patients with VCF who did not have detectable brain lesions also had behavioral abnormalities consistent with VCF. The significance of the lesions is not yet known, but the high prevalence of anomalies in this sample suggests that structural brain abnormalities are probably common in VCF. 25 refs.

  9. [Cerebral nerves - perineural tumor spread].

    PubMed

    Bisdas, S; Mack, M G

    2009-07-01

    Perineural tumor spread in the course of head and neck tumors is a form of metastatic disease in which the tumor disseminates centrifugally or centripetally along the nerve to (non)contiguous regions. Perineural tumor spread is a potentially devastating complication and has a high impact on the therapeutic management and overall prognosis. In a large proportion of patients the disease remains asymptomatic and imaging (especially MRI) plays a crucial role in the detection of lesions. Familiarity with the pertinent anatomy, knowledge of the common spread pathways and an appropriate imaging strategy allow detection of the perineural spread of the disease in the majority of the cases. PMID:19424678

  10. Melt anomalies and propagating ridge offsets: Insights from the East Pacific Rise and Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Marjanovic, M.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Canales, J.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observations of crustal structure associated with propagating ridge offsets at both the Endeavour and East Pacific Rise (EPR) ISS indicate local crustal thickness anomalies are associated with propagating ridge tips and renew the question of the role of melt anomalies in driving ridge propagation. Seismic and gravity data from the flanks of the Endeavour and adjoining segments of the Juan de Fuca Ridge reveal a 10-20 km wide zone of thicker and possibly denser crust on the young crust side of pseudofaults left by former propagating offsets. A sequence of bright ridge-ward dipping sub-Moho seismic reflections underlie the region of thicker crust and are interpreted as frozen magma sills at the base of the crust emplaced behind the propagating ridge tips [Nedimovic et al., 2005]. Crust within the pseudofault zones is denser and the presence of iron-enriched compositions is inferred, with the sub-crust magma sills the presumed source magma bodies for these denser, iron-enriched crustal rocks. Comparisons with the well-studied overlapping spreading center discontinuity at the EPR 9°03’N reveals a similar suite of crustal anomalies. On the flanks of this southward propagating discontinuity, an ~20 km wide band of crust that is both thicker and denser is located behind the V-shaped discordant zone of the OSC [Canales et al., 2002; Toomey and Hooft, 2008]. A broad swath of higher crustal magnetizations encompasses the region of thicker and denser crust as well as the adjoining discordant zone of relict OSC ridge tips and overlap basins [Carbotte and Macdonald, 1992]. At the southern edge of the band of thick crust, Singh et al. [2008] find evidence for a large melt anomaly in the lower crust and anomalously thick crust at the propagating eastern ridge of the OSC. The presence of local melt accumulations inferred from these bands of thicker crust behind propagating ridge offsets at both EPR and Juan de Fuca, presumably contributes to the forces driving ridge propagation in these regions. These excess melt accumulations may reflect presence of small shallow mantle melt anomalies that persist as discrete anomalies while migrating along-axis behind the propagating ridge tip. Alternatively, as the propagating ridge tip advances into colder preexisting lithosphere, damming and accumulation of melts due to the strongly 3D topography at the base of the lithosphere may be important.

  11. Physicochemical isotope anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Esat, T.M.

    1988-06-01

    Isotopic composition of refractory elements can be modified, by physical processes such as distillation and sputtering, in unexpected patterns. Distillation enriches the heavy isotopes in the residue and the light isotopes in the vapor. However, current models appear to be inadequate to describe the detailed mass dependence, in particular for large fractionations. Coarse- and fine-grained inclusions from the Allende meteorite exhibit correlated isotope effects in Mg both as mass-dependent fractionation and residual anomalies. This isotope pattern can be duplicated by high temperature distillation in the laboratory. A ubiquitous property of meteoritic inclusions for Mg as well as for most of the other elements, where measurements exist, is mass-dependent fractionation. In contrast, terrestrial materials such as microtektites, tektite buttons as well as lunar orange and green glass spheres have normal Mg isotopic composition. A subset of interplanetary dust particles labelled as chondritic aggregates exhibit excesses in {sup 26}Mg and deuterium anomalies. Sputtering is expected to be a dominant mechanism in the destruction of grains within interstellar dust clouds. An active proto-sun as well as the present solar-wind and solar-flare flux are of sufficient intensity to sputter significant amounts of material. Laboratory experiments in Mg show widespread isotope effects including residual {sup 26}Mg excesses and mass dependent fractionation. It is possible that the {sup 26}Mg excesses in interplanetary dust is related to sputtering by energetic solar-wind particles. The implication if the laboratory distillation and sputtering effects are discussed and contrasted with the anomalies in meteoritic inclusions the other extraterrestrial materials the authors have access to.

  12. Hypercharged anomaly mediation.

    PubMed

    Dermísek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2008-04-01

    We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with anomaly mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio alpha between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05 < or = |alpha| < or = 0.25 and m(3/2) > or = 35 TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario. PMID:18517937

  13. Hypercharged Anomaly Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermíšek, Radovan; Verlinde, Herman; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2008-04-01

    We show that, in string models with the minimal supersymmetric standard model residing on D-branes, the bino mass can be generated in a geometrically separated hidden sector. Hypercharge mediation thus naturally teams up with anomaly mediation. The mixed scenario predicts a distinctive yet viable superpartner spectrum, provided that the ratio ? between the bino and gravitino mass lies in the range 0.05?|?|?0.25 and m3/2?35TeV. We summarize some of the experimental signatures of this scenario.

  14. Islamic Universities Spread through Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindow, Megan

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on new universities for Muslims, many supported by groups in the Middle East, which are spreading through the sub-Saharan region. The Islamic University in Uganda is a prime example of a new kind of institution that has slowly been spreading its way across the continent. Embracing both conservative Muslim values and modern…

  15. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  16. Lunar Orbit Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio, L.

    2012-12-01

    Independent experiments show a large anomaly in measurements of lunar orbital evolution, with applications to cosmology and the speed of light. The Moon has long been known to be slowly drifting farther from Earth due to tidal forces. The Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LLRE) indicates the Moon's semimajor axis increasing at 3.82 ± .07 cm/yr, anomalously high. If the Moon were today gaining angular momentum at this rate, it would have coincided with Earth less than 2 Gyr ago. Study of tidal rhythmites indicates a rate of 2.9 ± 0.6 cm/yr. Historical eclipse observations independently measure a recession rate of 2.82 ± .08 cm/yr. Detailed numerical simulation of lunar orbital evolution predicts 2.91 cm/yr. LLRE differs from three independent experiments by over12 sigma. A cosmology where speed of light c is related to time t by GM=tc^3 has been suggested to predict the redshifts of Type Ia supernovae, and a 4.507034% proportion of baryonic matter. If c were changing in the amount predicted, lunar orbital distance would appear to increase by an additional 0.935 cm/yr. An anomaly in the lunar orbit may be precisely calculated, shedding light on puzzles of 'dark energy'. In Planck units this cosmology may be summarized as M=R=t.Lunar Recession Rate;

  17. Einstein, Entropy and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirtes, Daniel; Oberheim, Eric

    2006-11-01

    This paper strengthens and defends the pluralistic implications of Einstein's successful, quantitative predictions of Brownian motion for a philosophical dispute about the nature of scientific advance that began between two prominent philosophers of science in the second half of the twentieth century (Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend). Kuhn promoted a monistic phase-model of scientific advance, according to which a paradigm driven `normal science' gives rise to its own anomalies, which then lead to a crisis and eventually a scientific revolution. Feyerabend stressed the importance of pluralism for scientific progress. He rejected Kuhn's model arguing that it fails to recognize the role that alternative theories can play in identifying exactly which phenomena are anomalous in the first place. On Feyerabend's account, Einstein's predictions allow for a crucial experiment between two incommensurable theories, and are an example of an anomaly that could refute the reigning paradigm only after the development of a competitor. Using Kuhn's specification of a disciplinary matrix to illustrate the incommensurability between the two paradigms, we examine the different research strategies available in this peculiar case. On the basis of our reconstruction, we conclude by rebutting some critics of Feyerabend's argument.

  18. Automated anomaly detection processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiman, James B.; Arouh, Scott L.; Webb, Michael L.

    2002-07-01

    Robust exploitation of tracking and surveillance data will provide an early warning and cueing capability for military and civilian Law Enforcement Agency operations. This will improve dynamic tasking of limited resources and hence operational efficiency. The challenge is to rapidly identify threat activity within a huge background of noncombatant traffic. We discuss development of an Automated Anomaly Detection Processor (AADP) that exploits multi-INT, multi-sensor tracking and surveillance data to rapidly identify and characterize events and/or objects of military interest, without requiring operators to specify threat behaviors or templates. The AADP has successfully detected an anomaly in traffic patterns in Los Angeles, analyzed ship track data collected during a Fleet Battle Experiment to detect simulated mine laying behavior amongst maritime noncombatants, and is currently under development for surface vessel tracking within the Coast Guard's Vessel Traffic Service to support port security, ship inspection, and harbor traffic control missions, and to monitor medical surveillance databases for early alert of a bioterrorist attack. The AADP can also be integrated into combat simulations to enhance model fidelity of multi-sensor fusion effects in military operations.

  19. MAGSAT scalar anomaly map of South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, J. R.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A scalar magnetic anomaly map was prepared for South America and adjacent marine areas directly from original MAGSAT orbits. The preparation of the map poses special problems, notably in the separation of external field and crustal anomalies, and in the reduction of data to a common altitude. External fields are manifested in a long-wavelength ring current effect, a medium-wavelength equatorial electrojet, and short-wavelength noise. The noise is reduced by selecting profiles from quiet periods, and since the electrojet is confined primarily to dusk profiles, its effect is minimized by drawing the data set from dawn profiles only. The ring current is corrected through the use of the standard ring current equation, augmented by further filtering with a Butterworth bandpass filter. Under the assumption that the time-variant ring current is best removed when a replication of redundant profiles is achieved, a test set of 25 groups of 3 nearly coincident orbits per group is set up for filtering with a range of long-wavelength cutoffs to determine which cutoff best replicates the residual profiles. Altitude differences are then normalized by an inversion of the profile data onto a grid of equivalent point dipoles, and recalculated at an altitude of 350 km. The resulting map, when compared to the 2 deg averaged map, shows more coherent anomalies, with notable differences in the region affected by the electrojet.

  20. System for closure of a physical anomaly

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P; Maitland, Duncan J; Schumann, Daniel L; Wilson, Thomas S

    2014-11-11

    Systems for closure of a physical anomaly. Closure is accomplished by a closure body with an exterior surface. The exterior surface contacts the opening of the anomaly and closes the anomaly. The closure body has a primary shape for closing the anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly. The closure body preferably comprises a shape memory polymer.

  1. Use of MAGSAT anomaly data for crustal structure and mineral resources in the US Midcontinent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, R. S. (principal investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Personnel matters related to the processing and interpretation of MAGSAT data are reported. Efforts are being initiated to determine the crustal geology, structure, and potential economic consequences to be deduced from the satellite magnetic anomalies in conjuction with correlative data.

  2. Use of Magsat anomaly data for crustal structure and mineral resources in the US midcontinent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, R. S. (principal investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic profiles on individual satellites tracks were examined to identify bad (nonterrestrially-based) data points r profiles. Anomaly profiles for the same satellite track, but at different passes were compared for parallel tracks and for tracks that cross. The selected and processed data were plotted and contoured to develop a preliminary magnetic anomaly map. The map is similar in general morphology to NASA's Magsat global scalar anomaly map, but has more detail which is related to crustal properties. Efforts have begun to interpret the satellite magnetic anomalies in terms of crustal character. The correlation of magnetics with crustal petrology may have a much larger tectonic implication. Th possibility of there being an ultramafic lower crust along one zone as a consequence of a continental collision/subduction which helped form the midcontinent craton in Precambrian times is being investigated.

  3. Relation of MAGSAT Anomalies to the Main Tectonic Provinces of South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lidiak, E. G.; Keller, G. R. (principal investigators); Yuan, D. W.; Longacre, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    Comparison of MAGSAT scalar magnetic anomaly data to the main tectonic provinces and boundaries of South America reveals a number of geologic correlations. South America is divisible into a broad platform of Precambrian shields and cratons separated by Phanerozoic basins, grabens and aulacogens to the east, the Phanerozoic Patagonian Platform to the south, and the Mesozoic to Cenozoic Andean Fold Belt and Caribbean Mountain System to the west and north. The continental shields are mainly more magnetic then continental basins and orogenic belts. Cratons, mainly covered by younger sedimentary rocks, are generally associated with magnetic gradients. Most of the anomalies associated with the Patagonian Platform are positive and have higher amplitudes eastward away from the Andean Fold Belt. The northern Andes are coincident with positive magnetic anomalies, whereas the central and southern Andes are associated mainly with negative anomalies.

  4. Seismic data fusion anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David

    2014-06-01

    Detecting anomalies in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of anomaly detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to anomaly detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect anomalies in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for anomalies. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find anomalies in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which anomaly detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for anomaly detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.

  5. Genetics of lymphatic anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Brouillard, Pascal; Boon, Laurence; Vikkula, Miikka

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic anomalies include a variety of developmental and/or functional defects affecting the lymphatic vessels: sporadic and familial forms of primary lymphedema, secondary lymphedema, chylothorax and chylous ascites, lymphatic malformations, and overgrowth syndromes with a lymphatic component. Germline mutations have been identified in at least 20 genes that encode proteins acting around VEGFR-3 signaling but also downstream of other tyrosine kinase receptors. These mutations exert their effects via the RAS/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT pathways and explain more than a quarter of the incidence of primary lymphedema, mostly of inherited forms. More common forms may also result from multigenic effects or post-zygotic mutations. Most of the corresponding murine knockouts are homozygous lethal, while heterozygotes are healthy, which suggests differences in human and murine physiology and the influence of other factors. PMID:24590274

  6. Effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading: A fluctuation intensity transport analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Diamond, P. H.; Hahm, T. S.

    2014-09-15

    This paper studies effects of q-profile structure on turbulence spreading. It reports results of numerical experiments using global gyrokinetic simulations. We examine propagation of turbulence, triggered by an identical linear instability in a source region, into an adjacent, linearly stable region with variable q-profile. The numerical experiments are designed so as to separate the physics of turbulence spreading from that of linear stability. The strength of turbulence spreading is measured by the penetration depth of turbulence. Dynamics of spreading are elucidated by fluctuation intensity balance analysis, using a model intensity evolution equation which retains nonlinear diffusion and damping, and linear growth. It is found that turbulence spreading is strongly affected by magnetic shear s, but is hardly altered by the safety factor q itself. There is an optimal range of modest magnetic shear which maximizes turbulence spreading. For high to modest shear values, the spreading is enhanced by the increase of the mode correlation length with decreasing magnetic shear. However, the efficiency of spreading drops for sufficiently low magnetic shear even though the mode correlation length is comparable to that for the case of optimal magnetic shear. The reduction of spreading is attributed to the increase in time required for the requisite nonlinear mode-mode interactions. The effect of increased interaction time dominates that of increased mode correlation length. Our findings of the reduction of spreading and the increase in interaction time at weak magnetic shear are consistent with the well-known benefit of weak or reversed magnetic shear for core confinement enhancement. Weak shear is shown to promote locality, as well as stability.

  7. Geophysical investigations of a geothermal anomaly at Wadi Ghadir, eastern Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Hennin, S. F.; El-Sherif, A. A.; El-Sayed, A. A.; Basta, N. Z.; Melek, Y. S.

    1984-01-01

    During regional heat flow studies a geothermal anomaly was discovered approximately 2 km from the Red Sea coast at Wadi Ghadir, in the Red Sea Hills of Eastern Egypt. A temperature gradient of 55 C/km was measured in a 150 m drillhole at this location, indicating a heat flow of approximately 175 mw/sqm, approximately four times the regional background heat flow for Egypt. Gravity and magnetic data were collected along Wadi Ghadir, and combined with offshore gravity data, to investigate the source of the thermal anomaly. Magnetic anomalies in the profile do not coincide with the thermal anomaly, but were observed to correlate with outcrops of basic rocks. Other regional heat flow and gravity data indicate that the transition from continental to oceanic type lithosphere occurs close to the Red Sea margin, and that the regional thermal anomaly is possibly related to the formation of the Red Sea.

  8. Roles of Ties in Spreading

    E-print Network

    Cui, Ai-Xiang; Zhou, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Background: Controlling global epidemics in the real world and accelerating information propagation in the artificial world are of great significance, which have activated an upsurge in the studies on networked spreading dynamics. Lots of efforts have been made to understand the impacts of macroscopic statistics (e.g., degree distribution and average distance) and mesoscopic structures (e.g., communities and rich clubs) on spreading processes while the microscopic elements are less concerned. In particular, roles of ties are not yet clear to the academic community. Methodology/Principle Findings: Every edges is stamped by its strength that is defined solely based on the local topology. According to a weighted susceptible-infected-susceptible model, the steady-state infected density and spreading speed are respectively optimized by adjusting the relationship between edge's strength and spreading ability. Experiments on six real networks show that the infected density is increased when strong ties are favored i...

  9. Prevent the Spread of Norovirus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kitchen Carefully rinse fruits and vegetables, and cook oysters and other shellfish thoroughly before eating. Do not ... not to shake them —to avoid spreading virus. If available, wear rubber or disposable gloves while ...

  10. Imperfect spreading on temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueuning, Martin; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2015-11-01

    We study spreading on networks where the contact dynamics between the nodes is governed by a random process and where the inter-contact time distribution may differ from the exponential. We consider a process of imperfect spreading, where transmission is successful with a determined probability at each contact. We first derive an expression for the inter-success time distribution, determining the speed of the propagation, and then focus on a problem related to epidemic spreading, by estimating the epidemic threshold in a system where nodes remain infectious during a finite, random period of time. Finally, we discuss the implications of our work to design an efficient strategy to enhance spreading on temporal networks.

  11. Spreading dynamics of polymer nanodroplets.

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Grest, Gary Stephen; Heine, David R.

    2003-08-01

    The spreading of polymer droplets is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. To study the dynamics of both the precursor foot and the bulk droplet, large hemispherical drops of 200 000 monomers are simulated using a bead-spring model for polymers of chain length 10, 20, and 40 monomers per chain. We compare spreading on flat and atomistic surfaces, chain length effects, and different applications of the Langevin and dissipative particle dynamics thermostats. We find diffusive behavior for the precursor foot and good agreement with the molecular kinetic model of droplet spreading using both flat and atomistic surfaces. Despite the large system size and long simulation time relative to previous simulations, we find that even larger systems are required to observe hydrodynamic behavior in the hemispherical spreading droplet.

  12. Flame spread across liquid pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Howard; Miller, Fletcher; Schiller, David; Sirignano, William A.

    1993-01-01

    For flame spread over liquid fuel pools, the existing literature suggests three gravitational influences: (1) liquid phase buoyant convection, delaying ignition and assisting flame spread; (2) hydrostatic pressure variation, due to variation in the liquid pool height caused by thermocapillary-induced convection; and (3) gas-phase buoyant convection in the opposite direction to the liquid phase motion. No current model accounts for all three influences. In fact, prior to this work, there was no ability to determine whether ignition delay times and flame spread rates would be greater or lesser in low gravity. Flame spread over liquid fuel pools is most commonly characterized by the relationship of the initial pool temperature to the fuel's idealized flash point temperature, with four or five separate characteristic regimes having been identified. In the uniform spread regime, control has been attributed to: (1) gas-phase conduction and radiation; (2) gas-phase conduction only; (3) gas-phase convection and liquid conduction, and most recently (4) liquid convection ahead of the flame. Suggestions were made that the liquid convection was owed to both vuoyancy and thermocapillarity. Of special interest to this work is the determination of whether, and under what conditions, pulsating spread can and will occur in microgravity in the absence of buoyant flows in both phases. The approach we have taken to resolving the importance of buoyancy for these flames is: (1) normal gravity experiments and advanced diagnostics; (2) microgravity experiments; and (3) numerical modelling at arbitrary gravitational level.

  13. Lunar magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.; Srnka, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of lunar paleomagnetic and electromagnetic sounding results which appear inconsistent with the hypothesis that an ancient core dynamo was the dominant source of the observed crustal magnetism are discussed. Evidence is summarized involving a correlation between observed magnetic anomalies and ejecta blankets from impact events which indicates the possible importance of local mechanisms involving meteoroid impact processes in generating strong magnetic fields at the lunar surface. A reply is given to the latter argument which also presents recent evidence of a lunar iron core.

  14. Density Enhancements Associated with Equatorial Spread F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, J.; Huba, J.; Joyce, G. R.

    2009-12-01

    Forces governing the three-dimensional structure of equatorial spread-F (ESF) plumes are examined using the NRL SAMI3/ESF three-dimensional simulation code [1]. As is the case with the equatorial ionization anomaly (IA), density crests within the plume occur where gravitational and diffusive forces are in balance. Large E×B drifts within the ESF plume place these crests on field lines with apex heights higher than those of the background IA crests. Large poleward field-aligned ion velocities within the plume result in large ion-neutral diffusive forces that support these ionization crests at altitudes higher background IA crest altitudes. We show examples in which density enhancements associated with ESF, also called “plasma blobs,” can occur within an ESF plume on density-crest field lines, at or above the density crests. Simulated ESF density enhancements reproduce all key features of those observed using satellites. [1] Huba, J.D., G. Joyce, and J. Krall, GRL, 35, L10102, doi:10.1029/2008GL033509, 2008

  15. EVAREST - Evaluation of geological models by joint interpretation of potential field anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiba, Peter; Gabriel, Gerald; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Structural geological models are often based on the integration of different geophysical datasets. During the last years an increasing interest in the potential field methods, i.e. gravimetry and magnetic, can be observed, even though data acquisition can cause considerable costs and logistic effort. Therefore, the specific advantages and disadvantages of the different methods were analyzed. In a case study, which was conducted in cooperation with RWE Dea and which is located in northern Germany, it was studied to which level of detail gravity and magnetic anomalies can be interpreted jointly by 3D forward modelling. Special attention was paid to the individual residuals, i.e. those parts of the gravity and magnetic anomalies which could not be interpreted satisfactorily by the joint structural / physical model. In a subsequent stage of the workflow this information was analyzed individually for each dataset to improve the geological interpretation and to identify and localize the sources of the anomalies in more detail. For the discussed study several potential field datasets of different resolution were available, which were first analyzed by means of field transformation. While the gravity anomalies are mainly related to the occurrence of salt structures, the magnetic anomalies seem to be controlled by deep structures, most probably by the magnetic basement. Some local magnetic anomalies with amplitudes of less than 10 nT can be related to the rim synclines of the salt structures as well as to buried Pleistocene subglacial valleys. 3D forward models, constrained by existing structural information and rock physical data, have shown that, e.g., a common fitting of both anomaly fields is not possible if homogenous densities and magnetizations are assigned to the different lithological units and while considering the geometry of the source bodies to be the same for both potential field anomalies. To explain the magnetic anomalies a more detailed differentiation of the source bodies in terms of thin layers is required, while for the interpretation of the gravity anomalies vertical density gradients must be considered for specific lithologies. Furthermore, from the magnetic anomalies ideas about the maximum depth of source bodies can be derived.

  16. Anomalies and Graded Coisotropic Branes

    E-print Network

    Yi Li

    2004-05-30

    We compute the anomaly of the axial U(1) current in the A-model on a Calabi-Yau manifold, in the presence of coisotropic branes discovered by Kapustin and Orlov. Our results relate the anomaly-free condition to a recently proposed definition of graded coisotropic branes in Calabi-Yau manifolds. More specifically, we find that a coisotropic brane is anomaly-free if and only if it is gradable. We also comment on a different grading for coisotropic submanifolds introduced recently by Oh.

  17. Singularity analysis of potential fields to enhance weak anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Cheng, Q.; Liu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geoanomalies generally are nonlinear, non-stationary and weak, especially in the land cover areas, however, the traditional methods of geoanomaly identification are usually based on linear theory. In past two decades, many power-law function models have been developed based on fractal concept in mineral exploration and mineral resource assessment, such that the density-area (C-A) model and spectrum-area model (S-A) suggested by Qiuming Cheng have played important roles in extracting geophysical and geochemical anomalies. Several power-law relationships are evident in geophysical potential fields, such as field value-distance, power spectrum-wave number as well as density-area models. The singularity index based on density-area model involves the first derivative transformation of the measure. Hence, we introduce the singularity analysis to develop a novel high-pass filter for extracting gravity and magnetic anomalies with the advantage of scale invariance. Furthermore, we suggest that the statistics of singularity indices can provide a new edge detection scheme for the gravity or magnetic source bodies. Meanwhile, theoretical magnetic anomalies are established to verify these assertions. In the case study from Nanling mineral district in south China and Qikou Depression in east China, compared with traditional geophysical filtering methods including multiscale wavelet analysis and total horizontal gradient methods, the singularity method enhances and extracts the weak anomalies caused by buried magmatic rocks more effectively, and provides more distinct boundary information of rocks. Moreover, the singularity mapping results have good correspondence relationship with both the outcropping rocks and known mineral deposits to support future mineral resource exploration. The singularity method based on fractal analysis has potential to be a new useful theory and technique for processing gravity and magnetic anomaly data.

  18. Prediction of the probability of occurrence of spread F over Brazil using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnell, Lee-Anne; Paradza, Masimba; Abdu, Mangalathayil Ali

    The probability of occurrence of spread F can be modelled and predicted using Neural Networks (NNs). This paper presents a feasibility study into the development of a NN based model for the prediction of the probability of occurrence of spread F over selected equatorial stations within the Brazilian sector. The input space included the day number (seasonal variation), hour (diurnal variation), sunspot number (measure of the solar activity), magnetic index (measure of the magnetic activity) and magnetic position. Twelve years of spread F data from Brazil measured (during 1978-1989) at the equatorial site Fortaleza and low latitude site Cachoeira Paulista are used in the development of an input space and NN architecture for the model. Spread F data that is believed to be related to plasma bubble developments (range spread F, RSF) and those associated with narrow spectrum irregularities that occur near the F layer (frequency spread F, FSF) were used in the model. The model results show the dependency of spread F probability occurrence as a function of local time, season and latitude. The model also illustrates some known characteristics of spread F such as the onset and peak occurrence of spread F as a function of distance from the equator. Results from this model will be presented in this paper and compared to those obtained with analytical models developed for the same purpose.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Peters anomaly

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the anterior segment is abnormal, leading to incomplete separation of the cornea from the iris or the ... anomaly type I is characterized by an incomplete separation of the cornea and iris and mild to ...

  20. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  1. Gravitational Anomaly and Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Landsteiner, Karl; Melgar, Luis; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    We study the anomalous induced current of a vortex in a relativistic fluid via the chiral vortical effect, which is analogous to the anomalous current induced by a magnetic field via the chiral magnetic effect. We perform this analysis at weak and strong coupling. We discuss inequivalent implementations to the chemical potential for an anomalous symmetry. At strong coupling we use a holographic model with a pure gauge and mixed gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term in the action. We discuss the holographic renormalization and show that the Chern-Simons terms do not induce new divergences. Strong and weak coupling results agree precisely. We also point out that the holographic calculation can be done without a singular gauge field configuration on the horizon of the black hole.

  2. Gravitational Anomaly and Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Karl Landsteiner; Eugenio Megias; Luis Melgar; Francisco Pena-Benitez

    2011-11-18

    We study the anomalous induced current of a vortex in a relativistic fluid via the chiral vortical effect, which is analogous to the anomalous current induced by a magnetic field via the chiral magnetic effect. We perform this analysis at weak and strong coupling. We discuss inequivalent implementations to the chemical potential for an anomalous symmetry. At strong coupling we use a holographic model with a pure gauge and mixed gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term in the action. We discuss the holographic renormalization and show that the Chern-Simons terms do not induce new divergences. Strong and weak coupling results agree precisely. We also point out that the holographic calculation can be done without a singular gauge field configuration on the horizon of the black hole.

  3. Use of MAGSAT anomaly data for crustal structure and mineral resources in the US midcontinent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic field data acquired by NASA's MAGSAT satellite is used to construct a long-wavelength magnetic anomaly map for the U.S. midcontinent. This aids in interpretation of gross crustal geology (structure, lithologic composition, resource potential) of the region. Magnetic properties of minerals and rocks are investigated and assessed, to help in evaluation and modelling of crustal magnetization sources and depth to the Curie-temperature isotherm.

  4. A reexamination of the spreading center hypothesis for Ovda and Thetis regiones, Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1990-01-01

    Crumpler et al. (1987) proposed that Ovda and Thetis Regiones are spreading centers. The strong positive correlation between geoid and topography observed in ovda and Thetis is unlike that observed for terrestrial spreading centers. The maximum elevation expected for spreading centers on Venus is 1.5 km, and a cooling plate thermal model predicts a maximum geoid anomaly of 8 m, both much less than observed. Even if a spreading center is operative in Ovda and Thetis, most of the geoid and topography must be due to other mechanisms. Crumplet et al. also proposed the existence of 'cross-strike discontinuities', interpreted as transform fault zones, but the evidence for these structures is not conclusive.

  5. Shallow drilling in the Salton Sea region: The thermal anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R.L.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1988-11-10

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The central thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 /sup 0/C/m) to extreme (0.83 /sup 0/C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is greater than 600 mW/m/sup 2/ and in the two local anomalies exceeds 1200 mW/m/sup 2/. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes.

  6. Shallow Drilling In The Salton Sea Region, The Thermal Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R. L.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Younker, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 C/m) to extreme (0.83 C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is >600 mW/m{sup 2} and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m{sup 2}. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes. These observations of the thermal anomaly provide important constraints for models of the circulation of the hydrothermal system. Thermal budgets based on a simple model for this hydrothermal system indicate that the heat influx rate for local ''hot spots'' in the region may be large enough to account for the rate of heat flux from the entire Salton Trough.

  7. FREQUENCY HOPPING SPREAD SPECTRUM DIRECT SEQUENCE SPREAD SPECTRUM

    E-print Network

    Westall, James M.

    of spreading their signals. The range of available frequencies in the ISM2 (Industrial Scientific Medical) band.4GHz ISM band covering 79 channels. Each channel occupies 1Mhz of bandwidth and must hop at the minimum is not to be confused with CDMA. All 802.11 compliant products utilize the same PN code and therefore do not have a set

  8. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  9. The North German Conductivity Anomaly revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, A.; Houpt, L.; Brasse, H.; Hoffmann, N.

    2011-10-01

    The North German Conductivity Anomaly was detected already in the early years of electromagnetic deep sounding. It refers to the reversal of induction arrows (as a graphical representation of the tipper transfer function, the ratio of vertical to horizontal magnetic field variations) at the northern and southern margins of the North German Basin. In spite of the many experiments carried out so far, its origin has remained ambiguous; explanations encompass a deep-crustal or even mantle source as well as the simple response to deepening of sedimentary sequences in the centre of the basin. Here, we report on modelling of new long-period magnetotelluric data collected along two profiles in NE Germany and S Sweden, with one transect crossing the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone as the main boundary between Precambrian Baltica and the Palaeozoic belts of central Europe. With the exception of a few sites probably influenced by 3-D salt domes, the data allow a 2-D analysis. Resolution is reduced for large depths due to a well-conducting, saline aquifer, extending across the entire basin. The main result is that the reversal of induction arrows can largely be explained by the resistivity contrast between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin fill. Beneath Rügen island, a southward dipping conductor is interpreted to reflect an alum shale layer in Middle Cambrian-Lower Ordovician sediments. Beneath the southern basin, a moderately conductive upper mantle is modelled (although not very well resolved) which may reflect the thinning of the lithosphere as implied by seismic tomography. As the main anomalously inductive effect is primarily explained by the basin edges and numerous other anomalies exist inside the basin, we suggest not using the term 'North German Conductivity Anomaly' any longer.

  10. The Summer Evening Anomaly and conjugate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Alan; Wang, Wenbin; Solomon, Stanley; Lin, Charles C. H.; Jee, Gun-Hwa; Richmond, Arthur

    The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) GPS occultation data have been analyzed in this study to provide a better understanding of the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) and to place it in the wider context of a general phenomenon that occurs near dusk in summer which we are calling the Summer Evening Anomaly (SEA) to better capture its global nature. The terminator and the magnetically conjugate points for the terminator in the other hemisphere have been plotted on top of global maps of COSMIC NmF2 and hmF2 for two months either side of the December and June solstices for 2006 to 2008. These plots show that, in the late afternoon when the terminator and conjugate terminator are sufficiently separated in local time, there are distinct enhancements of NmF2 and increases in hmF2 as soon as the conjugate footprint of the field line on the winter terminator is seen at middle latitudes in the summer hemisphere. This effect is most pronounced where the WSA is formed, but it also occurs across the South Pacific Ocean in the southern summer, and across much of the North Atlantic Ocean, Siberia and Kamchatka during the northern summer. An hmF2 increase occurs between the two terminators even at locations where there is no increase in NmF2. A similar, but reversed, effect occurs in hmF2 near dawn. The NmF2 enhancement starts at the poleward boundary of the equatorial anomaly and occurs further from it as local times get later. This behavior is not consistent with neutral wind or downward precipitation explanations of the phenomenon, but is consistent with the behavior expected if a poleward (and hence upward as well) ion drift is occurring in the evening.

  11. AMISR-14: Observations of equatorial spread F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, F. S.; Nicolls, M. J.; Milla, M. A.; Smith, J. M.; Varney, R. H.; Strømme, A.; Martinis, C.; Arratia, J. F.

    2015-07-01

    A new, 14-panel Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar (AMISR-14) system was recently deployed at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We present results of the first coherent backscatter radar observations of equatorial spread F(ESF) irregularities made with the system. Colocation with the 50 MHz Jicamarca Unattended Long-term studies of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere (JULIA) radar allowed unique simultaneous observations of meter and submeter irregularities. Observations from both systems produced similar Range-Time-Intensity maps during bottom-type and bottomside ESF events. We were also able to use the electronic beam steering capability of AMISR-14 to "image" scattering structures in the magnetic equatorial plane and track their appearance, evolution, and decay with a much larger field of view than previously possible at Jicamarca. The results suggest zonal variations in the instability conditions leading to irregularities and demonstrate the dynamic behavior of F region scattering structures as they evolve and drift across the radar beams.

  12. Analytical representations of the spread harmonic measure density.

    PubMed

    Grebenkov, Denis S

    2015-05-01

    We study the spread harmonic measure that characterizes the spatial distribution of reaction events on a partially reactive surface. For Euclidean domains in which Brownian motion can be split into independent lateral and transverse displacements, we derive analytical formulas for the spread harmonic measure density and analyze its asymptotic behavior. This analysis is applicable to slab domains, general cylindrical domains, and a half-space. We investigate the spreading effect due to multiple reflections on the surface, and the underlying role of finite reactivity. We discuss further extensions and applications of analytical results to describe Laplacian transfer phenomena such as permeation through semipermeable membranes, secondary current distribution on partially blocking electrodes, and surface relaxation in nuclear magnetic resonance. PMID:26066120

  13. Using a Bear Put Spread 

    E-print Network

    Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Waller, Mark L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

    2008-10-07

    , Mark Waller and Kevin Dhuyvetter* 2 of the two options). The spread gain is limited to the difference between the strike price of the put option bought and the strike price of the put option sold, less commissions and the net cost of the premium...

  14. Verrucae planae spread by electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Petrozzi, J W

    1980-07-01

    The following case report presents a patient in whom flat warts were spread by electrolysis. Since electrolysis is a common procedure, physicians should be aware of such an occurrence. Adequate examination and treatment before the patient undergoes electrolysis can eliminate this unwanted side effect. PMID:7389402

  15. Using a Bull Call Spread 

    E-print Network

    Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Waller, Mark L.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

    2008-10-07

    The Bull Call Spread can be used to hedge against or to benefit from a rising market. The user buys a call option at a particular strike price and sells a call option at a higher strike price. Margin requirements, advantages and disadvantages...

  16. Spreading dynamics in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Sen; Makse, Hernán A.

    2013-12-01

    Searching for influential spreaders in complex networks is an issue of great significance for applications across various domains, ranging from epidemic control, innovation diffusion, viral marketing, and social movement to idea propagation. In this paper, we first display some of the most important theoretical models that describe spreading processes, and then discuss the problem of locating both the individual and multiple influential spreaders respectively. Recent approaches in these two topics are presented. For the identification of privileged single spreaders, we summarize several widely used centralities, such as degree, betweenness centrality, PageRank, k-shell, etc. We investigate the empirical diffusion data in a large scale online social community—LiveJournal. With this extensive dataset, we find that various measures can convey very distinct information of nodes. Of all the users in the LiveJournal social network, only a small fraction of them are involved in spreading. For the spreading processes in LiveJournal, while degree can locate nodes participating in information diffusion with higher probability, k-shell is more effective in finding nodes with a large influence. Our results should provide useful information for designing efficient spreading strategies in reality.

  17. Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, R B; Thunem, N Y; Anderson-Redick, S

    1989-01-01

    The Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System was started in 1966 in response to the thalidomide tragedy earlier in the decade. It was one of four provincial surveillance systems on which the federal government relied for baseline statistics of congenital anomalies. The government now collects data from six provinces and one territory. The Alberta Congenital Anomaly Surveillance System originally depended on three types of notification to the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Government of Alberta: birth notice and certificates of death and stillbirth; increased sources of ascertainment have greatly improved data quality. We present the data for 1980-86 and compare the prevalence rates of selected anomalies with the rates from three other surveillance systems. Surveillance systems do not guarantee that a new teratogen will be detected, but they are extremely valuable for testing hypotheses regarding causation. At the very least they provide baseline data with which to compare any deviation or trend. For many, if not most, congenital anomalies total prevention is not possible; however, surveillance systems can be used to measure progress in prevention. PMID:2819634

  18. Anomalies of a topologically ordered surface

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Deepnarayan; Thakur, Sangeeta; Ali, Khadiza; Balakrishnan, Geetha; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2015-01-01

    Bulk insulators with strong spin orbit coupling exhibit metallic surface states possessing topological order protected by the time reversal symmetry. However, experiments show vulnerability of topological states to aging and impurities. Different studies show contrasting behavior of the Dirac states along with plethora of anomalies, which has become an outstanding problem in material science. Here, we probe the electronic structure of Bi2Se3 employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy and discover the dependence of the behavior of Dirac particles on surface terminations. The Dirac cone apex appears at different binding energies and exhibits contrasting shift on Bi and Se terminated surfaces with complex time dependence emerging from subtle adsorbed oxygen-surface atom interactions. These results uncover the surface states behavior of real systems and the dichotomy of topological and normal surface states important for device fabrication as well as realization of novel physics such as Majorana Fermions, magnetic monopole, etc. PMID:26041405

  19. Obstructed Hemivagina with Ipsilateral Renal Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Santos, Xiomara M; Dietrich, Jennifer E

    2016-02-01

    The association of obstructed hemivagina with ipisilateral renal anomaly (OHVIRA) is a well-described entity. While there has been an increased familiarity with this disorder, the exact incidence of OHVIRA is unknown. Our aim was to review the available literature on this topic, look at common presentations, and uncommon presentations. This condition is a well-described entity but requires careful evaluation, because unique presentations do occur. Diagnostic challenges include time of presentation and symptoms associated with presentation. Surgical challenges include microperforation of the hemivaginal septum, pelvic inflammatory disease, thick septum, or high septum. Each of these must be managed carefully. Although a solitary kidney is frequently thought to be associated with OHVIRA, dysplastic kidneys, pelvic kidneys, or ectopic ureters can occur. Prompt and accurate diagnosis is essential for relief of symptoms and prevention of complications. To minimize problems associated with delayed diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging evaluation is recommended along with referral to a center with expertise in these conditions. PMID:26165909

  20. Resolving the axial mass anomaly in ?? scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodek, A.; Budd, H. S.; Christy, M. E.

    2012-09-01

    We present a parametrization of the observed enhancement in the transverse electron quasielastic (QE) response function for nucleons bound in carbon as a function of the square of the four momentum transfer (Q2) in terms of a correction to the magnetic form factors of bound nucleons. The parametrization should also be applicable to the transverse cross section in neutrino scattering. If the transverse enhancement originates from meson exchange currents (MEC), then it is theoretically expected that any enhancement in the longitudinal or axial contributions is small. We present the predictions of the "Transverse Enhancement" model (which is based on electron scattering data only) for the ??, ?¯? differential and total QE cross sections for nucleons bound in carbon. The Q2 dependence of the transverse enhancement is observed to resolve much of the long standing discrepancy ("Axial Mass Anomaly") in the QE total cross sections and differential distributions between low energy and high energy neutrino experiments on nuclear targets.

  1. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  2. Anomalies and asymmetries in quark-gluon matter

    SciTech Connect

    Teryaev, O. V.

    2012-06-15

    The manifestations of axial anomaly and related effects in heavy-ion collisions are considered. Special role is played by various asymmetries. The azimuthal correlational asymmetries of neutron pairs at NICA/FAIR energy range may probe the global rotation of strongly interacting matter. The conductivity is related to the angular asymmetries of dilepton pairs. The strong magnetic field generated in heavy-ion collisions leads to the excess of soft dileptons flying predominantly in the scattering plane.

  3. Extracting the chiral anomaly from gamma pi --> pi pi

    E-print Network

    Martin Hoferichter; Bastian Kubis; Dimitrios Sakkas

    2012-12-19

    We derive dispersive representations for the anomalous process gamma pi --> pi pi with the pi pi P-wave phase shift as input. We investigate how in this framework the chiral anomaly can be extracted from a cross-section measurement using all data up to 1 GeV, and discuss the importance of a precise representation of the gamma pi --> pi pi amplitude for the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  4. Graph anomalies in cyber communications

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Wiel, Scott A; Storlie, Curtis B; Sandine, Gary; Hagberg, Aric A; Fisk, Michael

    2011-01-11

    Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

  5. Boundary terms of conformal anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the structure of the boundary terms in the conformal anomaly integrated over a manifold with boundaries. We suggest that the anomalies of type B, polynomial in the Weyl tensor, are accompanied with the respective boundary terms of the Gibbons-Hawking type. Their form is dictated by the requirement that they produce a variation which compensates the normal derivatives of the metric variation on the boundary in order to have a well-defined variational procedure. This suggestion agrees with recent findings in four dimensions for free fields of various spins. We generalize this consideration to six dimensions and derive explicitly the respective boundary terms. We point out that the integrated conformal anomaly in odd dimensions is non-vanishing due to the boundary terms. These terms are specified in three and five dimensions.

  6. Region Spherical Harmonic Magnetic Modeling from Near-Surface and Satellite-Altitude Anomlaies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; von Frese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2013-01-01

    The compiled near-surface data and satellite crustal magnetic measured data are modeled with a regionally concentrated spherical harmonic presentation technique over Australia and Antarctica. Global crustal magnetic anomaly studies have used a spherical harmonic analysis to represent the Earth's magnetic crustal field. This global approach, however is best applied where the data are uniformly distributed over the entire Earth. Satellite observations generally meet this requirement, but unequally distributed data cannot be easily adapted in global modeling. Even for the satellite observations, due to the errors spread over the globe, data smoothing is inevitable in the global spherical harmonic presentations. In addition, global high-resolution modeling requires a great number of global spherical harmonic coefficients for the regional presentation of crustal magnetic anomalies, whereas a lesser number of localized spherical coefficients will satisfy. We compared methods in both global and regional approaches and for a case where the errors were propagated outside the region of interest. For observations from the upcoming Swarm constellation, the regional modeling will allow the production a lesser number of spherical coefficients that are relevant to the region of interest

  7. Analysis of DSN software anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galorath, D. D.; Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Reifer, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    A categorized data base of software errors which were discovered during the various stages of development and operational use of the Deep Space Network DSN/Mark 3 System was developed. A study team identified several existing error classification schemes (taxonomies), prepared a detailed annotated bibliography of the error taxonomy literature, and produced a new classification scheme which was tuned to the DSN anomaly reporting system and encapsulated the work of others. Based upon the DSN/RCI error taxonomy, error data on approximately 1000 reported DSN/Mark 3 anomalies were analyzed, interpreted and classified. Next, error data are summarized and histograms were produced highlighting key tendencies.

  8. Anomalies, Beta Functions, and GUT's

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, Alfredo; Diaz-Cruz, J. L.; Rojas, Alma D.

    2009-04-20

    In the framework of supersymmetric Grand Unified theories it is possible to extend the minimal Higgs sectors of the models by introducing high dimension (anomaly free) representations. For example, in the minimal SU(5) supersymmetric Grand Unified Model, this is done to obtain phenomenological viable fermion mass relations and/or to solve the doublet-triplet splitting problem. In this work we explore models with different anomaly free combinations of SU(5) representations motivated by the flavour problem as well as their effect on perturbative validity of the gauge coupling evolution.

  9. Spreading of a granular droplet.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, I.; Raynaud, F.; Lanuza, J.; Andreotti, B.; Clement, E.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Simon; CNRS-ESPCI-Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of controlled vibrations on the granular rheology is investigated in a specifically designed experiment in which a granular film spreads under the action of horizontal vibrations. A nonlinear diffusion equation is derived theoretically that describes the evolution of the deposit shape. A self-similar parabolic shape (the granular droplet) and a spreading dynamics are predicted that both agree quantitatively with the experimental results. The theoretical analysis is used to extract effective friction coefficients between the base and the granular layer under sustained and controlled vibrations. A shear thickening regime characteristic of dense granular flows is evidenced at low vibration energy, both for glass beads and natural sand. Conversely, shear thinning is observed at high agitation.

  10. Unusual Malignant Coronary Artery Anomaly: Results of Coronary Angiography, MR Imaging, and Multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    Apitzsch, Jonas; Kuehl, Harald P.; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of a man with an uncommon anomaly of the origin and course of the left coronary artery. Clinical, coronary angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and multislice computed tomography findings of this intermittently symptomatic 49 year-old patient with the rare anomaly of his left coronary artery stemming from the right sinus of Valsalva and taking an interarterial and intraseptal course are presented. The diagnostic value of the different imaging modalities is discussed.

  11. Space weather conditions during the Galaxy 15 spacecraft anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loto'aniu, T. M.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Green, J.; Denig, W.; Biesecker, D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-08-01

    On 5 April 2010, the Galaxy 15 spacecraft, orbiting at geosynchronous altitudes, experienced an anomaly near local midnight when it stopped responding to any ground commands. The anomaly has been reported as due to a lockup of the field-programmable gate array within the spacecraft baseband communications unit during an onboard electrostatic discharge (ESD). This study evaluates the space weather conditions at the time of the Galaxy 15 anomaly. The study also compares the plasma and geomagnetic environments around the anomaly to space weather observations over the operational lifetime of Galaxy 15 up to the anomaly time. On 5 April, the Galaxy 15 spacecraft encountered severe plasma conditions while it was in eclipse and during the subsequent anomaly interval. These conditions included a massive magnetic field dipolarization that injected energetic particles from the magnetotail during a substorm observed by GOES and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites. Galaxy 15 was located at a near-optimum position and local time to experience the full impact of the injected energetic particles. During the largest previous storm experienced by Galaxy 15 in December 2006, evidence suggests that it would not have been exposed to the same level of space weather as on 5 April 2010. Hence, while Galaxy 15 was traversing the nightside on 5 April, it likely experienced, for a short period, the most severe local plasma conditions it had encountered since launch. The most likely contributions to the ESD were interactions of the spacecraft with substorm-injected energetic particles facilitating spacecraft surface charging and deep dielectric charging.

  12. Slip of Spreading Viscoplastic Droplets.

    PubMed

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Balmforth, Neil J; Stoeber, Boris

    2015-11-10

    The spreading of axisymmetric viscoplastic droplets extruded slowly on glass surfaces is studied experimentally using shadowgraphy and swept-field confocal microscopy. The microscopy furnishes vertical profiles of the radial velocity using particle image velocimetry (PIV) with neutrally buoyant tracers seeded in the fluid. Experiments were conducted for two complex fluids: aqueous solutions of Carbopol and xanthan gum. On untreated glass surfaces, PIV demonstrates that both fluids experience a significant amount of effective slip. The experiments were repeated on glass that had been treated to feature positive surface charges, thereby promoting adhesion between the negatively charged polymeric constituents of the fluids and the glass surface. The Carbopol and xanthan gum droplets spread more slowly on the treated surface and to a smaller radial distance. PIV demonstrated that this reduced spreading was associated with a substantial reduction in slip. For Carbopol, the effective slip could be eliminated entirely to within the precision of the PIV measurements; the reduction in slip was less effective for xanthan gum, with a weak slip velocity remaining noticeable. PMID:26418827

  13. Connecting Stratospheric and Ionospheric Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spraggs, M. E.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Zhang, S.; Coster, A. J.; Benkevitch, L. V.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates any relationship between lunar phases and ionospheric anomalies that appear at low latitudes concurrently with sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). The study utilizes World-wide GPS Receiver Network Total Electron Content (TEC) data spanning 13 years (2001-2014) and focuses on the changes in the equatorial ionization anomaly the Western hemisphere. TEC is highly variable due to the influences of solar flux, geomagnetic activity, and seasonal variation and these influences are removed by the use of model. This empirical TEC model is a combination of linear dependencies of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap3) with a third degree polynomial dependency for day-of-year (DOY). With such dependencies removed, the remaining TEC variation could be resolved and attributed to an appropriate mechanism. Lunar phase and apside was investigated in particular, especially the new and full moon phases during perigees when tidal forcing would be most powerful. Lunar tidal forcing on planetary waves is also examined as being physically responsible for setting up conditions that may give rise to SSWs and ionospheric anomalies. Preliminary results suggest that such anomalies may be enhanced in intensity during the full or new moon and even more so during perigee by different amounts depending on whether the SSW is a major (40-60%) or minor (20-45%) event.

  14. Critical point and conformal anomaly

    E-print Network

    G. A. Kozlov

    2015-03-17

    We study the critical point (CP) phenomenon through the increase of fluctuations related to characteristic critical mode. CP would also be identified through the production of primary photons induced by conformal anomaly of strong and electromagnetic interactions. The novel approach to an approximate scale symmetry breaking is developed for this.

  15. Coral can have growth anomalies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral growth anomalies (GAs) are changes in the coral cells that deposit the calcium carbonate skeleton. They usually appear as raised areas of the skeleton and tissue that are different from the surrounding normal areas on the same colony. The features include abnormal shape a...

  16. Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Ronald E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents the Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional module on Sea-Floor Spreading and Transform Faults. The module includes activities and materials required, procedures, summary questions, and extension ideas for teaching Sea-Floor Spreading. (SL)

  17. Dynamics of information spread on networks

    E-print Network

    Lerman, Kristina

    popular trends #12;USC Information Sciences Institute Comparative empirical analysis Digg · VotingDynamics of information spread on networks Kristina Lerman USC Information Sciences Institute #12;USC Information Sciences Institute Information spread in online social networks Diffusion

  18. Formation of the Eurasia Basin in the Arctic Ocean as inferred from geohistorical analysis of the anomalous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebovsky, V. Yu.; Kaminsky, V. D.; Minakov, A. N.; Merkur'ev, S. A.; Childers, V. A.; Brozena, J. M.

    2006-07-01

    A new combined magnetic database and a magnetic-profile map are developed for the Eurasia Basin as a result of adjusting all available historical and recent Russian and American magnetic data sets. The geohistorical analysis of magnetic data includes several steps: identification of linear magnetic anomalies along each trackline, calculation of the Euler rotation pole positions for the relative motion of the North American and Eurasian plates, analysis of temporal and spatial variations in the spreading rate, and plate reconstructions. The pattern of key Cenozoic magnetic isochrons (24, 20, 18, 13, 6, 5, 2a) is constructed for the entire Eurasia Basin. In the western half of the basin, this pattern is consistent with a recently published scheme [16]. In its eastern half, magnetic isochrons are determined in detail for the first time and traced up to the Laptev Sea shelf. The main stages in the seafloor spreading are established for the Eurasia Basin. Each stage is characterized by a specific spreading rate and the degree of asymmetry of the basin opening. The revealed differences are traced along the Gakkel Ridge. Systematic patterns in wandering of the Eurasia Basin opening pole are established for particular stages. The continent-ocean transition zone corresponding to the primary rupture between plates is outlined in the region under consideration on the basis of gravimetric data. The nature of different potential fields and bottom topography on opposite sides of the Gakkel Ridge is discussed. The characteristic features of the basin-bottom formation at main stages of its evolution are specified on the basis of new and recently published data. The results obtained are in good agreement with plate geodynamics of the North Atlantic and the adjacent Arctic basins.

  19. Local gravity anomalies produced by dislocation sources.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Dilatancy, in general, does not correspond to the absence of a free air anomaly, as might be suggested by the special case of a spherical source of dilatation. For two-dimensional models a cylindrical source of dilatation produces no free air gravity anomaly, dip-slip faulting produces no Bouguer anomaly, and open cracks produce a Bouguer anomaly equal to that which would be produced had the material within the crack been mined out without deforming the solid. -from Author

  20. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  1. Geopotential Field Anomaly Continuation with Multi-Altitude Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Hyung Rae; vonFrese, Ralph; Taylor, Patrick; Rangelova, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Conventional gravity and magnetic anomaly continuation invokes the standard Poisson boundary condition of a zero anomaly at an infinite vertical distance from the observation surface. This simple continuation is limited, however, where multiple altitude slices of the anomaly field have been observed. Increasingly, areas are becoming available constrained by multiple boundary conditions from surface, airborne, and satellite surveys. This paper describes the implementation of continuation with multi-altitude boundary conditions in Cartesian and spherical coordinates and investigates the advantages and limitations of these applications. Continuations by EPS (Equivalent Point Source) inversion and the FT (Fourier Transform), as well as by SCHA (Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis) are considered. These methods were selected because they are especially well suited for analyzing multi-altitude data over finite patches of the earth such as covered by the ADMAP database. In general, continuations constrained by multi-altitude data surfaces are invariably superior to those constrained by a single altitude data surface due to anomaly measurement errors and the non-uniqueness of continuation.

  2. Geopotential Field Anomaly Continuation with Multi-Altitude Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Kim, Hyung Rae; von Frese, Ralph; Taylor, Patrick; Rangelova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Conventional gravity and magnetic anomaly continuation invokes the standard Poisson boundary condition of a zero anomaly at an infinite vertical distance from the observation surface. This simple continuation is limited, however, where multiple altitude slices of the anomaly field have been observed. Increasingly, areas are becoming available constrained by multiple boundary conditions from surface, airborne, and satellite surveys. This paper describes the implementation of continuation with multi-altitude boundary conditions in Cartesian and spherical coordinates and investigates the advantages and limitations of these applications. Continuations by EPS (Equivalent Point Source) inversion and the FT (Fourier Transform), as well as by SCHA (Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis) are considered. These methods were selected because they are especially well suited for analyzing multi-altitude data over finite patches of the earth such as covered by the ADMAP database. In general, continuations constrained by multi-altitude data surfaces are invariably superior to those constrained by a single altitude data surface due to anomaly measurement errors and the non-uniqueness of continuation.

  3. nem_spread Ver. 5.10

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-06-08

    Nem_spread reads it's input command file (default name nem_spread.inp), takes the named ExodusII geometry definition and spreads out the geometry (and optionally results) contained in that file out to a parallel disk system. The decomposition is taken from a scalar Nemesis load balance file generated by the companion utility nem_slice.

  4. Spreading Depression, Spreading Depolarizations, and the Cerebral Vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ayata, Cenk; Lauritzen, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Spreading depression (SD) is a transient wave of near-complete neuronal and glial depolarization associated with massive transmembrane ionic and water shifts. It is evolutionarily conserved in the central nervous systems of a wide variety of species from locust to human. The depolarization spreads slowly at a rate of only millimeters per minute by way of grey matter contiguity, irrespective of functional or vascular divisions, and lasts up to a minute in otherwise normal tissue. As such, SD is a radically different breed of electrophysiological activity compared with everyday neural activity, such as action potentials and synaptic transmission. Seventy years after its discovery by Leão, the mechanisms of SD and its profound metabolic and hemodynamic effects are still debated. What we did learn of consequence, however, is that SD plays a central role in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases including migraine, ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. An intriguing overlap among them is that they are all neurovascular disorders. Therefore, the interplay between neurons and vascular elements is critical for our understanding of the impact of this homeostatic breakdown in patients. The challenges of translating experimental data into human pathophysiology notwithstanding, this review provides a detailed account of bidirectional interactions between brain parenchyma and the cerebral vasculature during SD and puts this in the context of neurovascular diseases. PMID:26133935

  5. Cortical spreading depression: An enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R. M.; Huang, H.; Wylie, J. J.

    2007-08-01

    The brain is a complex organ with active components composed largely of neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. There exists an enormous experimental and theoretical literature on the mechanisms involved in the functioning of the brain, but we still do not have a good understanding of how it works on a gross mechanistic level. In general, the brain maintains a homeostatic state with relatively small ion concentration changes, the major ions being sodium, potassium, and chloride. Calcium ions are present in smaller quantities but still play an important role in many phenomena. Cortical spreading depression (CSD for short) was discovered over 60 years ago by A.A.P. Leão, a Brazilian physiologist doing his doctoral research on epilepsy at Harvard University, “Spreading depression of activity in the cerebral cortex," J. Neurophysiol., 7 (1944), pp. 359-390. Cortical spreading depression is characterized by massive changes in ionic concentrations and slow nonlinear chemical waves, with speeds on the order of mm/min, in the cortex of different brain structures in various experimental animals. In humans, CSD is associated with migraine with aura, where a light scintillation in the visual field propagates, then disappears, and is followed by a sustained headache. To date, CSD remains an enigma, and further detailed experimental and theoretical investigations are needed to develop a comprehensive picture of the diverse mechanisms involved in producing CSD. A number of mechanisms have been hypothesized to be important for CSD wave propagation. In this paper, we briefly describe several characteristics of CSD wave propagation, and examine some of the mechanisms that are believed to be important, including ion diffusion, membrane ionic currents, osmotic effects, spatial buffering, neurotransmitter substances, gap junctions, metabolic pumps, and synaptic connections. Continuum models of CSD, consisting of coupled nonlinear diffusion equations for the ion concentrations, and a discrete lattice-Boltzmann method approach will be described. Also, we will describe some open problems and remaining challenges.

  6. Synchronous changes in the rift-margin San Jose Island basin and initiation of the Alarcón spreading ridge: implications for rift to drift transition in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umhoefer, P. J.; Sutherland, F.; Kent, G.; Harding, A.; Lizarralde, D.; Fletcher, J.; Holbrook, W.; Axen, G.; González-Fernández, A.

    2007-12-01

    The rift to drift hypothesis is widely cited, but it well known in detail. The low sedimentation rate and recent rifting of the Gulf of California provides insight into the rift-to-drift process. Lizarralde et al. (2007) showed that the style of rifting, based on crustal structure, varies significantly between the central and southern Gulf of California, and this combined with the analysis of sedimentary basins shows the small-scale (~15 km) complexities of the rift-to-drift transition. The shut off of rifting on the eastern side of the plate boundary occurred at ca. 2 - 3 Ma (Aragon-Arreola etal, 2005, Aragon-Arreola & Martin-Barajas, 2007; our unpublished data). Many studies have shown that the western side of the Gulf is still active despite sea-floor spreading occurring on the Alarcón and other short spreading centers since 2 - 3 Ma. At the mouth of the Gulf, magnetic anomalies on the eastern side of the Alarcón rise show that it appears to have changed to seafloor spreading as early as 3.7 Ma. But comparatively, on the eastern side, magnetic anomalies do not indicate the formation of new oceanic crust until 2.5 Ma, so spreading was first fully established at 2.5 Ma. The San Jose Island basin (Umhoefer et al., 2007) began at approximately 4- 6 Ma; the basin had its most rapid subsidence, with faulting accompanying marine sedimentation, from 3.6 ± 0.5 Ma (Ar tuff age) to 2.5-2.4 Ma (forams). Basin margin faulting died and moved east (offshore) shortly after 2.5-2.4 Ma. Late Quaternary marine terraces suggest that faulting rates slowed by 1-2 orders of magnitude since the fault reorganization at 2.5 Ma. These observations suggest that the rift - drift transition started, but is not yet finished, on the western side of the Gulf of California, with low rates of faulting (<1? mm/yr) continuing on the continental margin for reasons that are not well understood. Our work highlights the importance of combining onshore field and MSC data and analyzing entire conjugate rifted margins to accurately assess rifting processes.

  7. Synchronous changes in the rift-margin San Jose Island basin and initiation of the Alarcón spreading ridge: implications for rift to drift transition in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umhoefer, P. J.; Sutherland, F.; Kent, G.; Harding, A.; Lizarralde, D.; Fletcher, J.; Holbrook, W.; Axen, G.; González-Fernández, A.

    2004-12-01

    The rift to drift hypothesis is widely cited, but it well known in detail. The low sedimentation rate and recent rifting of the Gulf of California provides insight into the rift-to-drift process. Lizarralde et al. (2007) showed that the style of rifting, based on crustal structure, varies significantly between the central and southern Gulf of California, and this combined with the analysis of sedimentary basins shows the small-scale (~15 km) complexities of the rift-to-drift transition. The shut off of rifting on the eastern side of the plate boundary occurred at ca. 2 - 3 Ma (Aragon-Arreola etal, 2005, Aragon-Arreola & Martin-Barajas, 2007; our unpublished data). Many studies have shown that the western side of the Gulf is still active despite sea-floor spreading occurring on the Alarcón and other short spreading centers since 2 - 3 Ma. At the mouth of the Gulf, magnetic anomalies on the eastern side of the Alarcón rise show that it appears to have changed to seafloor spreading as early as 3.7 Ma. But comparatively, on the eastern side, magnetic anomalies do not indicate the formation of new oceanic crust until 2.5 Ma, so spreading was first fully established at 2.5 Ma. The San Jose Island basin (Umhoefer et al., 2007) began at approximately 4- 6 Ma; the basin had its most rapid subsidence, with faulting accompanying marine sedimentation, from 3.6 ± 0.5 Ma (Ar tuff age) to 2.5-2.4 Ma (forams). Basin margin faulting died and moved east (offshore) shortly after 2.5-2.4 Ma. Late Quaternary marine terraces suggest that faulting rates slowed by 1-2 orders of magnitude since the fault reorganization at 2.5 Ma. These observations suggest that the rift - drift transition started, but is not yet finished, on the western side of the Gulf of California, with low rates of faulting (<1? mm/yr) continuing on the continental margin for reasons that are not well understood. Our work highlights the importance of combining onshore field and MSC data and analyzing entire conjugate rifted margins to accurately assess rifting processes.

  8. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2010-02-02

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  9. Age, spreading rates, and spreading asymmetry of the world's ocean crust

    E-print Network

    Müller, Dietmar

    are determined by linear interpolation between adjacent seafloor isochrons in the direction of spreading. Ages; seafloor spreading. Index Terms: 3040 Marine Geology and Geophysics: Plate tectonics (8150, 8155, 8157Age, spreading rates, and spreading asymmetry of the world's ocean crust R. Dietmar Mu

  10. 9 CFR 319.762 - Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat Salads and Meat Spreads § 319.762 Ham spread, tongue spread, and similar products. “Ham Spread,”...

  11. Tan F. Wong: Spread Spectrum & CDMA CHAPTER 0. OVERVIEW 0.1 What is spread spectrum?

    E-print Network

    Wong, Tan F.

    Tan F. Wong: Spread Spectrum & CDMA CHAPTER 0. OVERVIEW Chapter 0 Overview 0.1 What is spread spectrum? Spread spectrum: A modulation technique that produces a spectrum for the transmitted signal much to a spread spectrum modulation. BPSK, QPSK, QAM, and MSK are common examples of narrowband modulation

  12. Titanium isotopic anomalies in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neimeyer, S.; Lugmair, G. W.

    1984-07-01

    Studies of Ti isotopic compositions have shown that virtually every Ca-Al-rich Allende inclusion contains anomalous Ti. The present investigation is concerned with the results of a study of Ti isotopic compositions in meteorites. One objective of the study is to evaluate the possibility of a relation between oxygen and Ti anomalies, while another objective is to explore questions regarding the origin of the Ti anomalies. A summary of the major experimental findings of the study of Ti isotopic compositions is also presented. It is noted that an assessment of the implications of the Ti results favors a chemical memory type of model in which products from various nucleosynthetic sources survive in mineral grains. Isotopic heterogeneities are then preserved due to incomplete mixing and/or equilibriation with the bulk of solar system matter. Strong arguments are found to exist against a pure late supernova injection model.

  13. Ebstein Anomaly: An Overview for Nursing.

    PubMed

    Johnstad, Christine M; Hecker-Fernandes, Jill Renee; Fernandes, Regis

    2015-01-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect. Many nurses have probably never encountered this anomaly, with very few able to accurately depict the pathological anatomy of the condition. As technology further develops, providers are better equipped to recognize and manage Ebstein anomaly. There are important considerations for nurses when caring for an individual with Ebstein anomaly. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the condition exploring the pathophysiology, how patients typically present, and how to effectively care for a patient with Ebstein anomaly regarding medical and surgical courses of treatment. It is important for nurses to have a resource to reference on Ebstein anomaly, and the majority of current literature is solely based for medical providers. Furthermore, Ebstein patients may be seen on a variety of units in the hospital beyond cardiology (i.e., pregnant patient with a diagnosis of Ebstein anomaly). PMID:26395651

  14. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  15. Recognizing detachment-mode seafloor spreading in the deep geological past.

    PubMed

    Maffione, Marco; Morris, Antony; Anderson, Mark W

    2013-01-01

    Large-offset oceanic detachment faults are a characteristic of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges, leading to the formation of oceanic core complexes (OCCs) that expose upper mantle and lower crustal rocks on the seafloor. The lithospheric extension accommodated by these structures is now recognized as a fundamentally distinct "detachment-mode" of seafloor spreading compared to classical magmatic accretion. Here we demonstrate a paleomagnetic methodology that allows unequivocal recognition of detachment-mode seafloor spreading in ancient ophiolites and apply this to a potential Jurassic detachment fault system in the Mirdita ophiolite (Albania). We show that footwall and hanging wall blocks either side of an inferred detachment have significantly different magnetizations that can only be explained by relative rotation during seafloor spreading. The style of rotation is shown to be identical to rolling hinge footwall rotation documented recently in OCCs in the Atlantic, confirming that detachment-mode spreading operated at least as far back as the Jurassic. PMID:23903780

  16. Recognizing detachment-mode seafloor spreading in the deep geological past

    PubMed Central

    Maffione, Marco; Morris, Antony; Anderson, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Large-offset oceanic detachment faults are a characteristic of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges, leading to the formation of oceanic core complexes (OCCs) that expose upper mantle and lower crustal rocks on the seafloor. The lithospheric extension accommodated by these structures is now recognized as a fundamentally distinct “detachment-mode” of seafloor spreading compared to classical magmatic accretion. Here we demonstrate a paleomagnetic methodology that allows unequivocal recognition of detachment-mode seafloor spreading in ancient ophiolites and apply this to a potential Jurassic detachment fault system in the Mirdita ophiolite (Albania). We show that footwall and hanging wall blocks either side of an inferred detachment have significantly different magnetizations that can only be explained by relative rotation during seafloor spreading. The style of rotation is shown to be identical to rolling hinge footwall rotation documented recently in OCCs in the Atlantic, confirming that detachment-mode spreading operated at least as far back as the Jurassic. PMID:23903780

  17. Global Specification of the Post-Sunset Equatorial Ionization Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, C.; Dandenault, P. B.; Dymond, K.; Budzien, S. A.; Nicholas, A. C.; Chua, D. H.; McDonald, S. E.; Metzler, C. A.; Walker, P. W.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Gardner, L. C.; Zhu, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is used to specify the post-sunset Equatorial Ionization Anomaly. Ultraviolet emission profiles of 135.6 nm and 91.1 nm emissions from O++ e recombination are measured in successive altitude scans along the orbit of the satellite. The overlapping sample geometry provides for a high resolution reconstruction of the ionosphere in altitude and latitude for each pass of the satellite. Emission profiles are ingested by the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) space weather model, which was developed by Utah State University and is run operationally at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA). The resulting specification of the equatorial ionosphere reveals significant variability in the postsunset anomaly, which is reflective of the driving space weather processes, namely, electric fields and neutral winds. Significant longitudinal and day-to-day variability in the magnitude (or even existence) of the post-sunset anomaly reveal the influence of atmospheric tides and waves as well as geomagnetic disturbances on the pre-reversal enhancement of the electric field. Significant asymmetry between anomaly crests reveals the influence of atmospheric tides and waves on meridional neutral winds. A neutral wind parallel to the magnetic field line pushes plasma up (or down) the field lines, which raises (or lowers) the altitude of the crests and modifies the horizontal location and magnitude of the crests. The variability in the post-sunset anomaly is one of the largest sources of error in ionospheric specification models. The SSULI instrument provides critical data towards the reduction of this specification error and the determination of key driver parameters used in ionospheric forecasting. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the USAF Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Base Program, and the Office of Naval Research (ONR).

  18. Late Jurassic rifting along the Australian North West Shelf: margin geometry and spreading ridge

    E-print Network

    Müller, Dietmar

    configuration C. HEINE* AND R. D. MU¨LLER University of Sydney Institute of Marine Science and School have revisited the marine magnetic anomaly record of the Argo and Gascoyne Abyssal Plains of the Scott Plateau, Rowley Terrace and Exmouth/Wombat Plateaus limits this ocean basin to the east, south

  19. Limb anomalies in chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, R A; Santelmann, R

    1977-01-01

    This survey shows that there are at least 6 autosomal and 2 gonosomal aberrations which may produce specific types of limb anomaly in 30%-80% of cases. The "expressivity" of these anomalies covers a wide range within the morphogenetic pattern. No entirely specific malformation type is seen. The most unusual malformation, aplasia of the thumbs with proximal synostosis of the 4th aand 5th metacarpals, is seen in 13q- (13r) but the precise cytogenetic basis is not clear. Aplasia of the thumb associated with synostosis of the 4th and 5th metacarpals was occasionally described before (unilateral [105], bilateral [106] while synostosis only (V or Y shaped) may be due to a dominant [107] or an X-linked recessive gene [108]. Reduction malformations limited to radial heminelia have been noted in 4q- (4r) and in trisomy 18. Although the number of cases is still small the pattern is similar to that of thalidomide embryopathy, radial hemimelia (AD, 17910), cardiodigital syndromes (AD, 14290), and even Fanconi panmyelopathy (AR, 22790). It ranges from hypoplasia of the thenar muscles and thumb to pseudophocomelia which should be clearly distinguished from phocomelia because of the absence of the thumb and frequently of the 2nd and 3rd fingers. Nothing has to be added to the teratologic series published by Müller [58] and, more recently, Willert and Henkel [109], but the distribution of the various manifestations may diverge. Asymmetry in 4q- (4r) is noteworthy. Postaxial polydactyly which is noted in trisomy 13 and trisomy of the terminal portions of the long arm of No. 13 is as variable in distribution and morphology as is observed in families in which the gene (AD, 17420) is transmitted. The question cannot yet be answered whether infrequent anomalies of the limbs which do not fit into the morphologic pattern of these types, eg postaxial polydactyly in + 18 or absence of the radius in + 13 are random. Syndactyly of the 3rd and 4th but also of other digits is a frequent but variable anomaly in triploidy. It is very similar to hereditary zygodactyly (AD, 18590). Peripheral hypoplasia of several digits accompanied by onychodysplasia seems to be a frequent anomaly in 9p+ syndrome. It is similar to that seen in a syndrome with mental deficiency, peculiar facies, and stunted growth [110] in which no chromosomal aberration has been found up to the present. Dysostoses have been frequently noted in gonosomal aberations. Brachymetopodia in XO females maybe confused with pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism (XR, 30080) or brachydactyly type E (AD, 11330) when only the lateral metacarpals and/or metatarsals are shortened. However, further studies are needed in order to delineate these syndromes on the basis of different frequencies and radiologic patterns. The radioulnar synostosis noted in cases with supernumerary X chromosomes cannot be distinguished from the inherited anomaly (AD, 17930), but associated anomalies of the hand are uncommon. PMID:322750

  20. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  1. Predicting the probability of occurrence of spread-F over Brazil using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnell, L. A.; Paradza, M. W.; Cilliers, P. J.; Abdu, M. A.; de Souza, J. R.

    2010-10-01

    The probability of occurrence of spread-F can be modeled and predicted using neural networks (NNs). This paper presents a feasibility study into the development of a NN based model for the prediction of the probability of occurrence of spread-F over selected equatorial stations within the Brazilian sector. The input space included the day number (seasonal variation), hour (diurnal variation), sunspot number (measure of the solar activity), magnetic index (measure of the magnetic activity) and magnetic position. Twelve years of spread-F data from Brazil (covering the period 1978-1989) measured at the equatorial site Fortaleza (3.9°S, 38.45°W ) and low latitude site Cachoeira Paulista (22.6°S, 45.0°W ) are used in the development of an input space and NN architecture for the model. Spread-F data that is believed to be related to plasma bubble developments (range spread-F) was used in the development of the model. The model results show the probability of spread-F occurrence as a function of local time, season and latitude. Results from the Brazilian Sector NN (BSNN) based model are presented in this paper, as well as a comparative analysis with a Brazilian model developed for the same purpose.

  2. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOEpatents

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  3. The transition from rifting to spreading in the Red Sea: No sign of discrete spreading nodes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustin, N.; Devey, C. W.; Feldens, P.; van der Zwan, F. M.; Bantan, R.; Kwasnitschka, T.

    2012-12-01

    The rifting of a continent and its eventual splitting by the formation of an ocean basin is one of the decisive processes in plate tectonics - it is responsible for the formation of continental margins (home to most of the world's submarine hydrocarbon reserves) and has repeatedly divided and re-distributed the continental plates. The Red Sea is one of the few places on Earth where this process is presently occurring, with continental rifting occurring in the northern Red Sea (north of 23°N) and ocean floor creation in the south (south of 19.5°N). In the central region it has been proposed that the extension is accommodated in a series of discrete seafloor spreading cells in the so called "transition-" or "multi-deeps region". This suggestion is mainly based on interpretations of bathymetric, magnetic, gravimetric and seismic observations made in the late 1970's and mid 1980's at resolutions far below those possible today. During two major expeditions with the German and Dutch research vessels Poseidon (cruise #408) and Pelagia (cruise #350/51) in 2011 and 2012 we collected a continuous multibeam bathymetric dataset over and between the Red Sea deeps from the Thetis Deep at 23°N to the Red Sea Rift at 16.5°N, with a spatial acoustic resolution of 15-30 m over a total N-S distance of about 700 km. This data enables us to view in detail the bathymetric structures formed during extension and to make a detailed interpretation of the structural, tectonic, magmatic and sedimentary evolution of the Red Sea rift. Based on an analysis of the bathymetric datasets, combined with acoustic backscatter, shallow seismics, ground truthing sampling, and magmatic geochemical information, we arrive at a much simplier and less exotic model of the transition from rifting to spreading than previously proposed. Geomorphological features strongly indicate a continuous oceanic rift valley at least from Nereus Deep at 23°N southwards to the Danakil triple junction at 17°N. We can demonstrate that, although the previously described discrete deeps undoubtedly exist, they are not separated from one another by tectonic boundaries but rather represent a continuous deep spreading axis which is inundated and masked locally by massive sediment slumping or (in the case of the Red Sea evaporites) flow. This can also explain the relative paucity of large strike-slip earthquakes in the "transition region" - such earthquakes would be expected if the deeps were, as previously proposed, separated by transform- or "accommodation"-zones but are not required on a continuous spreading axis. The axis appears to become totally inundated with sediment and evaporites north of 23°N (Nereus Deep) - at what latitude seafloor spreading actually ceases is at present unknown. Geochemical indices of degree of melting vary in a systematic but not linear way along axis, with higher degrees of melting indicated for the axis around 18°N, falling off to the North and South of this. That the degree of melting falls off northwards (the direction in which rifting rate also decreases) is perhaps unsurprising, the decrease to the south seems to be related to the existence of a triple junction at 17°N and the partitioning of spreading between the Red Sea and the Danakil Rift.

  4. Anomalies and synergy in the caloric effects of magnetoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Shashwat; Waghmare, Umesh V.

    2014-12-01

    We determine isothermal entropy changes (? S) associated with electrocaloric, magnetocaloric, and the corresponding multicaloric effects in a model type-I multiferroic system using Landau-Devonshire thermodynamic analysis. We show that (a) the magnetocaloric effect exhibits an unexpected anomaly at the ferroelectric transition occurring at a high temperature, even in the absence of magnetic ordering, and (b) the synergy between electro- and magnetocaloric effects leads to a significantly enhanced multicaloric effect (\\mid ? {{S}MultiCE}\\mid \\gt \\mid ? {{S}ECE}\\mid +\\mid ? {{S}MCE}\\mid ) over a wide temperature range when the difference in temperatures of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering (\\mid ? {{T}C}\\mid =\\mid TCE-TCM\\mid ) is small. This result originate from the coupled thermal fluctuations of magnetic and electric order parameters. While the former is useful in detecting multiferroic materials from the measurements covering higher temperature transition alone, the latter augurs well for caloric applications of multiferroics.

  5. Concordant sea-floor spreading rates obtained from geochronology, astrochronology and space geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, Ajoy K.

    1994-01-01

    Reversals of the Earth's magnetic field, allied to sea-floor spreading, have left their imprint in the form of a magnetic tape recorder on the sea-floor. It is demonstrated that the geomagnetic polarity time scale for the past few million years, derived utilizing (a) radiometric dates of magnetic field reversals trapped in subareal, igneous rocks and (b) as derived from the Milankovitch forcing frequencies and their imprint in the sedimentary environment, are in good agreement. Further, sea-floor spreading rates calculated from these results are in substantial agreement with the rate of plate movement averaged over the last decade, as obtained by space geodetic measurements. Since the principles underlying these 'dating' techniques are entirely different, it lends credence to the results obtained for sea-floor spreading, arguably the most fundamental process in plate tectonics.

  6. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    E-print Network

    Xu, Jinghong; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  7. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  8. Automatically identification of Equatorial Spread-F occurrence on ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillat, Valdir Gil; Fagundes, Paulo Roberto; Guimarães, Lamartine Nogueira Frutuoso

    2015-12-01

    F-region large-scale irregularities, also called plasma bubbles, are one of the most interesting equatorial ionospheric phenomena. These irregularities are generated in the equatorial region and afterwards extend to lower latitudes. They are one of the important topics of investigation in equatorial ionosphere electrodynamics and, therefore, are subject to intense theoretical and experimental research. The ionosonde is the most used scientific equipment to study the ionosphere and the F-region. With advancement of digital ionosonde, it is now possible to carry out an ionospheric sounding with a cadence of 5 min or even with 1-minute cadence. To analyse a large amount of ionograms, more sophisticated tools are needed. Thus, development of algorithms to identify and analyse different aspects of ionograms has become very important to space science researchers. Multiple echoes recorded on ionograms are the signature of these irregularities in the ionograms, usually called Spread-F. Spread-F is classified into three types: range, frequency, and mixed. Thus, automatic identification of Spread-F is important in ionospheric studies, because studies usually involve the analysis and interpretation of large numbers of ionograms. The main objective of this paper is to present a new computational tool, based on fuzzy relation, designed to automatically identify the occurrence of Spread-F in ionograms. The test was conducted in ionograms recorded in the Brazilian sector (São José dos Campos (23.2°S, 45.9°W, dip latitude 17.6°S-low latitude) and Palmas (10.2°S, 48.2°W, dip latitude 5.5°S-near the magnetic equatorial)). The automatic identification of Spread-F occurrence was compared with those obtained manually and good agreement was found.

  9. Temporal and spatial distribution of GPS-TEC anomalies prior to the strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fuying; Wu, Yun; Zhou, Yiyan; Gao, Yang

    2013-06-01

    Earthquakes are one of the most destructive and harmful natural disasters, especially in recent years, the 2008/5/12 Wenchuan M7.9 earthquake, the 2011/3/11 Tohoku M9.0 earthquake and the 2012/4/11 Sumatra M8.6 earthquake have caused a significant impact to the human life. In this paper, we make a study of the temporal and spatial distribution of the Global Positioning System Total Electron Content (GPS TEC) anomalies prior to the three strong earthquakes by the method of statistical analysis. Our results show that the pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies are mainly positive anomalies and take the shape of a double-crest structure with a trough near the epicenter. The ionospheric anomalies do not coincide with the vertical projection of the epicenter of the subsequent earthquake, but mainly localize in the near-epicenter region and corresponding ionospheric anomalies are also simultaneously observed in the magnetic conjugate region prior to the three earthquakes. In addition, the amplitude and scale-size of the ionospheric ?TEC are different with the magnitude of the earthquake, and the horizontal scale-size of the greatest anomalies before the Tohoku M9.0 earthquake is ˜30? in longitude and ˜10? in latitude, with the maximum amplitude of TEC disturbances reaching ˜20 TECu relative to the background. The peak of anomaly enhancement usually occurs in the afternoon to sunset (i.e. between 14:00 and 18:00 local time) which lasts for approximate 2 hours. Possible causes of these anomalies are discussed, and after eliminating the effect of solar activities and magnetic storms it can be concluded that the detected obvious and regular anomalous behavior in TEC within just a few days before the earthquakes is related with the forthcoming earthquakes with high probability.

  10. Possible thermal brightness temperature anomalies associated with the Lushan (China) M S7.0 earthquake on 20 April 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tao; Ma, Weiyu

    2015-02-01

    Lushan M S7.0 earthquake occurred in Lushan county, Ya'an city, Sichuan province of China, on 20 April 2013, and caused 196 deaths, 23 people of missing and more than 12 thousand of people injured. In order to analyze the possible seismic brightness temperature anomalies which may be associated with Lushan earthquake, daily brightness temperature data for the period from 1 June 2011 to 31 May 2013 and the geographical extent of 25°E-35°N latitude and 98°E-108°E longitude are collected from Chinese geostationary meteorological satellite FY-2E. Continuous wavelet transform method which has good resolution both in time and frequency domains is used to analyze power spectrum of brightness temperature data. The results show that the relative wavelet power spectrum (RWPS) anomalies appeared since 24 January 2013 and still lasted on 19 April. Anomalies firstly appeared at the middle part of Longmenshan fault zone and gradually spread toward the southwestern part of Longmenshan fault. Anomalies also appeared along the Xianshuihe fault since about 1 March. Eventually, anomalies gathered at the intersection zone of Longmenshan and Xianshuihe faults. The anomalous areas and RWPS amplitude increased since the appearance of anomalies and reached maximum in late March. Anomalies attenuated with the earthquake approaching. And eventually the earthquake occurred at the southeastern edge of anomalous areas. Lushan earthquake was the only obvious geological event within the anomalous area during the time period, so the anomalous changes of RWPS are possibly associated with the earthquake.

  11. Spread and SpreadRecorder An Architecture for Data Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Ted

    2006-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) project at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been measuring the microgravity environment of the space shuttle, the International Space Station, MIR, sounding rockets, drop towers, and aircraft since 1991. The Principle Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project at NASA GRC has been collecting, analyzing, reducing, and disseminating over 3 terabytes of collected SAMS and other microgravity sensor data to scientists so they can understand the disturbances that affect their microgravity science experiments. The years of experience with space flight data generation, telemetry, operations, analysis, and distribution give the SAMS/ PIMS team a unique perspective on space data systems. In 2005, the SAMS/PIMS team was asked to look into generalizing their data system and combining it with the nascent medical instrumentation data systems being proposed for ISS and beyond, specifically the Medical Computer Interface Adapter (MCIA) project. The SpreadRecorder software is a prototype system developed by SAMS/PIMS to explore ways of meeting the needs of both the medical and microgravity measurement communities. It is hoped that the system is general enough to be used for many other purposes.

  12. Recognising serious umbilical cord anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Andrew S J; Jayapal, Sathiya S K; Whitburn, Jessica A S; Akinbiyi, Bolutito A; Willetts, Ian E

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical vessel catheterisation is a common intervention in neonatal care. Many complications are recognised, some of which are life-threatening. We report the case of a term neonate who was compromised at birth following antepartum haemorrhage with evidence of multiorgan ischaemic injury. Following resuscitation and umbilical vessel catheterisation, she developed pneumoperitoneum. At laparotomy, a patent vitellointestinal duct was identified and resected. Intestinal perforation was found in the duct wall, most plausibly explained by the unintentional catheterisation of the duct via the umbilicus. Learning to recognise umbilical cord anomalies, such as patent vitellointestinal duct, can be simple and could prevent potentially serious complications. PMID:24285812

  13. Anomaly detection for internet surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouma, Henri; Raaijmakers, Stephan; Halma, Arvid; Wedemeijer, Harry

    2012-06-01

    Many threats in the real world can be related to activity of persons on the internet. Internet surveillance aims to predict and prevent attacks and to assist in finding suspects based on information from the web. However, the amount of data on the internet rapidly increases and it is time consuming to monitor many websites. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically monitor trends and find anomalies on the internet. The system was tested on Twitter data. The results showed that it can successfully recognize abnormal changes in activity or emotion.

  14. ‘Shell’ model for impurity spreading from a localized source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.; Koltunov, M.

    2013-09-01

    In fusion devices strongly localized intensive sources of impurities may arise unexpectedly, e.g., if the wall is excessively demolished by hot plasma particles, or can be created deliberately through impurity injection done for diverse purposes. The spreading of impurities from such sources, both along and perpendicular to the magnetic field, is affected by Coulomb collisions with background particles, ionization, acceleration by electric field, etc. Simultaneously the plasma itself can be significantly disturbed by these interactions. To describe self-consistently the impurity spreading process and the electron density response, three-dimensional fluid equations for the particle, parallel momentum and energy balances of various ion species are solved by reducing them to one-dimensional equations for the time evolution of the radial profiles of several parameters which allow finding the main characteristics of solutions: the maximum densities of impurity ions of different charges, the dimensions along and across the magnetic field of ‘shells’, i.e. the cross-sections of the regions occupied with these particles by magnetic surfaces, and characteristic temperatures of impurity ions. The results of modelling of the penetration process for carbon impurity into a relatively cold edge of ohmic TEXTOR plasma and of argon into hot H-mode plasma in JET are presented.

  15. Holographic Gravitational Anomaly and Chiral Vortical Effect

    E-print Network

    Karl Landsteiner; Eugenio Megias; Luis Melgar; Francisco Pena-Benitez

    2011-07-02

    We analyze a holographic model with a pure gauge and a mixed gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term in the action. These are the holographic implementations of the usual chiral and the mixed gauge-gravitational anomalies in four dimensional field theories with chiral fermions. We discuss the holographic renormalization and show that the gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term does not induce new divergences. In order to cancel contributions from the extrinsic curvature at a boundary at finite distance a new type of counterterm has to be added however. This counterterm can also serve to make the Dirichlet problem well defined in case the gauge field strength vanishes on the boundary. A charged asymptotically AdS black hole is a solution to the theory and as an application we compute the chiral magnetic and chiral vortical conductivities via Kubo formulas. We find that the characteristic term proportional to T^2 is present also at strong coupling and that its numerical value is not renormalized compared to the weak coupling result.

  16. Holographic Gravitational Anomaly and Chiral Vortical Effect

    E-print Network

    Landsteiner, Karl; Melgar, Luis; Pena-Benitez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    We analyze a holographic model with a pure gauge and a mixed gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term in the action. These are the holographic implementations of the usual chiral and the mixed gauge-gravitational anomalies in four dimensional field theories with chiral fermions. We discuss the holographic renormalization and show that the gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons term does not induce new divergences. In order to cancel contributions from the extrinsic curvature at a boundary at finite distance a new type of counterterm has to be added however. This counterterm can also serve to make the Dirichlet problem well defined in case the gauge field strength vanishes on the boundary. A charged asymptotically AdS black hole is a solution to the theory and as an application we compute the chiral magnetic and chiral vortical conductivities via Kubo formulas. We find that the characteristic term proportional to T^2 is present also at strong coupling and that its numerical value is not renormalized compared to the wea...

  17. The seismic structure of crust formed in back-arc spreading centers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, Cesar R.; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    About 3/4 of the Earth crust and most past subducted crust have been formed at oceanic spreading centers. Seismic experiments on oceanic crust that underlies most of the world ocean basins have defined a ubiquitous three-velocity-layers structure. Layer 1 is identified as sediment, but interpretation of layers 2 and 3 has remained a topic of intense research for more than half century. The nature of oceanic crust at basins has been mainly inferred from indirect geophysical measurements and rocks sampled at the seafloor. Current models propose that the formation of oceanic crust at mid ocean ridges (MOR) -away from hotspot anomalies- is essentially controlled by the rate of plate separation, with crustal types classified as ultraslow, slow, intermediate, and fast spreading crust. We present the first modern extensive seismic study of back-arc oceanic crust providing constrains on accretion processes. The depth-velocity distribution of back-arc crust resembles MOR layered structure, but velocities are systematically different to MOR crust formed at any spreading rate. In particular, Layer 3 display lower velocities, indicating either a considerable different rock composition or deformation process. Integrating our observations with data from other back-arc basins of the world indicates a considerable variety of crustal velocities. The seismic structure of the crust indicates that back-arc spreading represents a class of spreading in its own.

  18. Aeromagnetic anomaly modeling of the central sector of the Chicxulub impact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Lopez-Loera, H.; Delgado-Rodriguez, O.

    2003-04-01

    We propose an updated model of the Chicxulub impact structure based on modeling of the aeromagnetic anomaly data, which incorporates electromagnetic sounding models and UNAM and CSDP borehole information. Modeling takes into account the relative contributions of the induced and remanent components. Studies of the magnetic susceptibility variation in the UNAM and Yaxcopoil boreholes along the lithologic column in the crater area reveal that the suevite-like breccias have a stronger magnetic signature than that of the impact-melt. The crystalline component estimated from clasts analyses in the suevite-like breccias has a higher magnetic susceptibility (up to 1200x10-5 SI) than that of the impact melt (~500x10-5 SI) and the crystalline basement (400x10-5 SI). Reduction to the pole and downward continuations document a fragmented character of the anomaly. The second-derivative of the magnetic anomaly depicts five concentric rings within the anomaly, the last ring correlates with the cenote ring, supporting the its relation with the buried structure. The analytical signal and the radially averaged spectrum yield an estimate of the depth to the magnetic sources, ranging from 1000 to 6000 m. Using this data, new 2-D magnetic models were developed, which suggest that the fragmented character of the northern portion of the crater might be controlled by system of near vertical faults. The main central anomaly is produced by a central uplift that is ~2500 m deep, from ground level, in the central area of the crater. Geophysical models are developed and compared with borehole information for the area of the Yaxcopoil-1 well, drilled recently as part of the Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project and the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program.

  19. Consistent anomalies of the induced W gravities

    E-print Network

    Abud, M; Cappiello, L

    1995-01-01

    The BRST anomaly which may be present in the induced W_n gravity quantized on the light-cone is evaluated in the geometrical framework of Zucchini. The cocycles linked by the cohomology of the BRST operator to the anomaly are straightforwardly calculated thanks to the analogy between this formulation and the Yang-Mills theory. We give also a conformally covariant formulation of these quantities including the anomaly, which is valid on arbitrary Riemann surfaces. The example of the W_3 theory is discussed and a comparison with other candidates for the anomaly available in the literature is presented.

  20. Consistent anomalies of the induced W gravities

    E-print Network

    M. Abud; J. -P. Ader; L. Cappiello

    1995-12-09

    The BRST anomaly which may be present in the induced $W_n$ gravity quantized on the light-cone is evaluated in the geometrical framework of Zucchini. The cocycles linked by the cohomology of the BRST operator to the anomaly are straightforwardly calculated thanks to the analogy between this formulation and the Yang-Mills theory. We give also a conformally covariant formulation of these quantities including the anomaly, which is valid on arbitrary Riemann surfaces. The example of the $W_3$ theory is discussed and a comparison with other candidates for the anomaly available in the literature is presented.

  1. Consistent anomalies of the induced W gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, Mario; Ader, Jean-Pierre; Cappiello, Luigi

    1996-02-01

    The BRST anomaly which may be present in the induced Wn gravity quantized on the light-cone is evaluated in the geometrical framework of Zucchini. The cocycles linked by the cohomology of the BRST operator to the anomaly are straightforwardly calculated thanks to the analogy between this formulation and the Yang-Mills theory. We give also a conformally covariant formulation of these quantities including the anomaly, which is valid on arbitrary Riemann surfaces. The example of the W3 theory is discussed and a comparison with other candidates for the anomaly available in the literature is presented.

  2. Conscious and unconscious detection of semantic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    When asked What superhero is associated with bats, Robin, the Penguin, Metropolis, Catwoman, the Riddler, the Joker, and Mr. Freeze? people frequently fail to notice the anomalous word Metropolis. The goals of this study were to determine whether detection of semantic anomalies, like Metropolis, is conscious or unconscious and whether this detection is immediate or delayed. To achieve these goals, participants answered anomalous and nonanomalous questions as their reading times for words were recorded. Comparisons between detected versus undetected anomalies revealed slower reading times for detected anomalies-a finding that suggests that people immediately and consciously detected anomalies. Further, comparisons between first and second words following undetected anomalies versus nonanomalous controls revealed some slower reading times for first and second words-a finding that suggests that people may have unconsciously detected anomalies but this detection was delayed. Taken together, these findings support the idea that when we are immediately aware of a semantic anomaly (i.e., immediate conscious detection) our language processes make immediate adjustments in order to reconcile contradictory information of anomalies with surrounding text; however, even when we are not consciously aware of semantic anomalies, our language processes still make these adjustments, although these adjustments are delayed (i.e., delayed unconscious detection). PMID:25624136

  3. Cerium anomalies in lateritic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jean-Jacques; Pagel, Maurice; Muller, Jean-Pierre; Bilong, Paul; Michard, Annie; Guillet, Bernard

    1990-03-01

    The REE geochemistry and mineralogy have been studied in four lateritic profiles, one derived from a syenite (Akongo, SW Cameroon), the others being developed on a gneissic basement and located along a soil toposequence (Goyoum, E Cameroon). There is a fractionation between LREE and HREE in the lateritic samples during weathering, the weathered residual products being enriched in LREE (from La to Eu) and depleted in HREE (from Gd to Lu); sampled waters are enriched in HREE in relation to the syenite host-rock. A positive Ce-anomaly has been found systematically at the top of the saprolite, beneath a zone of iron oxide accumulation in the laterite. Up to 2000 ppm Ce may be present. In the Akongo profile, cerianite, CeO 2, is present as very fine coatings in non-ferruginous clayey domains. Primary REE-bearing accessory minerals are weathered at the bottom of the profile. Specifically, allanite and apatite are transformed into florencite and rhabdophane but these phases have no Ce-anomaly. All the data are interpreted as the result of the following processes: (1) REE leaching in a reducing environment. (2) oxidation of Ce 3+ to Ce 4+ in an oxidizing environment. (3) deposition of cerium as cerianite whereas the other REE remain in solution.

  4. Spread spectrum mobile radio communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. C.; Soliman, S. S.

    1987-02-01

    This report is made up of two parts. In the first part we present additional results on the performance of random access protocols for mobile packet radio networks. The effect of three different types of diversity reception in Nakagami fading environment on the channel throughput and the average packet delay of nonpersistent carrier sense multiple access (NPCSMA) protocol is considered. Expressions for the probability of packet error with diversity receptions are newly obtained for both independent and correlated diversity branches. A noncoherent frequency shift keying modulation scheme is assumed. In the second part a comprehensive study of the problem of synchronization over fading dispersive channels is presented. Synchronization is a fundamental problem in digital communications as used in mobile radio. In the first chapter, we consider a simple binary detection problem. The effect of receiver mismatch is investigated. A closed form expression for the probability of false alarm and probability of detection are given, also a set of curves are provided to demonstrate the amount of degradation for under-spread channels with some special scattering.

  5. Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

  6. Spread spectrum mobile radio communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. C.

    1982-12-01

    In this report, we analyze the performance of frequency-hopped spread-spectrum systems under mobile radio channel conditions. Because of its good spectrum-efficiency, frequency-hopped systems seen to be natural candidates for mobile telephony in the near future. We analyze mainly the Frequency-Hopped-Multilevel Frequency Shift-Keyed (FH-MFSK) System, the reason being the established superiority of FH-MFSK over the other modulation, namely the Frequency-Hopped Differential Phase Shift Keyed system (FH-DPSK), under identical conditions. Our new results include the spectrum efficiency analysis of FH-MFSK for various bandwidths of interest, the performance analysis of FH-MFSK under the influence of log-normal shadowing and Rayleigh fading, the possible performance improvement with the inclusion of a small number of space-diversity branches to combat the losses due to fading, a preliminary analysis of the occurrence of burst errors in FH systems, the amount of degradation due to the users operating in the adjacent cells and a possible power control scheme to mitigate these effects and finally a result which establishes the near-equivalent performance of the hard-limited and the likelihood receivers under Rayleigh fading and multi-user interference conditions.

  7. Crustal magnetization and accretion at the Southwest Indian Ridge near the Atlantis II fracture zone, 0-25 Ma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosford, A.; Tivey, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Dick, H.; Schouten, Hans; Kinoshita, H.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze geophysical data that extend from 0 to 25-Myr-old seafloor on both flanks of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). Lineated marine magnetic anomalies are consistent and identifiable within the study area, even over seafloor lacking a basaltic upper crust. The full spreading rate of 14 km/Myr has remained nearly constant since at least 20 Ma, but crustal accretion has been highly asymmetric, with half rates of 8.5 and 5.5 km/Myr on the Antarctic and African flanks, respectively. This asymmetry may be unique to a ???400 km wide corridor between large-offset fracture zones of the SWIR. In contrast to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, crustal magnetization amplitudes correlate directly with seafloor topography along the present-day rift valleys. This pattern appears to be primarily a function of along-axis variations in crustal thickness, rather than magnetic mineralogy. Off-axis, magnetization amplitudes at paleo-segment ends are more positive than at paleo-segment midpoints, suggesting the presence of an induced component of magnetization within the lower crust or serpentinized upper mantle. Alteration of the magnetic source layer at paleo-segment midpoints reduces magnetization amplitudes by 70-80% within 20 Myr of accretion. Magnetic and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 735B data suggest that the lower crust cooled quickly enough to lock in a primary thermoremanent magnetization that is in phase with that of the overlying upper crust. Thus magnetic polarity boundaries within the intrusive lower crust may be steeper than envisioned in prior models of ocean crustal magnetization. As the crust ages, the lower crust becomes increasingly important in preserving marine magnetic stripes.

  8. Momentum spread in a relativistic electron beam in an undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ognivenko, V. V.

    2012-11-15

    The motion of the relativistic electron beam in the spatially periodic magnetic field of an undulator has been considered taking into account the effect of the incoherent field of the spontaneous undulator radiation on the motion of the electrons. An expression for the rms momentum of the electrons has been obtained. It has been shown that the momentum spread in the ultrarelativistic electron beam increases in the spontaneous incoherent emission mode. Conditions for the self-amplification of the spontaneous undulator radiation in ultrashort-wavelength free-electron lasers have been discussed.

  9. Anatomy of ridge discontinuities, transform fault and overlapping spreading centre, at the slow spreading sedimented Andaman Sea Spreading Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, A.; Singh, S. C.; Klinger, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Transform faults are the major discontinuities and define the main segment boundaries along spreading centres but their anatomy is poorly understood because of their complex seafloor morphology, even though they are observed at all types of spreading centres. Here, we present high-resolution seismic reflection images across the sedimented Andaman Sea Transform Fault where the sediments record the faulting and allow studying the evolution of the transform fault both in space and time. Furthermore, sediments allow the imaging of the faults down to the Moho depth that provides insight on the interplay between tectonic and magmatic processes. On the other hand, overlapping spreading centres (OSC) are small-scale discontinuities, possibly transient, and are observed only along fast or intermediate spreading centres. Exceptionally, an overlapping spreading centre is present at the slow spreading Andaman Sea Spreading Centre, which, we suggest, is due to the presence of thick sediments that hamper the efficient hydrothermal circulation allowing magma to stay much longer in the crust at different depths, and up to close to the segment ends, leading to the development of an overlapping spreading. The seismic reflection images across the OSC indicate the presence of large magma bodies in the crust. Seismic images also provide images of active faults allowing to study the link between faulting and magmatism. Interestingly, an earthquake swarm occurred at propagating limb of the OSC in 2006, after the great 2004 Andaman-Sumatra earthquake of Mw=9.3, highlighting the migration of the OSC westward. In this paper, we will show seismic reflection images and interpret these images in the light of bathymetry and earthquake data, and provide the anatomy of the ridge discontinuities along the slow spreading sedimented Andaman Sea Spreading Centre.

  10. Martian Crustal Magnetism: What Have We Learned After Approximately 6 Years of MGS Observations?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    The MAG/ER investigation aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has established conclusively that an internal, dynamo-generated field does not currently exist at Mars and discovered, unexpectedly, strong magnetization in the crust. An estimate of the upper limit of the current Mars dipole moment derived from the MGS data yields M < 2 x 10(exp 17) A-m2, which corresponds to a surface equatorial field strength of < 0.5 nT. The intense magnetization of the crust is closely associated with the ancient, heavily cratered high terrain, which lies south of Mars dichotomy boundary. The correlation of magnetization with the old terrain and the role of impacts, which have modified the magnetic properties of the crust, constitute a new and powerful diagnostic tool that is providing a unique view into the early thermal history of the planet, which was almost totally unknown prior to the arrival of MGS. Data from the Lunar Prospector mission complement contemporary analyses and interpretation of crustal magnetism in planetary system bodies that do not currently possess core dynamos. The observation of magnetic lineations over Terra Sirenum (Sirenum Fossae) and Terra Cimmeria, are suggestive of tectonic processes observed at Earth in association with sea-floor spreading and geomagnetic field reversals. If this association is correct, it would indicate the possible existence of plate tectonics and magnetic field reversals in Mars' early history. Alternative models involving fault/graben formation associated with the fracturing of a thin, magnetized crustal layer by tectonic or volcanism-induced stresses, yield equally valid interpretations. To date, no reliable correlation between topography, geology and crustal magnetism has been established and the origin of these remarkable Martian magnetic anomalies remains a mystery.

  11. Residual depth anomalies and the origin of the Australian-Antarctic discordance zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Karen M.; Vogt, Peter R.; Hall, Stuart A.

    1990-10-01

    A new, high resolution depth anomaly map covering the anomalously deep and rough Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD) has been constructed using crustal ages derived from a detailed aeromagnetic survey. The map shows a large, arcuate-shaped, negative depth anomaly that is centered on the Southeast Indian Ridge and trends NNE across the Australian plate (SSE across the Antarctic plate). Within this broad scale feature, two prominent depth anomaly lows are observed at 45°S, 128°E (the northern flank) and 54°S, 125°E (the southern flank). Both lows are associated with 15 Ma oceanic crust. The observed depth anomaly patterns are compared with the distinctive patterns predicted by coldspot, downwelling limbs of convection cells, and thin crust models of the discordance source. The observed depth anomaly does not result from absolute plate motions over a fixed coldspot source because the predicted ENE trend on the Antarctic plate is not in agreement with the SSE trend observed. The symmetric arrangement of the large-scale depth anomaly and prominent lows about the ridge axis suggests instead a source that has varied in strength but remained located at the ridge axis as the ridge migrated northeastward in the absolute reference frame. The organized pattern of elongated depth anomaly highs and lows predicted for upper mantle convection (cells) is not evident in the observed depth anomaly map. Thus a convergence of downwelling limbs of convection cells beneath the discordance is not indicated. If the source of cooler upwelling that produces less magma and hence thin crust has not varied over time, nor migrated along the ridge, then the predicted depth anomaly would persist unchanged with distance from the ridge axis, and trend in the direction of relative plate motion (parallel to fracture zones). The observed depth anomaly trends obliquely across fracture zones and changes in both amplitude and location relative to the ridge axis, and is therefore not consistent with cool upwelling producing thin crust. To explain the features of the depth anomaly map, we propose that asthenospheric material flowing from the Amsterdam hotspot in the west, and the Balleny and Tasmantid hotspots in the east, collides within the discordance. Propagating rifts converging on the AAD provide evidence for such asthenospheric flow. Attenuated shear velocities beneath the George V fracture zone complex, and lavas geochemically identical to those from propagating rifts associated with hotspots, suggest a thermal anomaly producing additional asthenospheric flow east of the AAD. The increased flow and greater proximity of the discordance to the thermal anomaly and hotspots to the east produce a higher pressure gradient, and hence greater driving force, which results in a westward migration of the collision zone with time. Seafloor spreading over the westward moving collision zone has produced the observed arcuate-shaped anomaly with the accompanying oblique depth anomaly trends. We cannot decipher from depth anomalies alone whether the converging flows downwell within the AAD or simply mix with upwelling materials.

  12. Texture-Based Automated Lithological Classification Using Aeromagenetic Anomaly Images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shankar, Vivek

    2009-01-01

    This report consists of a thesis submitted to the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, 2004 Aeromagnetic anomaly images are geophysical prospecting tools frequently used in the exploration of metalliferous minerals and hydrocarbons. The amplitude and texture content of these images provide a wealth of information to geophysicists who attempt to delineate the nature of the Earth's upper crust. These images prove to be extremely useful in remote areas and locations where the minerals of interest are concealed by basin fill. Typically, geophysicists compile a suite of aeromagnetic anomaly images, derived from amplitude and texture measurement operations, in order to obtain a qualitative interpretation of the lithological (rock) structure. Texture measures have proven to be especially capable of capturing the magnetic anomaly signature of unique lithological units. We performed a quantitative study to explore the possibility of using texture measures as input to a machine vision system in order to achieve automated classification of lithological units. This work demonstrated a significant improvement in classification accuracy over random guessing based on a priori probabilities. Additionally, a quantitative comparison between the performances of five classes of texture measures in their ability to discriminate lithological units was achieved.

  13. 21 CFR 102.23 - Peanut spreads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peanut spreads. 102.23 Section 102.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION COMMON OR USUAL NAME FOR NONSTANDARDIZED FOODS Requirements for Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.23 Peanut spreads. (a) The common...

  14. Modeling Malware Spreading Dynamics Michele Garetto

    E-print Network

    Khan, Javed I.

    designed to annoy (e.g., deface web pages), spread misinformation (e.g., false news reports or stock quotes), deny service (e.g., corrupt hard disks), steal financial information (e.g. credit card numbers), enableModeling Malware Spreading Dynamics Michele Garetto Dipartimento di Elettronica Politecnico di

  15. Prediction of Fire Spread Following Nuclear Explosions

    E-print Network

    Prediction of Fire Spread Following Nuclear Explosions Craig C. Chandler, Theodore G. Storey spread following nuclear explosions. Berkeley, Calif., Pacific SW. Forest & Range Expt Sta. 110 pp nuclear explosions. Berkeley, Calif., Pacific SW. Forest & Range Expt Sta. 110 pp., illus. (U.S. Forest

  16. Modeling spatial spread of communicable diseases involving

    E-print Network

    Ruan, Shigui

    CHAPTER 15 Modeling spatial spread of communicable diseases involving animal hosts Shigui Ruan on modeling spatial spread of specific communicable diseases involving animal hosts. Reaction-diffusion equations are used to model these diseases due to movement of animal hosts. Selected topics include

  17. Spreading of melts in presence of solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrhard, P.

    1996-08-01

    Future generations of pressurized water reactors will have to realize safety concepts, which go far beyond the present standard. With respect to a severe core melt down accident, precautions need to be taken to ensure coolability of the corium melt, In detail concepts rely on (a) catching the melt below the pressure vessel, (b) dry spreading and stabilization of the melt on a horizontal spreading area of sufficient extent, (c) passively initiated flooding of the spreaded melt from above using water, (d) removing the decay heat by means of circulating the pool water through external heat exchangers. The spreading of the corium melt on the spreading area, therefore, represents one of the crucial questions as it determines the outcome of the scenario. In the framework of the large-scale KATS experiments the spreading of both metallic and oxidic components of a Thermite melt in ceramic-coated channels is investigated. In parallel, physical models are developed to describe the flow, heat transport and solidification processes during the spreading. Hereby additional small-scale experiments using low-melting waxes and alloys are performed to identify the basic physical phenomena. The present paper, hereby, focuses on the development of models for the spreading flow. In detail a dimensional analysis in conjunction with a scenario discussion is presented.

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Dynamically Spreading Frontal and Cingulate

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Dynamically Spreading Frontal and Cingulate Deficits Mapped in Adolescents a dynamic wave of cortical gray matter loss that spreads across the lateral surface of the brain to determine whether brain systems are differentially affected. Neu- roanatomic and imaging studies consis

  19. Reports on investigations of uranium anomalies. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Goodknight, C.S.; Burger, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    During the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program, conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC), radiometric and geochemical surveys and geologic investigations detected anomalies indicative of possible uranium enrichment. Data from the Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey (ARMS) and the Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), both of which were conducted on a national scale, yielded numerous anomalies that may signal areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Results from geologic evaluations of individual 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles for the NURE program also yielded anomalies, which could not be adequately checked during scheduled field work. Included in this volume are individual reports of field investigations for the following six areas which were shown on the basis of ARMS, HSSR, and (or) geologic data to be anomalous: (1) Hylas zone and northern Richmond basin, Virginia; (2) Sischu Creek area, Alaska; (3) Goodman-Dunbar area, Wisconsin; (4) McCaslin syncline, Wisconsin; (5) Mt. Withington Cauldron, Socorro County, New Mexico; (6) Lake Tecopa, Inyo County, California. Field checks were conducted in each case to verify an indicated anomalous condition and to determine the nature of materials causing the anomaly. The ultimate objective of work is to determine whether favorable conditions exist for the occurrence of uranium deposits in areas that either had not been previously evaluated or were evaluated before data from recent surveys were available. Most field checks were of short duration (2 to 5 days). The work was done by various investigators using different procedures, which accounts for variations in format in their reports. All papers have been abstracted and indexed.

  20. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.