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Sample records for magnetic x-point oscillatory

  1. Nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic wave propagation in the neighbourhood of a 2D magnetic X-point: oscillatory reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; De Moortel, I.; Hood, A. W.; Brady, C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: This paper extends the models of Craig & McClymont (1991, ApJ, 371, L41) and McLaughlin & Hood (2004, A&A, 420, 1129) to include finite β and nonlinear effects. Aims: We investigate the nature of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves about a 2D magnetic X-point. Methods: We solve the compressible and resistive MHD equations using a Lagrangian remap, shock capturing code (Arber et al. 2001, J. Comp. Phys., 171, 151) and consider an initial condition in {v}×{B} \\cdot {hat{z}} (a natural variable of the system). Results: We observe the formation of both fast and slow oblique magnetic shocks. The nonlinear wave deforms the X-point into a “cusp-like” point which in turn collapses to a current sheet. The system then evolves through a series of horizontal and vertical current sheets, with associated changes in connectivity, i.e. the system exhibits oscillatory reconnection. Our final state is non-potential (but in force balance) due to asymmetric heating from the shocks. Larger amplitudes in our initial condition correspond to larger values of the final current density left in the system. Conclusions: The inclusion of nonlinear terms introduces several new features to the system that were absent from the linear regime. A movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Magnetic X-points, edge localized modes, and stochasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, L. E.; Strauss, H. R.

    2010-06-15

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) near the boundary of a high temperature, magnetically confined toroidal plasma represent a new type of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma instability that grows through a coherent plasma interaction with part of a chaotic magnetic field. Under perturbation, the freely moving magnetic boundary surface with an X-point splits into two different limiting asymptotic surfaces (manifolds), similar to the behavior of a hyperbolic saddle point in Hamiltonian dynamics. Numerical simulation using the extended MHD code M3D shows that field-aligned plasma instabilities, such as ballooning modes, can couple to the ''unstable'' manifold that forms helical, field-following lobes around the original surface. Large type I ELMs proceed in stages. Initially, a rapidly growing ballooning outburst involves the entire outboard side. Large plasma fingers grow well off the midplane, while low density regions penetrate deeply into the plasma. The magnetic field becomes superficially stochastic. A secondary inboard edge instability causes inboard plasma loss. The plasma gradually relaxes back toward axisymmetry, with diminishing cycles of edge instability. Poloidal rotation of the interior and edge plasma may be driven. The magnetic tangle constrains the early nonlinear ballooning, but may encourage the later inward penetration. Equilibrium toroidal rotation and two-fluid diamagnetic drifts have relatively small effects on a strong MHD instability. Intrinsic magnetic stochasticity may help explain the wide range of experimentally observed ELMs and ELM-free behavior in fusion plasmas, as well as properties of the H-mode and plasma edge.

  3. Density Effects on Tokamak Edge Turbulence and Transport with Magnetic X-points

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q; Cohen, R H; Nevins, W M; Rognlien, T D; Ryutov, D D; Umansky, M V; Pearlstein, L D; Bulmer, R H; Russell, D A; Myra, J R; D'Ippolito, D A; Greewald, M; Snyder, P B; Mahdavi, M A

    2004-10-12

    Results are presented from the 3D electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT, the 2D transport code UEDGE, and theoretical analysis of boundary turbulence and transport in a real divertor-plasma geometry and its relationship to the density limit. Key results include: (1) a transition of the boundary turbulence from resistive X-point to resistive-ballooning as a critical plasma density is exceeded; (2) formation of an X-point MARFE in 2D UEDGE transport simulations for increasing outboard radial transport as found by BOUT for increasing density; (3) formation of a density pedestal due to neutral fueling; (4)identification of convective transport by localized plasma 'blobs' in the SOL at high density and decorrelation of turbulence between the midplane and the divertor leg due to strong X-point magnetic shear; (5) a new divertor-leg instability driven by a radial tilt of the divertor plate.

  4. The effect of guide-field and boundary conditions on collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-01-15

    Works of Tsiklauri and Haruki [Phys. Plasmas 15, 102902 (2008); 14, 112905 (2007)] are extended by inclusion of the out-of-plane magnetic (guide) field. In particular, magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse for varying out-of-plane guide-fields is studied using a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code. For zero guide-field, cases for both open and closed boundary conditions are investigated, where magnetic flux and particles are lost and conserved, respectively. It is found that reconnection rates, out-of-plane currents and density in the X-point increase more rapidly and peak sooner in the closed boundary case, but higher values are reached in the open boundary case. The normalized reconnection rate is fast: 0.10-0.25. In the open boundary case it is shown that an increase of guide-field yields later onsets in the reconnection peak rates, while in the closed boundary case initial peak rates occur sooner but are suppressed. The reconnection current changes similarly with increasing guide-field; however for low guide-fields the reconnection current increases, giving an optimal value for the guide-field between 0.1 and 0.2 times the in-plane field in both cases. Also, in the open boundary case, it is found that for guide-fields of the order of the in-plane magnetic field, the generation of electron vortices occurs. Possible causes of the vortex generation, based on the flow of decoupled particles in the diffusion region and localized plasma heating, are discussed. Before peak reconnection onset, oscillations in the out-of-plane electric field at the X-point are found, ranging in frequency from approximately 1 to 2 ω{sub pe} and coinciding with oscillatory reconnection. These oscillations are found to be part of a larger wave pattern in the simulation domain. Mapping the out-of-plane electric field along the central lines of the domain over time and applying a 2D Fourier transform reveal that

  5. Octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure generation during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-06-15

    The out-of-plane magnetic field, generated by fast magnetic reconnection, during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse, was studied with a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code, using both closed (flux conserving) and open boundary conditions on a square grid. It was discovered that the well known quadrupolar structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field gains four additional regions of opposite magnetic polarity, emerging near the corners of the simulation box, moving towards the X-point. The emerging, outer, magnetic field structure has opposite polarity to the inner quadrupolar structure, leading to an overall octupolar structure. Using Ampere's law and integrating electron and ion currents, defined at grid cells, over the simulation domain, contributions to the out-of-plane magnetic field from electron and ion currents were determined. The emerging regions of opposite magnetic polarity were shown to be the result of ion currents. Magnetic octupolar structure is found to be a signature of X-point collapse, rather than tearing mode, and factors relating to potential discoveries in experimental scenarios or space-craft observations are discussed.

  6. Prompt particle acceleration around moving X-point magnetic field during impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, Jun-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    We present a model for high-energy solar flares to explain prompt proton and electron acceleration, which occurs around moving X-point magnetic field during the implosion phase of the current sheet. We derive the electromagnetic fields during the strong implosion phase of the current sheets, which is driven by the converging flow derived from the magnetohydrodynamic equations. It is shown that both protons and electrons can be promptly (within 1 second) accelerated to approximately 70 MeV and approximately 200 MeV, respectively. This acceleration mechanism can be applicable for the impulsive phase of the gradual gamma ray and proton flares (gradual GR/P flare), which have been called two-ribbon flares.

  7. Rotational and vibrational temperatures in a hydrogen discharge with a magnetic X-point

    SciTech Connect

    Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Toko, Kaoru

    2012-12-15

    A novel plasma source with a magnetic X-point has been developed to probe an alternative for cesium-free negative hydrogen ion production. This study presents first results for the gas and vibrational temperatures in the source at 1 Pa and various RF powers. The temperatures are obtained from analysis of the intensity distribution of the molecular Fulcher-{alpha} bands. The gas temperature increases with the RF power, while the vibrational temperature remains constant in the studied range of RF powers. Both quantities show no appreciable spatial dependence. The obtained high values of the vibrational temperatures indicate a high population of the vibrational levels, favourable for the volume negative ion production. A theoretical concept indicates the presence of an optimum value for the vibrational temperature at which the negative hydrogen ion yield by volume processes has a maximum. Coincidently, the measured value is close to this optimum. This indicates that the novel concept can provide certain advantages compared to other sources based on volume production.

  8. The effect of guide-field and boundary conditions on the features and signatures of collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic X-point collapse is investigated using a 2.5D fully relativistic particle-in-cell simulation, with varying strengths of guide-field as well as open and closed boundary conditions. In the zero guide-field case we discover a new signature of Hall-reconnection in the out-of-plane magnetic field, namely an octupolar pattern, as opposed to the well-studied quadrupolar out-of-plane field of reconnection. The emergence of the octupolar components was found to be caused by ion currents and is a general feature of X-point collapse. In a comparative study of tearing-mode reconnection, signatures of octupolar components are found only in the out-flow region. It is argued that space-craft observations of magnetic fields at reconnection sites may be used accordingly to identify the type of reconnection [1][2]. Further, initial oscillatory reconnection is observed, prior to reconnection onset, generating electro-magnetic waves at the upper-hybrid frequency, matching solar flare progenitor emission. When applying a guide-field, in both open and closed boundary conditions, thinner dissipation regions are obtained and the onset of reconnection is increasingly delayed. Investigations with open boundary conditions show that, for guide-fields close to the strength of the in-plane field, shear flows emerge, leading to the formation of electron flow vortices and magnetic islands [3]. Asymmetries in the components of the generalised Ohm's law across the dissipation region are observed. Extended in 3D geometry, it is shown that locations of magnetic islands and vortices are not constant along the height of the current-sheet. Vortices formed on opposite sites of the current-sheet travel in opposite directions along it, leading to a criss-cross vortex pattern. Possible instabilities resulting from this specific structure formation are to be investigated [4].[1] J. Graf von der Pahlen and D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 060705 (2014), [2] J. Graf von der Pahlen and D. Tsiklauri

  9. Modulation of cortical oscillatory activity during transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Brignani, Debora; Manganotti, Paolo; Rossini, Paolo M; Miniussi, Carlo

    2008-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can transiently modulate cortical excitability, with a net effect depending on the stimulation frequency (< or =1 Hz inhibition vs. > or =5 Hz facilitation, at least for the motor cortex). This possibility has generated interest in experiments aiming to improve deficits in clinical settings, as well as deficits in the cognitive domain. The aim of the present study was to investigate the on-line effects of low frequency (1 Hz) TMS on the EEG oscillatory activity in the healthy human brain, focusing particularly on the outcome of these modulatory effects in relation to the duration of the TMS stimulation. To this end, we used the event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) approach to determine the patterns of oscillatory activity during two consecutive trains of sham and real TMS. Each train of stimulation was delivered to the left primary motor cortex (MI) of healthy subjects over a period of 10 min, while EEG rhythms were simultaneously recorded. Results indicated that TMS induced an increase in the power of brain rhythms that was related to the period of the stimulation, i.e. the synchronization of the alpha band increased with the duration of the stimulation, and this increase was inversely correlated with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) amplitude. In conclusion, low frequency TMS over primary motor cortex induces a synchronization of the background oscillatory activity on the stimulated region. This induced modulation in brain oscillations seems to increase coherently with the duration of stimulation, suggesting that TMS effects may involve short-term modification of the neural circuitry sustaining MEPs characteristics. PMID:17557296

  10. A comprehensive study of sensitivity in measuring oscillatory magnetic fields using rotary saturation pulse sequences.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jingwei; Liu, Yun; Chai, Yuhui; Tang, Weinan; Wu, Bing; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Detecting the oscillatory currents with a specific frequency distribution may have the potential to make neuronal current MRI (ncMRI) come true. The phase shift or dephasing induced by both positive and negative episodes of oscillatory neuronal currents is likely to be canceled out over the echo time in typical BOLD-contrast fMRI experiments. Based on the contrast of rotary saturation, both of the recently developed spin-locked oscillatory excitation (SLOE) and stimulus-induced rotary saturation (SIRS) pulse sequences have been demonstrated to be able to detect weak oscillatory magnetic fields in phantoms with 3T MR scanners. In this report, through Bloch equation simulation as well as water phantom and anesthetic rats experiments, we comprehensively evaluate and compare the sensitivities of these two methods (SLOE and SIRS) in detecting the oscillatory magnetic fields for both high (100Hz) and low (10Hz) oscillation frequencies, while using their respective optimal imaging parameters. In agreement with the theoretical predications, both the simulated and experimental results showed that the SLOE method features a much higher detection sensitivity of weak magnetic fields than that of the SIRS method. SLOE was able to detect applied oscillatory magnetic fields as low as 0.1nT in a water phantom and 0.5nT in rat brains and the deteriorated noise levels in rat data may account for the reduced sensitivity in vivo. These promising results form the foundation for direct detection of in vivo neuronal currents using MRI. PMID:26616004

  11. Inverse and oscillatory magnetoresistance in Fe(001)/MgO/Cr/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Han, Prof. X. F.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of Cr(001) insertion layers in Fe(001)/MgO/Cr/Fe magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) is studied from first-principles. It is shown that with the increase of the Cr(001) layer thickness, the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) first decreases rapidly and then oscillates with a two-monolayer period. At some thicknesses, the oscillation leads to a sign reversal of the TMR. The oscillatory interfacial Cr moment at the Cr-MgO interface as a function of the Cr layer thickness, which arises from the layer-anti-ferromagnetic ordering of Cr, is the cause for the oscillatory TMR.

  12. Chemical spots and oscillatory diffusion modes in magnetic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpin, V.

    2016-07-01

    The stars of the middle main sequence often have spot-like chemical structures at their surfaces. We consider diffusion caused by electric currents and argue that such current-driven diffusion can form chemical inhomogeneities in a plasma. The considered mechanism can contribute to a formation of element spots in Hg-Mn and Ap-stars. Due to the Hall effect, diffusion in the presence of electric currents can be accompanied by the propagation of a particular type of magnetohydrodynamic modes in which only the impurity number density oscillates. Such modes exist if the magnetic pressure is much greater than the gas pressure and can be the reason for variations of the abundance peculiarities in stars.

  13. Oscillatory Decay of Magnetization Induced by Domain-Wall Stray Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Luc; Luening, Jan; Scholl, Andreas; Nolting, Frithjof; Anders, Simone; Stoehr, Joachim; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2000-04-10

    The demagnetization of a hard ferromagnetic layer via the fringing fields of domain walls created by reversing the moment of a neighboring soft ferromagnetic layer is explored experimentally. An unusual oscillatory decay of the magnetic moment of the hard layer is observed using structures in which the demagnetization occurs after a few hundred cycles. This surprising observation is confirmed on a microscopic scale by detailed imaging of the magnetization of the hard layer using high resolution photoemission electron microscopy and by micromagnetic simulations. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. An X-point ergodic divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, M.S.; Jensen, T.H.; La Haye, R.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Evans, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    A new ergodic divertor is proposed. It utilizes a system of external (n = 3) coils arranged to generate overlapping magnetic islands in the edge region of a diverted tokamak and connect the randomized field lines to the external (cold) divertor plate. The novel feature in the configuration is the placement of the external coils close to the X-point. A realistic design of the external coil set is studied by using the field line tracing method for a low aspect ratio (A {approx equal} 3) tokamak. Two types of effects are observed. First, by placing the coils close to the X-point, where the poloidal magnetic field is weak and the rational surfaces are closely packed only a moderate amount of current in the external coils is needed to ergodize the edge region. This ergodized edge enhances the edge transport in the X-point region and leads to the potential of edge profile control and the avoidance of edge localized modes (ELMs). Furthermore, the trajectories of the field lines close to the X-point are modified by the external coil set, causing the hit points on the external divertor plates to be randomized and spread out in the major radius direction. A time-dependent modulation of the currents in the external (n = 3) coils can potentially spread the heat flux more uniformly on the divertor plate avoiding high concentration of the heat flux. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  15. X -Point Effect on Plasma Blob Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, F.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma blob dynamics on the high-field side in the proximity of a magnetic field null (X point) is investigated in TORPEX. A significant acceleration of the blobs towards the X point is observed. Close to the X point the blobs break apart. The E ×B drifts associated with the blobs are measured, isolating the background drift component from the fluctuating contribution of the blob internal potential dipole. The time evolution of the latter is consistent with the fast blob dynamics. An analytical model based on charge conservation is derived for the potential dipole, including ion polarization, diamagnetic, and parallel currents. In the vicinity of the X point, a crucial role in determining the blob motion is played by the decrease of the poloidal magnetic field intensity. This variation increases the connection length that short circuits the potential dipole of the blob. Good quantitative agreement is found between the model and the experimental data in the initial accelerating phase of the blob dynamics.

  16. Noninvasive transcranial focused ultrasonic-magnetic stimulation for modulating brain oscillatory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi; Chen, Yudong; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-02-01

    A novel technique, transcranial focused ultrasonic-magnetic stimulation (tFUMS), has been developed for noninvasive brain modulation in vivo. tFUMS has a higher spatial resolution (<2 mm) and a higher penetration depth than other noninvasive neuromodulation methods. The in vivo animal experimental results show that tFUMS can not only increase the power of local field potentials and the firing rate of the neurons, but also enhance the effect of transcranial focused ultrasound stimulation on the neuromodulation. The results demonstrate that tFUMS can modulate brain oscillatory activities by stimulating brain tissues.

  17. Model calculation of oscillatory magnetic breakdown in metals with multiply degenerate bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmeier, P.; Falicov, L. M.

    1981-03-01

    We present a model calculation of the oscillatory magnetoresistance in a metal with three degenerate bands. We have in mind the example of body-centered cubic iron where, in the neighborhood of the H point of the Brillouin zone, three bands have multiple intersections and contacts. For magnetic fields along the [011] direction, the Fermi surface in the vicinity of H exhibits a complicated three-band interferometer which leads to complex oscillations in the magnetoresistance. A Fourier analysis of this magnetoresistance reveals that frequencies corresponding to split-beam interference, closed-orbit interference, and mixed type are all present with comparable strength. The connection to the experimental situation is discussed.

  18. Time-dependent Suppression of Oscillatory Power in Evolving Solar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Prasad, S.; Jess, D. B.; Jain, R.; Keys, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    Oscillation amplitudes are generally smaller within magnetically active regions like sunspots and plage when compared to their surroundings. Such magnetic features, when viewed in spatially resolved power maps, appear as regions of suppressed power due to reductions in the oscillation amplitudes. Employing high spatial- and temporal-resolution observations from the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) in New Mexico, we study the power suppression in a region of evolving magnetic fields adjacent to a pore. By utilizing wavelet analysis, we study for the first time how the oscillatory properties in this region change as the magnetic field evolves with time. Image sequences taken in the blue continuum, G-band, Ca ii K, and Hα filters were used in this study. It is observed that the suppression found in the chromosphere occupies a relatively larger area, confirming previous findings. Also, the suppression is extended to structures directly connected to the magnetic region, and is found to get enhanced as the magnetic field strength increased with time. The dependence of the suppression on the magnetic field strength is greater at longer periods and higher formation heights. Furthermore, the dominant periodicity in the chromosphere was found to be anti-correlated with increases in the magnetic field strength.

  19. Oscillatory magnetoconvective instability in a ferrofluid layer placed in an oblique external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Rahman, Habibur; Bozhko, Aleksandra A.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetite-based ferrofluids are manufactured magneto-polarisable nanofluids that magnetize in an external magnetic field in a similar way to natural paramagnetic fluids(e.g. oxygen), however to a much higher degree. Paramagnetic and ferrofluid flows are described by similar equations and it is expected that they would exhibit a similar behaviour. Indeed we show that in both type of fluids the most prominent instability structures align with the in-layer field component and the onset of magnetoconvection is delayed by the field inclination. However we find that in contrast to paramagnetic fluids the instabilities arising in differentially heated ferrofluids placed in a uniform external oblique magnetic field are oscillatory. This is traced back to the nonlinearity of the magnetic field distribution induced inside the ferrofluid layer that arises whenever the direction of the applied magnetic field is not normal. Given that the magnetic field inclination with respect to the plane of the layer is inevitable near its edges the obtained stability results shed light on the possible reasons for the existnce of unsteady patterns that have been detected in the normal field experiments we reported previously.

  20. Oscillatory states in thermal convection of a paramagnetic fluid in a cubical enclosure subjected to a magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenjereš, S.; Pyrda, L.; Wrobel, W.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.; Szmyd, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    We report experimental and numerical studies of combined natural and magnetic convection of a paramagnetic fluid inside a cubical enclosure heated from below and cooled from above and subjected to a magnetic field gradient. Values of the magnetic field gradient are in the range 9≤|grad|b0|2|≤900 T2/m for imposed magnetic field strengths in the center of the superconducting magnet bore of 1≤|b0|max≤10 T. Very good agreement between experiments and simulation is obtained in predicting the integral heat transfer over the entire range of working parameters (i.e., thermal Rayleigh number 1.15×105≤RaT≤8×106, Prandtl number 5≤Pr≤700, and magnetization number 0≤γ≤58.5). We present a stability diagram containing three characteristic states: steady, oscillatory (periodic), and turbulent regimes. The oscillatory states are identified for intermediate values of Pr (40≤Pr≤70) and low magnetic field (|b0|max≤2 T). Turbulent states are generated from initially stable flow and heat transfer regimes in the range of 70≤Pr≤500 for sufficiently strong magnetic field (|b0|max≥4 T).

  1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Schecklmann, Martin; Lehner, Astrid; Gollmitzer, Judith; Schmidt, Eldrid; Schlee, Winfried; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About 10 years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity). Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1 Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil) served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol 5 min of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with 1 week interval in between. Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS. This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be

  2. Circular orbits and related quasiharmonic oscillatory motion of charged particles around weakly magnetized rotating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursunov, Arman; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Kološ, Martin

    2016-04-01

    We study the motion of charged particles in the field of a rotating black hole immersed into an external asymptotically uniform magnetic field, focusing on the epicyclic quasicircular orbits near the equatorial plane. Separating the circular orbits into four qualitatively different classes according to the sign of the canonical angular momentum of the motion and the orientation of the Lorentz force, we analyze the circular orbits using the so-called force formalism. We find the analytical solutions for the radial profiles of velocity, specific angular momentum, and specific energy of the circular orbits in dependence on the black-hole dimensionless spin and the magnetic field strength. The innermost stable circular orbits are determined for all four classes of the circular orbits. The stable circular orbits with an outward-oriented Lorentz force can extend to radii lower than the radius of the corresponding photon circular geodesic. We calculate the frequencies of the harmonic oscillatory motion of the charged particles in the radial and vertical directions related to the equatorial circular orbits and study the radial profiles of the radial, ωr; vertical, ωθ; and orbital, ωϕ, frequencies, finding significant differences in comparison to the epicyclic geodesic circular motion. The most important new phenomenon is the existence of toroidal charged particle epicyclic motion with ωr˜ωθ≫ωϕ that could occur around retrograde circular orbits with an outward-oriented Lorentz force. We demonstrate that for the rapidly rotating black holes the role of the "Wald induced charge" can be relevant.

  3. Resistive X-point modes in tokamak boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Xu, X. Q.; Cohen, R. H.

    2000-06-01

    It is shown that the boundary (edge and scrape-off-layer) plasma in a typical low (L) mode diverted tokamak discharge is unstable to a new class of modes called resistive X-point (RX) modes. The RX mode is a type of resistive ballooning mode that exploits a synergism between resistivity and the magnetic geometry of the X-point region. The RX modes are shown to give robust instabilities at moderate mode numbers, and therefore are expected to be the dominant contributors to turbulent diffusion in the boundary plasma of a diverted tokamak. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Confinement and inhomogeneous broadening effects in the quantum oscillatory magnetization of quantum dot ensembles.

    PubMed

    Herzog, F; Heedt, S; Goerke, S; Ibrahim, A; Rupprecht, B; Heyn, Ch; Hardtdegen, H; Schäpers, Th; Wilde, M A; Grundler, D

    2016-02-01

    We report on the magnetization of ensembles of etched quantum dots with a lateral diameter of 460 nm, which we prepared from InGaAs/InP heterostructures. The quantum dots exhibit 1/B-periodic de-Haas-van-Alphen-type oscillations in the magnetization M(B) for external magnetic fields B  >  2 T, measured by torque magnetometry at 0.3 K. We compare the experimental data to model calculations assuming different confinement potentials and including ensemble broadening effects. The comparison shows that a hard wall potential with an edge depletion width of 100 nm explains the magnetic behavior. Beating patterns induced by Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) as measured in unpatterned and nanopatterned InGaAs/InP heterostructures are not observed for the quantum dots. From our model we predict that signatures of SOI in the magnetization could be observed in larger dots in tilted magnetic fields. PMID:26740509

  5. Magnetorheological fluid based on submicrometric silica-coated magnetite particles under an oscillatory magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustín-Serrano, R.; Donado, F.; Rubio-Rosas, E.

    2013-06-01

    An experimental study conducted on the rheological properties of a magnetorheological fluid based on submicrometric silica-coated magnetite particles dispersed in silicone oil is presented. We investigated the rheological behaviour when the system is simultaneously exposed to a static field and a sinusoidal field used as a perturbation. The results show that the perturbation modifies the rheological behaviour of the system and can be used to control its physical properties; however, the changes that are induced are smaller than expected from previous results for the aggregation of particles under magnetic perturbations. We discussed this difference in terms of the ratio between the magnetic energy and the thermal energy. We observed that a threshold magnetic field exists; below it, the yield stress is practically zero, whereas above it, the yield stress grows quickly. We discuss this result in terms of a model based on chain length distribution.

  6. Evidence of electron acceleration around the reconnection X-point in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2014-06-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point. Additionally, the plasma around the X-point was also thermally heated up to 10 MK. The estimated reconnection rate of this event is ∼0.017.

  7. Evidence of Electron Acceleration around the Reconnection X-point in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2016-05-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point.

  8. Oscillatory flow braking: inner magnetosphere observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    We search for damped oscillatory flow braking events observed by THEMIS/ARTEMIS in the near-Earth plasma sheet when their counterpart in the inner magnetosphere was observed. By comparing the particle and magnetic field data in the two locations we analyze the feedback of the inner magnetosphere to plasma sheet oscillatory flow braking. We discuss the possible role of the oscillatory flow events for plasma injection into the inner magnetosphere.

  9. Anomalous oscillatory magnetoresistance in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunchur, Milind N.; Dean, Charles L.; Ivlev, Boris I.

    2016-08-01

    We report oscillatory magnetoresistance in various superconducting films, with a magnetic-field period Δ B ˜0.1 T that is essentially independent of sample dimensions, temperature, transport current, and the magnitude and orientation of the magnetic field, including magnetic fields oriented parallel to the film plane. The characteristics of these oscillations seem hard to reconcile with previously established mechanisms for oscillations in magnetoresistance, suggesting the possibility of another type of physical origin.

  10. Effects of arterial blood flow on walls of the abdominal aorta: distributions of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Shimamura, Yoshiaki; Tezuka, Chie; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liu, Hao; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Although abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur mostly inferior to the renal artery, the mechanism of the development of AAA in relation to its specific location is not yet clearly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that even healthy volunteers may manifest specific flow characteristics of blood flow and alter wall shear or oscillatory shear stress in the areas where AAAs commonly develop. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this prospective study, aged from 24 to 27. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with electrocardiographic triggering. Flow-sensitive four-dimensional MR imaging of the abdominal aorta, with three-directional velocity encoding, including simple morphological image acquisition, was performed. Information on specific locations on the aortic wall was applied to the flow encodes to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). While time-framed WSS showed the highest peak of 1.14 ± 0.25 Pa in the juxtaposition of the renal artery, the WSS plateaued to 0.61 Pa at the anterior wall of the abdominal aorta. The OSI peaked distal to the renal arteries at the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta of 0.249 ± 0.148, and was constantly elevated in the whole abdominal aorta at more than 0.14. All subjects were found to have elevated OSI in regions where AAAs commonly occur. These findings indicate that areas of constant peaked oscillatory shear stress in the infra-renal aorta may be one of the factors that lead to morphological changes over time, even in healthy individuals. PMID:26481791

  11. The flux-coordinate independent approach applied to X-point geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hariri, F. Hill, P.; Ottaviani, M.; Sarazin, Y.

    2014-08-15

    A Flux-Coordinate Independent (FCI) approach for anisotropic systems, not based on magnetic flux coordinates, has been introduced in Hariri and Ottaviani [Comput. Phys. Commun. 184, 2419 (2013)]. In this paper, we show that the approach can tackle magnetic configurations including X-points. Using the code FENICIA, an equilibrium with a magnetic island has been used to show the robustness of the FCI approach to cases in which a magnetic separatrix is present in the system, either by design or as a consequence of instabilities. Numerical results are in good agreement with the analytic solutions of the sound-wave propagation problem. Conservation properties are verified. Finally, the critical gain of the FCI approach in situations including the magnetic separatrix with an X-point is demonstrated by a fast convergence of the code with the numerical resolution in the direction of symmetry. The results highlighted in this paper show that the FCI approach can efficiently deal with X-point geometries.

  12. X--Point Neutral Density Determination in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchin, R. J.; Maingi, R.; Isler, R. C.; Owen, L. W.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Carlstrom, T. N.

    1998-11-01

    A method has been developed to measure neutral densities in the divertor and X-point regions of diverted DIII-D plasmas. The method calibrates D_α light intensities from a tangentially-viewing video camera by means of a vertically-viewing photomultiplier. D_α light viewed by the video camera is reconstructed onto a poloidal plane in the region of the lower divertor. Neutral densities are obtained by dividing the D_α light intensities by the electron density and the electron excitation rate coefficients. These coefficients are steep functions of the electron temperature and density, which are measured by the divertor Thomson scattering diagnostic. Data have been analyzed for L-mode plasmas just below the L--H transition at two X-point heights. The neutral density decreases in the vertical direction from 10^13 atoms/cm^3 just above the divertor floor in the private flux region to 10^11 atoms/cm^3 at the X-point. The neutral density just inside the X-point is in the range 10^10--10^11 atoms/cm^3.

  13. ExB CIRCULATION AT THE TOKAMAK DIVERTOR X-POINT

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. SCHAFFER; B.D. BRAY; J.A.BOEDO; T.N. CARLSTROM; R.J.COLCHIN; J.G. WATKINS

    2000-11-01

    Detailed measurements in two dimensions by probes and Thomson scattering reveal unexpected local electric potential and electron pressure (p{sub e}) maxima near the divertor X-point in L-mode plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak [J.L. Luxon and L.G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The potential drives E x B circulation about the X-point, thereby exchanging plasma between closed and open magnetic surfaces at rates that can be comparable to the total cross-separatrix transport. The potential is consistent with the classical parallel Ohm's law. A simple model is proposed to explain the pressure and potential hills in low power, nearly detached plasmas. Recent two-dimensional edge transport modeling with plasma drifts also shows X-point pressure and potential hills but by a different mechanism. These experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that low power tokamak plasmas can be far from poloidal uniformity in a boundary layer just inside the separatrix. Additional data, though preliminary and incomplete, suggest that E x B circulation across the separatrix might be a common feature of low confinement behavior.

  14. Oscillatory Magnetogasdynamic Slip Flow in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ramesh

    2009-11-01

    The problem of pressure driven Magnetogasdynamic (MGD) slip flow with small rarefaction through a long micro-channel is considered. The flow is driven by steady or oscillatory pressure gradient. The study of MGD flows in microchannels is of great interest since they occur in magnetic thin films and other electromagnetic micro-scale devices. In obtaining the micro-fluidic solutions in the presence of a magnetic field, some additional physical, mathematical and numerical issues need to be considered. These issues deal with the scaling laws for micro-scale MHD flows and the relevant parameters such as Mach number, Reynolds number, Hartmann number, magnetic Reynolds number, and Knudsen number. For planar constant area micro-channel, it is possible to obtain the analytical solutions for both steady and oscillatory pressure driven flows. As physically expected, the higher value of the magnetic field (higher Hartmann number) flattens the velocity profile in the channel.

  15. Oscillatory regimes of the thermomagnetic instability in superconducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestgârden, J. I.; Galperin, Y. M.; Johansen, T. H.

    2016-05-01

    The stability of superconducting films with respect to oscillatory precursor modes for thermomagnetic avalanches is investigated theoretically. The results for the onset threshold show that previous treatments of nonoscillatory modes have predicted much higher thresholds. Thus, in film superconductors, oscillatory modes are far more likely to cause thermomagnetic breakdown. This explains the experimental fact that flux avalanches in film superconductors can occur even at very small ramping rates of the applied magnetic field. Closed expressions for the threshold magnetic field and temperature, as well oscillation frequency, are derived for different regimes of the oscillatory thermomagnetic instability.

  16. Imaging of X-point turbulence in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, Sean; Terry, James; White, Anne; Zweben, Stewart

    2015-11-01

    A nearly tangential view of the lower X-point region of Alcator C-Mod has been coupled to a high-speed camera filtered for D-alpha line emission. Recording at ~400,000 frames per second, the system detects filaments propagating in the private flux region that are approximately aligned with the local magnetic field. This behavior appears similar to what has recently been observed in the MAST tokamak. Turbulence and transport into the private flux region is potentially important. It may be a mechanism to spread heat across field lines and reduce peak heat fluxes on divertor targets. It may also explain how transport-driven flows seen in the high-field side scrape-off layer are accommodated, being otherwise too large compared to the particle flux arriving at the inner divertor target plates. The dynamics of these filaments are analyzed, as is the rate at which they are generated. Correlation analysis is used to determine the speed and trajectories of the filaments. Radial speeds of ~1 km/s are found. Clear changes are observed in the X-point-region fluctuations at the L-to-H-mode transition.

  17. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Electrophoresis has long been recognized as an effective analytic technique for the separation of proteins and other charged species, however attempts at scaling up to accommodate commercial volumes have met with limited success. In this report we describe a novel electrophoretic separation technique - Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis (BOCE). Numerical simulations indicate that the technique has the potential for preparative scale throughputs with high resolution, while simultaneously avoiding many problems common to conventional electrophoresis. The technique utilizes the interaction of an oscillatory electric field and a transverse oscillatory shear flow to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged protein species. An oscillatory electric field is applied across the narrow gap of a rectangular channel inducing a periodic motion of charged protein species. The amplitude of this motion depends on the dimensionless electrophoretic mobility, alpha = E(sub o)mu/(omega)d, where E(sub o) is the amplitude of the electric field oscillations, mu is the dimensional mobility, omega is the angular frequency of oscillation and d is the channel gap width. An oscillatory shear flow is induced along the length of the channel resulting in the separation of species with different mobilities. We present a model that predicts the oscillatory behavior of charged species and allows estimation of both the magnitude of the induced convective velocity and the effective diffusivity as a function of a in infinitely long channels. Numerical results indicate that in addition to the mobility dependence, the steady state behavior of solute species may be strongly affected by oscillating fluid into and out of the active electric field region at the ends of the cell. The effect is most pronounced using time dependent shear flows of the same frequency (cos((omega)t)) flow mode) as the electric field oscillations. Under such conditions, experiments indicate that

  18. Multiplexing oscillatory biochemical signals.

    PubMed

    de Ronde, Wiet; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2014-04-01

    In recent years it has been increasingly recognized that biochemical signals are not necessarily constant in time and that the temporal dynamics of a signal can be the information carrier. Moreover, it is now well established that the protein signaling network of living cells has a bow-tie structure and that components are often shared between different signaling pathways. Here we show by mathematical modeling that living cells can multiplex a constant and an oscillatory signal: they can transmit these two signals simultaneously through a common signaling pathway, and yet respond to them specifically and reliably. We find that information transmission is reduced not only by noise arising from the intrinsic stochasticity of biochemical reactions, but also by crosstalk between the different channels. Yet, under biologically relevant conditions more than 2 bits of information can be transmitted per channel, even when the two signals are transmitted simultaneously. These observations suggest that oscillatory signals are ideal for multiplexing signals. PMID:24685537

  19. A microwave dielectric resonant oscillatory circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigov, A. S.; Shvartsburg, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Bias currents in a thin dielectric nonconducting torus are investigated, and the resonant mode of excitation of these currents is established. The similarity of the frequency spectrum of such a dielectric element to the spectra of a classical Thomson oscillatory circuit and a metamaterial with negative permittivity is demonstrated. The resonant frequency of electromagnetic oscillations of the ring dielectric circuit and magnetic and electric fields of such a circuit under resonant excitation are determined.

  20. Generation of X-points and secondary islands in 2D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Minping; Matthaeus, William H.; Servidio, Sergio; Oughton, Sean

    2013-04-15

    We study the time development of the population of X-type critical points in a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model during the early stages of freely decaying turbulence. At sufficiently high magnetic Reynolds number Re{sub m}, we find that the number of neutral points increases as Re{sub m}{sup 3/2}, while the rates of reconnection at the most active sites decrease. The distribution of rates remains approximately exponential. We focus in particular on delicate issues of accuracy, which arise in these numerical experiments, in that the proliferation of X-points is also a feature of under-resolved simulations. The 'splitting' of neutral points at high Reynolds number appears to be a fundamental feature of the cascade that has important implications for understanding the relationship between reconnection and turbulence, an issue of considerable importance for the Magnetospheric Multiscale and Solar Probe missions as well as observation of reconnection in the solar wind.

  1. Oscillatory electrohydrodynamic gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, F.C.; McKinney, P.J.; Davidson, J.H.

    1995-09-01

    Prior numerical solutions of electrohydrodynamic flows in a positive-corona, wire-plate electrostatic precipitator are extended to reveal steady-periodic electrohydrodynamic flows. Previously, only steady solutions were reported. The present study includes results for flows with Reynolds numbers from 0 to 4,800 and with dimensionless electric number ranging from 0.06 to {infinity}. Results indicate that two regimes of low frequency oscillatory flow occur. The first regime is characterized by a single recirculating vortex that oscillates in strength between one and five Hertz. The second regime is characterized by two counter-rotating vortices that oscillate in strength at a frequency near one Hertz.

  2. Physics of collisionless reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.; Haruki, T.

    2008-10-15

    Recently, magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed, X-point collapse was studied using kinetic, 2.5-dimensional, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code [D. Tsiklauri and T. Haruki, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112905 (2007)]. Here we finalize the investigation of this topic by addressing key outstanding physical questions: (i) Which term in the generalized Ohm's law is responsible for the generation of the reconnection electric field? (ii) How does the time evolution of the reconnected flux vary with the ion-electron mass ratio? (iii) What is the exact energy budget of the reconnection process; i.e., in which proportion initial (mostly magnetic) energy is converted into other forms of energy? (iv) Are there any anisotropies in the velocity distribution of the accelerated particles? The following points have been established. (i) A reconnection electric field is generated by the electron pressure tensor off-diagonal terms, resembling to the case of tearing unstable Harris current sheet studied by the GEM reconnection challenge. (ii) For m{sub i}/m{sub e}>>1, the time evolution of the reconnected flux is independent of ion-electron mass ratio. In addition, in the case of m{sub i}/m{sub e}=1, we show that reconnection proceeds slowly as the Hall term is zero; when m{sub i}/m{sub e}>>1 (i.e., the Hall term is nonzero) reconnection is fast and we conjecture that this is due to magnetic field being frozen into electron fluid, which moves significantly faster than ion fluid. (iii) Within one Alfven time, somewhat less than half ({approx}40%) of the initial total (roughly magnetic) energy is converted into the kinetic energy of electrons, and somewhat more than half ({approx}60%) into kinetic energy of ions (similar to solar flare observations). (iv) In the strongly stressed X-point case, in about one Alfven time, a full isotropy in all three spatial directions of the velocity distribution is seen for superthermal electrons (also commensurate

  3. Optimal Phase Oscillatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follmann, Rosangela

    2013-03-01

    Important topics as preventive detection of epidemics, collective self-organization, information flow and systemic robustness in clusters are typical examples of processes that can be studied in the context of the theory of complex networks. It is an emerging theory in a field, which has recently attracted much interest, involving the synchronization of dynamical systems associated to nodes, or vertices, of the network. Studies have shown that synchronization in oscillatory networks depends not only on the individual dynamics of each element, but also on the combination of the topology of the connections as well as on the properties of the interactions of these elements. Moreover, the response of the network to small damages, caused at strategic points, can enhance the global performance of the whole network. In this presentation we explore an optimal phase oscillatory network altered by an additional term in the coupling function. The application to associative-memory network shows improvement on the correct information retrieval as well as increase of the storage capacity. The inclusion of some small deviations on the nodes, when solutions are attracted to a false state, results in additional enhancement of the performance of the associative-memory network. Supported by FAPESP - Sao Paulo Research Foundation, grant number 2012/12555-4

  4. Oscillatory counter-centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shujing; Nadim, Ali

    2016-02-01

    In ordinary centrifugation, a suspended particle that is heavier than the displaced fluid migrates away from the rotation axis when the fluid-filled container rotates steadily about that axis. In contrast a particle that is lighter than the displaced fluid (e.g., a bubble) migrates toward the rotation axis in a centrifuge. In this paper, we show theoretically that if a fluid-filled container rotates in an oscillatory manner as a rigid body about an axis, at high enough oscillation frequencies, the sense of migration of suspended particles is reversed. That is, in that case particles denser than the fluid migrate inward, while those that are lighter than the fluid move outward. We term this unusual phenomenon "Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation" or OCC, for short. Through application of the method of averaging to the equations of motion, we derive a simple criterion to predict the occurrence of OCC. The analysis also reveals that the time-average of the Coriolis force in the radial direction is the term that is responsible for this effect. In addition, we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Rubinow-Keller lift force on particle trajectories and find that OCC persists even when these forces are active. The phenomenon awaits experimental verification.

  5. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  6. Observation of heat transfer across x point of the islands during sawtooth crash on the HT-7 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Youwen; Wan, Baonian; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Kaiyun; Shen, Biao; Mao, Jianshan

    2009-06-01

    It is observed that a large heat flow abruptly transfers across the x point (which can be located at both the high field side and the low field side) of the 1/1 or 2/2 magnetic islands during a sawtooth crash on the HT-7 tokamak by using tomography of the high-resolution soft-x-ray emission together with the singular value decomposition technique. Although the poloidally asymmetric heat flow contributes an m = 1 component of perturbation in the signals, the heat flow is obviously different from the growth of the m = 1 magnetic island. Furthermore, it is also shown that the large heat flow or the displacement of the hot core occurs only after the crash. Hence, the large displacement of the hot core is just a result of the crash rather than the cause. The heat flow from both the x points of the m = 2 island is also observed. This observation demonstrates that a purely fast reconnection of the m = 1 magnetic island is not responsible for the crash, but that it may be due to the rapid energy and particle diffusion in the stochastic region.

  7. Turbulence simulations of x-point physics on the L-H transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X Q; Cohen, R H; Nevins, W M; Porter, G D; Rensink, M E; Rognlien, T D; Myra, J R; D'Ippolito, D A; Moyer, R; Snyder, P B; Carlstrom, T N

    2000-09-28

    We show that the resistive X-point mode is dominant mode in boundary plasmas in X-point divertor geometry. The poloidal fluctuation phase velocity from the resistive X-point turbulence shows experimentally measured structure across separatrix. The fluctuation phase velocity is larger than E x B velocity both in L and H mode phases, by at least a factor of two. We also demonstrate that there is a strong poloidal asymmetry of particle flux in the proximity of the separatrix. Turbulence suppression in the L-H transition results when sources of energy and particles drive sufficient gradients as experiments.

  8. X-point position dependence of edge intrinsic toroidal rotation on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Karpushov, A. N.; Sauter, O.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Reimerdes, H.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Camenen, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Recent theoretical work predicts intrinsic toroidal rotation in the tokamak edge to depend strongly on the normalized major radial position of the X-point. With this motivation, we conducted a series of Ohmic L-mode shots on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, moving the X-point from the inboard to the outboard edge of the last closed flux surface in both lower and upper single null configurations. The edge toroidal rotation evolved from strongly co-current for an inboard X-point to either vanishing or counter-current for an outboard X-point, in agreement with the theoretical expectations. The whole rotation profile shifted roughly rigidly with the edge rotation, resulting in variation of the peak core rotation by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation. Edge rotation was slightly more counter-current for unfavorable than favorable ∇B drift discharges.

  9. X-point position dependence of edge intrinsic toroidal rotation on the Tokamak à Configuration Variablea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Karpushov, A. N.; Sauter, O.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Reimerdes, H.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Camenen, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Recent theoretical work predicts intrinsic toroidal rotation in the tokamak edge to depend strongly on the normalized major radial position of the X-point. With this motivation, we conducted a series of Ohmic L-mode shots on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, moving the X-point from the inboard to the outboard edge of the last closed flux surface in both lower and upper single null configurations. The edge toroidal rotation evolved from strongly co-current for an inboard X-point to either vanishing or counter-current for an outboard X-point, in agreement with the theoretical expectations. The whole rotation profile shifted roughly rigidly with the edge rotation, resulting in variation of the peak core rotation by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation. Edge rotation was slightly more counter-current for unfavorable than favorable ∇B drift discharges.

  10. Scrape-Off Layer Plasmas for ITER with 2nd X-Point and Convective Transport Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T; Bulmer, R; Rensink, M; Brooks, J

    2006-05-19

    Plasma fluxes to the divertor region in ITER near the magnetic separatrix have been modeled extensively in the past. The smaller, but potentially very important fluxes to the main chamber and outer divertor regions are the focus of the present paper. Two main additions to the usual transport modeling are investigated: namely, convective radial transport from intermittent, rapidly propagating ''blob'' events, and inclusion of the magnetic flux-surface region beyond the second X-point that actually contacts the main-chamber wall. The two-dimensional fluid transport code UEDGE is use to model the plasma, while the energy spectrum of charge-exchange neutrals to the main chamber wall is calculated by DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo code. Additionally, the spatial distribution of Be sputtered from the main chamber wall is determined in the fluid limit.

  11. Local Oscillatory Rheology from Echography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Michel, Brice; Gibaud, Thomas; Leocmach, Mathieu; Manneville, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    Local oscillatory rheology from echography consists of a traditional rheology experiment synchronized with high-frequency ultrasonic imaging which gives access to the local material response to oscillatory shear. Besides classical global rheological quantities, this method provides quantitative time-resolved information on the local displacement across the entire gap of the rheometer. From the local displacement response, we compute and decompose the local strain in its Fourier components and measure the spatially resolved viscoelastic moduli. After benchmarking our method on homogeneous Newtonian fluids and soft solids, we demonstrate that this technique is well suited to characterize spatially heterogeneous samples, wall slip, and the emergence of nonlinearity under large-amplitude oscillatory stress in soft materials.

  12. Oscillatory flow braking in the magnetotail: THEMIS statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Evgeny V.; Kubyshkina, Marina V.; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Sergeev, Victor A.; Petrukovich, Anatoli A.

    2013-06-01

    Using 25 observations of damped oscillatory flow behavior in the near-Earth plasma sheet by the five THEMIS probes during the 2008-2009 magnetotail seasons, we derive the parameters of an oscillating thin filament, such as its oscillation period, damping factor, and entropy. To facilitate comparison with theory, we use measured pressures and magnetic fields with an empirical model to achieve a quantitative representation of the overall structure of the plasma sheet during each event. Because the observed oscillation period of the filament agrees with the oscillation period predicted by Wolf et al. (2012), the observed damped oscillatory flow behavior in the near-Earth plasma sheet is most likely caused by oscillatory braking of the filament.

  13. Oscillatory Head Movements in Cervical Dystonia: Dystonia, Tremor, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Zee, David S.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing of the head, often combined with tremor-like oscillatory head movements. The nature and source of these oscillatory head movements is controversial, so they were quantified to delineate their characteristics and develop a hypothetical model for their genesis. A magnetic search coil system was used to measure head movements in 14 subjects with cervical dystonia. Two distinct types of oscillatory head movements were detected for most subjects, even when they were not clinically evident. One type had a relatively large amplitude and jerky irregular pattern, and the other had smaller amplitude with a more regular and sinusoidal pattern. The kinematic properties of these two types of oscillatory head movements were distinct, although both were often combined in the same subject. Both had features suggestive of a defect in a central neural integrator. The combination of different types of oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia helps to clarify some of the current debates regarding whether they should be considered as manifestations of dystonia or tremor and provides novel insights into their potential pathogenesis. PMID:25879911

  14. Oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia: Dystonia, tremor, or both?

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Zee, David S; Jinnah, H A

    2015-05-01

    Cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing of the head, often combined with tremor-like oscillatory head movements. The nature and source of these oscillatory head movements is controversial, so they were quantified to delineate their characteristics and develop a hypothetical model for their genesis. A magnetic search coil system was used to measure head movements in 14 subjects with cervical dystonia. Two distinct types of oscillatory head movements were detected for most subjects, even when they were not clinically evident. One type had a relatively large amplitude and jerky irregular pattern, and the other had smaller amplitude with a more regular and sinusoidal pattern. The kinematic properties of these two types of oscillatory head movements were distinct, although both were often combined in the same subject. Both had features suggestive of a defect in a central neural integrator. The combination of different types of oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia helps to clarify some of the current debates regarding whether they should be considered as manifestations of dystonia or tremor and provides novel insights into their potential pathogenesis. PMID:25879911

  15. Transport-driven scrape-off layer flows and the x-point dependence of the L-H power threshold in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Rice, J. E.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Greenwald, M.; Granetz, R. S.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.; Marr, K.; Mossessian, D.; Parker, R.; Rowan, W.; Smick, N.; Snipes, J. A.; Terry, J. L.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    Factor of ˜2 higher power thresholds for low- to high-confinement mode transitions (L-H) with unfavorable x-point topologies in Alcator C-Mod [Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] are linked to flow boundary conditions imposed by the scrape-off layer (SOL). Ballooning-like transport drives flow along magnetic field lines from low- to high-field regions with toroidal direction dependent on upper/lower x-point balance; the toroidal rotation of the confined plasma responds, exhibiting a strong counter-current rotation when B ×∇B points away from the x point. Increased auxiliary heating power (rf, no momentum input) leads to an L-H transition at approximately twice the edge electron pressure gradient when B ×∇B points away. As gradients rise prior to the transition, toroidal rotation ramps toward the co-current direction; the H mode is seen when the counter-current rotation imposed by the SOL flow becomes compensated. Remarkably, L-H thresholds in lower-limited discharges are identical to lower x-point discharges; SOL flows are also found similar, suggesting a connection.

  16. Results of JET operation with continuous carbon and beryllium X-point target plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, C. G.; Ady, W. N.; Campbell, D. J.; Carman, P.; Clement, S.; Deksnis, E. B.; Gondhalekar, A.; Harbour, P. J.; Horton, L.; Janeschitz, G.; Lesourd, M.; Lingertat, J.; Pick, M. A.; Saibene, G.; Summers, D. D. R.; Thomas, P. R.

    1992-12-01

    The 1991/92 JET experimental campaign assessed the performance of three different toroidally continuous X-point target plates. The main differences were in the tile material, beryllium and carbon, and the presence of exposed edges. These three configurations have been tested up to power levels in excess of 22 MW and with gas fuelling at the X-point and in the midplane. With the beryllium a radiating divertor was achieved by puffing deuterium into the X-point region, while rapid ELMs resulted from deuterium puffing on the carbon target. The investigation into the importance of small edges, up to 1.5 mm, yielded some interesting results. Although the surface temperature rise was substantially reduced by eliminating exposed tile edges, the onset of the carbon bloom was not delayed by a similar amount. In this paper a model is presented which can explain this and other features of the bloom.

  17. X-Point-Position-Dependent Intrinsic Toroidal Rotation in the Edge of the TCV Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T; Karpushov, A N; Sauter, O; Duval, B P; Labit, B; Reimerdes, H; Vijvers, W A J; Camenen, Y

    2015-06-19

    Edge intrinsic rotation was investigated in Ohmic L-mode discharges on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, scanning the major radial position of the X point, R(X). Edge rotation decreased linearly with increasing R(X), vanishing or becoming countercurrent for an outboard X point, in agreement with theoretical expectations. The core rotation profile shifted fairly rigidly with the edge rotation, changing the central rotation speed by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation velocity. Edge rotation was modestly more countercurrent in unfavorable than favorable ∇B shots. PMID:26196980

  18. Ignitor Structural Analysis for Double X-points Configurations and Machine Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, A.; Frosi, P.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    Recent activities carried out by ANSALDO for the Ignitor program include the structural analysis of the machine Load Assembly for two new scenarios that extend the operation of the machine to H- regimes, where the plasma equilibrium configuration is of the double X- point type and the out-of-plane forces increase. A complete structural analysis was carried out for three scenarios with BT= 13 T and Ip= 9 and 10 MA and double X points just outside the plasma chamber, and Ip= 9 MA and double X points just inside the plasma chamber. The lowered values of the plasma current can offset the increase of stress due to the less favorable X-point configuration relative to the ``extended limiter'' configuration. With the cryogenic plant involving gaseous helium and studied by LINDE KRYOTECHNIK AG, the toroidal field coils reach temperatures up to 230 K and the central solenoid coils approach 220 K after a pulse at the most extreme machine parameters, while the vertical field coils remain under 100 K. Several hours are needed to re-cool the machine down to 30 K before each pulse. New calculations are underway to verify the plant cooling performance at reduced parameters but with more stringent cooling times between shots.

  19. Dynamics of an Isolated Blob in the Presence of the X-Point

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D

    2005-10-10

    The interplay of X-point shearing and axial plasma redistribution along a moving flux tube is discussed. Blobs limited to the main scrape-off-layer and the blobs entirely confined in the divertor region are identified. A strong effect of the radial tilt of the divertor plate on ''divertor'' blobs is found.

  20. Oscillatory phase shapes syllable perception.

    PubMed

    Ten Oever, Sanne; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-12-29

    The role of oscillatory phase for perceptual and cognitive processes is being increasingly acknowledged. To date, little is known about the direct role of phase in categorical perception. Here we show in two separate experiments that the identification of ambiguous syllables that can either be perceived as /da/ or /ga/ is biased by the underlying oscillatory phase as measured with EEG and sensory entrainment to rhythmic stimuli. The measured phase difference in which perception is biased toward /da/ or /ga/ exactly matched the different temporal onset delays in natural audiovisual speech between mouth movements and speech sounds, which last 80 ms longer for /ga/ than for /da/. These results indicate the functional relationship between prestimulus phase and syllable identification, and signify that the origin of this phase relationship could lie in exposure and subsequent learning of unique audiovisual temporal onset differences. PMID:26668393

  1. Plasma sheet flow damping by oscillatory flow braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Evgeny V.; Leontyeva, Olga S.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Nakamura, Rumi; Amm, Olaf; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Kubyshkina, Marina V.; Petrukovich, Anatoli A.; Sergeev, Victor A.; Weygand, James M.

    2015-04-01

    Using simultaneous observations in the near-Earth plasma sheet by five Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes, conjugate ground all-sky camera observations from Canada, and magnetometer networks over North America, we show that auroral bulge dynamics is modulated by a recently discovered process known as oscillatory flow braking, which occurs at about 10 Earth radii down the Earth's magnetotail. In oscillatory flow breaking, plasma sheet flows oscillating with different periods at various distances collide, producing pressure forces that exert shear stresses on the magnetic field, transiently amplifying the vertical magnetic field component. Sporadic fast relief of these stresses through significant particle precipitations causes damping of plasma sheet fast flows.

  2. Small-amplitude oscillatory shear magnetorheology of inverse ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jose; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2010-06-15

    A comprehensive investigation is performed on highly monodisperse silica-based inverse ferrofluids under small-amplitude oscillatory shear in the presence of external magnetic fields up to 1 T. The effect of particle volume fraction and continuous medium Newtonian viscosity is thoroughly investigated. Experimental results for storage modulus are used to validate existing micromechanical magnetorheological models assuming different particle-level field-induced structures. PMID:20345105

  3. Behavior of perturbed plasma displacement near regular and singular X-points for compressible ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alladio, F.; Mancuso, A.; Micozzi, P.; Rogier, F.

    2006-08-15

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis of axisymmetric plasma equilibria is simplified if magnetic coordinates, such as Boozer coordinates ({psi}{sub T} radial, i.e., toroidal flux divided by 2{pi}, {theta} poloidal angle, {phi} toroidal angle, with Jacobian {radical}(g){proportional_to}1/B{sup 2}), are used. The perturbed plasma displacement {xi}-vector is Fourier expanded in the poloidal angle, and the normal-mode equation {delta}W{sub p}({xi}-vector*,{xi}-vector)={omega}{sup 2}{delta}W{sub k}({xi}-vector*,{xi}-vector) (where {delta}W{sub p} and {delta}W{sub k} are the perturbed potential and kinetic plasma energies and {omega}{sup 2} is the eigenvalue) is solved through a 1D radial finite-element method. All magnetic coordinates are however plagued by divergent metric coefficients, if magnetic separatrices exist within (or at the boundary of) the plasma. The ideal MHD stability of plasma equilibria in the presence of magnetic separatrices is therefore a disputed problem. We consider the most general case of a simply connected axisymmetric plasma, which embeds an internal magnetic separatrix--{psi}{sub T}={psi}{sub T}{sup X}, with rotational transform {iota}slantslash({psi}{sub T}{sup X})=0 and regular X-points (B-vector{ne}0)--and is bounded by a second magnetic separatrix at the edge--{psi}{sub T}={psi}{sub T}{sup max}, with {iota}slantslash({psi}{sub T}{sup max}){ne}0--that includes a part of the symmetry axis (R=0) and is limited by two singular X-points (B-vector=0). At the embedded separatrix, the ideal MHD stability analysis requires the continuity of the normal plasma perturbed displacement variable, {xi}{sup {psi}}={xi}-vector{center_dot}{nabla}-vector{psi}{sub T}; the other displacement variables, the binormal {eta}{sup {psi}}={xi}-vector{center_dot}({nabla}-vector{theta}-{iota}slantslash{nabla}-vector{phi}) and the parallel {mu}=-{radical}(g){xi}-vector{center_dot}{nabla}-vector{phi}, can instead be discontinuous everywhere. The

  4. Collective phase description of oscillatory convection

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoji; Nakao, Hiroya

    2013-12-15

    We formulate a theory for the collective phase description of oscillatory convection in Hele-Shaw cells. It enables us to describe the dynamics of the oscillatory convection by a single degree of freedom which we call the collective phase. The theory can be considered as a phase reduction method for limit-cycle solutions in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, namely, stable time-periodic solutions to partial differential equations, representing the oscillatory convection. We derive the phase sensitivity function, which quantifies the phase response of the oscillatory convection to weak perturbations applied at each spatial point, and analyze the phase synchronization between two weakly coupled Hele-Shaw cells exhibiting oscillatory convection on the basis of the derived phase equations.

  5. X-point Shallow Donors in GaAs under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, L.; Haller, E. E.

    1996-03-01

    Transitions from the ground to bound excited states associated with shallow donors in GaAs under large hydrostatic pressure are studied with IR absorption spectroscopy. A modified Merrill-Basset diamond anvil cell was used to apply hydrostatic pressures of several GPa to lightly doped ( 10^15 cm-3) n-type GaAs samples. At such pressures, the energy of the conduction band at the X point falls below that at the Γ point and the wavefunctions of donor impurities take on X-band character. The deep DX centers which exist at these pressures were converted to shallow donors by illumination at low temperature with a red LED. The X-band absorption spectra for Sn and Si show one line each at 50 and 61 meV, respectively. The spectrum for S shows a broad absorption starting at 90 meV, which shifts to lower energies with increasing pressure. The presence of only one line in the Si and Sn spectra can be explained by the non-parabolicity of the X-point conduction band minimum. The binding energies of these donors are estimated to be 74, 85, and 117 meV for Sn, Si, and S respectively. This work supported by USNSF DMR-94 17763.

  6. Rhythmic TMS Causes Local Entrainment of Natural Oscillatory Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Thut, Gregor; Veniero, Domenica; Romei, Vincenzo; Miniussi, Carlo; Schyns, Philippe; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Neuronal elements underlying perception, cognition, and action exhibit distinct oscillatory phenomena, measured in humans by electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). So far, the correlative or causal nature of the link between brain oscillations and functions has remained elusive. A compelling demonstration of causality would primarily generate oscillatory signatures that are known to correlate with particular cognitive functions and then assess the behavioral consequences. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for causal entrainment of brain oscillations by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) using concurrent EEG. Results We used rhythmic TMS bursts to directly interact with an MEG-identified parietal α-oscillator, activated by attention and linked to perception. With TMS bursts tuned to its preferred α-frequency (α-TMS), we confirmed the three main predictions of entrainment of a natural oscillator: (1) that α-oscillations are induced during α-TMS (reproducing an oscillatory signature of the stimulated parietal cortex), (2) that there is progressive enhancement of this α-activity (synchronizing the targeted, α-generator to the α-TMS train), and (3) that this depends on the pre-TMS phase of the background α-rhythm (entrainment of natural, ongoing α-oscillations). Control conditions testing different TMS burst profiles and TMS-EEG in a phantom head confirmed specificity of α-boosting to the case of synchronization between TMS train and neural oscillator. Conclusions The periodic electromagnetic force that is generated during rhythmic TMS can cause local entrainment of natural brain oscillations, emulating oscillatory signatures activated by cognitive tasks. This reveals a new mechanism of online TMS action on brain activity and can account for frequency-specific behavioral TMS effects at the level of biologically relevant rhythms. PMID:21723129

  7. Intrinsic instabilities in X-point geometry: A tool to understand and predict the Scrape Off Layer transport in standard and advanced divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militello, F.; Liu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic Scrape Off Layer (SOL) instabilities are studied using flute approximation and incorporating the appropriate sheath boundary conditions at the target. The linear growth rate and the structure of the modes are obtained. The associated diffusion is estimated using a γ / k⊥2 approach for the fastest growing modes. The model used includes curvature and sheath drives, finite Larmor radius effects and partial line tying at the target. The magnetic geometry is obtained using current carrying wires, representing the plasma current and the divertor coils, and naturally generates X-point geometry and magnetic shear effects. The calculation is performed for ITER relevant parameters and scans in SOL width and distance from the separatrix are presented. In addition to a standard Lower Single Null, Super-X and Snowflake configurations are examined in order to assess the importance of the geometry on the stability of the boundary plasma.

  8. Studies of oscillatory combustion and fuel vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borman, G. L.; Myers, P. S.; Uyehara, O. A.

    1972-01-01

    Research projects involving oscillatory combustion and fuel vaporization are reported. Comparisons of experimental and theoretical droplet vaporization histories under ambient conditions such that the droplet may approach its thermodynamic critical point are presented. Experimental data on instantaneous heat transfer from a gas to a solid surface under conditions of oscillatory pressure with comparisons to an unsteady one-dimensional model are analyzed. Droplet size and velocity distribution in a spray as obtained by use of a double flash fluorescent method were investigated.

  9. Surface-Step-Induced Oscillatory Oxide Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Luo, Langli; Ciston, Jim; Saidi, Wissam A.; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-09-01

    We report in situ atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations of the oxidation of stepped Cu surfaces. We find that the presence of surface steps both inhibits oxide film growth and leads to the oxide decomposition, thereby resulting in oscillatory oxide film growth. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the oscillatory oxide film growth is induced by oxygen adsorption on the lower terrace along the step edge, which destabilizes the oxide film formed on the upper terrace.

  10. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  11. Oscillatory-like relaxation behavior of light transmitted through ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Lin, Yueqiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Fu, Jun; Miao, Hua; Zhang, Qingmei; Zhang, Tingzhen

    2011-10-20

    An oscillatory-like relaxation process in which there are two valleys in the T-t curve is observed when light is transmitted through binary ferrofluids composed of both ferrimagnetic CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles and paramagnetic p-MgFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles in the presence of a high magnetic field and through pure (single) CoFe(2)O(4) ferrofluids in a low magnetic field. This relaxation behavior is explained using a model of a bidispersed system based on both chained and unchained particles. In such a bidispersed system, the variation of the transmitted light results mainly from the motion of the chains, with the polarized unchained particles' gas producing the modulation effect. The oscillatory-like relaxation phenomenon depends on the features of both the chained and unchained particle systems. If either the particle volume fraction of chained particles or of unchained particles is very low, or the degree of polarization of the unchained particles gas is very weak, a simple nonlinear relaxation process, giving only a valley in the T-t curve, will appear for the transmitted light. For pure CoFe(2)O(4) ferrofluids, the number of chained and unchained particles does not remain constant under different values of the magnetic field. According to the analysis of the relaxation behavior of transmitted light, it is known that binary ferrofluids based on strong magnetic CoFe(2)O(4) particles and weak magnetic p-MgFe(2)O(4) particles can be much closer to the theoretical bidispersed system than single ferrofluids containing only strong magnetic particles. PMID:22015404

  12. Oscillatory phenomena in solar and stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, David Shaun

    This thesis presents varying studies into the nature of intensity oscillations observed both on the Sun and two active cool stars. The first part concentrates on the detection of correlated oscillations occuring between differing heights in the solar atmosphere above quiet-Sun magnetic network bright points (NBPs), interpreted as signatures of energy propagation. This is achieved through correlating in time the wavelet power spectra of lightcurves from images obtained in several optical wavelengths. In four of the eleven NBPs studied, evidence is found for upwardly-propagating, low-frequency waves (1.4 mHz, 2.1 mHz) in the lower chromosphere, decreasing in oscillatory power with the onset, or increase in power, of higher-frequency waves (2.9 mHz, 4.0 mHz) within the upper chromosphere. Moving higher into the atmosphere two of the four cases of higher frequency waves also show a decrease in power. These observational detections are interpreted as transverse-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves undergoing non-linear mode coupling to longitudinal-modes at double the frequency, which shock or otherwise dissipate in the high chromosphere. Evidence is also found for additional upward- and downward- directed waves within all the NBPs studied. The extension of wavelet power techniques into the analysis of phase difference and phase coherence is also presented, utilising UV intensities obtained from above a weak solar network element. The problems associated with the quantification of phase coherence values are outlined and a comparison of two differing methods is carried out. Changes observed in the evolution of phase difference between oscillations detected in the UV emission of the temperature minimum and low transition region are shown to be due to the alteration of the underlying magnetic topology, occuring when same polarity flux emerges nearby. The final part of this thesis concerns the differing situation of intensity variations during energetic flare phenomena on

  13. Normal forces of magnetorheological fluids under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chaoyang; Gong, Xinglong; Xuan, Shouhu; Zong, Luhang; Peng, Chao

    2012-03-01

    The normal forces of magnetorheological fluids under oscillatory shear are investigated by a commercial magneto-rheometer with plate-plate geometry. At the constant strain amplitude and frequency, the normal forces almost keep a steady value with the testing time if the strain amplitude is smaller than the critical value. When a larger strain is applied, they will fluctuate periodically. Under the strain sweep mode, the relationships between normal forces and strain amplitude can be divided into three regions: linear viscoelastic region, nonlinear viscoelastic region and the viscoplastic region. Under the frequency sweep method, it is found that the angular frequency show little influence on the normal forces. At last, the normal forces increase with increasing of the temperature under a low magnetic field, while they decrease under a high magnetic field.

  14. Frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutha, A. C.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-11-01

    A frequency-offset separated-oscillatory-field technique is presented. The technique is a modification of the Ramsey method of separated oscillatory fields [Phys. Rev. 76, 996 (1949), 10.1103/PhysRev.76.996], in which the frequencies of the two separated oscillatory fields are slightly offset from each other, so that the relative phase of the two fields varies continuously with time. With this technique, the detection signal oscillates in time at the offset frequency, and the resonance frequency is obtained by using a simple straight-line fit of the phase of this signal. The technique has the advantages of being insensitive to the frequency response of the experimental system, of being sensitive only to noise at the offset frequency, and of allowing systematic effects to be more cleanly resolved due to the simple lineshape.

  15. Shear and loading in channels: Oscillatory shearing and edge currents of superconducting vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambaugh, J. F.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-04-01

    Via computer simulations we study the motion of quantized magnetic flux-lines, or vortices, confined to a straight pin-free channel in a strong-pinning superconducting sample. We find that, when a constant current is applied across this system, a very unusual oscillatory shearing appears, in which the vortices moving at the edges of the channel periodically trail behind and then suddenly leapfrog past the vortices moving in the inner rows. For small enough driving forces, this oscillatory shearing dynamic phase is replaced by a continuous shearing phase in which the distance between initially-nearby vortices grows in time, quickly destroying the order of the lattice. An animation of this novel “oscillatory leapfrogging shear” effect of the vortex edge currents appears in http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/˜nori/channel/

  16. [Synchronized, oscillatory brain activity in visual perception].

    PubMed

    Braunitzer, Gábor

    2008-09-30

    The present study investigates one of the most promising developments of the brain-mind question, namely the possible links between synchronized oscillatory brain activity and certain (visual) perceptual processes. Through a review of the relevant literature, the author introduces the reader to the most important theories of coherent perception ('binding'), and makes an attempt to show how synchronization of EEG-registrable oscillatory activities from various frequency bands might explain binding. Finally, a number of clinical problems are also mentioned, regarding which the presented theoretical framework might deserve further consideration. PMID:18841649

  17. Cortico-pallidal oscillatory connectivity in patients with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Jha, Ashwani; Bock, Antje; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Sander, Tillmann H; Litvak, Vladimir; Kühn, Andrea A

    2015-07-01

    Primary dystonia has been associated with an underlying dysfunction of a wide network of brain regions including the motor cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. Dystonia can be effectively treated by pallidal deep brain stimulation although the mechanism of this effect is not well understood. Here, we sought to characterize cortico-basal ganglia functional connectivity using a frequency-specific measure of connectivity-coherence. We recorded direct local field potentials from the human pallidum simultaneously with whole head magnetoencephalography to characterize functional connectivity in the cortico-pallidal oscillatory network in nine patients with idiopathic dystonia. Three-dimensional cortico-pallidal coherence images were compared to surrogate images of phase shuffled data across patients to reveal clusters of significant coherence (family-wise error P < 0.01, voxel extent 1000). Three frequency-specific, spatially-distinct cortico-pallidal networks have been identified: a pallido-temporal source of theta band (4-8 Hz) coherence, a pallido-cerebellar source of alpha band (7-13 Hz) coherence and a cortico-pallidal source of beta band (13-30 Hz) coherence over sensorimotor areas. Granger-based directionality analysis revealed directional coupling with the pallidal local field potentials leading in the theta and alpha band and the magnetoencephalographic cortical source leading in the beta band. The degree of pallido-cerebellar coupling showed an inverse correlation with dystonic symptom severity. Our data extend previous findings in patients with Parkinson's disease describing motor cortex-basal ganglia oscillatory connectivity in the beta band to patients with dystonia. Source coherence analysis revealed two additional frequency-specific networks involving the temporal cortex and the cerebellum. Pallido-cerebellar oscillatory connectivity and its association with dystonic symptoms provides further confirmation of cerebellar involvement

  18. Mechanisms for oscillatory true polar wander.

    PubMed

    Creveling, J R; Mitrovica, J X; Chan, N-H; Latychev, K; Matsuyama, I

    2012-11-01

    Palaeomagnetic studies of Palaeoproterozoic to Cretaceous rocks propose a suite of large and relatively rapid (tens of degrees over 10 to 100 million years) excursions of the rotation pole relative to the surface geography, or true polar wander (TPW). These excursions may be linked in an oscillatory, approximately coaxial succession about the centre of the contemporaneous supercontinent. Within the framework of a standard rotational theory, in which a delayed viscous adjustment of the rotational bulge acts to stabilize the rotation axis, geodynamic models for oscillatory TPW generally appeal to consecutive, opposite loading phases of comparable magnitude. Here we extend a nonlinear rotational stability theory to incorporate the stabilizing effect of TPW-induced elastic stresses in the lithosphere. We demonstrate that convectively driven inertia perturbations acting on a nearly prolate, non-hydrostatic Earth with an effective elastic lithospheric thickness of about 10 kilometres yield oscillatory TPW paths consistent with palaeomagnetic inferences. This estimate of elastic thickness can be reduced, even to zero, if the rotation axis is stabilized by long-term excess ellipticity in the plane of the TPW. We speculate that these sources of stabilization, acting on TPW driven by a time-varying mantle flow field, provide a mechanism for linking the distinct, oscillatory TPW events of the past few billion years. PMID:23135471

  19. Computer-Assisted Experiments with Oscillatory Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, J. C.; Ferraz, A.; Rogalski, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    A basic setup for data acquisition and analysis from an oscillatory circuit is described, with focus on its application as either low-pass, high-pass, band-pass or band-reject frequency filter. A homemade board containing the "RLC" elements allows for the interchange of some of them, in particular, for the easy change of the "R" value, and this…

  20. Suppression of the Oscillatory Modes of a Space Charge in the Magnetron Injection Guns of Technological Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyavin, M. Yu.; Kuntsevich, A. D.; Manuilov, V. N.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of based on the PIC method numerical simulation of the dynamic processes of trapping of electrons into the adiabatic trap of a technological gyrotron for different configurations of the electric and magnetic fields in the electron beam formation region. The electrode geometry providing a low reflection coefficient of the magnetic mirror to suppress oscillatory modes in the space-charge cloud and ensure the stability of the electron beam with a high fraction of oscillatory energy in such a system has been found.

  1. Oscillatory correlates of autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Dorosheva, Elena A; Tamozhnikov, Sergey S; Saprigyn, Alexander E

    2015-03-01

    Recollection of events from one's own life is referred to as autobiographical memory. Autobiographical memory is an important part of our self. Neuroimaging findings link self-referential processes with the default mode network (DMN). Much evidence coming primarily from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies shows that autobiographical memory and DMN have a common neural base. In this study, electroencephalographic data collected in 47 participants during recollection of autobiographical episodes were analyzed using temporal and spatial independent component analyses in combination with source localization. Autobiographical remembering was associated with an increase of spectral power in alpha and beta and a decrease in delta band. The increase of alpha power, as estimated by sLORETA, was most prominent in the posterior DMN, but was also observed in visual and motor cortices, prompting an assumption that it is associated with activation of DMN and inhibition of irrelevant sensory and motor areas. In line with data linking delta oscillations with aversive states, decrease of delta power was more pronounced in episodes associated with positive emotions, whereas episodes associated with negative emotions were accompanied by an increase of delta power. Vividness of recollection correlated positively with theta oscillations. These results highlight the leading role of alpha oscillations and the DMN in the processes accompanying autobiographical remembering. PMID:25523347

  2. Stepwise oscillatory circuits of a DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunming

    2009-08-01

    A DNA molecule is characterized by a stepwise oscillatory circuit where every base pair is a capacitor, every phosphate bridge is an inductance, and every deoxyribose is a charge router. The circuitry accounts for DNA conductivity through both short and long distances in good agreement with experimental evidence that has led to the identification of the so-called super-exchange and multiple-step hopping mechanisms. However, in contrast to the haphazard hopping and super-exchanging events, the circuitry is a well-defined charge transport mechanism reflecting the great reliability of the genetic substance in delivering electrons. Stepwise oscillatory charge transport through a nucleotide sequence that directly modulates the oscillation frequency may have significant biological implications. PMID:19669574

  3. [Molecular oscillatory machinery of circadian rhythms].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2012-07-01

    Many metabolic and physiological processes display daily rhythms oscillated by the internal circadian clock system. This rhythm is generated by interlocked transcription-(post) translation feedback loops of clock genes: the core oscillatory loop, being composed of CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer activating the expressions of PER and CRY that directly repress CLOCK/BMAL1, is accompanied by accessory loops consisted with REV-ERB nuclear receptor repressing Bmal1 or with DBP competing with E4BP4 on D-box site. These clock proteins are regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitination (PER/CRY), and acetylation (CLOCK/BMAL1). Recently, a deacetylating protein SIRT1 mediated metabolic pathway is discovered to be interlocked with core oscillatory loop via Nampt expression, a late-limiting enzyme in NAD+ salvage pathway. Since many key-step enzymes of metabolisms are regulated by the circadian clock, circadian clock system may intimately link to cellular metabolism. PMID:22844791

  4. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  5. An oscillatory neural network unit model

    SciTech Connect

    Bazhenov, M.; Rabinovich, M.; Rubchinsky, L.

    1996-06-01

    A mathematical model of a neuron describing its oscillatory activity is constructed and investigated. The model in the form of a system of three ordinary differential equations demonstrates both regular behavior of the time dependence of electric membrane potential and its chaotic dynamics. The absence of rigorous heteroclinic trajectories in the phase space of the system is proved and the transition to chaos is investigated. The processes of synchronization of the oscillators are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Oscillatory traveling waves in excitable media

    SciTech Connect

    Zemskov, E. P. Loskutov, A. Yu.

    2008-08-15

    A new type of waves in an excitable medium, characterized by oscillatory profile, is described. The excitable medium is modeled by a two-component activator-inhibitor system. Reaction-diffusion systems with diagonal and cross diffusion are examined. As an example, a front (kink) represented by a heteroclinic orbit in the phase space is considered. The wave shape and velocity are analyzed with the use of exact analytical solutions for wave profiles.

  7. Modeling Stromatolite Growth Under Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. J.; Gong, J.; Tice, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stromatolite growth models based on diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) has been fairly successful at producing features commonly recognized in stromatolitic structures in the rock record. These models generally require slow mixing of solutes at time scales comparable to the growth of organisms and largely ignore fluid erosions. Recent research on microbial mats suggests that fluid flow might have a dominant control on the formation, deformation and erosion of surface microbial structures, raising the possibility that different styles of fluid flow may influence the morphology of stromatolites. Many stromatolites formed in relatively high energy, shallow water environments under oscillatory currents driven by wind-induced waves. In order to investigate the potential role of oscillatory flows in shaping stromatolites, we are constructing a numerical model of stromatolite growth parameterized by flume experiments with cyanobacterial biofilms. The model explicitly incorporates reaction-diffusion processes, surface deformation and erosion, biomass growth, sedimentation and mineral precipitation. A Lattice-Boltzmann numerical scheme was applied to the reaction-diffusion equations in order to boost computational efficiency. A basic finite element method was employed to compute surface deformation and erosion. Growth of biomass, sedimentation and carbonate precipitation was based on a modified discrete cellular automata scheme. This model will be used to test an alternative hypothesis for the formation of stromatolites in higher energy, shallow and oscillatory flow environments.

  8. Oscillatory shear response of dilute ferrofluids: predictions from rotational Brownian dynamics simulations and ferrohydrodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Soto-Aquino, D; Rosso, D; Rinaldi, C

    2011-11-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles that exhibit normal liquid behavior in the absence of magnetic fields but respond to imposed magnetic fields by changing their viscosity without loss of fluidity. The response of ferrofluids to constant shear and magnetic fields has received a lot of attention, but the response of ferrofluids to oscillatory shear remains largely unexplored. In the present work we used rotational Brownian dynamics to study the dynamic properties of ferrofluids with thermally blocked nanoparticles under oscillatory shear and constant magnetic fields. Comparisons between simulations and modeling using the ferrohydrodynamics equations were also made. Simulation results show that, for small rotational Péclet number, the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the complex viscosity depend on the magnitude of the magnetic field and frequency of the shear, following a Maxwell-like model with field-dependent viscosity and characteristic time equal to the field-dependent transverse magnetic relaxation time of the nanoparticles. Comparison between simulations and the numerical solution of the ferrohydrodynamic equations shows that the oscillatory rotational magnetoviscosity for an oscillating shear field obtained using the kinetic magnetization relaxation equation quantitatively agrees with simulations for a wide range of Péclet number and Langevin parameter but has quantitative deviations from the simulations at high values of the Langevin parameter. These predictions indicate an apparent elastic character to the rheology of these suspensions, even though we are considering the infinitely dilute limit in which there are negligible particle-particle interactions and, as such, chains do not form. Additionally, an asymptotic analytical solution of the ferrohydrodynamics equations, valid for Pe<2, was used to demonstrate that the Cox-Merz rule applies for dilute ferrofluids under conditions of small shear rates. At higher shear

  9. Rhythms and blues: modulation of oscillatory synchrony and the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments

    PubMed Central

    Leuchter, Andrew F.; Hunter, Aimee M.; Krantz, David E.; Cook, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) act at different hierarchical levels of biological complexity, ranging from the individual synapse to the brain as a whole. Theories of antidepressant medication action traditionally have focused on the level of cell-to-cell interaction and synaptic neurotransmission. However, recent evidence suggests that modulation of synchronized electrical activity in neuronal networks is a common effect of antidepressant treatments, including not only medications, but also neuromodulatory treatments such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Synchronization of oscillatory network activity in particular frequency bands has been proposed to underlie neurodevelopmental and learning processes, and also may be important in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Here, we review current research on the relationship between neuroplasticity and oscillatory synchrony, which suggests that oscillatory synchrony may help mediate neuroplastic changes related to neurodevelopment, learning, and memory, as well as medication and neuromodulatory treatment for MDD. We hypothesize that medication and neuromodulation treatments may have related effects on the rate and pattern of neuronal firing, and that these effects underlie antidepressant efficacy. Elucidating the mechanisms through which oscillatory synchrony may be related to neuroplasticity could lead to enhanced treatment strategies for MDD. PMID:25809789

  10. Oscillatory Extinction Of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Yoo, S. W.; Christianson, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Since extinction has been observed in an oscillatory manner in Le greater than 1 premixed flames, it is not unreasonable to expect that extinction could occur in an unsteady manner for diffusion flames. Indeed, near-limit oscillations have been observed experimentally under microgravity conditions for both candle flames and droplet flames. Furthermore, the analysis of Cheatham and Matalon on the unsteady behavior of diffusion flames with heat loss, identified an oscillatory regime which could be triggered by either a sufficiently large Lewis number (even without heat loss) or an appreciable heat loss (even for Le=1). In light of these recent understanding, the present investigation aims to provide a well-controlled experiment that can unambiguously demonstrate the oscillation of diffusion flames near both the transport- and radiation-induced limits. That is, since candle and jet flames are stabilized through flame segments that are fundamentally premixed in nature, and since premixed flames are prone to oscillate, there is the possibility that the observed oscillation of these bulk diffusion flames could be triggered and sustained by the oscillation of the premixed flame segments. Concerning the observed oscillatory droplet extinction, it is well-known that gas-phase oscillation in heterogeneous burning can be induced by and is thereby coupled with condensed-phase unsteadiness. Consequently, a convincing experiment on diffusion flame oscillation must exclude any ingredients of premixed flames and other sources that may either oscillate themselves or promote the oscillation of the diffusion flame. The present experiment on burner-generated spherical flames with a constant reactant supply endeavored to accomplish this goal. The results are further compared with those from computational simulation for further understanding and quantification of the flame dynamics and extinction.

  11. Coupled Coils, Magnets and Lenz's Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results. (Contains 6 figures and 1 footnote.)

  12. Dynamics of macroautophagy: Modeling and oscillatory behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyungreem; Kwon, Hyun Woong; Kang, Hyuk; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, Myung-Shik; Choi, M. Y.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a model for macroautophagy and study the resulting dynamics of autophagy in a system isolated from its extra-cellular environment. It is found that the intracellular concentrations of autophagosomes and autolysosomes display oscillations with their own natural frequencies. Such oscillatory behaviors, which are interrelated to the dynamics of intracellular ATP, amino acids, and proteins, are consistent with the very recent biological observations. Implications of this theoretical study of autophagy are discussed, with regard to the possibility of guiding molecular studies of autophagy.

  13. Frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezginov, N.; Vutha, A. C.; Ferchichi, I.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-05-01

    Improved measurements in atomic hydrogen are needed to shed light on the proton radius puzzle. We are measuring the Lamb shift in hydrogen (n = 2 ,S1 / 2 -->P1 / 2) using a frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields (FOSOF) method. The advantages of this method include its insensitivity to atomic beam intensity fluctuations and the microwave-system frequency response. We present experimental results obtained with this method, towards a new measurement of the proton charge radius. We acknowledge funding from NSERC, CFI, CRC, ORF, and NIST.

  14. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian D.; Cheng, Xiang; Ong, Desmond C.; Liddell-Watson, Chekesha; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Taylor dispersion—shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion—is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle’s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids.

  15. Absence of X-point band overlap in divalent hexaborides and variability of the surface chemical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Gweon, Gey-Hong; Mo, Sung-Kwan; Allen, James W.; Sarrao, John L.; Bianchi, Adrian D.; Fisk, Zachary

    2001-11-04

    Angle-resolved photoemission measurements of divalent hexaborides reveals a >1 eV X-point gap between the valence and conduction bands, in contradiction to the band overlap assumed in several models of their novel ferromagnetism. While the global ARPES band structure and gap size observed are consistent with the results of bulk-sensitive soft x-ray absorption and emission boron K-edge spectroscopy, the surface-sensitive photoemission measurements also show a variation with cation, surface and time of the position of the surface chemical potential in the band structure.

  16. Resistive reduced MHD modeling of multi-edge-localized-mode cycles in Tokamak X-point plasmas.

    PubMed

    Orain, F; Bécoulet, M; Huijsmans, G T A; Dif-Pradalier, G; Hoelzl, M; Morales, J; Garbet, X; Nardon, E; Pamela, S; Passeron, C; Latu, G; Fil, A; Cahyna, P

    2015-01-23

    The full dynamics of a multi-edge-localized-mode (ELM) cycle is modeled for the first time in realistic tokamak X-point geometry with the nonlinear reduced MHD code jorek. The diamagnetic rotation is found to be instrumental to stabilize the plasma after an ELM crash and to model the cyclic reconstruction and collapse of the plasma pressure profile. ELM relaxations are cyclically initiated each time the pedestal gradient crosses a triggering threshold. Diamagnetic drifts are also found to yield a near-symmetric ELM power deposition on the inner and outer divertor target plates, consistent with experimental measurements. PMID:25659004

  17. Oscillatory patterns in three-dimensional kinetic simulations of space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    We analyse kinetic simulations of the relaxation of a magnetic field configuration with multiple null-points. The power spectral density of the magnetic field is dissipative and exhibits two breaks: at ion-inertial and at electron-gyration scales; the slopes are steeper than observed in solar wind. Although different simulations in the same configuration show similar energetics, the local evolution pattern is rather chaotic. Most of the null-points in the simulations are of the spiral type, they are surrounded by twisted field lines, and powerful currents establish through them forming Z-pinches. Various instabilities are associated with the current channels, especially prominent is the kinking which drives secondary magnetic reconnection that dissipates the magnetic energy. In some regions the current channels produce thin secondary threads that show lower hybrid drift-like oscillatory characteristics. Oscillatory patterns are also detected at the halo boundary above dipolar lunar anomalies in 3-D kinetic simulations. It is found that they are (at least partially) in relation to the position of the B=0 line across the halo formed due to the opposing directions of the dipolar and interplanetary magnetic field in the simulation set-up, as well is to the strength of both fields and the solar wind parameters. We investigate and compare the detailed characteristics of small-scale wave patterns in both 3D simulations of null points and lunar magnetic anomalies.

  18. Information transmission in oscillatory neural activity.

    PubMed

    Koepsell, Kilian; Sommer, Friedrich T

    2008-11-01

    Periodic neural activity not locked to the stimulus or to motor responses is usually ignored. Here, we present new tools for modeling and quantifying the information transmission based on periodic neural activity that occurs with quasi-random phase relative to the stimulus. We propose a model to reproduce characteristic features of oscillatory spike trains, such as histograms of inter-spike intervals and phase locking of spikes to an oscillatory influence. The proposed model is based on an inhomogeneous Gamma process governed by a density function that is a product of the usual stimulus-dependent rate and a quasi-periodic function. Further, we present an analysis method generalizing the direct method (Rieke et al. in Spikes: exploring the neural code. MIT Press, Cambridge, 1999; Brenner et al. in Neural Comput 12(7):1531-1552, 2000) to assess the information content in such data. We demonstrate these tools on recordings from relay cells in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the cat. PMID:18985377

  19. Ketamine alters oscillatory coupling in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Fábio V.; Cornélio, Alianda M.; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Tort, Adriano B. L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that higher order oscillatory interactions such as cross-frequency coupling are important for brain functions that are impaired in schizophrenia, including perception, attention and memory. Here we investigated the dynamics of oscillatory coupling in the hippocampus of awake rats upon NMDA receptor blockade by ketamine, a pharmacological model of schizophrenia. Ketamine (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg i.p.) increased gamma and high-frequency oscillations (HFO) in all depths of the CA1-dentate axis, while theta power changes depended on anatomical location and were independent of a transient increase of delta oscillations. Phase coherence of gamma and HFO increased across hippocampal layers. Phase-amplitude coupling between theta and fast oscillations was markedly altered in a dose-dependent manner: ketamine increased hippocampal theta-HFO coupling at all doses, while theta-gamma coupling increased at the lowest dose and was disrupted at the highest dose. Our results demonstrate that ketamine alters network interactions that underlie cognitively relevant theta-gamma coupling. PMID:23907109

  20. Nonlinear oscillatory and monotonic shocks in dense plasmas with ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Rehman, Aman-ur; Hasnain, H.; Mustafa, N.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the ion acoustic oscillatory and monotonic shocks in dissipative homogeneous magnetized plasmas. The dissipation in the plasma system is considered via kinematic viscosity of ions and quantum effects are included through degeneracy pressure of ultra-relativistic electrons. Korteweg de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation is derived by using reductive perturbation method. Numerical and analytical solutions of KdVB equation are presented. The transition from oscillatory profile to monotonic shock are studied numerically at different values of kinematic viscosity. We also analyzed the effects of variations of different plasma parameters on the strength of the shock structure in dense plasmas. The relevance of the work to astrophysical plasma conditions such as in compact stars is also pointed out.

  1. Probing of field-induced structures and their dynamics in ferrofluids using oscillatory rheology.

    PubMed

    Felicia, Leona J; Philip, John

    2014-10-21

    We probe field-induced structures and their dynamics in ferrofluids using oscillatory rheology. The magnetic field dependence of the relaxation time and crossover modulus showed two distinct regions, indicating the different microstructures in those regions. The observed relaxation at various magnetic field strengths indicates that side chains are attached to the pinned single-sphere-width chains between the rheometer plates. Our results suggest that the ferrofluid under a magnetic field exhibits a soft solidlike behavior whose relaxation is governed by the imposed strain rate and the magnetic field. Using the scaling factors obtained from the frequency and modulus at the crossover point in the oscillatory rheological measurements, the constant strain-rate frequency sweep data is superimposed onto a single master curve. The frequency scaling factor increases with the strain rate as a power law with an exponent close to unity, whereas the amplitude scaling factor is almost strain-rate-independent at high magnetic field strengths. These findings are useful for a better understanding of field-induced ordering of nanoparticles in fluids and their optimization for practical applications. PMID:25268053

  2. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Steady and Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamp, Alison M.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study to investigate the effect of steady and oscillatory (with zero net mass flux) blowing on cavity resonance is undertaken. The objective is to study the basic mechanisms of the control of cavity resonance. An actuator is designed and calibrated to generate either steady blowing or oscillatory blowing with A zero net mass flux. The results of the experiment show that both steady and oscillatory blowing are effective, and reduce the amplitude of the dominant resonant mode by 1OdB. The oscillatory blowing is however found to be more superior in that the same effectiveness could be accomplished with a momentum coefficient an order of magnitude smaller than for steady blowing. The experiment also confirms the results of previous computations that suggest the forcing frequency for oscillatory blowing must not be at harmonic frequencies of the cavity resonant modes.

  3. Essentially Non-Oscillatory and Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Schemes for Hyperbolic Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    1997-01-01

    In these lecture notes we describe the construction, analysis, and application of ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws and related Hamilton- Jacobi equations. ENO and WENO schemes are high order accurate finite difference schemes designed for problems with piecewise smooth solutions containing discontinuities. The key idea lies at the approximation level, where a nonlinear adaptive procedure is used to automatically choose the locally smoothest stencil, hence avoiding crossing discontinuities in the interpolation procedure as much as possible. ENO and WENO schemes have been quite successful in applications, especially for problems containing both shocks and complicated smooth solution structures, such as compressible turbulence simulations and aeroacoustics. These lecture notes are basically self-contained. It is our hope that with these notes and with the help of the quoted references, the reader can understand the algorithms and code them up for applications.

  4. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production.

  5. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  6. Phase slips in oscillatory hair bundles.

    PubMed

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  7. Spiking dynamics of interacting oscillatory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantsev, V. B.; Nekorkin, V. I.; Binczak, S.; Jacquir, S.; Bilbault, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    Spiking sequences emerging from dynamical interaction in a pair of oscillatory neurons are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The model comprises two unidirectionally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units with modified excitability (MFHN). The first (master) unit exhibits a periodic spike sequence with a certain frequency. The second (slave) unit is in its excitable mode and responds on the input signal with a complex (chaotic) spike trains. We analyze the dynamic mechanisms underlying different response behavior depending on interaction strength. Spiking phase maps describing the response dynamics are obtained. Complex phase locking and chaotic sequences are investigated. We show how the response spike trains can be effectively controlled by the interaction parameter and discuss the problem of neuronal information encoding.

  8. Automatic control of oscillatory penetration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lucon, Peter A

    2015-01-06

    A system and method for controlling an oscillatory penetration apparatus. An embodiment is a system and method for controlling a sonic drill having a displacement and an operating range and operating at a phase difference, said sonic drill comprising a push-pull piston and eccentrics, said method comprising: operating the push-pull piston at an initial push-pull force while the eccentrics are operated at a plurality of different operating frequencies within the operating range of the sonic drill and measuring the displacement at each operating frequency; determining an efficient operating frequency for the material being drilled and operating the eccentrics at said efficient operating frequency; determining the phase difference at which the sonic drill is operating; and if the phase difference is not substantially equal to minus ninety degrees, operating the push-pull piston at another push-pull force.

  9. Production of oscillatory flow in wind tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Asmi, K.; Castro, I. P.

    1993-06-01

    A method for producing oscillatory flow in open-circuit wind tunnels driven by centrifugal fans is described. Performance characteristics of a new device installed on two such tunnels of greatly differing size are presented. It is shown that sinusoidal variations of the working section flow, having peak-to-peak amplitudes up to at least 30 percent of the mean flow speed and frequencies up to, typically, that corresponding to the acoustic quarter-wave-length frequency determined by the tunnel size, can be obtained with negligible harmonic distortion or acoustic noise difficulties. A brief review of the various methods that have been used previously is included, and the advantages and disadvantages of these different techniques are highlighted. The present technique seems to represent a significant improvement over many of them.

  10. Exercise oscillatory ventilation in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Corrà, Ugo

    2016-03-01

    Ventilation inefficiency has become a matter of interest for heart failure (HF) specialists, the most remarkable being exertional oscillatory ventilation (EOV). EOV is an abnormal ventilatory phenomenon, originally described as anecdotal, but now considered a marker of disease severity and worst prognosis in HF. EOV is a cyclic fluctuation of minute ventilation (VE) and expired gas kinetics occurring during exercise: it is a slow, prominent, consistent rather than random, fluctuation in VE that may be evanescent or transient and can follow several distinct patterns. In contrast to the periodic breathing observed in Cheyne-Stokes respiration and central sleep apnea, the gradual increase and decrease in minute ventilation (VE) are not spaced by periods of apnea. This review will discuss EOV in HF and the overlap with Cheyne-Stokes respiration. PMID:26935880

  11. Vortex generation in oscillatory canopy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Schlosser, Tamara

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time the generation of coherent vortices at the top of a canopy in oscillatory (i.e., wave-dominated) flow. Through a series of flow visualization experiments, vortex formation is shown to occur when two conditions described by the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) and Reynolds (Re) numbers are met. First, the wave period must be sufficiently long to allow the generation of the shear-driven instability at the top of the canopy; this occurs when KC ≳ 5. Second, the vortex instability must be able to overcome the stabilizing effects of viscosity; this occurs when Re ≳ 1000. The vortices greatly increase the rate of vertical mixing within the canopy, such that any prediction of residence time in a coastal canopy requires an understanding of whether vortex generation is occurring.

  12. Droplet migration characteristics in confined oscillatory microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the migration characteristics of a droplet in an oscillatory flow field in a parallel plate microconfinement. Using phase field formalism, we capture the dynamical evolution of the droplet over a wide range of the frequency of the imposed oscillation in the flow field, drop size relative to the channel gap, and the capillary number. The latter two factors imply the contribution of droplet deformability, commonly considered in the study of droplet migration under steady shear flow conditions. We show that the imposed oscillation brings an additional time complexity in the droplet movement, realized through temporally varying drop shape, flow direction, and the inertial response of the droplet. As a consequence, we observe a spatially complicated pathway of the droplet along the transverse direction, in sharp contrast to the smooth migration under a similar yet steady shear flow condition. Intuitively, the longitudinal component of the droplet movement is in tandem with the flow continuity and evolves with time at the same frequency as that of the imposed oscillation, although with an amplitude decreasing with the frequency. The time complexity of the transverse component of the movement pattern, however, cannot be rationalized through such intuitive arguments. Towards bringing out the underlying physics, we further endeavor in a reciprocal identity based analysis. Following this approach, we unveil the time complexities of the droplet movement, which appear to be sufficient to rationalize the complex movement patterns observed through the comprehensive simulation studies. These results can be of profound importance in designing droplet based microfluidic systems in an oscillatory flow environment.

  13. Newly developed ventricular assist device with linear oscillatory actuator.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Funakubo, Akio; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a new direct electromagnetic left ventricular assist device (DEM-LVAD) with a linear oscillatory actuator (LOA). The DEM-LVAD is a pulsatile pump with a pusher plate. The pusher plate is driven directly by the mover of the LOA. The LOA provides reciprocating motion without using any movement converter such as a roller screw or a hydraulic system. It consists of a stator with a single winding excitation coil and a mover with two permanent magnets. The simple structure of the LOA is based on fewer parts to bring about high reliability and smaller size. The mover moves back and forth when forward and backward electric current is supplied to the excitation coil. The pump housings have been designed using three-dimensional computer aided design software and fabricated with the aid of computer aided manufacturing technology. Monostrut valves (Bjork-Shiley #21) were used for the prototype. The DEM-LVAD dimension is 96 mm in diameter and 50 mm thick with a mass of 0.62 kg and a volume of 280 ml. An in vitro test (afterload 100 mm Hg; preload 10 mm Hg; input power 10 W) demonstrated more than 6 L/minute maximum output and 15% maximum efficiency at 130 beats per minute (bpm). Dynamic stroke volume ranged between 40 and 60 ml. The feasibility of the DEM-LVAD was confirmed. PMID:12790386

  14. Processing Oscillatory Signals by Incoherent Feedforward Loops.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Carolyn; Tsoi, Ryan; Wu, Feilun; You, Lingchong

    2016-09-01

    From the timing of amoeba development to the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency, many biological signaling pathways exhibit the ability to differentiate between pulsatile and sustained signals in the regulation of downstream gene expression. While the networks underlying this signal decoding are diverse, many are built around a common motif, the incoherent feedforward loop (IFFL), where an input simultaneously activates an output and an inhibitor of the output. With appropriate parameters, this motif can exhibit temporal adaptation, where the system is desensitized to a sustained input. This property serves as the foundation for distinguishing input signals with varying temporal profiles. Here, we use quantitative modeling to examine another property of IFFLs-the ability to process oscillatory signals. Our results indicate that the system's ability to translate pulsatile dynamics is limited by two constraints. The kinetics of the IFFL components dictate the input range for which the network is able to decode pulsatile dynamics. In addition, a match between the network parameters and input signal characteristics is required for optimal "counting". We elucidate one potential mechanism by which information processing occurs in natural networks, and our work has implications in the design of synthetic gene circuits for this purpose. PMID:27623175

  15. Control of Oscillatory Thermocapillary Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, Ray

    1998-01-01

    This project focused on the generation and suppression of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a thin liquid layer. The bulk of the research was experimental in nature, some theoretical work was also done. ne first phase of this research generated, for the first time, the hydrothermal-wave instability predicted by Smith and Davis in 1983. In addition, the behavior of the fluid layer under a number of conditions was investigated and catalogued. A transition map for the instability of buoyancy-thermocapillary convection was prepared which presented results in terms of apparatus-dependent and apparatus-independent parameters, for ease of comparison with theoretical results. The second phase of this research demonstrated the suppression of these hydrothermal waves through an active, feed-forward control strategy employing a CO2 laser to selectively heat lines of negative disturbance temperature on the free surface of the liquid layer. An initial attempt at this control was only partially successful, employing a thermocouple inserted slightly below the free surface of the liquid to generate the control scheme. Subsequent efforts, however, were completely successful in suppressing oscillations in a portion of the layer by utilizing data from an infrared image of the free surface to compute hydrothermal-wave phase speeds and, using these, to tailor the control scheme to each passing wave.

  16. Autocatalytic Reaction Front Propagation in Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, Marc; Martin, Jerome; Rakotomalala, Nicole; Salin, Dominique

    2003-11-01

    Laboratoire Fluides Automatique et Systèmes Thermiques, Universités P. et M. Curie and Paris Sud, C.N.R.S. (UMR 7608) Bâtiment 502, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France. Autocatalytic reaction front between two reacting species is able to propagate as a solitary wave that is at a constant velocity and with a stationary concentration profile resulting from a balance between molecular diffusion and chemical reaction. On the other hand, in laminar flow the association of molecular diffusion and convection leads to an overall diffusion effect, the so-called Taylor dispersion, with a flow dependent enhanced dispersion coefficient. Previous experiments have demonstrated the dissymmetry between supportive and adverse advection flows compared to the reaction front propagation without flow. We analyze experimentally the effect of laminar oscillatory flow on the propagation and on the shape of the fronts in the Iodate-Arsenous Acid autocatalytic reaction in micro Hele-Shaw cells. We observe new solitary waves whose velocity and shape depend on the relative importance of advection, diffusion and reaction. The results are in reasonable with our lattice 3D BGK simulations.

  17. Exercise oscillatory ventilation: Mechanisms and prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Bishnu P; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in breathing patterns characterized by cyclic variation of ventilation during rest and during exercise has been recognized in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) for nearly two centuries. Periodic breathing (PB) during exercise is known as exercise oscillatory ventilation (EOV) and is characterized by the periods of hyperpnea and hypopnea without interposed apnea. EOV is a non-invasive parameter detected during submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Presence of EOV during exercise in HF patients indicates significant impairment in resting and exercise hemodynamic parameters. EOV is also an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in HF patients both with reduced and preserved ejection fraction irrespective of other gas exchange variables. Circulatory delay, increased chemosensitivity, pulmonary congestion and increased ergoreflex signaling have been proposed as the mechanisms underlying the generation of EOV in HF patients. There is no proven treatment of EOV but its reversal has been noted with phosphodiesterase inhibitors, exercise training and acetazolamide in relatively small studies. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic basis of PB during exercise and the clinical implications of recognizing PB patterns in patients with HF. PMID:27022457

  18. Processing oscillatory signals by incoherent feedforward loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Carolyn; Wu, Feilun; Tsoi, Ryan; Shats, Igor; You, Lingchong

    From the timing of amoeba development to the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency,many biological signaling pathways exhibit the ability to differentiate between pulsatile and sustained signals in the regulation of downstream gene expression.While networks underlying this signal decoding are diverse,many are built around a common motif, the incoherent feedforward loop (IFFL),where an input simultaneously activates an output and an inhibitor of the output.With appropriate parameters,this motif can generate temporal adaptation,where the system is desensitized to a sustained input.This property serves as the foundation for distinguishing signals with varying temporal profiles.Here,we use quantitative modeling to examine another property of IFFLs,the ability to process oscillatory signals.Our results indicate that the system's ability to translate pulsatile dynamics is limited by two constraints.The kinetics of IFFL components dictate the input range for which the network can decode pulsatile dynamics.In addition,a match between the network parameters and signal characteristics is required for optimal ``counting''.We elucidate one potential mechanism by which information processing occurs in natural networks with implications in the design of synthetic gene circuits for this purpose. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (CZ).

  19. Turbulent shear control with oscillatory bubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Oishi, Yoshihiko; Tasaka, Yuji; Murai, Yuichi; Takeda, Yasushi

    2009-02-01

    It is known that injecting bubbles into shear flow can reduce the frictional drag. This method has advantages in comparison to others in simplicity of installation and also in environment. The amount of drag reduction by bubbles depends on the void fraction provided in the boundary layer. It means, however, that certain power must be consumed to generate bubbles in water, worsening the total power-saving performance. We propose oscillatory bubble injection technique to improve the performance in this study. In order to prove this idea of new type of drag reduction, velocity vector field and shear stress profile in a horizontal channel flow are measured by ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP) and shear stress transducer, respectively. We measure the gas-liquid interface from the UVP signal, as well. This compound measurement with different principles leads to deeper understanding of bubble-originated drag reduction phenomena, in particular for unsteady process of boundary layer alternation. At these experiments, the results have demonstrated that the intermittency promotes the drag reduction more than normal continuous injection for the same void fraction supplied.

  20. Parameters Determination of Oscillatory Impulse Current Waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shuji; Nishimura, Seisuke; Seki, Shingo

    This paper proposes numerical techniques to distil waveform parameters out of digitally measured data of oscillatory impulse current. The first method, to be used for liner circuit, based on a curve-fitting technique in which a smooth analytical curve is defined to fit the noise-superposed measured data. The waveform parameters are derived from the curve. The algorithm is examined its performance using a measured waveform data which is obtained from a circuit composed of linear elements only. It is not rare when impulse current is measured in a circuit with non-linear element, namely an arrester. After carefully observed behaviours of the circuit current when the non-linear element turns on and off, authors developed two algorithms capable to determine the parameters from the recorded data obtained from a circuit having a ZnO arrester. The developed algorithm processed the waveform data generated by TDG which is to be issued in 2009 as a part of IEC 61083-2. The details of the algorithm are to be demonstrated in the paper.

  1. Oscillatory flow through submerged canopies: 1. Velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2005-10-01

    Many benthic organisms form very rough surfaces on the seafloor that can be described as submerged canopies. Recent evidence has shown that, compared with a unidirectional current, an oscillatory flow driven by surface waves can significantly enhance biological processes such as nutrient uptake. However, to date, the physical mechanisms responsible for this enhancement have not been established. This paper presents a theoretical model to estimate flow inside a submerged canopy driven by oscillatory flow. To reduce the complexity of natural canopies, an idealized canopy consisting of an array of vertical cylinders is used. The attenuation of the in-canopy oscillatory flow is shown to be governed by three dimensionless parameters defined on the basis of canopy geometry and flow parameters. The model predicts that an oscillatory flow will always generate a higher in-canopy flow when compared to a unidirectional current of the same magnitude, and specifically that the attenuation will monotonically increase as the wave orbital excursion length is increased. A series of laboratory experiments are conducted for a range of different unidirectional and oscillatory flow conditions, and the results confirm that oscillatory flow increases water motion inside a canopy. It is hypothesized that this higher in-canopy flow will enhance rates of mass transfer from the canopy elements, a problem formally investigated in a companion paper (Lowe et al., 2005b).

  2. Normal force of magnetorheological fluids with foam metal under oscillatory shear modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xingan; Liu, Chuanwen; Liang, Huang; Qin, Huafeng; Yu, Qibing; Li, Chuan

    2016-04-01

    The normal force of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in porous foam metal was investigated in this paper. The dynamic repulsive normal force was studied using an advanced commercial rheometer under oscillatory shear modes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the influences of time, strain amplitude, frequency and shear rate on the normal force of MR fluids drawn from the porous foam metal were systematically analysed. The experimental results indicated that the magnetic field had the greatest effect on the normal force, and the effect increased incrementally with the magnetic field. Increasing the magnetic field produced a step-wise increase in the shear gap. However, other factors in the presence of a constant magnetic field only had weak effects on the normal force. This behaviour can be regarded as a magnetic field-enhanced normal force, as increases in the magnetic field resulted in more MR fluids being released from the porous foam metal, and the chain-like magnetic particles in the MR fluids becoming more elongated with aggregates spanning the gap between the shear plates.

  3. Robust Concentration and Frequency Control in Oscillatory Homeostats

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, Kristian; Agafonov, Oleg; Selstø, Christina H.; Jolma, Ingunn W.; Ni, Xiao Y.; Drengstig, Tormod; Ruoff, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Homeostatic and adaptive control mechanisms are essential for keeping organisms structurally and functionally stable. Integral feedback is a control theoretic concept which has long been known to keep a controlled variable robustly (i.e. perturbation-independent) at a given set-point by feeding the integrated error back into the process that generates . The classical concept of homeostasis as robust regulation within narrow limits is often considered as unsatisfactory and even incompatible with many biological systems which show sustained oscillations, such as circadian rhythms and oscillatory calcium signaling. Nevertheless, there are many similarities between the biological processes which participate in oscillatory mechanisms and classical homeostatic (non-oscillatory) mechanisms. We have investigated whether biological oscillators can show robust homeostatic and adaptive behaviors, and this paper is an attempt to extend the homeostatic concept to include oscillatory conditions. Based on our previously published kinetic conditions on how to generate biochemical models with robust homeostasis we found two properties, which appear to be of general interest concerning oscillatory and homeostatic controlled biological systems. The first one is the ability of these oscillators (“oscillatory homeostats”) to keep the average level of a controlled variable at a defined set-point by involving compensatory changes in frequency and/or amplitude. The second property is the ability to keep the period/frequency of the oscillator tuned within a certain well-defined range. In this paper we highlight mechanisms that lead to these two properties. The biological applications of these findings are discussed using three examples, the homeostatic aspects during oscillatory calcium and p53 signaling, and the involvement of circadian rhythms in homeostatic regulation. PMID:25238410

  4. Oscillatory multiband dynamics of free particles: The ubiquity of zitterbewegung effects

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, R.; Zuelicke, U.; Bolte, Jens

    2007-05-15

    In the Dirac theory for the motion of free relativistic electrons, highly oscillatory components appear in the time evolution of physical observables such as position, velocity, and spin angular momentum. This effect is known as zitterbewegung. We present a theoretical analysis of rather different Hamiltonians with gapped and/or spin-split energy spectrum (including the Rashba, Luttinger, and Kane Hamiltonians) that exhibit analogs of zitterbewegung as a common feature. We find that the amplitude of oscillations of the Heisenberg velocity operator v(t) generally equals the uncertainty for a simultaneous measurement of two linearly independent components of v. It is also shown that many features of zitterbewegung are shared by the simple and well-known Landau Hamiltonian, describing the dynamics of two-dimensional (2D) electron systems in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane. Finally, we also discuss the oscillatory dynamics of 2D electrons arising from the interplay of Rashba spin splitting and a perpendicular magnetic field.

  5. Possibility of oscillatory tidal heating of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, D.; Hussmann, H.; Sohl, F.; Kurita, K.

    2012-12-01

    Enceladus radiates ~16 GW of heat from its surface [1]. One efficient heat source of Enceladus is tidal heating which is maintained by the orbital resonance with Dione. However, assuming that the current eccentricity of Enceladus is in equilibrium with the resonance, tidal heating can generate only 1.1 GW of heat [2]. In the case of a non-equilibrium state, tidal heating rate and eccentricity evolve by interacting with each other. For homogeneous model of Enceladus, corresponding coupling calculations have been conducted by Meyer and Wisdom [3]. In their calculations, generated heat and eccentricity reach equilibrium state soon. In this work, we have performed coupling calculation among tidal heating rate, eccentricity and the interior structure of Enceladus. We constructed spherical shell Maxwell model for simplicity. Conventionally, dissipation factor (Q-value) of Saturn is estimated to more than 18,000 [2]. However, the latest observation implies a Q-value of Saturn that is one of order of magnitude less than conventional values [4]. We performed the calculation with different values of the Saturnian dissipation factor. In addition to the tidal heat, we took 7 GW of shear heat into consideration as an additional heat source[5]. In our calculation, if water-ice mixture (~10^9 Pa s in viscosity) exists between convective ice and silicate core instead of liquid ocean, eccentricity and heating rate oscillate with an 50-million-years cycle when the Q-value of Saturn is assumed around 3800. Minimum value of eccentricity is 0.005, which is comparable to the current value (0.0047). Generated tidal heat oscillates between 3 GW and 10 GW. Combined with shear heat, 17 GW of heat is generated at maximum. Although conditions for oscillatory heating are hard to fulfill and more consideration is needed, current large heat radiation of Enceladus may be remnant of episodically large tidal heating. Enceladus has divergent surface conditions, which might be related to episodic

  6. Brain oscillatory signatures of motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive brain-computer-interfaces (BCI) coupled with prosthetic devices were recently introduced in the rehabilitation of chronic stroke and other disorders of the motor system. These BCI systems and motor rehabilitation in general involve several motor tasks for training. This study investigates the neurophysiological bases of an EEG-oscillation-driven BCI combined with a neuroprosthetic device to define the specific oscillatory signature of the BCI task. Controlling movements of a hand robotic orthosis with motor imagery of the same movement generates sensorimotor rhythm oscillation changes and involves three elements of tasks also used in stroke motor rehabilitation: passive and active movement, motor imagery, and motor intention. We recorded EEG while nine healthy participants performed five different motor tasks consisting of closing and opening of the hand as follows: 1) motor imagery without any external feedback and without overt hand movement, 2) motor imagery that moves the orthosis proportional to the produced brain oscillation change with online proprioceptive and visual feedback of the hand moving through a neuroprosthetic device (BCI condition), 3) passive and 4) active movement of the hand with feedback (seeing and feeling the hand moving), and 5) rest. During the BCI condition, participants received contingent online feedback of the decrease of power of the sensorimotor rhythm, which induced orthosis movement and therefore proprioceptive and visual information from the moving hand. We analyzed brain activity during the five conditions using time-frequency domain bootstrap-based statistical comparisons and Morlet transforms. Activity during rest was used as a reference. Significant contralateral and ipsilateral event-related desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm was present during all motor tasks, largest in contralateral-postcentral, medio-central, and ipsilateral-precentral areas identifying the ipsilateral precentral cortex as an integral

  7. Oscillatory flow through submerged canopies: 2. Canopy mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Falter, James L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass transfer rates from submerged canopies constructed from arrays of vertical cylinders were investigated for a range of different cylinder spacings under both unidirectional and oscillatory flow. Individual canopy elements made from gypsum were dissolved in fresh water to simulate the mass transfer of dissolved metabolites to and from canopies of living benthic organisms. Mass transfer rates under oscillatory flow were up to three times higher than values measured for a comparable unidirectional current. This enhancement was shown to be a strong function of the canopy element spacing. A model was developed to predict canopy mass transfer rates on the basis of the in-canopy flow speed and was generalized to incorporate either unidirectional or oscillatory flow. Agreement between the modeled and experimentally measured mass transfer rates indicate that enhanced mass transfer to/from living benthic canopies under oscillatory flow is driven primarily by the higher in-canopy water motion generated by the oscillatory flow, as detailed in the companion paper (Lowe et al., 2005).

  8. Visualization of oscillatory behaviour of Pt nanoparticles catalysing CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Elkjær, C F; Falsig, H; Puspitasari, I; Dona, P; Mele, L; Morana, B; Nelissen, B J; van Rijn, R; Creemer, J F; Kooyman, P J; Helveg, S

    2014-09-01

    Many catalytic reactions under fixed conditions exhibit oscillatory behaviour. The oscillations are often attributed to dynamic changes in the catalyst surface. So far, however, such relationships were difficult to determine for catalysts consisting of supported nanoparticles. Here, we employ a nanoreactor to study the oscillatory CO oxidation catalysed by Pt nanoparticles using time-resolved high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, mass spectrometry and calorimetry. The observations reveal that periodic changes in the CO oxidation are synchronous with a periodic refacetting of the Pt nanoparticles. The oscillatory reaction is modelled using density functional theory and mass transport calculations, considering the CO adsorption energy and the oxidation rate as site-dependent. We find that to successfully explain the oscillations, the model must contain the phenomenon of refacetting. The nanoreactor approach can thus provide atomic-scale information that is specific to surface sites. This will improve the understanding of dynamic properties in catalysis and related fields. PMID:25038730

  9. Reciprocal relationships between the oscillatory systems of the brain.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, G G; Slobodskoi-Plyusnin, Ya Yu; Savost'yanov, A N; Levin, E A; Bocharov, A V

    2010-01-01

    Resting EEG recordings were made from cohorts of 146 children aged 7-17 years and 132 adults aged 18-32 years and the levels of personality features and psychopathology were assessed using the Eysenck, Spilberger, Gray-Wilson, and Goodman questionnaires. Factor analysis was used to discriminate covariance of measures of the spectral power of EEG rhythms into positive and negative components. The latter were interpreted as a measure of inhibitory interactions between oscillatory systems. In children, positive covariance of rhythms was stronger than in adults, while reciprocal relationships between oscillatory systems were weaker. In adults, trait anxiety correlated positively with the strength of the reciprocal relationship between the alpha and delta oscillatory systems. In children, an analogous relationship was seen between anxiety and the strength of the reciprocal relationship between the theta and delta systems. The data are discussed in the light of the evolutionary interpretation of EEG rhythms. PMID:20012491

  10. Linked and knotted chimera filaments in oscillatory systems.

    PubMed

    Lau, Hon Wai; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-07-01

    While the existence of stable knotted and linked vortex lines has been established in many experimental and theoretical systems, their existence in oscillatory systems and systems with nonlocal coupling has remained elusive. Here, we present strong numerical evidence that stable knots and links such as trefoils and Hopf links do exist in simple, complex, and chaotic oscillatory systems if the coupling between the oscillators is neither too short ranged nor too long ranged. In this case, effective repulsive forces between vortex lines in knotted and linked structures stabilize curvature-driven shrinkage observed for single vortex rings. In contrast to real fluids and excitable media, the vortex lines correspond to scroll wave chimeras [synchronized scroll waves with spatially extended (tubelike) unsynchronized filaments], a prime example of spontaneous synchrony breaking in systems of identical oscillators. In the case of complex oscillatory systems, this leads to a topological superstructure combining knotted filaments and synchronization defect sheets. PMID:27575065

  11. Linked and knotted chimera filaments in oscillatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hon Wai; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-07-01

    While the existence of stable knotted and linked vortex lines has been established in many experimental and theoretical systems, their existence in oscillatory systems and systems with nonlocal coupling has remained elusive. Here, we present strong numerical evidence that stable knots and links such as trefoils and Hopf links do exist in simple, complex, and chaotic oscillatory systems if the coupling between the oscillators is neither too short ranged nor too long ranged. In this case, effective repulsive forces between vortex lines in knotted and linked structures stabilize curvature-driven shrinkage observed for single vortex rings. In contrast to real fluids and excitable media, the vortex lines correspond to scroll wave chimeras [synchronized scroll waves with spatially extended (tubelike) unsynchronized filaments], a prime example of spontaneous synchrony breaking in systems of identical oscillators. In the case of complex oscillatory systems, this leads to a topological superstructure combining knotted filaments and synchronization defect sheets.

  12. Asymptotic expansions of Mellin convolution integrals: An oscillatory case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, José L.; Pagola, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper [J.L. López, Asymptotic expansions of Mellin convolution integrals, SIAM Rev. 50 (2) (2008) 275-293], we have presented a new, very general and simple method for deriving asymptotic expansions of for small x. It contains Watson's Lemma and other classical methods, Mellin transform techniques, McClure and Wong's distributional approach and the method of analytic continuation used in this approach as particular cases. In this paper we generalize that idea to the case of oscillatory kernels, that is, to integrals of the form , with c[set membership, variant]R, and we give a method as simple as the one given in the above cited reference for the case c=0. We show that McClure and Wong's distributional approach for oscillatory kernels and the summability method for oscillatory integrals are particular cases of this method. Some examples are given as illustration.

  13. Oscillatory contractions in tail arteries from genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lamb, F S; Myers, J H; Hamlin, M N; Webb, R C

    1985-01-01

    This study characterizes a cellular mechanism for oscillatory contractions induced by norepinephrine in vascular smooth muscle from spontaneously hypertensive stroke prone rats (SHRSP). Helically cut strips of tail arteries from SHRSP and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were mounted in a muscle bath for measurement of isometric force generation. Norepinephrine-induced responses of arteries from SHRSP were characterized by fluctuations in contractile activity, whereas those in arteries from WKY remained constant with time. The magnitude of the oscillatory contractile activity (frequency X mean amplitude) varied directly with norepinephrine concentration (5.9 X 10(-9) to 1.8 X 10(-7) M). The oscillatory contractile activity varied inversely with the potassium concentration (3-20 mM) of the buffer solution and directly with the calcium concentration (0.1-5.0 mM) of the buffer solution. The oscillatory activity was converted to maintained contraction by barium (10(-4) M), quinidine (3 X 10(-6) M), sparteine (10(-3) M), D-600 (10(-7) M), and nifedipine (10(-8) M). Tetraethylammonium and 3,4-diaminopyridine, inhibitors of voltage-dependent potassium channels, did not alter the oscillatory contractile activity induced by norepinephrine. These observations suggest that oscillatory contractile activity in tail arteries from SHRSP is caused by an abnormal variation in potassium efflux during stimulation with norepinephrine. The altered potassium efflux appears to be related to calcium entry, which is sensitive to inhibition by channel blockers. This altered membrane property may contribute to changes in vascular sensitivity in hypertension. PMID:3997233

  14. Oscillatory/chaotic thermocapillary flow induced by radiant heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Thompson, Robert L.; Vanzandt, David; Dewitt, Kenneth; Nash, Jon

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to conduct ground-based experiments to measure the onset conditions of oscillatory Marangoni flow in laser-heated silicone oil in a cylindrical container. For a single fluid, experimental data are presented using the aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number. It is found that for a fixed aspect ratio, there seems to be an asymptotic limit of the dynamic Bond number beyond which no onset of flow oscillation could occur. Experimental results also suggested that there could be a lower limit of the aspect ratio below which there is no onset of oscillatory flow.

  15. Self-organized alternating chimera states in oscillatory media

    PubMed Central

    Haugland, Sindre W.; Schmidt, Lennart; Krischer, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory media can exhibit the coexistence of synchronized and desynchronized regions, so-called chimera states, for uniform parameters and symmetrical coupling. In a phase-balanced chimera state, where the totals of synchronized and desynchronized regions, respectively, are of the same size, the symmetry of the system predicts that interchanging both phases still gives a solution to the underlying equations. We observe this kind of interchange as a self-emerging phenomenon in an oscillatory medium with nonlinear global coupling. An interplay between local and global couplings renders the formation of these alternating chimeras possible. PMID:25928860

  16. Strobes: pyrotechnic compositions that show a curious oscillatory combustion.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Justine M L; van Lingen, Joost N J; Zevenbergen, John F; Gijzeman, Onno L J; Meijerink, Andries

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are pyrotechnic compositions which show an oscillatory combustion; a dark phase and a flash phase alternate periodically. The strobe effect has applications in various fields, most notably in the fireworks industry and in the military area. All strobe compositions mentioned in the literature were discovered by trial and error methods and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Many oscillatory systems such as Belousov-Zhabotinsky reactions, cool flames, self-propagating high-temperature synthesis have been observed and theories developed to elucidate their unstable behavior based on chemical interactions or based on physical processes. These systems are compared to experimental observations made on strobe mixtures. PMID:23255499

  17. Fronto-Parietal Anatomical Connections Influence the Modulation of Conscious Visual Perception by High-Beta Frontal Oscillatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Quentin, Romain; Chanes, Lorena; Vernet, Marine; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2015-08-01

    May white matter connectivity influence rhythmic brain activity underlying visual cognition? We here employed diffusion imaging to reconstruct the fronto-parietal white matter pathways in a group of healthy participants who displayed frequency-specific ameliorations of visual sensitivity during the entrainment of high-beta oscillatory activity by rhythmic transcranial magnetic stimulation over their right frontal eye field. Our analyses reveal a strong tract-specific association between the volume of the first branch of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and improvements of conscious visual detection driven by frontal beta oscillation patterns. These data indicate that the architecture of specific white matter pathways has the ability to influence the distributed effects of rhythmic spatio-temporal activity, and suggest a potentially relevant role for long-range connectivity in the synchronization of oscillatory patterns across fronto-parietal networks subtending the modulation of conscious visual perception. PMID:24554730

  18. Finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes with constrained transport for ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, Andrew J.; Rossmanith, James A.; Tang, Qi

    2014-07-01

    In this work we develop a class of high-order finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (FD-WENO) schemes for solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in 2D and 3D. The philosophy of this work is to use efficient high-order WENO spatial discretizations with high-order strong stability-preserving Runge-Kutta (SSP-RK) time-stepping schemes. Numerical results have shown that with such methods we are able to resolve solution structures that are only visible at much higher grid resolutions with lower-order schemes. The key challenge in applying such methods to ideal MHD is to control divergence errors in the magnetic field. We achieve this by augmenting the base scheme with a novel high-order constrained transport approach that updates the magnetic vector potential. The predicted magnetic field from the base scheme is replaced by a divergence-free magnetic field that is obtained from the curl of this magnetic potential. The non-conservative weakly hyperbolic system that the magnetic vector potential satisfies is solved using a version of FD-WENO developed for Hamilton-Jacobi equations. The resulting numerical method is endowed with several important properties: (1) all quantities, including all components of the magnetic field and magnetic potential, are treated as point values on the same mesh (i.e., there is no mesh staggering); (2) both the spatial and temporal orders of accuracy are fourth-order; (3) no spatial integration or multidimensional reconstructions are needed in any step; and (4) special limiters in the magnetic vector potential update are used to control unphysical oscillations in the magnetic field. Several 2D and 3D numerical examples are presented to verify the order of accuracy on smooth test problems and to show high-resolution on test problems that involve shocks.

  19. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni peritectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-04-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure.

  20. Spatial structure of scrape-off-layer filaments near the midplane and X-point regions of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J L; Zweben, S J; Umansky, M V; Cziegler, I; Grulke, O; LaBombard, B; Stotler, D P

    2008-05-22

    Movies of edge turbulence at both the outboard midplane and the region outboard of the typical lower X-point location in C-Mod have been obtained using Gas-Puff-Imaging together with fast-framing cameras. Intermittent turbulent structures, typically referred to as blobs or filaments, are observed in both locations. Near the midplane the filaments are roughly circular in cross-section, while in the X-point region they are highly elongated. Filament velocities in this region are {approx}3x faster than the radial velocities at the midplane, in a direction roughly normal to the local flux surfaces. The observations are consistent with the picture that the filaments arise in outboard region and, as a consequence of the rapid parallel diffusion of the potential perturbations, map along field lines. A simulation using the 3D BOUT turbulence code has been made, with the result that reproduces many of the spatial features observed in the experiment.

  1. Bed Morphology and Sediment Transport under Oscillatory Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedocchi Miljan, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Recent laboratory and field experiments have shown the inability of existing oscillatory flow ripple predictors to accurately predict both ripple size and planform geometry. However, at this time, only partial adaptations of these predictors have been proposed in the literature to account for the observed discrepancies with experimental data…

  2. Resting-State Oscillatory Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornew, Lauren; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Blaskey, Lisa; Edgar, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Neural oscillatory anomalies in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggest an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance; however, the nature and clinical relevance of these anomalies are unclear. Whole-cortex magnetoencephalography data were collected while 50 children (27 with ASD, 23 controls) underwent an eyes-closed resting-state exam. A Fast Fourier…

  3. Geometrical Series and Phase Space in a Finite Oscillatory Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mareco, H. R. Olmedo

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses some interesting physical properties of oscillatory motion of a particle on two joined inclined planes. The geometrical series demonstrates that the particle will oscillate during a finite time. Another detail is the converging path to the origin of the phase space. Due to its simplicity, this motion may be used as a…

  4. Frontal Oscillatory Dynamics Predict Feedback Learning and Action Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Vijver, Irene; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Cohen, Michael X.

    2011-01-01

    Frontal oscillatory dynamics in the theta (4-8 Hz) and beta (20-30 Hz) frequency bands have been implicated in cognitive control processes. Here we investigated the changes in coordinated activity within and between frontal brain areas during feedback-based response learning. In a time estimation task, participants learned to press a button after…

  5. Temperature (over)compensation in an oscillatory surface reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Raphael; Epstein, Irving R; Gonzalez, Ernesto R; Varela, Hamilton

    2008-05-22

    Biological rhythms are regulated by homeostatic mechanisms that assure that physiological clocks function reliably independent of temperature changes in the environment. Temperature compensation, the independence of the oscillatory period on temperature, is known to play a central role in many biological rhythms, but it is rather rare in chemical oscillators. We study the influence of temperature on the oscillatory dynamics during the catalytic oxidation of formic acid on a polycrystalline platinum electrode. The experiments are performed at five temperatures from 5 to 25 °C, and the oscillations are studied under galvanostatic control. Under oscillatory conditions, only non-Arrhenius behavior is observed. Overcompensation with temperature coefficient (q(10), defined as the ratio between the rate constants at temperature T + 10 °C and at T) < 1 is found in most cases, except that temperature compensation with q(10) ≈ 1 predominates at high applied currents. The behavior of the period and the amplitude result from a complex interplay between temperature and applied current or, equivalently, the distance from thermodynamic equilibrium. High, positive apparent activation energies were obtained under voltammetric, nonoscillatory conditions, which implies that the non-Arrhenius behavior observed under oscillatory conditions results from the interplay among reaction steps rather than from a weak temperature dependence of the individual steps. PMID:18433166

  6. Non-oscillatory behaviour in vacuum Kaluza-Klein cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaret, J.; Henneaux, M.; Spindel, P.; Taormina, A.; Hanquin, J.-L.

    The generic behavior of vacuum inhomogeneous Kaluza-Klein cosmologies is studied in the vicinity of the cosmological singularity. It is argued that, in spacetime dimensions equal to or greater than 11, the generalized Kasner solution, with monotonic power-law behavior of the spatial distances, becomes a general solution of the Einstein vacuum field equations and, moreover, the chaotic oscillatory behavior disappears.

  7. Oscillatory Dynamics Related to the Unagreement Pattern in Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Alejandro; Molinaro, Nicola; Mancini, Simona; Barraza, Paulo; Carreiras, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Unagreement patterns consist in a person feature mismatch between subject and verb that is nonetheless grammatical in Spanish. The processing of this type of construction gives new insights into the understanding of agreement processes during language comprehension. Here, we contrasted oscillatory brain activity triggered by Unagreement in…

  8. Oscillatory Correlates of Retrieval-Induced Forgetting in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Bernhard; Hanslmayr, Simon; Opitz, Bertram; Mecklinger, Axel; Bauml, Karl-Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Retrieval practice on a subset of previously studied material enhances later memory for practiced material but can inhibit memory for related unpracticed material. The present study examines the effects of prior retrieval practice on evoked (ERPs) and induced (oscillatory power) measures of electrophysiological activity underlying recognition of…

  9. Magnetorheological fluid behavior in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode: Experimental tests and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the behavior of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode and proposes a mathematical model to reveal the MR mechanism. A specific MR squeeze structure avoiding the cavitation effect is designed for the experimental tests. The magnetic field- and gap distance-dependent damping force of the MR squeeze structure is presented and compared with the dramatically large damping force under quasi-static excitations, a moderate damping force is observed at high frequencies. Subsequently, in order to interpret the behavior of MR fluids at high frequencies, employing the continuum media theory, a mathematical model is established with consideration of the fluid inertia and hysteresis property. The damping force comparison between the model and experimental tests indicates that in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode, the squeeze-strengthen effect does not work and the shear yield stress can be applied well to characterize the flow property of MR fluids. In addition, the hysteresis property has a significant influence on the damping performance.

  10. Brain oscillatory activity during motor imagery in EEG-fMRI coregistration.

    PubMed

    Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Cerini, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the correlation between topographical changes in brain oscillatory activity and the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during a motor imagery (MI) task using electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) coregistration. EEG was recorded in 7 healthy subjects inside a 1.5 T MR scanner during the imagination of the kinesthetic experience of movement. A Fast Fourier Transform was applied to EEG signal in the rest and active conditions. We used the event-related-synchronization (ERS)/desynchronization (ERD) approach to characterize where the imagination of movement produces a decrease in alpha and beta power. The mean alpha map showed ERD decrease localized over the contralateral sensory motor area (SM1c) and a light desynchronization in the ipsilateral sensory motor area (SM1i); whereas the mean beta map showed ERD decrease over the supplementary motor area (SMA). fMRI showed significant activation in SMA, SM1c, SM1i. The correlation is negative in the contralateral side and positive in the ipsilateral side. Using combined EEG-fMRI signals we obtained useful new information on the description of the changes in oscillatory activity in alpha and beta bands during MI and on the investigation of the sites of BOLD activity as possible sources in generating these rhythms. By correlating BOLD and ERD/ERS we may identify more accurately which regions contribute to changes of the electrical response. PMID:20850237

  11. Lasting EEG/MEG Aftereffects of Rhythmic Transcranial Brain Stimulation: Level of Control Over Oscillatory Network Activity.

    PubMed

    Veniero, Domenica; Vossen, Alexandra; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    A number of rhythmic protocols have emerged for non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in humans, including transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), and repetitive (also called rhythmic) transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). With these techniques, it is possible to match the frequency of the externally applied electromagnetic fields to the intrinsic frequency of oscillatory neural population activity ("frequency-tuning"). Mounting evidence suggests that by this means tACS, otDCS, and rTMS can entrain brain oscillations and promote associated functions in a frequency-specific manner, in particular during (i.e., online to) stimulation. Here, we focus instead on the changes in oscillatory brain activity that persist after the end of stimulation. Understanding such aftereffects in healthy participants is an important step for developing these techniques into potentially useful clinical tools for the treatment of specific patient groups. Reviewing the electrophysiological evidence in healthy participants, we find aftereffects on brain oscillations to be a common outcome following tACS/otDCS and rTMS. However, we did not find a consistent, predictable pattern of aftereffects across studies, which is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of reported online effects. This indicates that aftereffects are partially dissociated from online, frequency-specific (entrainment) effects during tACS/otDCS and rTMS. We outline possible accounts and future directions for a better understanding of the link between online entrainment and offline aftereffects, which will be key for developing more targeted interventions into oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26696834

  12. Lasting EEG/MEG Aftereffects of Rhythmic Transcranial Brain Stimulation: Level of Control Over Oscillatory Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Veniero, Domenica; Vossen, Alexandra; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    A number of rhythmic protocols have emerged for non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in humans, including transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), and repetitive (also called rhythmic) transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). With these techniques, it is possible to match the frequency of the externally applied electromagnetic fields to the intrinsic frequency of oscillatory neural population activity (“frequency-tuning”). Mounting evidence suggests that by this means tACS, otDCS, and rTMS can entrain brain oscillations and promote associated functions in a frequency-specific manner, in particular during (i.e., online to) stimulation. Here, we focus instead on the changes in oscillatory brain activity that persist after the end of stimulation. Understanding such aftereffects in healthy participants is an important step for developing these techniques into potentially useful clinical tools for the treatment of specific patient groups. Reviewing the electrophysiological evidence in healthy participants, we find aftereffects on brain oscillations to be a common outcome following tACS/otDCS and rTMS. However, we did not find a consistent, predictable pattern of aftereffects across studies, which is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of reported online effects. This indicates that aftereffects are partially dissociated from online, frequency-specific (entrainment) effects during tACS/otDCS and rTMS. We outline possible accounts and future directions for a better understanding of the link between online entrainment and offline aftereffects, which will be key for developing more targeted interventions into oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26696834

  13. Oscillatory multiphase flow strategy for chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-07-19

    Continuous multiphase flow strategies are commonly employed for high-throughput parameter screening of physical, chemical, and biological processes as well as continuous preparation of a wide range of fine chemicals and micro/nano particles with processing times up to 10 min. The inter-dependency of mixing and residence times, and their direct correlation with reactor length have limited the adaptation of multiphase flow strategies for studies of processes with relatively long processing times (0.5-24 h). In this frontier article, we describe an oscillatory multiphase flow strategy to decouple mixing and residence times and enable investigation of longer timescale experiments than typically feasible with conventional continuous multiphase flow approaches. We review current oscillatory multiphase flow technologies, provide an overview of the advancements of this relatively new strategy in chemistry and biology, and close with a perspective on future opportunities. PMID:27397146

  14. An experimental study of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in cylindrical containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.; Lee, J. H.; Ostrach, S.; Pline, A.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of oscillatory thermocapillary in small cylindrical containers with a heating wire placed along the center axis is performed by investigating the flow structures and temperature distributions under various conditions. To supplement the flow visualization the surface is scanned using an infrared imager. Here, 2 cS viscosity (Pr = 27) silicone oil is used as the test fluid. It is observed that beyond a certain temperature difference between the container wall and the heating wire, a distinctive unsteady flow pattern appears. This unsteady phenomenon is identified as oscillatory thermocapillary. After the onset of oscillations the flow structure becomes nonaxisymmetric and wave motion is observed at the free surface. It is shown that the critical temperature difference is independent of container dimensions if the aspect ratio is fixed.

  15. Understanding the onset of oscillatory swimming in microchannels.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Joost; Mathijssen, Arnold J T M; Fabritius, Marc; Menke, Henri; Holm, Christian; Shendruk, Tyler N

    2016-05-25

    Self-propelled colloids (swimmers) in confining geometries follow trajectories determined by hydrodynamic interactions with the bounding surfaces. However, typically these interactions are ignored or truncated to the lowest order. We demonstrate that higher-order hydrodynamic moments cause rod-like swimmers to follow oscillatory trajectories in quiescent fluid between two parallel plates, using a combination of lattice-Boltzmann simulations and far-field calculations. This behavior occurs even far from the confining walls and does not require lubrication results. We show that a swimmer's hydrodynamic quadrupole moment is crucial to the onset of the oscillatory trajectories. This insight allows us to develop a simple model for the dynamics near the channel center based on these higher hydrodynamic moments, and suggests opportunities for trajectory-based experimental characterization of swimmers' hydrodynamic properties. PMID:27184912

  16. Low frequency entrainment of oscillatory bursts in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Shlomovitz, Roie; Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Kao, Albert; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W F; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-16

    Sensitivity of mechanical detection by the inner ear is dependent upon a highly nonlinear response to the applied stimulus. Here we show that a system of differential equations that support a subcritical Hopf bifurcation, with a feedback mechanism that tunes an internal control parameter, captures a wide range of experimental results. The proposed model reproduces the regime in which spontaneous hair bundle oscillations are bistable, with sporadic transitions between the oscillatory and the quiescent state. Furthermore, it is shown, both experimentally and theoretically, that the application of a high-amplitude stimulus to the bistable system can temporarily render it quiescent before recovery of the limit cycle oscillations. Finally, we demonstrate that the application of low-amplitude stimuli can entrain bundle motility either by mode-locking to the spontaneous oscillation or by mode-locking the transition between the quiescent and oscillatory states. PMID:23601313

  17. Low Frequency Entrainment of Oscillatory Bursts in Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shlomovitz, Roie; Fredrickson-Hemsing, Lea; Kao, Albert; Meenderink, Sebastiaan W.F.; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity of mechanical detection by the inner ear is dependent upon a highly nonlinear response to the applied stimulus. Here we show that a system of differential equations that support a subcritical Hopf bifurcation, with a feedback mechanism that tunes an internal control parameter, captures a wide range of experimental results. The proposed model reproduces the regime in which spontaneous hair bundle oscillations are bistable, with sporadic transitions between the oscillatory and the quiescent state. Furthermore, it is shown, both experimentally and theoretically, that the application of a high-amplitude stimulus to the bistable system can temporarily render it quiescent before recovery of the limit cycle oscillations. Finally, we demonstrate that the application of low-amplitude stimuli can entrain bundle motility either by mode-locking to the spontaneous oscillation or by mode-locking the transition between the quiescent and oscillatory states. PMID:23601313

  18. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation: Effects of History and Lift Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadim, Ali

    2014-11-01

    This work is co-authored with my doctoral student Shujing Xu and is dedicated to the memory of my doctoral advisor Howard Brenner who enjoyed thought experiments related to rotating systems. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation refers to our theoretical discovery that within a liquid-filled container that rotates in an oscillatory manner about a fixed axis as a rigid body, a suspended particle can be made to migrate on average in the direction opposite to that of ordinary centrifugation. That is, a heavy (or light) particle can move toward (or away from) the rotation axis, when the frequency of oscillations is high enough. In this work we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Saffman lift force on particle trajectories and find that the counter-centrifugation phenomenon persists even when these forces are active.

  19. Oscillatory motion of sheared nanorods beyond the nematic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehober, David A.; Engel, Harald; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2013-07-01

    We study the role of the control parameter triggering nematic order (temperature or concentration) on the dynamical behavior of a system of nanorods under shear. Our study is based on a set of mesoscopic equations of motion for the components of the tensorial orientational order parameter. We investigate these equations via a systematic bifurcation analysis based on a numerical continuation technique, focusing on spatially homogeneous states. Exploring a wide range of parameters we find, unexpectedly, that states with oscillatory motion can exist even under conditions where the equilibrium system is isotropic. These oscillatory states are characterized by a wagging motion of the paranematic director, and they occur if the tumbling parameter is sufficiently small. We also present full nonequilibrium phase diagrams in the plane spanned by the concentration and the shear rate.

  20. Oscillatory motion of a viscous fluid in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Siraev, R. R.

    2015-08-15

    An oscillatory flow of an incompressible fluid in a saturated porous medium in the presence of a solid inclusion has been theoretically studied. Unsteady filtration has been described by the Brinkman–Forchheimer equation, where inertial effects and terms with acceleration characteristic of high filtration rates and the presence of pulsations are taken into account. The convective part of the acceleration is responsible for nonlinear effects near macroinhomogeneities. These effects can play a noticeable role in unsteady flows in the porous medium, as is shown for the problem of a solid ball streamed by an oscillatory flow having a given velocity at infinity. The results indicate that a secondary averaged flow appears in the case of high frequencies and cannot be described by Darcy’s or Forchheimer’s filtration laws.

  1. Flow Loading Induces Oscillatory Trajectories in a Bloodstream Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Uppaluri, Sravanti; Heddergott, Niko; Stellamanns, Eric; Herminghaus, Stephan; Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of isolated microswimmers are studied in bounded flow using the African trypanosome, a unicellular parasite, as the model organism. With the help of a microfluidics platform, cells are subjected to flow and found to follow an oscillatory path that is well fit by a sine wave. The frequency and amplitudes of the oscillatory trajectories are dependent on the flow velocity and cell orientation. When traveling in such a manner, trypanosomes orient upstream while downstream-facing cells tumble within the same streamline. A comparison with immotile trypanosomes demonstrates that self-propulsion is essential to the trajectories of trypanosomes even at flow velocities up to ∼40 times higher than their own swimming speed. These studies reveal important swimming dynamics that may be generally pertinent to the transport of microswimmers in flow and may be relevant to microbial pathogenesis. PMID:22995488

  2. Oscillatory Enzyme Dynamics Revealed by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Philip; Guo, Qi; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    Enzymes move on a variety of length and time scales. While much is known about large structural fluctuations that impact binding of the substrates and release of products, little is known about faster motions of enzymes and how these motions may influence enzyme-catalyzed reactions. This Letter reports frequency fluctuations of the azide anion bound to the active site of formate dehydrogenase measured via 2D IR spectroscopy. These measurements reveal an underdamped oscillatory component to the frequency-frequency correlation function when the azide is bound to the NAD(+) ternary complex. This oscillation disappears when the reduced cofactor is added, indicating that the oscillating contributions most likely come from the charged nicotinamide ring. These oscillatory motions may be relevant to donor-acceptor distance sampling of the catalyzed hydride transfer and therefore may give future insights into the dynamic behavior involved in enzyme catalysis. PMID:27305279

  3. Oscillatory Thermocapillary Flow Experiment-2 (OTFE-2). Experiment 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Yasuhiro; Ostrach, Simon; Pline, Alexander D.

    1998-01-01

    Oscillatory thermocapillary flow experiments were performed in the Glovebox aboard the USML-2 Spacelab which was launched on October 20, 1995. Open cylindrical containers of 1.2 and 2.0 cm in diameter were used. The ratio of container depth to radius (aspect ratio) was set at 0.5 and 2. Silicone oil of 2 centistokes kinematic viscosity was the test fluid. The fluid was heated by a cylindrical heater placed along the center axis of the container. The fluid motion was studied by flow visualization. The effect of aspect ratio on the onset of oscillations and on the oscillatory flow was investigated. It was found that the onset of oscillations was delayed when the container was made more shallow.

  4. Oscillatory flow in jet pumps: nonlinear effects and minor losses.

    PubMed

    Petculescu, A; Wilen, L A

    2003-03-01

    A nonresonant, lumped-element technique is used to investigate the behavior of tapered cylindrical flow constrictions (jet pumps) in the nonlinear oscillatory flow regime. The array of samples studied spans a wide range of inlet curvature radii and taper angles. By measuring the rectified steady pressure component developed across a jet pump as well as the acoustic impedance, the minor loss coefficients for flow into and out of the narrow end of the jet pump are determined. These coefficients are found to be relatively insensitive to all but the smallest curvature radii (i.e., sharp edges). For fixed radius of curvature, the inflow minor loss coefficient increases with increasing taper angle while the outflow coefficient remains relatively constant. For all of the samples, the steady flow minor loss coefficients are also measured and compared to their oscillatory flow counterparts. The agreement is good, confirming the so-called Iguchi hypothesis. PMID:12656363

  5. Understanding the onset of oscillatory swimming in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Joost; Mathijssen, Arnold J. T. M.; Fabritius, Marc; Menke, Henri; Holm, Christian; Shendruk, Tyler N.

    Self-propelled colloids (swimmers) in confining geometries follow trajectories determined by hydrodynamic interactions with the bounding surfaces. However, typically these interactions are ignored or truncated to lowest order. We demonstrate that higher-order hydrodynamic moments cause rod-like swimmers to follow oscillatory trajectories in quiescent fluid between two parallel plates, using a combination of lattice-Boltzmann simulations and far-field calculations. This behavior occurs even far from the confining walls and does not require lubrication results. We show that a swimmer's hydrodynamic quadrupole moment is crucial to the onset of the oscillatory trajectories. This insight allows us to develop a simple model for the dynamics near the channel center based on these higher hydrodynamic moments, and suggests opportunities for trajectory-based experimental characterization of swimmers' hydrodynamic properties.

  6. Viscoelastic response of diblock copolymers to oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Rüdiger, S

    2005-05-01

    A mesoscopic model for diblock copolymers is combined with a simple rheological description of the viscoelastic contrast of its two phases. Under oscillatory shear the contrast generates secondary velocity fields and substantial deviations of volume-averaged flow parameters. The validity of our analytical findings is tested with three-dimensional numerical simulations. Furthermore, we consider the effect of advection by the generated flows on the stability of ordered lamellar states and propose a new criterion for the selection of orientations. PMID:15864726

  7. Steady and oscillatory fluid flows produce a similar osteogenic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Case, N; Sen, B; Thomas, J A; Styner, M; Xie, Z; Jacobs, C R; Rubin, J

    2011-03-01

    Mechanical loading induces positive changes in the skeleton due to direct effects on bone cells, which may include regulation of transcription factors that support osteoblast differentiation and function. Flow effects on osteoblast transcription factors have generally been evaluated after short exposures. In this work, we assayed flow effects on osteogenic genes at early and late time points in a preosteoblast (CIMC-4) cell line and evaluated both steady and oscillatory flows. Four hours of steady unidirectional flow decreased the level of RANKL mRNA 53 ± 7% below that of nonflowed cells, but increases in Runx2 and osterix mRNA (44 ± 22% and 129 ± 12%, respectively) were significant only after 12-19 h of continuous flow. Late flow effects on RANKL and osterix were also induced by an intermittent flow-rest protocol (four cycles of 1 h on/1 h off + overnight rest). Four hours of oscillatory flow decreased RANKL mRNA at this early time point (63 ± 2%) but did not alter either osterix or Runx2. When oscillatory flow was delivered using the intermittent flow-rest protocol, Runx2 and osterix mRNA increased significantly (85 ± 19% and 161 ± 22%, respectively). Both β-catenin and ERK1/2, known to be involved in RANKL regulation, were rapidly activated by steady flow. Inhibition of flow-activated ERK1/2 prevented the increase in osterix mRNA but not Runx2; Runx2 phosphorylation was increased by flow, an effect which likely contributes to osterix induction. This work shows that both steady and oscillatory fluid flows can support enhancement of an osteogenic phenotype. PMID:21165611

  8. Voltage oscillatory instability caused by induction motor loads

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, F.P. de; Feltes, J.W.

    1996-08-01

    Isolated power systems which fit the structure of a single equivalent generator supplying an equivalent composite load can experience a voltage oscillatory instability entirely traceable to effects of induction motor loads interacting with automatic voltage regulators. This scenario is one where an AVR properly tuned for open circuit conditions is not necessarily well tuned for the on load condition. The phenomenon is explained and a simple solution through AVR compensation is suggested.

  9. Measuring Response Of Propellant To Oscillatory Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, Leon D.; Schwartz, Ken; Burns, Shawn P.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for research in combustion of solid propellants measures oscillatory response of rate of burning to oscillating thermal radiation from modulated CO2 laser. Determines response to rate of burning to equivalent oscillation in pressure. Rod of propellant mounted in burner assembly including waveguide at one end and infrared window at other end. Microwave Doppler velocimeter measures motion of combustion front. Microwave, laser-current, and heat-flux signals processed into and recorded in forms useful in determining desired response of propellent.

  10. Changes of spontaneous oscillatory activity to tonic heat pain.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiwei; Hu, Li; Zhang, Zhiguo; Hu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Transient painful stimuli could induce suppression of alpha oscillatory activities and enhancement of gamma oscillatory activities that also could be greatly modulated by attention. Here, we attempted to characterize changes in cortical activities during tonic heat pain perception and investigated the influence of directed/distracted attention on these responses. We collected 5-minute long continuous Electroencephalography (EEG) data from 38 healthy volunteers during four conditions presented in a counterbalanced order: (A) resting condition; (B) innoxious-distracted condition; (C) noxious-distracted condition; (D) noxious-attended condition. The effects of tonic heat pain stimulation and selective attention on oscillatory activities were investigated by comparing the EEG power spectra among the four experimental conditions and assessing the relationship between spectral power difference and subjective pain intensity. The change of oscillatory activities in condition D was characterized by stable and persistent decrease of alpha oscillation power over contralateral-central electrodes and widespread increase of gamma oscillation power, which were even significantly correlated with subjective pain intensity. Since EEG responses in the alpha and gamma frequency band were affected by attention in different manners, they are likely related to different aspects of the multidimensional sensory experience of pain. The observed contralateral-central alpha suppression (conditions D vs. B and D vs. C) may reflect primarily a top-down cognitive process such as attention, while the widespread gamma enhancement (conditions D vs. A) may partly reflect tonic pain processing, representing the summary effects of bottom-up stimulus-related and top-down subject-driven cognitive processes. PMID:24603703

  11. Properties of carbachol-induced oscillatory activity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Williams, J H; Kauer, J A

    1997-11-01

    Properties of carbachol-induced oscillatory activity in rat hippocampus. J. Neurophysiol. 78: 2631-2640, 1997. The recent resurgence of interest in carbachol oscillations as an in vitro model of theta rhythm in the hippocampus prompted us to evaluate the circuit mechanisms involved. In extracellular recordings, a regularly spaced bursting pattern of field potentials was observed in both CA3 and CA1 subfields in the presence of carbachol. Removal of the CA3 region abolished oscillatory activity observed in CA1, suggesting that the oscillatory generator is located in CA3. An alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), blocked carbachol oscillations, indicating that AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic currents are necessary for the population oscillation. Moreover, the spread of oscillatory activity into CA1 required intact N-methyl--aspartate receptors. These data are more consistent with epileptiform bursting than with theta rhythm described in vivo. In the presence of carbachol, individual CA3 pyramidal cells exhibited a slow, rhythmic intrinsic oscillation that was not blocked by DNQX and that was enhanced by membrane hyperpolarization. We hypothesize that this slower oscillation is the fundamental oscillator that participates in triggering the population oscillation by exciting multiple synaptically connected CA3 neurons. gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptors are not necessary for carbachol to elicit synchronous CA3 field events but are essential to the bursting pattern observed. Neither GABAB nor metabotropic glutamate receptors appear to be necessary for carbachol oscillations. However, both nicotinic and M1 and M3 muscarinic cholinergic receptors contribute to the generation of this activity. These results establish the local circuit elements and neurotransmitter receptors that contribute to carbachol-induced oscillations and indicate that carbachol-induced oscillations are

  12. Hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes with different indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2010-10-01

    A key idea in finite difference weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes is a combination of lower order fluxes to obtain a higher order approximation. The choice of the weight to each candidate stencil, which is a nonlinear function of the grid values, is crucial to the success of WENO schemes. For the system case, WENO schemes are based on local characteristic decompositions and flux splitting to avoid spurious oscillation. But the cost of computation of nonlinear weights and local characteristic decompositions is very high. In this paper, we investigate hybrid schemes of WENO schemes with high order up-wind linear schemes using different discontinuity indicators and explore the possibility in avoiding the local characteristic decompositions and the nonlinear weights for part of the procedure, hence reducing the cost but still maintaining non-oscillatory properties for problems with strong shocks. The idea is to identify discontinuity by an discontinuity indicator, then reconstruct numerical flux by WENO approximation in discontinuous regions and up-wind linear approximation in smooth regions. These indicators are mainly based on the troubled-cell indicators for discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method which are listed in the paper by Qiu and Shu (J. Qiu, C.-W. Shu, A comparison of troubled-cell indicators for Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin methods using weighted essentially non-oscillatory limiters, SIAM Journal of Scientific Computing 27 (2005) 995-1013). The emphasis of the paper is on comparison of the performance of hybrid scheme using different indicators, with an objective of obtaining efficient and reliable indicators to obtain better performance of hybrid scheme to save computational cost. Detail numerical studies in one- and two-dimensional cases are performed, addressing the issues of efficiency (less CPU time and more accurate numerical solution), non-oscillatory property.

  13. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  14. Light scattering studies of an electrorheological fluid in oscillatory shear

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Odinek, J.

    1995-12-31

    We have conducted a real time, two-dimensional light scattering study of the nonlinear dynamics of field-induced structures in an electrorheological fluid subjected to oscillatory shear. We have developed a kinetic chain model of the observed dynamics by considering the response of a fragmenting/aggregating particle chain to the prevailing hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces. This structural theory is then used to describe the nonlinear rheology of ER fluids.

  15. An oscillatory neuronal circuit generating a locomotory rhythm.

    PubMed Central

    Friesen,, W O; Poon, M; Stent, G S

    1976-01-01

    A quartet of interconnected interneurons whose periodic activity appears to generate the traveling body wave of the swimming leech has been identified on each side of segmental ganglia of the ventral nerve cord of Hirudo medicinalis. Theoretical analysis and electronic analog models of the identified intra- and interganglionic synaptic connections of the segmentally iterated interneurons showed that they form an oscillatory network with cycle period and intra-and intersegmental phase relations appropriate for the swimming movement. Images PMID:1068483

  16. Direct observations of L-I-H and H-I-L transitions with the X-point reciprocating probe in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, S. H.; Manz, P.; Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching ; Stroth, U.; Physics Department E28, Technical University of Munich, 85747 Garching ; Tsalas, M.; Tynan, G. R.

    2014-04-15

    A reciprocating Langmuir probe was used to directly measure the behavior of turbulence and flows in the X-point region during transitions between low-(L) and high-confinement (H) mode in ASDEX Upgrade. The probe traverses the divertor horizontally in 140 ms, typically 2–5 cm below the X-point. Toroidal Mach number, density, floating potential (ϕ{sub f}), and electron temperature (T{sub e}) are measured. In the regime accessible to the probe (P{sub inj}<1.5 MW, line-integrated core density <4×10{sup 19} m{sup −2}), the L-H transition features an intermediate phase (I-phase), characterized by limit-cycle oscillations at 0.5–3 kHz [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)]. The probe measurements reveal that this pulsing affects both the density and the toroidal Mach number. It is present in both the low-(LFS) and high-field sides (HFS) of the scrape-off layer, while high-amplitude broadband turbulence usually dominates the private-flux region. Profile comparisons between L-mode and I-phase show lower density in pulsing regions and small shifts in T{sub e}, directed oppositely on LFS and HFS, which are compensated by shifts in ϕ{sub f} to yield a surprisingly unchanged plasma potential profile. Directly observed L-I-phase transitions reveal that the onset of the pulsing is preceded by a fast 50% density drop in the HFS X-point region. Back transitions to L-mode occur essentially symmetrically, with the pulsing stopping first, followed by a fast recovery to L-mode density levels in the divertor.

  17. Dynamical weakening by fluidization under oscillatory viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical weakening of granular materials plays a critical role on diverse geological events such as seismic faulting and landslides. A common feature in the dynamics of these processes is the development of fluid-solid relative flows, which could lead to fluidization by hydrodynamic viscous stresses. This work is focused on analyzing hydrodynamic fluidization under oscillatory viscous flows as a possible driving mechanism for dynamical weakening. The theoretical estimations and experimental observations presented and reviewed suggest that fluidization can be greatly promoted by oscillatory viscous flows, which are usually expected in geological events involving vibration of granular materials in viscous fluids. Fluidization under oscillatory viscous flows may occur at not excessively large vibration velocities of fine particles in gases or relatively larger particles in liquids or supercritical fluids. In particular, the enhancement of fluidization by high-frequency vibrations would be a powerful mechanism to promote dynamical weakening of fine powders in dry fault gouges, failure of liquid- (or supercritical fluid-) saturated beds, and sustained fluidization of pyroclastic flows and lahars.

  18. Oscillatory/Chaotic Thermocapillary Flow Induced by Radiant Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    There is a continuing need to understand the fluid physics occurring under low gravity conditions in processes such as crystal growth, materials processing, and the movement of bubbles or droplets. The fluid flow in such situations is often caused by a gradient in interfacial tension. If a temperature gradient is created due to a heat source, the resulting flow is called thermocapillary flow, a special case of Marangoni Convection. In this study, an experimental investigation was conducted using silicone oil in cylindrical containers with a laser heat source at the free surface. It was desired to determine the conditions under which steady, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow becomes unstable and oscillatory three-dimensional flow states develop. The critical Marangoni number for each observed oscillatory state was measured as a function of the container aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number, a measure of buoyant force versus ii thermocapillary force. Various oscillatory modes were observed during three- dimensional convection, and chaotic flow was reached in one test condition. The critical Marangoni numbers are compared with those measured in previous studies, and the power spectra and phase trajectories of the instantaneous surface temperature distributions are used to characterize the routes of transitions to the chaotic flow state. Results show that only superharmonic modes appear in the routes to chaos while infinite number of subharmonic modes occur in flow transitions for pure Rayleigh convection.

  19. [Recent results in research on oscillatory chemical reactions].

    PubMed

    Poros, Eszter; Kurin-Csörgei, Krisztina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of the complicated periodical phenomenas in the nature (e.g. hearth beat, sleep cycle, circadian rhythms, etc) could be understood with using the laws of nonlinear chemical systems. In this article the newest result in the research of the subfield of nonlinear chemical dynamics aimed at constructing oscillatory chemical reactions, which are novel either in composition or in configuration, are presented. In the introductory part the concept of chemical periodicity is defined, then the forms as it can appear in time and space and the methods of their study are discussed. Detailed description of the experimental work that has resulted in two significant discoveries is provided. A method was developed to design pH-oscillators which are capable of operating under close conditions. The batch pH-oscillators are more convenient to use in some proposed applications than the equivalent CSTR variant. A redox oscillator that is new in composition was found. The permanganate oxidation of some amino acids was shown to take place according to oscillatory kinetics in a narrow range of the experimental parameters. The KMnO4 - glycine - Na2HPO4 system represents the first example in the family of manganese based oscillators where amino acids is involved. In the conclusion formal analogies between the simple chemical and some more complicated biological oscillatory phenomena are mentioned and the possibility of modeling periodic processes with the use of information gained from the studies of chemical oscillations is pointed out. PMID:25872277

  20. A generalized locomotion CPG architecture based on oscillatory building blocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhijun; França, Felipe M G

    2003-07-01

    Neural oscillation is one of the most extensively investigated topics of artificial neural networks. Scientific approaches to the functionalities of both natural and artificial intelligences are strongly related to mechanisms underlying oscillatory activities. This paper concerns itself with the assumption of the existence of central pattern generators (CPGs), which are the plausible neural architectures with oscillatory capabilities, and presents a discrete and generalized approach to the functionality of locomotor CPGs of legged animals. Based on scheduling by multiple edge reversal (SMER), a primitive and deterministic distributed algorithm, it is shown how oscillatory building block (OBB) modules can be created and, hence, how OBB-based networks can be formulated as asymmetric Hopfield-like neural networks for the generation of complex coordinated rhythmic patterns observed among pairs of biological motor neurons working during different gait patterns. It is also shown that the resulting Hopfield-like network possesses the property of reproducing the whole spectrum of different gaits intrinsic to the target locomotor CPGs. Although the new approach is not restricted to the understanding of the neurolocomotor system of any particular animal, hexapodal and quadrupedal gait patterns are chosen as illustrations given the wide interest expressed by the ongoing research in the area. PMID:12836031

  1. Mechanism of the Ferrocyanide-Iodate-Sulfite Oscillatory Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Viktor; Epstein, Irving R; Kustin, Kenneth

    2016-03-31

    Existing models of the ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite (FIS) reaction seek to replicate the oscillatory pH behavior that occurs in open systems. These models exhibit significant differences in the amplitudes and waveforms of the concentration oscillations of such intermediates as I(-), I3(-), and Fe(CN)6(3-) under identical conditions and do not include several experimentally found intermediates. Here we report measurements of sulfite concentrations during an oscillatory cycle. Knowing the correct concentration of sulfite over the course of a period is important because sulfite is the main component that determines the buffer capacity, the pH extrema, and the amount of oxidizer (iodate) required for the transition to low pH. On the basis of this new result and recent experimental findings on the rate laws and intermediates of component processes taken from the literature, we propose a mass action kinetics model that attempts to faithfully represent the chemistry of the FIS reaction. This new comprehensive mechanism reproduces the pH oscillations and the periodic behavior in [Fe(CN)6(3-)], [I3(-)], [I(-)], and [SO3(2-)]T with characteristics similar to those seen in experiments in both CSTR and semibatch arrangements. The parameter ranges at which stationary and oscillatory behavior is exhibited also show good agreement with those of the experiments. PMID:26949219

  2. Targeted training modifies oscillatory brain activity in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Tzvetan G.; Carolus, Almut; Schubring, David; Popova, Petia; Miller, Gregory A.; Rockstroh, Brigitte S.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of both domain-specific and broader cognitive remediation protocols have been reported for neural activity and overt performance in schizophrenia (SZ). Progress is limited by insufficient knowledge of relevant neural mechanisms. Addressing neuronal signal resolution in the auditory system as a mechanism contributing to cognitive function and dysfunction in schizophrenia, the present study compared effects of two neuroplasticity-based training protocols targeting auditory–verbal or facial affect discrimination accuracy and a standard rehabilitation protocol on magnetoencephalographic (MEG) oscillatory brain activity in an auditory paired-click task. SZ were randomly assigned to either 20 daily 1-hour sessions over 4 weeks of auditory–verbal training (N = 19), similarly intense facial affect discrimination training (N = 19), or 4 weeks of treatment as usual (TAU, N = 19). Pre-training, the 57 SZ showed smaller click-induced posterior alpha power modulation than did 28 healthy comparison participants, replicating Popov et al. (2011b). Abnormally small alpha decrease 300–800 ms around S2 improved more after targeted auditory–verbal training than after facial affect training or TAU. The improvement in oscillatory brain dynamics with training correlated with improvement on a measure of verbal learning. Results replicate previously reported effects of neuroplasticity-based psychological training on oscillatory correlates of auditory stimulus differentiation, encoding, and updating and indicate specificity of cortical training effects. PMID:26082889

  3. Wavelet-based localization of oscillatory sources from magnetoencephalography data.

    PubMed

    Lina, J M; Chowdhury, R; Lemay, E; Kobayashi, E; Grova, C

    2014-08-01

    Transient brain oscillatory activities recorded with Eelectroencephalography (EEG) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) are characteristic features in physiological and pathological processes. This study is aimed at describing, evaluating, and illustrating with clinical data a new method for localizing the sources of oscillatory cortical activity recorded by MEG. The method combines time-frequency representation and an entropic regularization technique in a common framework, assuming that brain activity is sparse in time and space. Spatial sparsity relies on the assumption that brain activity is organized among cortical parcels. Sparsity in time is achieved by transposing the inverse problem in the wavelet representation, for both data and sources. We propose an estimator of the wavelet coefficients of the sources based on the maximum entropy on the mean (MEM) principle. The full dynamics of the sources is obtained from the inverse wavelet transform, and principal component analysis of the reconstructed time courses is applied to extract oscillatory components. This methodology is evaluated using realistic simulations of single-trial signals, combining fast and sudden discharges (spike) along with bursts of oscillating activity. The method is finally illustrated with a clinical application using MEG data acquired on a patient with a right orbitofrontal epilepsy. PMID:22410322

  4. Cerebral oscillatory activity during simulated driving using MEG

    PubMed Central

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Hirata, Masayuki; Ebe, Kazutoshi; Kimura, Kenji; Yi Ryu, Seong; Kono, Yoshiyuki; Muto, Nozomi; Yoshioka, Masako; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to examine cerebral oscillatory differences associated with psychological processes during simulated car driving. We recorded neuromagnetic signals in 14 healthy volunteers using magnetoencephalography (MEG) during simulated driving. MEG data were analyzed using synthetic aperture magnetometry to detect the spatial distribution of cerebral oscillations. Group effects between subjects were analyzed statistically using a non-parametric permutation test. Oscillatory differences were calculated by comparison between “passive viewing” and “active driving.” “Passive viewing” was the baseline, and oscillatory differences during “active driving” showed an increase or decrease in comparison with a baseline. Power increase in the theta band was detected in the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) during active driving. Power decreases in the alpha, beta, and low gamma bands were detected in the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), left postcentral gyrus (PoCG), middle temporal gyrus (MTG), and posterior cingulate gyrus (PCiG) during active driving. Power increase in the theta band in the SFG may play a role in attention. Power decrease in the right IPL may reflect selectively divided attention and visuospatial processing, whereas that in the left PoCG reflects sensorimotor activation related to driving manipulation. Power decreases in the MTG and PCiG may be associated with object recognition. PMID:25566017

  5. Free oscillations of magnetic fluid in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the esults of measuring the elastic parameters of an oscillatory system (coefficient of pondermotive elasticity, damping factor, and oscillation frequency) whose viscous inertial element is represented by a magnetic fluid confined in a tube by magnetic levitation in a strong magnetic field. The role of elasticity is played by the pondermotive force acting on thin layers at the upper and lower ends of the fluid column. It is shown that, by measuring the elastic oscillation frequencies of the magnetic fluid column, it is possible to develop a fundamentally new absolute method for determining the saturation magnetization of a magnetic colloid.

  6. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  7. Point spread function of the optical needle super-oscillatory lens

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Tapashree; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Yuan, Guanghui; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-06-09

    Super-oscillatory optical lenses are known to achieve sub-wavelength focusing. In this paper, we analyse the imaging capabilities of a super-oscillatory lens by studying its point spread function. We experimentally demonstrate that a super-oscillatory lens can generate a point spread function 24% smaller than that dictated by the diffraction limit and has an effective numerical aperture of 1.31 in air. The object-image linear displacement property of these lenses is also investigated.

  8. Single Polymer Dynamics under Large Amplitude Oscillatory Extensional (LAOE) Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuecheng; Schroeder, Charles M.

    Over the past two decades, advances in fluorescence imaging and particle manipulation have enabled the direct observation of single polymer dynamics in model flows such as shear flow and planar extensional flow. The vast majority of single polymer studies, however, has focused on chain dynamics using simple transient step forcing functions. In order to study single polymer dynamics in non-idealized model flows, there is a clear need to implement more complicated transient flow forcing functions. In bulk rheology, large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) was widely used to study the linear and nonlinear viscoelasticity of materials, but not yet been applied to molecular rheology. In this work, we directly probe single polymer dynamics using oscillatory extensional flow in precisely controlled microfluidic devices. We are able to generate large and small amplitude sinusoidal oscillatory extensional flow in a cross-slot microfluidic device while imaging the conformational dynamics of a single polymer trapped at the stagnation point. In this flow, polymer chains are stretched, squeezed, and rotated between extensional/compressional axes in a highly dynamic and transient manner. Using this technique, we studied the dynamics and coil-stretch transition of a single λ-DNA as a function of the Weissenberg number (Wi) and Deborah number (De). Moreover, we use Brownian dynamics simulation to map a wide range of Pipkin space for polymers from linear steady-state conditions to non-linear unsteady-states. Our results reveal a critical Wi at the coil-stretch transition that is function of the De in LAOE flow. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

  9. Oscillatory synchrony as a mechanism of attentional processing.

    PubMed

    Gregoriou, Georgia G; Paneri, Sofia; Sapountzis, Panagiotis

    2015-11-11

    The question of how the brain selects which stimuli in our visual field will be given priority to enter into perception, to guide our actions and to form our memories has been a matter of intense research in studies of visual attention. Work in humans and animal models has revealed an extended network of areas involved in the control and maintenance of attention. For many years, imaging studies in humans constituted the main source of a systems level approach, while electrophysiological recordings in non-human primates provided insight into the cellular mechanisms of visual attention. Recent technological advances and the development of sophisticated analytical tools have allowed us to bridge the gap between the two approaches and assess how neuronal ensembles across a distributed network of areas interact in visual attention tasks. A growing body of evidence suggests that oscillatory synchrony plays a crucial role in the selective communication of neuronal populations that encode the attended stimuli. Here, we discuss data from theoretical and electrophysiological studies, with more emphasis on findings from humans and non-human primates that point to the relevance of oscillatory activity and synchrony for attentional processing and behavior. These findings suggest that oscillatory synchrony in specific frequencies reflects the biophysical properties of specific cell types and local circuits and allows the brain to dynamically switch between different spatio-temporal patterns of activity to achieve flexible integration and selective routing of information along selected neuronal populations according to behavioral demands. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. PMID:25712615

  10. A self-regulating biomolecular comparator for processing oscillatory signals.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Franco, Elisa; Schulman, Rebecca

    2015-10-01

    While many cellular processes are driven by biomolecular oscillators, precise control of a downstream on/off process by a biochemical oscillator signal can be difficult: over an oscillator's period, its output signal varies continuously between its amplitude limits and spends a significant fraction of the time at intermediate values between these limits. Further, the oscillator's output is often noisy, with particularly large variations in the amplitude. In electronic systems, an oscillating signal is generally processed by a downstream device such as a comparator that converts a potentially noisy oscillatory input into a square wave output that is predominantly in one of two well-defined on and off states. The comparator's output then controls downstream processes. We describe a method for constructing a synthetic biochemical device that likewise produces a square-wave-type biomolecular output for a variety of oscillatory inputs. The method relies on a separation of time scales between the slow rate of production of an oscillatory signal molecule and the fast rates of intermolecular binding and conformational changes. We show how to control the characteristics of the output by varying the concentrations of the species and the reaction rates. We then use this control to show how our approach could be applied to process different in vitro and in vivo biomolecular oscillators, including the p53-Mdm2 transcriptional oscillator and two types of in vitro transcriptional oscillators. These results demonstrate how modular biomolecular circuits could, in principle, be combined to build complex dynamical systems. The simplicity of our approach also suggests that natural molecular circuits may process some biomolecular oscillator outputs before they are applied downstream. PMID:26378119

  11. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J.-M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guérin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  12. Oscillatory tank-treading motion of erythrocytes in shear flows.

    PubMed

    Dodson, W R; Dimitrakopoulos, P

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the oscillatory dynamics of the tank-treading motion of healthy human erythrocytes in shear flows with capillary number Ca = O(1) and small to moderate viscosity ratios 0.01 ≤ λ ≤ 1.5. These conditions correspond to a wide range of surrounding medium viscosities (4-600 m Pa s) and shear flow rates (2-560 s(-1)), and match those used in ektacytometry systems. For a given viscosity ratio, as the flow rate increases, the steady-state erythrocyte length L (in the shear plane) increases logarithmically while its depth W (normal to the shear plane) decreases logarithmically. In addition, the flow rate increase dampens the oscillatory erythrocyte inclination but not its length oscillations (which show relative variations of about 5-8%). For a given flow rate, as the viscosity ratio increases, the erythrocyte length L contracts while its depth W increases (i.e., the cell becomes less deformed) with a small decrease in the length variations. The average orientation angle of the erythrocyte shows a significant decrease with the viscosity ratio as does the angle oscillation while the oscillation period increases. These trends continue in higher viscosity ratios resulting eventually in the transition from a (weakly oscillatory) tank-treading motion to a tumbling motion. Our computations show that the erythrocyte width S, which exists in the shear plane, is practically invariant in time, capillary number, and viscosity ratio, and corresponds to a real cell thickness of about 2.5 μm. Comparison of our computational results with the predictions of (low degree-of-freedom) theoretical models and experimental findings, suggests that the energy dissipation due to the shape-memory effects is more significant than the energy dissipation due to the membrane viscosity. Our work shows that the oscillatory tank-treading motion can account for more than 50% of the variations found in ektacytometry systems; thus, researchers who wish to study inherent

  13. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Tourret, D; Debierre, J-M; Song, Y; Mota, F L; Bergeon, N; Guérin, R; Trivedi, R; Billia, B; Karma, A

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  14. Oscillatory behaviour in Type IA FBG: ruling out chemical complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, George; Kalli, Kyriacos; Canning, John; Lacraz, Amedee

    2015-09-01

    Type IA FBG are regenerated gratings that appear in hydrogenated germanosilicate fibre of all types during prolonged UV exposure. The gratings are characterised by a large Bragg wavelength shift and a concomitant increase in the mean fibre core index. Modulated index changes are complex by comparison and significantly weaker, often characterised by oscillatory growth behaviour. Low thermal stability of Type IA gratings suggests a possible chemical role similar to thermally processed optical fibres where autocatalysis has been observed. We show that GeOH and SiOH formation are not out-of-phase and follow each other, with no evidence of autocatalysis, ruling out a chemical origin.

  15. Adaptive wavelet-based recognition of oscillatory patterns on electroencephalograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazimov, Alexey I.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Hramov, Alexander E.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Sitnikova, Evgenija Y.

    2013-02-01

    The problem of automatic recognition of specific oscillatory patterns on electroencephalograms (EEG) is addressed using the continuous wavelet-transform (CWT). A possibility of improving the quality of recognition by optimizing the choice of CWT parameters is discussed. An adaptive approach is proposed to identify sleep spindles (SS) and spike wave discharges (SWD) that assumes automatic selection of CWT-parameters reflecting the most informative features of the analyzed time-frequency structures. Advantages of the proposed technique over the standard wavelet-based approaches are considered.

  16. Bray-Liebhafsky oscillatory reaction in the radiofrequency electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanisavljev, Dragomir R.; Velikić, Zoran; Veselinović, Dragan S.; Jacić, Nevena V.; Milenković, Maja C.

    2014-09-01

    Oscillatory Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) reaction is capacitively coupled with the electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range 60-110 MHz. Because of the specific reaction dynamics characterized by several characteristic parameters (induction period, period between chemical oscillations and their amplitude) it served as a good model system for the investigation of the effects of radiofrequent (RF) radiation. RF power of up to 0.2 W did not produce observable changes of the BL reaction parameters in the limit of the experiment reproductivity. Results indicate that, under the given experimental conditions, both dissipative and reactive properties of the solution are not considerably coupled with the RF electrical field.

  17. Oscillatory nonhmic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method of the invention maintain a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  18. Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  19. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelatedmore » at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global

  20. Regulation of oscillatory contraction in insect flight muscle by troponin.

    PubMed

    Krzic, Uros; Rybin, Vladimir; Leonard, Kevin R; Linke, Wolfgang A; Bullard, Belinda

    2010-03-19

    Insect indirect flight muscle is activated by sinusoidal length change, which enables the muscle to work at high frequencies, and contracts isometrically in response to Ca(2+). Indirect flight muscle has two TnC isoforms: F1 binding a single Ca(2+) in the C-domain, and F2 binding Ca(2+) in the N- and C-domains. Fibres substituted with F1 produce delayed force in response to a single rapid stretch, and those with F2 produce isometric force in response to Ca(2+). We have studied the effect of TnC isoforms on oscillatory work. In native Lethocerus indicus fibres, oscillatory work was superimposed on a level of isometric force that depended on Ca(2+) concentration. Maximum work was produced at pCa 6.1; at higher concentrations, work decreased as isometric force increased. In fibres substituted with F1 alone, work continued to rise as Ca(2+) was increased up to pCa 4.7. Fibres substituted with various F1:F2 ratios produced maximal work at a ratio of 100:1 or 50:1; a higher proportion of F2 increased isometric force at the expense of oscillatory work. The F1:F2 ratio was 9.8:1 in native fibres, as measured by immunofluorescence, using isoform-specific antibodies. The small amount of F2 needed to restore work to levels obtained for the native fibre is likely to be due to the relative affinity of F1 and F2 for TnH, the Lethocerus homologue of TnI. Affinity of TnC isoforms for a TnI fragment of TnH was measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. The K(d) was 1.01 muM for F1 binding and 22.7 nM for F2. The higher affinity of F2 can be attributed to two TnH binding sites on F2 and a single site on F1. Stretch may be sensed by an extended C-terminal domain of TnH, resulting in reversible dissociation of the inhibitory sequence from actin during the oscillatory cycle. PMID:20100491

  1. Oscillatory flow in a cone-and-plate bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C A; Tzou, M R; Ho, R W

    2005-08-01

    Motivated by biometric applications, we analyze oscillatory flow in a cone-and-plate geometry. The cone is rotated in a simple harmonic way on a stationary plate. Based on assuming that the angle between the cone and plate is small, we describe the flow analytically by a perturbation method in terms of two small parameters, the Womersley number and the Reynolds number, which account for the influences of the local acceleration and centripetal force, respectively. Working equations for the shear stresses induced both by laminar primary and secondary flows on the plate surface are presented. PMID:16121530

  2. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is

  3. About the oscillatory possibilities of the dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, R.; Pi, F.; Rius, J.; Orriols, G.

    2012-08-01

    This paper may be ultimately described as an attempt to make feasible the evolutionary emergence of novelty in a supposedly deterministic world whose behavior is associated with that of the mathematical dynamical systems. It means philosophical implications that the paper needs to address, subsidiarily at least. The work was motivated by the observation of complex oscillatory behaviors in a family of physical devices and related mathematical models, for which there is no known explanation in the mainstream of nonlinear dynamics. The paper begins by describing a nonlinear mechanism of oscillatory mode mixing explaining such behaviors and, through its generalization to richer nonlinear vector fields, establishes a generic dynamical scenario with extraordinary oscillatory possibilities, including expansive growing scalability toward high dimensionalities and through nonlinear multiplicities. The scenario is then used to tentatively explain complex oscillatory behaviors observed in nature like those of turbulent fluids and living brains. Finally, by considering the scenario as a dynamic substrate underlying generic aspects of both the functioning and the genesis of complex behaviors in a supposedly deterministic world, a theoretical framework covering the evolutionary development of structural transformations in the time evolution of that world is built up. The analysis includes attempts to clarify the roles of items often invoked apropos of pathways to complexity like chaos, pattern formation, externally-driven bifurcations, hysteresis, irreversibility, and order through random fluctuations. Thermodynamics, as the exclusive field of physics in providing generic evolutionary criteria, is briefly and synthetically considered from the dynamical systems point of view by trying to elucidate its explanatory possibilities concerning the emergence of complexity. Quantum mechanics gets involved in two different ways: the lack of a dynamical systems perspective in the currently

  4. Dynamics of a population of oscillatory and excitable elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Kevin P.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze a variant of a model proposed by Kuramoto, Shinomoto, and Sakaguchi for a large population of coupled oscillatory and excitable elements. Using the Ott-Antonsen ansatz, we reduce the behavior of the population to a two-dimensional dynamical system with three parameters. We present the stability diagram and calculate several of its bifurcation curves analytically, for both excitatory and inhibitory coupling. Our main result is that when the coupling function is broad, the system can display bistability between steady states of constant high and low activity, whereas when the coupling function is narrow and inhibitory, one of the states in the bistable regime can show persistent pulsations in activity.

  5. Spiral waves in oscillatory media with an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael; Ott, Edward; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    1999-02-01

    Spiral waves in oscillatory reaction-diffusion systems under the influence of a uniform, time-independent electric field are modeled by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation extended to include a convective term with complex coefficient. Results for the spiral drift, deformation, and frequency shift due to the electric field are obtained. The coefficient of the additional convective term is derived from the original reaction-diffusion system. The equation provides a good qualitative model of experimentally seen distortion of spiral waves in the presence of an applied electric field.

  6. Rotating copper plasmoid in external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Pramod K.; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-02-15

    Effect of nonuniform magnetic field on the expanding copper plasmoid in helium and argon gases using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging is presented. We report a peculiar oscillatory rotation of plasmoid in magnetic field and argon ambient. The temporal variation and appearance of the dip in the electron temperature show a direct evidence of the threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines from the plasmoid. Rayleigh Taylor instability produced at the interface separating magnetic field and plasma is discussed.

  7. Cassini nightside observations of the oscillatory motion of Saturn's northern auroral oval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunce, E. J.; Grodent, D. C.; Jinks, S. L.; Andrews, D. J.; Badman, S. V.; Coates, A. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dougherty, M. K.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Provan, G.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years we have benefitted greatly from the first in-orbit multi-wavelength images of Saturn's polar atmosphere from the Cassini spacecraft. Specifically, images obtained from the Cassini UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) provide an excellent view of the planet's auroral emissions, which in turn give an account of the large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and dynamics within the system. However, obtaining near-simultaneous views of the auroral regions with in situ measurements of magnetic field and plasma populations at high latitudes is more difficult to routinely achieve. Here we present an unusual case, during Revolution 99 in January 2009, where UVIS observes the entire northern UV auroral oval during a 2 h interval while Cassini traverses the magnetic flux tubes connecting to the auroral regions near 21 LT, sampling the related magnetic field, particle, and radio and plasma wave signatures. The motion of the auroral oval evident from the UVIS images requires a careful interpretation of the associated latitudinally "oscillating" magnetic field and auroral field-aligned current signatures, whereas previous interpretations have assumed a static current system. Concurrent observations of the auroral hiss (typically generated in regions of downward directed field-aligned current) support this revised interpretation of an oscillating current system. The nature of the motion of the auroral oval evident in the UVIS image sequence, and the simultaneous measured motion of the field-aligned currents (and related plasma boundary) in this interval, is shown to be related to the northern hemisphere magnetosphere oscillation phase. This is in agreement with previous observations of the auroral oval oscillatory motion.

  8. From simple to complex patterns of oscillatory behavior in a model for the mammalian cell cycle containing multiple oscillatory circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Claude; Goldbeter, Albert

    2010-12-01

    We previously proposed an integrated computational model for the network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) that controls the dynamics of the mammalian cell cycle [C. Gérard and A. Goldbeter, "Temporal self-organization of the cyclin/Cdk network driving the mammalian cell cycle," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 21643 (2009)]. The model contains four Cdk modules regulated by reversible phosphorylation, Cdk inhibitors, protein synthesis or degradation, and the balance between antagonistic effects of the tumor suppressor pRB and the transcription factor E2F. Increasing the level of a growth factor above a critical threshold triggers the transition from a quiescent, stable steady state to self-sustained oscillations in the Cdk network. These oscillations correspond to the repetitive, transient activation of cyclin D/Cdk4-6 in G1, cyclin E/Cdk2 at the G1/S transition, cyclin A/Cdk2 in S and at the S/G2 transition, and cyclin B/Cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This periodic, ordered activation of the various cyclin/Cdk complexes can be associated with cell proliferation. The multiplicity of feedback loops within the Cdk network is such that it contains at least four distinct circuits capable of producing oscillations. The tight coupling of these oscillatory circuits generally results in simple periodic behavior associated with repetitive cycles of mitosis or with endoreplication. The latter corresponds to multiple passages through the phase of DNA replication without mitosis. We show here that, as a result of the interaction between the multiple oscillatory circuits, particularly when attenuating the strength of the oscillatory module involving cyclin B/Cdk1, the model for the Cdk network can also produce complex periodic oscillations, quasiperiodic oscillations, and chaos. Numerical simulations based on limited explorations in parameter space nevertheless suggest that these complex modes of oscillatory behavior remain less common than the evolution to simple periodic

  9. Model for calcium dependent oscillatory growth in pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Jens H; Geitmann, Anja; Grant, Martin

    2008-07-21

    Experiments have shown that pollen tubes grow in an oscillatory mode, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. We propose a theoretical growth model of pollen tubes exhibiting such oscillatory behaviour. The pollen tube and the surrounding medium are represented by two immiscible fluids separated by an interface. The physical variables are pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, which depend on relevant biological quantities, namely calcium concentration and thickness of the cell wall. The essential features generally believed to control oscillating growth are included in the model, namely a turgor pressure, a viscous cell wall which yields under pressure, stretch-activated calcium channels which transport calcium ions into the cytoplasm and an exocytosis rate dependent on the cytosolic calcium concentration in the apex of the cell. We find that a calcium dependent vesicle recycling mechanism is necessary to obtain an oscillating growth rate in our model. We study the variation in the frequency of the growth rate by changing the extracellular calcium concentration and the density of ion channels in the membrane. We compare the predictions of our model with experimental data on the frequency of oscillation versus growth speed, calcium concentration and density of calcium channels. PMID:18471831

  10. Oscillatory shearing behavior of rocket leaves powder incorporated dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almusallam, Abdulwahab Salem; Ahmed, Jasim; Nahar, Shamsun; Chacko, Siby

    2016-05-01

    Dough blended with rocket leaves powder was subjected to small and large amplitude oscillatory shears. Small amplitude oscillatory shear data were fitted to a discrete relaxation model of elastic solids and to a critical gel model. The small amplitude relaxation spectrum was thereafter used to calculate the LAOS predictions of various large deformation models. The LAOS theoretical calculations using the Phan-Thien model showed good agreement with the first harmonic stress data, and only qualitative agreement with the third and the fifth harmonic stress values. Lissajous curves showed dissimilarity in shape between the experimental data and Phan-Thien model. The network model of Sim et al. (2003). Did not have the butterfly shape displayed in the Phan-Thien model, but it provided a worse fit to stress harmonics than the Phan-Thien model. An improved damage function was proposed, where time effect on network damage was taken into consideration, and fits to stress harmonics and to Lissajous stress-strain curves were significantly improved.

  11. Oscillatory characteristics of metallic nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Ansari, Reza; Darvizeh, Mansour

    2015-12-01

    This study is concerned with the oscillatory behavior of metallic nanoparticles, and in particular silver and gold nanoparticles, inside lipid nanotubes (LNTs) using the continuum approximation along with the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function. The nanoparticle is modeled as a dense sphere and the LNT is assumed to be comprised of six layers including two head groups, two intermediate layers and two tail groups. To evaluate van der Waals (vdW) interactions, analytical expressions are first derived through undertaking surface and volume integrals which are then validated by a fully numerical scheme based on the differential quadrature (DQ) technique. Using the actual force distribution between the two interacting molecules, the equation of motion is directly solved utilizing the Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme to arrive at the time history of displacement and velocity of the inner core. Also, a semi-analytical expression incorporating both geometrical parameters and initial conditions is introduced for the precise evaluation of oscillation frequency. A comprehensive study is conducted to gain an insight into the influences of nanoparticle radius, LNT length, head and tail group thicknesses and initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of the metallic nanoparticles inside LNTs. It is found that the escape velocity and oscillation frequency of silver nanoparticles are higher than those of gold ones. It is further shown that the oscillation frequency is less affected by the tail group thickness when compared to the head group thickness.

  12. 3- and 5- Minute Oscillatory Behavior in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabro, Brandon; McAteer, James; Pevtsov, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    We study the spatially- and temporally-localized oscillatory behavior of the solar corona using a 6-hour sequence of narrowband 171A (extreme ultraviolet) image from the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2. We use a Morlet wavelet transform to extract oscillation parameters from the temporal evolution of emission in each pixel and study the variation in space and time of oscillatory power in the 3- and 5-minute band. We extract and compare these parameters between active Sun, quiet Sun and coronal hole regions. In each region of the corona studied the 5-minute periodicity is more prevalent than the 3-minute periodicity by a factor of 2--3. All areas of the corona exhibit a similar temporal behavior in the 5-minute band, suggesting a global driving mechanism. However, the dominance of the 5-minute periodicity is stronger in active regions than in other areas of the Sun. The 3-minute periodicity in active regions tends to be localized in the sunspot umbra, whereas the 5-minute is more prevalent in the penumbra.

  13. Yielding of colloidal gels under steady and oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petekidis, George; Moghimi, Esmaeel; Koumakis, Nick; Forth Team

    2015-03-01

    The structural and rheological properties of intermediate volume fraction colloid polymer gels are examined during and after steady and oscillatory shear flow using rheometry, confocal microscopy, light scattering and Brownian Dynamics simulations. Our main objective is to rationalize the microscopic mechanisms through which one can tune the mechanical properties of such metastable colloidal gels by imposing different types of external shear and flow. Experimentally, the gels consist of model hard sphere particle dispersions of φ = 0.44 with the addition of non-adsorbing linear chains, while BD simulations are conducted for hard spheres with the superposition of an AO potential for depletion attractions. Structural analysis shows that variation of the applied shear rate produces strong changes in the structure of the gels both when under shear and during gel reformation at cessation. Larger rates are characterized by disperse particles and the total breakage of structures at rest, which after cessation evolve with time into strong solids with relatively homogeneous structures. However, smaller rates show large inhomogeneous structures under flow, which do not evolve after cessation and additionally exhibit reduced elasticity and as such are weaker solids. Furthermore oscillatory shear is far more efficient than steady shear creating gels with stronger differences in their elastic modulus. Thus by tuning the way a gel is sheared, one may vary the final strength and structure of the resulting gel. Work in collaboration with R. Besseling, W. C. K. Poon and J. F. Brady

  14. Propulsion of a microsubmarine using a thermally oscillatory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Lei; Luo, Cheng

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, motivated by the driving mechanism of a putt-putt toy boat, we explore the feasibility to propel a microsubmarine using a thermally oscillatory approach, which only requires a simple design and does not involve any complicated propulsive systems. We investigate the design, fabrication, actuation and horizontal motions of the corresponding microsubmarines. Based on the understanding gained through preliminary tests on two manually fabricated putt-putt boats, we designed and fabricated the prototype of a microsubmarine. Similar to a putt-putt boat, the prototype also uses a thermally oscillatory process for propulsion. In a cyclic period of this process, due to the expansion and shrinkage of a vapor bubble inside the reservoir of the submarine, liquid is first ejected outside and then sucked into the reservoir. Due to the difference in liquid flow directions between ejection and suction stages, a thrust is produced to propel the submarine. At an applied voltage of 16 V and pulse frequency of 100 Hz, the submarine was found to have the highest speed of 1.8 mm s-1 and longest travel distance of 12.6 mm. The corresponding thrust was estimated to be 67.6 nN.

  15. Exponential estimates for oscillatory integrals with degenerate phase functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, F.; Gramchev, T.; Lovison, A.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we give precise asymptotic expansions and estimates of the remainder R(λ) for oscillatory integrals with non Morse phase functions, having degeneracies of any order k >= 2. We provide an algorithm for writing down explicitly the coefficients of the asymptotic expansion analysing precisely the combinatorial behaviour of the coefficients (Gevrey type) and deriving optimal exponential decay estimates for the remainder when λ → ∞. We recapture the fundamental asymptotic expansions by Erdélyi (1956 Asymptotic Expansions (New York: Dover)). As it concerns the remainder estimates, it seems they are novel even for the classical cases. The main application of this machinery is a derivation of uniform estimates with respect to control parameters of celebrated oscillatory integrals in optics appearing in the calculations of the intensity of the light along the caustics (umbilics), see e.g. Arnold (1988 Singularities of Differentiable Maps vol II (Boston: Birkhäuser Boston Inc.)), (1974 USP. Mat. Nauk. 29 11-49) and Berry and Upstill (1980 Prog. Opt. 18 257-346). Finally, we mention that as an outcome of our abstract approach we obtain refinements for Morse phase functions provided suitable symmetry and Gevrey type regularity conditions on the phase functions and amplitudes hold. As far as we know, even this asymptotic expansion for the elliptic umbilic is a novelty.

  16. Cortical oscillatory dynamics in a social interaction model.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Slobodskoj-Plusnin, Jaroslav Y; Bocharov, Andrey V; Pylkova, Liudmila V

    2013-03-15

    In this study we sought to investigate cortical oscillatory dynamics accompanying three major kinds of social behavior: aggressive, friendly, and avoidant. Behavioral and EEG data were collected in 48 participants during a computer game modeling social interactions with virtual 'persons'. 3D source reconstruction and independent component analysis were applied to EEG data. Results showed that social behavior was partly reactive and partly proactive with subject's personality playing an important role in shaping this behavior. Most salient differences were found between avoidance and approach behaviors, whereas the two kinds of approach behavior (i.e., aggression and friendship) did not differ from each other. Comparative to avoidance, approach behaviors were associated with higher induced responses in most frequency bands which were mostly observed in cortical areas overlapping with the default mode network. The difference between approach- and avoidance-related oscillatory dynamics was more salient in subjects predisposed to approach behaviors (i.e., in aggressive or sociable subjects) and was less pronounced in subjects predisposed to avoidance behavior (i.e., in high trait anxiety scorers). There was a trend to higher low frequency phase-locking in motor area in approach than in avoid condition. Results are discussed in light of the concept linking induced responses with top-down and evoked responses with bottom-up processes. PMID:23254174

  17. Oscillatory correlates of moral decision-making: Effect of personality.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Dorosheva, Elena A; Tamozhnikov, Sergey S; Saprigyn, Alexander E

    2016-06-01

    The role of emotion in moral decision-making is still a matter of debate. Greene, Sommerville, Nystrom, Darley, and Cohen (2001) argue that 'personal' moral judgments are driven by emotional responses, while 'impersonal' judgments are largely driven by cognitive processes. In this study, oscillatory correlates of decision-making were compared in moral personal, moral impersonal, and nonmoral conditions, as well as in trials associated with utilitarian (i.e., favoring the 'greater good' over individual rights) and non-utilitarian choices. Event-related synchronization in delta and theta bands was greater in the right temporal lobe in personal than in both nonmoral and impersonal moral condition. Graph-theoretical analysis of connectivity patterns showed the prominent role of the orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices in personal moral decision-making, implying greater emotional and self-processing. Higher conscientiousness and intellect and lower behavioral activation were associated with greater difference in oscillatory responses between utilitarian and non-utilitarian choices in personal than in impersonal condition, indicating that sensitivity to moral issues and the ability to grasp the nuances of moral situation are essential for understanding the implications of utilitarian choices in personal and impersonal conditions. PMID:26167937

  18. Closed-loop Separation Control Using Oscillatory Flow Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Raney, David L.; Seifert, Avi; Pack, latunia G.; Brown, Donald E.

    2000-01-01

    Design and implementation of a digital feedback controller for a flow control experiment was performed. The experiment was conducted in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel on a generic separated configuration at a chord Reynolds number of 16 million and a Mach number of 0.25. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick airfoil at zero angle-of-attack. A moderate favorable pressure gradient, up to 55% of the chord, is followed by a severe adverse pressure gradient which is relaxed towards the trailing edge. The turbulent separation bubble, behind the adverse pressure gradient, is then reduced by introducing oscillatory flow excitation just upstream of the point of flow separation. The degree of reduction in the separation region can be controlled by the amplitude of the oscillatory excitation. A feedback controller was designed to track a given trajectory for the desired degree of flow reattachment and to improve the transient behavior of the flow system. Closed-loop experiments demonstrated that the feedback controller was able to track step input commands and improve the transient behavior of the open-loop response.

  19. In silico evolution of oscillatory dynamics in biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md Zulfikar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2015-03-01

    We are studying in silico evolution of complex, oscillatory network dynamics within the framework of a minimal mutational model of protein-protein interactions. In our model we consider two different types of proteins, kinase (activator) and phosphatase(inhibitor). In our model. each protein can either be phosphorylated(active) or unphospphorylated (inactive), represented by binary strings. Active proteins can modify their target based on the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of chemical equation. Reaction rate constants are directly related to sequence dependent protein-protein interaction energies. This model can be stuided for non-trivial behavior e.g. oscillations, chaos, multiple stable states. We focus here on biochemical oscillators; some questions we will address within our framework include how the oscillatory dynamics depends on number of protein species, connectivity of the network, whether evolution can readily converge on a stable oscillator if we start with random intitial parameters, neutral evolution with additional protein components and general questions of robustness and evolavability.

  20. Unconscious errors enhance prefrontal-occipital oscillatory synchrony.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; van Gaal, Simon; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Lamme, Victor A F

    2009-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (MFC) is critical for our ability to learn from previous mistakes. Here we provide evidence that neurophysiological oscillatory long-range synchrony is a mechanism of post-error adaptation that occurs even without conscious awareness of the error. During a visually signaled Go/No-Go task in which half of the No-Go cues were masked and thus not consciously perceived, response errors enhanced tonic (i.e., over 1-2 s) oscillatory synchrony between MFC and occipital cortex (OCC) leading up to and during the subsequent trial. Spectral Granger causality analyses demonstrated that MFC --> OCC directional synchrony was enhanced during trials following both conscious and unconscious errors, whereas transient stimulus-induced occipital --> MFC directional synchrony was independent of errors in the previous trial. Further, the strength of pre-trial MFC-occipital synchrony predicted individual differences in task performance. Together, these findings suggest that synchronous neurophysiological oscillations are a plausible mechanism of MFC-driven cognitive control that is independent of conscious awareness. PMID:19956401

  1. Inhomogeneity-induced bifurcation of stationary and oscillatory pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Alain; Li, Yue-Xian; Bressloff, Paul

    2005-03-01

    An excitable medium generally refers to a medium that is capable of generating traveling waves. It has been widely encountered in biology, chemistry and physics. Many excitable media have been modeled by systems of PDEs of the reaction-diffusion type. Excitable neural media are often modeled by integro-differential equations (IDEs). In both PDE and IDE models of excitable media, stationary spatial patterns of Turing’s type can occur under certain conditions. Such patterns have been used to explain a variety of biological pattern formation processes including morphogenesis and hallucination. Here we study a pattern formation mechanism that is different from Turing’s, called inhomogeneity-induced pattern formation. Such patterns can occur in an excitable medium either with an inhomogeneous but stationary forcing or a spatial variation in a model parameter. The interesting thing we found is: introducing a stationary bump into such a medium does not always produce just a simple bump-shaped output pattern. A complex bifurcation scenario can occur giving rise to the co-existence of multiple patterns. A stability analysis shows that the instability of such patterns often occurs through a Hopf bifurcation, giving rise to oscillatory pulse solutions. Such oscillatory pulses can behave like a pulse generator that emits traveling pulses periodically into the medium. Possible areas in biology where this theory can be applied will be discussed.

  2. Propulsion of micro-structures in Oscillatory Stokes Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Ikhee; Huang, Yangyang; Zimmerman, Walter; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery often necessitates specific site-targeting within the human body. The use of micro and/or nano devices swimming through the bloodstream provides an attractive mechanism for targeted drug targeting, however the design and practical implementation of such devices remain very challenging. Inspired by flapping wings, we construct a two-dimensional wedge-like device, consisting of two links connected by a linear torsional spring and released in an oscillatory Stokes flow. We vary the stiffness and rest angle of the linear spring and the oscillation amplitude and frequency of the background flow to explore the behavior of the device. We find that the device achieves a net displacement, or propulsion, in oscillatory flows even when no elastic energy is stored initially, thus breaking Purcell's scallop's theorem. More importantly, the vehicle tends to align with the background flow under perturbations. We conclude by commenting on how to control the parameters of the device and the fluid to achieve desired behavior of the device. These findings may have significant implications on the design of micro devices in viscous fluids.

  3. Anxiety, depression, and oscillatory dynamics in a social interaction model.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Rimareva, Julia M

    2016-08-01

    Although anxiety and depression frequently co-occur and share a substantial part of genetic vulnerability and other risk factors, they are distinct disorders and their effect on social functioning and accompanying cognitive and emotional processing could be different. In this study, in a nonclinical sample, we compared effects of trait anxiety and depressive symptoms on oscillatory dynamics accompanying perception of emotional facial expressions in the context of social interactions. Anxiety was associated with a longer reaction time, with preference of avoidance behavior, and with enhanced event-related alpha desynchronization and diminished theta synchronization. Depression did not show significant behavioral effects and was associated with diminished alpha desynchronization and augmented delta and theta synchronization in prefrontal cortical regions. Thus, in spite of frequent comorbidity, anxiety and depression show opposite patterns of associations with oscillatory dynamics accompanying social interactions. These patterns imply that anxiety is associated with hyper-reactive attentional system, whereas depression show signs of diminished cognitive reactivity. Depression-related enhancement of low-frequency synchronization in prefrontal cortex may reflect a compensatory mechanism of cognitive and emotional upregulation, which depression-prone individuals engage in the process of social interactions. PMID:27173999

  4. Theory of turbulence regulation by oscillatory zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-jin

    2006-02-15

    The theory of turbulence regulation by oscillatory zonal flows is presented for passive scalar field models. Zonal flows are assumed to have linear spatial variation of the form U=-x{omega}(t)y, where {omega}(t) has amplitude {omega}{sub m} and frequency {omega}{sub z}. The flux and fluctuation levels are found to scale as 1/|k{sub y}U{sub m}| and {tau}{sub *}/|k{sub y}U{sub m}|, respectively, for {omega}{sub m}>{omega}{sub z}. Here, {tau}{sub *}={tau}{sub {eta}}({omega}{sub z}/{omega}{sub m}){sup 2} is the effective decorrelation time, {tau}{sub {eta}}={tau}{sub *}({omega}=0), U{sub m}=x{omega}{sub m}, and k{sub y} is the typical poloidal wave number of the turbulence. The effect of stochasticity of oscillatory zonal flows on shear decorrelation is discussed. The results complement the theory of turbulence regulation by low-frequency random zonal flows [E. Kim and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Rev. Lett 91, 075001 (2003)].

  5. Asymptotically Correct Finite Difference Schemes for Highly Oscillatory ODEs

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Anton; Geier, Jens

    2010-09-30

    We are concerned with the numerical integration of ODE-initial value problems of the form {epsilon}{sup 2{phi}}{sub xx}+a(x){phi} = 0 with given a(x){>=}a{sub 0}>0 in the highly oscillatory regime 0<{epsilon}(appearing as a stationary Schroedinger equation, e.g.). In two steps we derive an accurate finite difference scheme that does not need to resolve each oscillation: With a WKB-ansatz the dominant oscillations are ''transformed out'', yielding a much smoother ODE. For the resulting oscillatory integrals we devise an asymptotic expansion both in {epsilon} and h. The resulting scheme typically has a step size restriction of h = o({radical}({epsilon})). If the phase of the WKB-transformation can be computed explicitly, then the scheme is asymptotically correct with an error bound of the order o({epsilon}{sup 3}h{sup 2}). As an application we present simulations of a 1D-model for ballistic quantum transport in a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor).

  6. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni peritectic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-01-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure. PMID:27066761

  7. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni peritectic alloy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-01-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure. PMID:27066761

  8. Circadian modulation of motor-related beta oscillatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Tony W.; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Becker, Katherine M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous electrophysiological investigations have evaluated movement-related beta (14–28 Hz) oscillatory activity in healthy participants. These studies have described an abrupt decrease in beta activity that starts before movement onset, and a sharp increase in beta power that peaks after movement termination. These neural responses have been respectively termed the event-related beta desynchronization or pre-movement beta ERD, and the post-movement beta rebound (PMBR). Previous studies have shown that a variety of movement parameters and demographic factors (e.g., age) modulate the amplitude of these oscillatory responses, and in the current study we evaluated whether the amplitudes follow a biological temporal rhythm (e.g., circadian), as it is known that spontaneous beta levels increase from morning to afternoon in some brain areas. To this end, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to evaluate oscillatory activity during a right hand finger-tapping task in four participants who were recorded at three different times (09:00, 12:00, 16:00) on three consecutive days (i.e., 36 total MEG sessions). All MEG data were corrected for head motion and examined in the time-frequency domain using beamforming methods. We found a significant linear increase in beta ERD amplitude from 09:00 to 16:00 hours in the left precentral gyrus, left premotor cortices, left supplementary motor area (SMA), and the right precentral and postcentral gyri. In contrast, the amplitude of the PMBR was very steady across the day in all brain regions except the left SMA, which exhibited a linear increase from morning to afternoon. Finally, beta levels during the baseline period also increased from 09:00 to 16:00 in most regions of the cortical sensorimotor network. These data show that both the pre-movement beta ERD and spontaneous beta levels strongly increase from morning to afternoon in the motor cortices, which may indicate that the amplitude of the beta ERD response is determined by the

  9. VINETA II: a linear magnetic reconnection experiment.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, H; Von Stechow, A; Rahbarnia, K; Grulke, O; Klinger, T

    2014-02-01

    A linear experiment dedicated to the study of driven magnetic reconnection is presented. The new device (VINETA II) is suitable for investigating both collisional and near collisionless reconnection. Reconnection is achieved by externally driving magnetic field lines towards an X-point, inducing a current in the background plasma which consequently modifies the magnetic field topology. Owing to the open field line configuration of the experiment, the current is limited by the axial sheath boundary conditions. A plasma gun is used as an additional electron source in order to counterbalance the charge separation effects and supply the required current. Two drive methods are used in the device. First, an oscillating current through two parallel conductors drive the reconnection. Second, a stationary X-point topology is formed by the parallel conductors, and the drive is achieved by an oscillating current through a third conductor. In the first setup, the magnetic field of the axial plasma current dominates the field topology near the X-point throughout most of the drive. The second setup allows for the amplitude of the plasma current as well as the motion of the flux to be set independently of the X-point topology of the parallel conductors. PMID:24593355

  10. VINETA II: A linear magnetic reconnection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, H. Von Stechow, A.; Rahbarnia, K.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.

    2014-02-15

    A linear experiment dedicated to the study of driven magnetic reconnection is presented. The new device (VINETA II) is suitable for investigating both collisional and near collisionless reconnection. Reconnection is achieved by externally driving magnetic field lines towards an X-point, inducing a current in the background plasma which consequently modifies the magnetic field topology. Owing to the open field line configuration of the experiment, the current is limited by the axial sheath boundary conditions. A plasma gun is used as an additional electron source in order to counterbalance the charge separation effects and supply the required current. Two drive methods are used in the device. First, an oscillating current through two parallel conductors drive the reconnection. Second, a stationary X-point topology is formed by the parallel conductors, and the drive is achieved by an oscillating current through a third conductor. In the first setup, the magnetic field of the axial plasma current dominates the field topology near the X-point throughout most of the drive. The second setup allows for the amplitude of the plasma current as well as the motion of the flux to be set independently of the X-point topology of the parallel conductors.

  11. Reversible plastic events during oscillatory deformation of amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Priezjev, Nikolai V

    2016-01-01

    The effect of oscillatory shear strain on nonaffine rearrangements of individual particles in a three-dimensional binary glass is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The amorphous material is represented by the Kob-Andersen mixture at the temperature well below the glass transition. We find that during periodic shear deformation of the material, some particles undergo reversible nonaffine displacements with amplitudes that are approximately power-law distributed. Our simulations show that particles with large amplitudes of nonaffine displacement exhibit a collective behavior; namely, they tend to aggregate into relatively compact clusters that become comparable with the system size near the yield strain. Along with reversible displacements there exist a number of irreversible ones. With increasing strain amplitude, the probability of irreversible displacements during one cycle increases, which leads to permanent structural relaxation of the material. PMID:26871146

  12. Collective Decision-Making and Oscillatory Behaviors in Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Koichi; Sawai, Satoshi

    2013-12-01

    Many examples of oscillations are known in multicellular dynamics, however how properties of individual cells can account for the collective rhythmic behaviors at the tissue level remain elusive. Recently, studies in chemical reactions, synthetic gene circuits, yeast and social amoeba Dictyostelium have greatly enhanced our understanding of collective oscillations in cell populations. From these relatively simple systems, a unified view of how excitable and oscillatory regulations could be tuned and coupled to give rise to tissue-level oscillations is emerging. This chapter reviews recent progress in these and other experimental systems and highlight similarities and differences. We will show how group-level information can be encoded in the oscillations depending on degree of autonomy of single cells and discuss some of their possible biological roles.

  13. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  14. Oscillatory Flows Induced by Swimming Microorganisms in Two-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Johnson, Karl A.; Gollub, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    We present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The phase-resolved velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, which evolve throughout the beat cycle of the organism, and the fluid velocity scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields via the viscous dissipation and scales with the square of the swimmer speed. The peak power is about 15 fW, and the dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require. These observations carry important implications for the interpretation and modeling of transport processes, locomotion, and flagellar mechanics.

  15. Carreau model for oscillatory blood flow in a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakova, S.; Nikolova, E.; Radev, St.

    2014-11-01

    The analysis of the blood flow dynamics (hemodynamics) in tubes is crucial when investigating the rupture of different types of aneurysms. The blood viscosity nonlinear dependence on the flow shear rate creates complicated manifestations of the blood pulsations. Although a great number of studies exists, experimental and numerical, this phenomenon is still not very well understood. The aim of the present work is to propose a numerical model of the oscillatory blood flow in a tube on the basis of the Carreau model of the blood viscosity (nonlinear model with respect to the shear rate). The obtained results for the flow velocity and tangential stress on the tube wall are compared well with other authors' results.

  16. Quantum oscillatory exciton migration in photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-08-01

    The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. The primary photon absorption, transport, and charge separation events, which trigger a chain of chemical reactions, take place in membrane-bound photosynthetic complexes. Whether quantum effects, stemming from entanglement of chromophores, persist in the energy transport at room temperature, despite the rapid decoherence effects caused by environment fluctuations, is under current active debate. If confirmed, these may explain the high efficiency of light harvesting and open up numerous applications to quantum computing and information processing. We present simulations of the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II that clearly establish oscillatory energy transport at room temperature originating from interference of quantum pathways. These signatures of quantum transport may be observed by two dimensional coherent optical spectroscopy.

  17. Minimum energy paths for optimal oscillatory movements of PUMA arm

    SciTech Connect

    Olgac, N.; Zhou, S.

    1988-08-01

    This paper employs a geometric approach in reducing the number of time-consuming iterations necessary for the numerical solution of an optimal energy consumption problem for small amplitude oscillatory motions of robot manipulators. A general objective function in joint space is given for the energy needs in the drives, and specific applications for a commercially available manipulator, Unimation-PUMA 560, are carried out by separating the manipulator motions into two parallel segments: arm and wrist. This process, in general, leads to a highly nonlinear and transcendental optimization problem. The geometric study is presented, and the shortened numerical optimization is carried out. For any given point in the workspace, optimal directions of oscillations and their corresponding energy levels are found. This information is translated into a map of minimum energy levels across the workspace. The map will comprise a section of an intelligent control mechanism of larger scope which is conceived for ultimate use in space and subsea robotic operations. 6 references.

  18. Nonequilibrium structure of colloidal dumbbells under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heptner, Nils; Chu, Fangfang; Lu, Yan; Lindner, Peter; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of dense, plastic-crystalline suspensions of mildly anisotropic colloidal hard dumbbells under the action of an oscillatory shear field by employing Brownian dynamics computer simulations. In particular, we extend previous investigations, where we uncovered nonequilibrium phase transitions, to other aspect ratios and to a larger nonequilibrium parameter space, that is, a wider range of strains and shear frequencies. We compare and discuss selected results in the context of scattering and rheological experiments. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate that the previously found transitions from the plastic crystal phase with increasing shear strain also occur at other aspect ratios. We explore the transition behavior in the strain-frequency phase and summarize it in a nonequilibrium phase diagram. Additionally, the experimental rheology results hint at a slowing down of the colloidal dynamics with higher aspect ratio.

  19. Resonances and oscillatory behavior near multi-species plasma equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Núñez, Manuel

    2014-03-15

    We consider dynamic multi-species plasma equilibria whose variables depend on a single spatial coordinate and linear perturbations of these. The linearized system may be reduced to a second-order one satisfied by the respective fluid streamfunctions. For the two-species case, the electron mass is a parameter small enough for a WKB asymptotic analysis to be justified. It turns out that the points where either the ion or electron equilibrium velocity equals the ratio between the temporal and transversal frequencies of the perturbation are turning or singular points of the system, connecting exponentially increasing or decreasing solutions to oscillatory ones. The crucial role of singular points in the balance between the different contributions to the electron kinetic energy is explored.

  20. Large-scale cortical correlation structure of spontaneous oscillatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Joerg F.; Hawellek, David J.; Corbetta, Maurizio; Siegel, Markus; Engel, Andreas K.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the brain-wide correlation of electrophysiological signals. Here we show that spontaneous oscillatory neuronal activity exhibits frequency-specific spatial correlation structure in the human brain. We developed an analysis approach that discounts spurious correlation of signal power caused by the limited spatial resolution of electrophysiological measures. We applied this approach to source estimates of spontaneous neuronal activity reconstructed from magnetoencephalography (MEG). Overall, correlation of power across cortical regions was strongest in the alpha to beta frequency range (8–32 Hz) and correlation patterns depended on the underlying oscillation frequency. Global hubs resided in the medial temporal lobe in the theta frequency range (4–6 Hz), in lateral parietal areas in the alpha to beta frequency range (8–23 Hz), and in sensorimotor areas for higher frequencies (32–45 Hz). Our data suggest that interactions in various large-scale cortical networks may be reflected in frequency specific power-envelope correlations. PMID:22561454

  1. Waves spontaneously generated by heterogeneity in oscillatory media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaohua; Huang, Xiaodong; Hu, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Wave propagation is an important characteristic for pattern formation and pattern dynamics. To date, various waves in homogeneous media have been investigated extensively and have been understood to a great extent. However, the wave behaviors in heterogeneous media have been studied and understood much less. In this work, we investigate waves that are spontaneously generated in one-dimensional heterogeneous oscillatory media governed by complex Ginzburg-Landau equations; the heterogeneity is modeled by multiple interacting homogeneous media with different system control parameters. Rich behaviors can be observed by varying the control parameters of the systems, whereas the behavior is incomparably simple in the homogeneous cases. These diverse behaviors can be fully understood and physically explained well based on three aspects: dispersion relation curves, driving-response relations, and wave competition rules in homogeneous systems. Possible applications of heterogeneity-generated waves are anticipated.

  2. Some observations on the oscillatory behavior of carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaffrey, B. J.; Berlad, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The oscillatory behavior of the oxidation of carbon monoxide was experimentally studied in an attempt to further elucidate the reaction at low pressure. The phenomenon is observed as multiple explosions and involves successive flashes of light accompanying the slow reaction in a static system, including over 450 flashes in one case. Electronically excited hydroxyl radicals (water impurity) and carbon dioxide have been identified as components of the emission. The phase difference between the two was seen to be negligible. The nature of the temperature and pressure changes during a cycle indicates that the oscillation is purely kinetic rather than thermokinetic. A procedure is presented whereby sustained oscillations can be obtained for particular regions in the pressure-temperature plane, vessel surface pretreatments, and H2O-containing reactants.

  3. [Vulnerability to Depression and Oscillatory Resting-State Networks].

    PubMed

    Knyazev, G G; Savostyanov, A N; Bocharov, A V; Saprygin, A E; Tamozhnikov, S S

    2015-01-01

    Depression is the most commonly observed mood disorder, which is accompanied by changes in emotional processes and the default mode network (DMN) activity. In this study, we aimed to investigate how predisposition to depression shows up in the emotional coloring of spontaneous thoughts and the activity of oscillatory resting-state networks, as revealed by source localization and independent component analysis techniques. Depressive symptoms correlated positively with the prevalence of negative emotion during EEG registration and with delta and theta activity in the orbitofrontal cortex and negatively with theta activity in the DMN. Since an increase of low-frequency oscillations in the orbitofrontal cortex is observed in aversive states, whereas their decrease in the DMN reflects an activation of this network, which is related to self-referenced processing, our results are consistent with the notion that vulnerability to depression is associated with general negative emotional disposition and excessive focus on the self. PMID:26281232

  4. Multigrid methods for differential equations with highly oscillatory coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engquist, Bjorn; Luo, Erding

    1993-01-01

    New coarse grid multigrid operators for problems with highly oscillatory coefficients are developed. These types of operators are necessary when the characters of the differential equations on coarser grids or longer wavelengths are different from that on the fine grid. Elliptic problems for composite materials and different classes of hyperbolic problems are practical examples. The new coarse grid operators can be constructed directly based on the homogenized differential operators or hierarchically computed from the finest grid. Convergence analysis based on the homogenization theory is given for elliptic problems with periodic coefficients and some hyperbolic problems. These are classes of equations for which there exists a fairly complete theory for the interaction between shorter and longer wavelengths in the problems. Numerical examples are presented.

  5. Waves spontaneously generated by heterogeneity in oscillatory media

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaohua; Huang, Xiaodong; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wave propagation is an important characteristic for pattern formation and pattern dynamics. To date, various waves in homogeneous media have been investigated extensively and have been understood to a great extent. However, the wave behaviors in heterogeneous media have been studied and understood much less. In this work, we investigate waves that are spontaneously generated in one-dimensional heterogeneous oscillatory media governed by complex Ginzburg-Landau equations; the heterogeneity is modeled by multiple interacting homogeneous media with different system control parameters. Rich behaviors can be observed by varying the control parameters of the systems, whereas the behavior is incomparably simple in the homogeneous cases. These diverse behaviors can be fully understood and physically explained well based on three aspects: dispersion relation curves, driving-response relations, and wave competition rules in homogeneous systems. Possible applications of heterogeneity-generated waves are anticipated. PMID:27142730

  6. Waves spontaneously generated by heterogeneity in oscillatory media.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaohua; Huang, Xiaodong; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wave propagation is an important characteristic for pattern formation and pattern dynamics. To date, various waves in homogeneous media have been investigated extensively and have been understood to a great extent. However, the wave behaviors in heterogeneous media have been studied and understood much less. In this work, we investigate waves that are spontaneously generated in one-dimensional heterogeneous oscillatory media governed by complex Ginzburg-Landau equations; the heterogeneity is modeled by multiple interacting homogeneous media with different system control parameters. Rich behaviors can be observed by varying the control parameters of the systems, whereas the behavior is incomparably simple in the homogeneous cases. These diverse behaviors can be fully understood and physically explained well based on three aspects: dispersion relation curves, driving-response relations, and wave competition rules in homogeneous systems. Possible applications of heterogeneity-generated waves are anticipated. PMID:27142730

  7. Mathematical Frameworks for Oscillatory Network Dynamics in Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Ashwin, Peter; Coombes, Stephen; Nicks, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    The tools of weakly coupled phase oscillator theory have had a profound impact on the neuroscience community, providing insight into a variety of network behaviours ranging from central pattern generation to synchronisation, as well as predicting novel network states such as chimeras. However, there are many instances where this theory is expected to break down, say in the presence of strong coupling, or must be carefully interpreted, as in the presence of stochastic forcing. There are also surprises in the dynamical complexity of the attractors that can robustly appear-for example, heteroclinic network attractors. In this review we present a set of mathematical tools that are suitable for addressing the dynamics of oscillatory neural networks, broadening from a standard phase oscillator perspective to provide a practical framework for further successful applications of mathematics to understanding network dynamics in neuroscience. PMID:26739133

  8. Amplitude sorting of oscillatory burst signals by sampling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for amplitude sorting of oscillatory burst signals is described in which the burst signal is detected to produce a burst envelope signal and an intermediate or midportion of such envelope signal is sampled to provide a sample pulse output. The height of the sample pulse is proportional to the amplitude of the envelope signal and to the maximum burst signal amplitude. The sample pulses are fed to a pulse height analyzer for sorting. The present invention is used in an acoustic emission testing system to convert the amplitude of the acoustic emission burst signals into sample pulse heights which are measured by a pulse height analyzer for sorting the pulses in groups according to their height in order to identify the material anomalies in the test material which emit the acoustic signals.

  9. Effectiveness of oscillatory gutter brushes in removing street sweeping waste.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Useche, Libardo V; Abdel-Wahab, Magd M; Parker, Graham A

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the novel concept of oscillatory gutter brushes of road sweepers is studied experimentally. Their effectiveness in removing different debris types is studied by means of a brushing test rig. The debris types dealt with are medium-size gravel, small and fine particles, wet thin debris, and compacted debris. The performance of two types of brushes, cutting and F128, under diverse operating conditions is investigated. The purpose of the tests is to ascertain whether brush oscillations superimposed onto brush rotation improve sweeping effectiveness. According to the results, brush oscillations seem to be useful for increasing brushing effectiveness in the case of bonded particles and wet thin debris, especially for bonded debris, but they seem to be of no value for other loosed debris. Also, appropriate values of brush penetration, sweeper speed, brush angle of attack, rotational speed, and frequency of brush speed oscillations, for the debris types studied are provided. PMID:26026947

  10. Oscillatory motion: quantum whistling in superfluid helium-4.

    PubMed

    Hoskinson, E; Packard, R E; Haard, Thomas M

    2005-01-27

    Fundamental considerations predict that macroscopic quantum systems such as superfluids and the electrons in superconductors will undergo oscillatory motion when forced through a small constriction. Here we induce these oscillations in superfluid helium-4 (4He) by pushing it through an array of nanometre-sized apertures. The oscillations, which are detected as an audible whistling sound, obey the so-called Josephson frequency relation and occur coherently among all the apertures. The discovery of this property in 4He at the relatively high temperature of 2 K (2,000 times higher than the temperature at which a related but different phenomenon occurs in 3He) may pave the way for a new class of practical rotation sensors of unprecedented precision. PMID:15674281

  11. Oscillatory EEG Correlates of Arithmetic Strategies: A Training Study

    PubMed Central

    Grabner, Roland H.; De Smedt, Bert

    2012-01-01

    There has been a long tradition of research on mathematics education showing that children and adults use different strategies to solve arithmetic problems. Neurophysiological studies have recently begun to investigate the brain correlates of these strategies. The existing body of data, however, reflect static end points of the learning process and do not provide information on how brain activity changes in response to training or intervention. In this study, we explicitly address this issue by training participants in using fact retrieval strategies. We also investigate whether brain activity related to arithmetic fact learning is domain-specific or whether this generalizes to other learning materials, such as the solution of figural-spatial problems. Twenty adult students were trained on sets of two-digit multiplication problems and figural-spatial problems. After the training, they were presented with the trained and untrained problems while their brain activity was recorded by means of electroencephalography (EEG). In both problem types, the training resulted in accuracies over 90% and significant decreases in solution times. Analyses of the oscillatory EEG data also revealed training effects across both problem types. Specifically, we observed training-related activity increases in the theta band (3–6 Hz) and decreases in the lower alpha band (8–10 Hz), especially over parietooccipital and parietal brain regions. These results provide the first evidence that a short-term fact retrieval training results in significant changes in oscillatory EEG activity. These findings further corroborate the role of the theta band in the retrieval of semantic information from memory and suggest that theta activity is sensitive to fact retrieval not only in mental arithmetic but also in other domains. PMID:23162495

  12. Extracting Independent Local Oscillatory Geophysical Signals by Geodetic Tropospheric Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botai, O. J.; Combrinck, L.; Sivakumar, V.; Schuh, H.; Bohm, J.

    2010-01-01

    Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) due to water vapor derived from space geodetic techniques and numerical weather prediction simulated-reanalysis data exhibits non-linear and non-stationary properties akin to those in the crucial geophysical signals of interest to the research community. These time series, once decomposed into additive (and stochastic) components, have information about the long term global change (the trend) and other interpretable (quasi-) periodic components such as seasonal cycles and noise. Such stochastic component(s) could be a function that exhibits at most one extremum within a data span or a monotonic function within a certain temporal span. In this contribution, we examine the use of the combined Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA): the EEMD-ICA algorithm to extract the independent local oscillatory stochastic components in the tropospheric delay derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) over six geodetic sites (HartRAO, Hobart26, Wettzell, Gilcreek, Westford, and Tsukub32). The proposed methodology allows independent geophysical processes to be extracted and assessed. Analysis of the quality index of the Independent Components (ICs) derived for each cluster of local oscillatory components (also called the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs)) for all the geodetic stations considered in the study demonstrate that they are strongly site dependent. Such strong dependency seems to suggest that the localized geophysical signals embedded in the ZTD over the geodetic sites are not correlated. Further, from the viewpoint of non-linear dynamical systems, four geophysical signals the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) index derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) anomaly from NCEP, the SIDC monthly Sun Spot Number (SSN), and the Length of Day (LoD) are linked to the extracted signal components from ZTD. Results from the synchronization

  13. Oscillatory Fluid Flow Influences Primary Cilia and Microtubule Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Espinha, Lina C.; Hoey, David A.; Fernandes, Paulo R.; Rodrigues, Hélder C.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity. PMID:25044764

  14. Circadian oscillatory transcriptional programs in grapevine ripening fruits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Temperature and solar radiation influence Vitis vinifera L. berry ripening. Both environmental conditions fluctuate cyclically on a daily period basis and the strength of this fluctuation affects grape ripening too. Additionally, a molecular circadian clock regulates daily cyclic expression in a large proportion of the plant transcriptome modulating multiple developmental processes in diverse plant organs and developmental phases. Circadian cycling of fruit transcriptomes has not been characterized in detail despite their putative relevance in the final composition of the fruit. Thus, in this study, gene expression throughout 24 h periods in pre-ripe berries of Tempranillo and Verdejo grapevine cultivars was followed to determine whether different ripening transcriptional programs are activated during certain times of day in different grape tissues and genotypes. Results Microarray analyses identified oscillatory transcriptional profiles following circadian variations in the photocycle and the thermocycle. A higher number of expression oscillating transcripts were detected in samples carrying exocarp tissue including biotic stress-responsive transcripts activated around dawn. Thermotolerance-like responses and regulation of circadian clock-related genes were observed in all studied samples. Indeed, homologs of core clock genes were identified in the grapevine genome and, among them, VvREVEILLE1 (VvRVE1), showed a consistent circadian expression rhythm in every grape berry tissue analysed. Light signalling components and terpenoid biosynthetic transcripts were specifically induced during the daytime in Verdejo, a cultivar bearing white-skinned and aromatic berries, whereas transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis were more prominently regulated in Tempranillo, a cultivar bearing black-skinned berries. Conclusions The transcriptome of ripening fruits varies in response to daily environmental changes, which might partially be under the control

  15. Bicycling and Walking are Associated with Different Cortical Oscillatory Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Storzer, Lena; Butz, Markus; Hirschmann, Jan; Abbasi, Omid; Gratkowski, Maciej; Saupe, Dietmar; Schnitzler, Alfons; Dalal, Sarang S.

    2016-01-01

    Although bicycling and walking involve similar complex coordinated movements, surprisingly Parkinson’s patients with freezing of gait typically remain able to bicycle despite severe difficulties in walking. This observation suggests functional differences in the motor networks subserving bicycling and walking. However, a direct comparison of brain activity related to bicycling and walking has never been performed, neither in healthy participants nor in patients. Such a comparison could potentially help elucidating the cortical involvement in motor control and the mechanisms through which bicycling ability may be preserved in patients with freezing of gait. The aim of this study was to contrast the cortical oscillatory dynamics involved in bicycling and walking in healthy participants. To this end, EEG and EMG data of 14 healthy participants were analyzed, who cycled on a stationary bicycle at a slow cadence of 40 revolutions per minute (rpm) and walked at 40 strides per minute (spm), respectively. Relative to walking, bicycling was associated with a stronger power decrease in the high beta band (23–35 Hz) during movement initiation and execution, followed by a stronger beta power increase after movement termination. Walking, on the other hand, was characterized by a stronger and persisting alpha power (8–12 Hz) decrease. Both bicycling and walking exhibited movement cycle-dependent power modulation in the 24–40 Hz range that was correlated with EMG activity. This modulation was significantly stronger in walking. The present findings reveal differential cortical oscillatory dynamics in motor control for two types of complex coordinated motor behavior, i.e., bicycling and walking. Bicycling was associated with a stronger sustained cortical activation as indicated by the stronger high beta power decrease during movement execution and less cortical motor control within the movement cycle. We speculate this to be due to the more continuous nature of bicycling

  16. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  17. Planar super-oscillatory lens for sub-diffraction optical needles at violet wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guanghui; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Roy, Tapashree; Adamo, Giorgio; Shen, Zexiang; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-01-01

    Planar optical lenses are fundamental elements of miniaturized photonic devices. However, conventional planar optical lenses are constrained by the diffraction limit in the optical far-field due to the band-limited wavevectors supported by free-space and loss of high-spatial-frequency evanescent components. As inspired by Einstein's radiation ‘needle stick', electromagnetic energy can be delivered into an arbitrarily small solid angle. Such sub-diffraction optical needles have been numerically investigated using diffractive optical elements (DOEs) together with specially polarized optical beams, but experimental demonstration is extremely difficult due to the bulky size of DOEs and the required alignment precision. Planar super-oscillatory lenses (SOLs) were proposed to overcome these constraints and demonstrated that sub-diffraction focal spots can actually be formed without any evanescent waves, making far-field, label-free super-resolution imaging possible. Here we extend the super-oscillation concept into the vectorial-field regime to work with circularly polarized light, and experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a circularly polarized optical needle with sub-diffraction transverse spot size (0.45λ) and axial long depth of focus (DOF) of 15λ using a planar SOL at a violet wavelength of 405 nm. This sub-diffraction circularly polarized optical needle has potential applications in circular dichroism spectroscopy, super-resolution imaging, high-density optical storage, heat-assisted magnetic recording, nano-manufacturing and nano-metrology. PMID:25208611

  18. Measurements of the three-dimensional oscillatory flow in a double bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, Andras; Jalal, Sahar; van de Moortele, Tristan; Coletti, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    Above a certain ventilation frequency, the unsteady nature of the respiratory flow becomes apparent, and inhalation and exhalation cannot be approximated as quasi-stationary processes. This is especially important in the upper and central airways, where length and velocity scales are the largest, making inertia and acceleration effects dominant over viscous dissipation. We experimentally investigate the primary features of the oscillatory flow through a symmetric double bifurcation which models the self-similar branching of the human bronchial tree. We consider a range of Reynolds and Womersley numbers relevant to physiological conditions between the trachea and the lobar bronchi. Three-component, three-dimensional velocity fields are acquired at multiple phases within the ventilation cycle using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and are complemented with instantaneous two-dimensional fields obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV). The phase-averaged volumetric data provide a description of the rich flow topology, characterizing the main secondary flow structures and their spatio-temporal evolution. The instantaneous measurements reveal some of the dynamics of the laminar-to-turbulent transition in the bifurcations, and its aperiodicity throughout the respiratory cycle.

  19. Genetic effects on source level evoked and induced oscillatory brain responses in a visual oddball task.

    PubMed

    Antonakakis, Marios; Zervakis, Michalis; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Boomsma, Dorret I; De Geus, Eco J C; Micheloyannis, Sifis; Smit, Dirk J A

    2016-02-01

    Stimuli in simple oddball target detection paradigms cause evoked responses in brain potential. These responses are heritable traits, and potential endophenotypes for clinical phenotypes. These stimuli also cause responses in oscillatory activity, both evoked responses phase-locked to stimulus presentation and phase-independent induced responses. Here, we investigate whether phase-locked and phase-independent oscillatory responses are heritable traits. Oscillatory responses were examined in EEG recordings from 213 twin pairs (91 monozygotic and 122 dizygotic twins) performing a visual oddball task. After group Independent Component Analysis (group-ICA) and time-frequency decomposition, individual differences in evoked and induced oscillatory responses were compared between MZ and DZ twin pairs. Induced (phase-independent) oscillatory responses consistently showed the highest heritability (24-55%) compared to evoked (phase-locked) oscillatory responses and spectral energy, which revealed lower heritability at 1-35.6% and 4.5-32.3%, respectively. Since the phase-independent induced response encodes functional aspects of the brain response to target stimuli different from evoked responses, we conclude that the modulation of ongoing oscillatory activity may serve as an additional endophenotype for behavioral phenotypes and psychiatric genetics. PMID:26744236

  20. Nonlinear stability of oscillatory pulses in the parametric nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul A. C.; Promislow, Keith

    2007-03-01

    We extend the renormalization group method, developed for the study of pulse interaction in damped wave equations, to the study of oscillatory motion of supercritical pulses in the parametrically forced nonlinear Schrödinger equation (PNLS). We construct a global manifold which asymptotically attracts the flow into an {\\cal O}(r^4) neighbourhood in the H1 norm, where r is the amplitude of the internal oscillations. The oscillatory and translational dynamics of the pulses are rigorously recovered as a finite-dimensional flow on the manifold. The normal form for the projected dynamics of the oscillatory pulse shows that it is created in a supercritical Poincaré-Hopf bifurcation.

  1. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Restrepo

    2008-09-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers en- compassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundry conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  2. Oscillatory brain activity reveals linguistic prints in the quantity code.

    PubMed

    Salillas, Elena; Barraza, Paulo; Carreiras, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Number representations change through education, although it is currently unclear whether and how language could impact the magnitude representation that we share with other species. The most prominent view is that language does not play any role in modulating the core numeric representation involved in the contrast of quantities. Nevertheless, possible cultural hints on the numerical magnitude representation are currently on discussion focus. In fact, the acquisition of number words provides linguistic input that the quantity system may not ignore. Bilingualism offers a window to the study of this question, especially in bilinguals where the two number wording systems imply also two different numerical systems, such as in Basque-Spanish bilinguals. The present study evidences linguistic prints in the core number representational system through the analysis of EEG oscillatory activity during a simple number comparison task. Gamma band synchronization appears when Basque-Spanish bilinguals compare pairs of Arabic numbers linked through the Basque base-20 wording system, but it does not if the pairs are related through the base-10 system. Crucially, this gamma activity, originated in a left fronto-parietal network, only appears in bilinguals who learned math in Basque and not in equivalent proficiency bilinguals who learned math in Spanish. Thus, this neural index reflected in gamma band synchrony appears to be triggered by early learning experience with the base-20 numerical associations in Basque number words. PMID:25875210

  3. Multistability of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a liquid bridge.

    PubMed

    Shevtsova, V M; Melnikov, D E; Legros, J C

    2003-12-01

    A parametric investigation of the onset of chaos in a liquid bridge was numerically carried out for a medium Prandtl number liquid, Pr = 4, and unit aspect ratio under zero-gravity conditions. Spatiotemporal patterns of thermocapillary flow were successively studied beginning from the onset of instability up to the appearance of the nonperiodic flow and further on. Well-tested numerical code is used for solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinate system. Two-dimensional steady flow becomes oscillatory with azimuthal wave number m=2 as a result of Hopf bifurcation at Re(cr)(1)=630. A second independent solution with wave number m=3 was found to appear at Reynolds number Re(cr)(2) approximately 810. Two branches of three-dimensional periodic orbits, traveling waves with m=2 and m=3, coexist for Re>Re(cr)(2). Additional stable branches do not connect them. The different flow organizations reveal different behaviors in the supercritical area. The m=2 traveling wave always remains periodic, but the mode m=3 starts exhibiting chaotic features at Re approximately 4200. The onset of temporal nonperiodicity was shown to be associated with development of broadband noise in spectra and preceded by a quasiperiodicity. The flow stabilizes back to periodic with single frequency when Re exceeds a value Re approximately 5100. The window of periodicity exists up to at least Re=6000, the largest investigated value of the Reynolds number. PMID:14754319

  4. Enhancing Hebbian Learning to Control Brain Oscillatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Witkowski, Matthias; Birbaumer, Niels; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2015-09-01

    Sensorimotor rhythms (SMR, 8-15 Hz) are brain oscillations associated with successful motor performance, imagery, and imitation. Voluntary modulation of SMR can be used to control brain-machine interfaces (BMI) in the absence of any physical movements. The mechanisms underlying acquisition of such skill are unknown. Here, we provide evidence for a causal link between function of the primary motor cortex (M1), active during motor skill learning and retention, and successful acquisition of abstract skills such as control over SMR. Thirty healthy participants were trained on 5 consecutive days to control SMR oscillations. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of 3 groups that received either 20 min of anodal, cathodal, or sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over M1. Learning SMR control across training days was superior in the anodal tDCS group relative to the other 2. Cathodal tDCS blocked the beneficial effects of training, as evidenced with sham tDCS. One month later, the newly acquired skill remained superior in the anodal tDCS group. Thus, application of weak electric currents of opposite polarities over M1 differentially modulates learning SMR control, pointing to this primary cortical region as a common substrate for acquisition of physical motor skills and learning to control brain oscillatory activity. PMID:24626608

  5. Oscillatory synchronization model of attention to moving objects.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ozgur

    2012-05-01

    The world is a dynamic environment hence it is important for the visual system to be able to deploy attention on moving objects and attentively track them. Psychophysical experiments indicate that processes of both attentional enhancement and inhibition are spatially focused on the moving objects; however the mechanisms of these processes are unknown. The studies indicate that the attentional selection of target objects is sustained via a feedforward-feedback loop in the visual cortical hierarchy and only the target objects are represented in attention-related areas. We suggest that feedback from the attention-related areas to early visual areas modulates the activity of neurons; establishes synchronization with respect to a common oscillatory signal for target items via excitatory feedback, and also establishes de-synchronization for distractor items via inhibitory feedback. A two layer computational neural network model with integrate-and-fire neurons is proposed and simulated for simple attentive tracking tasks. Consistent with previous modeling studies, we show that via temporal tagging of neural activity, distractors can be attentively suppressed from propagating to higher levels. However, simulations also suggest attentional enhancement of activity for distractors in the first layer which represents neural substrate dedicated for low level feature processing. Inspired by this enhancement mechanism, we developed a feature based object tracking algorithm with surround processing. Surround processing improved tracking performance by 57% in PETS 2001 dataset, via eliminating target features that are likely to suffer from faulty correspondence assignments. PMID:22369920

  6. Imaging of oscillatory behavior in event-related MEG studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantazis, Dimitrios; Weber, Darren L.; Dale, Corby L.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Simpson, Gregory V.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2005-03-01

    Since event-related components in MEG (magnetoencephalography) studies are often buried in background brain activity and environmental and sensor noise, it is a standard technique for noise reduction to average over multiple stimulus-locked responses or "epochs". However this also removes event-related changes in oscillatory activity that are not phase locked to the stimulus. To overcome this problem, we combine time-frequency analysis of individual epochs with corticallyconstrained imaging to produce dynamic images of brain activity on the cerebral cortex in multiple time-frequency bands. While the SNR in individual epochs is too low to see any but the strongest components, we average signal power across epochs to find event related components on the cerebral cortex in each frequency band. To determine which of these components are statistically significant within an individual subject, we threshold the cortical images to control for false positives. This involves testing thousands of hypotheses (one per surface element and time-frequency band) for significant experimental effects. To control the number of false positives over all tests, we must therefore apply multiplicity adjustments by controlling the familywise error rate, i.e. the probability of one or more false positive detections across the entire cortex. Applying this test to each frequency band produces a set of cortical images showing significant eventrelated activity in each band of interest. We demonstrate this method in applications to high density MEG studies of visual attention.

  7. Stimulus Load and Oscillatory Activity in Higher Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kornblith, Simon; Buschman, Timothy J; Miller, Earl K

    2016-09-01

    Exploring and exploiting a rich visual environment requires perceiving, attending, and remembering multiple objects simultaneously. Recent studies have suggested that this mental "juggling" of multiple objects may depend on oscillatory neural dynamics. We recorded local field potentials from the lateral intraparietal area, frontal eye fields, and lateral prefrontal cortex while monkeys maintained variable numbers of visual stimuli in working memory. Behavior suggested independent processing of stimuli in each hemifield. During stimulus presentation, higher-frequency power (50-100 Hz) increased with the number of stimuli (load) in the contralateral hemifield, whereas lower-frequency power (8-50 Hz) decreased with the total number of stimuli in both hemifields. During the memory delay, lower-frequency power increased with contralateral load. Load effects on higher frequencies during stimulus encoding and lower frequencies during the memory delay were stronger when neural activity also signaled the location of the stimuli. Like power, higher-frequency synchrony increased with load, but beta synchrony (16-30 Hz) showed the opposite effect, increasing when power decreased (stimulus presentation) and decreasing when power increased (memory delay). Our results suggest roles for lower-frequency oscillations in top-down processing and higher-frequency oscillations in bottom-up processing. PMID:26286916

  8. Rigorous electromagnetic test of super-oscillatory lens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Tong; Yang, Shuming; Sun, Lin; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2015-12-14

    Thus far, the vector field of light probed by a nanostructured super-oscillatory lens (SOL) has mostly been studied by approximate theoretical means. Here the first rigorous electromagnetic (EM) test has been presented through an established electromagnetic model solved by the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. It is found through comparisons that scalar/vectorial theories currently used for designing the metal-film-coated SOL can effectively predict the on-axis intensity behind a SOL simulated by FDTD for both linearly and circularly polarized beams; however, they cannot reflect the true 3D EM vector field distribution particularly for the linearly polarized beam and imprecise results for the total electric energy density have appeared in certain transverse planes, e.g. a relative error as high as 26% is produced for the size of the main focus behind a SOL of 14 μm large in diameter. Besides, it is found that current theories cannot be used for designing the glass-etched phase-type SOL. PMID:26699004

  9. Acoustic noise improves visual perception and modulates occipital oscillatory states.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Stephanie; Kayser, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Perception is a multisensory process, and previous work has shown that multisensory interactions occur not only for object-related stimuli but also for simplistic and apparently unrelated inputs to the different senses. We here compare the facilitation of visual perception induced by transient (target-synchronized) sounds to the facilitation provided by continuous background noise like sounds. Specifically, we show that continuous acoustic noise improves visual contrast detection by systematically shifting psychometric curves in an amplitude-dependent manner. This multisensory benefit was found to be both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that induced by a transient and target synchronized sound in the same paradigm. Studying the underlying neural mechanisms using electric neuroimaging (EEG), we found that acoustic noise alters occipital alpha (8-12 Hz) power and decreases beta-band (14-20 Hz) coupling of occipital and temporal sites. Task-irrelevant and continuous sounds thereby have an amplitude-dependent effect on cortical mechanisms implicated in shaping visual cortical excitability. The same oscillatory mechanisms also mediate visual facilitation by transient sounds, and our results suggest that task-related sounds and task-irrelevant background noises could induce perceptually and mechanistically similar enhancement of visual perception. Given the omnipresence of sounds and noises in our environment, such multisensory interactions may affect perception in many everyday scenarios. PMID:24236698

  10. Investigating correlation of oscillatory behaviour between two signals using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pering, Tom D.; Tamburello, Giancarlo; McGonigle, Andrew J. S.; Hanna, Edward; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Wavelet analysis is becoming more commonplace given the augmentation of computational power over recent decades. Consequently, the use of such techniques is increasing within the geosciences, particularly when investigating the presence of any oscillatory behaviour contained within signals. As such, the ability to investigate correlation of oscillations present between two separate signals has become increasingly necessary. We have developed a technique combining the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis on two signals of equal length and frequency. This is performed by calculating the CWT on the two signals, extracting coefficients from the generated data at each separate scale, followed by computation of correlation between each extracted scale. The result is a clear graphical depiction of links, if any, and strength between oscillations present, with the ability to determine whether signals are in or out of phase with one another. In comparison with alternate approaches, e.g., wavelet coherence, we establish that this technique is simpler to implement and interpret, providing far clearer visual identification of inter-series relationships. We demonstrate this fact using our developed simple and easy-to-use Matlab® code which rapidly executes this procedure, producing two and three dimensional images, with the major emphasis on simplicity of the technique. Subsequently we exhibit the approach on artificially generated signals with known periodicities which are also infused with random noise. Following this the utility of our technique on a number of volcanic, geochemical and climatic signals which contain periodic behaviour is illustrated.

  11. On the dynamics of flexible blades in oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhar, Mitul; Nepf, Heidi

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental and numerical study that describes the motion of flexible blades, scaled to be dynamically similar to natural aquatic plants, forced by wave-induced oscillatory flows. For the conditions tested, blade motion is governed primarily by two dimensionless variables: the Cauchy number, Ca , which represents the ratio of the hydrodynamic forcing to the restoring force due to blade stiffness, and the ratio of the blade length to the wave orbital excursion, L. For flexible blades with Ca > > 1 , the relationship between drag and velocity can be described by two different scaling laws. For large excursions (L < < 1) , the flow resembles a unidirectional current and the scaling laws developed for steady-flow reconfiguration studies hold. For small excursions (L > > 1) , the beam equations may be linearized and a different scaling law for drag applies. The numerical model employs the Morison force formulation, and adequately reproduces the experimentally measured forces and blade postures. In some cases with Ca ~ O (1) , the measured forces generated by the flexible blades exceed those generated by rigid blades. Observations of blade motion suggest that this behavior is related to an unsteady vortex shedding event, which the quasi-steady numerical model cannot reproduce.

  12. The Voice of Anger: Oscillatory EEG Responses to Emotional Prosody.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Renata; Blume, Christine; Wislowska, Malgorzata; Wielek, Tomasz; Heib, Dominik P J; Schabus, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Emotionally relevant stimuli and in particular anger are, due to their evolutionary relevance, often processed automatically and able to modulate attention independent of conscious access. Here, we tested whether attention allocation is enhanced when auditory stimuli are uttered by an angry voice. We recorded EEG and presented healthy individuals with a passive condition where unfamiliar names as well as the subject's own name were spoken both with an angry and neutral prosody. The active condition instead, required participants to actively count one of the presented (angry) names. Results revealed that in the passive condition the angry prosody only elicited slightly stronger delta synchronization as compared to a neutral voice. In the active condition the attended (angry) target was related to enhanced delta/theta synchronization as well as alpha desynchronization suggesting enhanced allocation of attention and utilization of working memory resources. Altogether, the current results are in line with previous findings and highlight that attention orientation can be systematically related to specific oscillatory brain responses. Potential applications include assessment of non-communicative clinical groups such as post-comatose patients. PMID:27442445

  13. The Voice of Anger: Oscillatory EEG Responses to Emotional Prosody

    PubMed Central

    del Giudice, Renata; Blume, Christine; Wislowska, Malgorzata; Wielek, Tomasz; Heib, Dominik P. J.; Schabus, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Emotionally relevant stimuli and in particular anger are, due to their evolutionary relevance, often processed automatically and able to modulate attention independent of conscious access. Here, we tested whether attention allocation is enhanced when auditory stimuli are uttered by an angry voice. We recorded EEG and presented healthy individuals with a passive condition where unfamiliar names as well as the subject’s own name were spoken both with an angry and neutral prosody. The active condition instead, required participants to actively count one of the presented (angry) names. Results revealed that in the passive condition the angry prosody only elicited slightly stronger delta synchronization as compared to a neutral voice. In the active condition the attended (angry) target was related to enhanced delta/theta synchronization as well as alpha desynchronization suggesting enhanced allocation of attention and utilization of working memory resources. Altogether, the current results are in line with previous findings and highlight that attention orientation can be systematically related to specific oscillatory brain responses. Potential applications include assessment of non-communicative clinical groups such as post-comatose patients. PMID:27442445

  14. Increased oscillatory theta activation evoked by violent digital game events.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Mikko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2008-04-11

    The authors examined electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillatory responses to two violent events, the player character wounding and killing an opponent character with a gun, in the digital game James Bond 007: NightFire. EEG was recorded from 25 (16 male) right-handed healthy young adults. EEG data were segmented into one 1-s baseline epoch before each event and two 1-s epochs after event onset. Power estimates (microV(2)) were derived with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) for each artefact free event. Both of the studied events evoked increased occipital theta (4-6Hz) responses as compared to the pre-event baseline. The wounding event evoked also increased occipital high theta (6-8Hz) response and the killing event evoked low alpha (8-10Hz) asymmetry over the central electrodes, both relative to the pre-event baseline. The results are discussed in light of facial electromyographic and electrodermal activity responses evoked by these same events, and it is suggested that the reported EEG responses may be attributable to affective processes related to these violent game events. PMID:18325669

  15. Biological processing in oscillatory baffled reactors: operation, advantages and potential

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, M. S. R.; Harvey, A. P.; Perez, G. Valente; Theodorou, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    The development of efficient and commercially viable bioprocesses is essential for reducing the need for fossil-derived products. Increasingly, pharmaceuticals, fuel, health products and precursor compounds for plastics are being synthesized using bioprocessing routes as opposed to more traditional chemical technologies. Production vessels or reactors are required for synthesis of crude product before downstream processing for extraction and purification. Reactors are operated either in discrete batches or, preferably, continuously in order to reduce waste, cost and energy. This review describes the oscillatory baffled reactor (OBR), which, generally, has a niche application in performing ‘long’ processes in plug flow conditions, and so should be suitable for various bioprocesses. We report findings to suggest that OBRs could increase reaction rates for specific bioprocesses owing to low shear, good global mixing and enhanced mass transfer compared with conventional reactors. By maintaining geometrical and dynamic conditions, the technology has been proved to be easily scaled up and operated continuously, allowing laboratory-scale results to be easily transferred to industrial-sized processes. This is the first comprehensive review of bioprocessing using OBRs. The barriers facing industrial adoption of the technology are discussed alongside some suggested strategies to overcome these barriers. OBR technology could prove to be a major aid in the development of commercially viable and sustainable bioprocesses, essential for moving towards a greener future. PMID:24427509

  16. Alpha oscillatory correlates of motor inhibition in the aged brain

    PubMed Central

    Bönstrup, Marlene; Hagemann, Julian; Gerloff, Christian; Sauseng, Paul; Hummel, Friedhelm C.

    2015-01-01

    Exerting inhibitory control is a cognitive ability mediated by functions known to decline with age. The goal of this study is to add to the mechanistic understanding of cortical inhibition during motor control in aged brains. Based on behavioral findings of impaired inhibitory control with age we hypothesized that elderly will show a reduced or a lack of EEG alpha-power increase during tasks that require motor inhibition. Since inhibitory control over movements has been shown to rely on prior motor memory formation, we investigated cortical inhibitory processes at two points in time—early after learning and after an overnight consolidation phase and hypothesized an overnight increase of inhibitory capacities. Young and elderly participants acquired a complex finger movement sequence and in each experimental session brain activity during execution and inhibition of the sequence was recorded with multi-channel EEG. We assessed cortical processes of sustained inhibition by means of task-induced changes of alpha oscillatory power. During inhibition of the learned movement, young participants showed a significant alpha power increase at the sensorimotor cortices whereas elderly did not. Interestingly, for both groups, the overnight consolidation phase improved up-regulation of alpha power during sustained inhibition. This points to deficits in the generation and enhancement of local inhibitory mechanisms at the sensorimotor cortices in aged brains. However, the alpha power increase in both groups implies neuroplastic changes that strengthen the network of alpha power generation over time in young as well as elderly brains. PMID:26528179

  17. Biological processing in oscillatory baffled reactors: operation, advantages and potential.

    PubMed

    Abbott, M S R; Harvey, A P; Perez, G Valente; Theodorou, M K

    2013-02-01

    The development of efficient and commercially viable bioprocesses is essential for reducing the need for fossil-derived products. Increasingly, pharmaceuticals, fuel, health products and precursor compounds for plastics are being synthesized using bioprocessing routes as opposed to more traditional chemical technologies. Production vessels or reactors are required for synthesis of crude product before downstream processing for extraction and purification. Reactors are operated either in discrete batches or, preferably, continuously in order to reduce waste, cost and energy. This review describes the oscillatory baffled reactor (OBR), which, generally, has a niche application in performing 'long' processes in plug flow conditions, and so should be suitable for various bioprocesses. We report findings to suggest that OBRs could increase reaction rates for specific bioprocesses owing to low shear, good global mixing and enhanced mass transfer compared with conventional reactors. By maintaining geometrical and dynamic conditions, the technology has been proved to be easily scaled up and operated continuously, allowing laboratory-scale results to be easily transferred to industrial-sized processes. This is the first comprehensive review of bioprocessing using OBRs. The barriers facing industrial adoption of the technology are discussed alongside some suggested strategies to overcome these barriers. OBR technology could prove to be a major aid in the development of commercially viable and sustainable bioprocesses, essential for moving towards a greener future. PMID:24427509

  18. Oscillatory Brain Activity Reveals Linguistic Prints in the Quantity Code

    PubMed Central

    Salillas, Elena; Barraza, Paulo; Carreiras, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Number representations change through education, although it is currently unclear whether and how language could impact the magnitude representation that we share with other species. The most prominent view is that language does not play any role in modulating the core numeric representation involved in the contrast of quantities. Nevertheless, possible cultural hints on the numerical magnitude representation are currently on discussion focus. In fact, the acquisition of number words provides linguistic input that the quantity system may not ignore. Bilingualism offers a window to the study of this question, especially in bilinguals where the two number wording systems imply also two different numerical systems, such as in Basque-Spanish bilinguals. The present study evidences linguistic prints in the core number representational system through the analysis of EEG oscillatory activity during a simple number comparison task. Gamma band synchronization appears when Basque-Spanish bilinguals compare pairs of Arabic numbers linked through the Basque base-20 wording system, but it does not if the pairs are related through the base-10 system. Crucially, this gamma activity, originated in a left fronto-parietal network, only appears in bilinguals who learned math in Basque and not in equivalent proficiency bilinguals who learned math in Spanish. Thus, this neural index reflected in gamma band synchrony appears to be triggered by early learning experience with the base-20 numerical associations in Basque number words. PMID:25875210

  19. Computational heat transfer analysis for oscillatory channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kannapareddy, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    An accurate finite-difference scheme has been utilized to investigate oscillatory, laminar and incompressible flow between two-parallel-plates and in circular tubes. The two-parallel-plates simulate the regenerator of a free-piston Stirling engine (foil type regenerator) and the channel wall was included in the analysis (conjugate heat transfer problem). The circular tubes simulate the cooler and heater of the engine with an isothermal wall. The study conducted covered a wide range for the maximum Reynolds number (from 75 to 60,000), Valensi number (from 2.5 to 700), and relative amplitude of fluid displacement (0.714 and 1.34). The computational results indicate a complex nature of the heat flux distribution with time and axial location in the channel. At the channel mid-plane we observed two thermal cycles (out of phase with the flow) per each flow cycle. At this axial location the wall heat flux mean value, amplitude and phase shift with the flow are dependent upon the maximum Reynolds number, Valensi number and relative amplitude of fluid displacement. At other axial locations, the wall heat flux distribution is more complex.

  20. Dispersal-induced destabilization of metapopulations and oscillatory Turing patterns in ecological networks

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Shigefumi; Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    As shown by Alan Turing in 1952, differential diffusion may destabilize uniform distributions of reacting species and lead to emergence of patterns. While stationary Turing patterns are broadly known, the oscillatory instability, leading to traveling waves in continuous media and sometimes called the wave bifurcation, remains less investigated. Here, we extend the original analysis by Turing to networks and apply it to ecological metapopulations with dispersal connections between habitats. Remarkably, the oscillatory Turing instability does not lead to wave patterns in networks, but to spontaneous development of heterogeneous oscillations and possible extinction of species. We find such oscillatory instabilities for all possible food webs with three predator or prey species, under various assumptions about the mobility of individual species and nonlinear interactions between them. Hence, the oscillatory Turing instability should be generic and must play a fundamental role in metapopulation dynamics, providing a common mechanism for dispersal-induced destabilization of ecosystems. PMID:24394959

  1. Vapour phase details in the oscillatory combustion of propellants A porous plate analogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.; Magiawala, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    A perforated porous plate burner is designed to scale up the vapor phase details in composite propellant combustion. A fuel vapor is passed through the pores and an oxidizer vapor is passed through the discrete perforations drilled in the plate. Discussion of the scale modeling of the vapor phase details in oscillatory combustion of composite propellants leads to the following conclusions: (1) the concept of a perforated porous plate analog for the composite propellant vapor phase combustion appears to be valid during oscillatory combustion as well; (2) the flame standoff distance can be conveniently determined with motion picture photography; (3) the flame standoff distance varies with the flow velocity during oscillatory combustion much the same way as during time-independent combustion; and (4) the overall structure of the combustion zone (flame) does not appear to vary too much from its time-independent structure during oscillatory combustion

  2. Dispersal-induced destabilization of metapopulations and oscillatory Turing patterns in ecological networks.

    PubMed

    Hata, Shigefumi; Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    As shown by Alan Turing in 1952, differential diffusion may destabilize uniform distributions of reacting species and lead to emergence of patterns. While stationary Turing patterns are broadly known, the oscillatory instability, leading to traveling waves in continuous media and sometimes called the wave bifurcation, remains less investigated. Here, we extend the original analysis by Turing to networks and apply it to ecological metapopulations with dispersal connections between habitats. Remarkably, the oscillatory Turing instability does not lead to wave patterns in networks, but to spontaneous development of heterogeneous oscillations and possible extinction of species. We find such oscillatory instabilities for all possible food webs with three predator or prey species, under various assumptions about the mobility of individual species and nonlinear interactions between them. Hence, the oscillatory Turing instability should be generic and must play a fundamental role in metapopulation dynamics, providing a common mechanism for dispersal-induced destabilization of ecosystems. PMID:24394959

  3. Dispersal-induced destabilization of metapopulations and oscillatory Turing patterns in ecological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Shigefumi; Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    As shown by Alan Turing in 1952, differential diffusion may destabilize uniform distributions of reacting species and lead to emergence of patterns. While stationary Turing patterns are broadly known, the oscillatory instability, leading to traveling waves in continuous media and sometimes called the wave bifurcation, remains less investigated. Here, we extend the original analysis by Turing to networks and apply it to ecological metapopulations with dispersal connections between habitats. Remarkably, the oscillatory Turing instability does not lead to wave patterns in networks, but to spontaneous development of heterogeneous oscillations and possible extinction of species. We find such oscillatory instabilities for all possible food webs with three predator or prey species, under various assumptions about the mobility of individual species and nonlinear interactions between them. Hence, the oscillatory Turing instability should be generic and must play a fundamental role in metapopulation dynamics, providing a common mechanism for dispersal-induced destabilization of ecosystems.

  4. A NON-OSCILLATORY SCHEME FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In modeling shocks in open channel flows, the traditional finite difference schemes become inefficient and warrant special numerical treatment for smooth computations. This paper provides a general introduction to the non-oscillatory high-resolution methodology, coupled with the ...

  5. Kinetics, mechanism and efficiency of oscillatory reactions. Final technical report, May 1, 1980-April 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.

    1983-11-01

    The project is concerned with the efficiency of thermal engines with power output, the response of oscillatory reactions to external periodic perturbations, and oscillations and control features in glycolysis. Theory predicts entrainment, resonance effects, phase locking and phase slippage.

  6. Detection and integration of oscillatory differential equations with initial stepsize, order and method selection

    SciTech Connect

    Gallivan, K. A.

    1980-12-01

    Within any general class of problems there typically exist subclasses possessed of characteristics that can be exploited to create techniques more efficient than general methods applied to these subclasses. Two such subclasses of initial-value problems in ordinary differential equations are stiff and oscillatory problems. Indeed, the subclass of oscillatory problems can be further refined into stiff and nonstiff oscillatory problems. This refinement is discussed in detail. The problem of developing a method of detection for nonstiff and stiff oscillatory behavior in initial-value problems is addressed. For this method of detection a control structure is proposed upon which a production code could be based. An experimental code using this control structure is described, and results of numerical tests are presented. 3 figures.

  7. On the oscillatory Marangoni instability in a thin film heated from below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilova, A. E.; Lobov, N. I.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the classical problem of the Marangoni instability in a liquid layer with a deformable free surface atop a substrate heated from below. The linear stability analysis is performed numerically in order to extend the recent asymptotic results [S. Shklyaev, M. Khenner, and A. A. Alabuzhev, "Oscillatory and monotonic modes of long-wave Marangoni convection in a thin film," Phys. Rev. E 82, 025302 (2010)] to finite-wavenumber perturbations. In spite of detailed analyses by many researchers, we have obtained novel computational results confirming the existence of the oscillatory mode for heating from below. Moreover, numerical simulations indicate that the oscillatory mode is critical in a wider range of parameters, than it is predicted by the asymptotic analysis. Additionally, we provide guiding data for the experimental observation of the oscillatory regime.

  8. Strategies for avoiding errors and ambiguities in the analysis of oscillatory pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, Michael; Sayler, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests have recently seen a resurgence in interest as a strategy for aquifer characterization. In a cross-well pumping test, measured responses to oscillatory pumping tests consist of the amplitude and phase delay of pressure changes at an observation well. This information can be used to obtain estimates of effective aquifer parameters (conductivity and storage coefficients), by fitting field data with an analytical model through parameter estimation. Alternately, multiple pumping tests can be fit simultaneously through tomographic analyses. However, in both cases, analysis of obtained test results may be ambiguous if "phase wrapping" occurs, i.e. if signals are delayed by more than one period. In this work, we demonstrate scenarios under which phase wrapping can make analysis of oscillatory testing difficult, and present guidelines for avoiding ambiguity in oscillatory testing results.

  9. Oscillatory Pattern Generation of the Olfactory Center Using Pulse-Type Hardware Chaotic Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ken; Hatano, Hirokazu; Saito, Minoru; Sekine, Yoshifumi

    Oscillatory patterns of electrical activity are a ubiquitous feature in nervous systems. Oscillatory patterns play an important role in the processing of sensory information pattern recognition. For example, earlier reports describe that the oscillatory patterns in the olfactory center of the land slug are changed by odor stimuli to the tentacles. Olfactory processing has also been studied in relation to rabbits and land slugs through the construction and use of mathematical neural network models. However, a large-scale model is necessary for the study of a model which has sensory information recognition by the oscillatory pattern. Therefore, the construction of a hardware model that can generate oscillatory patterns is desired because nonlinear operations can be processed at higher speeds than the mathematical model. We are studying about the neural network using hardware neuron models to construct the olfactory center model of the living organisms. In the present study, we discuss about the oscillatory pattern generation of the olfactory center using pulse-type hardware chaotic neuron models. Our model shows periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic oscillations such as the olfactory center of living organisms by changing the synaptic connection weights.

  10. Direct detection of optogenetically evoked oscillatory neuronal electrical activity in rats using SLOE sequence.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yuhui; Bi, Guoqiang; Wang, Liping; Xu, Fuqiang; Wu, Ruiqi; Zhou, Xin; Qiu, Bensheng; Lei, Hao; Zhang, Yaoyu; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2016-01-15

    The direct detection of neuronal electrical activity is one of the most challenging goals in non-BOLD fMRI research. Previous work has demonstrated its feasibility in phantom and cell culture studies, but attempts in in vivo studies remain few and far between. Most recent in vivo studies used T2*-weighted sequences to directly detect neuronal electrical activity evoked by sensory stimulus. As neuronal electrical signal is usually comprised of a series of spectrally distributed oscillatory waveforms rather than being a direct current, it is most likely to be detected using oscillatory current sensitive sequences. In this study, we explored the potential of using the spin-lock oscillatory excitation (SLOE) sequence with spiral readout to directly detect optogenetically evoked oscillatory neuronal electrical activity, whose main spectral component can be manipulated artificially to match the resonance frequency of spin-lock RF field. In addition, experiments using the stimulus-induced rotary saturation (SIRS) sequence with spiral readout were also performed. Electrophysiological recording and MRI data acquisition were conducted on separate animals. Robust optogenetically evoked oscillatory LFP signals were observed and significant BOLD signals were acquired with the GE-EPI sequence before and after the whole SLOE and SIRS acquisitions, but no significant neuronal current MRI (ncMRI) signal changes were detected. These results indicate that the sensitivity of oscillatory current sensitive sequences needs to be further improved for direct detection of neuronal electrical activity. PMID:26518631

  11. Effects of Oscillatory Flow on Fertilization in the Green Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

    PubMed Central

    Kregting, Louise T.; Bass, Anna L.; Guadayol, Òscar; Yund, Philip O.; Thomas, Florence I. M.

    2013-01-01

    Broadcast spawning invertebrates that live in shallow, high-energy coastal habitats are subjected to oscillatory water motion that creates unsteady flow fields above the surface of animals. The frequency of the oscillatory fluctuations is driven by the wave period, which will influence the stability of local flow structures and may affect fertilization processes. Using an oscillatory water tunnel, we quantified the percentage of eggs fertilized on or near spawning green sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. Eggs were sampled in the water column, wake eddy, substratum and aboral surface under a range of different periods (T = 4.5 – 12.7 s) and velocities of oscillatory flow. The root-mean-square wave velocity (rms(uw)) was a good predictor of fertilization in oscillatory flow, although the root-mean-square of total velocity (rms(u)), which incorporates all the components of flow (current, wave and turbulence), also provided significant predictions. The percentage of eggs fertilized varied between 50 – 85% at low flows (rms(uw) <0.02 m s−1), depending on the location sampled, but declined to below 10% for most locations at higher rms(uw). The water column was an important location for fertilization with a relative contribution greater than that of the aboral surface, especially at medium and high rms(uw) categories. We conclude that gametes can be successfully fertilized on or near the parent under a range of oscillatory flow conditions. PMID:24098766

  12. Localized electron heating by strong guide-field magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Inomoto, Michiaki; Sugawara, Takumichi; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ushiki, Tomohiko; Ono, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in the University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system is documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. Shape of the high electron temperature area does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et.jt . If we include a guide-field effect term Bt/(Bp+αBt) for Et.jt , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point.

  13. Spin torque-generated magnetic droplet solitons.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, S M; Sani, S R; Persson, J; Nguyen, T N Anh; Chung, S; Pogoryelov, Ye; Muduli, P K; Iacocca, E; Eklund, A; Dumas, R K; Bonetti, S; Deac, A; Hoefer, M A; Akerman, J

    2013-03-15

    Dissipative solitons have been reported in a wide range of nonlinear systems, but the observation of their magnetic analog has been experimentally challenging. Using spin transfer torque underneath a nanocontact on a magnetic thin film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), we have observed the generation of dissipative magnetic droplet solitons and report on their rich dynamical properties. Micromagnetic simulations identify a wide range of automodulation frequencies, including droplet oscillatory motion, droplet "spinning," and droplet "breather" states. The droplet can be controlled by using both current and magnetic fields and is expected to have applications in spintronics, magnonics, and PMA-based domain-wall devices. PMID:23493707

  14. Oscillatory and burst discharge across electrosensory topographic maps.

    PubMed

    Turner, R W; Plant, J R; Maler, L

    1996-10-01

    1. Three parallel maps of the distribution of tuberous electroreceptor inputs are found in the medullary electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of weakly electric fish. Pyramidal cells in each map are known to respond differentially to the frequency of amplitude modulations (AMs) of external electric fields in vivo. We used an in vitro ELL slice preparation of Apteronotus leptorhynchus to compare the characteristics of spontaneously active single units across the three tuberous maps. It was our objective to determine whether spontaneous bursting activity of pyramidal cells in each map correlates with the known AM frequency selectivities of pyramidal cells in vivo. 2. Single-unit discharges were recorded from the pyramidal cell layer of the centromedial segment (CMS), centrolateral segment (CLS), and lateral segment (LS) of the ELL. Stochastic analysis of interspike intervals (ISIs) was used to identify bursting and nonbursting unit activity, and to separately analyze intra- and interburst ISIs. Four ISI patterns were identified as 1) bursting, 2) regular spiking, 3) irregular spiking, and 4) highly irregular spiking. This work focuses primarily on the characteristics of bursting units across the ELL segments. 3. Spontaneous bursting discharge was identified in all three maps (68 of 97 units), with several characteristics changing in a gradual manner across the maps. The coefficient of variation (CV) of ISIs and intraburst ISIs decreased significantly from the CMS to the LS, whereas the CV of burst periods increased significantly from the CMS to the LS. Autocorrelations and power spectral density analysis identified units discharging in an oscillatory manner with the following ratio: CMS, 75%; CLS, 4%; LS, 8%. 4. The mean period of spike bursts decreased significantly across the segments (CMS, 2.7 s; CLS, 1.2 s; LS, 1.1 s) primarily because of a shortening of mean burst duration (CMS, 1.0 s; CLS, 0.1 s; LS, 0.05 s). The average number of spikes per burst decreased

  15. Surface Instability of Liquid Propellant under Vertical Oscillatory Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; Peugeot, John

    2011-01-01

    Fluid motion in a fuel tank produced during thrust oscillations can circulate sub-cooled hydrogen near the liquid-vapor interface resulting in increased condensation and ullage pressure collapse. The first objective of this study is to validate the capabilities of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool, CFD-ACE+, in modeling the fundamental interface transition physics occurring at the propellant surface. The second objective is to use the tool to assess the effects of thrust oscillations on surface dynamics. Our technical approach is to first verify the CFD code against known theoretical solutions, and then validate against existing experiments for small scale tanks and a range of transition regimes. A 2D axisymmetric, multi-phase model of gases, liquids, and solids is used to verify that CFD-ACE+ is capable of modeling fluid-structure interaction and system resonance in a typical thrust oscillation environment. Then, the 3D mode is studied with an assumed oscillatory body force to simulate the thrust oscillating effect. The study showed that CFD modeling can capture all of the transition physics from solid body motion to standing surface wave and to droplet ejection from liquid-gas interface. Unlike the analytical solutions established during the 1960 s, CFD modeling is not limited to the small amplitude regime. It can extend solutions to the nonlinear regime to determine the amplitude of surface waves after the onset of instability. The present simulation also demonstrated consistent trends from numerical experiments through variation of physical properties from low viscous fluid to high viscous fluids, and through variation of geometry and input forcing functions. A comparison of surface wave patterns under various forcing frequencies and amplitudes showed good agreement with experimental observations. It is concluded that thrust oscillations can cause droplet formation at the interface, which results in increased surface area and enhanced heat transfer

  16. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re{sub max}, Re{sub W}, and A{sub R}, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA`s Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  17. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  18. Grid cells and theta as oscillatory interference: theory and predictions.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Neil

    2008-01-01

    The oscillatory interference model [Burgess et al. (2007) Hippocampus 17:801-802] of grid cell firing is reviewed as an algorithmic level description of path integration and as an implementation level description of grid cells and their inputs. New analyses concern the relationships between the variables in the model and the theta rhythm, running speed, and the intrinsic firing frequencies of grid cells. New simulations concern the implementation of velocity-controlled oscillators (VCOs) with different preferred directions in different neurons. To summarize the model, the distance traveled along a specific direction is encoded by the phase of a VCO relative to a baseline frequency. Each VCO is an intrinsic membrane potential oscillation whose frequency increases from baseline as a result of depolarization by synaptic input from speed modulated head-direction cells. Grid cell firing is driven by the VCOs whose preferred directions match the current direction of motion. VCOs are phase-reset by location-specific input from place cells to prevent accumulation of error. The baseline frequency is identified with the local average of VCO frequencies, while EEG theta frequency is identified with the global average VCO frequency and comprises two components: the frequency at zero speed and a linear response to running speed. Quantitative predictions are given for the inter-relationships between a grid cell's intrinsic firing frequency and grid scale, the two components of theta frequency, and the running speed of the animal. Qualitative predictions are given for the properties of the VCOs, and the relationship between environmental novelty, the two components of theta, grid scale and place cell remapping. PMID:19021256

  19. Psychoacoustic Tinnitus Loudness and Tinnitus-Related Distress Show Different Associations with Oscillatory Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Balkenhol, Tobias; Wallhäusser-Franke, Elisabeth; Delb, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background The phantom auditory perception of subjective tinnitus is associated with aberrant brain activity as evidenced by magneto- and electroencephalographic studies. We tested the hypotheses (1) that psychoacoustically measured tinnitus loudness is related to gamma oscillatory band power, and (2) that tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related distress are related to distinct brain activity patterns as suggested by the distinction between loudness and distress experienced by tinnitus patients. Furthermore, we explored (3) how hearing impairment, minimum masking level, and (4) psychological comorbidities are related to spontaneous oscillatory brain activity in tinnitus patients. Methods and Findings Resting state oscillatory brain activity recorded electroencephalographically from 46 male tinnitus patients showed a positive correlation between gamma band oscillations and psychoacoustic tinnitus loudness determined with the reconstructed tinnitus sound, but not with the other psychoacoustic loudness measures that were used. Tinnitus-related distress did also correlate with delta band activity, but at electrode positions different from those associated with tinnitus loudness. Furthermore, highly distressed tinnitus patients exhibited a higher level of theta band activity. Moreover, mean hearing loss between 0.125 kHz and 16 kHz was associated with a decrease in gamma activity, whereas minimum masking levels correlated positively with delta band power. In contrast, psychological comorbidities did not express significant correlations with oscillatory brain activity. Conclusion Different clinically relevant tinnitus characteristics show distinctive associations with spontaneous brain oscillatory power. Results support hypothesis (1), but exclusively for the tinnitus loudness derived from matching to the reconstructed tinnitus sound. This suggests to preferably use the reconstructed tinnitus spectrum to determine psychoacoustic tinnitus loudness. Results also support

  20. Quantifying gyrotropy in magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisdak, M.

    2016-01-01

    A new scalar measure of the gyrotropy of a pressure tensor is defined. Previously suggested measures are shown to be incomplete by means of examples for which they give unphysical results. To demonstrate its usefulness as an indicator of magnetic topology, the new measure is calculated for electron data taken from numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, shown to peak at separatrices and X points, and compared to the other measures. The new diagnostic has potential uses in analyzing spacecraft observations, and so a method for calculating it from measurements performed in an arbitrary coordinate system is derived.

  1. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  2. Monitoring of oscillatory characteristics of pulverized coal flames through image processing and spectral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, G.; Yan, Y.; Colechin, M.; Hill, R.

    2006-02-15

    This paper presents the monitoring of the oscillatory characteristics of pulverized coal flames using image processing and spectral analysis techniques. The instrumentation system employed in this investigation is an integral part of a multifunctional flame monitoring system, being capable of monitoring the oscillatory frequency of a flame on a two-dimensional and concurrent basis. A quantitative flicker frequency is defined as the power-density-weighted mean frequency over the spectral range to represent the oscillatory characteristics of a specific region of the flame. Digital filtering techniques incorporating direct gray-level thresholding and wavelet shrinkage algorithms are employed to reduce background noise from flame images and white noise from the resulting flame frequency signal. A series of tests was undertaken on an industrial-scale coal-fired combustion test facility (CTF) under a range of operating conditions. Relationships between the measured flame oscillatory frequency and the process data including emissions are identified. Results obtained demonstrate that the flame oscillatory frequency responds in predictable ways to the effects of operating conditions on the dynamic nature of the flame.

  3. Decision-making ability of Physarum polycephalum enhanced by its coordinated spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iwayama, Koji; Zhu, Liping; Hirata, Yoshito; Aono, Masashi; Hara, Masahiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-06-01

    An amoeboid unicellular organism, a plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated information processing capabilities while deforming its amorphous body. We previously devised an 'amoeba-based computer (ABC),' that implemented optical feedback control to lead this amoeboid organism to search for a solution to the traveling salesman problem (TSP). In the ABC, the shortest TSP route (the optimal solution) is represented by the shape of the organism in which the body area (nutrient absorption) is maximized while the risk of being exposed to aversive light stimuli is minimized. The shortness of the TSP route found by ABC, therefore, serves as a quantitative measure of the optimality of the decision made by the organism. However, it remains unclear how the decision-making ability of the organism originates from the oscillatory dynamics of the organism. We investigated the number of coexisting traveling waves in the spatiotemporal patterns of the oscillatory dynamics of the organism. We show that a shorter TSP route can be found when the organism exhibits a lower number of traveling waves. The results imply that the oscillatory dynamics are highly coordinated throughout the global body. Based on the results, we discuss the fact that the decision-making ability of the organism can be enhanced not by uncorrelated random fluctuations, but by its highly coordinated oscillatory dynamics. PMID:27070463

  4. Synchronization phenomena in mixed media of passive, excitable, and oscillatory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A. K.; Petrov, V. S.; Averyanova, L. S.; Osipov, G. V.; Chen, W.; Drugova, O.; Chan, C. K.

    2008-09-01

    We study collective phenomena in highly heterogeneous cardiac cell culture and its models. A cardiac culture is a mixture of passive (fibroblasts), oscillatory (pacemakers), and excitable (myocytes) cells. There is also heterogeneity within each type of cell as well. Results of in vitro experiments are modelled by Luo-Rudy and FitzHugh-Nagumo systems. For oscillatory and excitable media, we focus on the transitions from fully incoherent behavior to partially coherent behavior and then to global synchronization as the coupling strength is increased. These regimes are characterized qualitatively by spatiotemporal diagrams and quantitatively by profiles of dependence of individual frequencies on coupling. We find that synchronization clusters are determined by concentric and spiral waves. These waves arising due to the heterogeneity of medium push covered cells to oscillate in synchrony. We are also interested in the influence of passive and excitable elements on the oscillatory characteristics of low- and high-dimensional ensembles of cardiac cells. The mixture of initially silent excitable and passive cells shows the transitions to oscillatory behavior. In the media of oscillatory and passive or excitable cells, the effect of oscillation death is observed.

  5. Oscillatory Notch-pathway activity in a delay model of neuronal differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momiji, Hiroshi; Monk, Nicholas A. M.

    2009-08-01

    Lateral inhibition resulting from a double-negative feedback loop underlies the assignment of different fates to cells in many developmental processes. Previous studies have shown that the presence of time delays in models of lateral inhibition can result in significant oscillatory transients before patterned steady states are reached. We study the impact of local feedback loops in a model of lateral inhibition based on the Notch signaling pathway, elucidating the roles of intracellular and intercellular delays in controlling the overall system behavior. The model exhibits both in-phase and out-of-phase oscillatory modes and oscillation death. Interactions between oscillatory modes can generate complex behaviors such as intermittent oscillations. Our results provide a framework for exploring the recent observation of transient Notch-pathway oscillations during fate assignment in vertebrate neurogenesis.

  6. Visual study of the effect of grazing flow on the oscillatory flow in a resonator orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    Grazing flow and oscillatory flow in an orifice were studied in a plexiglass flow channel with a single side branch Helmholtz resonator using water as the fluid medium. An oscillatory flow was applied to the resonatory cavity, and color dyes were injected in both the orifice and the grazing flow field to record the motion of the fluid. The flow regimes associated with linear and nonlinear (high sound pressure level) impedances with and without grazing flows were recorded by a high-speed motion-picture camera. Appreciable differences in the oscillatory flow field were seen in the various flow regimes. With high grazing flows, the outflow and inflow from the resonator cavity are found to be asymmetric. The visual study confirms that jet energy loss during flow into a resonator cavity is much larger than the loss for ejection from the cavity into the grazing flow. For inflow into the resonator cavity, the effective orifice area was significantly reduced.

  7. Pseudo-inverse Jacobian control with grey relational analysis for robot manipulators mounted on oscillatory bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Lin, C. C.; Lo, H.-S.

    2009-10-01

    Interest in complex robotic systems is growing in new application areas. An example of such a robotic system is a dexterous manipulator mounted on an oscillatory base. In literature, such systems are known as macro/micro systems. This work proposes pseudo-inverse Jacobian feedback control laws and applies grey relational analysis for tuning outer-loop PID control parameters of Cartesian computed-torque control law for robotic manipulators mounted on oscillatory bases. The priority when modifying controller parameters should be the top ranking importance among parameters. Grey relational grade is utilized to investigate the sensitivity of tuning the auxiliary signal PID of the Cartesian computed-torque law to achieve desired performance. Results of this study can be feasible to numerous mechanical systems, such as mobile robots, gantry cranes, underwater robots, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases, for moving the end-effector to a desired Cartesian position.

  8. Study on Minor Losses Around the Thermoacoustic Parallel Stack in the Oscillatory Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiyi, Mao; Xiujuan, Xie; Shaoqi, Yang; Qing, Li

    Minor losses around the thermoacoustic parallel stack in the oscillatory flow conditions are amongthe main factors that influencethe efficiency ofthermoacoustic systems. In this paper, a two-dimension model of a thermoacoustic parallel stack in a thermoacoustic system driven by double loudspeakers is setup. The characteristicsof the vortex structure at the end of the parallel stack under different pressure amplitude are analyzed. Meanwhile based on the principle of the two-microphone method and the above simulation result, the minor loss coefficient of oscillatory flow through a sudden area change is analyzed. The result shows that the vortex structuresget larger with the increase of pressure amplitude. Furthermore, the real part of the minor loss coefficient exponentially increases with the ratio of hydraulic radius and displacement amplitude of the oscillatory flow. A close agreement between simulation and experimental result is found, thus providing support for the validly of the model.

  9. A comparative analysis on different nanofluid models for the oscillatory stagnation point flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Khan, A. U.; Saleem, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we have presented the comparative analysis of the oscillatory stagnation point flow of nanofluids. Both the phase flow model and Buongiorno model are discussed for oscillatory stagnation point flows and a comparison between experimental model and theoretical model is presented. The resulting partial differential equations for oscillatory two-dimensional flows are simplified in a fixed frame and a moving frame of reference subject to the assumed form of solutions. The homotopy analysis method is used to solve the reduced system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The consequences are examined through graphs and tables. It is also found that comparatively both the Boungiorno nanofluid model and phase flow model are of compatible order for a special set of parameters but generally such results do not hold.

  10. Observations of velocities, sand concentrations, and fluxes under velocity-asymmetric oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruessink, B. G.; Michallet, H.; Abreu, T.; Sancho, F.; van der A, D. A.; van der Werf, J. J.; Silva, P. A.

    2011-03-01

    U-tube measurements of instantaneous velocities, concentrations, and fluxes for a well-sorted, medium-sized sand in oscillatory sheet flow are analyzed. The experiments involved two velocity-asymmetric flows, the same two flows with an opposing current of 0.4 m/s, and a mixed skewed-asymmetric flow, all with a velocity amplitude of 1.2 m/s and flow period of 7 s. We find that the net positive transport rate beneath velocity-asymmetric oscillatory flow results from large, but opposing sand fluxes during the positive and negative flow phase. With an increase in velocity asymmetry and, in particular, velocity skewness, the difference in the magnitude of the fluxes in the two half cycles increases, leading to larger net transport rates. This trend is consistent with the observed increase in skewness of the oscillatory bed shear stress. Phase-lag effects, whereby sand stirred during the negative flow phase has not settled by the time of the negative-to-positive flow reversal and is subsequently transported during the positive flow phase, are notable but of minor importance to the net transport rate compared to earlier experiments with finer sands. In the vertical, the oscillatory flux is positive above the no-flow bed. Within the sheet flow pick-up layer, the oscillatory flux is negative and similar in magnitude to the positive flux induced by the residual flow. The 0.4 m/s opposing current causes more sand to be picked up during the negative than during the positive flow phase. Above the no-flow bed the resulting negative oscillatory flux is comparable in magnitude to the current-related flux.

  11. Oscillatory zoning in synthetic Hf-Y-doped zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskin, P.

    2003-04-01

    Onion-skin-like growth-layers, known as oscillatory zoning patterns (OZPs), are commonly observed in igneous zircon. OZPs are also observed in synthetic zircon although the conditions of growth differ significantly from those formed naturally—synthetic zircons are usually grown in anhydrous simple chemical fluxes at higher temperatures (900--1200^oC) and ZrO_2 compositions (1--3 wt.%), at 1 atm pressure, and under laboratory time scales (days to weeks). In order to investigate the role of temperature only as a cause of OZP formation, two simultaneous zircon-growth experiments were performed. An initial starting mix of ZrO_2 (with ˜1 wt.% HfO_2 impurity) and SiO_2 (at 1:10 molar ratio) was doped with Y_2O_3, La_2O_3 and CeO_2 each representing 2 wt.% of the combined weight of ZrO_2+SiO_2. Equal halves of the doped mix were added to a flux comprising Na_2WO_4 and WO_3. Experiments were performed in sealed Pt crucibles in air at 1 atm and were heated at 1300^oC for 24 h. The first experiment was left at that temperature (a total of 70 h) until quenching in air. The second experiment was reduced in temperature four times before quenching in air (1: 1300--1200^oC in 2 min, held for 14 h; 2: 1200--1100^oC at 12.5^oC/h; 3: 1100--1000^oC in 2 min, held for 16 h; 4: 1000--900^oC at 12.5^oC/h), a total experimental time of 70 h. Zircons (50--130 mm-long) were recovered from the flux and represented a ˜30% yield by weight. Crystals from both experiments were analysed by EMPA and cathodoluminescence (CL). Zircon from experiment 1 are unzoned and have an average composition of (Zr0.97Hf0.03)SiO_4. Zircon from experiment 2 is zoned. Each crystal ((Zr0.950-0.958Hf0.014-0.034Y0.000-0.005)SiO_4) has 5 zones, which may vary in thickness between crystals, that are interpreted to represent growth at 1300^oC (zone 1) and the four other temperature ranges of experimentation (zones 2--5). Only Hf and Y were above the detection limit for EMPA. CL intensities correspond with Y

  12. Essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing methods applied to turbulence amplification in shock wave calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, Stanley; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1988-01-01

    ENO (essentially non-oscillatory) schemes can provide uniformly high order accuracy right up to discontinuities while keeping sharp, essentially non-oscillatory shock transitions. Recently, an efficient implementation of ENO schemes was obtained based on fluxes and TVD Runge-Kutta time discretizations. The resulting code is very simple to program for multi-dimensions. ENO schemes are especially suitable for computing problems with both discontinuities and fine structures in smooth regions, such as shock interaction with turbulence, for which results for 1-D and 2-D Euler equations are presented. Much better resolution is observed by using third order ENO schemes than by using second order TVD schemes for such problems.

  13. Rotational-oscillatory motions of the Earth and time variations in the geopotential coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V. V.; Rykhlova, L. V.; Filippova, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Anumerical-analytical model for oscillatory motions of the Earth's pole that can provide qualitative explanations for irregular oscillatory phenomena and improvements in the accuracy of forecasting the polar trajectories in periods of significant anomalies is proposed. The model represents a natural refinement of the main model for the polar oscillations (the Chandler and annual components) developed earlier using celestial mechanics methods and observations of the Earth's gravitational field. The results of numerical simulations of the polar oscillations are compared with measurements carried out by the International Earth Rotation Service.

  14. FEL and Optical Klystron Gain for an Electron Beam with Oscillatory Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    If the energy spread of a beam is larger then the Pierce parameter, the FEL gain length increases dramatically and the FEL output gets suppressed. We show that if the energy distribution of such a beam is made oscillatory on a small scale, the gain length can be considerably decreased. Such an oscillatory energy distribution is generated by first modulating the beam energy with a laser via the mechanism of inverse FEL, and then sending it through a strong chicane. We show that this approach also works for the optical klystron enhancement scheme. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  15. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  16. Transport of heat and momentum in oscillatory wall-bounded flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Alireza; Biles, Drummond; White, Christopher; Pond, Ian; Dubief, Yves; UNH Team; UVM Team

    2015-11-01

    The balance of the leading order terms in the mean momentum and energy equations and their thrice integrated forms are investigated in oscillatory wall-bounded flow using both DNS and experimental data. The integrated forms of the equations are used to investigate the dynamical contributions to the phase-averaged wall shear stress and wall heat flux. Preliminary results indicate that phases corresponding to flow acceleration are dynamically similar to oscillatory laminar flow and phases corresponding to flow deceleration are dynamically similar to fully developed turbulent flow. Moreover, the flow becomes more turbulent-like with increasing period of oscillation.

  17. On essentially non-oscillatory schemes on unstructured meshes: Analysis and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abgrall, R.

    1992-01-01

    A few years ago, the class of Essentially Non-Oscillatory Schemes for the numerical simulation of hyperbolic equations and systems was constructed. Since then, some extensions have been made to multidimensional simulations of compressible flows, mainly in the context of very regular structured meshes. In this paper, we first recall and improve the results of an earlier paper about non-oscillatory reconstruction on unstructured meshes, emphasizing the effective calculation of the reconstruction. Then we describe a class of numerical schemes on unstructured meshes and give some applications for its third order version. This demonstrates that a higher order of accuracy is indeed obtained, even on very irregular meshes.

  18. Magnetic equilibria for X-Diverted plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, M.; Valanju, P.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Wiley, J.; Mahajan, S.

    2006-10-01

    The X-divertor has been proposed to solve heat exhaust problems for reactors beyond ITER. By generating an extra X-point downstream from the main X-point, the X-divertor greatly expands magnetic flux at the divertor plates. As a result, the heat is distributed over a larger area and the line length is greatly increased. We have developed coil sets for X-diverted magnetic equilibria for many devices (NSTX, PEGASUS, EAST, HL-2A, CREST, and a CTF). These demonstrate that the XD configuration can be created for highly shaped plasmas using moderate coil currents. For reactors, all coils can be placed behind 1 m of shielding. We have also shown that XD configurations are robust to modest plasma perturbations and VDEs; this is in contrast to the sensitivity of highly tilted divertor plates.

  19. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  20. Morphological stability analysis of directional solidification into an oscillatory fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volfson, Dmitri; Viñals, Jorge

    2001-12-01

    We study the stability of a planar solid-melt boundary during directional solidification of a binary alloy when the solid is being periodically vibrated in the direction parallel to the boundary (or equivalently, under a far field uniform and oscillatory flow parallel to the planar boundary). The analysis is motivated by directional solidification experiments under the low level residual acceleration field characteristic of a microgravity environment, and possible effects on crystal growth in space. It is known that periodic modulation of the solid-melt interface under the conditions stated induces second order stationary streaming flows within a boundary layer adjacent to the interface, the thickness of which is the same as the wavelength of the modulation. We derive an effective solute transport equation by averaging over the fast time scale of the oscillatory flow, and obtain the resulting dispersion relation for a small disturbance of a planar interface. We find both regions of stationary and oscillatory instability. For small ratios of the viscous to solutal layer thicknesses, s, the flow generally destabilizes the planar interface. For s≃1, the flow stabilizes the stationary branch, but it can also excite an oscillatory instability. For large s, the effect of the flow is small.

  1. Stability of Traveling Pulses with Oscillatory Tails in the FitzHugh-Nagumo System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Paul; de Rijk, Björn; Sandstede, Björn

    2016-05-01

    The FitzHugh-Nagumo equations are known to admit fast traveling pulses that have monotone tails and arise as the concatenation of Nagumo fronts and backs in an appropriate singular limit, where a parameter ɛ goes to zero. These pulses are known to be nonlinearly stable with respect to the underlying PDE. Recently, the existence of fast pulses with oscillatory tails was proved for the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations. In this paper, we prove that the fast pulses with oscillatory tails are also nonlinearly stable. Similar to the case of monotone tails, stability is decided by the location of a nontrivial eigenvalue near the origin of the PDE linearization about the traveling pulse. We prove that this real eigenvalue is always negative. However, the expression that governs the sign of this eigenvalue for oscillatory pulses differs from that for monotone pulses, and we show indeed that the nontrivial eigenvalue in the monotone case scales with ɛ , while the relevant scaling in the oscillatory case is ɛ ^{2/3}.

  2. Taylor Series Expansion with the Fluctuation Freely Approximated Remainder Over Highly Oscillatory Basis Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Guervit, Ercan; Baykara, N. A.; Demiralp, Metin

    2009-09-09

    A new formulation is developed here to approximate highly oscillatory functions by applying the Fluctuationlessness Theorem to the remainder term of the Taylor polynomial. To this end a trigonometric basis set is utilized. Because of the limitation of space in this extended abstract the implementation of results are left to the presentation.

  3. Task-sensitive reconfiguration of corticocortical 6-20 Hz oscillatory coherence in naturalistic human performance.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Timo; Jalava, Antti; Kujala, Jan; Stevenson, Claire; Salmelin, Riitta

    2015-07-01

    Electrophysiological oscillatory coherence between brain regions has been proposed to facilitate functional long-range connectivity within neurocognitive networks. This notion is supported by intracortical recordings of coherence in singled-out corticocortical connections in the primate cortex. However, the manner in which this operational principle manifests in the task-sensitive connectivity that supports human naturalistic performance remains undercharacterized. Here, we demonstrate task-sensitive reconfiguration of global patterns of coherent connectivity in association with a set of easier and more demanding naturalistic tasks, ranging from picture comparison to speech comprehension and object manipulation. Based on whole-cortex neuromagnetic recording in healthy behaving individuals, the task-sensitive component of long-range corticocortical coherence was mapped at spectrally narrow-band oscillatory frequencies between 6 and 20 Hz (theta to alpha and low-beta bands). This data-driven cortical mapping unveiled markedly distinct and topologically task-relevant spatiospectral connectivity patterns for the different tasks. The results demonstrate semistable oscillatory states relevant for neurocognitive processing. The present findings decisively link human behavior to corticocortical coherence at oscillatory frequencies that are widely thought to convey long-range, feedback-type neural interaction in cortical functional networks. PMID:25760689

  4. Oscillatory Critical Amplitudes in Hierarchical Models and the Harris Function of Branching Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, Ovidiu; Giacomin, Giambattista

    2013-02-01

    Oscillatory critical amplitudes have been repeatedly observed in hierarchical models and, in the cases that have been taken into consideration, these oscillations are so small to be hardly detectable. Hierarchical models are tightly related to iteration of maps and, in fact, very similar phenomena have been repeatedly reported in many fields of mathematics, like combinatorial evaluations and discrete branching processes. It is precisely in the context of branching processes with bounded off-spring that T. Harris, in 1948, first set forth the possibility that the logarithm of the moment generating function of the rescaled population size, in the super-critical regime, does not grow near infinity as a power, but it has an oscillatory prefactor (the Harris function). These oscillations have been observed numerically only much later and, while the origin is clearly tied to the discrete character of the iteration, the amplitude size is not so well understood. The purpose of this note is to reconsider the issue for hierarchical models and in what is arguably the most elementary setting—the pinning model—that actually just boils down to iteration of polynomial maps (and, notably, quadratic maps). In this note we show that the oscillatory critical amplitude for pinning models and the Harris function coincide. Moreover we make explicit the link between these oscillatory functions and the geometry of the Julia set of the map, making thus rigorous and quantitative some ideas set forth in Derrida et al. (Commun. Math. Phys. 94:115-132, 1984).

  5. Brain Oscillatory Activity during Spatial Navigation: Theta and Gamma Activity Link Medial Temporal and Parietal Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, David J.; Congedo, Marco; Ciorciari, Joseph; Silberstein, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Brain oscillatory correlates of spatial navigation were investigated using blind source separation (BSS) and standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) analyses of 62-channel EEG recordings. Twenty-five participants were instructed to navigate to distinct landmark buildings in a previously learned virtual reality town…

  6. Shadows of Music-Language Interaction on Low Frequency Brain Oscillatory Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrus, Elisa; Koelsch, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies investigating similarities between music and language perception have relied exclusively on the signal averaging technique, which does not adequately represent oscillatory aspects of electrical brain activity that are relevant for higher cognition. The current study investigated the patterns of brain oscillations…

  7. An Extended Motor Network Generates Beta and Gamma Oscillatory Perturbations during Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Tony W.; Slason, Erin; Asherin, Ryan; Kronberg, Eugene; Reite, Martin L.; Teale, Peter D.; Rojas, Donald C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the time course and neural generators of oscillatory beta and gamma motor responses in typically-developing children. Participants completed a unilateral flexion-extension task using each index finger as whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were acquired. These MEG data were imaged in the frequency-domain using spatial…

  8. Oscillatory phase dynamics in neural entrainment underpin illusory percepts of time.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Björn; Henry, Molly J; Grigutsch, Maren; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-10-01

    Neural oscillatory dynamics are a candidate mechanism to steer perception of time and temporal rate change. While oscillator models of time perception are strongly supported by behavioral evidence, a direct link to neural oscillations and oscillatory entrainment has not yet been provided. In addition, it has thus far remained unaddressed how context-induced illusory percepts of time are coded for in oscillator models of time perception. To investigate these questions, we used magnetoencephalography and examined the neural oscillatory dynamics that underpin pitch-induced illusory percepts of temporal rate change. Human participants listened to frequency-modulated sounds that varied over time in both modulation rate and pitch, and judged the direction of rate change (decrease vs increase). Our results demonstrate distinct neural mechanisms of rate perception: Modulation rate changes directly affected listeners' rate percept as well as the exact frequency of the neural oscillation. However, pitch-induced illusory rate changes were unrelated to the exact frequency of the neural responses. The rate change illusion was instead linked to changes in neural phase patterns, which allowed for single-trial decoding of percepts. That is, illusory underestimations or overestimations of perceived rate change were tightly coupled to increased intertrial phase coherence and changes in cerebro-acoustic phase lag. The results provide insight on how illusory percepts of time are coded for by neural oscillatory dynamics. PMID:24089487

  9. On oscillatory convection with the Cattaneo–Christov hyperbolic heat-flow model

    PubMed Central

    Bissell, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of the hyperbolic Cattaneo–Christov heat-flow model in place of the more usual parabolic Fourier law is shown to raise the possibility of oscillatory convection in the classic Bénard problem of a Boussinesq fluid heated from below. By comparing the critical Rayleigh numbers for stationary and oscillatory convection, Rc and RS respectively, oscillatory convection is found to represent the preferred form of instability whenever the Cattaneo number C exceeds a threshold value CT≥8/27π2≈0.03. In the case of free boundaries, analytical approaches permit direct treatment of the role played by the Prandtl number P1, which—in contrast to the classical stationary scenario—can impact on oscillatory modes significantly owing to the non-zero frequency of convection. Numerical investigation indicates that the behaviour found analytically for free boundaries applies in a qualitatively similar fashion for fixed boundaries, while the threshold Cattaneo number CT is computed as a function of P1∈[10−2,10+2] for both boundary regimes. PMID:25792960

  10. Information-geometric measures estimate neural interactions during oscillatory brain states

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yimin; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Tatsuno, Masami

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of functional network structures among multiple neurons is essential to understanding neural information processing. Information geometry (IG), a theory developed for investigating a space of probability distributions has recently been applied to spike-train analysis and has provided robust estimations of neural interactions. Although neural firing in the equilibrium state is often assumed in these studies, in reality, neural activity is non-stationary. The brain exhibits various oscillations depending on cognitive demands or when an animal is asleep. Therefore, the investigation of the IG measures during oscillatory network states is important for testing how the IG method can be applied to real neural data. Using model networks of binary neurons or more realistic spiking neurons, we studied how the single- and pairwise-IG measures were influenced by oscillatory neural activity. Two general oscillatory mechanisms, externally driven oscillations and internally induced oscillations, were considered. In both mechanisms, we found that the single-IG measure was linearly related to the magnitude of the external input, and that the pairwise-IG measure was linearly related to the sum of connection strengths between two neurons. We also observed that the pairwise-IG measure was not dependent on the oscillation frequency. These results are consistent with the previous findings that were obtained under the equilibrium conditions. Therefore, we demonstrate that the IG method provides useful insights into neural interactions under the oscillatory condition that can often be observed in the real brain. PMID:24605089

  11. Information-geometric measures estimate neural interactions during oscillatory brain states.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yimin; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Tatsuno, Masami

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of functional network structures among multiple neurons is essential to understanding neural information processing. Information geometry (IG), a theory developed for investigating a space of probability distributions has recently been applied to spike-train analysis and has provided robust estimations of neural interactions. Although neural firing in the equilibrium state is often assumed in these studies, in reality, neural activity is non-stationary. The brain exhibits various oscillations depending on cognitive demands or when an animal is asleep. Therefore, the investigation of the IG measures during oscillatory network states is important for testing how the IG method can be applied to real neural data. Using model networks of binary neurons or more realistic spiking neurons, we studied how the single- and pairwise-IG measures were influenced by oscillatory neural activity. Two general oscillatory mechanisms, externally driven oscillations and internally induced oscillations, were considered. In both mechanisms, we found that the single-IG measure was linearly related to the magnitude of the external input, and that the pairwise-IG measure was linearly related to the sum of connection strengths between two neurons. We also observed that the pairwise-IG measure was not dependent on the oscillation frequency. These results are consistent with the previous findings that were obtained under the equilibrium conditions. Therefore, we demonstrate that the IG method provides useful insights into neural interactions under the oscillatory condition that can often be observed in the real brain. PMID:24605089

  12. Positive and Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia Relate to Distinct Oscillatory Signatures of Sensory Gating

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Julian; Roa Romero, Yadira; Balz, Johanna; Henjes, Melissa; Senkowski, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory activity in neural populations and temporal synchronization within these populations are important mechanisms contributing to perception and cognition. In schizophrenia, perception and cognition are impaired. Aberrant gating of irrelevant sensory information, which has been related to altered oscillatory neural activity, presumably contributes to these impairments. However, the link between schizophrenia symptoms and sensory gating deficits, as reflected in oscillatory activity, is not clear. In this electroencephalography study, we used a paired-stimulus paradigm to investigate frequency-resolved oscillatory activity in 22 schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls. We found sensory gating deficits in patients compared to controls, as reflected in reduced gamma-band power and alpha-band phase synchrony difference between the first and the second auditory stimulus. We correlated these markers of neural activity with a five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Gamma-band power sensory gating was positively correlated with positive symptoms. Moreover, alpha-band phase synchrony sensory gating was negatively correlated with negative symptoms. A cluster analysis revealed three schizophrenia phenotypes, characterized by (i) aberrant gamma-band power and high positive symptoms, (ii) aberrant alpha-band phase synchrony, low positive, and low negative symptom scores or (iii) by intact sensory gating and high negative symptoms. Our study demonstrates that aberrant neural synchronization, as reflected in gamma-band power and alpha-band phase synchrony, relates to the schizophrenia psychopathology. Different schizophrenia phenotypes express distinct levels of positive and negative symptoms as well as varying degrees of aberrant oscillatory neural activity. Identifying the individual phenotype might improve therapeutic interventions in schizophrenia. PMID:27014035

  13. Reduced visual event-related δ oscillatory responses in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Yener, Görsev G; Kurt, Pınar; Emek-Savaş, Derya Durusu; Güntekin, Bahar; Başar, Erol

    2013-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered as a prodromal stage for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of cases. Event-related oscillations might be used for detection of cognitive deficits. Our group's earlier results showed diminished delta visual and auditory target oscillatory responses in AD, and we investigated whether this prevails for MCI. Eighteen MCI subjects and 18 age-matched healthy elderly controls were investigated. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitudes of oscillatory responses for each subject's averaged oscillatory target responses in delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands upon application of visual oddball paradigm were measured. Repeated measures of ANOVA was used to analyze four locations (frontal, central, parietal, occipital), at three coronal (left, midline, right) sites. Independent t tests were applied for post-hoc analyses. The oddball target delta response (0.5-3.0 Hz) was 26-32% lower in MCI than healthy controls over fronto-central-parietal regions [F(1.34) = 4.562, p = 0.04]. Without a group effect, theta oscillatory responses (4-7 Hz) showed significant differences in coronal electrodes indicating highest values over mid-electrode sites, and a anteriorposterior x coronal effect, being maximum at mid-central. Alpha frequency band analyses indicated no statistical differences. Peak-to-peak amplitudes of visual target delta oscillatory responses were lower in fronto-central-parietal regions in MCI than in healthy controls. This supports our earlier findings in AD, showing hypoactive delta fronto-central-parietal regions during cognitive tasks. These results indicate that event-related oscillations may detect early changes of brain dynamics in MCI, and deserves to be investigated as a candidate biomarker in further studies using multimodal techniques. PMID:23948923

  14. Determination of the Neutron Magnetic Moment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Greene, G. L.; Ramsey, N. F.; Mampe, W.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Smith, K.; Dress, W. B.; Miller, P. D.; Perrin, P.

    1981-06-01

    The neutron magnetic moment has been measured with an improvement of a factor of 100 over the previous best measurement. Using a magnetic resonance spectrometer of the separated oscillatory field type capable of determining a resonance signal for both neutrons and protons (in flowing H{sub 2}O), we find ..mu..{sub n}/..mu..{sub p} = 0.68497935(17) (0.25 ppM). The neutron magnetic moment can also be expressed without loss of accuracy in a variety of other units.

  15. Rheological behavior of magnetic powder mixtures for magnetic PIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hun; Kim, See Jo; Park, Seong Jin; Mun, Jun Ho; Kang, Tae Gon; Park, Jang Min

    2012-06-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is a promising manufacturing technology for the net-shape production of small, complex, and precise metal or ceramic components. In order to manufacture high quality magnets using PIM, the magneto-rheological (MR) properties of the PIM feedstock, i.e. magnetic powder-binder mixture, should be investigated experimentally and theoretically. The current research aims at comprehensive understanding of the rheological characteristics of the PIM feedstock. The feedstock used in the experiment consists of strontium ferrite powder and paraffin wax. Steady and oscillatory shear tests have been carried out using a plate-and-plate rheometer, under the influence of a uniform magnetic field applied externally. Rheological properties of the PIM feedstock have been measured and characterized for various conditions by changing the temperature, the powder fraction and the magnetic flux density.

  16. EXPLICT CALULATIONS OF HOMOCLINIC TANGLES SURROUNDING MAGNETIC ISLANDS IN TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    ROEDER, R.K.W.; RAPOPORT, B.I.; EVANS, T.E.

    2002-06-01

    We present explicit calculations of the complicated geometric objects known as homoclinic tangles that surround magnetic islands in the Poincare mapping of a tokamak's magnetic field. These tangles are shown to exist generically in the magnetic field of all toroidal confinement systems. The geometry of these tangles provides an explanation for the stochasticity known to occur near the X-points of the Poincare mapping. Furthermore, the intersection of homoclinic tangles from different resonances provides an explicit mechanism for the non-diffusive transport of magnetic field lines between these resonance layers.

  17. Recovery of oscillatory magneto-resistance in phase separated La0.3Pr0.4Ca0.3MnO3 epitaxial thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagoz, H. S.; Jeon, J.; Mahmud, S. T.; Saber, M. M.; Prasad, B.; Egilmez, M.; Chow, K. H.; Jung, J.

    2013-12-01

    In-plane angular dependent magneto-resistance has been studied in La0.3Pr0.4Ca0.3MnO3 (LPCMO) manganite thin films deposited on the (100) oriented NdGaO3, and (001) oriented SrTiO3 and LaAlO3 substrates. At temperatures where the electronic phase separation is the strongest, a metastable irreversible state exists in the films whose resistivity ρ attains a large time dependent value. The ρ decreases sharply with an increasing angle θ between the magnetic field and the current, and does not display an expected oscillatory cos2θ /sin2θ dependence for all films. The regular oscillations are recovered during repetitive sweeping of θ between 0° and 180°. We discuss possible factors that could produce these unusual changes in the resistivity.

  18. Micromechanical measurement of beating patterns in the quantum oscillatory chemical potential of InGaAs quantum wells due to spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Florian Wilde, Marc A.; Heyn, Christian; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Schäpers, Thomas; Grundler, Dirk

    2015-08-31

    The quantum oscillatory magnetization M(B) and chemical potential μ(B) of a two-dimensional (2D) electron system provide important and complementary information about its ground state energy at low temperature T. We developed a technique that provides both quantities in the same cool-down process via a decoupled static operation and resonant excitation of a micromechanical cantilever. On InGaAs/InP heterostructures, we observed beating patterns in both M(B) and μ(B) attributed to spin-orbit interaction. A significantly enhanced sensitivity in μ enabled us to extract Rashba and Dresselhaus parameters with high accuracy. The technique is powerful for detailed investigations on the electronic properties of 2D materials.

  19. A permanent magnet tubular linear generator for wave energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Liu, Chunyuan; Yuan, Bang; Hu, Minqiang; Huang, Lei; Zhou, Shigui

    2012-04-01

    A novel three-phase permanent magnet tubular linear generator (PMTLG) with Halbach array is proposed for the sea wave energy conversion. Non-linear axi-symmetrical finite element method (FEM) is implemented to calculate the magnetic fields along air-gap for different Halbach arrays of PMTLGs. The PMTLG characteristics are analyzed and the simulation results are validated by the experiment. An assistant tooth is implemented to greatly minimize the end and cogging effects which cause the oscillatory detent force.

  20. Crystal growth under microgravity conditions with using of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feonychev, A.; Bondareva, N.

    The peculiarities of melt flows and crystal growth by the Bridgman and floating zone methods aboard spacecrafts under the action of steady axial or rotating magnetic field are considered. Steady magnetic field can minimize adverse effect of residual accelerations and vibrations on dopant segregation in crystals growing by the Bridgman method but it requires using strong magnetic fields, which induces specific oscillations. Under strong convection in terrestrial conditions steady magnetic field gives positive effect. Under growth of small-sized crystals by the floating zone method in microgravity conditions an use of steady magnetic field brings into dramatic increase of radial segregation due to convective vortex to free fluid surface. The flows being created by rotating magnetic field and resultant under combination of Marangoni convection with rotating magnetic field were studied for wide range of parameters including the regimes of oscillatory (turbulent) convection. Mathematical model and computer program was tested by published results of two experiments. The dependence of transition from laminar to oscillatory flow was obtained for different boundary conditions, geometric parameters of fluid and intensity of magnetic field. Specific oscillations with very low frequency and oscillations of the beating type had been discovered under the action rotating magnetic field on Marangoni convection. The mutual influence of rotating magnetic field and thermocapillary convection on flow stability was noted. Use of rotating magnetic field under crystal growth by floating zone method leads to reduction of azimuth velocity which is responsible for origin of oscillatory convection and striation of crystals. It was shown on concrete examples that there is a possibility to reduce radial segregation under optimization of rotating velocity and intensity of magnetic field. For the Bridgman method (in general for ampoule methods of crystal growth), the use of rotating magnetic

  1. Multiphase Oscillatory Flow Strategy for in Situ Measurement and Screening of Partition Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Coley, Connor W; Jensen, Klavs F

    2015-11-01

    Taking advantage of the difference between the surface energies of aqueous and organic solvents on a Teflon substrate, a fully automated small-scale strategy is developed on the basis of gas-driven oscillatory motion of a biphasic slug for high-throughput in situ measurement and screening of partition coefficients of organic substances between aqueous and organic phases. The developed oscillatory flow strategy enables single partition coefficient data point measurement within 8 min (including the sample preparation time) which is 360 times faster than the conventional "shake-flask" method, while using less than a 30 μL volume of the two phases and 9 nmol of the target organic substance. The developed multiphase strategy is validated using a conventional shake-flask technique. Finally, the developed strategy is extended to include automated screening of partition coefficients at physiological temperature. PMID:26436292

  2. Oscillatory Mass Transport in Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth of Sapphire Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sang Ho; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Kauffmann, Yaron; Kaplan, Wayne D.; Luo, Weidong; Rühle, Manfred; Scheu, Christina

    2010-10-01

    In vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, the liquid phase plays a pivotal role in mediating mass transport from the vapor source to the growth front of a nanowire. Such transport often takes place through the liquid phase. However, we observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy a different behavior for self-catalytic VLS growth of sapphire nanowires. The growth occurs in a layer-by-layer fashion and is accomplished by interfacial diffusion of oxygen through the ordered liquid aluminum atoms. Oscillatory growth and dissolution reactions at the top rim of the nanowires occur and supply the oxygen required to grow a new (0006) sapphire layer. A periodic modulation of the VLS triple-junction configuration accompanies these oscillatory reactions.

  3. Time variations of geopotential coefficients in the structure of the oscillatory process of the Earth's pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V. V.; Krylov, S. S.

    2014-11-01

    A numerical-analytical model of the oscillatory motion of the Earth's pole is proposed with allowance for effects of time variations in geopotential coefficients. The model is a natural refinement of the earlier developed main model of pole oscillations (of Chandler and annual components) by use of celestial mechanics methods and observation data of the gravitational field of the Earth. Based on amplitude-frequency analysis and numerical simulation of the pole motion, the model allows one to offer a qualitative explanation of observed irregular phenomena in the oscillatory process and improve the forecasting accuracy for the trajectory of the pole motion. The results of numerical simulation of oscillations of the pole coordinates are presented in comparison with observation and measurement data of the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS).

  4. Lower mass limit of an evolving interstellar cloud and chemistry in an evolving oscillatory cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarafdar, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous solution of the equation of motion, equation of state and energy equation including heating and cooling processes for interstellar medium gives for a collapsing cloud a lower mass limit which is significantly smaller than the Jeans mass for the same initial density. The clouds with higher mass than this limiting mass collapse whereas clouds with smaller than critical mass pass through a maximum central density giving apparently similar clouds (i.e., same Av, size and central density) at two different phases of its evolution (i.e., with different life time). Preliminary results of chemistry in such an evolving oscillatory cloud show significant difference in abundances of some of the molecules in two physically similar clouds with different life times. The problems of depletion and short life time of evolving clouds appear to be less severe in such an oscillatory cloud.

  5. Beta oscillations and reward processing: Coupling oscillatory activity and hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Mas-Herrero, Ernest; Ripollés, Pablo; HajiHosseini, Azadeh; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Marco-Pallarés, Josep

    2015-10-01

    Diverse cortical and subcortical regions are synergically engaged during reward processing. Previous studies using time-frequency decomposition of Electroencephalography (EEG) data have revealed an increase of mid-frontal beta oscillatory activity (BOA) after reward delivery, which could be a potential mechanism in the coordination of the different areas engaged during reward processing. In order to evaluate this hypothesis, twenty subjects performed a monetary gambling paradigm in two separate sessions (EEG and fMRI). Time-frequency oscillatory EEG data and fMRI activity were fused using Joint Independent Component Analysis (ICA). The present results showed that mid-frontal BOA elicited by monetary gains is associated with the engagement of a fronto-striatal-hippocampal network previously involved in reward-related memory enhancement, supporting the role of this activity during reward processing. PMID:26070260

  6. Oscillatory Mass Transport in Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth of Sapphire Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Sang Ho; Chisholm, Matthew F; Kauffmann, Yaron; Kaplan, Prof. Wayne D.; Luo, Weidong; Ruhle, M.; Scheu, Christina

    2010-01-01

    In vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, the liquid phase plays a pivotal role in mediating mass transport from the vapor source to the growth front of a nanowire. Such transport often takes place through the liquid phase. However, we observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy a different behavior for self-catalytic VLS growth of sapphire nanowires. The growth occurs in a layer-by-layer fashion and is accomplished by interfacial diffusion of oxygen through the ordered liquid aluminum atoms. Oscillatory growth and dissolution reactions at the top rim of the nanowires occur and supply the oxygen required to grow a new (0006) sapphire layer. A periodic modulation of the VLS triple-junction configuration accompanies these oscillatory reactions.

  7. A New Linear Oscillatory Actuator with Variable Characteristics Using Two Sets of Coils

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Fumiya; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Niguchi, Noboru; Kobayashi, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, electromagnetic linear oscillatory actuators are used as vibration control devices because of their high controllability. However, there is a problem that thrust and vibration are small at a wide drive frequency range. In order to improve this problem, we propose a new linear oscillatory actuator that can easily change its own characteristics by using two sets of coils. Through finite element analysis, large vibration was observed at 100 Hz in a series connection, and large vibration and high thrust were observed at 70 Hz and 140 Hz in a parallel connection. From these results, we verified that the actuator had two different characteristics due to switchable connections, and could generate high thrust and large vibration by smaller currents at a wide drive frequency range. PMID:26999136

  8. Age-related oscillatory theta modulation of multisensory integration in frontocentral regions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianyi; Bi, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Mengmeng; Wang, Wenhui; Yao, Zhiqi; Yang, Weiping; Wu, Jinglong

    2016-08-01

    This study used electroencephalogram measurements to investigate the effects of aging on oscillatory theta modulation during an audiovisual discrimination task. By a wavelet-based time-frequency analysis, age-related theta oscillation response differences were observed within a relatively restricted time range (0-500 ms) over frontal-central regions. Older adults showed stronger theta spectral power during visual and audiovisual stimuli in the left frontal regions; however, young adults showed stronger theta spectral power during auditory and audiovisual stimuli in the central regions. These findings suggest that multisensory oscillatory theta responses differ according to age, which further proves that the left frontal regions play an important role in audiovisual integration. PMID:27272690

  9. Counting of oscillatory modes of valence quarks forming q-q¯ mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabana, Sonia; Minkowski, Peter

    2016-03-01

    We present the unique properties of oscillatory modes of valence quarks (u,d,s) and antiquarks in mesons and the mass spectrum of associated mesons. The mesonic multiplets are shown to emerge from the picture of oscillating quarks and antiquarks in three space dimensions in the center of mass system of the mesons. All oscillatory modes are fully relativistic with a finite number of oscillators and this is forming the unique harmonic oscillator with these properties. The density of states as a function of masssquare is calculated. Since it is known that there are missing states of unobserved hadrons this estimate is of relevance for the accounting of the latter, as the here estimated mesonic multiplets include both the observed and the unobserved (or “missing”) hadrons. The estimate is conceptually different from Hagedorn’s model and is based on field theory of QCD.

  10. A New Linear Oscillatory Actuator with Variable Characteristics Using Two Sets of Coils.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Fumiya; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Niguchi, Noboru; Kobayashi, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, electromagnetic linear oscillatory actuators are used as vibration control devices because of their high controllability. However, there is a problem that thrust and vibration are small at a wide drive frequency range. In order to improve this problem, we propose a new linear oscillatory actuator that can easily change its own characteristics by using two sets of coils. Through finite element analysis, large vibration was observed at 100 Hz in a series connection, and large vibration and high thrust were observed at 70 Hz and 140 Hz in a parallel connection. From these results, we verified that the actuator had two different characteristics due to switchable connections, and could generate high thrust and large vibration by smaller currents at a wide drive frequency range. PMID:26999136

  11. Competition between drift and spatial defects leads to oscillatory and excitable dynamics of dissipative solitons.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rivas, P; Gomila, D; Matías, M A; Colet, P; Gelens, L

    2016-01-01

    We have reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 064103 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.110.064103 that in systems which otherwise do not show oscillatory dynamics, the interplay between pinning to a defect and pulling by drift allows the system to exhibit excitability and oscillations. Here we build on this work and present a detailed bifurcation analysis of the various dynamical instabilities that result from the competition between a pulling force generated by the drift and a pinning of the solitons to spatial defects. We show that oscillatory and excitable dynamics of dissipative solitons find their origin in multiple codimension-2 bifurcation points. Moreover, we demonstrate that the mechanisms leading to these dynamical regimes are generic for any system admitting dissipative solitons. PMID:26871077

  12. Distributed coupling complexity in a weakly coupled oscillatory network with associative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostorz, Kathrin; Hölzel, Robert W.; Krischer, Katharina

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel architecture of an oscillatory neural network capable of performing pattern recognition tasks. Two established strategies for obtaining associative properties in oscillatory networks invoke either a physical, time constant or a global, dynamical all-to-all coupling. Our network distributes the complexity of the coupling between the spatial and the temporal domain. Instead of {O}(N^2) physical connections or a global connection with {O}(N^2) frequency components, each of the N oscillators receives an individual coupling signal which is composed of N - 1 frequency components. We demonstrate that such a network can be built with analog electronic oscillators and possesses reliable pattern recognition properties. Theoretical analysis shows that the scalability is in fact superior to the dynamic global coupling approach, while its physical complexity is greatly reduced compared to the individual time constant coupling.

  13. Noise-induced standing waves in oscillatory systems with time-delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, Michael; Chattopadhyay, Amit K.

    2016-05-01

    In oscillatory reaction-diffusion systems, time-delay feedback can lead to the instability of uniform oscillations with respect to formation of standing waves. Here, we investigate how the presence of additive, Gaussian white noise can induce the appearance of standing waves. Combining analytical solutions of the model with spatiotemporal simulations, we find that noise can promote standing waves in regimes where the deterministic uniform oscillatory modes are stabilized. As the deterministic phase boundary is approached, the spatiotemporal correlations become stronger, such that even small noise can induce standing waves in this parameter regime. With larger noise strengths, standing waves could be induced at finite distances from the (deterministic) phase boundary. The overall dynamics is defined through the interplay of noisy forcing with the inherent reaction-diffusion dynamics.

  14. Characteristic oscillatory motion of a camphor boat sensitive to physicochemical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, S.; Yoshii, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Suematsu, N. J.

    2015-06-01

    A self-propelled camphor boat on water was investigated from the viewpoint of characteristic features of motion and mode-bifurcation depending on the diffusion length of camphor molecules. When a camphor disk was connected to the bottom of a larger plastic plate and then was placed on water, either oscillatory motion (repetition between rest and motion) or continuous motion was observed. In this paper, we report the novel features of this motion and mode-bifurcation as a function of the diffusion length of camphor molecules, e.g., multiple accelerations during oscillation, period-2 or irregular oscillatory motion, and reciprocating oscillation. These characteristic motion and mode-bifurcation are discussed in relation to the diffusion length of camphor molecules under the camphor boat and the development of camphor molecules from the camphor boat on water.

  15. Oscillatory barrier-assisted Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of large-scale quantum dot monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shicheng; Dadlani, Anup L.; Acharya, Shinjita; Schindler, Peter; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-03-01

    Depositing continuous, large-scale quantum dot films with low pinhole density is an inevitable but nontrivial step for studying their properties for applications in catalysis, electronic devices, and optoelectronics. This rising interest in high-quality quantum dot films has provided research impetus to improve the deposition technique. We show that by incorporating oscillatory barriers in the commonly used Langmuir-Blodgett method, large-scale monolayers of quantum dots with full coverage up to several millimeters have been achieved. With assistance of perturbation provided by the oscillatory barriers, the film has been shown to relax towards thermal equilibrium, and this physical process has been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. In addition, time evolution of dilatational moduli has been shown to give a clear indication of the film morphology and its stability.

  16. Signaling Diversity of PKA Achieved Via a Ca2+-cAMP-PKA Oscillatory Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qiang; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Aye-Han, Nwe-Nwe; Gao, Xinxin; Allen, Michael D.; Levchenko, Andre; Zhang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Many protein kinases are key nodal signaling molecules that regulate a wide range of cellular functions. These functions may require complex spatiotemporal regulation of kinase activities. Here, we show that Protein Kinase A (PKA), Ca2+ and cAMP oscillate in sync in insulin-secreting MIN6 β cells, forming a highly integrated oscillatory circuit. We found that PKA activity was essential for this oscillatory circuit, and was capable of not only initiating the signaling oscillations but also modulating their frequency, thereby diversifying the spatiotemporal control of downstream signaling. Our findings suggest that exquisite temporal control of kinase activity, mediated via signaling circuits resulting from cross-regulation of signaling pathways, can encode diverse inputs into temporal parameters such as oscillation frequency, which in turn contributes to proper regulation of complex cellular functions in a context-dependent manner. PMID:21102470

  17. Bursting dynamics in a population of oscillatory and excitable Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hens, Chittaranjan; Pal, Pinaki; Dana, Syamal K.

    2015-08-01

    We report an emergent bursting dynamics in a globally coupled network of mixed population of oscillatory and excitable Josephson junctions. The resistive-capacitive shunted junction (RCSJ) model of the superconducting device is considered for this study. We focus on the parameter regime of the junction where its dynamics is governed by the saddle-node on invariant circle (SNIC) bifurcation. For a coupling value above a threshold, the network splits into two clusters when a reductionism approach is applied to reproduce the bursting behavior of the large network. The excitable junctions effectively induce a slow dynamics on the oscillatory units to generate parabolic bursting in a broad parameter space. We reproduce the bursting dynamics in a mixed population of dynamical nodes of the Morris-Lecar model.

  18. Nanomechanical control of properties of biological membranes achieved by rodlike magnetic nanoparticles in a superlow-frequency magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Yu. I.; Klyachko, N. L.; Gribanovskii, S. L.; Golovin, D. Yu.; Samodurov, A. A.; Majouga, A. G.; Sokolsky-Papkov, M.; Kabanov, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    It is proposed to use single-domain rodlike magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as mediators for nanomechanical control of properties of biological membranes and cells on the molecular or cellular level by exposing them to a homogeneous nonheating low-frequency magnetic field (AC MF). The trigger effect is achieved due to rotatory-oscillatory motion of MNPs in the AC MF, which causes the needed deformations in macromolecules of the membrane interacting with these MNPs.

  19. Hydrodynamic parameters of micro porous media for steady and oscillatory flow: Application to cryocooler regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jeesung Jeff

    Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTC) are a class of rugged and high-endurance refrigeration systems that operate without a moving part at their low temperature ends, and are capable of easily reaching 120°K. These devices can also be configured in multiple stages to reach temperatures below 10 °K. PTCs are particularly suitable for applications in space, missile guiding systems, cryosurgery, medicine preservation, superconducting electronics, magnetic resonance imaging, weather observation, and liquefaction of nitrogen. Although various designs of PTCs have been in use for a few decades, they represent a dynamic and developmental field. PTCs ruggedness comes at the price of relatively low efficiency, however, and thus far they have been primarily used in high-end applications. They have the potential of extensive use in consumer products, however, should sufficiently higher efficiencies be achieved. Intense research competition is underway worldwide, and newer designs are continuously introduced. Some of the fundamental processes that are responsible for their performance are at best not fully understood, however, and consequently systematic modeling of PTC systems is difficult. Among the challenges facing the PTC research community, besides improvement in terms of system efficiency, is the possible miniaturization (total fluid volume of few cubic centimeters (cc)) of these systems. The operating characteristics of a PTC are significantly different from the conventional refrigeration cycles. A PTC implements the theory of oscillatory compression and expansion of the gas within a closed volume to achieve desired refrigeration. Regenerators and pulse tubes are often viewed as the two most complex and essential components in cryocoolers. An important deficiency with respect to the state of art models dealing with PTCs is the essentially total lack of understanding about the directional hydrodynamic and thermal transport parameters associated with periodic flow in

  20. Potassium conductance and oscillatory contractions in tail arteries from genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lamb, F S; Webb, R C

    1989-06-01

    Tail arteries isolated from the stroke-prone substrain of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-SP) exhibit oscillatory contractile responses to norepinephrine. Simultaneous recording of force generation and membrane potential (Em) has previously demonstrated that the contractile phase of these oscillations is associated with bursts of calcium-dependent action potentials. The smooth muscle cells are electrically quiescent during the relaxation phase of the oscillations. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that this quiescent period results from the stimulation of a calcium-activated potassium conductance (gKCa) in the cells responsible for triggering the bursting activity. Isolated tail artery strips from SHR-SP and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were prepared for measurement of isometric force generation or for simultaneous recording of force and Em. The channel-specific toxins apamin (4 x 10(-7) mol/l) and charybdotoxin (4.7 x 10(-8) did not alter the oscillatory pattern of contraction in response to norepinephrine. Oscillations were converted to sustained contraction by barium (10(-4) mmol), quinidine (5.8 x 10(-5) mmol) and elevation of extracellular potassium (20 mmol/l). Em recordings show that both potassium and barium convert bursting activity into tonic firing. Only 20 mmol/k+ caused significant depolarization in addition to that produced by norepinephrine. In contrast, quinidine appears to alter oscillatory behavior by interfering with calcium-spike generation. Norepinephrine-induced electrical activity is diminished in the presence of quinidine. These results suggest that potassium conductance plays an important role in controlling Em, electrical spiking and therefore oscillatory contractile activity in response to norepinephrine in the tail arteries of SHR-SP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2778313

  1. Oscillatory instability of Rayleigh-Marangoni-Bénard convection in two-layer liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q. S.; Zhou, B. H.; Tang, Z. M.

    2005-09-01

    The oscillatory behaviour of the Rayleigh-Marangoni-Bénard convective instability (R-M-B instability) regarding two combinations of two-layer fluid systems has been investigated theoretically and numerically. For the two-layer system of Silicone oil (10cSt) over Fluorinert (FC70), both linear instability analysis and 2D numerical simulation show that the instability of the system depends strongly on the depth ratio Hr = H 1/H 2 of the two-layer liquid. The oscillatory regime at the onset of R-M-B convection enlarges with reducing Γ = Ra /Ma values. In the two-layer system of Silicone oil (2cSt) over water, it loses its stability and onsets to steady convection at first, then the steady convection bifurcates to oscillatory convection with increasing Rayleigh number Ra. This behaviour was found through numerical simulation above the onset of steady convection in the case of Γ = 2.9, ɛ = (Ra - Rac ) / Rac = 1.0, and Hr = 0.5. Our findings are different from the previous study of the Rayleigh-Bénard instability and show the strong effects of the thermocapillary force at the interface on the time-dependent oscillations at or after the onset of convection. We propose a secondary oscillatory instability mechanism to explain the experimental observation of Degen et al. [Phys. Rev. E, 57 (1998), 6647-6659].

  2. On Exact Solutions for Oscillatory Flows in a Generalized Burgers Fluid with Slip Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Najam, Saher; Sajid, Muhammad; Ayub, Muhammad; Mesloub, Said

    2010-05-01

    An analysis is performed for the slip effects on the exact solutions of flows in a generalized Burgers fluid. The flow modelling is based upon the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nature of the fluid and modified Darcy law in a porous space. Two illustrative examples of oscillatory flows are considered. The results obtained are compared with several limiting cases. It has been shown here that the derived results hold for all values of frequencies including the resonant frequency.

  3. Oscope identifies oscillatory genes in unsynchronized single-cell RNA-seq experiments.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ning; Chu, Li-Fang; Barry, Chris; Li, Yuan; Choi, Jeea; Li, Xiaomao; Jiang, Peng; Stewart, Ron M; Thomson, James A; Kendziorski, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Oscillatory gene expression is fundamental to development, but technologies for monitoring expression oscillations are limited. We have developed a statistical approach called Oscope to identify and characterize the transcriptional dynamics of oscillating genes in single-cell RNA-seq data from an unsynchronized cell population. Applying Oscope to a number of data sets, we demonstrated its utility and also identified a potential artifact in the Fluidigm C1 platform. PMID:26301841

  4. Aging modulates the oscillatory dynamics underlying successful working memory encoding and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Proskovec, Amy L; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2016-06-01

    Working memory is central to the execution of many daily functions and is typically divided into three phases: encoding, maintenance, and retrieval. While working memory performance has been repeatedly shown to decline with age, less is known regarding the underlying neural processes. We examined age-related differences in the neural dynamics that serve working memory by recording high-density magnetoencephalography (MEG) in younger and older adults while they performed a modified, high-load Sternberg working memory task with letters as stimuli. MEG data were evaluated in the time-frequency domain and significant oscillatory responses were imaged using a beamformer. A hierarchical regression was performed to investigate whether age moderated the relationship between oscillatory activity and accuracy on the working memory task. Our results indicated that the spatiotemporal dynamics of oscillatory activity in language-related areas of the left fronto-temporal cortices were similar across groups. Age-related differences emerged during early encoding in the right-hemispheric homologue of Wernicke's area. Slightly later, group differences emerged in the homologue of Broca's area and these persisted throughout memory maintenance. Additionally, occipital alpha activity during maintenance was stronger, occurred earlier, and involved more cortical tissue in older adults. Finally, age significantly moderated the relationship between accuracy and neural activity in the prefrontal cortices. In younger adults, as prefrontal activity decreased, accuracy tended to increase. Our results are consistent with predictions of the compensation-related utilization of neural circuits hypothesis (CRUNCH). Such differences in the oscillatory dynamics could reflect compensatory mechanisms, which would aid working memory performance in older age. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2348-2361, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991358

  5. Chimeras in globally coupled oscillatory systems: From ensembles of oscillators to spatially continuous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lennart; Krischer, Katharina

    2015-06-01

    We study an oscillatory medium with a nonlinear global coupling that gives rise to a harmonic mean-field oscillation with constant amplitude and frequency. Two types of cluster states are found, each undergoing a symmetry-breaking transition towards a related chimera state. We demonstrate that the diffusional coupling is non-essential for these complex dynamics. Furthermore, we investigate localized turbulence and discuss whether it can be categorized as a chimera state.

  6. Oscillatory behavior in the size dependence of cluster mobility on metal surfaces: Rh on Rh(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Kellogg, G.L. )

    1994-09-26

    The mobility of Rh clusters containing two to twelve atoms adsorbed on the Rh(100) plane is examined by field ion microscopy. The activation energy of surface diffusion exhibits an interesting, oscillatory behavior as a function of cluster size. Compact geometric structures (squares and rectangles) have a consistently higher activation energy than structures with extra atoms at the periphery. The atomic-level mechanism involved in cluster diffusion is inferred from a comparison of the measured activation energies to previous theoretical calculations.

  7. Free vibrations and buckling analysis of laminated plates by oscillatory radial basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, A. M. A.; Ferreira, A. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the free vibrations and buckling analysis of laminated plates is performed using a global meshless method. A refined version of Kant's theorie which accounts for transverse normal stress and through-the-thickness deformation is used. The innovation is the use of oscillatory radial basis functions. Numerical examples are performed and results are presented and compared to available references. Such functions proved to be an alternative to the tradicional nonoscillatory radial basis functions.

  8. Calcium response in osteocytic networks under steady and oscillatory fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Lu, X Lucas; Huo, Bo; Park, Miri; Guo, X Edward

    2012-09-01

    The fluid flow in the lacunar-canalicular system of bone is an essential mechanical stimulation on the osteocyte networks. Due to the complexity of human physical activities, the fluid shear stress on osteocyte bodies and processes consists of both steady and oscillatory components. In this study, we investigated and compared the intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) responses of osteocytic networks under steady and oscillatory fluid flows. An in vitro osteocytic network was built with MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells using micro-patterning techniques to simulate the in vivo orderly organization of osteocyte networks. Sinusoidal oscillating fluid flow or unidirectional steady flow was applied on the cell surface with 2Pa peak shear stress. It was found that the osteocytic networks were significantly more responsive to steady flow than to oscillatory flow. The osteocytes can release more calcium peaks with higher magnitudes at a faster speed under steady flow stimulation. The [Ca(2+)](i) signaling transients under the steady and oscillatory flows have significantly different spatiotemporal characters, but a similar responsive percentage of cells. Further signaling pathway studies using inhibitors showed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store, extracellular calcium source, ATP, PGE(2) and NO related pathways play similar roles in the [Ca(2+)](i) signaling of osteocytes under either steady or oscillating flow. The spatiotemporal characteristics of [Ca(2+)](i) transients under oscillating fluid flow are affected more profoundly by pharmacological treatments than under the steady flow. Our findings support the hypothesis that the [Ca(2+)](i) responses of osteocytic networks are significantly dependent on the profiles of fluid flow. PMID:22750013

  9. Optimized fourth-order Runge-Kutta method for solving oscillatory problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Kasim; Ismail, Fudziah; Senu, Norazak; Rabiei, Faranak

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we develop a Runge-Kutta method with invalidation of phase lag, phase lag's derivatives and amplification error to solve second-order initial value problem (IVP) with oscillating solutions. The new method depends on the explicit Runge-Kutta method of algebraic order four. Numerical tests from its implementation to well-known oscillatory problems illustrate the robustness and competence of the new method as compared to the well-known Runge-Kutta methods in the scientific literature.

  10. Low-frequency acoustic atomization with oscillatory flow around micropillars in a microfluidic device

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yin Nee E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Wong, Teck Neng E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Nguyen, Nam Trung

    2014-10-06

    This letter reports a low frequency acoustic atomization technique with oscillatory extensional flow around micropillars. Large droplets passing through two micropillars are elongated. Small droplets are then produced through the pinch-off process at the spindle-shape ends. As the actuation frequency increases, the droplet size decreases with increasing monodispersity. This method is suitable for in-situ mass production of fine droplets in a multi-phase environment without external pumping. Small particles encapsulation was demonstrated with the current technique.

  11. Frequency response of axisymmetric liquid bridges to an oscillatory microgravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, J. A.

    1991-10-01

    The dynamical response of nearly-cylindrical liquid bridges when subjected to an oscillatory microgravity field has been studied. The analysis has been performed by using a linear three-dimensional model, valid for columns of arbitrary slenderness. Theoretical results are presented and compared with previous ones of a one-dimensional slice model showing that the validity of the slice model is restricted to slender columns.

  12. An asymptotic expansion of the Kontorovich-Lebedev transform of damped oscillatory functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, D.

    2002-08-01

    An asymptotic expansion valid for large positive values of s is constructed for the integral transformwhere Kis(x) denotes the modified Bessel function of the third kind of purely imaginary order. The expansion applies to functions f(x) that are analytic in the sector arg(x)[less-than-or-equals, slant][pi]/4 and that are exponentially damped and oscillatory as x-->[infinity] in this sector.

  13. Heat transfer in oscillatory flow. Progress report, January 1983-December 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Telionis, D.P.; Diller, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Progress is reported in work with a water tunnel facility and wind tunnel facilities used to study heat transfer in oscillatory flow. Work on both facilities include construction and modifications of the facilities themselves, instrumentation and data acquisition, and experimental measurements. A computer code was developed for the calculation of steady and unsteady heat transfer over the attached portion of the boundary layer. The equations of momentum and energy were recast in their finite-difference form. (LEW)

  14. Echogenicity variations from porcine blood II: the "bright ring" under oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Dong-Guk; Chiao, Richard Y; Shung, K Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Echogenicity variations from porcine blood were observed in a mock flow loop under pulsatile flow in a series of experiments (Paeng et al. 2004). In this paper, oscillatory flow was generated to further investigate the cyclic and radial variation of blood echogenicity and its origin and mechanisms by several parameters, including stroke volume, stroke rate, mean steady flow and transducer angle, using a GE LOGIQ 700 Expert system. The echogenicity at the center of the tube was enhanced during acceleration and lower during deceleration, and the expansion and collapse of the "bright ring" was observed twice per cycle. The "black hole," a central echo-poor zone surrounded by a hyperechoic zone, was barely observable under oscillatory flow, and these patterns differed from those under pulsatile flow. The cyclic and radial variation of echogenicity under oscillatory flow was affected by such hemodynamic parameters as stroke volume, stroke rate and mean steady flow. It was suggested that rouleaux might be aligned at an angle of about 25 degrees relative to the tube axis during the acceleration phase, based on the experimental results reaching a maximum of the echogenicity variation at a transducer angle of 25 degrees. Radial distribution of rouleaux alignments was proposed to be another important factor to blood echogenicity variation, in addition to combined effects of shear rate and flow acceleration on erythrocyte aggregation and blood echogenicity. The weak cyclic variation of echogenicity was also observed from the porcine erythrocyte suspensions under pure oscillatory flow, but not under pulsatile flow. It is postulated that the echogenicity variations from erythrocyte suspensions are from red cell deformation. PMID:15219961

  15. Pseudospin symmetry for a new oscillatory ring-shaped noncentral potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Mincang; Huangfu Guoqing

    2011-05-15

    A new oscillatory ring-shaped noncentral potential is proposed and the pseudospin symmetry for this potential is investigated by solving the Dirac equation with equally mixed scalar and vector potentials with opposite signs. The spinor wave functions and the energy spectrum for the bound states are obtained by using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method. The effect of angle-dependent part on the radial solutions and the algebraic property of the energy equation are discussed.

  16. Analysis of an oscillatory oil squeeze film containing a central gas bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, S.; Etsion, I.

    1985-01-01

    A squeeze-film damper, consisting of two circular plates, having only normal oscillatory relative motion is considered. The liquid lubricant between the plates is assumed to contain a single central gas bubble. The effect of the bubble on the damper performance is analyzed. Comparison is made with the performance of a pure liquid damper. Substantial deviations in peak dynamic pressures are predicted which explain discrepancies between experimental and theoretical results reported in the literature.

  17. Beta and gamma oscillatory activities associated with olfactory memory tasks: different rhythms for different functional networks?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claire; Ravel, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory processing in behaving animals, even at early stages, is inextricable from top down influences associated with odor perception. The anatomy of the olfactory network (olfactory bulb, piriform, and entorhinal cortices) and its unique direct access to the limbic system makes it particularly attractive to study how sensory processing could be modulated by learning and memory. Moreover, olfactory structures have been early reported to exhibit oscillatory population activities easy to capture through local field potential recordings. An attractive hypothesis is that neuronal oscillations would serve to “bind” distant structures to reach a unified and coherent perception. In relation to this hypothesis, we will assess the functional relevance of different types of oscillatory activity observed in the olfactory system of behaving animals. This review will focus primarily on two types of oscillatory activities: beta (15–40 Hz) and gamma (60–100 Hz). While gamma oscillations are dominant in the olfactory system in the absence of odorant, both beta and gamma rhythms have been reported to be modulated depending on the nature of the olfactory task. Studies from the authors of the present review and other groups brought evidence for a link between these oscillations and behavioral changes induced by olfactory learning. However, differences in studies led to divergent interpretations concerning the respective role of these oscillations in olfactory processing. Based on a critical reexamination of those data, we propose hypotheses on the functional involvement of beta and gamma oscillations for odor perception and memory. PMID:25002840

  18. LES-based characterization of a suction and oscillatory blowing fluidic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a novel fluidic actuator using steady suction and oscillatory blowing was developed for control of turbulent flows. The suction and oscillatory blowing (SaOB) actuator combines steady suction and pulsed oscillatory blowing into a single device. The actuation is based upon a self-sustained mechanism of confined jets and does not require any moving parts. The control output is determined by a pressure source and the geometric details, and no additional input is needed. While its basic mechanisms have been investigated to some extent, detailed characteristics of internal turbulent flows are not well understood. In this study, internal flows of the SaOB actuator are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES). Flow characteristics within the actuator are described in detail for a better understanding of the physical mechanisms and improving the actuator design. LES predicts the self-sustained oscillations of the turbulent jet. Switching frequency, maximum velocity at the actuator outlets, and wall pressure distribution are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The computational results are used to develop simplified boundary conditions for numerical experiments of active flow control. Supported by the Boeing company.

  19. Accelerating oscillatory fronts in a nonlinear sonic vacuum with strong nonlocal effects.

    PubMed

    Gendelman, O V; Zolotarevskiy, V; Savin, A V; Bergman, L A; Vakakis, A F

    2016-03-01

    We describe and explore accelerating oscillatory fronts in sonic vacua with nonlocal interactions. As an example, a chain of particles oscillating in the plane and coupled by linear springs, with fixed ends, is considered. When one end of this system is harmonically excited in the transverse direction, one observes accelerated propagation of the excitation front, accompanied by an almost monochromatic oscillatory tail. Position of the front obeys the scaling law l(t) ∼ t(4/3). The frequency of the oscillatory tail remains constant, and the wavelength scales as λ ∼ t(1/3). These scaling laws result from the nonlocal effects; we derive them analytically (including the scaling coefficients) from a continuum approximation. Moreover, a certain threshold excitation amplitude is required in order to initiate the front propagation. The initiation threshold is evaluated on the basis of a simplified discrete model, further reduced to a completely integrable nonlinear system. Given their simplicity, nonlinear sonic vacua of the type considered herein should be common in periodic lattices. PMID:27078353

  20. Dynamics of Concentrated Silica Suspension under Oscillatory Shear Studied by SAXS and XPCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonghun; Lin, Xiao-Min; Sandy, Alec; Narayanan, Suresh; X-ray Science Division Team; CenterNanomaterials Team

    2015-03-01

    The viscoelastic properties of complex fluids are often obtained by applying small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS). In this regime, their microstructure does not change by shear, and the shear stress linearly responds to the applied strain. However, in the real application, high shear strain or rate is applied, where the viscoelastic properties are affected by the microstructural deformation by this high shear. The rheological behavior of complex fluids under large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) has been widely studied, but there is a lack of studies in microscopic dynamics of complex fluids under LAOS. X-ray scattering is a suitable method to understand microscopic perspective of rheology because of its proper length scales of tens to hundreds nm and time scales of millisecond to thousands second. Here, we studied the dynamics of the concentrated silica nanoparticle suspensions in PEG under different shear strain regimes using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). With strain increasing, these suspensions showed shear thinning and shear thickening behavior, and their microstructural change was observed by SAXS. In oscillatory shear, as the original scattering volume periodically comes back to the original position, we could better study the changes in autocorrelation function by shear and diffusion than steady shear study where correlation decays by transit.

  1. Laboratory Observations of Sand Ripple Evolution in a Small Oscillatory Flow Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Palmsten, M. L.; Chu, J.; Landry, B. J.; Penko, A.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of sand ripples are vital to understanding numerous coastal processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, boundary layer development, and seafloor acoustic properties. Experimental work was conducted in a small oscillatory flow tunnel at the Sediment Dynamics Laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center. Six different monochromatic oscillatory forcings, three with velocity asymmetry and three without, were used to investigate sand ripple dynamics using a unimodal grain size distribution with D50=0.65 mm. The experiments represent an extension of previous work using bimodal grain size distributions. A DSLR camera with a 180-degree fisheye lens collected images of the sediment bed profile every 2 seconds to resolve changes in ripple geometries and migration rates resulting from the different flow conditions for over 127 hours (229,388 images). Matlab © algorithms undistorted the fisheye images and quantified the ripple geometries, wavelengths, heights, and migration rates as a function of flow forcing. The mobility number was kept nearly constant by increasing and decreasing the semi-excursion amplitude and the wave frequency, respectively. We observed distinct changes in ripple geometry and migration rate for the pair of oscillatory forcings having nearly identical mobility numbers. The results suggested that the commonly used mobility number might not be appropriate to characterize ripple geometry or migration rates.

  2. Characterization of Oscillatory Boundary Layer Over a Closely Packed Bed of Sediment Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skitka, Joseph; Apte, Sourabh

    2012-11-01

    Lack of accurate criteria for onset of incipient motion and sediment pickup function remain two of the biggest hurdles in developing better predictive models for sediment transport. To study pickup and transport of sediment, it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the small amplitude oscillatory flow over the sediment layer near the sea bed. Fully resolved direct numerical simulations are performed using fictitious domain approach (Apte et al., JCP 2009) to investigate the effect of a sinusoidally oscillating flow field over a rough wall made of regular hexagonal pack of spherical particles. The flow arrangement is similar to the experimental data of Keiller & Sleath (JFM 1976). Transitional and turbulent flows at Reδ = 50 , 100 , 150 , 200 (based on the Stokes layer thickness, delta) are explored over a range of non-dimensional sphere sizes. The coherent vortex structures, turbulent cross-correlations and lift forces on the roughness elements are characterized for these flow conditions and compared against available data of Keiller & Sleath (JFM 1976) and Sleath (JFM 1986). The dynamics of the oscillatory flow over the sediment bed is used to understand the mechanism of sediment pick-up. Funding: NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows: Fully Resolved Numerical Experiments and Modeling.

  3. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stone, David B; Coffman, Brian A; Bustillo, Juan R; Aine, Cheryl J; Stephen, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46) and healthy controls (N = 57) using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25414652

  4. Good vibrations, bad vibrations: Oscillatory brain activity in the attentional blink

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Jolanda; Kranczioch, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB) is a deficit in reporting the second (T2) of two targets (T1, T2) when presented in close temporal succession and within a stream of distractor stimuli. The AB has received a great deal of attention in the past two decades because it allows to study the mechanisms that influence the rate and depth of information processing in various setups and therefore provides an elegant way to study correlates of conscious perception in supra-threshold stimuli. Recently evidence has accumulated suggesting that oscillatory signals play a significant role in temporally coordinating information between brain areas. This review focuses on studies looking into oscillatory brain activity in the AB. The results of these studies indicate that the AB is related to modulations in oscillatory brain activity in the theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands. These modulations are sometimes restricted to a circumscribed brain area but more frequently include several brain regions. They occur before targets are presented as well as after the presentation of the targets. We will argue that the complexity of the findings supports the idea that the AB is not the result of a processing impairment in one particular process or brain area, but the consequence of a dynamic interplay between several processes and/or parts of a neural network. PMID:22253672

  5. Shaken, and stirred: oscillatory segmented flow for controlled size-evolution of colloidal nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Oskooei, Ali; Klinkova, Anna; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Günther, Axel

    2014-07-01

    We introduce oscillatory segmented flow as a compact microfluidic format that accommodates slow chemical reactions for the solution-phase processing of colloidal nanomaterials. The strategy allows the reaction progress to be monitored at a dynamic range of up to 80 decibels (i.e., residence times of up to one day, equivalent to 720-14,400 times the mixing time) from only one sensing location. A train of alternating gas bubbles and liquid reaction compartments (segmented flow) was initially formed, stopped and then subjected to a consistent back-and-forth motion. The oscillatory segmented flow was obtained by periodically manipulating the pressures at the device inlet and outlet via square wave signals generated by non-wetted solenoid valves. The readily implementable format significantly reduced the device footprint as compared with continuous segmented flow. We investigated mixing enhancement for varying liquid segment lengths, oscillation amplitudes and oscillation frequencies. The etching of gold nanorods served as a case study to illustrate the utility of the approach for dynamic characterization and precise control of colloidal nanomaterial size and shape for 5 h. Oscillatory segmented flows will be beneficial for a broad range of lab-on-a-chip applications that require long processing times. PMID:24828153

  6. Oscillatory Shear Alignment and Rheology of a Main-chain Thermotropic Liquid Crystalline Polymer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornfield, Julia A.; Zhou, Weijun; Ugaz, Victor M.; Vaish, Nitin; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2000-03-01

    Orientational flipping is well known in lamellar block copolymers under oscillatory shear. For thermotropic LCPs, two different orientation states have also been reported under steady shear -- oriented either along the flow direction (``parallel'') or along the vorticity direction (``perpendicular''). Here we examine the oscillatory shear behavior of a model thermotropic LCP (DHMS-7,9, T_m=90^circC, T_xn=120^circC, T_ni=192^circC, where T_xn is the transition temperature between an unidentified mesophase ``Phase X'' to nematic phase), which exhibits this type of orientational flipping. Systematic studies have been carried out on DHMS-7,9 as a function of temperature, frequency, and strain amplitude. In the nematic phase, oscillatory shear induces parallel alignment. However, in Phase X, qualitatively different alignment behavior was observed: low frequency and large strain amplitude promote perpendicular alignment, while high frequency and small strain amplitude induce parallel orientation. A possible explanation of this anomalous shear alignment behavior will be provided.

  7. A Hybrid Oscillatory Interference/Continuous Attractor Network Model of Grid Cell Firing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Grid cells in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex exhibit remarkably regular spatial firing patterns that tessellate all environments visited by the animal. Two theoretical mechanisms that could generate this spatially periodic activity pattern have been proposed: oscillatory interference and continuous attractor dynamics. Although a variety of evidence has been cited in support of each, some aspects of the two mechanisms are complementary, suggesting that a combined model may best account for experimental data. The oscillatory interference model proposes that the grid pattern is formed from linear interference patterns or “periodic bands” in which velocity-controlled oscillators integrate self-motion to code displacement along preferred directions. However, it also allows the use of symmetric recurrent connectivity between grid cells to provide relative stability and continuous attractor dynamics. Here, we present simulations of this type of hybrid model, demonstrate that it generates intracellular membrane potential profiles that closely match those observed in vivo, addresses several criticisms aimed at pure oscillatory interference and continuous attractor models, and provides testable predictions for future empirical studies. PMID:24695724

  8. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Stone, David B.; Coffman, Brian A.; Bustillo, Juan R.; Aine, Cheryl J.; Stephen, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46) and healthy controls (N = 57) using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25414652

  9. Oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity of fed and starved rats.

    PubMed

    Kotlar, T J; Borensztajn, J

    1977-10-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was measured at short time intervals in cardiac and skeletal muscles of normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats fed ad libitum or deprived of food. In normal animals fed ad libitum, lipoprotein lipase activities of heart, diaphragm, soleus, and fast-twitch red fibers of the quadriceps muscle showed rhythmic oscillations that appeared to coincide with the nocturnal feeding habits of the animals. During the day (7 A.M. to 7 P.M.), when food consumption by the rats was greatly reduced, lipoprotein lipase activity in all muscles increased, followed by a decline to basal levels during the night. Similar oscillatory changes in lipoprotein lipase activity were observed in the muscles of diabetic rats fed ad libitum. In normal rats deprived of food, however, the oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity were not abolished and persisted for at least 48 h. In diabetic rats starved during a 48-h period, the oscillatory changes in muscle lipoprotein lipase activity were markedly altered. In all animals, muscle lipoprotein lipase activities were not correlated to plasma glucagon levels. PMID:143895

  10. EEG Oscillatory States: Universality, Uniqueness and Specificity across Healthy-Normal, Altered and Pathological Brain Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fingelkurts, Alexander A.; Fingelkurts, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time the dynamic repertoires and oscillatory types of local EEG states in 13 diverse conditions (examined over 9 studies) that covered healthy-normal, altered and pathological brain states were quantified within the same methodological and conceptual framework. EEG oscillatory states were assessed by the probability-classification analysis of short-term EEG spectral patterns. The results demonstrated that brain activity consists of a limited repertoire of local EEG states in any of the examined conditions. The size of the state repertoires was associated with changes in cognition and vigilance or neuropsychopathologic conditions. Additionally universal, optional and unique EEG states across 13 diverse conditions were observed. It was demonstrated also that EEG oscillations which constituted EEG states were characteristic for different groups of conditions in accordance to oscillations’ functional significance. The results suggested that (a) there is a limit in the number of local states available to the cortex and many ways in which these local states can rearrange themselves and still produce the same global state and (b) EEG individuality is determined by varying proportions of universal, optional and unique oscillatory states. The results enriched our understanding about dynamic microstructure of EEG-signal. PMID:24505292

  11. Experimental Investigation of Oscillatory Flow Pressure and Pressure Drop Through Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Wang, Meng; Gedeon, David

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate the oscillatory flow pressure and pressure drop through complex geometries. These experiments were conducted at the CSU-SLRE facility which is a horizontally opposed, two-piston, single-acting engine with a split crankshaft driving mechanism. Flow through a rectangular duct, with no insert (obstruction), was studied first. Then four different inserts were examined: Abrupt, Manifold, Diverging Short and Diverging Long. The inserts were mounted in the center of the rectangular duct to represent different type of geometries that could be encountered in Stirling machines. The pressure and pressure drop of the oscillating flow was studied for: 1) different inserts, 2) different phase angle between the two pistons of the engine (zero, 90 lead, 180, and 90 lag), and 3) for different piston frequencies (5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz). It was found that the pressure drop of the oscillatory flow increases with increasing Reynolds number. The pressure drop was shown to be mainly due to the gas inertia for the case of oscillatory flow through a rectangular duct with no insert. On the other hand, for the cases with different inserts into the rectangular duct, the pressure drop has three sources: inertia, friction, and local losses. The friction pressure drop is only a small fraction of the total pressure drop. It was also shown that the dimensionless pressure drop decreases with increasing kinetic Reynolds number.

  12. Accelerating oscillatory fronts in a nonlinear sonic vacuum with strong nonlocal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendelman, O. V.; Zolotarevskiy, V.; Savin, A. V.; Bergman, L. A.; Vakakis, A. F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe and explore accelerating oscillatory fronts in sonic vacua with nonlocal interactions. As an example, a chain of particles oscillating in the plane and coupled by linear springs, with fixed ends, is considered. When one end of this system is harmonically excited in the transverse direction, one observes accelerated propagation of the excitation front, accompanied by an almost monochromatic oscillatory tail. Position of the front obeys the scaling law l (t ) ˜t4 /3 . The frequency of the oscillatory tail remains constant, and the wavelength scales as λ ˜t1 /3 . These scaling laws result from the nonlocal effects; we derive them analytically (including the scaling coefficients) from a continuum approximation. Moreover, a certain threshold excitation amplitude is required in order to initiate the front propagation. The initiation threshold is evaluated on the basis of a simplified discrete model, further reduced to a completely integrable nonlinear system. Given their simplicity, nonlinear sonic vacua of the type considered herein should be common in periodic lattices.

  13. Recovery of an oscillatory mode of batch yeast growth in water for a pure culture.

    PubMed

    Vadasz, A S; Vadasz, P; Abashar, M E; Gupthar, A S

    2001-12-30

    New experiments that we conducted show an oscillatory mode of batch yeast growth in water, for a pure culture of the T206 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The oscillations are damped over time, allowing the cell concentration to stabilize at the stationary equilibrium. A new proposed model that includes the complete cell growth dynamics is introduced and showed to recover the experimental oscillatory results. In addition the proposed model recovers effects that are frequently encountered in experiments such as a "Lag Phase" as well as an inflection point in the "ln curve" of the cell concentration. The proposed model recovers also the Logistic Growth Curve as a special case. For purposes of providing some interesting contrast we present additional experimental as well as computational results for the growth of the VIN7 strain of S. cerevisiae in a 5% grape juice medium. The latter indicates even stronger oscillations during the growth process. In order to capture experimentally the oscillatory growth behavior, very frequent readings are required (every 15-30 min) and the measurement process needs to be extended to longer than usual periods (over 250 h). PMID:11789940

  14. Loss of regular oscillatory insulin secretion in islet cell antibody positive non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Bingley, P J; Matthews, D R; Williams, A J; Bottazzo, G F; Gale, E A

    1992-01-01

    Basal insulin secretion was compared in nine islet-cell antibody positive, non-diabetic first-degree relatives of children with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and nine normal control subjects matched for age, sex and weight. Acute insulin responses to a 25 g intravenous glucose tolerance test were similar in the two groups (243 (198-229) vs 329 (285-380) mU.l-1 x 10 min-1, mean (+/- SE), p = 0.25). Fasting plasma insulin was assayed in venous samples taken at one min intervals for 2 h. Time series analysis was used to demonstrate oscillatory patterns in plasma insulin. Autocorrelation showed that regular oscillatory activity was generally absent in the islet-cell antibody-positive group, whereas a regular 13 min cycle was shown in control subjects (p less than 0.0001). Fourier transformation did, however, show a 13 min spectral peak in the islet-cell antibody positive group, consistent with intermittent pulsatility. We conclude that overall oscillatory patterns of basal insulin secretion are altered in islet-cell antibody positive subjects even when the acute insulin response is within the normal range. PMID:1541379

  15. A meta-analytic study of exogenous oscillatory electric potentials in neuroenhancement.

    PubMed

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Wischnewski, Miles

    2016-06-01

    The assumption that transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) enhances perceptual and cognitive ability in healthy volunteers by exposing the brain to exogenous oscillatory electric fields is increasingly finding its way into society and commercial parties. The aim of the present study is to quantify the effects of exogenous oscillatory electric field potentials on neuroenhancement in healthy volunteers. The meta-analysis included fifty-one sham controlled experiments that investigated the effects of tACS on perception and cognitive performance. Results from random effects modelling of the cumulative effect size showed small, but robust perceptual and cognitive enhancement in healthy participants to weak exogenous oscillatory electric field potentials. Analyses of tACS parameters indicate that simultaneous stimulation of the anterior and posterior locations of the scalp at >1mA intensity currently has the highest probability of increasing performance. However, technical and methodological issues currently limit the applicability of tACS in neuroenhancement. Additional research is needed to further evaluate the potential of tACS in perception and cognitive ability, and to establish the contexts and parameters under which tACS is effective. PMID:27085766

  16. An active damping control of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases by singular perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Huang, Z. Z.; Huang, P. H.

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with active damping control problems of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases. A first investigation of two-time scale fuzzy logic controller with vibration stabilizer for such structures has been proposed, where the dynamics of a robotic system is strongly affected by disturbances due to the base oscillation. Under the assumption of two-time scale, its stability and design procedures are presented for a multiple link manipulator with multiple dimension oscillation. The fast-subsystem controller will damp out the vibration of the oscillatory bases using a PD control method. Hence, the slow-subsystem fuzzy logic controller dominates the trajectory tracking. It can be guaranteed the stability of the internal dynamics by adding a boundary-layer correction based on singular perturbations approach. Experimental results have shown that the proposed control model offers several implementation advantages such as reduced effect of overshoot and chattering, smaller steady state error, and a fast convergent rate. The results of this study can be feasible to various mechanical systems, such as mobile robot, gantry cranes, underwater robot, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases.

  17. Reversibility and hysteresis of the sharp yielding transition of a colloidal glass under oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Dang, M T; Denisov, D; Struth, B; Zaccone, A; Schall, P

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical response of glasses remains challenging to understand. Recent results indicate that the oscillatory rheology of soft glasses is accompanied by a sharp non-equilibrium transition in the microscopic dynamics. Here, we use simultaneous x-ray scattering and rheology to investigate the reversibility and hysteresis of the sharp symmetry change from anisotropic solid to isotropic liquid dynamics observed in the oscillatory shear of colloidal glasses (D. Denisov, M.T. Dang, B. Struth, A. Zaccone, P. Schall, Sci. Rep. 5 14359 (2015)). We use strain sweeps with increasing and decreasing strain amplitude to show that, in analogy with equilibrium transitions, this sharp symmetry change is reversible and exhibits systematic frequency-dependent hysteresis. Using the non-affine response formalism of amorphous solids, we show that these hysteresis effects arise from frequency-dependent non-affine structural cage rearrangements at large strain. These results consolidate the first-order-like nature of the oscillatory shear transition and quantify related hysteresis effects both via measurements and theoretical modelling. PMID:27106107

  18. Global and local oscillatory entrainment of visual behavior across retinotopic space.

    PubMed

    Sokoliuk, Rodika; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing brain oscillations (7-10 Hz) modulate visual perception; in particular, their precise phase can predict target perception. Here, we employ this phase-dependence of perception in a psychophysical experiment to track spatial properties of entrained oscillations of visual perception across the visual field. Is this entrainment local, or a more global phenomenon? If the latter, does oscillatory phase synchronize over space, or vary with increasing distance from the oscillatory source? We presented a disc stimulus in the upper left quadrant, oscillating in luminance at different frequencies (individual alpha frequency (IAF), 5 Hz, and 15 Hz) to entrain an oscillation with specific frequency and spatial origin. Observers fixated centrally, while flash stimuli at perceptual threshold appeared at different positions and times with respect to the oscillating stimulus. IAF and 5 Hz luminance oscillations modulated detection performance at all tested positions, whereas at 15 Hz, the effect was weaker and less consistent. Furthermore, for IAF and 5 Hz entrainment, preferred phases for target detection differed significantly between spatial locations, suggesting "local" entrainment of detection performance next to the oscillatory source, whereas more distant target locations shared a "global" effect with a significantly different phase. This unexpected global component of entrainment is tentatively attributed to widespread connectivity from thalamic nuclei such as the pulvinar. PMID:27126642

  19. Global and local oscillatory entrainment of visual behavior across retinotopic space

    PubMed Central

    Sokoliuk, Rodika; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing brain oscillations (7–10 Hz) modulate visual perception; in particular, their precise phase can predict target perception. Here, we employ this phase-dependence of perception in a psychophysical experiment to track spatial properties of entrained oscillations of visual perception across the visual field. Is this entrainment local, or a more global phenomenon? If the latter, does oscillatory phase synchronize over space, or vary with increasing distance from the oscillatory source? We presented a disc stimulus in the upper left quadrant, oscillating in luminance at different frequencies (individual alpha frequency (IAF), 5 Hz, and 15 Hz) to entrain an oscillation with specific frequency and spatial origin. Observers fixated centrally, while flash stimuli at perceptual threshold appeared at different positions and times with respect to the oscillating stimulus. IAF and 5 Hz luminance oscillations modulated detection performance at all tested positions, whereas at 15 Hz, the effect was weaker and less consistent. Furthermore, for IAF and 5 Hz entrainment, preferred phases for target detection differed significantly between spatial locations, suggesting “local” entrainment of detection performance next to the oscillatory source, whereas more distant target locations shared a “global” effect with a significantly different phase. This unexpected global component of entrainment is tentatively attributed to widespread connectivity from thalamic nuclei such as the pulvinar. PMID:27126642

  20. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase and NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial superoxide production in response to oscillatory shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, J. Scott; Davis, Michael E.; Giddens, Don P.; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Dikalov, Sergey; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Oscillatory shear stress occurs at sites of the circulation that are vulnerable to atherosclerosis. Because oxidative stress contributes to atherosclerosis, we sought to determine whether oscillatory shear stress increases endothelial production of reactive oxygen species and to define the enzymes responsible for this phenomenon. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to static, laminar (15 dyn/cm2), and oscillatory shear stress (+/-15 dyn/cm2). Oscillatory shear increased superoxide (O2.-) production by more than threefold over static and laminar conditions as detected using electron spin resonance (ESR). This increase in O2*- was inhibited by oxypurinol and culture of endothelial cells with tungsten but not by inhibitors of other enzymatic sources. Oxypurinol also prevented H2O2 production in response to oscillatory shear stress as measured by dichlorofluorescin diacetate and Amplex Red fluorescence. Xanthine-dependent O2*- production was increased in homogenates of endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear stress. This was associated with decreased xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) protein levels and enzymatic activity resulting in an elevated ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) to XDH. We also studied endothelial cells lacking the p47phox subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidase. These cells exhibited dramatically depressed O2*- production and had minimal XO protein and activity. Transfection of these cells with p47phox restored XO protein levels. Finally, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, prolonged inhibition of the NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin decreased XO protein levels and prevented endothelial cell stimulation of O2*- production in response to oscillatory shear stress. These data suggest that the NAD(P)H oxidase maintains endothelial cell XO levels and that XO is responsible for increased reactive oxygen species production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

  1. Quantitative assessment of oscillatory components in blood circulation: classification of the effect of aging, diabetes, and acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernjak, Alan; Stefanovska, Aneta; Urbancic-Rovan, Vilma; Azman-Juvan, Katja

    2005-04-01

    The human cardiovascular system is a complex system with the pumping activity of the heart as the main generator of oscillations. Besides the heartbeat there are several other oscillatory components which determine its dynamics. Their nonlinear nature and a weak coupling between them both require special treatment while studying this system. A particular characteristic of the oscillatory components is their frequency fluctuations in time. Consequently, their interactions also fluctuate in time. Therefore the wavelet transform is applied to trace the oscillatory components in time, and specific quantitative measures are introduced to quantify the contribution of each of the oscillatory components involved on the time scale of up to three minutes. Oscillatory components are then analysed from signals obtained by simultaneous measurements of blood flow in the microcirculation, ECG, respiration and blood pressure. Based on quantitative evaluation of the oscillatory components related to (I) the heart beat (0.6-2Hz), (II) respiration (0.145-0.6Hz), (III) intrinsic myogenic activity (0.052-0.145Hz), (IV) sympathetic activity (0.021-0.052Hz), (V, VI) endothelial related activity (0.0095-0.021Hz, 0.005 - 0.0095 Hz), 30-minutes recording taken on 109 healthy subjects, 75 patients with diabetes, and 82 patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were analysed. Classification of the effect of ageing, diabetes and AMI from blood flow signals simultaneously recorded in the skin of four extremities, the heart rate and heart rate variability from R-R intervals will be presented and discussed.

  2. Simultaneous tracking of 3D actin and microtubule strains in individual MLO-Y4 osteocytes under oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Baik, Andrew D; Qiu, Jun; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X Edward

    2013-02-22

    Osteocytes in vivo experience complex fluid shear flow patterns to activate mechanotransduction pathways. The actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons have been shown to play an important role in the osteocyte's biochemical response to fluid shear loading. The dynamic nature of physiologically relevant fluid flow profiles (i.e., 1Hz oscillatory flow) impedes the ability to image and study both actin and MT cytoskeletons simultaneously in the same cell with high spatiotemporal resolution. To overcome these limitations, a multi-channel quasi-3D microscopy technique was developed to track the actin and MT networks simultaneously under steady and oscillatory flow. Cells displayed high intercellular variability and intracellular cytoskeletal variability in strain profiles. Shear Exz was the predominant strain in both steady and oscillatory flows in the form of viscoelastic creep and elastic oscillations, respectively. Dramatic differences were seen in oscillatory flow, however. The actin strains displayed an oscillatory strain profile more often than the MT networks in all the strains tested and had a higher peak-to-trough strain magnitude. Taken together, the actin networks are the more responsive cytoskeletal networks in osteocytes under oscillatory flow and may play a bigger role in mechanotransduction pathway activation and regulation. PMID:23352617

  3. Oscillatory MHD Convective Flow of Second Order Fluid Through Porous Medium in a Vertical Rotating Channel in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, B. P.; Singh, K. D.; Bansal, A. K.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of an oscillatory magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convective flow of a second order (viscoelastic), incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid through a porous medium bounded by two infinite vertical parallel porous plates is presented. The two porous plates with slip-flow condition and the no-slip condition are subjected respectively to a constant injection and suction velocity. The pressure gradient in the channel varies periodically with time. A magnetic field of uniform strength is applied in the direction perpendicular to the planes of the plates. The induced magnetic field is neglected due to the assumption of a small magnetic Reynolds number. The temperature of the plate with no-slip condition is non-uniform and oscillates periodically with time and the temperature difference of the two plates is assumed high enough to induce heat radiation. The entire system rotates in unison about the axis perpendicular to the planes of the plates. Adopting complex variable notations, a closed form solution of the problem is obtained. The analytical results are evaluated numerically and then presented graphically to discuss in detail the effects of different parameters of the problem. The velocity, temperature and the skin-friction in terms of its amplitude and phase angle have been shown graphically to observe the effects of the viscoelastic parameter γ, rotation parameter Ω, suction parameter λ , Grashof number Gr, Hartmann number M, the pressure A, Prandtl number Pr, radiation parameter N and the frequency of oscillation ω .

  4. The dynamics of magnetic flux rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, E. E.; Fisher, G. H.; Patten, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in the presence of turbulent convection is examined using results of numerical simulations of closed magnetic flux tubes embedded in a steady 'ABC' flow field, which approximate some of the important characteristics of a turbulent convecting flow field. Three different evolutionary scenarios were found: expansion to a steady deformed ring; collapse to a compact fat flux ring, separated from the expansion type of behavior by a critical length scale; and, occasionally, evolution toward an advecting, oscillatory state. The work suggests that small-scale flows will not have a strong effect on large-scale, strong fields.

  5. Oscillatory cerebral blood flow is associated with impaired neurocognition and functional hyperemia in postural tachycardia syndrome during graded tilt.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Pandey, Akash; Messer, Zachary R; Terilli, Courtney; Medow, Marvin S

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesize that upright cognitive impairment in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is caused by reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF). The CBF velocity (CBF(v)) measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound decreased excessively during 70° tilt in a minority of patients with intermittent hyperpnea/hypocapnia. Incremental tilt showed no difference in mean CBF(v). But N-back memory tasking indicated progressive compromised memory, reduced functional hyperemia, and reduced neurovascular coupling. Orthostasis caused slow oscillations in CBF(v) linked to oscillations in arterial pressure in patients with POTS. We also hypothesize that oscillatory CBF(v) degrades neurovascular coupling. We performed 2-back testing when subjects were in supine position and during incremental tilts to 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° in 11 patients with POTS and 9 controls. Oscillatory arterial pressure, oscillatory CBF(v), and neurovascular coupling were similar in supine position. The oscillatory arterial pressure increased by 31%, 45%, 67%, and 93% in patients with POTS during tilt and remained unchanged in the controls. Oscillatory CBF(v) increased by 61%, 82%, 161%, and 264% in patients with POTS during tilt and remained unchanged in the controls. Functional hyperemia decreased from 4.1% to 3.0%, 1.1%, 0.2%, and to 0.04% in patients with POTS, but it was unchanged at 4% in the controls. Percent correct N-back responses decreased from 78% to 33% in patients with POTS, whereas they remained at 89% in the controls. In patients with POTS, oscillatory CBF(v) was linearly correlated with functional hyperemia (r(2)=0.76). Increased oscillatory CBF is associated with reduced neurovascular coupling and diminished cognitive performance in patients with POTS. PMID:25510829

  6. Oscillatory Cerebral Blood Flow Is Associated With Impaired Neurocognition And Functional Hyperemia In Postural Tachycardia Syndrome During Graded Tilt

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Julian M.; Del Pozzi, Andrew T.; Pandey, Akash; Messer, Zachary R.; Terilli, Courtney; Medow, Marvin S.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesize upright cognitive impairment in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome is due to reduced cerebral blood flow. Cerebral blood flow velocity measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound decreased excessively during 70° tilt in a minority of patients with intermittent hyperpnea/hypocapnia. Incremental tilt showed no difference in mean cerebral blood flow velocity. But, N-Back memory tasking indicated progressive compromised memory, reduced functional hyperemia and reduced neurovascular coupling. Orthostasis caused slow oscillations in cerebral blood flow velocity linked to oscillations in arterial pressure in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome. We also hypothesize that oscillatory cerebral blood flow velocity degrades neurovascular coupling. We performed 2-Back testing supine and during incremental tilts to 15°, 30°, 45° and 60° in 11 Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and 9 controls. Oscillatory arterial pressure, oscillatory cerebral blood flow velocity and neurovascular coupling were similar supine. Oscillatory arterial pressure increased 31, 45, 67, and 93% in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome during tilt, remaining unchanged in control. Oscillatory cerebral blood flow velocity increased by 61, 82, 161, and 264% in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome during tilt remaining unchanged in control. Functional hyperemia decreased from 4.1% to 3.0, 1.1, 0.2, to 0.04% in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome but was unchanged at 4% in control. Percent correct N-Back responses decreased from 78% to 33% in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome while remaining at 89% in controls. In Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, oscillatory cerebral blood flow velocity was linearly correlated with functional hyperemia (r2=0.76). Increased oscillatory cerebral blood flow is associated with reduced neurovascular coupling and diminished cognitive performance in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome. PMID:25510829

  7. Serotonin and NO complementarily regulate generation of oscillatory activity in the olfactory CNS of a terrestrial mollusk.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Watanabe, S; Kirino, Y

    2001-06-01

    Synchronous oscillation of membrane potentials, generated by assemblies of neurons, is a prominent feature in the olfactory systems of many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, its generation mechanism is still controversial. Biogenic amines play important roles for mammalian olfactory learning and are also implicated in molluscan olfactory learning. Here, we investigated the role of serotonin, a biogenic amine, in the oscillatory dynamics in the procerebrum (PC), the molluscan olfactory center. Serotonin receptor blockers inhibited the spontaneous synchronous oscillatory activity of low frequency (approximately 0.5 Hz) in the PC. This was due to diminishing the periodic slow oscillation of membrane potential in bursting (B) neurons, which are essential neuronal elements for the synchronous oscillation in the PC. On the other hand, serotonin enhanced the amplitude of the slow oscillation in B neurons and subsequently increased the number of spikes in each oscillatory cycle. These results show that the extracellular serotonin level regulates the oscillation amplitude in B neurons and thus serotonin may be called an oscillation generator in the PC. Although nitric oxide (NO) is known to also be a crucial factor for generating the PC oscillatory activity and setting the PC oscillation frequency, the present study showed that NO only regulates the oscillation frequency in B neurons but could not increase the spikes in each oscillatory cycle. These results suggest complementary regulation of the PC oscillatory activity: NO determines the probability of occurrence of slow potentials in B neurons, whereas serotonin regulates the amplitude in each cycle of the oscillatory activity in B neurons. PMID:11387408

  8. Reduction of satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slud, E. V.; Smith, P. J.; Langel, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of global magnetic anomaly maps derived from satellite data is facilitated by inversion to the equivalent magnetization in a constant thickness magnetic crust or, equivalently, by reduction to the pole. Previous inversions have proven unstable near the geomagnetic equator. The instability results from magnetic moment distributions which are admissible in the inversion solution but which make only small contribution to the computed values of anomaly field. Their admissibility in the solution could result from noisy or incomplete data or from small poorly resolved anomalies. The resulting magnetic moments are unrealistically large and oscillatory. Application of the method of principal components (e.g. eigenvalue decomposition and selective elimination of less significant eigenvectors) is proposed as a way of overcoming the instability and the method is demonstrated by applying it to the region around the Bangui anomaly in Central Africa.

  9. Acute refractory hypoxemia after chest trauma reversed by high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Polytrauma often results in significant hypoxemia secondary to direct lung contusion or indirectly through atelectasis, systemic inflammatory response, large volume fluid resuscitation and blood product transfusion. In addition to causing hypoxemia, atelectasis and acute lung injury can lead to right ventricular failure through an acute increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Mechanical ventilation is often applied, accompanied with recruitment maneuvers and positive end-expiratory pressure in order to recruit alveoli and reverse atelectasis, while preventing excessive alveolar damage. This strategy should lead to the reversal of the hypoxemic condition and the detrimental heart–lung interaction that may occur. However, as described in this case report, hemodynamic instability and intractable alveolar atelectasis sometimes do not respond to conventional ventilation strategies. Case presentation We describe the case of a 21-year-old Caucasian man with severe chest trauma requiring surgical interventions, who developed refractory hypoxemia and overt right ventricular failure. After multiple failed attempts of recruitment using conventional ventilation, the patient was ventilated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. This mode of ventilation allowed the reversal of the hemodynamic effects of severe hypoxemia and of the acute cor pulmonale. We use this case report to describe the physiological advantages of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in patients with chest trauma, and formulate the arguments to explain the positive effect observed in our patient. Conclusions High-frequency oscillatory ventilation can be used in the context of a blunt chest trauma accompanied by severe hypoxemia due to atelectasis. The positive effect is due to its capacity to recruit the collapsed alveoli and, as a result, the relief of increased pulmonary vascular resistance and subsequently the reversal of acute cor pulmonale. This approach may represent an

  10. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomin, A. J.; Gilbert, P. H.; Schmalzer, A. M.

    2015-03-19

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of the polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number λω is zero and the Weissenberg number λγ 0 is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both λω and λγ 0 exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where λω exceeds unity and where λγ 0 approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion.

  11. Intramedullary Pressure and Matrix Strain Induced by Oscillatory Skeletal Muscle Stimulation and its Potential in Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lam, Hoyan

    2010-01-01

    Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by oscillatory muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia, i.e., hindlimb suspension (HLS). To test this hypothesis, we evaluated a) MS induced ImP and bone strain as function of stimulation frequency, and b) the adaptive responses to functional disuse, and disuse plus 1Hz and 20Hz stimulation in vivo. Femoral ImP and bone strain generated by MS were measured in the frequencies of 1Hz-100Hz in four rats. Forty retired breeder rats were used for the in vivo HLS study. The quadriceps muscle was stimulated at frequencies of 1 Hz and 20 Hz, 10min/d for 4 weeks. The metaphyseal trabecular bone quantity and microstructure at the distal femur were evaluated using μCT, while bone formation indices were analyzed using histomorphometric techniques. Oscillatory MS generated a maximum ImP of 45±9 mmHg at 20 Hz and produced a maximum matrix strain of 128±19 με at 10 Hz. Our analyses from the in vivo study showed that MS at 20 Hz was able to attenuate trabecular bone loss and partially maintain the microstructure induced by HLS. Conversely, there was no evidence of an adaptive effect of stimulation at 1 Hz on disused skeleton. The results suggested that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics and mechanical strain in bone, which serves as a critical mediator of adaptation. These results clearly demonstrated the ability of MS in attenuating bone loss from the disuse osteopenia and could hold potential in mitigating skeletal degradation imposed by conditions of disuse, which may serve as a biomechanical intervention in clinic application. PMID:19081096

  12. One central oscillatory drive is compatible with experimental motor unit behaviour in essential and Parkinsonian tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Gallego, Juan A.; Holobar, Ales; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Pathological tremors are symptomatic to several neurological disorders that are difficult to differentiate and the way by which central oscillatory networks entrain tremorogenic contractions is unknown. We considered the alternative hypotheses that tremor arises from one oscillator (at the tremor frequency) or, as suggested by recent findings from the superimposition of two separate inputs (at the tremor frequency and twice that frequency). Approach. Assuming one central oscillatory network we estimated analytically the relative amplitude of the harmonics of the tremor frequency in the motor neuron output for different temporal behaviors of the oscillator. Next, we analyzed the bias in the relative harmonics amplitude introduced by superimposing oscillations at twice the tremor frequency. These findings were validated using experimental measurements of wrist angular velocity and surface electromyography (EMG) from 22 patients (11 essential tremor, 11 Parkinson’s disease). The ensemble motor unit action potential trains identified from the EMG represented the neural drive to the muscles. Main results. The analytical results showed that the relative power of the tremor harmonics in the analytical models of the neural drive was determined by the variability and duration of the tremor bursts and the presence of the second oscillator biased this power towards higher values. The experimental findings accurately matched the analytical model assuming one oscillator, indicating a negligible functional role of secondary oscillatory inputs. Furthermore, a significant difference in the relative power of harmonics in the neural drive was found across the patient groups, suggesting a diagnostic value of this measure (classification accuracy: 86%). This diagnostic power decreased substantially when estimated from limb acceleration or the EMG. Signficance. The results indicate that the neural drive in pathological tremor is compatible with one central network

  13. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation and an interventional lung assist device to treat hypoxaemia and hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    David, M; Heinrichs, W

    2004-10-01

    A male patient accidentally aspirated paraffin oil when performing as a fire-eater. Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (Pa(o(2))/Fi(o(2)) ratio 10.7 kPa) developed within 24 h. Conventional pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) with high airway pressures and low tidal volumes failed to improve oxygenation. Hypercapnia (Pa(co(2)) 12 kPa) with severe acidosis (pH<7.20) ensued. Treatment with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) and a higher adjusted airway pressure (35 cm H(2)O) improved the Pa(o(2))/Fi(o(2)) ratio within 1 h from 10.7 to 22.9 kPa, but the hypercapnia and acidosis continued. Stepwise reduction of the mean airway pressure (26 cm H(2)O), and oscillating frequencies (3.5 Hz), as well as increasing the oscillating amplitudes (95 cm H(2)O) resulted in an unchanged Pa(co(2)), but oxygenation worsened. The new pumpless extracorporeal interventional lung assist device (ILA, NovaLung, Hechingen, Germany) was therefore used for carbon dioxide elimination to enable a less aggressive ventilation strategy. Pa(co(2)) normalized after initiation of ILA. HFOV with a mean airway pressure of 32 cm H(2)O was maintained, but with a higher oscillatory frequency (9 Hz) and very low oscillatory amplitude (25 cm H(2)O). After 6 days, the patient was transferred to a conventional ventilator, and ILA was discontinued after 13 days without complications. PMID:15277297

  14. Characterization of oscillatory instability in lid driven cavity flows using lattice Boltzmann method

    PubMed Central

    Anupindi, Kameswararao; Lai, Weichen; Frankel, Steven

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied for simulating flow in a three-dimensional lid driven cubic and deep cavities. The developed code is first validated by simulating flow in a cubic lid driven cavity at 1000 and 12000 Reynolds numbers following which we study the effect of cavity depth on the steady-oscillatory transition Reynolds number in cavities with depth aspect ratio equal to 1, 2 and 3. Turbulence modeling is performed through large eddy simulation (LES) using the classical Smagorinsky sub-grid scale model to arrive at an optimum mesh size for all the simulations. The simulation results indicate that the first Hopf bifurcation Reynolds number correlates negatively with the cavity depth which is consistent with the observations from two-dimensional deep cavity flow data available in the literature. Cubic cavity displays a steady flow field up to a Reynolds number of 2100, a delayed anti-symmetry breaking oscillatory field at a Reynolds number of 2300, which further gets restored to a symmetry preserving oscillatory flow field at 2350. Deep cavities on the other hand only attain an anti-symmetry breaking flow field from a steady flow field upon increase of the Reynolds number in the range explored. As the present work involved performing a set of time-dependent calculations for several Reynolds numbers and cavity depths, the parallel performance of the code is evaluated a priori by running the code on up to 4096 cores. The computational time required for these runs shows a close to linear speed up over a wide range of processor counts depending on the problem size, which establishes the feasibility of performing a thorough search process such as the one presently undertaken. PMID:24587561

  15. Characterization of oscillatory instability in lid driven cavity flows using lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Anupindi, Kameswararao; Lai, Weichen; Frankel, Steven

    2014-03-20

    In the present work, lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is applied for simulating flow in a three-dimensional lid driven cubic and deep cavities. The developed code is first validated by simulating flow in a cubic lid driven cavity at 1000 and 12000 Reynolds numbers following which we study the effect of cavity depth on the steady-oscillatory transition Reynolds number in cavities with depth aspect ratio equal to 1, 2 and 3. Turbulence modeling is performed through large eddy simulation (LES) using the classical Smagorinsky sub-grid scale model to arrive at an optimum mesh size for all the simulations. The simulation results indicate that the first Hopf bifurcation Reynolds number correlates negatively with the cavity depth which is consistent with the observations from two-dimensional deep cavity flow data available in the literature. Cubic cavity displays a steady flow field up to a Reynolds number of 2100, a delayed anti-symmetry breaking oscillatory field at a Reynolds number of 2300, which further gets restored to a symmetry preserving oscillatory flow field at 2350. Deep cavities on the other hand only attain an anti-symmetry breaking flow field from a steady flow field upon increase of the Reynolds number in the range explored. As the present work involved performing a set of time-dependent calculations for several Reynolds numbers and cavity depths, the parallel performance of the code is evaluated a priori by running the code on up to 4096 cores. The computational time required for these runs shows a close to linear speed up over a wide range of processor counts depending on the problem size, which establishes the feasibility of performing a thorough search process such as the one presently undertaken. PMID:24587561

  16. The impact of the perception of rhythmic music on self-paced oscillatory movements.

    PubMed

    Peckel, Mathieu; Pozzo, Thierry; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by theories of perception-action coupling and embodied music cognition, we investigated how rhythmic music perception impacts self-paced oscillatory movements. In a pilot study, we examined the kinematic parameters of self-paced oscillatory movements, walking and finger tapping using optical motion capture. In accordance with biomechanical constraints accounts of motion, we found that movements followed a hierarchical organization depending on the proximal/distal characteristic of the limb used. Based on these findings, we were interested in knowing how and when the perception of rhythmic music could resonate with the motor system in the context of these constrained oscillatory movements. In order to test this, we conducted an experiment where participants performed four different effector-specific movements (lower leg, whole arm and forearm oscillation and finger tapping) while rhythmic music was playing in the background. Musical stimuli consisted of computer-generated MIDI musical pieces with a 4/4 metrical structure. The musical tempo of each song increased from 60 BPM to 120 BPM by 6 BPM increments. A specific tempo was maintained for 20 s before a 2 s transition to the higher tempo. The task of the participant was to maintain a comfortable pace for the four movements (self-paced) while not paying attention to the music. No instruction on whether to synchronize with the music was given. Results showed that participants were distinctively influenced by the background music depending on the movement used with the tapping task being consistently the most influenced. Furthermore, eight strategies put in place by participants to cope with the task were unveiled. Despite not instructed to do so, participants also occasionally synchronized with music. Results are discussed in terms of the link between perception and action (i.e., motor/perceptual resonance). In general, our results give support to the notion that rhythmic music is processed in a motoric

  17. Oscillatory lower body negative pressure impairs task related functional hyperemia in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Balakrishnan, Keshawadhana; Visintainer, Paul; Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Messer, Zachary R; Terilli, Courtney; Medow, Marvin S

    2016-03-15

    Neurovascular coupling refers to the link between an increase in neural activity in response to a task and an increase in cerebral blood flow denoted "functional hyperemia." Recent work on postural tachycardia syndrome indicated that increased oscillatory cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) was associated with reduced functional hyperemia. We hypothesized that a reduction in functional hyperemia could be causally produced in healthy volunteers by using oscillations in lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) to force oscillations in CBFv. CBFv was measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the left middle cerebral artery. We used passive arm flexion applied during eight periodic 60-s flexion/60-s relaxation epochs to produce 120-s periodic changes in functional hyperemia (at 0.0083 Hz). We used -30 mmHg of OLBNP at 0.03, 0.05, and 0.10 Hz, the range for cerebral autoregulation, and measured spectral power of CBFv at all frequencies. Arm flexion power performed without OLBNP was compared with arm flexion power during OLBNP. OLBNP power performed in isolation was compared with power during OLBNP plus arm flexion. Cerebral flow velocity oscillations at 0.05 Hz reduced and at 0.10 Hz eliminated functional hyperemia, while 0.03 Hz did not reach significance. In contrast, arm flexion reduced OLBNP-induced oscillatory power at all frequencies. The interactions between OLBNP-driven CBFv oscillations and arm flexion-driven CBFv oscillations are reciprocal. Thus induced cerebral blood flow oscillations suppress functional hyperemia, and functional hyperemia suppresses cerebral blood flow oscillations. We conclude that oscillatory cerebral blood flow produces a causal reduction of functional hyperemia. PMID:26801310

  18. Oscillatory Brain Correlates of Live Joint Attention: A Dual-EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Lachat, Fanny; Hugueville, Laurent; Lemaréchal, Jean-Didier; Conty, Laurence; George, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Joint attention consists in following another’s gaze onto an environmental object, which leads to the alignment of both subjects’ attention onto this object. It is a fundamental mechanism of non-verbal communication, and it is essential for dynamic, online, interindividual synchronization during interactions. Here we aimed at investigating the oscillatory brain correlates of joint attention in a face-to-face paradigm where dyads of participants dynamically oriented their attention toward the same or different objects during joint and no-joint attention periods respectively. We also manipulated task instruction: in socially driven instructions, the participants had to follow explicitly their partner’s gaze, while in color-driven instructions, the objects to be looked at were designated at by their color so that no explicit gaze following was required. We focused on oscillatory activities in the 10 Hz frequency range, where parieto-occipital alpha and the centro-parietal mu rhythms have been described, as these rhythms have been associated with attention and social coordination processes respectively. We tested the hypothesis of a modulation of these oscillatory activities by joint attention. We used dual-EEG to record simultaneously the brain activities of the participant dyads during our live, face-to-face joint attention paradigm. We showed that joint attention periods – as compared to the no-joint attention periods – were associated with a decrease of signal power between 11 and 13 Hz over a large set of left centro-parieto-occipital electrodes, encompassing the scalp regions where alpha and mu rhythms have been described. This 11–13 Hz signal power decrease was observed independently of the task instruction: it was similar when joint versus no-joint attention situations were socially driven and when they were color-driven. These results are interpreted in terms of the processes of attention mirroring, social coordination, and mutual

  19. The impact of the perception of rhythmic music on self-paced oscillatory movements

    PubMed Central

    Peckel, Mathieu; Pozzo, Thierry; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by theories of perception-action coupling and embodied music cognition, we investigated how rhythmic music perception impacts self-paced oscillatory movements. In a pilot study, we examined the kinematic parameters of self-paced oscillatory movements, walking and finger tapping using optical motion capture. In accordance with biomechanical constraints accounts of motion, we found that movements followed a hierarchical organization depending on the proximal/distal characteristic of the limb used. Based on these findings, we were interested in knowing how and when the perception of rhythmic music could resonate with the motor system in the context of these constrained oscillatory movements. In order to test this, we conducted an experiment where participants performed four different effector-specific movements (lower leg, whole arm and forearm oscillation and finger tapping) while rhythmic music was playing in the background. Musical stimuli consisted of computer-generated MIDI musical pieces with a 4/4 metrical structure. The musical tempo of each song increased from 60 BPM to 120 BPM by 6 BPM increments. A specific tempo was maintained for 20 s before a 2 s transition to the higher tempo. The task of the participant was to maintain a comfortable pace for the four movements (self-paced) while not paying attention to the music. No instruction on whether to synchronize with the music was given. Results showed that participants were distinctively influenced by the background music depending on the movement used with the tapping task being consistently the most influenced. Furthermore, eight strategies put in place by participants to cope with the task were unveiled. Despite not instructed to do so, participants also occasionally synchronized with music. Results are discussed in terms of the link between perception and action (i.e., motor/perceptual resonance). In general, our results give support to the notion that rhythmic music is processed in a motoric

  20. Oscillatory signatures of crossmodal congruence effects: An EEG investigation employing a visuotactile pattern matching paradigm.

    PubMed

    Göschl, Florian; Friese, Uwe; Daume, Jonathan; König, Peter; Engel, Andreas K

    2015-08-01

    Coherent percepts emerge from the accurate combination of inputs from the different sensory systems. There is an ongoing debate about the neurophysiological mechanisms of crossmodal interactions in the brain, and it has been proposed that transient synchronization of neurons might be of central importance. Oscillatory activity in lower frequency ranges (<30Hz) has been implicated in mediating long-range communication as typically studied in multisensory research. In the current study, we recorded high-density electroencephalograms while human participants were engaged in a visuotactile pattern matching paradigm and analyzed oscillatory power in the theta- (4-7Hz), alpha- (8-13Hz) and beta-bands (13-30Hz). Employing the same physical stimuli, separate tasks of the experiment either required the detection of predefined targets in visual and tactile modalities or the explicit evaluation of crossmodal stimulus congruence. Analysis of the behavioral data showed benefits for congruent visuotactile stimulus combinations. Differences in oscillatory dynamics related to crossmodal congruence within the two tasks were observed in the beta-band for crossmodal target detection, as well as in the theta-band for congruence evaluation. Contrasting ongoing activity preceding visuotactile stimulation between the two tasks revealed differences in the alpha- and beta-bands. Source reconstruction of between-task differences showed prominent involvement of premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, somatosensory association cortex and the supramarginal gyrus. These areas not only exhibited more involvement in the pre-stimulus interval for target detection compared to congruence evaluation, but were also crucially involved in post-stimulus differences related to crossmodal stimulus congruence within the detection task. These results add to the increasing evidence that low frequency oscillations are functionally relevant for integration in distributed brain networks, as demonstrated for

  1. Potential energy, force distribution and oscillatory motion of chloride ion inside electrically charged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, F.; Ansari, R.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, a continuum-based model is presented to explore potential energy, force distribution and oscillatory motion of ions, and in particular chloride ion, inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) decorated by functional groups at two ends. To perform this, van der Waals (vdW) interactions between ion and nanotube are modeled by the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, whereas the electrostatic interactions between ion and functional groups are modeled by the Coulomb potential and the total interactions are analytically derived by summing the vdW and electrostatic interactions. Making the assumption that carbon atoms and charge of functional groups are all uniformly distributed over the nanotube surface and the two ends of nanotube, respectively, a continuum approach is utilized to evaluate the related interactions. Based on the actual force distribution, the equation of motion is also solved numerically to arrive at the time history of displacement and velocity of inner core. With respect to the proposed formulations, comprehensive studies on the variations of potential energy and force distribution are carried out by varying functional group charge and nanotube length. Moreover, the effects of these parameters together with initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of system are studied and discussed in detail. It is found out that chloride ion escapes more easily from negatively charged CNTs which is followed by uncharged and positively charged ones. It is further shown that the presence of functional groups leads to enhancing the operating frequency of such oscillatory systems especially when the electric charges of ion and functional groups have different signs.

  2. Influence of torque on the lift and drag of a particle in an oscillatory flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P. F.; Leaf, G. K.; Restrepo, J. M.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Arizona

    2008-10-01

    In the work of Fischer et al. (2002, 'Forces on Particles in an Oscillatory Boundary Layer', J. Fluid Mech., 468, pp. 327-347, 2005; 'Influence of Wall Proximity on the Lift and Drag of a Particle in an Oscillatory Flow', ASME J. Fluids Eng., 127, pp. 583-594) we computed the lift and drag forces on a sphere, subjected to a wall-bounded oscillatory flow. The forces were found as a function of the Reynolds number, the forcing frequency, and the gap between the particle and the ideally smooth rigid bounding wall. Here we investigate how the forces change as a function of the above parameters and its moment of inertia if the particle is allowed to freely rotate. Allowing the particle to rotate does not change appreciably the drag force, as compared to the drag experienced by the particle when it is held fixed. Lift differences between the rotating and nonrotating cases are shown to be primarily dominated in the mean by the pressure component. The lift of the rotating particle varies significantly from the fixed-particle case and depends strongly on the Reynolds number, the forcing frequency, and the gap; much less so on the moment of inertia. Of special significance is that the lift is enhanced for small Reynolds numbers and suppressed for larger ones, with a clear transition point. We also examine how the torque changes when the particle is allowed to rotate as compared to when it is held fixed. As a function of the Reynolds number the torque of the fixed sphere is monotonically decreasing in the range Re=5 to Re=400. The rotating-sphere counterpart experiences a smaller and more complex torque, synchronized with the lift transition mentioned before. As a function of the gap, the torque is significantly larger in the fixed particle case.

  3. Cortical oscillatory dynamics and benzodiazepine-site modulation of tonic inhibition in fast spiking interneurons.

    PubMed

    Prokic, Emma J; Weston, Cathryn; Yamawaki, Naoki; Hall, Stephen D; Jones, Roland S G; Stanford, Ian M; Ladds, Graham; Woodhall, Gavin L

    2015-08-01

    Tonic conductance mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors has been implicated in the modulation of network oscillatory activity. Using an in vitro brain slice to produce oscillatory activity and a kinetic model of GABAA receptor dynamics, we show that changes in tonic inhibitory input to fast spiking interneurons underlie benzodiazepine-site mediated modulation of neuronal network synchrony in rat primary motor cortex. We found that low concentrations (10 nM) of the benzodiazepine site agonist, zolpidem, reduced the power of pharmacologically-induced beta-frequency (15-30 Hz) oscillatory activity. By contrast, higher doses augmented beta power. Application of the antagonist, flumazenil, also increased beta power suggesting endogenous modulation of the benzodiazepine binding site. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that pharmacologically-induced rhythmic inhibitory postsynaptic currents were reduced by 10 nM zolpidem, suggesting an action on inhibitory interneurons. Further voltage-clamp studies of fast spiking cells showed that 10 nM zolpidem augmented a tonic inhibitory GABAA receptor mediated current in fast spiking cells whilst higher concentrations of zolpidem reduced the tonic current. A kinetic model of zolpidem-sensitive GABAA receptors suggested that incubation with 10 nM zolpidem resulted in a high proportion of GABAA receptors locked in a kinetically slow desensitized state whilst 30 nM zolpidem favoured rapid transition into and out of desensitized states. This was confirmed experimentally using a challenge with saturating concentrations of GABA. Selective modulation of an interneuron-specific tonic current may underlie the reversal of cognitive and motor deficits afforded by low-dose zolpidem in neuropathological states. PMID:25797493

  4. Spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics during the encoding and maintenance phases of a visual working memory task.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2015-08-01

    Many electrophysiology studies have examined neural oscillatory activity during the encoding, maintenance, and/or retrieval phases of various working memory tasks. Together, these studies have helped illuminate the underlying neural dynamics, although much remains to be discovered and some findings have not replicated in subsequent work. In this study, we examined the oscillatory dynamics that serve visual working memory operations using high-density magnetoencephalography (MEG) and advanced time-frequency and beamforming methodology. Specifically, we recorded healthy adults while they performed a high-load, Sternberg-type working memory task, and focused on the encoding and maintenance phases. We found significant 9-16 Hz desynchronizations in the bilateral occipital cortices, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and left superior temporal areas throughout the encoding phase. Our analysis of the dynamics showed that the left DLPFC and superior temporal desynchronization became stronger as a function of time during the encoding period, and was sustained throughout most of the maintenance phase until sharply decreasing in the milliseconds preceding retrieval. In contrast, desynchronization in occipital areas became weaker as a function of time during encoding and eventually evolved into a strong synchronization during the maintenance period, consistent with previous studies. These results provide clear evidence of dynamic network-level processes during the encoding and maintenance phases of working memory, and support the notion of a dynamic pattern of functionally-discrete subprocesses within each working memory phase. The presence of such dynamic oscillatory networks may be a potential source of inconsistent findings in this literature, as neural activity within these networks changes dramatically with time. PMID:26043156

  5. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giacomin, A. J.; Gilbert, P. H.; Schmalzer, A. M.

    2015-03-19

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of themore » polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number λω is zero and the Weissenberg number λγ 0 is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both λω and λγ 0 exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where λω exceeds unity and where λγ 0 approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion.« less

  6. Oscillatory structural forces due to nonionic surfactant micelles: data by colloidal-probe AFM vs theory.

    PubMed

    Christov, Nikolay C; Danov, Krassimir D; Zeng, Yan; Kralchevsky, Peter A; von Klitzing, Regine

    2010-01-19

    Micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants Brij 35 and Tween 20 are confined between two surfaces in a colloidal-probe atomic-force microscope (CP-AFM). The experimentally detected oscillatory forces due to the layer-by-layer expulsion of the micelles agree very well with the theoretical predictions for hard-sphere fluids. While the experiment gives parts of the stable branches of the force curve, the theoretical model allows reconstruction of the full oscillatory curve. Therewith, the strength and range of the ordering could be determined. The resulting aggregation number from the fits of the force curves for Brij 35 is close to 70 and exhibits a slight tendency to increase with the surfactant concentration. The last layer of micelles cannot be pressed out. The measured force-vs-distance curve has nonequilibrium portions, which represent "jumps" from one to another branch of the respective equilibrium oscillatory curve. In the case of Brij 35, at concentrations <150 mM spherical micelles are present and the oscillation period is close to the micelle diameter, slightly decreasing with the rise of concentration. For elongated micelles (at concentration 200 mM), no harmonic oscillations are observed anymore; instead, the period increases with the decrease of film thickness. In the case of Tween 20, the force oscillations are almost suppressed, which implies that the micelles of this surfactant are labile and are demolished by the hydrodynamic shear stresses due to the colloidal-probe motion. The comparison of the results for the two surfactants demonstrates that in some cases the micelles can be destroyed by the CP-AFM, but in other cases they can be stable and behave as rigid particles. This behavior correlates with the characteristic times of the slow micellar relaxation process for these surfactants. PMID:20067306

  7. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, A J; Gilbert, P H; Schmalzer, A M

    2015-03-01

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of the polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number [Formula: see text] is zero and the Weissenberg number [Formula: see text] is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where [Formula: see text] exceeds unity and where [Formula: see text] approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion. PMID:26798789

  8. Neuro-oscillatory phase alignment drives speeded multisensory response times: an electro-corticographic investigation.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Manuel R; Molholm, Sophie; Fiebelkorn, Ian C; Butler, John S; Schwartz, Theodore H; Foxe, John J

    2015-06-01

    Even simple tasks rely on information exchange between functionally distinct and often relatively distant neuronal ensembles. Considerable work indicates oscillatory synchronization through phase alignment is a major agent of inter-regional communication. In the brain, different oscillatory phases correspond to low- and high-excitability states. Optimally aligned phases (or high-excitability states) promote inter-regional communication. Studies have also shown that sensory stimulation can modulate or reset the phase of ongoing cortical oscillations. For example, auditory stimuli can reset the phase of oscillations in visual cortex, influencing processing of a simultaneous visual stimulus. Such cross-regional phase reset represents a candidate mechanism for aligning oscillatory phase for inter-regional communication. Here, we explored the role of local and inter-regional phase alignment in driving a well established behavioral correlate of multisensory integration: the redundant target effect (RTE), which refers to the fact that responses to multisensory inputs are substantially faster than to unisensory stimuli. In a speeded detection task, human epileptic patients (N = 3) responded to unisensory (auditory or visual) and multisensory (audiovisual) stimuli with a button press, while electrocorticography was recorded over auditory and motor regions. Visual stimulation significantly modulated auditory activity via phase reset in the delta and theta bands. During the period between stimulation and subsequent motor response, transient synchronization between auditory and motor regions was observed. Phase synchrony to multisensory inputs was faster than to unisensory stimulation. This sensorimotor phase alignment correlated with behavior such that stronger synchrony was associated with faster responses, linking the commonly observed RTE with phase alignment across a sensorimotor network. PMID:26041921

  9. Increased Beta Frequency (15-30 Hz) Oscillatory Responses in Euthymic Bipolar Patients Under Lithium Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Devran; Özerdem, Ayşegül; Güntekin, Bahar; Atagün, M Ilhan; Tülay, Elif; Karadağ, Figen; Başar, Erol

    2016-04-01

    The effect of lithium on neurocognition is not still fully explored. Brain oscillatory activity is altered in bipolar disorder. We aimed to assess the oscillatory responses of euthymic bipolar patients and how they are affected by lithium monotherapy. Event-related oscillations in response to visual target stimulus during an oddball paradigm in 16 euthymic drug-free and 13 euthymic lithium-treated bipolar patients were compared with 16 healthy controls. The maximum peak-to-peak amplitudes were measured for each subject's averaged beta (15-30 Hz) responses in the 0- to 300-ms time window over frontal (F3, Fz, F4), central (C3, Cz, C4), temporal (T7, T8), temporo-parietal (TP7, TP8), parietal (P3, Pz, P4), and occipital (O1, Oz, O2) areas. Patients under lithium monotherapy had significantly higher beta responses to visual target stimuli than healthy controls (P=.017) and drug-free patients (P=.015). The increase in beta response was observed at all electrode locations, however, the difference was statistically significant for the left (T7; P=.016) and right (T8; P=.031) temporal beta responses. Increased beta responses in drug-free patients and further significant increase in lithium-treated patients may be indicative of a core pathophysiological process of bipolar disorder and how it is affected by lithium. Whether the finding corresponds to lithium's corrective effect on the underlying pathology or to its neurocognitive side effect remains to be further explored. In either case, the finding is a sign that the oscillatory activity may be useful in tracking medication effect in bipolar disorder. PMID:25465436

  10. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  11. Multi-physics modelling approach for oscillatory microengines: application for a microStirling generator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, F.; Fréchette, L. G.

    2015-12-01

    An electrical circuit equivalent (ECE) approach has been set up allowing elementary oscillatory microengine components to be modelled. They cover gas channel/chamber thermodynamics, viscosity and thermal effects, mechanical structure and electromechanical transducers. The proposed tool has been validated on a centimeter scale Free Piston membrane Stirling engine [1]. We propose here new developments taking into account scaling effects to establish models suitable for any microengines. They are based on simplifications derived from the comparison of the hydraulic radius with respect to the viscous and thermal penetration depths respectively).

  12. Energy Characteristics of Electric Drive of Oscillatory Motion at the Shock-Free Start

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payuk, L. A.; Voronina, N. A.; Galtseva, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The peculiarity of operation of oscillatory electric drive with doubly-fed motor at realization of algorithm of shock-free start was considered. The method of evaluating of energy parameters of such motors operating at the resonance mode with yueTOM of quantitative and qualitative components of the process of energy conversion by an electric motor (doubly-fed motor) is proposed. The calculation of energy characteristics of electric drive of this type was made, the results of calculation show an increase of energy efficiency (an average, generalized efficiency coefficient nE increased by 10%), which confirms the practical significance of the research object.

  13. Coexistence of synchrony and incoherence in oscillatory media under nonlinear global coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lennart; Schönleber, Konrad; Krischer, Katharina; García-Morales, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We report a novel mechanism for the formation of chimera states, a peculiar spatiotemporal pattern with coexisting synchronized and incoherent domains found in ensembles of identical oscillators. Considering Stuart-Landau oscillators, we demonstrate that a nonlinear global coupling can induce this symmetry breaking. We find chimera states also in a spatially extended system, a modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. This theoretical prediction is validated with an oscillatory electrochemical system, the electro-oxidation of silicon, where the spontaneous formation of chimeras is observed without any external feedback control.

  14. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models. PMID:23005490

  15. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models.

  16. Coexistence of synchrony and incoherence in oscillatory media under nonlinear global coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Lennart; García-Morales, Vladimir; Schönleber, Konrad; Krischer, Katharina

    2014-03-15

    We report a novel mechanism for the formation of chimera states, a peculiar spatiotemporal pattern with coexisting synchronized and incoherent domains found in ensembles of identical oscillators. Considering Stuart-Landau oscillators, we demonstrate that a nonlinear global coupling can induce this symmetry breaking. We find chimera states also in a spatially extended system, a modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. This theoretical prediction is validated with an oscillatory electrochemical system, the electro-oxidation of silicon, where the spontaneous formation of chimeras is observed without any external feedback control.

  17. Diffusion-induced periodic transition between oscillatory modes in amplitude-modulated patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaodong; He, Yuxiu; Wang, Shaorong; Gao, Qingyu; Epstein, Irving R.; Wang, Qun

    2014-06-15

    We study amplitude-modulated waves, e.g., wave packets in one dimension, overtarget spirals and superspirals in two dimensions, under mixed-mode oscillatory conditions in a three-variable reaction-diffusion model. New transition zones, not seen in the homogeneous system, are found, in which periodic transitions occur between local 1{sup N−1} and 1{sup N} oscillations. Amplitude-modulated complex patterns result from periodic transition between (N − 1)-armed and N-armed waves. Spatial recurrence rates provide a useful guide to the stability of these modulated patterns.

  18. Longwave oscillatory patterns in liquids: outside the world of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomnyashchy, Alexander; Shklyaev, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    The main subject of the present review is longwave oscillatory patterns in systems with conservation laws, that cannot be described by the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. As basic examples, we consider nonlinear patterns created by Marangoni and buoyancy instabilities in pure and binary liquids, where the longwave nature of instabilities is related to conservation of the liquid volume, conservation of mass or approximate conservation of the mean temperature. Also, we discuss the excitation of longwave instabilities by a time-periodic parameter modulation.

  19. Distinguishing Direct from Indirect Interactions in Oscillatory Networks with Multiple Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrath, Jakob; Romano, M. Carmen; Thiel, Marco; Kiss, István Z.; Wickramasinghe, Mahesh; Timmer, Jens; Kurths, Jürgen; Schelter, Björn

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to infer the coupling structure in networks of nonlinear oscillatory systems with multiple time scales. The method of partial phase synchronization allows us to infer the coupling structure for coupled nonlinear oscillators with one well-defined time scale. The case of oscillators with multiple time scales has remained a challenge until now. Here, we introduce partial recurrence based synchronization analysis to tackle this challenge. We successfully apply the proposed method to model systems and experimental data from coupled electrochemical oscillators. The statistical significance of the results is evaluated based on a surrogate hypothesis test.

  20. Is there still a role for high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates, children and adults?

    PubMed

    Hupp, Susan R; Turner, David A; Rehder, Kyle J

    2015-10-01

    Critically ill patients with respiratory pathology often require mechanical ventilation and while low tidal volume ventilation has become the mainstay of treatment, achieving adequate gas exchange may not be attainable with conventional ventilator modalities. In attempt to achieve gas exchange goals and also mitigate lung injury, high frequency ventilation is often implemented which couples low tidal volumes with sustained mean airway pressure. This manuscript presents the physiology of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, reviews the currently available data on its use and provides strategies and approaches for this mode of ventilation. PMID:26290121

  1. Oscillatory chloride current evoked by temperature jumps during muscarinic and serotonergic activation in Xenopus oocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Miledi, R; Parker, I; Sumikawa, K

    1987-01-01

    1. Membrane currents were recorded from voltage-clamped oocytes of Xenopus laevis, during temperature jumps imposed by a heating light. Resting oocytes usually showed little response, but large oscillatory membrane currents developed in response to cooling steps applied during activation of 'native' muscarinic receptors. 2. Similar temperature jump (Tjump) currents were seen during activation of oscillatory chloride currents mediated by muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh), serotonin, glutamate and noradrenaline receptors, expressed in the oocyte following injection with messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) from rat brain. The Tjump response during muscarinic activation was selectively blocked by atropine, and that during serotonergic activation by methysergide. In contrast, the 'smooth' membrane currents elicited by nicotinic ACh, kainate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were not accompanied by Tjump responses. 3. Rapid cooling of the oocyte gave larger Tjump currents than a gradual cooling over a few seconds. The size of the Tjump current elicited by a fixed cooling step increased linearly with the preceding time of warming, becoming maximal at intervals greater than about 100 s. 4. The Tjump current was inward at a clamp potential of -60 mV and reversed direction at about -22 mV, which corresponds to the chloride equilibrium potential in the oocyte. In low-chloride solution the reversal potential was shifted to more positive potentials, but it was almost unchanged by changes in potassium and sodium concentration. The size of the Tjump current decreased as the membrane potential was made more negative than about -40 mV. 5. The period of oscillation of the Tjump current increased with decreasing temperature, following a Q10 of 3.15. Depolarization also caused a small increase in period. 6. The Tjump current was not abolished in calcium-free solution, or by addition of manganese or lanthanum to the bathing solution. However, it was abolished by intracellular injection of

  2. Spectral characteristics of sign-alternating self-oscillatory endoplasm mobility in a myxomycete plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a short time Fourier transform of the time dependences of the self-oscillatory endoplasm velocity in an isolated strand of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium recorded using a sign-sensitive laser Doppler microscope are described. Unlike the mode recording an absolute velocity, a sign-sensitive mode makes it possible to detect the pairs of equidistant harmonic components in the time dependence spectra of endoplasm movement. The resulting frequency and amplitude values are used to construct a model adequately describing the alternating endoplasm mobility.

  3. Onset of sliding in amorphous films triggered by high-frequency oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Léopoldès, J; Conrad, G; Jia, X

    2013-06-14

    We investigate the change of the static friction threshold of weakly adhesive amorphous interfaces in the presence of the shear ultrasonic oscillation. Prior to sliding, a softening of the shear interfacial stiffness is observed under either static or high-amplitude oscillatory shear. We find that the nonlinear shear ultrasound, regardless of its polarization, triggers the macroscopic sliding at these interfaces far below the static threshold. Such unjamming transition is due to the vibration-induced decrease of the apparent coefficient of static friction, which provides a mechanism for understanding the reduction of the yielding threshold of granular media by the acoustic fluidization. PMID:25165969

  4. Molecular dynamics investigation into the oscillatory behavior of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the oscillatory behavior of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes is investigated based on the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations are performed using the Lennard-Jones and Tersoff-like potential functions. The influences of friction between the walls of inner and outer tubes, flexibility, velocity and outer length-to-inner length ratio on the frequency of oscillations are studied. The results show that the flexibility increases the frequency during the simulation. Furthermore, it is observed that by increasing the initial velocity, the frequency decreases.

  5. [Use of high frequency oscillatory ventilation in a patient with fulminant fat embolism syndrome].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yukinori; Yoshida, Satoru; Kumagai, Ken; Hirose, Yasuo; Ishikawa, Seiichi; Hashidate, Hideki

    2012-12-01

    We report a case of fulminant fat embolism syndrome treated with high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). A 77-year-old woman sustained a right tibia and fibula fracture and a left open tibia fracture after a traffic accident. She was conscious and her respiratory condition was normal on admission. However, she suddenly progressed to a coma and was intubated for approximately 2 hours after the accident; she developed critical respiratory failure. We used HFOV and were able to maintain her respiratory status. However, her right heart failure deteriorated and she died 95 hours after the accident. It was difficult for her to survive without percutaneous cardiopulmonary support. PMID:23362769

  6. Oscillatory multiplexing of population codes for selective communication in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Thomas; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian brains exhibit population oscillations whose structures vary in time and space according to behavioural state. A proposed function of these oscillations is to control the flow of signals among anatomically connected networks. However, the nature of neural coding that may support oscillatory selective communication has received relatively little attention. Here we consider the role of multiplexing, whereby multiple information streams share a common neural substrate. We suggest that multiplexing implemented through periodic modulation of firing rate population codes enables flexible reconfiguration of effective connectivity among brain areas. PMID:24434912

  7. Influence of a nonlinear reference temperature profile on oscillatory Bénard-Marangoni convection.

    PubMed

    Dondlinger, M; Colinet, P; Dauby, P C

    2003-12-01

    We analyze oscillatory instabilities in a fluid layer of infinite horizontal extent, heated from above or cooled from below, taking into account the nonlinearity of the reference temperature profile during the transient state of heat conduction. The linear stability analysis shows that a nonlinear reference temperature profile can have a strong effect on the system, either stabilizing or destabilizing, depending on the relative importance of buoyancy and surface tension forces. For the nonlinear analysis we use a Galerkin-Eckhaus method leading to a finite set of amplitude equations. In the two-dimensional (2D) case, we show the solution of these amplitude equations are standing waves. PMID:14754318

  8. WLS-ENO: Weighted-least-squares based essentially non-oscillatory schemes for finite volume methods on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxu; Jiao, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes are widely used high-order schemes for solving partial differential equations (PDEs), especially hyperbolic conservation laws with piecewise smooth solutions. For structured meshes, these techniques can achieve high order accuracy for smooth functions while being non-oscillatory near discontinuities. For unstructured meshes, which are needed for complex geometries, similar schemes are required but they are much more challenging. We propose a new family of non-oscillatory schemes, called WLS-ENO, in the context of solving hyperbolic conservation laws using finite-volume methods over unstructured meshes. WLS-ENO is derived based on Taylor series expansion and solved using a weighted least squares formulation. Unlike other non-oscillatory schemes, the WLS-ENO does not require constructing sub-stencils, and hence it provides a more flexible framework and is less sensitive to mesh quality. We present rigorous analysis of the accuracy and stability of WLS-ENO, and present numerical results in 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D for a number of benchmark problems, and also report some comparisons against WENO.

  9. Numerical investigation of oscillatory thermocapillary flows under zero gravity in a circular liquid film with concave free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Takagi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Dost, S.

    2016-03-01

    NASA astronaut Pettit has conducted thermocapillary flow experiments in water films suspended in a solid ring onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2003 and 2011. In one of these experiments, an oscillatory thermocapillary flow was observed. The developed flow broke its symmetry along the centerline of the film. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies on such oscillatory thermocapillary flows in thin films, and the flow-mechanism giving rise to such oscillatory flows is also not well understood. In order to shed light on the subject, we have carried out a numerical simulation study. The simulation results have shown that the water film geometry (film surface shape; being concave) is an important parameter and give rise to three oscillatory flow structures in the film, namely, a hydrothermal wave developing near the heated section, a symmetric oscillatory flow due to temperature variations, and a symmetry breaking flow due to the hydrodynamic instability along the free boundary layer (mixing layer) and the development of the hydrothermal waves. Simulation results show that the symmetry-breaking phenomenon observed in the thin film experiment on the ISS can be explained by the hydrodynamic instability and the development of hydrothermal waves.

  10. Oscillatory phase modulates the timing of neuronal activations and resulting behavior.

    PubMed

    Coon, W G; Gunduz, A; Brunner, P; Ritaccio, A L; Pesaran, B; Schalk, G

    2016-06-01

    Human behavioral response timing is highly variable from trial to trial. While it is generally understood that behavioral variability must be due to trial-by-trial variations in brain function, it is still largely unknown which physiological mechanisms govern the timing of neural activity as it travels through networks of neuronal populations, and how variations in the timing of neural activity relate to variations in the timing of behavior. In our study, we submitted recordings from the cortical surface to novel analytic techniques to chart the trajectory of neuronal population activity across the human cortex in single trials, and found joint modulation of the timing of this activity and of consequent behavior by neuronal oscillations in the alpha band (8-12Hz). Specifically, we established that the onset of population activity tends to occur during the trough of oscillatory activity, and that deviations from this preferred relationship are related to changes in the timing of population activity and the speed of the resulting behavioral response. These results indicate that neuronal activity incurs variable delays as it propagates across neuronal populations, and that the duration of each delay is a function of the instantaneous phase of oscillatory activity. We conclude that the results presented in this paper are supportive of a general model for variability in the effective speed of information transmission in the human brain and for variability in the timing of human behavior. PMID:26975551

  11. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  12. Self-Sustained Oscillatory Sliding Movement of Doublet Microtubules and Flagellar Bend Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the basis for flagellar and ciliary movements is ATP-dependent sliding between adjacent doublet microtubules. However, the mechanism for converting microtubule sliding into flagellar and ciliary movements has long remained unresolved. The author has developed new sperm models that use bull spermatozoa divested of their plasma membrane and midpiece mitochondrial sheath by Triton X-100 and dithiothreitol. These models enable the observation of both the oscillatory sliding movement of activated doublet microtubules and flagellar bend formation in the presence of ATP. A long fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by synchronous sliding of the sperm flagella and a short fiber of doublet microtubules extruded by metachronal sliding exhibited spontaneous oscillatory movements and constructed a one beat cycle of flagellar bending by alternately actuating. The small sliding displacement generated by metachronal sliding formed helical bends, whereas the large displacement by synchronous sliding formed planar bends. Therefore, the resultant waveform is a half-funnel shape, which is similar to ciliary movements. PMID:26863204

  13. Oscillatory behavior of the surface reduction process of multilayer graphene oxide at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voylov, Dmitry; Ivanov, Ilia; Bykov, Valerii; Tsybenova, Svetlana; Merkulov, Igor; Kurochkin, Sergei; Holt, Adam; Kisliuk, Alexandr

    The graphene oxide (GO) is one of 2D materials which continues to be studied intensively since it is thought can be used as a precursor of graphene. Recently, it was found that the chemical composition of multilayer GO is metastable on the time scale of one month even at room temperature. The observed changes in chemical composition were attributed to a reduction process controlled by the in-plane diffusion of functional groups which progresses through radical reactions. Here we report the observation of oscillatory oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions on the surface of multilayer GO films at room temperature. The redox reactions exhibited dampened oscillatory behavior with a period of about 5 days and found to be dependent on the time elapsed from GO deposition. The kinetic behavior of the processes and observed metastability of the surface functional groups are adequately described by two models involving reactions between functional groups of GO and reactant diffusion. US team acknowledges partial financial support from the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  14. Enhanced oscillatory rectification and negative differential resistance in pentamantane diamondoid-cumulene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Sherif Abdulkader; Cui, X. Y.; Ringer, S. P.; Stampfl, C.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new functionality for diamondoids in nanoelectronics. Based on the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism and density functional theory, we reveal that when attached to gold electrodes, the pentamantane-cumulene molecular junction exhibits large and oscillatory rectification and negative differential resistance (NDR) - depending on the number of carbon atoms in cumulene (Cn). When n is odd rectification is greatly enhanced where the rectification ratio can reach ~180 and a large negative differential resistance peak current of ~3 μA. This oscillatory behavior is well rationalised in terms of the occupancy of the carbon 2p states in Cn. Interestingly, different layers of C atoms in the pentamantane molecule have different contributions to transmission. The first and third layers of C atoms in pentamantane have a slight contribution to rectification, and the fifth and sixth layers have a stronger contribution to both rectification and NDR. Thus, our results suggest potential avenues for controlling their functions by chemically manipulating various parts of the diamondoid molecule, thus extending the applications of diamondoids in nanoscale integrated circuits.

  15. EEG neural oscillatory dynamics reveal semantic and response conflict at difference levels of conflict awareness

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Qinglin; Van Gaal, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Although previous work has shown that conflict can be detected in the absence of awareness, it is unknown how different sources of conflict (i.e., semantic, response) are processed in the human brain and whether these processes are differently modulated by conflict awareness. To explore this issue, we extracted oscillatory power dynamics from electroencephalographic (EEG) data recorded while human participants performed a modified version of the Stroop task. Crucially, in this task conflict awareness was manipulated by masking a conflict-inducing color word preceding a color patch target. We isolated semantic from response conflict by introducing four color words/patches, of which two were matched to the same response. We observed that both semantic as well as response conflict were associated with mid-frontal theta-band and parietal alpha-band power modulations, irrespective of the level of conflict awareness (high vs. low), although awareness of conflict increased these conflict-related power dynamics. These results show that both semantic and response conflict can be processed in the human brain and suggest that the neural oscillatory mechanisms in EEG reflect mainly “domain general” conflict processing mechanisms, instead of conflict source specific effects. PMID:26169473

  16. Nanofluid bioconvection in water-based suspensions containing nanoparticles and oxytactic microorganisms: oscillatory instability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a novel type of a nanofluid that contains both nanoparticles and motile (oxytactic) microorganisms. The benefits of adding motile microorganisms to the suspension include enhanced mass transfer, microscale mixing, and anticipated improved stability of the nanofluid. In order to understand the behavior of such a suspension at the fundamental level, this article investigates its stability when it occupies a shallow horizontal layer. The oscillatory mode of nanofluid bioconvection may be induced by the interaction of three competing agencies: oxytactic microorganisms, heating or cooling from the bottom, and top or bottom-heavy nanoparticle distribution. The model includes equations expressing conservation of total mass, momentum, thermal energy, nanoparticles, microorganisms, and oxygen. Physical mechanisms responsible for the slip velocity between the nanoparticles and the base fluid, such as Brownian motion and thermophoresis, are accounted for in the model. An approximate analytical solution of the eigenvalue problem is obtained using the Galerkin method. The obtained solution provides important physical insights into the behavior of this system; it also explains when the oscillatory mode of instability is possible in such system. PMID:21711604

  17. Does low and oscillatory wall shear stress correlate spatially with early atherosclerosis? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Veronique; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2013-07-15

    Low and oscillatory wall shear stress is widely assumed to play a key role in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Indeed, some studies have relied on the low shear theory when developing diagnostic and treatment strategies for cardiovascular disease. We wished to ascertain if this consensus is justified by published data. We performed a systematic review of papers that compare the localization of atherosclerotic lesions with the distribution of haemodynamic indicators calculated using computational fluid dynamics. The review showed that although many articles claim their results conform to the theory, it has been interpreted in different ways: a range of metrics has been used to characterize the distribution of disease, and they have been compared with a range of haemodynamic factors. Several studies, including all of those making systematic point-by-point comparisons of shear and disease, failed to find the expected relation. The various pre- and post-processing techniques used by different groups have reduced the range of shears over which correlations were sought, and in some cases are mutually incompatible. Finally, only a subset of the known patterns of disease has been investigated. The evidence for the low/oscillatory shear theory is less robust than commonly assumed. Longitudinal studies starting from the healthy state, or the collection of average flow metrics derived from large numbers of healthy vessels, both in conjunction with point-by-point comparisons using appropriate statistical techniques, will be necessary to improve our understanding of the relation between blood flow and atherogenesis. PMID:23459102

  18. Characterization of Oscillatory Boundary Layer Over a Closely Packed Bed of Sediment Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, S. V.; Skitka, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lack of accurate criteria for onset of incipient motion and sediment pickup function remain two of the biggest hurdles in developing better predictive models for sediment transport. To study pickup and transport of sediment, it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the small amplitude oscillatory flow over the sediment layer near the sea bed. Fully resolved direct numerical simulations are performed using fictitious domain approach (Apte et al., JCP 2009) to investigate the effect of a sinusoidally oscillating flow field over a rough wall made of regular hexagonal pack of spherical particles. The flow arrangement is similar to the experimental data of Keiller & Sleath (JFM 1976). Transitional and turbulent flows at Reδ = 50,100,150,200 (based on the Stokes layer thickness, delta) are explored over a range of non-dimensional sphere sizes. The coherent vortex structures, turbulent cross-correlations and lift forces on the roughness elements are characterized for these flow conditions and compared against available data of Keiller & Sleath (JFM 1976) and Sleath (JFM 1986). The dynamics of the oscillatory flow over the sediment bed is used to understand the mechanism of sediment pick-up.

  19. The neural origins of visual crowding as revealed by event-related potentials and oscillatory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Luca; Bertoni, Sara; Bellacosa Marotti, Rosilari

    2016-06-01

    Visual crowding is the difficulty in perceiving a target in the presence of nearby flankers. Most neurophysiological studies of crowding employed functional neuroimaging, but because of its low temporal resolution, no definitive answer can be given to the question: is crowding arising at the earliest or at later stages of visual processing? Here, we used a classic letters crowding paradigm in combination with electroencephalography (EEG). We manipulated the critical space between peripheral target and flankers, while ensuring a proper control of basic stimulus characteristics. Analyses were focused on event-related potentials (ERPs) and oscillatory activity in the alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma (30-80 Hz) bands. At the ERP level, we found that the first sign of a crowding-induced modulation of EEG activity was a suppression of the N1 component. Oscillatory analysis revealed an early stimulus-evoked gamma enhancement and a later alpha reduction that, however, were not influenced by the amount of crowding. Importantly, reduction in the beta band reflected the amount of crowding (i.e., stronger reduction for strong relative to mid crowding condition) and correlated with individual behavioral performance. Collectively, these findings show that crowding for complex objects emerges at later stages of visual processing, possibly as a result of large-scale network interaction. PMID:27088616

  20. Sight restoration after congenital blindness does not reinstate alpha oscillatory activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Davide; Troje, Nikolaus F; Ley, Pia; Hense, Marlene; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Röder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Functional brain development is characterized by sensitive periods during which experience must be available to allow for the full development of neural circuits and associated behavior. Yet, only few neural markers of sensitive period plasticity in humans are known. Here we employed electroencephalographic recordings in a unique sample of twelve humans who had been blind from birth and regained sight through cataract surgery between four months and 16 years of age. Two additional control groups were tested: a group of visually impaired individuals without a history of total congenital blindness and a group of typically sighted individuals. The EEG was recorded while participants performed a visual discrimination task involving intact and scrambled biological motion stimuli. Posterior alpha and theta oscillations were evaluated. The three groups showed indistinguishable behavioral performance and in all groups evoked theta activity varied with biological motion processing. By contrast, alpha oscillatory activity was significantly reduced only in individuals with a history of congenital cataracts. These data document on the one hand brain mechanisms of functional recovery (related to theta oscillations) and on the other hand, for the first time, a sensitive period for the development of alpha oscillatory activity in humans. PMID:27080158

  1. Double-porosity modelling of oscillatory gas motion and contaminant transport in a fractured porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Nilson, R.H.; Lie, K.H. )

    1987-12-01

    A double-porosity model is used to describe the oscillatory gas motion and associated contaminant transport induced by cyclical variations in the barometric pressure at the surface of a fractured porous medium. Flow along the fractures and within the permeable matrix blocks is locally one-dimensional. The interaction between fractures and blocks includes the Darcian seepage of fluid as well as the Fickian diffusion of contaminant. To guard against artificial numerical diffusion, the FRAM filtering remedy and methodology of Chapman is used in calculating the advective fluxes along fractures and within blocks. The entire system of equations, including the fracture/matrix interaction terms, is solved by a largely implicit non-computational time step is large compared to the cross-block transit time of Darcian pressure waves. The numerical accuracy is tested by comparison with exact solutions for oscillatory and unidirectional flows, some of which include Darcian seepage or Fickian diffusion interaction between the fracture and the matrix. The method is used to estimate the rate of transport of radioactive gases through the rubblized chimney produced by an underground nuclear explosion.

  2. Relativistic frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet regime using self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors.

    PubMed

    Kim, I Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Yun, Hyeok; Yun, Sang Jae; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yoon, Jin Woo; Yu, Tae Jun; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2012-01-01

    Coherent short-wavelength radiation from laser-plasma interactions is of increasing interest in disciplines including ultrafast biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. Using solid targets instead of atomic gases could enable the generation of coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation with higher energy and more energetic photons. Here we present the generation of extreme ultraviolet radiation through coherent high-harmonic generation from self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors--a new-generation mechanism established in a long underdense plasma on a solid target. Using a 30-fs, 100-TW Ti:sapphire laser, we obtain wavelengths as short as 4.9 nm for an optimized level of amplified spontaneous emission. Particle-in-cell simulations show that oscillatory flying electron nanosheets form in a long underdense plasma, and suggest that the high-harmonic generation is caused by reflection of the laser pulse from electron nanosheets. We expect this extreme ultraviolet radiation to be valuable in realizing a compact X-ray instrument for research in biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. PMID:23187631

  3. Enhanced oscillatory rectification and negative differential resistance in pentamantane diamondoid-cumulene systems.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Sherif Abdulkader; Cui, X Y; Ringer, S P; Stampfl, C

    2016-02-14

    We propose a new functionality for diamondoids in nanoelectronics. Based on the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism and density functional theory, we reveal that when attached to gold electrodes, the pentamantane-cumulene molecular junction exhibits large and oscillatory rectification and negative differential resistance (NDR) - depending on the number of carbon atoms in cumulene (Cn). When n is odd rectification is greatly enhanced where the rectification ratio can reach ∼180 and a large negative differential resistance peak current of ∼3 μA. This oscillatory behavior is well rationalised in terms of the occupancy of the carbon 2p states in Cn. Interestingly, different layers of C atoms in the pentamantane molecule have different contributions to transmission. The first and third layers of C atoms in pentamantane have a slight contribution to rectification, and the fifth and sixth layers have a stronger contribution to both rectification and NDR. Thus, our results suggest potential avenues for controlling their functions by chemically manipulating various parts of the diamondoid molecule, thus extending the applications of diamondoids in nanoscale integrated circuits. PMID:26794415

  4. Frequency dependent hydraulic properties estimated from oscillatory pumping tests in an unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Avinoam; Barrash, Warren; Cardiff, Michael; Hochstetler, David L.; Bakhos, Tania; Dagan, Gedeon; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests were conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. A periodic pressure signal is generated by pumping and injecting water into the aquifer consecutively and the pressure response is recorded at many points around the source. We present and analyze the data from the field test after applying Fourier analysis. We then match the data with a recently derived analytical solution for homogeneous formations to estimate the equivalent aquifer properties: conductivity K, specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy . The estimated values are shown to be in agreement with previous estimates conducted at this site. We observe variations in the estimated parameters with different oscillation periods of pumping. The trend of the parameters with changing period is discussed and compared to predictions by existing theory and laboratory experiments dealing with dynamic effective properties. It is shown that the results are qualitatively consistent with recent works on effective properties of formations of spatially variable properties in oscillatory flow. To grasp the impact of heterogeneity, a simple configuration is proposed, helping explain the observed increase in effective conductivity with decreasing period.

  5. Pre-stimulus beta and gamma oscillatory power predicts perceived audiovisual simultaneity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangyong; Li, Haijiang; Liu, Peiduo; Yuan, Hong; Huang, Xiting

    2016-09-01

    Pre-stimulus oscillation activity in the brain continuously fluctuates, but it is correlated with subsequent behavioral and perceptual performance. Here, using fast Fourier transformation of pre-stimulus electroencephalograms, we explored how oscillatory power modulates the subsequent discrimination of perceived simultaneity from non-simultaneity in the audiovisual domain. We found that the over-scalp high beta (20-28Hz), parieto-occipital low beta (14-20Hz), and high gamma oscillations (55-80Hz) were significantly stronger before audition-then-vision sequence when they were judged as simultaneous rather than non-simultaneous. In contrast, a broad range of oscillations, mainly the beta and gamma bands over a great part of the scalp were significantly weaker before vision-then-audition sequences when they were judged as simultaneous versus non-simultaneous. Moreover, for auditory-leading sequence, pre-stimulus beta and gamma oscillatory power successfully predicted subjects' reports of simultaneity on a trial-by-trial basis, with stronger activity resulting in more simultaneous judgments. These results indicate that ongoing fluctuations of beta and gamma oscillations can modulate subsequent perceived audiovisual simultaneity, but with an opposing pattern for auditory- and visual-leading sequences. PMID:27393081

  6. Reduced Sensory Oscillatory Activity during Rapid Auditory Processing as a Correlate of Language-Learning Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Sabine; Friedman, Jennifer Thomas; Keil, Andreas; Benasich, April A.

    2010-01-01

    Successful language acquisition has been hypothesized to involve the ability to integrate rapidly presented, brief acoustic cues in sensory cortex. A body of work has suggested that this ability is compromised in language-learning impairment (LLI). The present research aimed to examine sensory integration during rapid auditory processing by means of electrophysiological measures of oscillatory brain activity using data from a larger longitudinal study. Twenty-nine children with LLI and control participants with typical language development (n=18) listened to tone doublets presented at a temporal interval that is essential for accurate speech processing (70-ms interstimulus interval). The children performed a deviant (pitch change of second tone) detection task, or listened passively. The electroencephalogram was recorded from 64 electrodes. Data were source-projected to the auditory cortices and submitted to wavelet analysis, resulting in time-frequency representations of electrocortical activity. Results show significantly reduced amplitude and phase-locking of early (45–75 ms) oscillations in the gamma-band range (29–52 Hz), specifically in the LLI group, for the second stimulus of the tone doublet. This suggests altered temporal organization of sensory oscillatory activity in LLI when processing rapid sequences. PMID:21822356

  7. Modafinil Effects on Middle-Frequency Oscillatory Power During Rule Selection in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Minzenberg, Michael J; Yoon, Jong H; Cheng, Yaoan; Carter, Cameron S

    2014-01-01

    Control-related cognitive processes such as rule selection are associated with cortical oscillations in the theta, alpha and, beta ranges, and modulated by catecholamine neurotransmission. Thus, a potential strategy for improving cognitive control deficits in schizophrenia would be to use pro-catecholamine pharmacological agents to augment these control-related oscillations. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled (within-subjects) study, we tested the effects of adjunctive single-dose modafinil 200 mg on rule-related 4–30 Hz oscillations in 23 stable schizophrenia patients, using EEG during cognitive control task performance. EEG data underwent time-frequency decomposition with Morlet wavelets to determine the power of 4–30 Hz oscillations. Modafinil (relative to placebo) enhanced oscillatory power associated with high-control rule selection in theta, alpha, and beta ranges, with modest effects during rule maintenance. Modafinil treatment in schizophrenia augments middle-frequency cortical oscillatory power associated with rule selection, and may subserve diverse subcomponent processes in proactive cognitive control. PMID:24964814

  8. Sight restoration after congenital blindness does not reinstate alpha oscillatory activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bottari, Davide; Troje, Nikolaus F.; Ley, Pia; Hense, Marlene; Kekunnaya, Ramesh; Röder, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Functional brain development is characterized by sensitive periods during which experience must be available to allow for the full development of neural circuits and associated behavior. Yet, only few neural markers of sensitive period plasticity in humans are known. Here we employed electroencephalographic recordings in a unique sample of twelve humans who had been blind from birth and regained sight through cataract surgery between four months and 16 years of age. Two additional control groups were tested: a group of visually impaired individuals without a history of total congenital blindness and a group of typically sighted individuals. The EEG was recorded while participants performed a visual discrimination task involving intact and scrambled biological motion stimuli. Posterior alpha and theta oscillations were evaluated. The three groups showed indistinguishable behavioral performance and in all groups evoked theta activity varied with biological motion processing. By contrast, alpha oscillatory activity was significantly reduced only in individuals with a history of congenital cataracts. These data document on the one hand brain mechanisms of functional recovery (related to theta oscillations) and on the other hand, for the first time, a sensitive period for the development of alpha oscillatory activity in humans. PMID:27080158

  9. Oscillatory Brain Dynamics during Sentence Reading: A Fixation-Related Spectral Perturbation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vignali, Lorenzo; Himmelstoss, Nicole A.; Hawelka, Stefan; Richlan, Fabio; Hutzler, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated oscillatory brain dynamics during self-paced sentence-level processing. Participants read fully correct sentences, sentences containing a semantic violation and “sentences” in which the order of the words was randomized. At the target word level, fixations on semantically unrelated words elicited a lower-beta band (13–18 Hz) desynchronization. At the sentence level, gamma power (31–55 Hz) increased linearly for syntactically correct sentences, but not when the order of the words was randomized. In the 300–900 ms time window after sentence onsets, theta power (4–7 Hz) was greater for syntactically correct sentences as compared to sentences where no syntactic structure was preserved (random words condition). We interpret our results as conforming with a recently formulated predictive-coding framework for oscillatory neural dynamics during sentence-level language comprehension. Additionally, we discuss how our results relate to previous findings with serial visual presentation vs. self-paced reading. PMID:27199713

  10. Relativistic frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet regime using self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, I Jong; Pae, Ki Hong; Kim, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Taek; Yun, Hyeok; Yun, Sang Jae; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Yoon, Jin Woo; Yu, Tae Jun; Jeong, Tae Moon; Nam, Chang Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2012-01-01

    Coherent short-wavelength radiation from laser–plasma interactions is of increasing interest in disciplines including ultrafast biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. Using solid targets instead of atomic gases could enable the generation of coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation with higher energy and more energetic photons. Here we present the generation of extreme ultraviolet radiation through coherent high-harmonic generation from self-induced oscillatory flying mirrors—a new-generation mechanism established in a long underdense plasma on a solid target. Using a 30-fs, 100-TW Ti:sapphire laser, we obtain wavelengths as short as 4.9 nm for an optimized level of amplified spontaneous emission. Particle-in-cell simulations show that oscillatory flying electron nanosheets form in a long underdense plasma, and suggest that the high-harmonic generation is caused by reflection of the laser pulse from electron nanosheets. We expect this extreme ultraviolet radiation to be valuable in realizing a compact X-ray instrument for research in biomolecular imaging and attosecond physics. PMID:23187631

  11. Continuum study on the oscillatory characteristics of carbon nanocones inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Sadeghi, F.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-02-01

    This article aims to present a comprehensive study on the oscillatory behavior of concentric carbon nanocones (CNCs) inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using a continuum approach. To this end, the optimum radius of nanotube for which the nanocone lies on the tube axis is determined based on the distribution of suction energy. Using the Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme, the equation of motion is solved numerically to attain the time history of displacement and velocity of nanocone. It is observed that the oscillation of nanocone occurs with respect to its axial equilibrium distance which moves further away from the middle axis of nanotube as the number of pentagons increases. A novel semi-analytical expression as a function of geometrical parameters, initial conditions and cone vertex direction is also proposed for the precise evaluation of oscillation frequency. With respect to the proposed frequency expression, a detailed parametric study is conducted to get an insight into the effects of number of pentagons, cone vertex direction and initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of CNC-CNT oscillators. It is found that nanocones with more pentagons generate greater maximum frequencies inside nanotubes. Furthermore, it is shown that higher maximum frequencies can be achieved if the nanocone enters the nanotube from base.

  12. Oscillatory Brain Dynamics during Sentence Reading: A Fixation-Related Spectral Perturbation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Lorenzo; Himmelstoss, Nicole A; Hawelka, Stefan; Richlan, Fabio; Hutzler, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated oscillatory brain dynamics during self-paced sentence-level processing. Participants read fully correct sentences, sentences containing a semantic violation and "sentences" in which the order of the words was randomized. At the target word level, fixations on semantically unrelated words elicited a lower-beta band (13-18 Hz) desynchronization. At the sentence level, gamma power (31-55 Hz) increased linearly for syntactically correct sentences, but not when the order of the words was randomized. In the 300-900 ms time window after sentence onsets, theta power (4-7 Hz) was greater for syntactically correct sentences as compared to sentences where no syntactic structure was preserved (random words condition). We interpret our results as conforming with a recently formulated predictive-coding framework for oscillatory neural dynamics during sentence-level language comprehension. Additionally, we discuss how our results relate to previous findings with serial visual presentation vs. self-paced reading. PMID:27199713

  13. Frequency-domain Monte Carlo method for linear oscillatory gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladiges, Daniel R.; Sader, John E.

    2015-03-01

    Gas flows generated by resonating nanoscale devices inherently occur in the non-continuum, low Mach number regime. Numerical simulations of such flows using the standard direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method are hindered by high statistical noise, which has motivated the development of several alternate Monte Carlo methods for low Mach number flows. Here, we present a frequency-domain low Mach number Monte Carlo method based on the Boltzmann-BGK equation, for the simulation of oscillatory gas flows. This circumvents the need for temporal simulations, as is currently required, and provides direct access to both amplitude and phase information using a pseudo-steady algorithm. The proposed method is validated for oscillatory Couette flow and the flow generated by an oscillating sphere. Good agreement is found with an existing time-domain method and accurate numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-BGK equation. Analysis of these simulations using a rigorous statistical approach shows that the frequency-domain method provides a significant improvement in computational speed.

  14. Memory improvement via slow-oscillatory stimulation during sleep in older adults.

    PubMed

    Westerberg, Carmen E; Florczak, Susan M; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Marshall, Lisa; Zee, Phyllis C; Paller, Ken A

    2015-09-01

    We examined the intriguing but controversial idea that disrupted sleep-dependent consolidation contributes to age-related memory decline. Slow-wave activity during sleep may help strengthen neural connections and provide memories with long-term stability, in which case decreased slow-wave activity in older adults could contribute to their weaker memories. One prediction from this account is that age-related memory deficits should be reduced by artificially enhancing slow-wave activity. In young adults, applying transcranial current oscillating at a slow frequency (0.75 Hz) during sleep improves memory. Here, we tested whether this procedure can improve memory in older adults. In 2 sessions separated by 1 week, we applied either slow-oscillatory stimulation or sham stimulation during an afternoon nap in a double-blind, crossover design. Memory tests were administered before and after sleep. A larger improvement in word-pair recall and higher slow-wave activity was observed with slow-oscillatory stimulation than with sham stimulation. This is the first demonstration that this procedure can improve memory in older adults, suggesting that declarative memory performance in older adults is partly dependent on slow-wave activity during sleep. PMID:26116933

  15. Co-existence of silent and oscillatory regimes of a single neuron's activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaschenko, Tatiana; Shilnikov, Andrey; Cymbalyu, Gennady

    2008-03-01

    Bursting, tonic spiking, sub-threshold oscillations and silence are basic robust regimes of activity of a single neuron. A model of a leech heart interneuron demonstrates three different types of co-existence: (1) silence and bursting, (2) silence and tonic spiking, and (3) silence and sub-threshold oscillations. We show that these types of co-existence can be explicated by the unstable sub-threshold oscillations (USTO) separating silence and an oscillatory regime and setting the threshold between them. The range of parameters, where the co-existence is observed, is determined by the critical values at which the USTO appear and disappear. More precisely, the USTO occur through the sub-critical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, where the rest state loses stability. Then, the USTO disappear on the homoclinic bifurcation near which the oscillatory regime disappears as a regime. The bifurcation values are calculated and shown to match the empirical transition values found in numerical experiments in Cymbalyuk et al., 2002.

  16. Modafinil effects on middle-frequency oscillatory power during rule selection in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Minzenberg, Michael J; Yoon, Jong H; Cheng, Yaoan; Carter, Cameron S

    2014-12-01

    Control-related cognitive processes such as rule selection are associated with cortical oscillations in the theta, alpha and, beta ranges, and modulated by catecholamine neurotransmission. Thus, a potential strategy for improving cognitive control deficits in schizophrenia would be to use pro-catecholamine pharmacological agents to augment these control-related oscillations. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled (within-subjects) study, we tested the effects of adjunctive single-dose modafinil 200 mg on rule-related 4-30 Hz oscillations in 23 stable schizophrenia patients, using EEG during cognitive control task performance. EEG data underwent time-frequency decomposition with Morlet wavelets to determine the power of 4-30 Hz oscillations. Modafinil (relative to placebo) enhanced oscillatory power associated with high-control rule selection in theta, alpha, and beta ranges, with modest effects during rule maintenance. Modafinil treatment in schizophrenia augments middle-frequency cortical oscillatory power associated with rule selection, and may subserve diverse subcomponent processes in proactive cognitive control. PMID:24964814

  17. Oscillatory Structure of Elastic Precursor in Shocked Crystalline Solids: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zybin, Sergey; Zhakhovskii, Vasilii; Elert, Mark; White, Carter T.

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structure of elastic precursors of shock waves propagating through crystalline solids in different directions. Both rare gas and diamond crystals were studied using Lennard-Jones and reactive empirical bond order potentials respectively. Elastic precursors were found to exhibit an oscillatory profile for various directions and different shock strengths ranging from a pure elastic wave to an elastic-plastic shock splitting to a shock wave with melting. These oscillations originate from collisions of atomic planes in the shock direction bouncing against each other as in one-dimensional chain. After the oscillations fade, and the shear stress achieves its sustained maximum value, plastic deformation develops. These effects are strongly influenced by the orientation dependence of shear stress under high strain rate at the shock front. Our simulations also show that a stationary combination of elastic precursor with plastic wave could exist in moderate and even melting shock waves. The oscillatory structure of the elastic precursor might play an important role in the initiation of shock-induced chemical reactions in crystalline solids.

  18. Oscillatory flow at the end of parallel-plate stacks: phenomenological and similarity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoan; Jaworski, Artur J.

    2010-10-01

    This paper addresses the physics of the oscillatory flow in the vicinity of a series of parallel plates forming geometrically identical channels. This type of flow is particularly relevant to thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, where a reciprocating flow is responsible for the desirable energy transfer, but it is also of interest to general fluid mechanics of oscillatory flows past bluff bodies. In this paper, the physics of an acoustically induced flow past a series of plates in an isothermal condition is studied in detail using the data provided by PIV imaging. Particular attention is given to the analysis of the wake flow during the ejection part of the flow cycle, where either closed recirculating vortices or alternating vortex shedding can be observed. This is followed by a similarity analysis of the governing Navier-Stokes equations in order to derive the similarity criteria governing the wake flow behaviour. To this end, similarity numbers including two types of Reynolds number, the Keulegan-Carpenter number and a non-dimensional stack configuration parameter, d/h, are considered and their influence on the phenomena are discussed.

  19. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Horacio G.; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling.

  20. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Horacio G; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-14

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling. PMID:22979891

  1. Computational modelling of movement-related beta-oscillatory dynamics in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Mrudul B; Bowen, Stephanie; Rossiter, Holly E; Dupont-Hadwen, Joshua; Moran, Rosalyn J; Friston, Karl J; Ward, Nick S

    2016-06-01

    Oscillatory activity in the beta range, in human primary motor cortex (M1), shows interesting dynamics that are tied to behaviour and change systematically in disease. To investigate the pathophysiology underlying these changes, we must first understand how changes in beta activity are caused in healthy subjects. We therefore adapted a canonical (repeatable) microcircuit model used in dynamic causal modelling (DCM) previously used to model induced responses in visual cortex. We adapted this model to accommodate cytoarchitectural differences between visual and motor cortex. Using biologically plausible connections, we used Bayesian model selection to identify the best model of measured MEG data from 11 young healthy participants, performing a simple handgrip task. We found that the canonical M1 model had substantially more model evidence than the generic canonical microcircuit model when explaining measured MEG data. The canonical M1 model reproduced measured dynamics in humans at rest, in a manner consistent with equivalent studies performed in mice. Furthermore, the changes in excitability (self-inhibition) necessary to explain beta suppression during handgrip were consistent with the attenuation of sensory precision implied by predictive coding. These results establish the face validity of a model that can be used to explore the laminar interactions that underlie beta-oscillatory dynamics in humans in vivo. Our canonical M1 model may be useful for characterising the synaptic mechanisms that mediate pathophysiological beta dynamics associated with movement disorders, such as stroke or Parkinson's disease. PMID:26956910

  2. [Features of brain oscillatory activity and cardiac defense in treatment arterial hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Aftanas, L I; Brak, I V; Gilinskaia, O M; Pavlov, S V; Reva, N V

    2014-01-01

    Stress reactivity of the motivational system of defense can be assessed with the aid the cardiac defense response (CDR) - the reaction of the cardiovascular system to unexpected aversive unconditioned stimulus. The main objective of the study was revealing putative contribution of oscillatory systems of the brain into central pathogenic mechanisms of enhanced blood pressure (BP) stress-reactivity in naive patients with arterial hypertension (AH) of the 1st-2nd degrees (n = 17) and healthy control (n = 19) subjects. Using dynamic registration "beat-by-beat" arterial pressure, and oscillatory activity related EEG (64 channels) is estimated using the event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERD/ERS). Along with abnormally high blood pressure in patients with hypertension background set significantly lower concentrations of serotonin blood platelets and increased tonic activation of the left hemisphere, reflected in the asymmetric reduction of delta- (2-4 Hz) and theta-1 (4-6 Hz) power in the central and parietal cortex in the hemisphere CDR of the patients are characterized by hyperactivity both short- and long-latency components of blood pressure. According to the dynamic analysis of the concomitant EEG, long-latency BP components may be accounted by, among other mechanisms, weakening of the descending ("top-down") inhibitory control, hypothetically implemented with the high-frequency EEG alpha (10-12 Hz) oscillations from the medial central-parietal cortex of both hemispheres of the brain. PMID:25464727

  3. Transition of oscillatory flow in tubes - An empirical model for application to Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Ibrahim, M.; Kannapareddy, M.; Johnson, T.; Friedman, G.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to an empirical model for transition to turbulence in oscillatory flows in straight tubes. Designed after a correlation for transition of a boundary layer on a flat plate, the model yields the laminar flow momentum thickness Reynolds number that must be met before transition to turbulence will occur. The transition point is located by comparing this to the actual momentum thickness Reynolds number. A scheme is proposed for estimating the momentum thickness Reynolds number in terms of the position within the cycle, the maximum value of the diameter Reynolds within the cycle, Re(max), and the dimensionless frequency, Valensi number. Results from an experimental study of oscillatory flow in a tube are employed to develop the model. When the flow is determined to be turbulent, it is proposed that a fully-developed, steady flow friction coefficient be applied. When the flow is laminar, the assumption of fully developed flow cannot be made; thus, a method is suggested for estimating the friction factor.

  4. Sedimentation of an elliptical particle in periodic oscillatory pressure driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wenjun; Deng, Jianqiang; Cao, Zheng; Mei, Mei

    2015-12-01

    The sedimentation of a heavy elliptical particle in a two-dimensional channel filled with Newtonian fluid under oscillatory pressure driven flow has been numerically investigated by using the finite element arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. The effects of particle Reynolds number, initial position, blockage ratio, as well as oscillation frequency and amplitude on the flow patterns during sedimentation have been studied. The results show that there exists an equilibrium position for high frequency flow, and the position of the heavier particle is closer to the centerline. As rotation contributes to non-uniform pressure on particle surface, the further initial position and lower amplitude lead to the larger scale zigzag migration; however, the maximum lateral displacements of these low frequency zigzag motions are nearly the same due to the consistent lubrication limit. Moreover, our simulation results indicate that there are five distinct modes of settling in oscillatory flow: horizontal with offset, oscillating, tumbling throughout channel, tumbling at one side and the special ‘resonance’ phenomenon. The ‘resonance’ induced by the wall is shown to have a close association with the harmonious change of drag and lift on particle surface, and be sensitive to the oscillation in the wake and the periodic discharge of vorticity from behind the body.

  5. Nanoscopic Terraces, Mesas, and Ridges in Freely Standing Thin Films Sculpted by Supramolecular Oscillatory Surface Forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiran; Yilixiati, Subinuer; Pearsall, Collin; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-04-26

    Freely standing thin liquid films containing supramolecular structures including micelles, nanoparticles, polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes, and smectic liquid crystals undergo drainage via stratification. The layer-by-layer removal of these supramolecular structures manifests as stepwise thinning over time and a coexistence of domains and nanostructures of discretely different thickness. The layering of supramolecular structures in confined thin films contributes additional non-DLVO, supramolecular oscillatory surface forces to disjoining pressure, thus influencing both drainage kinetics and stability of thin films. Understanding and characterizing the spontaneous creation and evolution of nanoscopic topography of stratifying, freely standing thin liquid films have been long-standing challenges due to the absence of experimental techniques with the requisite spatial (thickness <10 nm) and temporal resolution (<1 ms). Using Interferometry Digital Imaging Optical Microscopy (IDIOM) protocols developed herein, we visualize and characterize size, shape, and evolution kinetics of nanoscopic mesas, terraces, and ridges. The exquisite thickness maps created using IDIOM protocols provide much needed and unprecedented insights into the role of supramolecular oscillatory surface forces in driving growth of such nanostructures as well as in controlling properties and stability of freely standing thin films and, more generally, of colloidal dispersions like foams. PMID:27057959

  6. Low order oscillatory modeling of the inner layer of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hellum, Aren M.

    2012-11-01

    The visualization of the viscous sublayer (VSL) by Einstein & Li (1956) and others indicates an oscillatory character with varying periods of growth followed by Strouhal-like liquidation of spanwise vorticity into arrays of lifting hairpins. In streak PIV at 20 wall units due to Li, Adrian & Hanratty (1996), we notice a preponderance of dislocations. Therefore, we assume the sublayer to be in a permanent state of near-bifurcation irrespective of Reynolds number. To the lowest order, we model this process by Stuart-Landau (SL) oscillator equation. It is assumed that within a VSL cell, the oscillator is diffusively coupled along the span, the surface-normal growth is also diffusive--slowing as it thickens--and the outer layer provides the disturbance vector. The sublayer growth is followed by breakdown, creating a new outer layer disturbance vector for the next cycle. The SL equation is modified accounting for the above processes. The initial value solution of spanwise vorticity shows the development of nonuniformity, numerous dislocations and meandering streak-like structures that persist over extraordinarily large number of oscillatory cycles. Variation of the oscillator time scale shows the effects of increasing Reynolds number. Sponsor: ONR34.

  7. Oscillatory activity of single units in a somatosensory cortex of an awake monkey and their possible role in texture analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ahissar, E; Vaadia, E

    1990-01-01

    Neuronal activity was extracellularly recorded in the cortex of an awake monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Single units displaying oscillatory firing patterns were found in the upper bank of the lateral sulcus in a region where most of the neurons responded to somatosensory stimuli. The spectral energies of the oscillating activity were distributed in a trimodal fashion--0-15, 15-50, and 80-250 Hz--with the most common frequencies around 30 Hz. The oscillatory activity was not affected by anesthesia, but it was often reduced by tactile stimulation or self-initiated movements. Analysis of the spike trains suggests that the majority of oscillatory activity was intrinsically generated by the neurons. A neural model of texture analysis is offered based on a corticothalamic phase-locked loop. The newly identified oscillators play a key role in this model. The relevance of the model to physiological, anatomical, and psychophysical data, as well as testable predictions, are discussed. Images PMID:2247469

  8. Nonlinear oscillatory rheology and structure of wormlike micellar solutions and colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnon, Amanda Kate

    The complex, nonlinear flow behavior of soft materials transcends industrial applications, smart material design and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A long-standing, fundamental challenge in soft-matter science is establishing a quantitative connection between the deformation field, local microstructure and macroscopic dynamic flow properties i.e., the rheology. Soft materials are widely used in consumer products and industrial processes including energy recovery, surfactants for personal healthcare (e.g. soap and shampoo), coatings, plastics, drug delivery, medical devices and therapeutics. Oftentimes, these materials are processed by, used during, or exposed to non-equilibrium conditions for which the transient response of the complex fluid is critical. As such, designing new dynamic experiments is imperative to testing these materials and further developing micromechanical models to predict their transient response. Two of the most common classes of these soft materials stand as the focus of the present research; they are: solutions of polymer-like micelles (PLM or also known as wormlike micelles, WLM) and concentrated colloidal suspensions. In addition to their varied applications these two different classes of soft materials are also governed by different physics. In contrast, to the shear thinning behavior of the WLMs at high shear rates, the near hard-sphere colloidal suspensions are known to display increases, sometimes quite substantial, in viscosity (known as shear thickening). The stress response of these complex fluids derive from the shear-induced microstructure, thus measurements of the microstructure under flow are critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying the complex, nonlinear rheology of these complex fluids. A popular micromechanical model is reframed from its original derivation for predicting steady shear rheology of polymers and WLMs to be applicable to weakly nonlinear oscillatory shear flow. The validity, utility and limits of

  9. On the Distribution of Particle Acceleration Sites in Plasmoid-dominated Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Cerutti, Benoît; Werner, Gregory R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the distribution of particle acceleration sites, independently of the actual acceleration mechanism, during plasmoid-dominated, relativistic collisionless magnetic reconnection by analyzing the results of a particle-in-cell numerical simulation. The simulation is initiated with Harris-type current layers in pair plasma with no guide magnetic field, negligible radiative losses, no initial perturbation, and using periodic boundary conditions. We find that the plasmoids develop a robust internal structure, with colder dense cores and hotter outer shells, that is recovered after each plasmoid merger on a dynamical timescale. We use spacetime diagrams of the reconnection layers to probe the evolution of plasmoids, and in this context we investigate the individual particle histories for a representative sample of energetic electrons. We distinguish three classes of particle acceleration sites associated with (1) magnetic X-points, (2) regions between merging plasmoids, and (3) the trailing edges of accelerating plasmoids. We evaluate the contribution of each class of acceleration sites to the final energy distribution of energetic electrons: magnetic X-points dominate at moderate energies, and the regions between merging plasmoids dominate at higher energies. We also identify the dominant acceleration scenarios, in order of decreasing importance: (1) single acceleration between merging plasmoids, (2) single acceleration at a magnetic X-point, and (3) acceleration at a magnetic X-point followed by acceleration in a plasmoid. Particle acceleration is absent only in the vicinity of stationary plasmoids. The effect of magnetic mirrors due to plasmoid contraction does not appear to be significant in relativistic reconnection.

  10. Cluster synchronization and spatio-temporal dynamics in networks of oscillatory and excitable Luo-Rudy cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakov, O. I.; Osipov, G. V.; Chan, C.-K.; Kurths, J.

    2007-03-01

    We study collective phenomena in nonhomogeneous cardiac cell culture models, including one- and two-dimensional lattices of oscillatory cells and mixtures of oscillatory and excitable cells. Individual cell dynamics is described by a modified Luo-Rudy model with depolarizing current. We focus on the transition from incoherent behavior to global synchronization via cluster synchronization regimes as coupling strength is increased. These regimes are characterized qualitatively by space-time plots and quantitatively by profiles of local frequencies and distributions of cluster sizes in dependence upon coupling strength. We describe spatio-temporal patterns arising during this transition, including pacemakers, spiral waves, and complicated irregular activity.

  11. Contribution of transcranial oscillatory stimulation to research on neural networks: an emphasis on hippocampo-neocortical rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Lisa; Binder, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    EEG rhythms reflect the synchronized activity of underlying biological neuronal network oscillations, and certain predominant frequencies are typically linked to certain behavioral states. For instance, slow wave activity characterized by sleep slow oscillation (SO) emerges normally during slow-wave sleep (SWS). In this mini-review we will first give a background leading up to the present day association between specific oscillations and their functional relevance for learning and memory consolidation. Following, some principles on oscillatory activity are summarized and finally results of studies employing slowly oscillating transcranial electric stimulation are given. We underscore that oscillatory transcranial electric stimulation presents a tool to study principles of cortical network function. PMID:24133431

  12. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G; Robbins, J M; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-12-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  13. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G.; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  14. Meeting on Stellar and Planetary Magnetic Fields, Potsdam, East Germany, August 29-September 2, 1983, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The morphologies and origins of the magnetic fields of the planets, the sun, and different classes of stars are examined in reviews and reports of theoretical and observational investigations. Topics discussed include topological-pumping mechanisms, solar-cyclic oscillatory motions, turbulent heat transfer in convective envelopes, premain-sequence stellar magnetic activity, magnetic starspots, three types of planetary dynamo, and the dynamics and energetics of the earth's core. Consideration is given to mean-field models of the planetary or stellar dynamo, photometry and spectrophotometry of magnetic stars, the binary nature of Beta CrB, and precession-induced long-period variations in magnetic stars.

  15. Solitary and shock waves in magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Abdukerim, Nuriman; Xie, Bai-Song

    2014-02-15

    An Ohm's law for electron-positron (EP) plasma is obtained. In the framework of EP magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate nonrelativistic nonlinear waves' solutions in a magnetized EP plasma. In the collisionless limit, quasistationary propagating solitary wave structures for the magnetic field and the plasma density are obtained. It is found that the wave amplitude increases with the Mach number and the Alfvén speed. However, the dependence on the plasma temperature is just the opposite. Moreover, for a cold EP plasma, the existence range of the solitary waves depends only on the Alfvén speed. For a hot EP plasma, the existence range depends on the Alfvén speed as well as the plasma temperature. In the presence of collision, the electromagnetic fields and the plasma density can appear as oscillatory shock structures because of the dissipation caused by the collisions. As the collision frequency increases, the oscillatory shock structure becomes more and more monotonic.

  16. The electrostatic wake of a superthermal test electron in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.A.; Wiley, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    The electrostatic potential is determined for a test electron with {upsilon}{sub {parallel}} {much gt} {upsilon}{sub Te}, in a uniform magnetized plasma ({omega}{sub ce} {much gt} {omega}{sub pe}). In the frame of the test electron, part of the spatially oscillatory potential has spherical symmetry over the hemisphere to the rear of the electron and is zero ahead of the electron. A second part of different character, which makes the potential continuous at the plane containing the electron, is oscillatory in the radial direction but decreases almost monotonically in the axial direction.

  17. The electrostatic wake of a superthermal test electron in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.A.; Wiley, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    The electrostatic potential is determined for a test electron with {upsilon}{sub {parallel}} {much_gt} {upsilon}{sub Te}, in a uniform magnetized plasma ({omega}{sub ce} {much_gt} {omega}{sub pe}). In the frame of the test electron, part of the spatially oscillatory potential has spherical symmetry over the hemisphere to the rear of the electron and is zero ahead of the electron. A second part of different character, which makes the potential continuous at the plane containing the electron, is oscillatory in the radial direction but decreases almost monotonically in the axial direction.

  18. Particle distributions in collisionless magnetic reconnection: An implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) description

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, D.W.; Francis, G.E.; Max, C.E.

    1990-06-29

    Evidence from magnetospheric and solar flare research supports the belief that collisionless magnetic reconnection can proceed on the Alfven-wave crossing timescale. Reconnection behavior that occurs this rapidly in collisionless plasmas is not well understood because underlying mechanisms depend on the details of the ion and electron distributions in the vicinity of the emerging X-points. We use the direct implicit Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code AVANTI to study the details of these distributions as they evolve in the self-consistent E and B fields of magnetic reconnection. We first consider a simple neutral sheet model. We observe rapid movement of the current-carrying electrons away from the emerging X-point. Later in time an oscillation of the trapped magnetic flux is found, superimposed upon continued linear growth due to plasma inflow at the ion sound speed. The addition of a current-aligned and a normal B field widen the scope of our studies.

  19. Magnetic geometry and physics of advanced divertors: The X-divertor and the snowflake

    SciTech Connect

    Kotschenreuther, Mike; Valanju, Prashant; Covele, Brent; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2013-10-15

    Advanced divertors are magnetic geometries where a second X-point is added in the divertor region to address the serious challenges of burning plasma power exhaust. Invoking physical arguments, numerical work, and detailed model magnetic field analysis, we investigate the magnetic field structure of advanced divertors in the physically relevant region for power exhaust—the scrape-off layer. A primary result of our analysis is the emergence of a physical “metric,” the Divertor Index DI, which quantifies the flux expansion increase as one goes from the main X-point to the strike point. It clearly separates three geometries with distinct consequences for divertor physics—the Standard Divertor (DI = 1), and two advanced geometries—the X-Divertor (XD, DI > 1) and the Snowflake (DI < 1). The XD, therefore, cannot be classified as one variant of the Snowflake. By this measure, recent National Spherical Torus Experiment and DIIID experiments are X-Divertors, not Snowflakes.

  20. Altered oscillatory cerebral blood flow velocity and autoregulation in postural tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Medow, Marvin S.; Del Pozzi, Andrew T.; Messer, Zachary R.; Terilli, Courtney; Stewart, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    Decreased upright cerebral blood flow (CBF) with hyperpnea and hypocapnia is seen in a minority of patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). More often, CBF is not decreased despite upright neurocognitive dysfunction. This may result from time-dependent changes in CBF. We hypothesized that increased oscillations in CBF occurs in POTS (N = 12) compared to healthy controls (N = 9), and tested by measuring CBF velocity (CBFv) by transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the middle cerebral artery, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and related parameters, supine and during 70° upright tilt. Autospectra for mean CBFv and MAP, and transfer function analysis were obtained over the frequency range of 0.0078–0.4 Hz. Upright HR was increased in POTS (125 ± 8 vs. 86 ± 2 bpm), as was diastolic BP (74 ± 3 vs. 65 ± 3 mmHg) compared to control, while peripheral resistance, cardiac output, and mean CBFv increased similarly with tilt. Upright BP variability (BPV), low frequency (LF) power (0.04–0.13 Hz), and peak frequency of BPV were increased in POTS (24.3 ± 4.1, and 18.4 ± 4.1 mmHg2/Hz at 0.091 Hz vs. 11.8 ± 3.3, and 8.8 ± 2 mmHg2/Hz c at 0.071 Hz), as was upright overall CBFv variability, low frequency power and peak frequency of CBFv variability (29.3 ± 4.7, and 22.1 ± 2.7 [cm/s]2/Hz at.092 Hz vs. 14.7 ± 2.6, and 6.7 ± 1.2 [cm/s]2/Hz at 0.077Hz). Autospectra were sharply peaked in POTS. LF phase was decreased in POTS (-14 ± 4 vs. -25 ± 10 degrees) while upright. LF gain was increased (1.51 ± 0.09 vs. 0.86 ± 0.12 [cm/s]/ mmHg) while coherence was increased (0.96 ± 0.01 vs. 0.80 ± 0.04). Increased oscillatory BP in upright POTS patients is closely coupled to oscillatory CBFv over a narrow bandwidth corresponding to the Mayer wave frequency. Therefore combined increased oscillatory BP and increased LF gain markedly increases CBFv oscillations in a narrow bandwidth. This close coupling of CBF to MAP indicates impaired cerebral autoregulation that may underlie