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Sample records for magnetically actuated probes

  1. Single-body lensed-fiber scanning probe actuated by magnetic force for optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Min, Eun Jung; Na, Jihoon; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-06-15

    We propose a fiber-based hand-held scanning probe suitable for the sample arm of an optical imaging system including optical coherence tomography. To achieve compactness, a single-body lensed-fiber and a solenoid actuator were utilized. The focusing lens of the probe was directly formed onto the distal end of a fiber, which eliminated the need for additional optical components and optical alignment. A ferromagnetic iron bead was glued onto the middle of the fiber to enable actuation by magnetic force, which allowed easy fabrication and good practicality. The fiber piece having the built-in fiber lens was forced to oscillate in its resonant frequency. With the implemented probe, optical coherence tomography images of a human fingertip and a pearl were obtained at an imaging speed of 30 frames/s over a scanning range of 4 mm. PMID:19529740

  2. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  3. Magnetic actuation of hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  4. Magnetic actuation of hair cells.

    PubMed

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  5. Impedance analysis of the organ of corti with magnetically actuated probes.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Marc P; Gummer, Anthony W

    2004-08-01

    An innovative method is presented to measure the mechanical driving point impedance of biological structures up to at least 40 kHz. The technique employs an atomic force cantilever with a ferromagnetic coating and an external magnetic field to apply a calibrated force to the cantilever. Measurement of the resulting cantilever velocity using a laser Doppler vibrometer yields the impedance. A key feature of the method is that it permits measurements for biological tissue in physiological solutions. The method was applied to measure the point impedance of the organ of Corti in situ, to elucidate the biophysical basis of cochlear amplification. The basilar membrane was mechanically clamped at its tympanic surface and the measurements conducted at different radial positions on the reticular lamina. The tectorial membrane was removed. The impedance was described by a generalized Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic model, in which the stiffness was real-valued and independent of frequency, but the viscosity was complex-valued with positive real part, which was dependent on frequency and negative imaginary part, which was independent of frequency. There was no evidence for an inertial component. The magnitude of the impedance was greatest at the tunnel of Corti, and decreased monotonically in each of the radial directions. In the absence of inertia, the mechanical load on the outer hair cells causes their electromotile displacement responses to be reduced by only 10-fold over the entire range of auditory frequencies. PMID:15298940

  6. Magnetic cantilever actuator with sharpened magnetic thin film ellipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Ger, Tzong-Rong; Lai, Mei-Feng; Chen, We-Yun; Huang, Hao-Ting; Chen, Jiann-Yeu; Wang, Pei-Jen; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-01

    A SiO2 cantilever covered by elliptical magnetic thin films was designed as an actuator. Under magnetic field, the elliptical magnetic film with sharp ends would exhibit single-domain structures and generate torque to push or pull the two arms of the cantilever. The cantilever could then stretch or compress and the displacement could be controlled by adjusting the magnitude and direction of the external magnetic field. The combination between micromagnetism of patterned films and actuator was successfully demonstrated. The magnetic actuator can be applied for future application in the biological field and would be valuable for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  7. Navigating conjugated polymer actuated neural probes in a brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, Eugene D.; Kipke, Daryl; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-04-01

    Neural probe insertion methods have a direct impact on the longevity of the device in the brain. Initial tissue and vascular damage caused by the probe entering the brain triggers a chronic tissue response that is known to attenuate neural recordings and ultimately encapsulate the probes. Smaller devices have been found to evoke reduced inflammatory response. One way to record from undamaged neural networks may be to position the electrode sites away from the probe. To investigate this approach, we are developing probes with controllably movable electrode projections, which would move outside of the zone that is damaged by the insertion of the larger probe. The objective of this study was to test the capability of conjugated polymer bilayer actuators to actuate neural electrode projections from a probe shank into a transparent brain phantom. Parylene neural probe devices, having five electrode projections with actuating segments and with varying widths (50 - 250 μm) and lengths (200 - 1000 μm) were fabricated. The electroactive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) was used to bend or flatten the projections. The devices were inserted into the brain phantom using an electronic microdrive while simultaneously activating the actuators. Deflections were quantified based on video images. The electrode projections were successfully controlled to either remain flat or to actuate out-of-plane and into the brain phantom during insertion. The projection width had a significant effect on their ability to deflect within the phantom, with thinner probes deflecting but not the wider ones. Thus, small integrated conjugated polymer actuators may enable multiple neuro-experiments and applications not possible before.

  8. Enhancing the force capability of permanent magnet latching actuators for electromechanical valve actuation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rens, J.; Clark, R. E.; Jewell, G. W.; Howe, D.

    2005-05-01

    This article introduces a topology of parallel-polarized permanent magnet latching actuator for use in electromagnetic valve actuation systems for internal combustion engines. The actuator has a number of advantages over reluctance actuators, commonly employed in such systems, in terms of reduced starting currents and fail-safe capability. The influence of a number of design features on actuator performance, such as tooth tapering, additional magnets to improve the main magnet flux path and prevent the onset of saturation, and mechanical clearances required to protect the permanent magnet from shock loads are investigated. The design study findings are verified by measurements on a prototype actuator.

  9. Magnetic suspension characteristics of electromagnetic actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dantam K.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1993-01-01

    Electromagnetic actuators that use a current-carrying coil (which is placed in a magnetic field) to generate mechanical force are conceptually attractive components for active control of rotating shafts. In one concept that is being tested in the laboratory, the control forces from such actuators are applied on the flexibly supported bearing housings of the rotor. Development of this concept into a practical reality requires a clear and thorough understanding of the role of electromechanical parameters of these actuators in delivering the right amount of control force at the right phase into the rotor. The electromechanical parameters of the actuators investigated are the mass of the armature, stiffness of its suspension, electrical resistance, and inductance of the coils. Improper selection of these parameters can result in degradation in their performance, leading to mistuning between the actuator and the rotor. Through a simple analysis, it is shown that use of such mistuned actuators could result in sharp fluctuations in the phase of the control force delivered into the rotor around the critical speeds. These sharp fluctuations in phase, called 'Phase Glitches', are undesirable. Hence, future designs of controllers should take into account the undesirable mistuning effects between the actuator and the rotor caused by the phase glitches.

  10. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  11. Flux-Feedback Magnetic-Suspension Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1990-01-01

    Flux-feedback magnetic-suspension actuator provides magnetic suspension and control forces having linear transfer characteristics between force command and force output over large range of gaps. Hall-effect devices used as sensors for electronic feedback circuit controlling currents flowing in electromagnetic windings to maintain flux linking suspended element at substantially constant value independent of changes in length of gap. Technique provides effective method for maintenance of constant flux density in gap and simpler than previous methods. Applications include magnetic actuators for control of shapes and figures of antennas and of precise segmented reflectors, magnetic suspensions in devices for storage of angular momentum and/or kinetic energy, and systems for control, pointing, and isolation of instruments.

  12. Electropermanent magnet actuation for droplet ferromicrofluidics

    PubMed Central

    Padovani, José I.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Howe, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    Droplet actuation is an essential mechanism for droplet-based microfluidic systems. On-demand electromagnetic actuation is used in a ferrofluid-based microfluidic system for water droplet displacement. Electropermanent magnets (EPMs) are used to induce 50 mT magnetic fields in a ferrofluid filled microchannel with gradients up to 6.4 × 104 kA/m2. Short 50 µs current pulses activate the electropermanent magnets and generate negative magnetophoretic forces that range from 10 to 70 nN on 40 to 80 µm water-in-ferrofluid droplets. Maximum droplet displacement velocities of up to 300 µm/s are obtained under flow and no-flow conditions. Electropermanent magnet-activated droplet sorting under continuous flow is demonstrated using a split-junction microfluidic design. PMID:27583301

  13. Magnetically driven filament probe.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Herrmann, A; Rohde, V; Maraschek, M; Müller, H W

    2007-05-01

    A radially movable probe has been developed for studies of filamentary transport in ASDEX Upgrade during edge localized modes (ELMs) by means of Langmuir tips and magnetic pickup coils. The probe is permanently installed at the low field side in the ASDEX Upgrade vacuum vessel and is not subject to limitations in probe size, as, for example, probes on a shared manipulator are. The probe is moved by a magnetic drive, which allows for easy installation in the vessel, and has moderate machine requirements, as it will only require an electric feedthrough and an external power supply. The drive gives a linear motion with a radial range of 5 cm within 50 ms, where range and velocity can be largely scaled according to experimental requirements. The probe has been installed in the outer midplane of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel, where ELM filaments are expected to have their maximum amplitude. Filaments are coherent substructures within an ELM, carrying a fraction of the ELM released energy towards the wall. The new probe allows to measure the structure of these filaments, in particular, parameters such as filament rotation (by time delay measurements) and size (by peak width analysis). Activating the drive moves the probe from a safe position behind the limiter to a position in front of the limiters, i.e., exposes the Langmuir pins to the scrape-off layer plasma. PMID:17552815

  14. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-17

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis. PMID:26715211

  15. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis. PMID:26715211

  16. Magnetically Actuated Cilia for Microfluidic Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, Srinivas; Owen, Drew; Ballard, Matt; Hesketh, Peter J.; Alexeev, Alexander; Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering Collaboration; Petit InstituteBioengineering; Biosciences Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate magnetic micro-cilia based microfluidic mixing and capture techniques. For this, we use a simple and easy to fabricate high aspect ratio cilia, which are actuated magnetically. These micro-features are fabricated by evaporating NiFe alloy at room temperature, on to patterned photoresist. The evaporated alloy curls upwards when the seed layer is removed to release the cilia, thus making a free standing `C' shaped magnetic microstructure. This is actuated using an external electromagnet or a rotating magnet. The artificial cilia can be actuated upto 20Hz. We demonstrate the active mixing these cilia can produce in the microchannel. Also, we demonstrate the capture of target species in a sample using these fast oscillating cilia. The surface of the cilia is functionalized by streptavidin which binds to biotin labelled fluorescent microspheres and mimic the capture of bacteria. We show very high capture efficiencies by using these methods. These simple to fabricate micro cilia can easily be incorporated into many microfluidic systems which require high mixing and capture efficiencies.

  17. Conjugated Polymer Actuators for Articulating Neural Probes and Electrode Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, Eugene Dariush

    This thesis investigated the potential use of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) to controllably articulate (bend or guide) flexible neural probes and electrodes. PPy(DBS) actuation performance was characterized in the ionic mixture and temperature found in the brain. Nearly all the ions in aCSF were exchanged into the PPy---the cations Na +, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, as well as the anion PO43-; Cl- was not present. Nevertheless, deflections in aCSF were comparable to those in NaDBS and they were monotonic with oxidation level: strain increased upon reduction, with no reversal of motion despite the mixture of ionic charges and valences being exchanged. Actuation depended on temperature. Upon warming, the cyclic voltammograms showed additional peaks and an increase of 70% in the consumed charge. Actuation strain was monotonic under these conditions, demonstrating that conducting polymer actuators can indeed be used for neural interface and neural probe applications. In addition, a novel microelectro-mechanical system (MEMS) was developed to measure previously disregarded residual stress in a bilayer actuator. Residual stresses are a major concern for MEMS devices as that they can dramatically influence their yield and functionality. This device introduced a new technique to measure micro-scaled actuation forces that may be useful for characterization of other MEMS actuators. Finally, a functional movable parylene-based neural electrode prototype was developed. Employing PPy(DBS) actuators, electrode projections were successfully controlled to either remain flat or actuate out-of-plane and into a brain phantom during insertion. An electrode projection 800 microm long and 50 microm wide was able to deflect almost 800 microm away from the probe substrate. Applications that do not require insertion into tissue may also benefit from the electrode projections described here. Implantable neural interface devices are a critical component to a broad class of

  18. Magnetic circuit design for miniaturized magnetic shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, C.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) is a relatively new kind of smart material. Upon application of a large magnetic field, it exhibits actuation strains up to 10% similar to thermal shape memory alloy (SMA) but shows significantly reduced response time in the millisecond range. Currently, application is restricted by the brittleness of the single crystal material, its nonlinear behaviour and the difficulty to generate and apply a magnetic field around 0.6T in order to exploit the full actuation potential. The focus of this work is on the design of miniaturized magnetic circuits for bulk MSMAs. Various circuit designs are compared such as toroidal and series-parallel shapes. Equivalent circuit as well as finite element simulation is used to increase the magnetic field in a characteristic air gap where the smart material is placed. A symmetrical toroid coil layout with the MSMA element at the center that allows easy integration of the actuator in various applications is described. Static characterization results of this actuator are provided. Using the described magnetic circuit and 5M - MSMA rods with dimensions of 20x2.5x1mm3, a peak displacement of 0.8mm and a blocked force of 4.5N was obtained. Further design guidelines for such miniaturized actuators are given.

  19. High bandwidth piezoresistive force probes with integrated thermal actuation

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2012-01-01

    We present high-speed force probes with on-chip actuation and sensing for the measurement of pN-scale forces at the microsecond time scale. We achieve a high resonant frequency in water (1–100 kHz) with requisite low spring constants (0.3–40 pN/nm) and low integrated force noise (1–100 pN) by targeting probe dimensions on the order of 300 nm thick, 1–2 μm wide and 30–200 μm long. Forces are measured using silicon piezoresistors while the probes are actuated thermally with an aluminum unimorph and silicon heater. The piezoresistive sensors are designed using open source numerical optimization code that incorporates constraints on operating temperature. Parylene passivation enables operation in ionic media and we demonstrate simultaneous actuation and sensing. The improved design and fabrication techniques that we describe enable a 10–20 fold improvement in force resolution or measurement bandwidth over prior piezoresistive cantilevers of comparable thickness. PMID:23175616

  20. Thermo-magnetic materials for use in designing intelligent actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Yoshimutsu; Yoshimura, Fumikatsu; Hatakeyama, Iwao; Ishii, Yoshikazu

    1994-12-31

    The authors present the concept of an intelligent thermal actuator designed by using thermally sensitive magnetic materials. The use of the magnetic transition of FeRh alloy is very effective in increasing the actuator functions. These functions are freedom of direction, tuning temperature, and increasing both sensitivity and power. Two new types of actuator, a remote controlled optical driven thermo-magnetic motor and a temperature sensitive spring-less valve, are proposed and experimental results are shown.

  1. Simultaneous magnetic actuation and observation with ferromagnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, J.; Kinnunen, P.; Haapanen, K.; Niinimäki, J.; Fabritius, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel, non-contact, and non-optical approach to actuation and sensing. In the developed method, both functions are based only on the alternating magnetic field and take place simultaneously. The article demonstrates the technique in one of its potential applications, i.e. rheometry. The developed device uses two orthogonal pairs of inductor coils to generate a rotating magnetic field. The field actuates a rotor with an embedded NdFeB ring magnet. The angular displacement is simultaneously monitored with an angular AMR sensor, placed underneath the rotor. The device is used to study aqueous solutions at different concentrations of glycerol (10-95%). The accuracy of the angular sensing is verified using machine vision and pattern recognition, which is a technique widely used in the existing viscometers. A new approach to viscosity probing and phase slipping detection is introduced. So far, in non-contact rotational viscometers the dynamic viscosity was related to a critical frequency, determined by altering the frequency of the rotating magnetic field. However, we propose to alter the magnitude of the field, by changing the current in the inductor coils. The frequency is kept constant and the viscosity is proportional to the amplitude of current, for which the phase slipping occurs. The applied rate of rotation can be optimized for a particular measurement scenario. The results suggest a great potential of the technique in a variety of scenarios. Simultaneous magnetic actuation and sensing enables application in a broad frequency band, from dc to tens of kilohertz. Moreover, the design of a measurement device is simplified, so that its cost can be significantly lower than that of a conventional system. Furthermore, presented method is non-contact, does not require a clear optical path, and could be less susceptible to the environmental conditions (e.g. poor illumination, or full immersion in the studied solution).

  2. Cardiac tissue engineering in magnetically actuated scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Yulia; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers new possibilities for the functional and structural restoration of damaged or lost heart tissue by applying cardiac patches created in vitro. Engineering such functional cardiac patches is a complex mission, involving material design on the nano- and microscale as well as the application of biological cues and stimulation patterns to promote cell survival and organization into a functional cardiac tissue. Herein, we present a novel strategy for creating a functional cardiac patch by combining the use of a macroporous alginate scaffold impregnated with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) and the application of external magnetic stimulation. Neonatal rat cardiac cells seeded within the magnetically responsive scaffolds and stimulated by an alternating magnetic field of 5 Hz developed into matured myocardial tissue characterized by anisotropically organized striated cardiac fibers, which preserved its features for longer times than non-stimulated constructs. A greater activation of AKT phosphorylation in cardiac cell constructs after applying a short-term (20 min) external magnetic field indicated the efficacy of magnetic stimulation to actuate at a distance and provided a possible mechanism for its action. Our results point to a synergistic effect of magnetic field stimulation together with nanoparticulate features of the scaffold surface as providing the regenerating environment for cardiac cells driving their organization into functionally mature tissue.

  3. Numerical analysis of thermally actuated magnets for magnetization of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Quan; Yan, Yu; Rawlings, Colin; Coombs, Tim

    2010-06-01

    Superconductors, such as YBCO bulks, have extremely high potential magnetic flux densities, comparing to rare earth magnets. Therefore, the magnetization of superconductors has attracted broad attention and contribution from both academic research and industry. In this paper, a novel technique is proposed to magnetize superconductors. Unusually, instead of using high magnetic fields and pulses, repeatedly magnetic waves with strength of as low as rare earth magnets are applied. These magnetic waves, generated by thermally controlling a Gadolinium (Gd) bulk with a rare earth magnet underneath, travel over the flat surface of a YBCO bulk and get trapped little by little. Thus, a very small magnetic field can be used to build up a very large magnetic field. In this paper, the modelling results of thermally actuated magnetic waves are presented showing how to transfer sequentially applied thermal pulses into magnetic waves. The experiment results of the magnetization of YBCO bulk are also presented to demonstrate how superconductors are progressively magnetized by small magnetic field

  4. Beating kinematics of magnetically actuated cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downton, M. T.; Stark, H.

    2009-02-01

    We study the beating kinematics and pumping performance of a magnetically actuated artificial cilium attached to a surface using a bead spring model. Several different beating patterns for the external field are considered along with the possiblity of defects in the filament at isolated points. Hydrodynamic interactions between the beads are included by a modified Rotne-Prage tensor such that the no-slip boundary condition at the surface is satisfied. We find that the correct positioning of defects along the filament length can lead to significant increases in the pumping performance of a planar beating pattern. Even more efficient for pumping fluid are three-dimensional beating strokes which bring the filament close to the surface during the return part of the stroke.

  5. Magnetic circuitry mutual coupling probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Development of magnetic probe for nondestructive testing of multilayer printed circuit boards to determine existence of opens or shorts is reported. Components of probe are described and procedures for operation are discussed. Two illustrations are provided to show magnetic circuits and principles of operation.

  6. Concept and Demonstration of Individual Probe Actuation in Two-Dimensional Parallel Atomic Force Microscope System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Terunobu; Aeschimann, Laure; Chantada, Laura; de Rooij, Nico. F.; Heinzelmann, Harry; Herzig, Hans P.; Manzardo, Omar; Meister, André; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Pugin, Raphaël; Staufer, Urs; Vettiger, Peter

    2007-09-01

    A concept of an array actuator that is used to control the tip-sample separation of cantilevers in a two-dimensional (2D) probe array scanning system is proposed in this article. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated with a 10× 10 array actuator with 500 μm xy-pitches. The array actuator is made by slicing a bulk piezoceramic block. The obtained maximum actuation of a single probe was 2.19 μmp-p at ± 168 Vp-p. A major issue for the actuator was the insufficient strength of the frame of the probe array chip. The demonstrated array actuator is highly compatible with previously developed parallel readout modules that use either a parallel optical beam or integrated piezoresistive deflection sensing. A large-scale 2D probe array is our ultimate target.

  7. Digital microfluidics with a magnetically actuated floating liquid marble.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Mei Kum; Ooi, Chin Hong; Mohd-Yasin, Faisal; Vadivelu, Raja; John, James St; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-06-21

    Controlled actuation of a floating liquid marble, a liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic particles floating on another liquid surface, is a potential digital microfluidics platform for the transport of aqueous solution with minimal volume loss. This paper reports our recent investigation on the magnetic actuation of floating liquid marbles filled with magnetic particles. The magnetic force and frictional force acting on the floating liquid marble determine the horizontal movement of the marble. We varied the magnetic flux density, flux density gradient, concentration of magnetic particles and speed of the marble to elucidate the relationship between the acting forces. We subsequently determined the suitable operating conditions for the actuation and derived the scaling laws for the actuation parameters. PMID:27191398

  8. Magnetic field analysis of novel spherical actuators with three-dimensional pole arrays.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Liang, Fengqi; Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi

    2016-06-01

    Spherical actuator is an electric device that can achieve multiple degree-of-freedom rotary motions in a single joint. Permanent magnet array is a key factor that influences the output performance of electromagnetic spherical actuators. In this paper, a novel three-dimensional (3D) pole array is proposed to improve the system flux density and thus the output performance. Analysis of magnetic field distribution is extremely important for spherical actuators with 3D magnet arrays. Thus, the investigation of magnetic field is conducted in analytical, numerical, and experimental ways. The general solution of magnetic scalar potential in 3D space is formulated analytically based on Laplace's equations and spherical harmonics, and then specific solutions of the magnetic scalar potential and magnetic flux density are obtained by using boundary conditions. Numerical computation is utilized to validate the analytical model and to facilitate the observation of the magnetic field variation. A research prototype and a testing platform of magnetic field have been developed for experimental study. The testing platform can move the probe to any position around the spherical actuator and measure the flux density automatically. Experiments are conducted to obtain the flux distribution. Both numerical and experimental results validate the analytical model well. PMID:27370488

  9. Magnetic field analysis of novel spherical actuators with three-dimensional pole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Liang, Fengqi; Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi

    2016-06-01

    Spherical actuator is an electric device that can achieve multiple degree-of-freedom rotary motions in a single joint. Permanent magnet array is a key factor that influences the output performance of electromagnetic spherical actuators. In this paper, a novel three-dimensional (3D) pole array is proposed to improve the system flux density and thus the output performance. Analysis of magnetic field distribution is extremely important for spherical actuators with 3D magnet arrays. Thus, the investigation of magnetic field is conducted in analytical, numerical, and experimental ways. The general solution of magnetic scalar potential in 3D space is formulated analytically based on Laplace's equations and spherical harmonics, and then specific solutions of the magnetic scalar potential and magnetic flux density are obtained by using boundary conditions. Numerical computation is utilized to validate the analytical model and to facilitate the observation of the magnetic field variation. A research prototype and a testing platform of magnetic field have been developed for experimental study. The testing platform can move the probe to any position around the spherical actuator and measure the flux density automatically. Experiments are conducted to obtain the flux distribution. Both numerical and experimental results validate the analytical model well.

  10. Development of Microfabricated Magnetic Actuators for Removing Cellular Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Selene A.; Lee, Hyowon; Pinney, James R; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W.

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on the development of torsional magnetic microactuators for displacing biological materials in implantable catheters. Static and dynamic behaviors of the devices were characterized in air and in fluid using optical experimental methods. The devices were capable of achieving large deflections (>60°) and had resonant frequencies that ranged from 70 Hz to 1.5 kHz in fluid. The effect of long-term actuation (>2.5 · 108 cycles) was quantified using resonant shift as the metric (Δf < 2%). Cell-clearing capabilities of the devices were evaluated by examining the effect of actuation on a layer of aggressively growing adherent cells. On average, actuated microdevices removed 37.4% of the adherent cell layer grown over the actuator surface. The effect of actuation time, deflection angle, and beam geometry were evaluated. The experimental results indicate that physical removal of adherent cells at the microscale is feasible using magnetic microactuation. PMID:21886945

  11. Computational Modeling of Magnetically Actuated Propellant Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1996-01-01

    sufficient performance to support cryogenic propellant management tasks. In late 1992, NASA MSFC began a new investigation in this technology commencing with the design of the Magnetically-Actuated Propellant Orientation (MAPO) experiment. A mixture of ferrofluid and water is used to simulate the paramagnetic properties of LOX and the experiment is being flown on the KC-135 aircraft to provide a reduced gravity environment. The influence of a 0.4 Tesla ring magnet on flow into and out of a subscale Plexiglas tank is being recorded on video tape. The most efficient approach to evaluating the feasibility of MAPO is to compliment the experimental program with development of a computational tool to model the process of interest. The goal of the present research is to develop such a tool. Once confidence in its fidelity is established by comparison to data from the MAPO experiment, it can be used to assist in the design of future experiments and to study the parameter space of the process. Ultimately, it is hoped that the computational model can serve as a design tool for full-scale spacecraft applications.

  12. Spacecraft Attitude Tracking and Maneuver Using Combined Magnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of spacecraft attitude control using magnetic actuators only is low and on the order of 0.4-5 degrees. The key reason is that the magnetic torque is two-dimensional and it is only in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field vector. In this paper novel attitude control algorithms using the combination of magnetic actuators with Reaction Wheel Assembles (RWAs) or other types of actuators, such as thrusters, are presented. The combination of magnetic actuators with one or two RWAs aligned with different body axis expands the two-dimensional control torque to three-dimensional. The algorithms can guarantee the spacecraft attitude and rates to track the commanded attitude precisely. A design example is presented for Nadir pointing, pitch and yaw maneuvers. The results show that precise attitude tracking can be reached and the attitude control accuracy is comparable with RWAs based attitude control. The algorithms are also useful for the RWAs based attitude control. When there are only one or two workable RWAs due to RWA failures, the attitude control system can switch to the control algorithms for the combined magnetic actuators with the RWAs without going to the safe mode and the control accuracy can be maintained.

  13. Materials for efficient high-flux magnetic bearing actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. E.; Trumper, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have demonstrated the capability for achieving positioning accuracies at the nanometer level in precision motion control stages. This makes possible the positioning of a wafer in six degrees of freedom with the precision necessary for photolithography. To control the position of an object at the nanometer level, a model of the magnetic bearing actuator force-current-airgap relationship must be accurately obtained. Additionally, to reduce thermal effects the design of the actuator should be optimized to achieve maximum power efficiency and flux density. Optimization of the actuator is accomplished by proper pole face sizing and utilizing a magnetic core material which can be magnetized to the highest flux density with low magnetic loss properties. This paper describes the construction of a magnetic bearing calibration fixture designed for experimental measurement of the actuator force characteristics. The results of a material study that review the force properties of nickel-steel, silicon-steel, and cobalt-vanadium-iron, as they apply to magnetic bearing applications are also presented.

  14. Three-axis force actuator for a magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention features a three-axis force actuator that axially, radially and rotatably supports a bearing member for frictionless rotation about an axis of rotation generally coincident with a Z-axis. Also featured is a magnetic bearing having such an actuator. The actuator includes an inner member, a magnetic member and a pole assembly having a ring member and four pole extending therefrom. The poles are equi-angular spaced from each other and radially spaced about the Z-axis. The inner member extends along the Z-axis and is a highly magnetic permeable material. The magnetic member is formed about the inner member outer surface, extends along the Z-axis and is configured so one magnetic pole polarity is located at its outer surface and the other polarity pole is located at its inner surface. Preferably, the magnetic member is a radially magnetized permanent magnet. The inner surface of the ring member is magnetically coupled to the magnetic member and a face of each pole is coupled to the bearing member. The magnetic member, the pole assembly, the inner member and the bearing member cooperate to generate a magnetic field that radially and rotatably supports a rotating member secured to the bearing member. The actuator further includes a plurality of electromagnetic coils. Preferably, a coil is formed about each pole and at least 2 coils are formed about the inner member. When energized, the electromagnetic coils generate a modulated magnetic field that stabilizes the rotating member in the desired operational position.

  15. Magnetic Gearing Versus Conventional Gearing in Actuators for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchhammer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic geared actuators (MGA) are designed to perform highly reliable, robust and precise motion on satellite platforms or aerospace vehicles. The design allows MGA to be used for various tasks in space applications. In contrast to conventional geared drives, the contact and lubrication free force transmitting elements lead to a considerable lifetime and range extension of drive systems. This paper describes the fundamentals of magnetic wobbling gears (MWG) and the deduced inherent characteristics, and compares conventional and magnetic gearing.

  16. Magnetic Actuation of Self-Assembled DNA Hinges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauback, S.; Mattioli, K.; Armstrong, M.; Miller, C.; Pease, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    DNA nanotechnology offers a broad range of applications spanning from the creation of nanoscale devices, motors and nanoparticle templates to the development of precise drug delivery systems. Central to advancing this technology is the ability to actuate or reconfigure structures in real time, which is currently achieved primarily by DNA strand displacement yielding slow actuation times (about 1-10min). Here we exploit superparamagnetic beads to magnetically actuate DNA structures which also provides a system to measure forces associated with molecular interactions. DNA nanodevices are folded using DNA origami, whereby a long single-stranded DNA is folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides. Our DNA nanodevice is a nanohinge from which rod shaped DNA nanostructures are polymerized into micron-scale filaments forming handles for actuation. By functionalizing one arm of the hinge and the filament ends, the hinge can be attached to a surface while still allowing an arm to rotate and the filaments can be labeled with magnetic beads enabling the hinge to be actuated almost instantaneously by external magnetic fields. These results lay the groundwork to establish real-time manipulation and direct force application of DNA constructs.

  17. Spacecraft Attitude Tracking and Maneuver Using Combined Magnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    A paper describes attitude-control algorithms using the combination of magnetic actuators with reaction wheel assemblies (RWAs) or other types of actuators such as thrusters. The combination of magnetic actuators with one or two RWAs aligned with different body axis expands the two-dimensional control torque to three-dimensional. The algorithms can guarantee the spacecraft attitude and rates to track the commanded attitude precisely. A design example is presented for nadir-pointing, pitch, and yaw maneuvers. The results show that precise attitude tracking can be reached and the attitude- control accuracy is comparable with RWA-based attitude control. When there are only one or two workable RWAs due to RWA failures, the attitude-control system can switch to the control algorithms for the combined magnetic actuators with the RWAs without going to the safe mode, and the control accuracy can be maintained. The attitude-control algorithms of the combined actuators are derived, which can guarantee the spacecraft attitude and rates to track the commanded values precisely. Results show that precise attitude tracking can be reached, and the attitude-control accuracy is comparable with 3-axis wheel control.

  18. Low power valve actuation using trans-permanent magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Luis Denit

    The subject of magnetic actuators is very broad, and encompasses a wide range of technologies, magnetic circuit topologies, and performance characteristics for an ever-increasing spectrum of applications. As a consequence of recent advances in soft and hard magnetic materials and developments in power electronics, microprocessors and digital control strategies, and the continuing demand for higher performance motion control systems, there appears to be more research and development activity in magnetic actuators for applications spanning all market sectors than at any time. In this dissertation, a rational approach for switching the states of permanent magnets through an on-board magnetization process is presented. The resulting dynamic systems are referred to as trans-permanent magnetic systems (T-PM). The first part of this research focuses on the governing equations needed for the analysis of T-PM systems. Their feasibility is demonstrated experimentally. In doing so, a method that has the potential of leading to new ultra-low power designs for electromechanical devices is introduced. In the second part of this research, the aforementioned developments in T-PM are applied to the problem of low power valves. Whereas alternate approaches to low power valve control may utilize latching mechanisms to maintain valve position during inactive periods, an approach that eliminates latching mechanisms is presented. Instead, the principles of T-PM are employed to switch the states of permanent magnets; the used of permanent magnets instead of electromagnets eliminates power consumption during inactive periods, thereby reducing power consumption to ultra-low levels. The magnets in a T-PM actuator are configured in a stack. The relationships between the strength and number of magnets in the stack and the stroke and resolution of the actuator are developed. This dissertation reports on the design and testing of a prototype valve actuator that uses a stack pf T-PM with

  19. Magnetic TRAnsition Region Probe (MTRAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Davis, John; Hathaway, David; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    MTRAP (Magnetic Transition Region Probe) will reveal the fine-scale physical processes in the Sun's magnetic transition region, the complex layer from the upper photosphere to the upper chromosphere/lower transition region. In the magnetic transition region plasma forces and magnetic forces are of comparable strength, which results in complex interplay of the two, which interplay governs the coupling of the convectively-driven deeper layers to the magnetically-driven upper transition region and inner corona. The fine-scale magnetic structure, processes, and events in the magnetic transition region are key to the genesis of the Sun's entire hot, dynamic outer atmosphere and to the initiation of large eruptive events. MTRAP will be a single spacecraft in Sun-synchronous Earth orbit. Because MTRAP will probe and measure the 3-D structure and dynamics of the magnetic field and plasma in the chromosphere and transition region with unprecedented resolution, the required telescope size and telemetry rates dictate that MTRAP be in Earth orbit, not in deep space. The observations will feature visible and infrared maps of vector magnetic and velocity fields in the magnetic transition region and photosphere. These will have large field of view (greater than 100,000 km), high resolution (greater than 100 km), and high sensitivity (greater than 30 G in transverse field). These observations of the lower atmosphere will be complemented by UV maps of the structure, velocity, and magnetic field (including the full vector field if technically feasible) higher up, in the upper chromosphere and lower transition region. MTRAP will also have an EUV imaging spectrograph observing coronal structure and dynamics in the same field of view with comparable resolution. Specific phenomena to be analyzed include spicules, bright points, jets, the base of plumes, and the triggering of eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  20. Design and Modeling of a 3-D Magnetic Actuator for Magnetic Microbead Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, modeling, and analyses of a hexapole magnetic actuator that is capable of 3-D manipulation of a magnetic microbead. The magnetic actuator employs six sharp-tipped magnetic poles placed in hexapole configuration, six actuating coils, and a magnetic yoke. The magnetic poles concentrate the magnetic flux generated by the coils to the workspace, resulting in a high magnetic field with a large field gradient for magnetic force generation on the magnetic microbead. A lumped-parameter magnetic force model is then established to characterize nonlinearity of the magnetic force exerting on the magnetic microbead with respect to the applied currents to the coils and the position dependence of the magnetic force in the workspace. The force generation capability of the designed system is then explored using the force model. Moreover, an inverse force model is derived and its effect on the magnetic actuation capability is investigated. The inverse force model facilitates the implementation of a feedback control law to stabilize and control the motion of a magnetic microbead. Experimental results in terms of the magnetic force in relation to stable motion control of a magnetic microbead are used to validate the force model. PMID:24382943

  1. Analysis and decoupling control of a permanent magnet spherical actuator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Chen, Weihai; Liu, Jingmeng; Wu, Xingming

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the analysis and decoupling control of a spherical actuator, which is capable of performing three degree-of-freedom motion in one joint. The proposed actuator consists of a rotor with multiple PM (Permanent Magnet) poles in a circle and a stator with circumferential coils in three layers. Based on this actuator design, a decoupling control approach is developed. Unlike existing control methods that each coil is responsible for both the spinning and tilting motion, the proposed control strategy specifies the function of each coil. Specifically, the spinning motion is governed by the middle layer coils with a step control approach; while the tilting motion is regulated by upper and lower coils with a computed torque control method. Experiments have been conducted on the prototype to verify the validity of the design procedure, and the experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the analysis and control strategy. PMID:24387456

  2. Analysis and decoupling control of a permanent magnet spherical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Chen, Weihai; Liu, Jingmeng; Wu, Xingming

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the analysis and decoupling control of a spherical actuator, which is capable of performing three degree-of-freedom motion in one joint. The proposed actuator consists of a rotor with multiple PM (Permanent Magnet) poles in a circle and a stator with circumferential coils in three layers. Based on this actuator design, a decoupling control approach is developed. Unlike existing control methods that each coil is responsible for both the spinning and tilting motion, the proposed control strategy specifies the function of each coil. Specifically, the spinning motion is governed by the middle layer coils with a step control approach; while the tilting motion is regulated by upper and lower coils with a computed torque control method. Experiments have been conducted on the prototype to verify the validity of the design procedure, and the experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the analysis and control strategy.

  3. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  4. Magnetic actuator intended for left ventricular assist system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saotome, H.; Okada, T.

    2006-04-01

    With the goal of developing an artificial heart, the authors fabricated a prototype pump employing a linear motion magnetic actuator, and carried out performance tests. The actuator is composed of two disk-shaped Nd-Fe-B magnets having a diameter of 80 mm and a thickness of 7 mm. The disks are magnetized in the direction normal to the circular surface, and are formed by semicircular pieces; one semicircle serves as a N pole and the other as a S pole. The magnets face each other in the actuator. One magnet is limited to spin around its axis while the second magnet is limited to move in linear motion along its axis. In this way, the circumferential rotation of one of the magnets produces reciprocating forces on the other magnet, causing it to move back and forth. This coupled action produces a pumping motion. Because the two magnets are magnetically coupled without any mechanical contact, the rotating magnet does not have to be implanted and should be placed outside the body. The rotating magnet is driven by a motor. The motor power is magnetically conveyed, via the rotating magnet, to the implanted linear motion magnet through the skin. The proposed system yields no problems with infection that would otherwise require careful treatment in a system employing a tube penetrating the skin for power transmission. Comparison of the proposed system with another system using a transcutaneous transformer shows that our system has good potential to occupy a smaller space in the body, because it obviates implantation of a secondary part of the transformer, a power supply, and armature windings. The dimensions of the trial pump are designed in accordance with the fluid mechanical specifications of a human left ventricle, by computing magnetic fields that provide the magnetic forces on the magnets. The output power of the trial pump, 1.0 W at 87 beats/min, is experimentally obtained under the pressure and flow conditions of water, 100 mm Hg and 4.5 l/min.

  5. The triathlon of magnetic actuation: Rolling, propelling, swimming with a single magnetic material

    PubMed Central

    Vach, Peter J.; Faivre, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic actuation of microscopic devices in a liquid environment has been achieved in various ways, which can be grouped into rolling, propelling and swimming. Previous actuators were designed with a focus on one particular type of magnetic actuation. We have shown earlier that efficient magnetic propellers can be selected from randomly shaped magnetic nanostructures synthesized in solution. Here we show that these synthesized nanostructures can be used for all three types of magnetic actuation. Whereas it might not be surprising that single structures can roll in addition to propelling, swimming is unexpectedly also observed using the same material. In this case, however, the magnetically guided self-assembly of several individual particles into chain-like structures is necessary to obtain swimmers, since individual rigid nanostructures cannot swim. Interestingly, the direction of the swimming motion is not necessarily parallel to the long axis of the chain-like assembly, a finding that had been theoretically expected but experimentally not observed so far. Our findings show that the range of structures that can be effectively actuated by external magnetic fields is much broader than assumed until now. This could open up new opportunities for the design of magnetically actuated devices. PMID:25791721

  6. Magnetically Actuated Soft Capsule With the Multimodal Drug Release Function.

    PubMed

    Yim, Sehyuk; Goyal, Kartik; Sitti, Metin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetically actuated multimodal drug release mechanism using a tetherless soft capsule endoscope for the treatment of gastric disease. Because the designed capsule has a drug chamber between both magnetic heads, if it is compressed by the external magnetic field, the capsule could release a drug in a specific position locally. The capsule is designed to release a drug in two modes according to the situation. In the first mode, a small amount of drug is continuously released by a series of pulse type magnetic field (0.01-0.03 T). The experimental results show that the drug release can be controlled by the frequency of the external magnetic pulse. In the second mode, about 800 mm(3) of drug is released by the external magnetic field of 0.07 T, which induces a stronger magnetic attraction than the critical force for capsule's collapsing. As a result, a polymeric coating is formed around the capsule. The coated area is dependent on the drug viscosity. This paper presents simulations and various experiments to evaluate the magnetically actuated multimodal drug release capability. The proposed soft capsules could be used as minimally invasive tetherless medical devices with therapeutic capability for the next generation capsule endoscopy. PMID:25378896

  7. Magnetically actuated tuning method for Gunn oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacks, B. H. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A tunable microwave generator based on the Gunn effect is disclosed. The generator includes a semiconductor material which exhibits the Gunn effect when current flows between anode and cathode end contacts. The material has a plurality of sides each with a scratch at a different distance from the anode contact. A magnetic field is produced by a magnet placed about the semiconductor field. The Lorentz force produced as a function of the current flow and the magnetic field drive the electrons to the surface of one of the sides to cause nucleation to occur at the scratch. A domain formed thereat travels to the anode contact to provide pulses at a frequency which is related to the distance between the scratch and the anode contact.

  8. Probing the Buried Magnetic Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenqing; Zhou, Qionghua; Chen, Qian; Niu, Daxin; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Yongbing; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jinlan; van der Laan, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Understanding magnetism in ferromagnetic metal/semiconductor (FM/SC) heterostructures is important to the development of the new-generation spin field-effect transistor. Here, we report an element-specific X-ray magnetic circular dichroism study of the interfacial magnetic moments for two FM/SC model systems, namely, Co/GaAs and Ni/GaAs, which was enabled using a specially designed FM1/FM2/SC superstructure. We observed a robust room temperature magnetization of the interfacial Co, while that of the interfacial Ni was strongly diminished down to 5 K because of hybridization of the Ni d(eg) and GaAs sp(3) states. The validity of the selected method was confirmed by first-principles calculations, showing only small deviations (<0.02 and <0.07 μB/atom for Co/GaAs and Ni/GaAs, respectively) compared to the real FM/SC interfaces. Our work proved that the electronic structure and magnetic ground state of the interfacial FM2 is not altered when the topmost FM2 is replaced by FM1 and that this model is applicable generally for probing the buried magnetic interfaces in the advanced spintronic materials.. PMID:26887429

  9. Mechanical characterization of conducting polymer actuated neural probes under physiological settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, Eugene D.; Smela, Elisabeth; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2010-04-01

    Most implantable chronic neural probes have fixed electrode sites on the shank of the probe. Neural probe shapes and insertion methods have been shown to have considerable effects on the resulting chronic reactive tissue response that encapsulates probes. We are developing probes with controllable articulated electrode projections, which are expected to provoke less reactive tissue response due to the projections being minimally sized, as well as to permit a degree of independence from the probe shank allowing the recording sites to "float" within the brain. The objective of this study was to predict and analyze the force-generating capability of conducting polymer bilayer actuators under physiological settings. Custom parylene beams 21 μm thick, 1 cm long, and of varying widths (200 - 1000 μm) were coated with Cr/Au. Electroplated weights were fabricated at the ends of the beams to apply known forces. Polypyrrole was potentiostatically polymerized to varying thicknesses onto the Au at 0.5 V in a solution of 0.1 M pyrrole and 0.1 M dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS). Using cyclic voltammetry, the bilayer beams were cycled in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) at 37 °C, as well as in aqueous NaDBS as a control. Digital images and video were analyzed to quantify the deflections. The images and the cyclic voltammograms showed that divalent cations in the aCSF interfered with polymer reduction. By integrating polypyrrole-based conducting polymer actuators, we present a type novel neural probe. We demonstrate that actuating PPy(DBS) under physiological settings is possible, and that the technique of microfabricating weights onto the actuators is a useful tool for studying actuation forces.

  10. Direct torsional actuation of microcantilevers using magnetic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Nalam, Prathima C.; Tam, Qizhan; Carpick, Robert W.; Exarhos, Annemarie L.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Torsional mode dynamic force microscopy can be used for a wide range of studies including mapping lateral contact stiffness, torsional frequency or amplitude modulation imaging, and dynamic friction measurements of various materials. Piezo-actuation of the cantilever is commonly used, but it introduces spurious resonances, limiting the frequency range that can be sampled, and rendering the technique particularly difficult to apply in liquid medium where the cantilever oscillations are significantly damped. Here, we demonstrate a method that enables direct torsional actuation of cantilevers with high uniformity over wide frequency ranges by attaching a micrometer-scale magnetic bead on the back side of the cantilever. We show that when beads are magnetized along the width of the cantilever, efficient torsional actuation of the cantilevers can be achieved using a magnetic field produced from a solenoid placed underneath the sample. We demonstrate the capability of this technique by imaging atomic steps on graphite surfaces in tapping mode near the first torsional resonance of the cantilever in dodecane. The technique is also applied to map the variations in the lateral contact stiffness on the surface of graphite and polydiacetylene monolayers.

  11. Triaxial Probe Magnetic Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shultz, Kimberly; Whittlesey, Albert; Narvaez, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The Triaxial Magnetic Moment Analysis software uses measured magnetic field test data to compute dipole and quadrupole moment information from a hardware element. It is used to support JPL projects needing magnetic control and an understanding of the spacecraft-generated magnetic fields. Evaluation of the magnetic moment of an object consists of three steps: acquisition, conditioning, and analysis. This version of existing software was extensively rewritten for easier data acquisition, data analysis, and report presentation, including immediate feedback to the test operator during data acquisition. While prior JPL computer codes provided the same data content, this program has a better graphic display including original data overlaid with reconstructed results to show goodness of fit accuracy and better appearance of the report graphic page. Data are acquired using three magnetometers and two rotations of the device under test. A clean acquisition user interface presents required numeric data and graphic summaries, and the analysis module yields the best fit (least squares) for the magnetic dipole and/or quadrupole moment of a device. The acquisition module allows the user to record multiple data sets, selecting the best data to analyze, and is repeated three times for each of the z-axial and y-axial rotations. In this update, the y-axial rotation starting position has been changed to an option, allowing either the x- or z-axis to point towards the magnetometer. The code has been rewritten to use three simultaneous axes of magnetic data (three probes), now using two "rotations" of the device under test rather than the previous three rotations, thus reducing handling activities on the device under test. The present version of the software gathers data in one-degree increments, which permits much better accuracy of the fit ted data than the coarser data acquisition of the prior software. The data-conditioning module provides a clean data set for the analysis module

  12. Steering trajectories in magnetically actuated colloidal propellers.

    PubMed

    Tierno, P; Sagués, F

    2012-08-01

    Microscale colloidal doublets composed of DNA-linked paramagnetic particles and floating close to a surface are able to propel in viscous fluids when subjected to external precessing magnetic fields. We show here that for certain values of the precession angle, the composite particles can be steered into tilted rather than linear trajectories characterized by a non-vanishing lateral velocity during motion. We extend the original model developed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 218304 (2008) in order to explain this phenomenon, by including high-order corrections in the expansion of the director field and demonstrate the validity of this approach by comparing the analytical results with the experimental data. PMID:22872443

  13. Spin-axis pointing of a magnetically actuated spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzini, G.; de Angelis, E. L.; Giulietti, F.

    2014-01-01

    Attitude regulation proves to be a challenging problem, when magnetic actuators alone are used as attitude effectors, since they do not provide three independent control torque components at each time instant. In this paper a rigorous proof of global exponential stability is derived for a magnetic control law that leads the satellite to a desired spin condition around a principal axis of inertia, pointing the spin axis toward a prescribed direction in the inertial frame. The technique is demonstrated by means of numerical simulation of a few example maneuvers. An extensive Monte Carlo simulation is performed for random initial conditions, in order to investigate the effect of changes in control law gains.

  14. Magnetic fish-robot based on multi-motion control of a flexible magnetic actuator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Shin, Kyoosik; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a biologically inspired fish-robot driven by a single flexible magnetic actuator with a rotating magnetic field in a three-axis Helmholtz coil. Generally, magnetic fish-robots are powered by alternating and gradient magnetic fields, which provide a single motion such as bending the fish-robot's fins. On the other hand, a flexible magnetic actuator driven by an external rotating magnetic field can create several gaits such as the bending vibration, the twisting vibration, and their combination. Most magnetic fish-like micro-robots do not have pectoral fins on the side and are simply propelled by the tail fin. The proposed robot can swim and perform a variety of maneuvers with the addition of pectoral fins and control of the magnetic torque direction. In this paper, we find that the robot's dynamic actuation correlates with the magnetic actuator and the rotating magnetic field. The proposed robot is also equipped with new features, such as a total of six degrees of freedom, a new control method that stabilizes posture, three-dimensional swimming, a new velocity control, and new turning abilities. PMID:22550128

  15. Computational modeling of magnetically actuated propellant orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.

    1996-01-01

    spacecraft propellant tanks: magnetic fields.

  16. Magnetic nanostructures: radioactive probes and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandolini, M. J.

    2006-05-01

    The miniaturization of magnetic sensors and storage devices down to the nano-scale leads to drastic changes in magnetic phenomena compared with the same devices with a larger size. Excited-nuclear-probe (radioactive probe) techniques are ideal for investigating these new magnetic nanostructures. By observing the magnetic hyperfine fields (and in some cases the electric-field-gradients (EFGs)) at the nuclei of radioactive probes, microscopic information about the magnetic environment of the probes is acquired. The magnetic hyperfine field is particularly sensitive to the s-spin polarization of the conduction electrons and to the orbital magnetic moment of the probe atom. Three methods of inserting radioactive probes into magnetic nanostructures are presented; neutron activation, recoil implantation and 'soft-landing', followed by descriptions of their application to selected examples. In some cases, these methods offer the simultaneous creation and observation of new magnetic materials at the atomic scale. This review focuses firstly on the induced magnetism in noble-metal spacer layers between either ferromagnetic (FM) or FM/antiferromagnetic (AFM) layers in a trilayer structure. Using the method of low-temperature nuclear orientation, the s-spin polarization of noble-metal probes was measured and was found to be very sensitive to the magnetic properties at both the FM and AFM interfaces. Secondly, the recoil implantation of radioactive Fe probes into rare-earth hosts and d-band alloys and subsequent measurement using time-differential perturbed angular distribution offer the possibility of controlling the chemical composition and number of nearest-neighbours. This method was used to prepare local 3d-magnetic clusters in a non-magnetic matrix and to observe their magnetic behaviour. Finally, non-magnetic radioactive probes were 'soft-landed' onto Ni surfaces and extremely lattice-expanded ultrathin Ni films. By measuring the magnetic hyperfine fields and EFGs at

  17. Magnetically actuated artificial cilia for optimum mixing performance in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Chen, Chia-Yun; Lin, Cheng-Yi; Hu, Ya-Ting

    2013-07-21

    Contemporary lab-chip devices require efficient, high-performance mixing capability. A series of artificial cilia with embedded magnetic particles was fabricated to achieve precise flow manipulation through magnetically driven control. These fabricated structures were actuated in a homogeneous magnetic field generated by a built-in magnetic coil system for various beating cycles inside a microchannel. Three representative trajectories, namely, circular motion, back-and-forth oscillation, and a figure-of-eight pattern, of artificial cilia were designed and generated to mimic the motion of actual cilia. Homogeneous mixing of two highly viscous (>25 centipoise) dyed solutions by using the figure-of-eight trajectory achieved a mixing efficiency of approximately 86%. The underlying relationship between ciliated structures and the induced flow fields was further elucidated by performing a hydrodynamic analysis with micro-particle image velocimetry. In addition, a numerical modeling method which used a fluid structure interaction module was applied to provide quantitative 3D illustrations of induced flow patterns, including vortical structures and vortex core locations. The results reveal that both the magnitude and distribution of induced vortices primarily affect the mixing performance of two viscous flow streams. By using magnetically controlled artificial cilia along with the presented analytical paradigms, a new active flow mixing strategy was suggested to efficiently transport/agitate flows for microfluidics and biomedical applications. PMID:23685964

  18. Magnetic field concentrator for probing optical magnetic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Wróbel, Piotr; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2010-12-01

    Development of all dielectric and plasmonic metamaterials with a tunable optical frequency magnetic response creates a need for new inspection techniques. We propose a method of measuring magnetic responses of such metamaterials within a wide range of optical frequencies with a single probe. A tapered fiber probe with a radially corrugated metal coating concentrates azimuthally polarized light in the near-field into a subwavelength spot the longitudinal magnetic field component which is much stronger than the perpendicular electric one. The active probe may be used in a future scanning near-field magnetic microscope for studies of magnetic responses of subwavelength elementary cells of metamaterials. PMID:21164936

  19. Analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator with permanent magnet fluxbiasing is presented. An AMCD consists of a spinning annular rim which is suspended by a noncontacting linear electromagnetic spin motor. The actuator is treated as a lumped-parameter electromechanical system in the development of the model.

  20. A magnetic minirobot with anchoring and drilling ability in tubular environments actuated by external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K.; Jeon, S. M.; Nam, J. K.; Jang, G. H.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a magnetic minirobot with anchoring and drilling ability (MMAD) controlled by an external magnetic field. The proposed MMAD can navigate through a tubular environment, such as human blood vessels, actuated by a magnetic gradient and uniform rotating magnetic field. It can also generate an anchoring motion, which stably holds the position of the MMAD under pulsatile flow, in order to drill and unclog obstructed blood vessels. The operating conditions of the MMAD were examined by investigating the magnetic torques, and the holding force of the MMAD was measured by a force sensing resistor. Finally, we performed various experiments in a tubular environment to verify the validity of the proposed MMAD.

  1. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  2. Magnetically actuated propulsion at low Reynolds numbers: towards nanoscale control.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peer; Ghosh, Ambarish

    2011-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in the fabrication of micron and sub-micron structures whose motion can be controlled in liquids under ambient conditions. The aim of many of these engineering endeavors is to be able to build and propel an artificial micro-structure that rivals the versatility of biological swimmers of similar size, e.g. motile bacterial cells. Applications for such artificial "micro-bots" are envisioned to range from microrheology to targeted drug delivery and microsurgery, and require full motion-control under ambient conditions. In this Mini-Review we discuss the construction, actuation, and operation of several devices that have recently been reported, especially systems that can be controlled by and propelled with homogenous magnetic fields. We describe the fabrication and associated experimental challenges and discuss potential applications. PMID:21152575

  3. Preliminary validation of Sm-Fe-N magnetic silicone rubber for a flexible magnetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushi, Takanori; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for a flexible magnetic actuator (FMA) using Sm-Fe-N magnetic silicone rubber (MSR) that has a higher degree of freedom (DOF) in shape, flexibility, ease of fabrication and combinative ability than permanent magnets. To verify its potential for use in an FMA, we examined its magnetic and elastic properties and focused on magnetic torque control within a uniform rotating magnetic field. Silicone rubber liquid and hardener were mixed with Sm-Fe-N powder and poured into a mold. The fabricated Sm-Fe-N MSR included Sm-Fe-N powder of 13.5, 17.3, and 21.2 vol% ratio. The physical and elastic properties were determined by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and elastic load, respectively. Furthermore, we fabricated two FMAs (multiple-magnetic anisotropy type and spiral-type), and evaluated the suitability of the Sm-Fe-N MSR for magnetic wireless actuators based on magnetic torque control.

  4. Surface Absorption Polarization Sensors (SAPS), Final Technical Report, Laser Probing of Immobilized SAPS Actuators Component

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph I. Cline

    2010-04-22

    propensity for the angular control of rotary motion to be strongly influenced by the presence of the H+ analyte: the SAPS actuators can readily detect the presence of a H+ analyte at 1 equivalent concentration. Because the total number of SAPS actuators in the probe volume of the film is small, the amount of analyte detectable can be very low. A variety of SAPS actuator structures based on dibenzofulvene rotors are possible that could bind other analytes. It appears that analyte binding that alters the electron density in the dibenzofulvene ring is sufficient to create a detectable change in the rotary efficiency. If the analyte is strongly bound to the rotor, the SAPS actuator behaves in a dosimeter mode. Weak, reversible binding would allow for monitoring of varying concentrations.

  5. Compensator-based 6-DOF control for probe asteroid-orbital-frame hovering with actuator limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Keping; Li, Yuanchun

    2016-05-01

    This paper is concerned with 6-DOF control of a probe hovering in the orbital frame of an asteroid. Considering the requirements of the scientific instruments pointing direction and orbital position in practical missions, the coordinate control of relative attitude and orbit between the probe and target asteroid is imperative. A 6-DOF dynamic equation describing the relative translational and rotational motion of a probe in the asteroid's orbital frame is derived, taking the irregular gravitation, model and parameter uncertainties and external disturbances into account. An adaptive sliding mode controller is employed to guarantee the convergence of the state error, where the adaptation law is used to estimate the unknown upper bound of system uncertainty. Then the controller is improved to deal with the practical problem of actuator limitations by introducing a RBF neural network compensator, which is used to approximate the difference between the actual control with magnitude constraint and the designed nominal control law. The closed-loop system is proved to be asymptotically stable through the Lyapunov stability analysis. Numerical simulations are performed to compare the performances of the preceding designed control laws. Simulation results demonstrate the validity of the control scheme using the compensator-based adaptive sliding mode control law in the presence of actuator limitations, system uncertainty and external disturbance.

  6. Ball bearing versus magnetic bearing reaction and momentum wheels as momentum actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, W.

    1980-01-01

    Different bearing technologies of momentum actuators for the attitude control of satellites are compared and a guideline for the selection of the suitable momentum actuators or momentum actuator configurations to meet given mission goals with high reliability and low cost is developed. The comparison between ball bearing and magnetic bearing momentum actuators shows that given mission requirements can be economically met by employing the ball bearing technology without decreasing reliability and lifetime. However, for some special mission requirements, such as 'zero friction at zero speed,' fine pointing (met by vernier gimballing), and/or active damping, magnetic bearings may be advantageous. This makes it evident that magnetic bearing technology will not replace ball bearing technology for momentum actuators, but will supplement it for some special mission requirements.

  7. Selective and directional actuation of elastomer films using chained magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sumeet R; Dickey, Michael D; Velev, Orlin D; Tracy, Joseph B

    2016-01-21

    We report selective and directional actuation of elastomer films utilizing magnetic anisotropy introduced by chains of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Under uniform magnetic fields or field gradients, dipolar interactions between the MNPs favor magnetization along the chain direction and cause selective lifting. This mechanism is described using a simple model. PMID:26677134

  8. Micromachined piezoresistive proximal probe with integratedbimorph actuator for aligned single ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Ivanova, K.; Sarov, Y.; Ivanov, Tzv.; Volland, B.E.; Rangelow, I.W.; Nikolov, N.; Schenkel, T.; Djakov, V.; Jenkins, D.W.K.; Meijer, J.; Vogel, T.

    2006-10-01

    The authors report a microfabrication procedure ofself-actuated piezoresistive scanning probes (SAPSPs). They are designedfor a SAPSP instrument that is integrated with an ion beam for alignedsingle ion implantation in ultrahigh vacuum. The novelty of the design isan integrated hollow pyramid, instead of a previously mechanically handmounted pyramid [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 23, 2798 (2005)]. Thepyramidhas dual purpose. First it collimates the ion beam and suppressessecondary particles from the back side of the cantilever, so thatsecondary particles from the target material can be used for single iondetection. Second the pyramid also provides an atomic force microscopetip for the scanning probe. A crucial step in the fabrication is the backside opening via etching for the hollow pyramid. The fabricationprocedure will be discussed in detail.

  9. Electromechanical simulation and test of rotating systems with magnetic bearing or piezoelectric actuator active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan B.; Tang, Punan; Kim, Chaesil; Manchala, Daniel; Barrett, Tim; Kascak, Albert F.; Brown, Gerald; Montague, Gerald; Dirusso, Eliseo; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a summary of the experience of the authors in the field of electromechanical modeling for rotating machinery - active vibration control. Piezoelectric and magnetic bearing actuator based control are discussed.

  10. The influence of eddy currents on magnetic actuator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmood, R. B.; Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The present investigation of the effects of eddy currents on EM actuators' transient performance notes that a transfer function representation encompassing a first-order model of the eddy current influence can be useful in control system analysis. The method can be extended to represent the higher-order effects of eddy currents for actuators that cannot be represented by semiinfinite planes.

  11. Investigation of static and dynamic behavior of functionally graded piezoelectric actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Vibhuti Bhushan; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper a novel functionally graded piezoelectric (FGP) actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe is proposed for atomic force microscope. The shear piezoelectric coefficient d15 has much higher value than coupling coefficients d31 and d33, hence in the present work the micro cantilever beam actuated by d15 effect is utilized. The material properties are graded in the thickness direction of actuator by a simple power law. A three dimensional finite element analysis has been performed using COMSOL Multiphysics® (version 4.2) software. Tip deflection and free vibration analysis for the micro cantilever probe has been done. The results presented in the paper shall be useful in the design of micro cantilever probe and their subsequent utilization in atomic force microscopes.

  12. Study on The Response Improvement of A Linear Actuator Using Temperature-Sensitive Magnetic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Kanzaki, Yasunori; Ota, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Kawase, Yoshihiro

    We have been studying a linear actuator for the thermostatic switch using temperature-sensitive magnetic material (TSMM). In this paper, the effect of the geometry of TSMM on response time is investigated by computing the dynamic characteristics of the actuator employing the 3-D finite element method coupled with the equations of magnetic field, heat transfer and motion. As a result, it is found that the response of the actuator is greatly improved. The validity of the computation is clarified though the comparison with the measurement of a prototype.

  13. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynamical hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothesis passes the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale range. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at length-scale 1/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy-overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small-scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magnetogeostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core-mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order 120 years is pseudo-scale-invariant. Magnetic spectra of other

  14. Magnetic Probing of Core Geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand geomagnetic theory and observation, we can use spatial magnetic spectra for the main field and secular variation to test core dynmcal hypotheses against seismology. The hypotheses lead to theoretical spectra which are fitted to observational spectra. Each fit yields an estimate of the radius of Earth's core and uncertainty. If this agrees with the seismologic value, then the hypothes pass the test. A new way to obtain theoretical spectra extends the hydromagnetic scale analysis of Benton to scale-variant field and flow. For narrow scale flow and a dynamically weak field by the top of Earth's core, this yields a generalized Stevenson-McLeod spectrum for the core-source field, and a secular variation spectrum modulated by a cubic polynomial in spherical harmonic degree n. The former passes the tests. The latter passes many tests, but does not describe rapid dipole decline and quadrupole rebound; some tests suggest it is a bit hard, or rich in narrow scale change. In a core geodynamo, motion of the fluid conductor does work against the Lorentz force. This converts kinetic into magnetic energy which, in turn, is lost to heat via Ohmic dissipation. In the analysis at lentgh-scale l/k, if one presumes kinetic energy is converted in either eddy- overturning or magnetic free-decay time-scales, then Kolmogorov or other spectra in conflict with observational spectra can result. Instead, the rate work is done roughly balances the dissipation rate, which is consistent with small scale flow. The conversion time-scale depends on dynamical constraints. These are summarized by the magneto-geostrophic vertical vorticity balance by the top of the core, which includes anisotropic effects of rotation, the magnetic field, and the core- mantle boundary. The resulting theoretical spectra for the core-source field and its SV are far more compatible with observation. The conversion time-scale of order l20 years is pseudo-scale-invarient. Magnetic spectra of other

  15. Fabrication and Manipulation of Ciliary Microrobots with Non-reciprocal Magnetic Actuation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangwon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Jeonghun; Nelson, Bradley J.; Zhang, Li; Choi, Hongsoo

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically actuated ciliary microrobots were designed, fabricated, and manipulated to mimic cilia-based microorganisms such as paramecia. Full three-dimensional (3D) microrobot structures were fabricated using 3D laser lithography to form a polymer base structure. A nickel/titanium bilayer was sputtered onto the cilia part of the microrobot to ensure magnetic actuation and biocompatibility. The microrobots were manipulated by an electromagnetic coil system, which generated a stepping magnetic field to actuate the cilia with non-reciprocal motion. The cilia beating motion produced a net propulsive force, resulting in movement of the microrobot. The magnetic forces on individual cilia were calculated with various input parameters including magnetic field strength, cilium length, applied field angle, actual cilium angle, etc., and the translational velocity was measured experimentally. The position and orientation of the ciliary microrobots were precisely controlled, and targeted particle transportation was demonstrated experimentally. PMID:27470077

  16. Fabrication and Manipulation of Ciliary Microrobots with Non-reciprocal Magnetic Actuation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Jeonghun; Nelson, Bradley J; Zhang, Li; Choi, Hongsoo

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically actuated ciliary microrobots were designed, fabricated, and manipulated to mimic cilia-based microorganisms such as paramecia. Full three-dimensional (3D) microrobot structures were fabricated using 3D laser lithography to form a polymer base structure. A nickel/titanium bilayer was sputtered onto the cilia part of the microrobot to ensure magnetic actuation and biocompatibility. The microrobots were manipulated by an electromagnetic coil system, which generated a stepping magnetic field to actuate the cilia with non-reciprocal motion. The cilia beating motion produced a net propulsive force, resulting in movement of the microrobot. The magnetic forces on individual cilia were calculated with various input parameters including magnetic field strength, cilium length, applied field angle, actual cilium angle, etc., and the translational velocity was measured experimentally. The position and orientation of the ciliary microrobots were precisely controlled, and targeted particle transportation was demonstrated experimentally. PMID:27470077

  17. Fabrication and Manipulation of Ciliary Microrobots with Non-reciprocal Magnetic Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangwon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Jeonghun; Nelson, Bradley J.; Zhang, Li; Choi, Hongsoo

    2016-07-01

    Magnetically actuated ciliary microrobots were designed, fabricated, and manipulated to mimic cilia-based microorganisms such as paramecia. Full three-dimensional (3D) microrobot structures were fabricated using 3D laser lithography to form a polymer base structure. A nickel/titanium bilayer was sputtered onto the cilia part of the microrobot to ensure magnetic actuation and biocompatibility. The microrobots were manipulated by an electromagnetic coil system, which generated a stepping magnetic field to actuate the cilia with non-reciprocal motion. The cilia beating motion produced a net propulsive force, resulting in movement of the microrobot. The magnetic forces on individual cilia were calculated with various input parameters including magnetic field strength, cilium length, applied field angle, actual cilium angle, etc., and the translational velocity was measured experimentally. The position and orientation of the ciliary microrobots were precisely controlled, and targeted particle transportation was demonstrated experimentally.

  18. Halbach-Magnet-Array-Based Focusing Actuator for Small-Form-Factor Optical Storage Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung‑Q; Park, Kang‑Ho; Paek, Mun‑Cheal; Kang, Kwang‑Yong

    2006-02-01

    Small-form-factor optical data storage devices are being developed rapidly nowadays. In the case of a CF-II-type optical data storage device (43×36×5 mm3), its components such as the disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within a 5 mm thickness. Since the thickness specification is tight, each component should be designed to have a small thickness. In this paper, a Halbach magnet array is proposed for the focusing actuator. The proposed Halbach magnet array has the advantage of a thin actuation structure without sacrificing flux densities due to its special magnet array feature that increases the magnetic flux on one side without using a yoke. By finite element method (FEM) analysis, flux density, actuation force and actuator thickness are compared with those of conventional methods. Each dimension of the array is obtained to achieve higher performances. Finally, the working range and the resolution of the focusing actuator are experimentally obtained to verify the feasibility of the proposed idea.

  19. Influence of Segmentation of Ring-Shaped NdFeB Magnets with Parallel Magnetization on Cylindrical Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Goltz, Evandro Claiton; Filho, Aly Ferreira Flores

    2014-01-01

    This work analyses the effects of segmentation followed by parallel magnetization of ring-shaped NdFeB permanent magnets used in slotless cylindrical linear actuators. The main purpose of the work is to evaluate the effects of that segmentation on the performance of the actuator and to present a general overview of the influence of parallel magnetization by varying the number of segments and comparing the results with ideal radially magnetized rings. The analysis is first performed by modelling mathematically the radial and circumferential components of magnetization for both radial and parallel magnetizations, followed by an analysis carried out by means of the 3D finite element method. Results obtained from the models are validated by measuring radial and tangential components of magnetic flux distribution in the air gap on a prototype which employs magnet rings with eight segments each with parallel magnetization. The axial force produced by the actuator was also measured and compared with the results obtained from numerical models. Although this analysis focused on a specific topology of cylindrical actuator, the observed effects on the topology could be extended to others in which surface-mounted permanent magnets are employed, including rotating electrical machines. PMID:25051032

  20. Towards nanomedicines of the future: Remote magneto-mechanical actuation of nanomedicines by alternating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Yuri I; Gribanovsky, Sergey L; Golovin, Dmitry Y; Klyachko, Natalia L; Majouga, Alexander G; Master, Аlyssa M; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2015-12-10

    The paper describes the concept of magneto-mechanical actuation of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in super-low and low frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) and its possible use for remote control of nanomedicines and drug delivery systems. The applications of this approach for remote actuation of drug release as well as effects on biomacromolecules, biomembranes, subcellular structures and cells are discussed in comparison to conventional strategies employing magnetic hyperthermia in a radio frequency (RF) AMF. Several quantitative models describing interaction of functionalized MNPs with single macromolecules, lipid membranes, and proteins (e.g. cell membrane receptors, ion channels) are presented. The optimal characteristics of the MNPs and an AMF for effective magneto-mechanical actuation of single molecule responses in biological and bio-inspired systems are discussed. Altogether, the described studies and phenomena offer opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics both alone and in combination with magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26407671

  1. Eversion of bistable shells under magnetic actuation: a model of nonlinear shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffen, Keith A.; Vidoli, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    We model in closed form a proven bistable shell made from a magnetic rubber composite material. In particular, we incorporate a non-axisymmetrical displacement field, and we capture the nonlinear coupling between the actuated shape and the magnetic flux distribution around the shell. We are able to verify the bistable nature of the shell and we explore its eversion during magnetic actuation. We show that axisymmetrical eversion is natural for a perfect shell but that non-axisymmetrical eversion rapidly emerges under very small initial imperfections, as observed in experiments and in a computational analysis. We confirm the non-uniform shapes of shell and we study the stability of eversion by considering how the landscape of total potential and magnetic energies of the system changes during actuation.

  2. Magnetic Actuators and Suspension for Space Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knospe, Carl R.; Allaire, Paul E.; Lewis, David W.

    1993-01-01

    The research on microgravity vibration isolation performed at the University of Virginia is summarized. This research on microgravity vibration isolation was focused in three areas: (1) the development of new actuators for use in microgravity isolation; (2) the design of controllers for multiple-degree-of-freedom active isolation; and (3) the construction of a single-degree-of-freedom test rig with umbilicals. Described are the design and testing of a large stroke linear actuator; the conceptual design and analysis of a redundant coarse-fine six-degree-of-freedom actuator; an investigation of the control issues of active microgravity isolation; a methodology for the design of multiple-degree-of-freedom isolation control systems using modern control theory; and the design and testing of a single-degree-of-freedom test rig with umbilicals.

  3. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-12-31

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  4. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  5. Hysteresis Modeling of Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy Actuator Based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shoubin; Gao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    As a new type of intelligent material, magnetically shape memory alloy (MSMA) has a good performance in its applications in the actuator manufacturing. Compared with traditional actuators, MSMA actuator has the advantages as fast response and large deformation; however, the hysteresis nonlinearity of the MSMA actuator restricts its further improving of control precision. In this paper, an improved Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii (KP) model is used to establish the hysteresis model of MSMA actuator. To identify the weighting parameters of the KP operators, an improved gradient correction algorithm and a variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are proposed in this paper. In order to demonstrate the validity of the proposed modeling approach, simulation experiments are performed, simulations with improved gradient correction algorithm and variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are studied, respectively. Simulation results of both identification algorithms demonstrate that the proposed modeling approach in this paper can establish an effective and accurate hysteresis model for MSMA actuator, and it provides a foundation for improving the control precision of MSMA actuator. PMID:23737730

  6. Behavior of a Single Langmuir Probe in a Magnetic Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pytlinski, J. T.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to demonstrate the influence of a magnetic field on the behavior of a single Langmuir probe. The experiment introduces the student to magnetically supported plasma and particle behavior in a magnetic field. (GA)

  7. Fundamentals of magnet-actuated droplet manipulation on an open hydrophobic surface†

    PubMed Central

    Long, Zhicheng; Shetty, Abhishek M.; Solomon, Michael J.; Larson, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    We systematically investigate droplet movement, coalescence, and splitting on an open hydrophobic surface. These processes are actuated by magnetic beads internalized in an oil-coated aqueous droplet using an external magnet. Results are organized into an ‘operating diagram’ that describes regions of droplet stable motion, breakage, and release from the magnet. The results are explained theoretically with a simple model that balances magnetic, friction, and capillary-induced drag forces and includes the effects of particle type, droplet size, surrounding oil layer, surface tension, and viscosity. Finally, we discuss the implications of the results for the design of magnet-actuated droplet systems for applications such as nucleic acid purification, immunoassay and drug delivery. PMID:19458864

  8. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Issues for Implantable Microfabricated Magnetic Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyowon; Xu, Qing; Shellock, Frank G.; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical robustness of microfabricated torsional magnetic actuators in withstanding the strong static fields (7 T) and time-varying field gradients (17 T/m) produced by an MR system was studied in this investigation. The static and dynamic mechanical characteristics of 30 devices were quantitatively measured before and after exposure to both strong uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields. The results showed no statistically significant change in both the static and dynamic mechanical performance, which mitigate concerns about the mechanical stability of these devices in association with MR systems under the conditions used for this assessment. The MR-induced heating was also measured in a 3-T/128-MHz MR system. The results showed a minimal increase (1.6 °C) in temperature due to the presence of the magnetic microactuator array. Finally, the size of the MR-image artifacts created by the magnetic microdevices were quantified. The signal loss caused by the devices was approximately four times greater than the size of the device. PMID:24077662

  9. Development of magnetic shape memory alloy actuators for a swashplateless helicopter rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, Ronald Newton

    Actuator concepts utilizing NiMnGa, ferromagnetic shape memory alloy are investigated for potential use on a smart rotor for trailing edge flap actuation. With their high energy density, large dynamic stroke, and wide operating bandwidth, ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMA) like NiMnGa, seem like attractive candidates for smart rotor actuators, potentially able to fulfill the requirements for both primary rotor control and vibration suppression. However, because of the recent discovery of the material, current experimental data and analytical tools are limited. To rectify these shortcomings, an extensive set of detailed experiments were conducted on samples of NiMnGa to characterize the response of the alloy for a wide variety of mechanical and magnetic loading conditions. Measurements of the material performance parameters such as power density, damping properties, magneto-mechanical coupling, and transduction efficiency were included. Once characterized, the experimental data were used to develop a series of analytical tools to predict the behavior of the material. A model, developed in parallel to thermal shape memory alloy models is proposed to predict the quasi-static stress-strain behavior. A simple, low frequency, parameter based model was also developed to predict the alloy's dynamic strain response. A method for developing conceptual actuators utilizing NiMnGa as the actuation element was proposed. This approach incorporates experimental data into a process that down-selects a series of possible actuator configurations to obtain a single configuration optimized for volumetric and weight considerations. The proposed actuator was designed to deliver 2 mm of stroke and 60 N of force at an actuation frequency of 50 Hz. However, to generate the 1.0 T magnetic field, the actuator mass was determined to be 2.8 kg and required a minimum of 320 Watts of power for operation. The mass of the NiMnGa element was only 18.3 g. It was concluded that although the Ni

  10. Design of a bidirectional actuator for a nanopositioning system with a permanent magnet and an electromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Gweon, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    A precision bidirectional linear actuator for ultraprecision systems is proposed and designed in this article. The actuator is composed of a symmetric structure with a force generation unit and a guide mechanism. The force generation part consists of a permanent magnet and an electromagnet, which generate a permanent and a reversible flux, respectively. The combination of permanent and reversible fluxes makes various flux densities in its air gaps between the moving part and the fixed yokes. The difference between flux densities in the lower and upper gaps creates forces for bidirectional linear motions of hundreds of micrometers. As a guide mechanism, two circular plates and one shaft are used. Reducing other forces generated by motions, except the z-directional motion, these circular plates in the form of a flexure endow the actuator with smooth motion, freedom from wear, and a high stiffness for a rapid settling time. The function of the shaft is to transfer motion to an object. Finally, the total body has a symmetric structure enabling it to be stable in terms of thermal error. The actuator is designed with the software tools MAXWELL™2D and PRO-MECHANICA™. The designed actuator is evaluated with a linear current amplifier, a laser Doppler vibrometer for nanometer resolution, a dynamic signal analyzer for frequency responses of the proposed actuator, and a simple proportional-integral-derivative controller for its tracking performance.

  11. A Comparison of Analytical and Experimental Data for a Magnetic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Bloodgood, V. Dale, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental force-displacement and force-current data are compared for two configurations of a simple horseshoe, or bipolar, magnetic actuator. One configuration utilizes permanent magnet wafers to provide a bias flux and the other configuration has no source of bias flux. The theoretical data are obtained from two analytical models of each configuration. One is an ideal analytical model which is developed under the following assumptions: (1) zero fringing and leakage flux, (2) zero actuator coil mmf loss, and (3) infinite permeability of the actuator core and suspended element flux return path. The other analytical model, called the extended model, is developed by adding loss and leakage factors to the ideal model. The values of the loss and leakage factors are calculated from experimental data. The experimental data are obtained from a magnetic actuator test fixture, which is described in detail. Results indicate that the ideal models for both configurations do not match the experimental data very well. However, except for the range around zero force, the extended models produce a good match. The best match is produced by the extended model of the configuration with permanent magnet flux bias.

  12. Progesterone-Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Determination of progesterone receptor (PR) status in hormone-dependent diseases is essential in ascertaining disease prognosis and monitoring treatment response. The development of a noninvasive means of monitoring these processes would have significant impact on early detection, cost, repeated measurements, and personalized treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely recognized as a technique that can produce longitudinal studies, and PR-targeted MR probes may address a clinical problem by providing contrast enhancement that reports on PR status without biopsy. Commercially available MR contrast agents are typically delivered via intravenous injection, whereas steroids are administered subcutaneously. Whether the route of delivery is important for tissue accumulation of steroid-modified MRI contrast agents to PR-rich tissues is not known. To address this question, modification of the chemistry linking progesterone with the gadolinium chelate led to MR probes with increased water solubility and lower cellular toxicity and enabled administration through the blood. This attribute came at a cost through lower affinity for PR and decreased ability to cross the cell membrane, and ultimately it did not improve delivery of the PR-targeted MR probe to PR-rich tissues or tumors in vivo. Overall, these studies are important, as they demonstrate that targeted contrast agents require optimization of delivery and receptor binding of the steroid and the gadolinium chelate for optimal translation in vivo. PMID:25019183

  13. Microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired and magnetically actuated artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Ling-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Mani, Karthick

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired artificial cilia provide a promising alternative for lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the ability of actuating artificial cilia to achieve a time-dependent local flow control with high accuracy together with the elegance of full integration into the biocompatible microfluidic platforms remains remote. Driven by this motive, the current work has constructed a series of artificial cilia inside a microchannel to facilitate the time-dependent flow propulsion through artificial cilia actuation with high-speed (>40 Hz) circular beating behavior. The generated flow was quantified using micro-particle image velocimetry and particle tracking with instantaneous net flow velocity of up to 10(1 ) μm/s. Induced flow patterns caused by the tilted conical motion of artificial cilia constitutes efficient fluid propulsion at microscale. This flow phenomenon was further measured and illustrated by examining the induced flow behavior across the depth of the microchannel to provide a global view of the underlying flow propulsion mechanism. The presented analytic paradigms and substantial flow evidence present novel insights into the area of flow manipulation at microscale. PMID:26045730

  14. Microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired and magnetically actuated artificial cilia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Cheng, Ling-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Chieh; Mani, Karthick

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in microscale flow propulsion through bioinspired artificial cilia provide a promising alternative for lab-on-a-chip applications. However, the ability of actuating artificial cilia to achieve a time-dependent local flow control with high accuracy together with the elegance of full integration into the biocompatible microfluidic platforms remains remote. Driven by this motive, the current work has constructed a series of artificial cilia inside a microchannel to facilitate the time-dependent flow propulsion through artificial cilia actuation with high-speed (>40 Hz) circular beating behavior. The generated flow was quantified using micro-particle image velocimetry and particle tracking with instantaneous net flow velocity of up to 101 μm/s. Induced flow patterns caused by the tilted conical motion of artificial cilia constitutes efficient fluid propulsion at microscale. This flow phenomenon was further measured and illustrated by examining the induced flow behavior across the depth of the microchannel to provide a global view of the underlying flow propulsion mechanism. The presented analytic paradigms and substantial flow evidence present novel insights into the area of flow manipulation at microscale. PMID:26045730

  15. Magnetic-probe diagnostics for railgun plasma armatures

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.

    1989-06-01

    Magnetic probes were employed on the first plasma armature railgun experiments, and they have been used continuously since then for position determination and qualitative determination of the armature current. In the last few years, improvements in experimental technique and analysis have permitted more accurate measurements of the plasma-armature current distribution. This paper reviews the various probe configurations in use today and presents analytic approximations for the dependence of the probe signal on probe location and railgun geometry. Rail current and armature current probes are compared and contrasted with respect to resolution and accuracy. Further improvements in measurement accuracy are predicted for close-spaced magnetic-probe arrays.

  16. A Cryogenic Magnetostrictive Actuator Using a Persistent High Temperature Superconducting Magnet. Part 1; Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett; Bromberg, Leslie; Teter, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic magnetostrictive materials, such as rare earth zinc crystals, offer high strains and high forces with minimally applied magnetic fields, making the material ideally suited for deformable optics applications. For cryogenic temperature applications the use of superconducting magnets offer the possibility of a persistent mode of operation, i.e., the magnetostrictive material will maintain a strain field without power. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are attractive options if the temperature of operation is higher than 10 degrees Kelvin (K) and below 77 K. However, HTS wires have constraints that limit the minimum radius of winding, and even if good wires can be produced, the technology for joining superconducting wires does not exist. In this paper, the design and capabilities of a rare earth zinc magnetostrictive actuator using bulk HTS is described. Bulk superconductors can be fabricated in the sizes required with excellent superconducting properties. Equivalent permanent magnets, made with this inexpensive material, are persistent, do not require a persistent switch as in HTS wires, and can be made very small. These devices are charged using a technique which is similar to the one used for charging permanent magnets, e.g., by driving them into saturation. A small normal conducting coil can be used for charging or discharging. Because of the magnetic field capability of the superconductor material, a very small amount of superconducting magnet material is needed to actuate the rare earth zinc. In this paper, several designs of actuators using YBCO and BSCCO 2212 superconducting materials are presented. Designs that include magnetic shielding to prevent interaction between adjacent actuators will also be described. Preliminary experimental results and comparison with theory for BSCCO 2212 with a magnetostrictive element will be discussed.

  17. MTRAP: The Magnetic Transition Region Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; West, E. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Oberright, J. F.; Evans, D. C.; Wood, H. J.; Saba, J. L. R.; Alexander, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Magnetic Transition Region Probe is a space telescope designed to measure the magnetic field at several heights and temperatures in the solar atmosphere, providing observations spanning the chromospheric region where the field is expected to become force free. The primary goal is to provide an early warning system (hours to days) for solar energetic particle events that pose a serious hazard to astronauts in deep space and to understand the source regions of these particles. The required magnetic field data consist of simultaneous circular and linear polarization measurements in several spectral lines over the wavelength range from 150 to 855 nm. Because the observations are photon limited an optical telescope with a large (>18sq m) collecting area is required. To keep the heat dissipation problem manageable we have chosen to implement MTRAP with six separate Gregorian telescopes, each with approx. 3 sq m collecting area, that are brought to a common focus. The large field of view (5 x 5 arcmin(sup 2)) and angular resolution (0.025 arcsec pixels) require large detector arrays and, because of the requirements on signal to noise (10(exp 3)), pixels with large full well depths to reduce the readout time and improve the temporal resolution. The optical and engineering considerations that have gone into the development of a concept that meets MTRAP's requirements are described.

  18. A microfabricated magnetic actuation device for mechanical conditioning of arrays of 3D microtissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Zhao, Ruogang; Liu, Alan S; Metz, Tristin; Shi, Yu; Bose, Prasenjit; Reich, Daniel H

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an approach to actuate magnetically arrays of microtissue constructs for long-term mechanical conditioning and subsequent biomechanical measurements. Each construct consists of cell/matrix material self-assembled around a pair of flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) pillars. The deflection of the pillars reports the tissues' contractility. Magnetic stretching of individual microtissues via magnetic microspheres mounted on the cantilevers has been used to elucidate the tissues' elastic modulus and response to varying mechanical boundary conditions. This paper describes the fabrication of arrays of micromagnetic structures that can transduce an externally applied uniform magnetic field to actuate simultaneously multiple microtissues. These structures are fabricated on silicon-nitride coated Si wafers and contain electrodeposited Ni bars. Through-etched holes provide optical and culture media access when the devices are mounted on the PDMS microtissue scaffold devices. Both static and AC forces (up to 20 μN on each microtissue) at physiological frequencies are readily generated in external fields of 40 mT. Operation of the magnetic arrays was demonstrated via measurements of elastic modulus and dynamic stiffening in response to AC actuation of fibroblast populated collagen microtissues. PMID:25959132

  19. A microfabricated magnetic actuation device for mechanical conditioning of arrays of 3D microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fan; Zhao, Ruogang; Liu, Alan S.; Metz, Tristin; Shi, Yu; Bose, Prasenjit; Reich, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to actuate magnetically arrays of microtissue constructs for long-term mechanical conditioning and subsequent biomechanical measurements. Each construct consists of cell/matrix material self-assembled around a pair of flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) pillars. The deflection of the pillars reports the tissues’ contractility. Magnetic stretching of individual microtissues via magnetic microspheres mounted on the cantilevers has been used to elucidate the tissues’ elastic modulus and response to varying mechanical boundary conditions. This paper describes the fabrication of arrays of micromagnetic structures that can transduce an externally applied uniform magnetic field to actuate simultaneously multiple microtissues. These structures are fabricated on silicon-nitride coated Si wafers and contain electrodeposited Ni bars. Through-etched holes provide optical and culture media access when the devices are mounted on the PDMS microtissue scaffold devices. Both static and AC forces (up to 20 μN on each microtissue) at physiological frequencies are readily generated in external fields of 40 mT. Operation of the magnetic arrays was demonstrated via measurements of elastic modulus and dynamic stiffening in response to AC actuation of fibroblast populated collagen microtissues. PMID:25959132

  20. Design considerations for an air core magnetic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1992-01-01

    Equations for the force produced by an air core electromagnet on a permanent magnet core as a function of the coil height, coil inner and outer radii, and core displacement are developed. The magnetization vector of the permanent magnet core is assumed to be aligned with the central axis of the electromagnet and the forces which are produced lie along the same axis. Variations in force due to changes in electromagnet parameters and core displacement are investigated and parameter plots which should be useful for coil design are presented.

  1. Apparatus comprising magnetically actuated valves and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Thayne L.; Harper, Jason C.

    2016-07-12

    The present invention, in part, relates to an apparatus having a single-use, normally-closed fluidic valve that is initially maintained in the closed position by a valve element bonded to an adhesive coating. The valve is opened using a magnetic force. The valve element includes a magnetic material or metal. In some examples, the valve is opened by bringing a magnet in proximity to the valve element to provide a magnetic force that delaminates the valve element from the adhesive coating. In particular, the apparatus can be useful for on-chip amplification and/or detection of various targets, including biological targets and any amplifiable targets. Such apparatuses and methods are useful for in-field or real-time detection of targets, especially in limited resource settings.

  2. Magnetically-actuated artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion.

    PubMed

    Khaderi, S N; Craus, C B; Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Westerweel, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; den Toonder, J M J; Onck, P R

    2011-06-21

    In this paper we quantitatively analyse the performance of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for lab-on-a-chip applications. The artificial cilia are fabricated using thin polymer films with embedded magnetic nano-particles and their deformation is studied under different external magnetic fields and flows. A coupled magneto-mechanical solid-fluid model that accurately captures the interaction between the magnetic field, cilia and fluid is used to simulate the cilia motion. The elastic and magnetic properties of the cilia are obtained by fitting the results of the computational model to the experimental data. The performance of the artificial cilia with a non-uniform cross-section is characterised using the numerical model for two channel configurations that are of practical importance: an open-loop and a closed-loop channel. We predict that the flow and pressure head generated by the artificial cilia can be as high as 18 microlitres per minute and 3 mm of water, respectively. We also study the effect of metachronal waves on the flow generated and show that the fluid propelled increases drastically compared to synchronously beating cilia, and is unidirectional. This increase is significant even when the phase difference between adjacent cilia is small. The obtained results provide guidelines for the optimal design of magnetically-driven artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion. PMID:21331419

  3. Design, modelling and control of a micro-positioning actuator based on magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minorowicz, Bartosz; Leonetti, Giuseppe; Stefanski, Frederik; Binetti, Giulio; Naso, David

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an actuator based on magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) suitable for precise positioning in a wide range (up to 1 mm). The actuator is based on the spring returned operating mode and uses a Smalley wave spring to maintain the same operating parameters of a classical coil spring, while being characterized by a smaller dimension. The MSMA element inside the actuator provides a deformation when excited by an external magnetic field, but its behavior is characterized by an asymmetric and saturated hysteresis. Thus, two models are exploited in this work to represent such a non-linear behavior, i.e., the modified and generalized Prandtl–Ishlinskii models. These models are particularly suitable for control purposes due to the existence of their analytical inversion that can be easily exploited in real time control systems. To this aim, this paper investigates three closed-loop control strategies, namely a classical PID regulator, a PID regulator with direct hysteresis compensation, and a combined PID and feedforward compensation strategy. The effectiveness of both modelling and control strategies applied to the designed MSMA-based actuator is illustrated by means of experimental results.

  4. Patterned magnetic traps for magnetophoretic assembly and actuation of microrotor pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henighan, T.; Giglio, D.; Chen, A.; Vieira, G.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate a microscopic magnetic rotor pump for fluidic channels whose components are assembled in situ and powered by weak external magnetic fields (<150 Oe). A platform of patterned Permalloy microdisks and microcavities provided for the transport, trapping, and rotation of the superparamagnetic spherical microrotors. Parallel actuation of several rotors without direct physical link to external energy sources, tunable rotation speeds, and reversible drive torques offers significant advantages over macroscopic techniques to control flow within microfluidic devices. The effectiveness of trapping and transporting magnetic nanoparticles by the disks illustrate scalability to smaller, submicrometer sized devices.

  5. Probing Planetary Magnetic Fields During Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Jardine, M.; Helling, C.

    2011-10-01

    Recently, Fossati et al. observed that the near-UV transit light curve of the close-in giant planet WASP-12b shows an early ingress as compared to its optical transit. Such observations were interpreted as due to the presence of asymmetries in the exosphere of the planet. In particular, we suggest that this asymmetry could be explained by the presence of a shock formed around the planet's magnetosphere. Bow shocks are formed as a result of the interaction of the planet with the coronal material of the host star, similar to the one formed around the Earth's magnetosphere. According to our model, shock detection through transit observations can be a useful tool to probe and constrain exoplanetary magnetic field. In the case of WASP- 12b, we derive an upper limit for the magnetic field of ∼ 24 G. In addition, we predict that observable shocks should be a common feature in other transiting systems. Promising candidates are: WASP- 19b, WASP-4b, WASP-18b, CoRoT-7b, HAT-P-7b, CoRoT-1b, TrES-3 and WASP-5b.

  6. A low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator.

    PubMed

    Secoli, Riccardo; Robinson, Matthew; Brugnoli, Michele; Rodriguez y Baena, Ferdinando

    2015-03-01

    To perform minimally invasive surgical interventions with the aid of robotic systems within a magnetic resonance imaging scanner offers significant advantages compared to conventional surgery. However, despite the numerous exciting potential applications of this technology, the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible robotics has been hampered by safety, reliability and cost concerns: the robots should not be attracted by the strong magnetic field of the scanner and should operate reliably in the field without causing distortion to the scan data. Development of non-conventional sensors and/or actuators is thus required to meet these strict operational and safety requirements. These demands commonly result in expensive actuators, which mean that cost effectiveness remains a major challenge for such robotic systems. This work presents a low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator: a pneumatic stepper motor which is controllable in open loop or closed loop, along with a rotary encoder, both fully manufactured in plastic, which are shown to perform reliably via a set of in vitro trials while generating negligible artifacts when imaged within a standard clinical scanner. PMID:25833997

  7. An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors for permanent magnet spherical actuators with 3D magnet array.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators. PMID:25342000

  8. An Orientation Measurement Method Based on Hall-effect Sensors for Permanent Magnet Spherical Actuators with 3D Magnet Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I.-Ming

    2014-10-01

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  9. Magnetic microwire probes for the magnetic rod interfacial stress rheometer.

    PubMed

    Tajuelo, J; Pastor, J M; Martínez-Pedrero, F; Vázquez, M; Ortega, F; Rubio, R G; Rubio, M A

    2015-02-01

    The magnetic needle interfacial shear rheometer is a valuable tool for the study of the mechanical properties of thin fluid films or monolayers. However, it is difficult to differentiate the interfacial and subphase contributions to the drag on the needle. In principle, the problem can be addressed by decreasing the needle diameter, which decreases the bulk contribution while the interfacial contribution remains essentially the same. Here we show the results obtained when using a new type of needle, that of magnetic microwires with diameter approximately 10 times thinner than for commercial needles. We show that the lower inertia of the microwires calls for a new calibration procedure. We propose such a new calibration procedure based on the flow field solution around the needle introduced in refs 1 and 2. By measuring thin silicone oil films with well-controlled interfacial viscosities as well as eicosanol (C20) and pentadecanoic acid (PDA, C15) Langmuir monolayers, we show that the new calibration method works well for standard needles as well as for the microwire probes. Moreover, we show that the analysis of the force terms contributing to the force on the needle helps to ascertain whether the measurements obtained are reliable for given surface shear viscosity values. We also show that the microwire probes have at least a 10-fold-lower resolution limit, allowing one to measure interfacial viscosities as low as 10(-7) N·m/s. PMID:25495270

  10. Results of a Parametric Study on 10,000 lb. and 50,000 lb. Permanent Magnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stekly, Z. J. J.; Gardner, C.; Domigan, P.; McDonald, C.; Farrell, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate design data and complete dynamic performance estimates for a high performance permanent magnet actuator. The basic configuration selected for analysis is an axisymmetric Nd-B-Fe permanent magnet actuator capable of providing force in one direction along its major axis. The actuator consisted of two main axisymmetric components separated by an air gap. The design was optimized for each value of force, gap and magnetic field to yield minimum weight and maximum lift to weight ratio. The basic conclusion is that, within parameters considered, the 10,000 lb. and 50,000 lb. actuators are lightweight and compact. As expected for most permanent magnet devices, the smaller ones have higher lift to eight ratios.

  11. Brake Failure from Residual Magnetism in the Mars Exploration Rover Lander Petal Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jandura, Louise

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, two Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft arrived at Mars. Each safely delivered an identical rover to the Martian surface in a tetrahedral lander encased in airbags. Upon landing, the airbags deflated and three Lander Petal Actuators opened the three deployable Lander side petals enabling the rover to exit the Lander. Approximately nine weeks prior to the scheduled launch of the first spacecraft, one of these mission-critical Lander Petal Actuators exhibited a brake stuck-open failure during its final flight stow at Kennedy Space Center. Residual magnetism was the definitive conclusion from the failure investigation. Although residual magnetism was recognized as an issue in the design, the lack of an appropriately specified lower bound on brake drop-out voltage inhibited the discovery of this problem earlier in the program. In addition, the brakes had more unit-to-unit variation in drop-out voltage than expected, likely due to a larger than expected variation in the magnetic properties of the 15-5 PH stainless steel brake plates. Failure analysis and subsequent rework of two other Lander Petal Actuators with marginal brakes was completed in three weeks, causing no impact to the launch date.

  12. Thickness dependence of voltage-driven magnetization switching in FeCo/PI/piezoelectric actuator heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, B. S.; Guo, X. B.; Wu, K.; Li, D.; Zuo, Y. L.; Xi, L.

    2016-03-01

    Strain mediated magnetization switching of ferromagnetic/substrate/piezoelectric actuator heterostructures has become a hot issue due to the advantage of low-power consumption. In this work, Fe65Co35 thin films were deposited on a flexible polyamides (PI) substrate, which has quite low Young’s module (~4 GPa for PI as compared to ~180 GPa for Si) and benefits from complete transfer of the strain from the piezoelectric actuator to magnetic thin films. A complete 90° transition of the magnetic easy axis was realized in 50 nm thick FeCo films under the voltage of 70 V, while a less than 90° rotation angle of the magnetic easy axis direction was observed in other samples, which was ascribed to the distribution of the anisotropy field and/or the orthogonal misalignment between stress induced anisotropy and original uniaxial anisotropy. A model considering two uniaxial anisotropies with orthogonal arrangement was used to quantitatively understand the observed results and the linear-like voltage dependent anisotropy field, especially for 10 nm FeCo films, in which the switching mechanism along the easy axis direction can be explained by the domain wall depinning model. It indicates that the magnetic domain-wall movement velocity may be controlled by strain through tuning the energy barrier of the pinning in heterostructures. Moreover, voltage-driven 90° magnetization switching with low-power consumption was achieved in this work.

  13. Feedforward-Feedback Hybrid Control for Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy Actuators Based on the Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Miaolei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    As a new type of smart material, magnetic shape memory alloy has the advantages of a fast response frequency and outstanding strain capability in the field of microdrive and microposition actuators. The hysteresis nonlinearity in magnetic shape memory alloy actuators, however, limits system performance and further application. Here we propose a feedforward-feedback hybrid control method to improve control precision and mitigate the effects of the hysteresis nonlinearity of magnetic shape memory alloy actuators. First, hysteresis nonlinearity compensation for the magnetic shape memory alloy actuator is implemented by establishing a feedforward controller which is an inverse hysteresis model based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii operator. Secondly, the paper employs the classical Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control with feedforward control to comprise the hybrid control system, and for further enhancing the adaptive performance of the system and improving the control accuracy, the Radial Basis Function neural network self-tuning Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control replaces the classical Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control. Utilizing self-learning ability of the Radial Basis Function neural network obtains Jacobian information of magnetic shape memory alloy actuator for the on-line adjustment of parameters in Proportion Integration Differentiation controller. Finally, simulation results show that the hybrid control method proposed in this paper can greatly improve the control precision of magnetic shape memory alloy actuator and the maximum tracking error is reduced from 1.1% in the open-loop system to 0.43% in the hybrid control system. PMID:24828010

  14. A novel magnetic suspension cum linear actuator system for satellite cryo coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadasan, K.K. . ISRO Inertial Systems Unit)

    1994-05-01

    Stirling cycle cryogenic coolers have been widely used for device cooling in satellites. Various types of magnetic bearings and linear actuators find application in such systems. The most widely used configurations have two-axis-radially-active suspension stations placed at either ends of a reciprocating shaft in the compression and expansion sections. Separate or integral liner motors are provided in each section for axial shaft movement. It may be noted that such configurations are rather complicated and less reliable because of the presence of numerous electro-mechanical components, sensors and electronic servo channels. In this paper, a simple and reliable scheme is suggested which axially stabilizes and linearly perturbs the piston so that the need for a separate motor for axial actuation can be totally dispensed with. The piston is radially supported by passive repulsive bearings. In the axial direction, a servo actuator balances'' the piston and also actuates it bi-directionally. Implemented of this bearing cum motor theme,'' reduces the number of electromechanical and electronic components required to operate the system and hence minimizes the chances of system failure. Apart from this, the system's power consumption is reduced and efficiency is improved as electrical heating losses caused by quiescent-operating currents are removed and electromagnetic losses on the moving parts are minimized. The necessary system parameters have been derived using finite element analysis techniques. Finally, the proposed design is validated by computer-aided system simulation.

  15. Inductively heated shape memory polymer for the magnetic actuation of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Patrick R; McKinley, Gareth H; Wilson, Thomas S; Small, Ward; Benett, William J; Bearinger, Jane P; McElfresh, Michael W; Maitland, Duncan J

    2006-10-01

    Presently, there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with nickel zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP. PMID:17019872

  16. Inductively Heated Shape Memory Polymer for the Magnetic Actuation of Medical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, P; Mckinley, G; Wilson, T; Small, W; Benett, W; Bearinger, J; McElfresh, M; Maitland, D

    2005-09-06

    Presently there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with Nickel Zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  17. Radial and tangential winding coil probes for sextupole magnet measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    Rotating coil probes of radial and tangential winding geometries for the measurements of the magnetic center, main field integral and multipole coefficients of sextupole magnets are describes. Two sets of coils are sufficient for a probe of radial winding geometry. For a tangential winding probe, however, typically several sets of coils are required to measure the above magnetic parameters. The tangential coil geometry in this note is described with three sets of coils. The main sextupole field coefficients are defined as b{sub 2} = 1.0cm{sup {minus}2} and a{sub 2} = 0 for the expression of the multipole field coefficients.

  18. Aggregation of magnetic microparticles in the context of targeted therapies actuated by a magnetic resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Martel, Sylvain

    2009-08-01

    A study of magnetic aggregation in the context of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based actuated targeting is proposed. MRI systems can induce displacement forces on magnetized particles as they flow through the blood vessels. Magnetic aggregation of the particles happens when they are placed within the magnetic field of the MRI system and can greatly influence the MRI steering dynamics of magnetic particles. In this paper, a review of the different parameters that can be used to tailor the size, geometry, stiffness, and density of magnetic aggregates is proposed. Then, magnetic aggregation experiments on a suspension of Fe3O4 microparticles ranging from 0.1 to 100 μm in diameter are described. The effects of particle concentration, flow rate, and magnetic field amplitude were evaluated. Field amplitudes of 1.5 mT, 0.4 T, and 1.5 T fields were applied without any magnetic steering gradients and caused aggregates that could sometimes exceed 1 mm in length. Since magnetic aggregates can reach higher magnetophoretic velocities than individual particles, large aggregates could be exploited in larger arteries with important blood flows. A few strategies are discussed to assist in the design of MRI steering experiments by enhancing the positive effects of magnetic aggregation over its negative effects.

  19. Magnetically-Actuated Escherichia coli System for Micro Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauback, S.; Brown, E.; Pérez-Guzman, L.; Peace, C.; Pierce, C.; Lower, B. H.; Lower, S. K.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Technologies that control matter at the nano- and micro-scale are crucial for developing new engineered materials and devices. While the more traditional approaches for such manipulations often depend on lithographic fabrication, they can be expanded upon by taking advantage of the biological systems within a living cell which also operate on the nano- and micro- scale. In this study, a system is being developed to functionalize a targeted location on the surface of a chip with the protein AmCyan from transformed Escherichia coli cells. Using established methods in molecular biology where a plasmid with the amcyan gene sequence is inserted into the cell, E. coli are engineered to express the AmCyan protein on their outer surface. In order to transport the cells to the targeted location, the transformed E. coli are labeled with superparamagnetic micro-beads which exert directed forces on the cells in an external field. Preliminary results of the protein expression on E. coli, the transport of the cell through weak magnetic fields to targeted locations and the potential to transfer protein from the cell to the chip surface will be presented.

  20. Metachronal wave of artificial cilia array actuated by applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumori, Fujio; Marume, Ryuma; Saijou, Akinori; Kudo, Kentaro; Osada, Toshiko; Miura, Hideshi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a biomimetic microstructure related to cilia, which are effective fluidic and conveying systems in nature, is described. Authors have already reported that a magnetic elastomer pillar actuated by a rotating magnetic field can work like a natural cilium. In the present work, we show examples of a cilia array with a metachronal wave as the next step. A metachronal wave is a sequential action of a number of cilia. It is theoretically known that a metachronal wave gives a higher fluidic efficiency; however, there has been no report on a metachronal wave by artificial cilia. We prepared magnetic elastomer pillars that contain chainlike clusters of magnetic particles. The orientation of chains was set to be different in each pillar so that each pillar will deform with a different phase.

  1. Swimming of a Microrobot Actuated by a Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Frederck P.; Zhou, David; Lalande, Viviane; Vonthron, Manuel; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-11-01

    A miniature robot was designed to achieve fish-like locomotion when actuated by the imaging coils of a clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system. The wireless fish robot is composed of a ferromagnetic head, a flexible tail and a float. In an aquarium placed in the MRI, the robot is set into a swimming motion by an alternating transverse linear magnetic gradient. The influence of tail length, forcing frequency and forcing magnitude on the swimming velocity and flapping amplitude are investigated. Moreover, by using a combination of simultaneous magnetic gradients, the fish can reach superior swimming speeds than can be achieved by simply "pulling" on the fish with a magnetic field. Upon further miniaturization, the propulsion principle devised here could be used to navigate a micro surgical robot or a drug delivery system. A great advantage of this system is that no energy storage, motor or control system need to be carried by the robot, allowing great miniaturization possibilities.

  2. A new mount with moving-magnet type electromagnetic actuator for naval shipboard equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yun-Ho; Moon, Seok-Jun; Kwon, Jeong-Il; Jung, Woo-Jin; Jeon, Jae-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This study is proposed a new hybrid mount having a moving-magnet type electromagnetic actuator to reduce the vibration transmitted from naval shipboard equipment to the structure of the ship's hull. Optimal design specifications are determined through experimental analysis. The detailed design of the hybrid mount is determined through several design steps with electromagnetic numerical analysis using Maxwell Software(S/W). The hybrid mount that combines a rubber mount and an electromagnetic actuator has a fail-safe function for shock resistance. The mount is fabricated and tested using a universal testing machine to evaluate the design specifications. Finally, numerical simulation of the hybrid mount is performed to confirm control performance and applicability

  3. Guidance of Magnetic Nanocontainers for Treating Alzheimer's Disease Using an Electromagnetic, Targeted Drug-Delivery Actuator.

    PubMed

    Do, Ton Duc; Ul Amin, Faiz; Noh, Yeongil; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

    2016-03-01

    The "impermeability" of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has hindered effective treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. A drug can be delivered to a targeted disease site effectively by applying a strong electromagnetic force to the conjugate of a drug and magnetic nanocontainers. This study developed a novel nanotechnology-based strategy to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain via the BBB as a possible therapeutic approach for AD. First, a novel approach for an electromagnetic actuator for guiding nanocontainers is introduced. Then, we analyzed the in vivo uptake in mice experimentally to evaluate the capacity of the nanocontainers. In the mouse model, we demonstrated that magnetic particles can cross the normal BBB when subjected to external electromagnetic fields of 28 mT (0.43 T/m) and 79.8 mT (1.39 T/m). Our study also assessed the differential effects of pulsed (0.25, 0.5, and 1 Hz) and constant magnetic fields on the transport of particles across the BBB in mice injected with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via a tail vein. The applied magnetic field was either kept constant or pulsed on and off. Relative to a constant magnetic field, the rate of MNP uptake and transport across the BBB was enhanced significantly by a pulsed magnetic field. Localization inside the brain was established using fluorescent MNPs. These results using 770-nm fluorescent carboxyl magnetic nanocontainers demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed electromagnetic targeted drug delivery actuator. These results establish an effective strategy for regulating the biodistribution of MNPs in the brain through the application of an external electromagnetic field. This might be a valuable targeting system for AD diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27280254

  4. Tracking Control of a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator Using an Inverse Preisach Model with Modified Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory (MSM) alloys are a new class of smart materials with extraordinary strains up to 12% and frequencies in the range of 1 to 2 kHz. The MSM actuator is a potential device which can achieve high performance electromagnetic actuation by using the properties of MSM alloys. However, significant non-linear hysteresis behavior is a significant barrier to control the MSM actuator. In this paper, the Preisach model was used, by capturing experiments from different input signals and output responses, to model the hysteresis of MSM actuator, and the inverse Preisach model, as a feedforward control, provided compensational signals to the MSM actuator to linearize the hysteresis non-linearity. The control strategy for path tracking combined the hysteresis compensator and the modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) which served as a path controller. Based on the experimental results, it was verified that a tracking error in the order of micrometers was achieved. PMID:27571081

  5. Cryogenic Characterization and Testing of Magnetically-Actuated Microshutter Arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, T. T.; Kletetschka, G.; Jah, M. A.; Li, M. J.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Wang, L. L.; Beamesderfer, M. A.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Silverberg, R. F.; Rapchun, D.; Schwinger, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Two-dimensional MEMS microshutter arrays (MSA) have been fabricated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to enable cryogenic (approximately 35 K) spectrographic astronomy measurements in the near-infrared region. Functioning as a focal plane object selection device, the MSA is a 2-D programmable aperture mask with fine resolution, high efficiency and high contrast. The MSA are close- packed silicon nitride shutters (cell size of 100 x 200 microns) patterned with a torsion flexure to allow opening to 90 degrees. A layer of magnetic material is deposited onto each shutter to permit magnetic actuation. Two electrodes are deposited, one onto each shutter and another onto the support structure side-wall, permitting electrostatic latching and 2-D addressing. New techniques were developed to test MSA under mission-similar conditions (8 K less than or equal to T less than 300K). The magnetic rotisserie has proven to be an excellent tool for rapid characterization of MSA. Tests conducted with the magnetic rotisserie method include accelerated cryogenic lifetesting of unpackaged 128 x 64 MSA and parallel measurement of the magneto-mechanical stiffness of shutters in pathfinder test samples containing multiple MSA designs. Lifetest results indicate a logarithmic failure rate out to approximately 10(exp 6) shutter actuations. These results have increased our understanding of failure mechanisms and provide a means to predict the overall reliability of MSA devices.

  6. Cryogenic characterization and testing of magnetically-actuated microshutter arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. T.; Kletetschka, G.; Jah, M. A.; Beamesderfer, M. A.; Li, M. J.; Wang, L. L.; Moseley, S. H.; Sparr, L. M.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Silverberg, R. F.; Rapchun, D.; Zheng, Y.; Schwinger, D. S.; Voellmer, G. M.

    2005-08-01

    Two-dimensional MEMS microshutter arrays (MSA) have been fabricated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to enable cryogenic (~35 K) spectrographic astronomy measurements at near-infrared wavelengths. Functioning as a focal plane object selection device, the MSA is a 2D programmable aperture mask with fine resolution, high efficiency and high contrast. The MSA are close-packed silicon nitride shutters (cell size of 100 µm × 200 µm) patterned with a torsion flexure to allow their opening to 90°. A layer of magnetic material is deposited onto each shutter to permit magnetic actuation. Two electrodes are deposited, one onto each shutter and another onto the support structure side-wall, permitting electrostatic latching and 2D addressing. New techniques were developed to test MSA under mission-similar conditions (8 K <= T < 300 K). The 'magnetic rotisserie' has proven to be an excellent tool for rapid characterization of MSA. Tests conducted with the magnetic rotisserie method include accelerated cryogenic lifetesting of unpackaged 128 × 64 MSA and parallel measurement of the magneto-mechanical stiffness of shutters in 'pathfinder' test samples containing multiple MSA designs. Lifetest results indicate a logarithmic failure rate out to ~106 shutter actuations. These results have increased our understanding of failure mechanisms and provide a means to predict the overall reliability of MSA devices.

  7. Real-time thickness measurement of biological tissues using a microfabricated magnetically-driven lens actuator.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Hadi; Zeng, Haishan; Chiao, Mu

    2011-08-01

    A fiber optic confocal catheter with a micro scanning lens was developed for real-time and non-contact thickness measurement of biological tissue. The catheter has an outer diameter and rigid length of 4.75 mm and 30 mm respectively and is suitable for endoscopic applications. The catheter incorporates a lens actuator that is fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The lens is mounted on a folded flexure made of nickel and is actuated by magnetic field. Thickness measurements are performed by positioning the catheter in front of the tissue and actuating the lens scanner in the out-of-plane direction. A single-mode optical fiber (SMF) is used to deliver a 785 nm laser beam to the tissue and relay back the reflected light from the tissue to a photomultiplier tube (PMT). When the focal point of the scanning lens passes tissue boundaries, intensity peaks are detected in the reflecting signal. Tissue thickness is calculated using its index of refraction and the lens displacement between intensity peaks. The utility of the confocal catheter was demonstrated by measuring the cornea and skin thicknesses of a mouse. Measurement uncertainty of 8.86 µm within 95% confidence interval has been achieved. PMID:21468630

  8. A dual-axis pointing mirror with moving-magnet actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataman, Çağlar; Lani, Sébastien; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2013-02-01

    A large-aperture and large-angle MEMS-based 2D pointing mirror is presented. The device is electromagnetically actuated by a moving-magnet/stationary-coil pair and potentially suited for high power laser beam shaping and beam pointing applications, such as LIDAR. The 4×4 mm2 mirror, the radially symmetric compliant membrane, and the off-the-shelf permanent magnet are manually assembled, with the planar coil kept at a well-defined vertical distance from the permanent magnet by simple alignment pins. The mirror and the compliant membrane structures are separately microfabricated on bulk silicon and SOI wafers, respectively. The hybrid integration of microfabricated and off-the-shelf components enable low-risk/high-yield fabrication, while limiting the throughput. The device features minimum inter-axis cross coupling and good linearity and is highly immune to alignment and assembly imperfections, thanks to the robust actuation principle. All the components including the bi-axial electromagnetic actuator provide a device footprint as small as the top mirror, allowing the design to be used in compact and high-fill-factor mirror arrays. With a drive coil of 400 mA and 5.12 W drive power, the total uniaxial dc rotation exceeds ±16° (optical) for both axes with good decoupling. At maximum measured angle (biaxial 10° (mechanical)), a position stability better than 0.05° over 7 h, and a position repeatability of 0.04° over 5000 switching cycles is reported. Thermally, the simulated mirror temperature increases to 64 K above the heat sink temperature with a thermal in-flux of 1 kW m-2, under absolute vacuum.

  9. Implementation of Akiyama probe in low temperature magnetic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, Paul; Wu, Weida

    Exotic phenomena often call for high sensitivity scanning probe microscopic techniques working at extremely low temperatures. Specifically, it is of great fundamental interest to detect the weak magnetic signals in a range of interesting systems such as, quantum anomalous Hall, skyrmion, heavy-fermion, and multiferroic systems. To this end, we are developing low temperature magnetic force microscope (MFM) using a self-sensing cantilever called Akiyama-probe (A-probe). The main advantage of this specific probe is its extremely low power-dissipation compared to other self-sensing (e.g. piezoresistive) cantilevers for low temperature application. We will present progress of the implementation of A-probe and preliminary results under various conditions. This work is supported by DOE BES under Award DE-SC0008147.

  10. The magnetic-distortion probe: Velocimetry in conducting fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, Sophie; Verhille, Gautier; Plihon, Nicolas; Pinton, Jean-François

    2011-09-01

    A new type of velocimeter, capable of local velocity measurements in conducting fluids, is introduced. The principle of the "magnetic-distortion probe" is based on the measurement of the induced magnetic field by the flow of a conducting fluid in the vicinity of a localized magnetic field. The new velocimeter has no moving parts, and can be enclosed in a sealed cap, easing the implementation in harsh environments, such as liquid metals. The proposed method allows one to probe both the continuous part and fluctuations of the velocity, the temporal and spatial resolution being linked to the actual geometric configuration of the probe. A prototype probe has been tested in a gallinstan pipe flow and in a fully turbulent flow of liquid gallium generated by the counter rotation of two coaxial impellers in a cylinder. The signals have been compared to a reference potential probe and show very good agreement both for time-averaged velocities and turbulent fluctuations. The prototype is shown to detect motion from a few cm s-1 to a few m s-1. Moreover, the use of the magnetic-distortion probe with large-scale applied magnetic field is discussed.

  11. Electronic linearization of piezoelectric actuators and noise budget in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, G.; Santucci, A.; Carlà, M.; Dolci, D.; Lanzi, L.

    2006-07-01

    The maximum resolution achievable with a scanning probe microscope is limited by the probe size, by the mechanism of interaction with the sample, as is widely known, and by the electronic noise in the instrument. The evaluation of this noise for the three motion axes of a linearized high resolution scanning electrochemical microscope has been carried through and the intrinsic maximum resolution is discussed.

  12. A Unique Self-Sensing, Self-Actuating AFM Probe at Higher Eigenmodes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhichao; Guo, Tong; Tao, Ran; Liu, Leihua; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-01-01

    With its unique structure, the Akiyama probe is a type of tuning fork atomic force microscope probe. The long, soft cantilever makes it possible to measure soft samples in tapping mode. In this article, some characteristics of the probe at its second eigenmode are revealed by use of finite element analysis (FEA) and experiments in a standard atmosphere. Although the signal-to-noise ratio in this environment is not good enough, the 2 nm resolution and 0.09 Hz/nm sensitivity prove that the Akiyama probe can be used at its second eigenmode under FM non-contact mode or low amplitude FM tapping mode, which means that it is easy to change the measuring method from normal tapping to small amplitude tapping or non-contact mode with the same probe and equipment. PMID:26580619

  13. Development and Testing of a Magnetically Actuated Capsule Endoscopy for Obesity Treatment.

    PubMed

    Do, Thanh Nho; Seah, Tian En Timothy; Ho, Khek Yu; Yu, Ho Khek; Phee, Soo Jay

    2016-01-01

    Intra-gastric balloons (IGB) have become an efficient and less invasive method for obesity treatment. The use of traditional IGBs require complex insertion tools and flexible endoscopes to place and remove the balloon inside the patient's stomach, which may cause discomfort and complications to the patient. This paper introduces a new ingestible weight-loss capsule with a magnetically remote-controlled inflatable and deflatable balloon. To inflate the balloon, biocompatible effervescent chemicals are used. As the source of the actuation is provided via external magnetic fields, the magnetic capsule size can be significantly reduced compared to current weight-loss capsules in the literature. In addition, there are no limitations on the power supply. To lose weight, the obese subject needs only to swallow the magnetic capsule with a glass of water. Once the magnetic capsule has reached the patient's stomach, the balloon will be wirelessly inflated to occupy gastric space and give the feeling of satiety. The balloon can be wirelessly deflated at any time to allow the magnetic capsule to travel down the intestine and exit the body via normal peristalsis. The optimal ratio between the acid and base to provide the desired gas volume is experimentally evaluated and presented. A prototype capsule (9.6mm x 27mm) is developed and experimentally validated in ex-vivo experiments. The unique ease of delivery and expulsion of the proposed magnetic capsule is slated to make this development a good treatment option for people seeking to lose excess weight. PMID:26815309

  14. Probe-Sample Coupling in the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, A.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Roukes, M. L.; Hammel, P. C.

    2002-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) provides a route to achieving scanned probe magnetic resonance imaging with extremely high spatial resolution. Achieving this capability will require understanding the force exerted on a microscopic magnetic probe by a spatially extended sample over which the probe is scanned. Here we present a detailed analysis of this interaction between probe and sample. We focus on understanding the situation where the micromagnet mounted on the mechanical resonator generates a very inhomogeneous magnetic field and is scanned over a sample with at least one spatial dimension much larger than that of the micromagnet. This situation differs quite significantly from the conditions under which most MRFM experiments have been carried out where the sample is mounted on the mechanical resonator and placed in a rather weak magnetic field gradient. In addition to the concept of a sensitive slice (the spatial region where the magnetic resonance condition is met) it is valuable to map the forces exerted on the probe by spins at various locations; this leads to the concept of the force slice (the region in which spins exert force on the resonator). Results of this analysis, obtained both analytically and numerically, will be qualitatively compared with an initial experimental finding from an EPR-MRFM experiment carried out on DPPH at 4 K.

  15. Probe--sample coupling in the magnetic resonance force microscope.

    PubMed

    Suter, A; Pelekhov, D V; Roukes, M L; Hammel, P C

    2002-02-01

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) provides a route to achieving scanned probe magnetic resonance imaging with extremely high spatial resolution. Achieving this capability will require understanding the force exerted on a microscopic magnetic probe by a spatially extended sample over which the probe is scanned. Here we present a detailed analysis of this interaction between probe and sample. We focus on understanding the situation where the micromagnet mounted on the mechanical resonator generates a very inhomogeneous magnetic field and is scanned over a sample with at least one spatial dimension much larger than that of the micromagnet. This situation differs quite significantly from the conditions under which most MRFM experiments have been carried out where the sample is mounted on the mechanical resonator and placed in a rather weak magnetic field gradient. In addition to the concept of a sensitive slice (the spatial region where the magnetic resonance condition is met) it is valuable to map the forces exerted on the probe by spins at various locations; this leads to the concept of the force slice (the region in which spins exert force on the resonator). Results of this analysis, obtained both analytically and numerically, will be qualitatively compared with an initial experimental finding from an EPR-MRFM experiment carried out on DPPH at 4 K. PMID:11846579

  16. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Cantoni, Claudia; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setupmore » presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.« less

  17. Directed Fluid Flow Produced by Arrays of Magnetically Actuated Core-Shell Biomimetic Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiser, B. L.; Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Superfine, R.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a novel core-shell microstructure that we use to fabricate arrays of flexible, magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia. Our biomimetic cilia mimic the size and beat shape of biological cilia in order to replicate the transport of fluid driven by cilia in many biological systems including the determination of left-right asymmetry in the vertebrate embryonic nodal plate and mucociliary clearance in the lung. Our core-shell structures consist of a flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) core surrounded by a shell of nickel approximately forty nanometers thick; by using a core-shell structure, we can tune the mechanical and magnetic properties independently. We present the fabrication process and the long-range transport that occurs above the beating biomimetic cilia tips and will report on progress toward biomimetic cilia induced flow in viscoelastic fluids similar to mucus in the human airway. These flows may have applications in photonics and microfluidics, and our structures may be further useful as sensors or actuators in microelectromechanical systems.

  18. Nanopatterning reconfigurable magnetic landscapes via thermally assisted scanning probe lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albisetti, E.; Petti, D.; Pancaldi, M.; Madami, M.; Tacchi, S.; Curtis, J.; King, W. P.; Papp, A.; Csaba, G.; Porod, W.; Vavassori, P.; Riedo, E.; Bertacco, R.

    2016-06-01

    The search for novel tools to control magnetism at the nanoscale is crucial for the development of new paradigms in optics, electronics and spintronics. So far, the fabrication of magnetic nanostructures has been achieved mainly through irreversible structural or chemical modifications. Here, we propose a new concept for creating reconfigurable magnetic nanopatterns by crafting, at the nanoscale, the magnetic anisotropy landscape of a ferromagnetic layer exchange-coupled to an antiferromagnetic layer. By performing localized field cooling with the hot tip of a scanning probe microscope, magnetic structures, with arbitrarily oriented magnetization and tunable unidirectional anisotropy, are reversibly patterned without modifying the film chemistry and topography. This opens unforeseen possibilities for the development of novel metamaterials with finely tuned magnetic properties, such as reconfigurable magneto-plasmonic and magnonic crystals. In this context, we experimentally demonstrate spatially controlled spin wave excitation and propagation in magnetic structures patterned with the proposed method.

  19. Nanopatterning reconfigurable magnetic landscapes via thermally assisted scanning probe lithography.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, E; Petti, D; Pancaldi, M; Madami, M; Tacchi, S; Curtis, J; King, W P; Papp, A; Csaba, G; Porod, W; Vavassori, P; Riedo, E; Bertacco, R

    2016-06-01

    The search for novel tools to control magnetism at the nanoscale is crucial for the development of new paradigms in optics, electronics and spintronics. So far, the fabrication of magnetic nanostructures has been achieved mainly through irreversible structural or chemical modifications. Here, we propose a new concept for creating reconfigurable magnetic nanopatterns by crafting, at the nanoscale, the magnetic anisotropy landscape of a ferromagnetic layer exchange-coupled to an antiferromagnetic layer. By performing localized field cooling with the hot tip of a scanning probe microscope, magnetic structures, with arbitrarily oriented magnetization and tunable unidirectional anisotropy, are reversibly patterned without modifying the film chemistry and topography. This opens unforeseen possibilities for the development of novel metamaterials with finely tuned magnetic properties, such as reconfigurable magneto-plasmonic and magnonic crystals. In this context, we experimentally demonstrate spatially controlled spin wave excitation and propagation in magnetic structures patterned with the proposed method. PMID:26950242

  20. Increased optical contrast in imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor using magnetically actuated hybrid gold/iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Jesse S.; Oh, Junghwan; Larson, Timothy A.; Kumar, Sonia; Milner, Thomas E.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2006-12-01

    We describe a new approach for optical imaging that combines the advantages of molecularly targeted plasmonic nanoparticles and magnetic actuation. This combination is achieved through hybrid nanoparticles with an iron oxide core surrounded by a gold layer. The nanoparticles are targeted in-vitro to epidermal growth factor receptor, a common cancer biomarker. The gold portion resonantly scatters visible light giving a strong optical signal and the superparamagnetic core provides a means to externally modulate the optical signal. The combination of bright plasmon resonance scattering and magnetic actuation produces a dramatic increase in contrast in optical imaging of cells labeled with hybrid gold/iron oxide nanoparticles.

  1. High-Resolution and Frequency, Printed Miniature Magnetic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Picard, Julian

    2013-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) is developing a technique to significantly reduce the cost and development time of producing magnetic field diagnostics. EHT is designing probes that can be printed on flexible PCBs thereby allowing for extremely small coils to be produced while essentially eliminating the time to wind the coils. The coil size can be extremely small when coupled with the EHT Hybrid Integrator, which is capable of high bandwidth measurements over short and long pulse durations. This integrator is currently being commercialized with the support of a DOE SBIR. Additionally, the flexible PCBs allow probes to be attached to complex surface and/or probes that have a complex 3D structure to be designed and fabricated. During the Phase I, EHT will design and construct magnetic field probes on flexible PCBs, which will be tested at the University of Washington's HIT-SI experiment and in EHT's material science plasma reactor. Funding provided by DOE SBIR/STTR Program.

  2. Neutrons to probe nanoscale magnetism in perpendicular magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataramana, Vikash

    A perpendicular magnetic medium is a multi-layered magnetic thin film structure with the topmost layer comprising nanoscale magnetic grains of high perpendicular anisotropy. The reported work investigates the structural and magnetic properties of the magnetic grains and multi-layers in the perpendicular magnetic medium using polarised neutron scattering and reflectivity techniques. The work investigates the structural and magnetic properties of the CoCrPt grains, apart from understanding the CoCrPt magnetic grain switching. The work also investigates the magnetisation in the layers of the thin film perpendicular media structure using polarised neutron reflectivity (PNR). Using polarised small angle neutron scattering (PolSANS) shows that ferromagnetic ordered core region of the CoCrPt grain in the recording layer is smaller than the physical CoCrPt granular structure. The magnetic switching behaviour of the CoCrPt grain at different magnetic fields is also analysed and the experimental PolSANS data is fitted with non-interacting size-dependent analytical grain switching models. This result provides significant evidence that the magnetic anisotropy increases with grain size, with larger magnetic grains having larger magnetic anisotropy. Polarised neutron scattering experiments are carried out with the magnetically softer exchange coupled composite (ECC) layer included in the thin film magnetic structure.. The first experiments investigate if the ECC layer contributes to the nuclear and magnetic interference scattering term in the experimenting scattering data. The experiments clearly show that there is no contribution from the ECC layer in the nuclear and magnetic scattering interference term. The role of the ECC layer in the magnetic switching process is then investigated at different magnetic fields. Polarised neutron reflectivity (PNR) experiments have also been carried out with the ECC layer on the perpendicular magnetic media samples. These experiments

  3. Field measuring probe for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ganetis, G.; Herrera, J.; Hogue, R.; Skaritka, J.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1987-03-01

    The field probe developed for measuring the field in SSC dipole magnets is an adaptation of the rotating tangential coil system in use at Brookhaven for several years. Also known as the MOLE, it is a self-contained room-temperature mechanism that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet with regular stops to measure the local field. Several minutes are required to measure the field at each point. The probe measures the multipole components of the field as well as the field angle relative to gravity. The sensitivity of the coil and electronics is such that the field up to the full 6.6 T excitation of the magnet as well as the field when warm with only 0.01 T excitation can be measured. Tethers are attached to both ends of the probe to carry electrical connections and to supply dry nitrogen to the air motors that rotate the tangential windings as well as the gravity sensor. A small computer is attached to the probe for control and for data collection, analysis and storage. Digital voltmeters are used to digitize the voltages from the rotating coil and several custom circuits control motor speeds in the probe. The overall diameter of the probe is approximately 2 cm and its length is 2.4 m; the field sensitive windings are 0.6 m in length.

  4. Seismic probes of solar interior magnetic structure.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Birch, Aaron; Gizon, Laurent; Tromp, Jeroen

    2012-09-01

    Sun spots are prominent manifestations of solar magnetoconvection, and imaging their subsurface structure is an outstanding problem of wide physical importance. Travel times of seismic waves that propagate through these structures are typically used as inputs to inversions. Despite the presence of strongly anisotropic magnetic waveguides, these measurements have always been interpreted in terms of changes to isotropic wave speeds and flow-advection-related Doppler shifts. Here, we employ partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization to determine the appropriate parametrization of the structural properties of the magnetic interior. Seven different wave speeds fully characterize helioseismic wave propagation: the isotropic sound speed, a Doppler-shifting flow-advection velocity, and an anisotropic magnetic velocity. The structure of magnetic media is sensed by magnetoacoustic slow and fast modes and Alfvén waves, each of which propagates at a different wave speed. We show that even in the case of weak magnetic fields, significant errors may be incurred if these anisotropies are not accounted for in inversions. Translation invariance is demonstrably lost. These developments render plausible the accurate seismic imaging of magnetoconvection in the Sun. PMID:23005276

  5. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-02-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features.

  6. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  7. Probing of multiple magnetic responses in magnetic inductors using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seongjae; Seo, Hosung; Seol, Daehee; Yoon, Young-Hwan; Kim, Mi Yang; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-01-01

    Even though nanoscale analysis of magnetic properties is of significant interest, probing methods are relatively less developed compared to the significance of the technique, which has multiple potential applications. Here, we demonstrate an approach for probing various magnetic properties associated with eddy current, coil current and magnetic domains in magnetic inductors using multidimensional magnetic force microscopy (MMFM). The MMFM images provide combined magnetic responses from the three different origins, however, each contribution to the MMFM response can be differentiated through analysis based on the bias dependence of the response. In particular, the bias dependent MMFM images show locally different eddy current behavior with values dependent on the type of materials that comprise the MI. This approach for probing magnetic responses can be further extended to the analysis of local physical features. PMID:26852801

  8. Magnetic probing of the solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.; Estes, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic field patterns in the region beneath the solar photosphere is determined. An approximate method for downward extrapolation of line of sight magnetic field measurements taken at the solar photosphere was developed. It utilizes the mean field theory of electromagnetism in a form thought to be appropriate for the solar convection zone. A way to test that theory is proposed. The straightforward application of the lowest order theory with the complete model fit to these data does not indicate the existence of any reasonable depth at which flux conservation is achieved.

  9. Development and Testing of a Magnetically Actuated Capsule Endoscopy for Obesity Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thanh Nho; Seah, Tian En Timothy; Yu, Ho Khek; Phee, Soo Jay

    2016-01-01

    Intra-gastric balloons (IGB) have become an efficient and less invasive method for obesity treatment. The use of traditional IGBs require complex insertion tools and flexible endoscopes to place and remove the balloon inside the patient’s stomach, which may cause discomfort and complications to the patient. This paper introduces a new ingestible weight-loss capsule with a magnetically remote-controlled inflatable and deflatable balloon. To inflate the balloon, biocompatible effervescent chemicals are used. As the source of the actuation is provided via external magnetic fields, the magnetic capsule size can be significantly reduced compared to current weight-loss capsules in the literature. In addition, there are no limitations on the power supply. To lose weight, the obese subject needs only to swallow the magnetic capsule with a glass of water. Once the magnetic capsule has reached the patient’s stomach, the balloon will be wirelessly inflated to occupy gastric space and give the feeling of satiety. The balloon can be wirelessly deflated at any time to allow the magnetic capsule to travel down the intestine and exit the body via normal peristalsis. The optimal ratio between the acid and base to provide the desired gas volume is experimentally evaluated and presented. A prototype capsule (9.6mm x 27mm) is developed and experimentally validated in ex-vivo experiments. The unique ease of delivery and expulsion of the proposed magnetic capsule is slated to make this development a good treatment option for people seeking to lose excess weight. PMID:26815309

  10. Magnetically Actuated Propellant Orientation, Controlling Fluids in a Low-Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Holt, James B.

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic fluid management (CFM) is a technology area common to virtually every space transportation propulsion concept envisioned. Storage, supply, transfer and handling of sub-critical cryogenic fluids are basic capabilities that have long been needed by multiple programs and the need is expected to continue in the future. The use of magnetic fields provides another method, which could replace or augment current/traditional approaches, potentially simplifying vehicle operational constraints. The magnetically actuated propellant orientation (MAPO) program effort focused on the use of magnetic fields to control fluid motion as it relates to positioning (i.e. orientation and acquisition) of a paramagnetic substance such as LO2. Current CFM state- of-the-art systems used to control and acquire propellant in low gravity environments rely on liquid surface tension devices which employ vanes, fine screen mesh channels and baskets. These devices trap and direct propellant to areas where it's needed and have been used routinely with storable (non-cryogenic) propellants. However, almost no data exists r,egarding their operation in cryogenics and the use of such devices confronts designers with a multitude of significant technology issues. Typical problems include a sensitivity to screen dry out (due to thermal loads and pressurant gas) and momentary adverse accelerations (generated from either internal or external sources). Any of these problems can potentially cause the acquisition systems to ingest or develop vapor and fail. The use of lightweight high field strength magnets may offer a valuable means of augmenting traditional systems potentially mitigating or at least easing operational requirements. Two potential uses of magnetic fields include: 1) strategically positioning magnets to keep vent ports clear of liquid (enabling low G vented fill operations), and 2) placing magnets in the center or around the walls of the tank to create an insulating vapor pocket (between

  11. Performance of field measuring probes for SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.; Ganetis, G.; Herrera, J.; Hogue, R.; Jain, A.; Louie, W.; Marone, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1993-12-31

    Several years of experience have been acquired on the operation of probes (``moles``) constructed for the measurement of the multipole components of the magnetic fields of SSC magnets. The field is measured by rotating coils contained in a 2.4-m long tube that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet by an external device-the transporter. In addition to the measuring coils, the tube contains motors for rotating the coil and a system for sensing local vertical using gravity sensors to provide an absolute reference for the field measurements. We describe the steps that must be taken in order to ensure accurate, repeatable measurements; the design changes that have been motivated by difficulties encountered (noise, vibration, variations in temperature); and other performance issues. The mechanical interface between the probe and the hewn tube of the magnet is also described.

  12. An efficient framework for qualitative and quantitative analysis of magnetically actuated, rigid microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Minjun; Fu, Henry

    2013-11-01

    Artificial microswimmers or microrobots have been actively investigated for possible applications in microactuation, drug-delivery, in situ sensing and diagnostics, and microtransport and assembly. We describe simple achiral, rigid microswimmers actuated by rotating magnetic fields, and elucidate the the minimal conditions for propulsion. We present an efficient method for analyzing the propulsion of such swimmers, which is capable of predicting the speed and direction of swimming as well as the swimmer's rotational dynamics. The method assumes knowledge of the swimmer's geometry and magnetic dipole moment,which can be measured from its response to an impulsive change in the direction of the magnetic field. The method only requires a single calculation of the swimmer's mobility matrix using a boundary element method such as the method of regularized Stokeslets. We validate our method by finding good agreement with experiment for both qualitative and quantitative predictions. The method described can be easily applied to rigid swimmers with arbitrary geometries which are rotated by external magnetic fields.

  13. Oil whip instability control using μ-synthesis technique on a magnetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Bernd; Araujo Perini, Efrain; Lucchesi Cavalca, Katia; Fiori de Castro, Helio; Rinderknecht, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    Rotating machines have a wide application range and since those machines have high trust levels, several rotor vibrations control methods are investigated in order to avoid sudden cracks, improve rotor performance or even to reach higher operation speeds by controlling some instabilities, critical speeds resonances or oil whip effect. Rotor instabilities are associated to the operation speed and can have structural or dynamic sources from the shaft, bearings and foundation or even from an actuator external force. This work focuses on a strategy that uses the μ-synthesis control technique to attenuate the oil whip instability effect of flexible hydrodynamically supported rotors and allows the rotor to operate in higher speeds. For the identified rotor model and the synthesized controller applied on a magnetic actuator, the control system stability and performance specifications are analyzed with regard to the model uncertainties and μ-synthesis controlled vibration levels are compared to PID controller in vertical and horizontal directions. The performance specifications within the μ-synthesis are optimized to suppress unbalance vibration and, in order to contribute to industrial acceptance, the controller design is presented as a strategy which focuses on a design at reduced effort.

  14. Hysteresis Analysis and Positioning Control for a Magnetic Shape Memory Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jhih-Hong; Chiang, Mao-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys (MSM alloys), a new kind of smart materials, have become a potential candidate in many engineering fields. MSMs have the advantage of bearing a huge strain, much larger than other materials. In addition, they also have fast response. These characteristics make MSM a good choice in micro engineering. However, MSMs display the obvious hysteresis phenomenon of nonlinear behavior. Thus the difficulty in using the MSM element as a positioning actuator is increased due to the hysteresis. In this paper, the hysteresis phenomenon of the MSM actuator is analyzed, and the closed-loop positioning control is also implemented experimentally. For that, a modified fuzzy sliding mode control (MFSMC) is proposed. The MFSMC and the PID control are used to design the controllers for realizing the positioning control. The experimental results are compared under different experimental conditions, such as different frequency, amplitude, and loading. The experimental results show that the precise positioning control of MFSMC can be achieved satisfactorily. PMID:25853405

  15. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  16. Magnetic Probe Construction using Thick-film Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Sakakibara, S.; Kubota, Y.; and Yamada, H.

    2001-02-02

    Thick-film technology has been successfully adapted for the design and fabrication of magnetic probes of a new type suitable for use in the simultaneous ultra-high vacuum and high-temperature environment of a nuclear fusion device. The maximum usable temperature is expected to be around 900 degrees C. This new probe has a specific sensitivity (coupling area per unit volume) an order of magnitude higher than a conventional coil. The new probe in one implementation is capable of simultaneously measuring magnetic field in three orthogonal directions about a single spatial point and in two frequency ranges. Low-frequency coils have a measured coupling area of 296-323 cm squared and a frequency response of about 300 kHz. High-frequency coils have a design coupling area of 12-15 cm squared.

  17. Mesoscale wide-bandwidth linear magnetic actuators : an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lawrence Anthony

    2004-02-01

    As MEMS transducers are scaled up in size, the threshold is quickly crossed to where magnetoquasistatic (MQS) transducers are superior for force production compared to electroquasistatic (EQS) transducers. Considerable progress has been made increasing the force output of MEMS EQS transducers, but progress with MEMS MQS transducers has been more modest. A key reason for this has been the difficulty implementing efficient lithographically-fabricated magnetic coil structures. The contribution of this study is a planar multilayer polyphase coil architecture which provides for the lithographic implementation of efficient stator windings suitable for linear magnetic machines. A millimeter-scale linear actuator with complex stator windings was fabricated using this architecture. The stators of the actuator were fabricated using a BCB/Cu process, which does not require replanarization of the wafer between layers. The prototype stator was limited to thin copper layers (3 {micro}m) due to the use of evaporated metal at the time of fabrication. Two layers of metal were implemented in the prototype, but the winding architecture naturally supports additional metal layer pairs. It was found in laboratory tests that the windings can support very high current densities of 4 x 10{sup 9}A/m{sup 2} without damage. Force production normal to the stator was calculated to be 0.54 N/A. For thin stators such as this one, force production increases approximately linearly with the thickness of the windings and a six-layer stator fabricated using a newly implemented electroplated BCB/Cu process (six layers of 15 {micro}m thick metal) is projected to produce approximately 8.8 N/A.

  18. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James; Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Samuel; Mihalusova, Mariana

    2003-03-01

    We have commissioned a superconducting solenoid based apparatus designed to exert strong magnetic body forces on biological specimens and other organic materials in ambient environmental conditions for extended periods. In its room temperature bore, it can produce a maximum magnetic field-field gradient product of 16 T^2-cm-1 which is sufficient to levitate frog embryos Xenopus Laevis[1]. We will discuss how we are applying these magnetic body forces to probe the known influences of gravitational forces on frog embryos and the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. In the process, we will describe a novel method for measuring the diamagnetic susceptibilities of specimens such as paramecia.

  19. Probing magnetic and electric optical responses of silicon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakov, Dmitry; Sinev, Ivan; Markovich, Dmitry; Samusev, Anton; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel; Valuckas, Vytautas; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris S.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-04-27

    We study experimentally both magnetic and electric optically induced resonances of silicon nanoparticles by combining polarization-resolved dark-field spectroscopy and near-field scanning optical microscopy measurements. We reveal that the scattering spectra exhibit strong sensitivity of electric dipole response to the probing beam polarization and attribute the characteristic asymmetry of measured near-field patterns to the excitation of a magnetic dipole mode. The proposed experimental approach can serve as a powerful tool for the study of photonic nanostructures possessing both electric and magnetic optical responses.

  20. Comparison of magnetic probe calibration at nano and millitesla magnitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahl, Ryan A.; Rovey, Joshua L.; Pommerenke, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field probes are invaluable diagnostics for pulsed inductive plasma devices where field magnitudes on the order of tenths of tesla or larger are common. Typical methods of providing a broadband calibration of dot{{B}} probes involve either a Helmholtz coil driven by a function generator or a network analyzer. Both calibration methods typically produce field magnitudes of tens of microtesla or less, at least three and as many as six orders of magnitude lower than their intended use. This calibration factor is then assumed constant regardless of magnetic field magnitude and the effects of experimental setup are ignored. This work quantifies the variation in calibration factor observed when calibrating magnetic field probes in low field magnitudes. Calibration of two dot{{B}} probe designs as functions of frequency and field magnitude are presented. The first dot{{B}} probe design is the most commonly used design and is constructed from two hand-wound inductors in a differential configuration. The second probe uses surface mounted inductors in a differential configuration with balanced shielding to further reduce common mode noise. Calibration factors are determined experimentally using an 80.4 mm radius Helmholtz coil in two separate configurations over a frequency range of 100-1000 kHz. A conventional low magnitude calibration using a vector network analyzer produced a field magnitude of 158 nT and yielded calibration factors of 15 663 ± 1.7% and 4920 ± 0.6% {T}/{V {s}} at 457 kHz for the surface mounted and hand-wound probes, respectively. A relevant magnitude calibration using a pulsed-power setup with field magnitudes of 8.7-354 mT yielded calibration factors of 14 615 ± 0.3% and 4507 ± 0.4% {T}/{V {s}} at 457 kHz for the surface mounted inductor and hand-wound probe, respectively. Low-magnitude calibration resulted in a larger calibration factor, with an average difference of 9.7% for the surface mounted probe and 12.0% for the hand-wound probe. The

  1. A systematic reliability investigation of the dielectric charging process in electrostatically actuated MEMS based on Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, U.; Papaioannou, G. J.; Coccetti, F.; Pons, P.; Plana, R.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive investigation for the dielectric charging problem in electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices. The approach is based on Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and targets, in this specific paper, thin PECVD silicon nitride films for electrostatic capacitive RF MEMS switches. KPFM has been employed in order to mimic the potential induced at the dielectric surface due to charge injection through asperities. The effect of dielectric thickness has been investigated through depositing SiNx films with different thicknesses. Then, in order to simulate the different scenarios of dielectric charging in real MEMS switches, SiNx films have been deposited over thermally grown oxide, evaporated gold and electroplated gold layers. Also, the effect of the deposition conditions has been investigated through depositing dielectric films using low and high frequency PECVD methods. The investigation reveals that thin dielectric films have larger relaxation times compared to thick ones when the same injection bias is applied, independently of the substrate nature. For the same SiNx film thickness, the decay time constant is found to be smaller in dielectric films deposited over metallic layers compared to the ones deposited over silicon substrates. Finally, the material stoichiometry is found to affect the surface potential distribution as well as the relaxation time constant.

  2. Ultralow Magnetic Fields and Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, J. C.; Lockhart, J. M.; Muhlfelder, B.; Murray, D. O.; Taber, M. A.

    We describe the generation of an ultralow magnetic field of < 10-11Tesla in the flight dewar of the Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission. The field was achieved using expanded-superconducting-shield techniques and is maintained with the aid of a magnetic materials control program. A high performance magnetic shield system is required for the proper function of gyroscope readout. The readout system employs a dc SQUID to measure the London moment generated by the superconducting gyro rotor in order to resolve sub-milliarcsecond changes in the gyro spin direction. In addition to a low residual dc magnetic field, attenuation of external field variation is required to be 1012 at the gyro positions. We discuss the measurement of the dc magnetic field and ac attenuation factor and the performance of the readout system

  3. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-15

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm{sup 2}, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle’s position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  4. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm(2), a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle's position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads. PMID:25933874

  5. Experimental investigation of magnetically actuated separation using tangential microfluidic channels and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Munir, Ahsan; Zhu, Zanzan; Wang, Jianlong; Zhou, Hong Susan

    2014-06-01

    A novel continuous switching/separation scheme of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in a sub-microlitre fluid volume surrounded by neodymium permanent magnet is studied in this work using tangential microfluidic channels. Polydimethylsiloxane tangential microchannels are fabricated using a novel micromoulding technique that can be done without a clean room and at much lower cost and time. Negligible switching of MNPs is seen in the absence of magnetic field, whereas 90% of switching is observed in the presence of magnetic field. The flow rate of MNPs solution had dramatic impact on separation performance. An optimum value of the flow rate is found that resulted in providing effective MNP separation at much faster rate. Separation performance is also investigated for a mixture containing non-magnetic polystyrene particles and MNPs. It is found that MNPs preferentially moved from lower microchannel to upper microchannel resulting in efficient separation. The proof-of-concept experiments performed in this work demonstrates that microfluidic bioseparation can be efficiently achieved using functionalised MNPs, together with tangential microchannels, appropriate magnetic field strength and optimum flow rates. This work verifies that a simple low-cost magnetic switching scheme can be potentially of great utility for the separation and detection of biomolecules in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:25014081

  6. Magnetically actuated bi-directional microactuators with permalloy and Fe/Pt hard magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C. T.; Shen, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    Bi-directional polyimide (PI) electromagnetic microactuator with different geometries are designed, fabricated and tested. Fabrication of the electromagnetic microactuator consists of 10 μm thick Ni/Fe (80/20) permalloy deposition on the PI diaphragm by electroplating, high aspect ratio electroplating of copper planar coil with 10 μm in thickness, bulk micromachining, and excimer laser selective ablation. They were fabricated by a novel concept avoiding the etching selectivity and residual stress problems during wafer etching. A mathematical model is created by ANSYS software to analyze the microactuator. The external magnetic field intensity (Hext) generated by the planar coil is simulated by ANSYS software. ANSYS software is used to predict the deflection angle of the microactuator. Besides, to provide bi-directional and large deflection angle of microactuator, hard magnet Fe/Pt is deposited at a low temperature of 300 °C by sputtering onto the PI diaphragm to produce a perpendicular magnetic anisotropic field. This magnetic field can enhance the interaction with Hext to induce attractive and repulsive bi-directional force to provide large displacement. The results of magnetic microactuator with and without hard magnets are compared and discussed. The preliminary result reveals that the electromagnetic microactuator with hard magnet shows a greater deflection angle than that without one.

  7. Analysis of magnetic field plasma interactions using microparticles as probes.

    PubMed

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2015-08-01

    The interaction between a magnetic field and plasma close to a nonconductive surface is of interest for both science and technology. In space, crustal magnetic fields on celestial bodies without atmosphere can interact with the solar wind. In advanced technologies such as those used in fusion or spaceflight, magnetic fields can be used to either control a plasma or protect surfaces exposed to the high heat loads produced by plasma. In this paper, a method will be discussed for investigating magnetic field plasma interactions close to a nonconductive surface inside a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell employing dust particles as probes. To accomplish this, a magnet covered by a glass plate was exposed to a low power argon plasma. The magnetic field was strong enough to magnetize the electrons, while not directly impacting the dynamics of the ions or the dust particles used for diagnostics. In order to investigate the interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field and the nonconductive surface, micron-sized dust particles were introduced into the plasma and their trajectories were recorded with a high-speed camera. Based on the resulting particle trajectories, the accelerations of the dust particles were determined and acceleration maps over the field of view were generated which are representative of the forces acting on the particles. The results show that the magnetic field is responsible for the development of strong electric fields in the plasma, in both horizontal and vertical directions, leading to complex motion of the dust particles. PMID:26382535

  8. Analysis of magnetic field plasma interactions using microparticles as probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2015-08-01

    The interaction between a magnetic field and plasma close to a nonconductive surface is of interest for both science and technology. In space, crustal magnetic fields on celestial bodies without atmosphere can interact with the solar wind. In advanced technologies such as those used in fusion or spaceflight, magnetic fields can be used to either control a plasma or protect surfaces exposed to the high heat loads produced by plasma. In this paper, a method will be discussed for investigating magnetic field plasma interactions close to a nonconductive surface inside a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell employing dust particles as probes. To accomplish this, a magnet covered by a glass plate was exposed to a low power argon plasma. The magnetic field was strong enough to magnetize the electrons, while not directly impacting the dynamics of the ions or the dust particles used for diagnostics. In order to investigate the interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field and the nonconductive surface, micron-sized dust particles were introduced into the plasma and their trajectories were recorded with a high-speed camera. Based on the resulting particle trajectories, the accelerations of the dust particles were determined and acceleration maps over the field of view were generated which are representative of the forces acting on the particles. The results show that the magnetic field is responsible for the development of strong electric fields in the plasma, in both horizontal and vertical directions, leading to complex motion of the dust particles.

  9. A light-induced spin crossover actuated single-chain magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zheng, Hui; Kang, Soonchul; Shiota, Yoshihito; Hayami, Shinya; Mito, Masaki; Sato, Osamu; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Kanegawa, Shinji; Duan, Chunying

    2013-11-01

    Both spin-crossover complexes and molecular nanomagnets display bistable magnetic states, potentially behaving as elementary binary units for information storage. It is a challenge to introduce spin-crossover units into molecular nanomagnets to switch the bistable state of the nanomagnets through external stimuli-tuned spin crossover. Here we report an iron(II) spin-crossover unit and paramagnetic iron(III) ions that are incorporated into a well-isolated double-zigzag chain. The chain exhibits thermally induced reversible spin-crossover and light-induced excited spin-state trapping at the iron(II) sites. Single-chain magnet behaviour is actuated accompanying the synergy between light-induced excited spin-state trapping at the iron(II) sites and ferromagnetic interactions between the photoinduced high-spin iron(II) and low-spin iron(III) ions in the chain. The result provides a strategy to switch the bistable state of molecular nanomagnets using external stimuli such as light and heat, with the potential to erase and write information at a molecular level.

  10. Probing the magnetic topologies of magnetic clouds by means of solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1991-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) have been used as probes of magnetic cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to the interiors of many clouds indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun and hence are not plasmoids. The small modulation of galactic cosmic rays associated with clouds also suggests that the magnetic fields of clouds are not closed.

  11. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  12. Active control of surge in centrifugal compressors using magnetic thrust bearing actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanadgol, Dorsa

    This research presents a new method for active surge control in centrifugal compressors with unshrouded impellers using a magnetic thrust bearing to modulate the impeller tip clearance. Magnetic bearings offer the potential for active control of flow instabilities. This capability is highly dependent on the sensitivity of the compressor characteristics to blade tip clearance. If the position of the shaft can be actuated with sufficient authority and speed, the induced pressure modulation makes control of surge promising. The active nature of the magnetic bearing system makes the real-time static and dynamic positioning of the rotor and therefore modulation of the impeller tip clearance possible. A theoretical model is first established that describes the sensitivity of the centrifugal compressor characteristic curve to tip clearance variations induced by axial motion of the rotor. Results from simulation of the nonlinear model for a single stage high-speed centrifugal compressor show that using the proposed control method, mass flow and pressure oscillations associated with compressor surge are quickly suppressed with acceptable tip clearance excursions, typically less than 20% of the available clearance. It is shown that it is possible to produce adequate axial excursions in the clearance between the impeller blades and the adjacent stationary shroud using a magnetic thrust bearing with practical levels of drive voltage. This surge control method would allow centrifugal compressors to reliably and safely operate with a wider range than is currently done in the field. The principal advantage of the proposed approach over conventional surge control methods lies in that, in machines already equipped with magnetic bearing, the method can potentially be implemented by simply modifying controller software. This dispenses with the need to introduce additional hardware, permitting adaptation of existing machinery at virtually no cost. In addition, since the controller is

  13. Electro-magnetically Actuated Minute Polymer Pump Fabricated using Packaging Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, G.; Singh, A.; Ananthasuresh, G. K.

    2006-04-01

    Design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a flat pump with millimetre thickness are described in this paper. The pump is entirely made of polymer materials barring the magnet and copper coils used for electromagnetic actuation. The fabrication is carried out using widely available microelectronic packaging machinery and techniques. Therefore, the fabrication of the pump is straightforward and inexpensive. Two types of prototypes are designed and built. One consists of copper coils that are etched on an epoxy plate and the other has wound insulated wire of 90 µm diameter to serve as a coil. The overall size of the first pump is 25 mm × 25 mm × 3.6 mm including the 3.1 mm-thick NdFeB magnet of diameter 12 mm. It consists of a pump chamber of 20 mm × 20 mm × 0.8 mm with copper coils etched from a copper-clad epoxy plate using dry-film lithography and milled using a CNC milling machine, two passive valves and the pump-diaphragm made of Kapton film of 0.089 mm thickness. The second pump has an overall size of 35 mm × 35 mm × 4.4 mm including the magnet and the windings. A breadboard circuit and DC power supply are used to test the pump by applying an alternating square-wave voltage pulse. A water slug in a tube attached to the inlet is used to observe and measure the air-flow induced by the pump against atmospheric pressure. The maximum flow rate was found to be 15 ml/min for a voltage of 2.5 V and a current of 19 mA at 68 Hz.

  14. PROBING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS USING Ly{alpha} CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Kanhaiya L.; Sethi, Shiv K.

    2013-01-01

    From previous studies of the effect of primordial magnetic fields on early structure formation, we know that the presence of primordial magnetic fields during early structure formation could induce more perturbations at small scales (at present 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc) as compared to the usual {Lambda}CDM theory. Matter power spectra over these scales are effectively probed by cosmological observables such as shear correlation and Ly{alpha} clouds. In this paper we discuss the implications of primordial magnetic fields on the distribution of Ly{alpha} clouds. We simulate the line-of-sight density fluctuation including the contribution coming from the primordial magnetic fields. We compute the evolution of Ly{alpha} opacity for this case and compare our theoretical estimates of Ly{alpha} opacity with the existing data to constrain the parameters of the primordial magnetic fields. We also discuss the case when the two density fields are correlated. Our analysis yields an upper bound of roughly 0.3-0.6 nG on the magnetic field strength for a range of nearly scale-invariant models, corresponding to a magnetic field power spectrum index n {approx_equal} -3.

  15. Closed-Loop Time-Optimal Attitude Maneuvering of Magnetically Actuated Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhavat, Pooya; Yan, Hui; Fleming, Andrew; Ross, I. Michael; Alfriend, Kyle T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the performance of the pseudospectral optimal control scheme for closed-loop time-optimal attitude maneuvering of the NPSAT1 spacecraft, a magnetically actuated spacecraft designed and built at the Naval Postgraduate School. The closed-loop control is devised and implemented using the notion of Carathéodory-π solutions: repeated computation and update of the complete open-loop control solution in real-time. The performance of the pseudospectral feedback-control scheme is compared to a standard state feedback-control technique. It is shown that the use of standard state feedback control leads to significantly slower convergence time and may lead to substantially lower performance metrics. The substantial performance gains when using closed-loop optimal control are attributed to the optimal scheme's ability to exploit the full maneuverability envelope of the spacecraft by applying bang-bang controls in all three directions. In contrast, traditional gain-based feedback control laws substantially limit the performance of the vehicle to well below its physical capabilities. The feasibility of each open-loop optimal control solution is verified by numerical propagation while Pontryagin's necessary conditions for optimality are used to verify the solution's optimality.

  16. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  17. Scanning Hall probe microscopy of a diluted magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Seongsoo; Samarth, Nitin; Lozanne, Alex de

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the micromagnetic properties of a diluted magnetic semiconductor as a function of temperature and applied field with a scanning Hall probe microscope built in our laboratory. The design philosophy for this microscope and some details are described. The samples analyzed in this work are Ga{sub 0.94}Mn{sub 0.06}As films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the magnetic domains are 2-4 mum wide and fairly stable with temperature. Magnetic clusters are observed above T{sub C}, which we ascribe to MnAs defects too small and sparse to be detected by a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

  18. Matched dipole probe for precise electron density measurements in magnetized and non-magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    We present a plasma diagnostics method based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole placed in the plasma. This allows measuring the local electron density in the range from 1012-1015 m-3 with a magnetic field of at least 0-50 mT. The magnetic field strength is not directly influencing the data analysis and requires only that the dipole probe is oriented perpendicularly to the magnetic field. As a result, the magnetic field can be non-homogeneous or even non-defined within the probe length without any effect on the final tolerance of the measurements. The method can be applied to plasmas of relatively small dimensions (< 10 cm) and doesn't require any special boundary conditions. The high sensitivity of the impedance measurements is achieved by using a miniature matching system installed close to the probe tip, which also allows to suppress sheath resonance effects. We experimentally show here that the tolerance of the electron density measurements reaches values lower than 1%, both with and without the magnetic field. The method is successfully validated by both analytical modeling and experimental comparison with Langmuir probes. The validation experiments are conducted in a low pressure (1 mTorr) Ar discharge sustained in a 10 cm size plasma chamber with and without a transversal magnetic field of about 20 mT. This work was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships within FP7 (NEPTUNE PIIF-GA-2012-326054).

  19. Remote control thermal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Harrigill, W. T.; Krsek, A.

    1969-01-01

    Thermal actuator makes precise changes in the position of one object with respect to another. Expansion of metal tubes located in the actuator changes the position of the mounting block. Capacitance probe measures the change in position of the block relative to the fixed target plate.

  20. Mapping magnetism with atomic resolution using aberrated electron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrobo, Juan; Rusz, Ján; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk, we report a direct experimental real-space mapping of magnetic circular dichroism with atomic resolution in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an aberrated electron probe with customized phase distribution, we reveal with electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The aberrated probes allow the collection of EEL spectra using the transmitted beam, which results in a magnetic circular dichroic signal with intrinsically larger signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained via nanodiffraction techniques (where most of the transmitted electrons are discarded). The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution. This research was supported by DOE SUFD MSED, by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the US DOE, and by the Swedish Research Council and Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (NSC center)

  1. A multichannel magnetic probe system for analysing magnetic fluctuations in helical axis plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haskey, S. R.; Blackwell, B. D.; Seiwald, B.; Hole, M. J.; Pretty, D. G.; Howard, J.; Wach, J.

    2013-09-15

    The need to understand the structure of magnetic fluctuations in H-1NF heliac [S. Hamberger et al., Fusion Technol. 17, 123 (1990)] plasmas has motivated the installation of a sixteen former, tri-axis helical magnetic probe Mirnov array (HMA). The new array complements two existing poloidal Mirnov arrays by providing polarisation information, higher frequency response, and improved toroidal resolution. The helical placement is ideal for helical axis plasmas because it positions the array as close as possible to the plasma in regions of varying degrees of favourable curvature in the magnetohydrodynamic sense, but almost constant magnetic angle. This makes phase variation with probe position near linear, greatly simplifying the analysis of the data. Several of the issues involved in the design, installation, data analysis, and calibration of this unique array are presented including probe coil design, frequency response measurements, mode number identification, orientation calculations, and mapping probe coil positions to magnetic coordinates. Details of specially designed digitally programmable pre-amplifiers, which allow gains and filters to be changed as part of the data acquisition initialisation sequence and stored with the probe signals, are also presented. The low shear heliac geometry [R. Jiménez-Gómez et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 033001 (2011)], flexibility of the H-1NF heliac, and wealth of information provided by the HMA create a unique opportunity for detailed study of Alfvén eigenmodes, which could be a serious issue for future fusion reactors.

  2. A multichannel magnetic probe system for analysing magnetic fluctuations in helical axis plasmas.

    PubMed

    Haskey, S R; Blackwell, B D; Seiwald, B; Hole, M J; Pretty, D G; Howard, J; Wach, J

    2013-09-01

    The need to understand the structure of magnetic fluctuations in H-1NF heliac [S. Hamberger et al., Fusion Technol. 17, 123 (1990)] plasmas has motivated the installation of a sixteen former, tri-axis helical magnetic probe Mirnov array (HMA). The new array complements two existing poloidal Mirnov arrays by providing polarisation information, higher frequency response, and improved toroidal resolution. The helical placement is ideal for helical axis plasmas because it positions the array as close as possible to the plasma in regions of varying degrees of favourable curvature in the magnetohydrodynamic sense, but almost constant magnetic angle. This makes phase variation with probe position near linear, greatly simplifying the analysis of the data. Several of the issues involved in the design, installation, data analysis, and calibration of this unique array are presented including probe coil design, frequency response measurements, mode number identification, orientation calculations, and mapping probe coil positions to magnetic coordinates. Details of specially designed digitally programmable pre-amplifiers, which allow gains and filters to be changed as part of the data acquisition initialisation sequence and stored with the probe signals, are also presented. The low shear heliac geometry [R. Jiménez-Gómez et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 033001 (2011)], flexibility of the H-1NF heliac, and wealth of information provided by the HMA create a unique opportunity for detailed study of Alfvén eigenmodes, which could be a serious issue for future fusion reactors. PMID:24089823

  3. A multichannel magnetic probe system for analysing magnetic fluctuations in helical axis plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskey, S. R.; Blackwell, B. D.; Seiwald, B.; Hole, M. J.; Pretty, D. G.; Howard, J.; Wach, J.

    2013-09-01

    The need to understand the structure of magnetic fluctuations in H-1NF heliac [S. Hamberger et al., Fusion Technol. 17, 123 (1990)] plasmas has motivated the installation of a sixteen former, tri-axis helical magnetic probe Mirnov array (HMA). The new array complements two existing poloidal Mirnov arrays by providing polarisation information, higher frequency response, and improved toroidal resolution. The helical placement is ideal for helical axis plasmas because it positions the array as close as possible to the plasma in regions of varying degrees of favourable curvature in the magnetohydrodynamic sense, but almost constant magnetic angle. This makes phase variation with probe position near linear, greatly simplifying the analysis of the data. Several of the issues involved in the design, installation, data analysis, and calibration of this unique array are presented including probe coil design, frequency response measurements, mode number identification, orientation calculations, and mapping probe coil positions to magnetic coordinates. Details of specially designed digitally programmable pre-amplifiers, which allow gains and filters to be changed as part of the data acquisition initialisation sequence and stored with the probe signals, are also presented. The low shear heliac geometry [R. Jiménez-Gómez et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 033001 (2011)], 10.1088/0029-5515/51/3/033001, flexibility of the H-1NF heliac, and wealth of information provided by the HMA create a unique opportunity for detailed study of Alfvén eigenmodes, which could be a serious issue for future fusion reactors.

  4. Development of flexible array eddy current probes for complex geometries and inspection of magnetic parts using magnetic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, B.; Decitre, J.-M.; Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Skarlatos, A.

    2013-01-01

    Eddy Current Technique is a powerful method of inspection of metal parts. When size of flaws decreases, inspection areas become hardly accessible or material is magnetic, traditional winding coil probes are less efficient. Thanks to new CIVA simulation tools, we have designed and optimized advanced EC probes: flexible EC probe based on micro-coil arrays and EC probe with magnetic sensors, including specific electronics.

  5. Magnetic nanoparticles as both imaging probes and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Ho, Don; Sun, Shouheng

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been explored extensively as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or as heating agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) [1]. To achieve optimum operation conditions in MRI and MFH, these NPs should have well-controlled magnetic properties and biological functionalities. Although numerous efforts have been dedicated to the investigations on MNPs for biomedical applications [2-5], the NP optimizations for early diagnostics and efficient therapeutics are still far from reached. Recent efforts in NP syntheses have led to some promising MNP systems for sensitive MRI and efficient MFH applications. This review summarizes these advances in the synthesis of monodisperse MNPs as both contrast probes in MRI and as therapeutic agents via MFH. It will first introduce the nanomagnetism and elucidate the critical parameters to optimize the superparamagnetic NPs for MRI and ferromagnetic NPs for MFH. It will further outline the new chemistry developed for making monodisperse MNPs with controlled magnetic properties. The review will finally highlight the NP functionalization with biocompatible molecules and biological targeting agents for tumor diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20388109

  6. Magnetic field measurement techniques with heavy ion beam probes

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Spatially (0.1 cm/sup 3/) and temporally (1 ..mu..s) resolved magnetic field measurement techniques using a heavy ion beam probe as a test particle source are described. The measurement of both steady-state and time-varying fields is discussed. The plasma flux function can be determined by measuring the toroidal velocity of the beam ion in an axisymmetric device, because the canonical angular momentum of a particle, P/sub phi/ = qpsi+M..nu../sub phi/R, is conserved in an axisymmetric system. Corrections due to nonaxisymmetry can be significant in tokamaks and must be taken into account for the current profile and fluctuation measurements. The requirements and design of a toroidal velocity detector are discussed. The signals expected in experiments using the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) heavy ion beam probe with a velocity detector have been calculated, and they are at least two orders of magnitude higher than the amplifier noise for dc measurements of poloidal and ergodic magnetic limiter fields and for sawtooth and MHD oscillations. Low-level turbulence is expected to produce signals below the noise level.

  7. Development of a novel shape memory alloy-actuated resettable locking device for magnetic bearing reaction wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Shaowei; Nie, Jingxu

    2014-01-01

    The current investigation proposes a shape memory alloy (SMA)-actuated resettable locking device for magnetic bearing reaction wheel. The device employed two SMA wire-based actuators to realize locking and unlocking. Dual-slope mating surfaces were used on one hand to transmit the motion between a moving part and a clamp, and on the other hand to achieve a self-locking linkage in the locking state. Moreover, geometric parameters of the two SMA wires and corresponding bias springs were also designed. Based on the proposed design scheme, four locking devices were manufactured and assembled. Performance and environmental tests were performed to verify the proposed locking device. Test results show that the locking device can protect the magnetic bearing reaction wheel from launch vibration damage, and can withstand the thermal environment in the launch and on-orbit stage. Moreover, the device can be successfully operated for 76 times, and the response time for the locking and unlocking processes under 7 V power supply is 0.9 s and 5.6 s, respectively. Considering the results obtained from these tests, we conclude that the proposed resettable locking device is an attractive alternative technology to conventional motor-driven or pyrotechnics-based technologies, and can be applied reliably in the magnetic bearing reaction wheel.

  8. Development of a novel shape memory alloy-actuated resettable locking device for magnetic bearing reaction wheel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Shaowei; Nie, Jingxu

    2014-01-01

    The current investigation proposes a shape memory alloy (SMA)-actuated resettable locking device for magnetic bearing reaction wheel. The device employed two SMA wire-based actuators to realize locking and unlocking. Dual-slope mating surfaces were used on one hand to transmit the motion between a moving part and a clamp, and on the other hand to achieve a self-locking linkage in the locking state. Moreover, geometric parameters of the two SMA wires and corresponding bias springs were also designed. Based on the proposed design scheme, four locking devices were manufactured and assembled. Performance and environmental tests were performed to verify the proposed locking device. Test results show that the locking device can protect the magnetic bearing reaction wheel from launch vibration damage, and can withstand the thermal environment in the launch and on-orbit stage. Moreover, the device can be successfully operated for 76 times, and the response time for the locking and unlocking processes under 7 V power supply is 0.9 s and 5.6 s, respectively. Considering the results obtained from these tests, we conclude that the proposed resettable locking device is an attractive alternative technology to conventional motor-driven or pyrotechnics-based technologies, and can be applied reliably in the magnetic bearing reaction wheel. PMID:24517805

  9. Toxoplasma gondii DNA detection with a magnetic molecular beacon probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shichao; Yao, Cuicui; Wei, Shuoming; Zhang, Jimei; Dai, Zhao; Zheng, Guo; Sun, Bo; Han, Qing; Hu, Fei; Zhou, Hongming

    2008-12-01

    Toxoplasma Gondii infection is widespread in humans worldwide and reported infection rates range from 3%-70%, depending on the populations or geographic areas, and it has been recognized as a potential food safety hazard in our daily life. A magnetic molecular beacon probe (mMBP), based on theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), was currently reported to detect Toxoplasma Gondii DNA. Nano-sized Fe3O4 were primarily prepared by coprecipitation method in aqueous phase with NaOH as precipitator, and was used as magnetic core. The qualified coreshell magnetic quantum dots (mQDs), i.e. CdTe(symbol)Fe3O4, were then achieved by layer-by-layer method when mol ratio of Fe3O4/CdTe is 1/3, pH at 6.0, 30 °C, and reactant solution was refluxed for 30 min, the size of mQDs were determined to be 12-15 nm via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Over 70% overlap between emission spectrum of mQDs and absorbance spectrum of BHQ-2 was observed, this result suggests the synthesized mQDs and BHQ-2 can be utilized as energy donor and energy acceptor, respectively. The sensing probe was fabricated and a stem-loop Toxoplasma Gondii DNA oligonucleotide was labeled with mQDs at the 5' end and BHQ-2 at 3' end, respectively. Target Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected under conditions of 37 °C, hybridization for 2h, at pH8.0 in Tris-HCl buffer. About 30% recovery of fluorescence intensity was observed via fluorescence spectrum (FS) after the Toxoplasma gondii DNA was added, which suggested that the Toxoplasma Gondii DNA was successfully detected. Specificity investigation of the mMBP indicated that relative low recovery of fluorescence intensity was obtained when the target DNA with one-base pair mismatch was added, this result indicated the high specificity of the sensing probe. Our research simultaneously indicated that mMBP can be conveniently separated from the unhybridized stem-loop DNA and target DNA, which will be meaningful in DNA sensing and purification process.

  10. A Global Probe of Cosmic Magnetic Fields to High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, P. P.; Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J.; Short, M. B.; Higdon, D. M.

    2008-03-01

    Faraday rotation (rotation measure [RM]) probes of magnetic fields in the universe are sensitive to cosmological and evolutionary effects as z increases beyond ~1 because of the scalings of electron density and magnetic fields, and the growth in the number of expected intersections with galaxy-scale intervenors, dN/dz. In this new global analysis of an unprecedented large sample of RMs of high-latitude quasars extending out to z ~ 3.7, we find that the distribution of RM broadens with redshift in the 20-80 rad m-2 range, despite the (1 + z)-2 wavelength dilution expected in the observed Faraday rotation. Our results indicate that the universe becomes increasingly "Faraday-opaque" to sources beyond z ~ 2; that is, as z increases, progressively fewer sources are found with a "small" RM in the observer's frame. This is in contrast to sources at zlesssim 1. They suggest that the environments of galaxies were significantly magnetized at high redshifts, with magnetic field strengths that were at least as strong within a few Gyr of the big bang as at the current epoch. We separately investigate a simple unevolving toy model in which the RM is produced by Mg II absorber systems, and find that it can approximately reproduce the observed trend with redshift. An additional possibility is that the intrinsic RM associated with the radio sources was much higher in the past, and we show that this is not a trivial consequence of the higher radio luminosities of the high-redshift sources.

  11. Effective 90-degree magnetization rotation in Co2FeAl thin film/piezoelectric system probed by microstripline ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, M.; Zighem, F.; Belmeguenai, M.; Gabor, M. S.; Tiusan, C.; Faurie, D.

    2015-07-01

    Microstripline ferromagnetic resonance technique has been used to study the indirect magnetoelectric coupling occurring in an artificial magnetoelectric heterostructure consisting of a magnetostrictive thin film cemented onto a piezoelectric actuator. Two different modes (sweep-field and sweep-frequency modes) of this technique have been employed to quantitatively probe the indirect magnetoelectric coupling and to observe a voltage induced magnetization rotation (of 90°). This latter has been validated by the experimental frequency variation of the uniform mode and by the amplitude of the sweep-frequency spectra.

  12. New developments in actuator materials as reflected in magnetically controlled shape memory alloys and high-strength shape memory steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullakko, Kari; Yakovenko, Peter G.; Gavriljuk, Valentin G.

    1996-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are applied as actuator materials in smart structures and in fastening and pre-stressing devices. Shape memory alloys can be divided into three groups: one-way alloys, two-way alloys and magnetically controlled SMAs. The magnetically controlled SMAs recently suggested by one of the present authors are potential actuator materials for smart structures because they may provide rapid strokes with large amplitudes under precise control. The most extensively applied conventional SMAs are Ni-Ti and Cu- based alloys. Iron-based shape memory alloys, especially Fe-Mn-Si steels, are becoming more and more important in engineering applications due to their low price. The properties of Fe- Mn-Si steels have been improved by alloying, for example, with Cr, Ni and Co. Nitrogen alloying was shown to significantly improve shape memory, mechanical and corrosion properties of Fe-Mn-Si-based steels. Tensile strengths over 1500 MPa, recovery stresses of 300 MPa and recoverable strains of 4% have been attained. In fasteners made from these steels, stresses of 700 MPa were reached. The beneficial effect of nitrogen alloying on shape memory and mechanical properties is based on the decrease of stacking fault energy and increase of the strength of austenite caused by nitrogen atoms. Nitrogen alloyed Fe-Mn-Si- based steels are expected to be employed as actuator materials in pre-stressing and fastening applications in many fields of engineering. Nitrogen alloyed shape memory steels possess good manufacturing properties and weldability, and they are economical to process using conventional industrial methods.

  13. Finite element modeling of magnetic bias eddy current probe interaction with ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, J.

    2013-01-01

    Requirements to demonstrate eddy current inspection capabilities for inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power generation stations are becoming more rigorous. One method to support qualification of an existing, modified, or new eddy current probe design is to model the probe response to various degradation modes and tube artifacts with a finite element approach. Magnetic-bias probes are used to inspect for defects in conditions where material magnetic permeability effects are a concern, such as in the presence of ferromagnetic tubes, deposits, or supports. In this paper, a transient finite element modeling approach was used to model the interaction of magnetic-bias eddy current probes with ferromagnetic materials.

  14. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.; Turchi, Peter J.; Burton, Rodney L.; Messer, Sarah; Lovberg, Ralph H.; Hallock, Ashley K.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are often employed to perform field measurements in electric propulsion applications where there are time-varying fields. Magnetic field probes provide the means to measure these magnetic fields and can even be used to measure the plasma current density indirectly through the application of Ampere's law. Measurements of this type can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. Results of the development of a standard for B-dot probe measurements are presented, condensing the available literature on the subject into an accessible set of rules, guidelines, and techniques to standardize the performance and presentation of future measurements.

  15. Magnetization precession of magnetic thin films studied by all optical pump-probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Steven A.

    The study of magnetization dynamics such as magnetization precession and precessional damping provides insights into the behavior of complex magnetic systems, and indeed may lead to a better understanding of the fundamental limits of magnetic reversal process. In this work, a time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect system (TRMOKE) was developed to study magnetization dynamics: Precession and damping. The system uses a femtosecond laser in a pump-probe experiment with direct optical excitation, very similar to the method introduced by Ganping Ju and coworkers. Also, a model based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation (LLG) was developed and used to interpret and analyze the experimental magnetization precession data of a single magnetic layer. The model can be used to predict the precession frequencies with and without damping, the eigenvectors of the magnetization and allows the Gilbert damping parameter (alpha) to be determined. The model is extended to a system of two magnetic layers coupled through a nonmagnetic spacer layer. The capabilities of the TRMOKE system and the LLG models, were demonstrated by studying the magnetization dynamics of Ni/Pt bilayers. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled magnetic layers have been investigated by magneto-optical measurements. The samples are [Pt/Co] multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) exchange-coupled to a Co layer with in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The exchange is indirect, realized and tuned by an intervening Pt layer of varying thickness. Both the strength and the angle of an external applied magnetic field were varied and for many samples, two modes with two distinct precession frequencies were observed in the precession measurements. The frequencies of both modes depend on the strength and the angle of the applied magnetic field. The LLG model predicts two precessional modes ("acoustic" and "optic") whose behaviors depend on the strength and sign of the exchange coupling

  16. Structural Analysis of a Magnetically Actuated Silicon Nitride Micro-Shutter for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughlin, James P.; Fettig, Rainer K.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Mott, D. Brent; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Finite element models have been created to simulate the electrostatic and electromagnetic actuation of a 0.5 micrometers silicon nitride micro-shutter for use in a spacebased Multi-object Spectrometer (MOS). The microshutter uses a torsion hinge to go from the closed, 0 degree, position, to the open, 90 degree position. Stresses in the torsion hinge are determined with a large deformation nonlinear finite element model. The simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of fabricated micro-shutter devices.

  17. Probing the Earth's core with magnetic field observations from Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Christopher; Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Gillet, Nicolas; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth. In this contribution we present a new high resolution model of the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, derived from a dataset that includes more two years of observations from the Swarm mission. Resulting inferences regarding the underlying core flow, its dynamics, and the nature of the geodynamo process will be discussed. The CHAOS-6 geomagnetic field model, covering the interval 1999-2016, is derived from magnetic data collected by the three Swarm missions, as well as the earlier CHAMP and Oersted satellites, and monthly means data collected from 160 ground observatories. Advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of the Swarm mission by ingesting both scalar and vector field differences along-track and across track between the lower pair of Swarm satellites. The internal part of the model consists of a spherical harmonic (SH) expansion, time-dependent for degrees 20 and below. The model coefficients are estimated using a regularized, iteratively reweighted, least squares scheme involving Huber weights. At Earth's surface, CHAOS-6 shows evidence for positive acceleration of the field intensity in 2015 over a broad area around longitude 90deg E that is also seen at ground observatories such as Novosibirsk. At the core surface, we are able to map the secular variation (linear trend in the magnetic field) up to SH degree 16. The radial field acceleration at the core surface in 2015 is found be largest at low latitudes under the India-South East Asia region and under the region of northern South America, as well as at high northern latitudes under Alaska and Siberia. Surprisingly, there is also evidence for some acceleration in the central Pacific region, for example

  18. Probing the magnetic topologies of magnetic clouds by means of solar energetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S.W. ); Reames, D.V. )

    1991-06-01

    Magnetic clouds are large (<0.25 AU) interplanetary regions with topologies consistent with those of magnetic loops. They are of interest because they may be an interplanetary signature of coronal mass ejections. Clouds have been identified in solar wind data by their magnetic properties and by the presence of bidirectional particle fluxes. Two possible closed magnetic topologies have been considered for clouds: (1) an elongated bottle with field lines rooted at both ends in the Sun and (2) a detached magnetic bubble or plasmoid consisting of closed field lines. The inferred topologies are also consistent with open field lines that converge beyond 1 AU. The authors have used solar energetic particles (SEPs) as probes of the cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to the interiors of many clouds indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the Sun and hence are not plasmoids. The small modulation of galactic cosmic rays associated with clouds also suggests that the magnetic fields of clouds are not closed.

  19. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael H.; Martin, Adam; Hawk, Clark W.; Fimognan, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and ejecting them at high velocity. A plasmoid is a plasma with an imbedded closed magnetic field structure. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids have been measured with of an array of magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes were constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes are wound on a square G10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x l0(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is the cross-sectional area. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven by a high-voltage pulser to measure NA, and by a signal generator to determine the probe's frequency response. The plasmoid electron number density n(sub e) electron temperature T(sub e), and velocity ratio v/c(sub m), (where v is the bulk plasma flow velocity and c(sub m), is the ion thermal speed) have also been measured with a quadruple Langmuir probe. The Langmuir probe tips are 10 mm long, 20-mil diameter stainless steel wire, housed in a 6-inch long 4-bore aluminum rod. Measurements on PTX with argon and hydrogen from the magnetic field probes and quadruple Langmuir probe will be presented in this paper.

  20. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademolhosseini, F.; Liu, C.-C.; Lim, C. J.; Chiao, M.

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells.

  1. High sensitivity piezomagnetic force microscopy for quantitative probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian Nataly; Ma, Feiyue; Xie, Shuhong; Liu, Yuanming; Proksch, Roger; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-07-01

    Accurate scanning probing of magnetic materials at the nanoscale is essential for developing and characterizing magnetic nanostructures, yet quantitative analysis is difficult using the state of the art magnetic force microscopy, and has limited spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this communication, we develop a novel piezomagnetic force microscopy (PmFM) technique, with the imaging principle based on the detection of magnetostrictive response excited by an external magnetic field. In combination with the dual AC resonance tracking (DART) technique, the contact stiffness and energy dissipation of the samples can be simultaneously mapped along with the PmFM phase and amplitude, enabling quantitative probing of magnetic materials and structures at the nanoscale with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PmFM has been applied to probe magnetic soft discs and cobalt ferrite thin films, demonstrating it as a powerful tool for a wide range of magnetic materials. PMID:23720016

  2. Cobalt ferrite based magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor and actuator applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiles, David C. (Inventor); Paulsen, Jason A. (Inventor); Snyder, John E. (Inventor); Lo, Chester C. H. (Inventor); Ring, Andrew P. (Inventor); Bormann, Keith A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Magnetostrictive material based on cobalt ferrite is described. The cobalt ferrite is substituted with transition metals (such manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) or mixtures thereof) by substituting the transition metals for iron or cobalt to form substituted cobalt ferrite that provides mechanical properties that make the substituted cobalt ferrite material effective for use as sensors and actuators. The substitution of transition metals lowers the Curie temperature of the material (as compared to cobalt ferrite) while maintaining a suitable magnetostriction for stress sensing applications.

  3. Structural Analysis of a Magnetically Actuated Silicon Nitride Micro-Shutter for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughlin, James P.; Fettig, Rainer K.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Mott, D. Brent; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Finite element models have been created to simulate the electrostatic and electromagnetic actuation of a 0.5gm silicon nitride micro-shutter for use in a spacebased Multi-object Spectrometer (MOS). The micro-shutter uses a torsion hinge to go from the closed, 0 degree, position, to the open, 90 degree position. Stresses in the torsion hinge are determined with a large deformation nonlinear finite element model. The simulation results are compared to experimental measurements of fabricated micro-shutter devices.

  4. Muons as a probe of magnetism in molecule-based low dimensional magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Tom; Blundell, Stephen J.; Pratt, Francis L.; Brooks, Michael L.; Manson, Jamie L.; Brechin, Euan K.; Cadiou, Cyril; Low, David; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Winpenny, Richard E. P.

    2004-10-01

    We present the results of muon spin relaxation (mgr+SR) studies on low dimensional molecular magnet systems. mgr+SR measurements have been carried out on the Cu-based chain compounds CuX2(pyz) (where X = Br, Cl, NCS and pyz = pyrazine) as a function of temperature and applied longitudinal magnetic field. Oscillations in the time dependence of the muon polarization, characteristic of magnetic order at two distinct muon sites, are detected in both CuBr2(pyz) (below TN = 3.6(1) K) and CuCl2(pyz) (below TN = 3.2(2) K). No evidence of magnetic order is observed in Cu(NCS)2(pyz) down to 0.35 K. The results are discussed in terms of the estimated Cu-X-Cu and Cu-(pyz)-Cu exchange constants. The theory of mgr+SR in high spin molecule (HSM) systems, which are effectively zero-dimensional magnets, is discussed and results are presented on [Ni12(chp)12(O2CMe)12(H2O)6(THF)6] (S = 12), [Mn9O7(OAc)11(thme)(py)3(H2O)2] (S = 17/2) and [Fe14(bta)6(O)6(OMe)18 Cl6] (S \\geq 23 ). Measurements made in applied longitudinal magnetic fields on HSM materials at dilution refrigerator temperatures strongly suggest that dynamic local magnetic field fluctuations are responsible for the relaxation of the muon spin ensemble. Trends in temperature and field dependent behaviour in these systems, as probed by the muon, are discussed.

  5. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample. PMID:22003461

  6. Shimming of a Magnet for Calibration of NMR Probes for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielajew, Rachel

    2013-10-01

    The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the anomalous magnetic moment aμ ≡ (g-2)/2 of the muon to the precision of 0.14 parts per million. This experimental value of aμ can then be compared to the similarly precise theoretical predictions of the Standard Model in order to test the completeness of the model. The value of aμ is extracted from muons precessing in a magnetic field. The magnetic field will be measured with a set of 400 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) probes, which have the ability to measure the field to a precision of tens of parts per billion. Before the Muon g-2 Experiment can take place, new NMR probes must be designed, built, and tested using a 1.45 Tesla test magnet at the University of Washington Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics (CENPA). In order to achieve a significant signal from NMR probes, the magnetic field in which the probes are immersed must be extremely uniform. The existing magnet at CENPA has an approximately linear gradient in magnetic field of about 1 Gauss per centimeter in the smoothest direction. A pair of adjacent square Helmholtz coils was designed and built to create a linear gradient in order to cancel the existing gradient. The length of the NMR signals improved with the implementation of the coils. The results of the addition of the coils to the magnet on the signals from the NMR probes will be presented.

  7. Novel Handheld Magnetometer Probe Based on Magnetic Tunnelling Junction Sensors for Intraoperative Sentinel Lymph Node Identification

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, A.; Balalis, G. L.; Thompson, S. K.; Forero Morales, D.; Mohtar, A.; Wedding, A. B.; Thierry, B.

    2015-01-01

    Using magnetic tunnelling junction sensors, a novel magnetometer probe for the identification of the sentinel lymph node using magnetic tracers was developed. Probe performance was characterised in vitro and validated in a preclinical swine model. Compared to conventional gamma probes, the magnetometer probe showed excellent spatial resolution of 4.0 mm, and the potential to detect as few as 5 μg of magnetic tracer. Due to the high sensitivity of the magnetometer, all first-tier nodes were identified in the preclinical experiments, and there were no instances of false positive or false negative detection. Furthermore, these preliminary data encourage the application of the magnetometer probe for use in more complex lymphatic environments, such as in gastrointestinal cancers, where the sentinel node is often in close proximity to other non-sentinel nodes, and high spatial resolution detection is required. PMID:26038833

  8. Novel handheld magnetometer probe based on magnetic tunnelling junction sensors for intraoperative sentinel lymph node identification.

    PubMed

    Cousins, A; Balalis, G L; Thompson, S K; Forero Morales, D; Mohtar, A; Wedding, A B; Thierry, B

    2015-01-01

    Using magnetic tunnelling junction sensors, a novel magnetometer probe for the identification of the sentinel lymph node using magnetic tracers was developed. Probe performance was characterised in vitro and validated in a preclinical swine model. Compared to conventional gamma probes, the magnetometer probe showed excellent spatial resolution of 4.0 mm, and the potential to detect as few as 5 μg of magnetic tracer. Due to the high sensitivity of the magnetometer, all first-tier nodes were identified in the preclinical experiments, and there were no instances of false positive or false negative detection. Furthermore, these preliminary data encourage the application of the magnetometer probe for use in more complex lymphatic environments, such as in gastrointestinal cancers, where the sentinel node is often in close proximity to other non-sentinel nodes, and high spatial resolution detection is required. PMID:26038833

  9. Miniaturized magnetic-driven scanning probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ziwei; Wu, Jigang

    2015-06-01

    We designed and implemented a magnetic-driven scanning (MDS) probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). The probe uses an externally-driven tiny magnet in the distal end to achieve unobstructed 360-degree circumferential scanning at the side of the probe. The design simplifies the scanning part inside the probe and thus allows for easy miniaturization and cost reduction. We made a prototype probe with an outer diameter of 1.4 mm and demonstrated its capability by acquiring OCT images of ex vivo trachea and artery samples from a pigeon. We used a spectrometer-based Fourier-domain OCT system and the system sensitivity with our prototype probe was measured to be 91 dB with an illumination power of 850 μW and A-scan exposure time of 1 ms. The axial and lateral resolutions of the system are 6.5 μm and 8.1 μm, respectively. PMID:26114041

  10. Note: A calibration method to determine the lumped-circuit parameters of a magnetic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fuming; Chen, Zhipeng; Zhu, Lizhi; Liu, Hai; Wang, Zhijiang; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a novel method to determine the lumped-circuit parameters of a magnetic inductive probe for calibration by using Helmholtz coils with high frequency power supply (frequency range: 10 kHz-400 kHz). The whole calibration circuit system can be separated into two parts: "generator" circuit and "receiver" circuit. By implementing the Fourier transform, two analytical lumped-circuit models, with respect to these separated circuits, are constructed to obtain the transfer function between each other. Herein, the precise lumped-circuit parameters (including the resistance, inductance, and capacitance) of the magnetic probe can be determined by fitting the experimental data to the transfer function. Regarding the fitting results, the finite impedance of magnetic probe can be used to analyze the transmission of a high-frequency signal between magnetic probes, cables, and acquisition system.

  11. A Cryogenic Magnetostrictive Actuator using a Persistent High Temperature Superconducting Magnet, Part 1: Concept and Design. Part 1; Concept and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett C.; Bromberg, Leslie; Teter, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Cryogenic magnetostrictive materials, such as rare earth zinc crystals, offer high strains and high forces with minimally applied magnetic fields, making the material ideally suited for deformable optics applications. For cryogenic temperature applications, such as Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), the use of superconducting magnets offer the possibility of a persistent mode of operation, i.e., the magnetostrictive material will maintain a strain field without power. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are attractive options if the temperature of operation is higher than 10 degrees Kelvin (K) and below 77 K. However, HTS wires have constraints that limit the minimum radius of winding, and even if good wires can be produced, the technology for joining superconducting wires does not exist. In this paper, the design and capabilities of a rare earth zinc magnetostrictive actuator using bulk HTS is described. Bulk superconductors can be fabricated in the sizes required with excellent superconducting properties. Equivalent permanent magnets, made with this inexpensive material, are persistent, do not require a persistent switch as in HTS wires, and can be made very small. These devices are charged using a technique which is similar to the one used for charging permanent magnets, e.g., by driving them into saturation. A small normal conducting coil can be used for charging or discharging. Very fast charging and discharging of HTS tubes, as short as 100 microseconds, has been demonstrated. Because of the magnetic field capability of the superconductor material, a very small amount of superconducting magnet material is needed to actuate the rare earth zinc. In this paper, several designs of actuators using YBCO and BSCCO 2212 superconducting materials are presented. Designs that include magnetic shielding to prevent interaction between adjacent actuators will also be described. Preliminary experimental results and comparison with theory for BSSCO 2212 with a

  12. Magnetic Probe to Study Plasma Jets for Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Daniel; Hsu, Scott C.

    2012-08-16

    A probe has been constructed to measure the magnetic field of a plasma jet generated by a pulsed plasma rail-gun. The probe consists of two sets of three orthogonally-oriented commercial chip inductors to measure the three-dimensional magnetic field vector at two separate positions in order to give information about the magnetic field evolution within the jet. The strength and evolution of the magnetic field is one of many factors important in evaluating the use of supersonic plasma jets for forming imploding spherical plasma liners as a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion.

  13. Magnetic field probe for measuring surface current distributions on millimetre wave microstrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, R. R.; Bansal, R.

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic field probe for measuring surface current distributions on millimeter wave microstrip antennas has been designed and fabricated. This current probe was tested by measuring the surface current distributions of printed microstrip dipole antennas. The current distributions obtained compared well with the theoretically expected distributions.

  14. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  15. Aberrated electron probes for magnetic spectroscopy with atomic resolution: Theory and practical aspects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rusz, Ján; Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-24

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of a electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. Here we present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  16. Aberrated electron probes for magnetic spectroscopy with atomic resolution: Theory and practical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusz, Ján; Idrobo, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    It was recently proposed that electron magnetic circular dichroism can be measured in scanning transmission electron microscopy with atomic resolution by tuning the phase distribution of an electron beam. Here, we describe the theoretical and practical aspects for the detection of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetization utilizing atomic size electron probes. We present the calculated optimized astigmatic probes and discuss how to achieve them experimentally.

  17. Parametric study of a pin-plane probe in moderately magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binwal, S.; Gandhi, S.; Kabariya, H.; Karkari, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    The application of a planar Langmuir probe in magnetized plasma is found to be problematic due to significant perturbation of plasma along the magnetic field lines intercepting the probe surface. This causes the Ampere-Volts ‘I e(U)’ characteristics of the probe to deviate from its usual exponential law; in conjunction the electron saturation current I es is significantly reduced. Moreover estimating the electron temperature T e by considering the entire semi-log plot of I e(U) gives ambiguous values of T e. To address this problem, Pitts and Stangeby developed a formula for the reduction factor for I es. This formula depends on a number of uncertain parameters, namely; the ion temperature T +, electron cross-field diffusion coefficient {{D}\\bot ,\\text{e}} and the local potential hill V h estimated by applying a floating pin probe in the vicinity of the planar probe. Due to implicit dependence of these parameters on T e, the resulting analysis is not straightforward. This paper presents a parametric study of different parameters that influence the characteristics of a planar probe in magnetized plasma. For this purpose a pin-plane probe is constructed and applied in the magnetized plasma column. A comprehensive discussion is presented that highlights the practical methodology of using this technique for extracting useful information of plasma parameters in magnetized plasmas.

  18. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment.

    PubMed

    Khademolhosseini, F; Liu, C-C; Lim, C J; Chiao, M

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells. PMID:27587150

  19. Magnetically actuated tissue engineered scaffold: insights into mechanism of physical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sapir-Lekhovitser, Yulia; Rotenberg, Menahem Y; Jopp, Juergen; Friedman, Gary; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-02-14

    Providing the right stimulatory conditions resulting in efficient tissue promoting microenvironment in vitro and in vivo is one of the ultimate goals in tissue development for regenerative medicine. It has been shown that in addition to molecular signals (e.g. growth factors) physical cues are also required for generation of functional cell constructs. These cues are particularly relevant to engineering of biological tissues, within which mechanical stress activates mechano-sensitive receptors, initiating biochemical pathways which lead to the production of functionally mature tissue. Uniform magnetic fields coupled with magnetizable nanoparticles embedded within three dimensional (3D) scaffold structures remotely create transient physical forces that can be transferrable to cells present in close proximity to the nanoparticles. This study investigated the hypothesis that magnetically responsive alginate scaffold can undergo reversible shape deformation due to alignment of scaffold's walls in a uniform magnetic field. Using custom made Helmholtz coil setup adapted to an Atomic Force Microscope we monitored changes in matrix dimensions in situ as a function of applied magnetic field, concentration of magnetic particles within the scaffold wall structure and rigidity of the matrix. Our results show that magnetically responsive scaffolds exposed to an externally applied time-varying uniform magnetic field undergo a reversible shape deformation. This indicates on possibility of generating bending/stretching forces that may exert a mechanical effect on cells due to alternating pattern of scaffold wall alignment and relaxation. We suggest that the matrix structure deformation is produced by immobilized magnetic nanoparticles within the matrix walls resulting in a collective alignment of scaffold walls upon magnetization. The estimated mechanical force that can be imparted on cells grown on the scaffold wall at experimental conditions is in the order of 1 pN, which

  20. Magnetically actuated tissue engineered scaffold: insights into mechanism of physical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir-Lekhovitser, Yulia; Rotenberg, Menahem Y.; Jopp, Juergen; Friedman, Gary; Polyak, Boris; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-02-01

    Providing the right stimulatory conditions resulting in efficient tissue promoting microenvironment in vitro and in vivo is one of the ultimate goals in tissue development for regenerative medicine. It has been shown that in addition to molecular signals (e.g. growth factors) physical cues are also required for generation of functional cell constructs. These cues are particularly relevant to engineering of biological tissues, within which mechanical stress activates mechano-sensitive receptors, initiating biochemical pathways which lead to the production of functionally mature tissue. Uniform magnetic fields coupled with magnetizable nanoparticles embedded within three dimensional (3D) scaffold structures remotely create transient physical forces that can be transferrable to cells present in close proximity to the nanoparticles. This study investigated the hypothesis that magnetically responsive alginate scaffold can undergo reversible shape deformation due to alignment of scaffold's walls in a uniform magnetic field. Using custom made Helmholtz coil setup adapted to an Atomic Force Microscope we monitored changes in matrix dimensions in situ as a function of applied magnetic field, concentration of magnetic particles within the scaffold wall structure and rigidity of the matrix. Our results show that magnetically responsive scaffolds exposed to an externally applied time-varying uniform magnetic field undergo a reversible shape deformation. This indicates on possibility of generating bending/stretching forces that may exert a mechanical effect on cells due to alternating pattern of scaffold wall alignment and relaxation. We suggest that the matrix structure deformation is produced by immobilized magnetic nanoparticles within the matrix walls resulting in a collective alignment of scaffold walls upon magnetization. The estimated mechanical force that can be imparted on cells grown on the scaffold wall at experimental conditions is in the order of 1 pN, which

  1. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are useful for performing measurements in electric space thrusters and various plasma accelerator applications where a time-varying magnetic field is present. Magnetic field probes have proven to be a mainstay in diagnosing plasma thrusters where changes occur rapidly with respect to time, providing the means to measure the magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents and even an indirect measure of the plasma current density through the application of Ampère's law. Examples of applications where this measurement technique has been employed include pulsed plasma thrusters and quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. The Electric Propulsion Technical Committee (EPTC) of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was asked to assemble a Committee on Standards (CoS) for Electric Propulsion Testing. The assembled CoS was tasked with developing Standards and Recommended Practices for various diagnostic techniques used in the evaluation of plasma thrusters. These include measurements that can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. This paper presents a summary of the standard, describing the preferred methods for fabrication, calibration, and usage of inductive magnetic field probes for use in diagnosing plasma thrusters. Inductive magnetic field probes (also called B-dot probes throughout this document) are commonly used in electric propulsion (EP) research and testing to measure unsteady magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents. The B-dot probe is relatively simple in construction, and requires minimal cost, making it a low-cost technique that is readily accessible to most researchers. While relatively simple, the design of a B-dot probe is not trivial and there are many opportunities for errors in

  2. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Fimognari, Peter; Hawk, Clark W.; Lee, Mike; Martin, Adam

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and subsequently ejecting them at high velocity. An overview of PTX is described in a companion paper. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids will be measured with of an array of inductive magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes (for a total of twelve probes) have been constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven alternately by a high-voltage pulser or a signal generator. The probes are wound on a G-10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x 10(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is cross-sectional area. The frequency response of the probes was measured over the range from 1 kHz to 10 MHZ. The electron number density n(sub e), electron temperature T(sub e) and velocity v will be determined from measurements taken with a quadruple Langmuir probe, situated in the exhaust chamber. Three of the four probes on the quadruple probe sample the current-voltage characteristic, and from this yield measurements of T(sub e) and n(sub e). The fourth probe provides a measurement of plasma flow velocity. A 6-inch long alumina rod, hollowed with four holes to house the probe wires, is being used to construct the quadruple probe. A variety of propellants will be used, including hydrogen, nitrogen and argon. From the measurements of the plasmoid mass, density, temperature, and velocity, the basic propulsion characteristics of PTX will be evaluated.

  3. Electrodeposition of low residual stress CoNiMnP hard magnetic thin films for magnetic MEMS actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shan; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2005-04-01

    A new technique for electrodeposition of CoNiMnP hard magnetic thin films is developed to provide thin films with low residual stress and magnetic properties useful for MEMS applications. Processing parameters including applied current density, film thickness, pH and temperature of the electrolyte are regulated in order to reduce residual stress of the film. In addition, a hybrid residual stress reliever composed of sodium saccharine and a rare-earth salts mixture of Ce 2(SO 4) 3 and Nd 2(SO 4) 3 is created to further reduce the residual stress, eliminate microcracks and improve surface morphology of the film. The effects of residual stress on the magnetic properties of electrodeposited CoNiMnP hard magnetic films such as coercivity, saturation and residual magnetization are reported in this paper.

  4. Magnetic actuated pH-responsive hydrogel-based soft micro-robot for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Go, Gwangjun; Ko, Seong Yong; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2016-02-01

    For drug delivery in cancer therapy, various stimuli-responsive hydrogel-based micro-devices have been studied with great interest. Here, we present a new concept for a hybrid actuated soft microrobot targeted drug delivery. The proposed soft microrobot consists of a hydrogel bilayer structure of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (PHEMA) and poly (ethylene glycol) acrylate (PEGDA) with iron (II, III) oxide particles (Fe3O4). The PHEMA layer as a pH-responsive gel is used for a trapping and unfolding motion of the soft microrobot in pH-varying solution, and the PEGDA-with-Fe3O4 layer is employed for the locomotion of the soft microrobot in the magnetic field. The bilayer soft microrobot was fabricated by a conventional photolithography procedure and its characteristics were analyzed and presented. To evaluate the trapping performance and the motility of the soft microrobot, test solutions with different pH values and an electromagnetic actuation (EMA) system were used. First, the soft microrobot showed its full trapping motion at about pH 9.58 and its unfolding motion at about pH 2.6. Second, the soft microrobot showed a moving velocity of about 600 μm s-1 through the generated magnetic field of the EMA system. Finally, we fabricated the real anti-cancer drug microbeads (PCL-DTX) and executed the cytotoxicity test using the mammary carcinoma cells (4T1). The viability of the 4T1 cells treated with the proposed microrobot and the PCL-DTX microbeads decreased to 70.25 ± 1.52%. The result demonstrated that the soft microrobot can be moved to a target position by the EMA system and can release a small amount of beads by the pH variation and the robot exhibited no toxicity to the cells. In the future, we expect that the proposed soft microrobot can be applied to a new tumor-therapeutic tool that can move to a target tumor and release anti-tumor drugs.

  5. Modeling and Measurements by Hall probes of Magnetic Structures of Undulators HU256

    SciTech Connect

    Batrakov, A.; Churkin, I.; Ilyin, I.; Steshov, A.; Vobly, P.; Briquez, F.; Chubar, O.; Dael, A.; Roux, G.; Valleau, M.

    2007-01-19

    The magnetic calculations of the individual dipoles and dipoles in 'undulator environment' were executed by means of Mermaid 3D Code and these results were confirmed by magnetic measurements of the individual dipoles and the assembled undulators. The magnetic parameters of all dipoles were estimated on basis of the mechanical measurement of the dipole characteristics (pole gap, yoke width, coil position) and the main dependences obtained from magnetic calculations and measurements. These parameters were used for optimal placing of the dipoles in undulators (sorting). The special Hall probe system was designed and manufactured for magnetic measurements of the undulators. It allowed us to observe the inner structure of the magnetic fields. At a magnetic field measurement accuracy of {+-} 15 {mu}T the accuracy of the 1st integral calculated on the basis of the measured magnetic fields is {approx} 50 {mu}Tm. All three undulators were magnetically measured at BINP and are being re-measured at Soleil after transportation.

  6. Modeling and Measurements by Hall probes of Magnetic Structures of Undulators HU256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A.; Briquez, F.; Chubar, O.; Dael, A.; Churkin, I.; Ilyin, I.; Roux, G.; Steshov, A.; Valleau, M.; Vobly, P.

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic calculations of the individual dipoles and dipoles in "undulator environment" were executed by means of Mermaid 3D Code and these results were confirmed by magnetic measurements of the individual dipoles and the assembled undulators. The magnetic parameters of all dipoles were estimated on basis of the mechanical measurement of the dipole characteristics (pole gap, yoke width, coil position) and the main dependences obtained from magnetic calculations and measurements. These parameters were used for optimal placing of the dipoles in undulators (sorting). The special Hall probe system was designed and manufactured for magnetic measurements of the undulators. It allowed us to observe the inner structure of the magnetic fields. At a magnetic field measurement accuracy of ± 15 μT the accuracy of the 1st integral calculated on the basis of the measured magnetic fields is ˜ 50 μTm. All three undulators were magnetically measured at BINP and are being re-measured at Soleil after transportation.

  7. Single Langmuir probe characteristic in a magnetized plasma at the text tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Jachmich, S.

    1995-05-01

    A single Langmuir probe tip was used at TEXT-Upgrade to obtain I-V characteristics in a magnetized plasma. Noisy data were reduced by a boxcar-averaging routine. Unexpected effects, namely nonsaturation of ion current, hysterises in the characteristics and I(V)-data were observed, which are in disagreement to the common single probe model. A double probe model allows parameterization of the I(V) curves and to determine the plasma properties in the scrape-off layer. It is shown in this model that a Langmuir probe does perturb the local space potential in the plasma. Comparisons were made with the triple probe technique of measuring temperatures. The nonsaturation of ion current leads to an error in the triple probe technique of order 20%.

  8. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  9. An EPR method for probing surface magnetic fields, dipolar distances, and magnetization fluctuations in single molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Rakvin, B; Zilić, D; Dalal, N S; North, J M; Cevc, P; Arcon, D; Zadro, K

    2004-05-01

    We outline a spectroscopic method for probing the effective magnetic field B on the surface of crystals of the single molecule magnet (SMM) [(C6H15N3)6Fe8(mu3-O)2(mu2-OH)12]Br7(H2O)Br.H2O, (Fe8Br8). This technique utilizes the line shape changes in the EPR spectra of the organic radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) (g = 2.0036, single peak) adsorbed onto the sample. The temperature dependence of the EPR line shifts scale with the sample's magnetization as measured by a SQUID magnetometer. Analysis of the line shape in terms of dipolar coupling between the DPPH and the SMM molecules on the surface, yields their average dipolar distance. The method's potential for measuring the magnetization fluctuation dynamics is briefly pointed out using the SMM [Mn12O12(CH3COO)16(H2O)4].2CH3COOH.4H2O (Mn12-acetate). PMID:15134721

  10. An EPR method for probing surface magnetic fields, dipolar distances, and magnetization fluctuations in single molecule magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakvin, B.; Žilić, D.; Dalal, N. S.; North, J. M.; Cevc, P.; Arčon, D.; Zadro, K.

    2004-05-01

    We outline a spectroscopic method for probing the effective magnetic field B on the surface of crystals of the single molecule magnet (SMM) [(C 6H 15N 3) 6Fe 8(μ 3-O) 2(μ 2-OH) 12]Br 7(H 2O)Br·H 2O, (Fe 8Br 8). This technique utilizes the line shape changes in the EPR spectra of the organic radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) ( g=2.0036, single peak) adsorbed onto the sample. The temperature dependence of the EPR line shifts scale with the sample's magnetization as measured by a SQUID magnetometer. Analysis of the line shape in terms of dipolar coupling between the DPPH and the SMM molecules on the surface, yields their average dipolar distance. The method's potential for measuring the magnetization fluctuation dynamics is briefly pointed out using the SMM [Mn 12O 12(CH 3COO) 16(H 2O) 4]·2CH 3COOH·4H 2O (Mn 12-acetate).

  11. Planetary magnetism. [Mariner, Venera and Pioneer probe results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1979-01-01

    Recent data on planetary magnetism are reviewed, with attention given to information obtained by Mariner 10 at Mercury, from Venera 9 and 10 orbiting Venus, and Pioneer spacecraft flying past Jupiter. In addition, less recent magnetic measurements of Mars are reconsidered. Doubts about whether Mars has an active dynamo at present are mentioned, and further planetary magnetic assessments are suggested. In particular, the need to refine knowledge of multipole moments is stressed.

  12. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V.; Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K.; Dantelle, G.; Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S.

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  13. Probing magnetic microstructures with quasi-ballistic Hall crosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasbender, S.; Schluck, J.; Cerchez, M.; Heinzel, T.; Sievers, S.; Pierz, K.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2016-03-01

    Hall sensing is performed on a localized magnetic field pattern using a quasi-ballistic Hall cross device. The Hall resistance shows a pronounced peak as a function of the magnetic field amplitude which is absent in the magnetization hysteresis loop. This non-monotonic response exemplifies qualitatively the failure of conventional Hall sensing. It is demonstrated how, by using a numerical simulation based on the Landauer-Büttiker model, the amplitude of the magnetic field profile can be determined from such measurements.

  14. Magnetically Actuated Propellant Orientation Experiment, Controlling Fluid Motion With Magnetic Fields in a Low-Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Holt, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    This report details the results of a series of fluid motion experiments to investigate the use of magnets to orient fluids in a low-gravity environment. The fluid of interest for this project was liquid oxygen (LO2) since it exhibits a paramagnetic behavior (is attracted to magnetic fields). However, due to safety and handling concerns, a water-based ferromagnetic mixture (produced by Ferrofluidics Corporation) was selected to simplify procedures. Three ferromagnetic fluid mixture strengths and a nonmagnetic water baseline were tested using three different initial fluid positions with respect to the magnet. Experiment accelerometer data were used with a modified computational fluid dynamics code termed CFX-4 (by AEA Technologies) to predict fluid motion. These predictions compared favorably with experiment video data, verifying the code's ability to predict fluid motion with and without magnetic influences. Additional predictions were generated for LO2 with the same test conditions and geometries used in the testing. Test hardware consisted of a cylindrical Plexiglas tank (6-in. bore with 10-in. length), a 6,000-G rare Earth magnet (10-in. ring), three-axis accelerometer package, and a video recorder system. All tests were conducted aboard the NASA Reduced-Gravity Workshop, a KC-135A aircraft.

  15. Probing the Magnetic Causes of CMEs: Free Magnetic Energy More Important Than Either Size Or Twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    To probe the magnetic causes of CMEs, we have examined three types of magnetic measures: size, twist and total nonpotentiality (or total free magnetic energy) of an active region. Total nonpotentiality is roughly the product of size times twist. For predominately bipolar active regions, we have found that total nonpotentiality measures have the strongest correlation with future CME productivity (approx. 75% prediction success rate), while size and twist measures each have a weaker correlation with future CME productivity (approx. 65% prediction success rate) (Falconer, Moore, & Gary, ApJ, 644, 2006). For multipolar active regions, we find that the CME-prediction success rates for total nonpotentiality and size are about the same as for bipolar active regions. We also find that the size measure correlation with CME productivity is nearly all due to the contribution of size to total nonpotentiality. We have a total nonpotentiality measure that can be obtained from a line-of-sight magnetogram of the active region and that is as strongly correlated with CME productivity as are any of our total-nonpotentiality measures from deprojected vector magnetograms. We plan to further expand our sample by using MDI magnetograms of each active region in our sample to determine its total nonpotentiality and size on each day that the active region was within 30 deg. of disk center. The resulting increase in sample size will improve our statistics and allow us to investigate whether the nonpotentiality threshold for CME production is nearly the same or significantly different for multipolar regions than for bipolar regions. In addition, we will investigate the time rates of change of size and total nonpotentiality as additional causes of CME productivity.

  16. 2H transmit-receive NMR probes for magnetic field monitoring in MRI.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Pekka; Greding, Sebastian; Wachutka, Gerhard; Wiesinger, Florian

    2011-05-01

    Measuring image encoding fields in real time and applying the information in postprocessing offer improved image quality for MRI, particularly for applications that are intrinsically sensitive to gradient imperfections. For this task, a stand-alone magnetometer system based on multiple (2)H transmit-receive NMR probes has been developed. The conceptual advantages of changing to (2)H NMR probes for (1)H magnetic field monitoring are elucidated here, and the practical design of the probes is described. In comparison to previous (1)H NMR probe-based designs, (2)H probes are perfectly decoupled from standard (1)H imaging. Utilization of RF shielding or other nonoptimal decoupling schemes is therefore not needed. Probes based on (2)H nuclei are also more easily miniaturized for high-resolution imaging. This is particularly important for diffusion tensor and phase-contrast imaging, which rely on strong motion-sensitizing gradients. The presented (2)H NMR probes have been shown to fulfill the requirements for accurate (1)H imaging down to image resolutions of 0.2 mm. Using susceptibility matching techniques, the probe's B(0) inhomogeneity-induced signal dephasing is reduced and monitoring periods beyond 200 msec are achieved. The benefit of real time magnetic field monitoring is highlighted for phase-contrast and non-Cartesian multishot imaging. PMID:21254204

  17. Analysis of the Distribution of Magnetic Fluid inside Tumors by a Giant Magnetoresistance Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kurnicki, Adam; Yamada, Sotoshi; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42°C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe. PMID:24312280

  18. Time-Resolved X-Ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism - A Selective Probe of Magnetization Dynamics on Nanosecond Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzini, Stefania; Vogel, Jan; Bonfim, Marlio; Fontaine, Alain

    Many synchrotron radiation techniques have been developed in the last 15 years for studying the magnetic properties of thin-film materials. The most attractive properties of synchrotron radiation are its energy tunability and its time structure. The first property allows measurements in resonant conditions at an absorption edge of each of the magnetic elements constituting the probed sample, and the latter allows time-resolved measurements on subnanosecond timescales. In this review, we introduce some of the synchrotron-based techniques used for magnetic investigations. We then describe in detail X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and how time-resolved XMCD studies can be carried out in the pump-probe mode. Finally, we illustrate some applications to magnetization reversal dynamics in spin valves and tunnel junctions, using fast magnetic field pulses applied along the easy magnetization axis of the samples. Thanks to the element-selectivity of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, the magnetization dynamics of the soft (Permalloy) and the hard (cobalt) layers can be studied independently. In the case of spin valves, this allowed us to show that two magnetic layers that are strongly coupled in a static regime can become uncoupled on nanosecond timescales.Present address: Universidade Federal do Paraná, Centro Politécnico CP 19011, Curitiba - PR CEP 81531-990, Brazil

  19. Ferromagnetic eddy current probe having eccentric magnetization for detecting anomalies in a tube

    SciTech Connect

    Cecco, V.S.; Carter, J.R.

    1993-08-17

    An eddy current probe is described for detecting anomalies in a tube made of a ferromagnetic material, comprising: a probe housing made of a non-ferromagnetic material and shaped to be introduced into the tube for inspection, said housing having a central axis substantially coinciding with the axis of the tube to be inspected when the probe is in use; at least two eddy current measuring assemblies provided in said housing, each said assembly including magnetization means for generating a magnetic field in the tube under inspection to magnetize said tube, said magnetization means producing a maximum magnetization at an area of said tube and a minimum magnetization at a diametrically opposite area of said tube and at least one eddy current measuring coil associated with said magnetization means to measure the eddy current generated in the said tube and which has a relatively high sensitivity to an anomaly at said maximum magnetization area; and said eddy current measuring assemblies being spaced apart axially within said housing and rotated about said central axis from each other by a predetermined angle so that each assembly is sensitive to anomalies differently depending upon their location in said housing.

  20. LabVIEW software for analyzing Langmuir probe characteristics in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, S.; Binwal, S.; Kabariya, H.; Karkari, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology for processing Ampere-Volts (I-V) characteristics of the Langmuir probe in magnetized plasma using graphical programming language based on LabVIEW. Computing the plasma parameters from I-V characteristic involves several steps that include signal processing, interpolation, linear and non-linear curve fitting based on physical models, finding the derivatives of the experimental curve and determining the zero-crossing of the probe current as a function of the applied voltage. These operations are practically tedious to perform manually causing systematic errors in output parameters. To overcome this challenge, software is developed to analyze the planar Langmuir probe characteristics in magnetized plasma. The software allows simultaneous display of different plasma parameters that helps to verify the consistency of the analyzed plasma parameters with the standard probe theory. Using this software, plasma parameters are obtained in a linear plasma device and its characteristics are discussed.

  1. Magnetic actuation of a thermodynamically stable colloid of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Prodanov, Maksym F; Buluy, Oleksandr G; Popova, Ekaterina V; Gamzaeva, Saniyat A; Reznikov, Yuriy O; Vashchenko, Valerii V

    2016-08-21

    We report the development of a highly stable nanomaterial based on ferromagnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a thermotropic liquid crystal. The long-term colloidal stability and homogeneity were achieved through surface modification of the nanoparticles with a mixture of a dendritic oligomesogenic surfactant and hexylphosphonic acid and confirmed by optical and electron microscopy. The nanomaterial has an increased sensitivity to the magnetic field possessing collective and non-collective magneto-optical responses in contrast to the undoped LC. The effective coupling of the spherical particles with the LC director is due to the arrangement of the nanoparticles in chains. PMID:27439890

  2. Scanning probe measurements on a magnetic bead biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megens, Mischa; de Theije, Femke; de Boer, Bart; van Gaal, Frans

    2007-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the sensitivity of an integrated detection scheme for small superparamagnetic beads, intended for medical diagnostic applications. Detection is based on the giant magnetoresistance effect of a 100×3μm2 magnetic multilayer strip. A conductive wire to magnetize the superparamagnetic beads is integrated on the same substrate. By scanning a single bead over the wires and sensor strip using an atomic force microscope, we simultaneously measure topography and sensor resistivity in a three-dimensional volume above the sensor. The observations can be explained well by means of the macroscopically measured sensor resistivity curve and the magnetization of the beads, combined with the Biot-Savart law for the magnetic field of the wire. From these encouraging results, we project that it is possible to detect even a single 300nm superparamagnetic bead on our sensor.

  3. Probing arrays of circular magnetic microdots by ferromagnetic resonance.

    SciTech Connect

    Kakazei, G. N.; Mewes, T.; Wigen, P. E.; Hammel, P. C.; Slavin, A. N.; Pogorelov, Y. G.; Costa, M. D.; Golub, V. O.; Guslienko, K. Y.; Novosad, V.

    2008-06-01

    X-band ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) was used to characterize in-plane magnetic anisotropies in rectangular and square arrays of circular nickel and Permalloy microdots. In the case of a rectangular lattice, as interdot distances in one direction decrease, the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy field increases, in good agreement with a simple theory of magnetostatically interacting uniformly magnetized dots. In the case of a square lattice a four-fold anisotropy of the in-plane FMR field H(r) was found when the interdot distance a gets comparable to the dot diameter D. This anisotropy, not expected in the case of uniformly magnetized dots, was explained by a non-uniform magnetization m(r) in a dot in response to dipolar forces in the patterned magnetic structure. It is well described by an iterative solution of a continuous variation procedure. In the case of perpendicular magnetization multiple sharp resonance peaks were observed below the main FMR peak in all the samples, and the relative positions of these peaks were independent of the interdot separations. Quantitative description of the observed multiresonance FMR spectra was given using the dipole-exchange spin wave dispersion equation for a perpendicularly magnetized film where in-plane wave vector is quantized due to the finite dot radius, and the inhomogenetiy of the intradot static demagnetization field in the nonellipsoidal dot is taken into account. It was demonstrated that ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy (FMRFM) can be used to determine both local and global properties of patterned submicron ferromagnetic samples. Local spectroscopy together with the possibility to vary the tip-sample spacing enables the separation of those two contributions to a FMRFM spectrum. The global FMR properties of circular submicron dots determined using magnetic resonance force microscopy are in a good agreement with results obtained using conventional FMR and with theoretical descriptions.

  4. Probing the duplex stainless steel phases via magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheno, S. M.; Santos, F. S.; Kuri, S. E.

    2008-03-01

    Duplex stainless steels are austenitic-ferritic alloys used in many applications, thanks to their excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. In this work, chemical analyses, x-ray diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were employed to characterize the solution annealed and aged duplex stainless steel. The samples exhibited no changes in lattice parameters and the MFM technique proved successful in clearly imaging the magnetic domain structure of the ferrite phase.

  5. Probing electric field control of magnetism using ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziyao; Trassin, Morgan; Gao, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Diana; Ashraf, Khalid; Nan, Tianxiang; Yang, Xi; Bowden, S R; Pierce, D T; Stiles, M D; Unguris, J; Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Salahuddin, S; Ramesh, R; Sun, Nian X

    2015-01-01

    Exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 thin-film heterostructures show great promise for power-efficient electric field-induced 180° magnetization switching. However, the coupling mechanism and precise qualification of the exchange coupling in CoFe/BiFeO3 heterostructures have been elusive. Here we show direct evidence for electric field control of the magnetic state in exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 through electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and nanoscale spatially resolved magnetic imaging. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis images reveal the coupling of the magnetization in the CoFe layer to the canted moment in the BiFeO3 layer. Electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance measurements quantify the exchange coupling strength and reveal that the CoFe magnetization is directly and reversibly modulated by the applied electric field through a ~180° switching of the canted moment in BiFeO3. This constitutes an important step towards robust repeatable and non-volatile voltage-induced 180° magnetization switching in thin-film multiferroic heterostructures and tunable RF/microwave devices. PMID:25631924

  6. Properties of a hairpin probe in a strongly magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkari, S. K.; Gogna, G. S.; Boilson, D.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding of the physics in the filter field region of a neutral beam injection source for ITER under development is very important, as this region is where the negative ions are generated and extracted. For accurately determining electron densities in this complex plasma, a floating hairpin probe is applied on the KAMABOKO III ion source, at the MANTIS test bed at CEA Cadarache. The technique is based on measuring the probes resonance frequency (few GHz) shift in plasma with respect to that obtained in vacuum. The resonance frequency is proportional to the permittivity of the medium filling the space between the wires of the hairpin resonator. Using this technique we obtained the electron density variation as function of discharge power and on the external grid bias in front of the plasma grid.

  7. Design and Application of Hybrid Magnetic Field-Eddy Current Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Leser, Paul; Simpson, John

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of magnetic field sensors into eddy current probes can result in novel probe designs with unique performance characteristics. One such example is a recently developed electromagnetic probe consisting of a two-channel magnetoresistive sensor with an embedded single-strand eddy current inducer. Magnetic flux leakage maps of ferrous materials are generated from the DC sensor response while high-resolution eddy current imaging is simultaneously performed at frequencies up to 5 megahertz. In this work the design and optimization of this probe will be presented, along with an application toward analysis of sensory materials with embedded ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles. The sensory material is designed to produce a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the FSMA particles under strain. Mapping of the stray magnetic field and eddy current response of the sample with the hybrid probe can thereby image locations in the structure which have experienced an overstrain condition. Numerical modeling of the probe response is performed with good agreement with experimental results.

  8. Using NV centers to probe magnetization dynamics in normal metal/magnetic insulator hybrid system at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Ku, Mark J. H.; Han, Minyong; Casola, Francesco; van der Sar, Toeno; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding magnetization dynamics induced by electric current is of great interest for both fundamental and practical reasons. Great endeavor has been dedicated to spin-orbit torques (SOT) in metallic structures, while quantitative study of analogous phenomena in magnetic insulators remains challenging where transport measurements are not feasible. Recently we have developed techniques using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to probe few-nanometre-scale correlated-electron magnetic excitations (i.e., spin waves). Here we demonstrate how this powerful tool can be implemented to study magnetization dynamics inside ferromagnetic insulator, Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with spin injection from electrical current through normal metal (Platinum in our case). Particularly our work will focus on NV magnetic detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of coherent auto-oscillations in Pt/YIG microdisc. Magnetic fluctuations and local temperature measurements, both with nearby NV centers, will also be interesting topics relevant to SOT physics in Pt/YIG hybrid system.

  9. Magnetic dipole discharges. II. Cathode and anode spot discharges and probe diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2013-08-15

    The high current regime of a magnetron-type discharge has been investigated. The discharge uses a permanent magnet as a cold cathode which emits secondary electrons while the chamber wall or a grounded electrode serves as the anode. As the discharge voltage is increased, the magnet develops cathode spots, which are short duration arcs that provide copious electrons to increase the discharge current dramatically. Short (1 μs), high current (200 A) and high voltage (750 V) discharge pulses are produced in a relaxation instability between the plasma and a charging capacitor. Spots are also observed on a negatively biased plane Langmuir probe. The probe current pulses are as large as those on the magnet, implying that the high discharge current does not depend on the cathode surface area but on the properties of the spots. The fast current pulses produce large inductive voltages, which can reverse the electrical polarity of the magnet and temporarily operate it as an anode. The discharge current may also oscillate at the frequency determined by the charging capacitor and the discharge circuit inductance. Each half cycle of high-current current pulses exhibits a fast (≃10 ns) current rise when a spot is formed. It induces high frequency (10–100 MHz) transients and ringing oscillations in probes and current circuits. Most probes behave like unmatched antennas for the electromagnetic pulses of spot discharges. Examples are shown to distinguish the source of oscillations and some rf characteristics of Langmuir probes.

  10. Perspective: Probing 2-D magnetic structures in a 3-D world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutter, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic interfaces have been identified as promising systems upon which to base next-generation spintronic devices. In these nearly two-dimensional systems, deviations from bulk electronic structure and competition between nearly degenerate magnetic ground states allow the stabilization of widely tunable emergent properties. However, ever smaller length scales pose new challenges which must be overcome in order to understand and control magnetic properties at the atomic level. Using recent examples in oxide heterostructures and topological insulators, we discuss how combining techniques such as neutron scattering, X-ray scattering, X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy enables the probing of magnetism on the Angstrom scale.

  11. Dynamic modeling of a thermo-piezo-electrically actuated nanosize beam subjected to a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    In this article, free vibration behavior of magneto-electro-thermo-elastic functionally graded nanobeams is investigated based on a higher order shear deformation beam theory. Four types of thermal loading including uniform and linear temperature change as well as heat conduction and sinusoidal temperature rise through the thickness are assumed. Magneto-electro-thermo-elastic properties of FG nanobeam are supposed to change continuously throughout the thickness based on power-law model. Via nonlocal elasticity theory of Eringen, the small size effects are adopted. Based upon Hamilton's principle, the coupled nonlocal governing equations for higher order shear deformable METE-FG nanobeams are obtained and they are solved applying analytical solution. It is shown that the vibrational behavior of METE-FG nanobeams is significantly affected by various temperature rises, magnetic potential, external electric voltage, power-law index, nonlocal parameter and slenderness ratio.

  12. A versatile rotary-stage high frequency probe station for studying magnetic films and devices.

    PubMed

    He, Shikun; Meng, Zhaoliang; Huang, Lisen; Yap, Lee Koon; Zhou, Tiejun; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-07-01

    We present a rotary-stage microwave probe station suitable for magnetic films and spintronic devices. Two stages, one for field rotation from parallel to perpendicular to the sample plane (out-of-plane) and the other intended for field rotation within the sample plane (in-plane) have been designed. The sample probes and micro-positioners are rotated simultaneously with the stages, which allows the field orientation to cover θ from 0(∘) to 90(∘) and φ from 0(∘) to 360(∘). θ and φ being the angle between the direction of current flow and field in a out-of-plane and an in-plane rotation, respectively. The operation frequency is up to 40 GHz and the magnetic field up to 1 T. The sample holder vision system and probe assembly are compactly designed for the probes to land on a wafer with diameter up to 3 cm. Using homemade multi-pin probes and commercially available high frequency probes, several applications including 4-probe DC measurements, the determination of domain wall velocity, and spin transfer torque ferromagnetic resonance are demonstrated. PMID:27475578

  13. A versatile rotary-stage high frequency probe station for studying magnetic films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shikun; Meng, Zhaoliang; Huang, Lisen; Yap, Lee Koon; Zhou, Tiejun; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-07-01

    We present a rotary-stage microwave probe station suitable for magnetic films and spintronic devices. Two stages, one for field rotation from parallel to perpendicular to the sample plane (out-of-plane) and the other intended for field rotation within the sample plane (in-plane) have been designed. The sample probes and micro-positioners are rotated simultaneously with the stages, which allows the field orientation to cover θ from 0∘ to 90∘ and φ from 0∘ to 360∘. θ and φ being the angle between the direction of current flow and field in a out-of-plane and an in-plane rotation, respectively. The operation frequency is up to 40 GHz and the magnetic field up to 1 T. The sample holder vision system and probe assembly are compactly designed for the probes to land on a wafer with diameter up to 3 cm. Using homemade multi-pin probes and commercially available high frequency probes, several applications including 4-probe DC measurements, the determination of domain wall velocity, and spin transfer torque ferromagnetic resonance are demonstrated.

  14. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-04-15

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β ∼ 10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  15. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  16. Electromechanical flight control actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electromechanical actuator (EMA) as the primary flight control equipment in aerospace flight is examined. The EMA motor design is presented utilizing improved permanent magnet materials. The necessary equipment to complete a single channel EMA using the single channel power electronics breadboard is reported. The design and development of an improved rotor position sensor/tachometer is investigated.

  17. Beyond Solar-B: MTRAP, the Magnetic Transition Region Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John M.; Moore, Ronald L.; Hathaway, David H.

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of solar missions will reveal and measure fine-scale solar magnetic fields and their effects in the solar atmosphere at heights, small scales, sensitivities, and fields of view well beyond the reach of Solar-B. The necessity for, and potential of, such observations for understanding solar magnetic fields, their generation in and below the photosphere, and their control of the solar atmosphere and heliosphere, were the focus of a science definition workshop, 'High-Resolution Solar Magnetography from Space: Beyond Solar-B,' held in Huntsville Alabama in April 2001. Forty internationally prominent scientists active in solar research involving fine-scale solar magnetism participated in this Workshop and reached consensus that the key science objective to be pursued beyond Solar-B is a physical understanding of the fine-scale magnetic structure and activity in the magnetic transition region, defined as the region between the photosphere and corona where neither the plasma nor the magnetic field strongly dominates the other. The observational objective requires high cadence (less than 10s) vector magnetic field maps, and spatially resolved spectra from the IR, visible, vacuum UV, to the EUV at high resolution (less than 50km) over a large FOV (approximately 140,000 km). A polarimetric resolution of one part in ten thousand is required to measure transverse magnetic fields of less than 30G. The latest SEC Roadmap includes a mission identified as MTRAP to meet these requirements. Enabling technology development requirements include large, lightweight, reflecting optics, large format sensors (16K x 16K pixels) with high QE at 150 nm, and extendable spacecraft structures. The Science Organizing Committee of the Beyond Solar-B Workshop recommends that: (1) Science and Technology Definition Teams should be established in FY04 to finalize the science requirements and to define technology development efforts needed to ensure the practicality of MTRAP

  18. Probing nonlinear magnetization dynamics in Fe/MgO(001) film by all optical pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    He, Wei; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Zhan, Qing-Feng

    2014-04-07

    An all-optical pump-probe technique has been employed to investigate the nonlinear magnetization dynamics of a 10 nm Fe/MgO(001) thin film in time domain. The magnetization precession was excited by pump-laser pulses and modulated by laser fluence variations. With increasing the laser fluence up to 7.1 mJ/cm{sup 2}, in addition to the uniform precession mode, a second harmonic signal was detected. The time evolution of the second harmonic signal was obtained in time-frequency domain. Based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, the numerical simulation was performed to reproduce the observed the frequency doubling behaviors in Fe/MgO(001) film.

  19. Magnification bias as a novel probe for primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Camera, S.; Fedeli, C.; Moscardini, L. E-mail: cosimo.fedeli@oabo.inaf.it

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate magnetic fields generated in the early Universe. These fields are important candidates at explaining the origin of astrophysical magnetism observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters, whose genesis is still by and large unclear. Compared to the standard inflationary power spectrum, intermediate to small scales would experience further substantial matter clustering, were a cosmological magnetic field present prior to recombination. As a consequence, the bias and redshift distribution of galaxies would also be modified. Hitherto, primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) have been tested and constrained with a number of cosmological observables, e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation, galaxy clustering and, more recently, weak gravitational lensing. Here, we explore the constraining potential of the density fluctuation bias induced by gravitational lensing magnification onto the galaxy-galaxy angular power spectrum. Such an effect is known as magnification bias. Compared to the usual galaxy clustering approach, magnification bias helps in lifting the pathological degeneracy present amongst power spectrum normalisation and galaxy bias. This is because magnification bias cross-correlates galaxy number density fluctuations of nearby objects with weak lensing distortions of high-redshift sources. Thus, it takes advantage of the gravitational deflection of light, which is insensitive to galaxy bias but powerful in constraining the density fluctuation amplitude. To scrutinise the potentiality of this method, we adopt a deep and wide-field spectroscopic galaxy survey. We show that magnification bias does contain important information on primordial magnetism, which will be useful in combination with galaxy clustering and shear. We find we shall be able to rule out at 95.4% CL amplitudes of PMFs larger than 5 × 10{sup −4} nG for values of the PMF power spectral index n{sub B} ∼ 0.

  20. Magnification bias as a novel probe for primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, S.; Fedeli, C.; Moscardini, L.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we investigate magnetic fields generated in the early Universe. These fields are important candidates at explaining the origin of astrophysical magnetism observed in galaxies and galaxy clusters, whose genesis is still by and large unclear. Compared to the standard inflationary power spectrum, intermediate to small scales would experience further substantial matter clustering, were a cosmological magnetic field present prior to recombination. As a consequence, the bias and redshift distribution of galaxies would also be modified. Hitherto, primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) have been tested and constrained with a number of cosmological observables, e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation, galaxy clustering and, more recently, weak gravitational lensing. Here, we explore the constraining potential of the density fluctuation bias induced by gravitational lensing magnification onto the galaxy-galaxy angular power spectrum. Such an effect is known as magnification bias. Compared to the usual galaxy clustering approach, magnification bias helps in lifting the pathological degeneracy present amongst power spectrum normalisation and galaxy bias. This is because magnification bias cross-correlates galaxy number density fluctuations of nearby objects with weak lensing distortions of high-redshift sources. Thus, it takes advantage of the gravitational deflection of light, which is insensitive to galaxy bias but powerful in constraining the density fluctuation amplitude. To scrutinise the potentiality of this method, we adopt a deep and wide-field spectroscopic galaxy survey. We show that magnification bias does contain important information on primordial magnetism, which will be useful in combination with galaxy clustering and shear. We find we shall be able to rule out at 95.4% CL amplitudes of PMFs larger than 5 × 10-4 nG for values of the PMF power spectral index nB ~ 0.

  1. Solar energetic particles as probes of the structures of magnetic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    Two possible closed magnetic topologies are considered for clouds: an elongated bottle with field lines rooted at both ends in the sun and a magnetic bubble or plasmoid consisting of closed field lines. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are used as probes of the cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to clouds in many events indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun.

  2. Solar energetic particles as probes of the structures of magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Reames, D. V.

    1990-01-01

    Two possible closed magnetic topologies are considered for clouds: an elongated bottle with field lines rooted at both ends in the sun and a magnetic bubble or plasmoid consisting of closed field lines. Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are used as probes of the cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to clouds in many events indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the sun.

  3. Magnetic and Pressure Probes on the HyperV Contoured Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2008-11-01

    Magnetic and pressure data from several contoured-gap coaxial railguns is presented. These plasma guns use an injected plasma annulus and shaped inner and outer electrodes to mitigate the blow-by instability. Passive magnetic probes and photodiodes search for evidence of the blow-by instability and azimuthal asymmetries. Stagnation pressure and velocity are compared for different size guns and for different driving voltages and currents.

  4. Matched dipole probe for magnetized low electron density laboratory plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, a diagnostic method for magnetized and unmagnetized laboratory plasma is proposed, based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole. The range of the measured electron densities is limited to low density plasmas (10{sup 12}–10{sup 15 }m{sup −3}), where other diagnostic methods have strong limitations on the magnetic field strength and topology, plasma dimensions, and boundary conditions. The method is designed for use in both large- and small-dimension plasma (<10 cm) without or with strong non-homogeneous magnetic field, which can be undefined within the probe size. The design of a matched dipole probe allows to suppress the sheath resonance effects and to reach high sensitivity at relatively small probe dimensions. Validation experiments are conducted in both magnetized (B ∼ 170 G) and unmagnetized (B = 0) low density (7 × 10{sup 12 }m{sup −3}–7 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3}) low pressure (1 mTorr) 10 cm scale plasmas. The experimentally measured data show very good agreement with an analytical theory both for a non-magnetized and a magnetized case. The electron density measured by the matched dipole and Langmuir probes in the range of 7 × 10{sup 12 }m{sup −3}–7 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3} show less than 30% difference. An experimentally measured tolerance/uncertainty of the dipole probe method is estimated to ±1% for plasma densities above 2 × 10{sup 13 }m{sup −3}. A spatial resolution is estimated from the experiments to be about 3d, where d is the dipole diameter. The diagnostic method is also validated by comparing the measured plasma impedance curves with results of analytical modelling.

  5. Probing correlations of early magnetic fields using μ-distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Ganc, Jonathan; Sloth, Martin S. E-mail: sloth@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2014-08-01

    The damping of a non-uniform magnetic field between the redshifts of about 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} injects energy into the photon-baryon plasma and causes the CMB to deviate from a perfect blackbody spectrum, producing a so-called μ-distortion. We can calculate the correlation (μ T) of this distortion with the temperature anisotropy T of the CMB to search for a correlation ( B{sup 2}ζ) between the magnetic field B and the curvature perturbation ζ; knowing the ( B{sup 2}ζ) correlation would help us distinguish between different models of magnetogenesis. Since the perturbations which produce the μ-distortion will be much smaller scale than the relevant density perturbations, the observation of this correlation is sensitive to the squeezed limit of ( B{sup 2}ζ), which is naturally parameterized by b{sub NL} (a parameter defined analogously to f{sub NL}). We find that a PIXIE-like CMB experiments has a signal to noise S/N≈ 1.0 × b{sub NL} ( B-tilde {sub μ}/10nG){sup 2}, where B-tilde {sub μ} is the magnetic field's strength on μ-distortion scales normalized to today's redshift; thus, a 10 nG field would be detectable with b{sub NL}=O(1). However, if the field is of inflationary origin, we generically expect it to be accompanied by a curvature bispectrum (ζ{sup 3}) induced by the magnetic field. For sufficiently small magnetic fields, the signal ( B{sup 2} ζ) will dominate, but for B-tilde {sub μ}∼> 1 nG, one would have to consider the specifics of the inflationary magnetogenesis model. We also discuss the potential post-magnetogenesis sources of a ( B{sup 2}ζ) correlation and explain why there will be no contribution from the evolution of the magnetic field in response to the curvature perturbation.

  6. Detection of Rifampicin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Padlock Probes and Magnetic Nanobead-Based Readout

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Anna; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Strømme, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Control of the global epidemic tuberculosis is severely hampered by the emergence of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Molecular methods offer a more rapid means of characterizing resistant strains than phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. We have developed a molecular method for detection of rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis based on padlock probes and magnetic nanobeads. Padlock probes were designed to target the most common mutations associated with rifampicin resistance in M. tuberculosis, i.e. at codons 516, 526 and 531 in the gene rpoB. For detection of the wild type sequence at all three codons simultaneously, a padlock probe and two gap-fill oligonucleotides were used in a novel assay configuration, requiring three ligation events for circularization. The assay also includes a probe for identification of the M. tuberculosis complex. Circularized probes were amplified by rolling circle amplification. Amplification products were coupled to oligonucleotide-conjugated magnetic nanobeads and detected by measuring the frequency-dependent magnetic response of the beads using a portable AC susceptometer. PMID:23630621

  7. Probe measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic field structure in a rotating magnetic field sustained field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2014-01-15

    A translatable three-axis probe was constructed and installed on the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) experiment. With ninety windings, the probe can simultaneously measure B{sub r}, B{sub θ}, and B{sub z} at 30 radial positions, and can be placed at any desired axial position within the field reversed configuration (FRC) confinement chamber. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Measurements were made for odd-parity rotating magnetic field (RMF) antennas and even-parity RMF. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Comparisons will be made to the 3D magnetic structure predicted by NIMROD simulations, with parameters adjusted to match that of the TCSU experiments. The probe provides sufficient data to utilize a Maxwell stress tensor approach to directly measure the torque applied to the FRC's electrons, which combined with a resistive torque model, yields an estimate of the average FRC resistivity.

  8. Magnetic Spin Relaxation Probed with Sweep Speed Dependent Coercivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gredig, Thomas; Byrne, Matthew

    The magnetic spin relaxation of finite-length iron chains has been investigated in iron phthalocyanine thin films by means of sweep speed dependence on magnetic coercivity. The Fe(II) ions are embedded in a carbon matrix and molecules self-assemble during vacuum sublimation, so that the Fe(II) cores form well-separated chains of 1.3 nm and tunable chain lengths within the polycrystalline thin film. The average length of the chains is controlled through deposition variables and ranges from 30 nm to 300 nm. The coercivity strongly increases with chain length in this regime. This may be an interesting experimental realization of a low-dimensional finite-sized Ising model. The coercivity dependence on chain length and sweep speed is described with an Ising model based on Glauber dynamics. Research support from NSF under Grant DMR 0847552.

  9. Probing soil and aquifer material porosity with nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinedi, Z. R.; Kabala, Z. J.; Skaggs, T. H.; Borchardt, D. B.; Lee, R. W. K.; Chang, A. C.

    1993-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation measurements were used to identify different characteristic porosity domains in soil and aquifer materials. The porosity distribution can be inferred from these measurements by a regularization method applicable to any nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation, or by an analytic method applicable only to multiexponential relaxations (D. Orazio et al., 1989). The porosity distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements strongly depends on the pore shape factor. For the Borden aquifer material, both the regularized and the analytic pore size distribution obtained from NMR relaxation measurements are consistent with those obtained by Ball et al. (1990) using Hg porosimetry and N2 adsorption. For the Eustis and the Webster soils, the measured porosity domains are qualitatively consistent with those expected based on their respective composition. Our findings suggest that due to the long time required to saturate fine pores, NMR measurements of porosity distribution that are collected at short saturation times are biased toward larger pore sizes.

  10. Low magnetic field dynamic nuclear polarization using a single-coil two-channel probe

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, D.M.; Augustine, M.P.; Pines, A.; Clarke, J. |

    1997-03-01

    We describe the design and construction of a single-coil, two-channel probe for the detection of low-field magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The high-frequency channel of the probe, which is used to saturate the electron spins, is tuned to the electron Larmor frequency, 75 MHz at 2.7 mT, and matched to 50 {Omega}. Low-field, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is detected through the second, low-frequency channel at frequencies {lt}1 MHz. The performance of the probe was tested by measuring the DNP of protons in a manganese (II) chloride solution at 2.7 mT. At the proton NMR frequency of 120 kHz, the signal amplitude was enhanced over the value without DNP by a factor of about 200. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Probing Solar Eruption by Tracking Magnetic Cavities and Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Johnson, J. R.; Moore, R. L.; Gibson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    A solar eruption is a tremendous explosion on the Sun that happens when energy stored in twisted (or distorted) magnetic fields is suddenly released. When this field is viewed along the axis of the twist in projection at the limb, e.g. in EUV or white-light coronal images, the outer portions of the pre-eruption magnetic structure sometimes appears as a region of weaker emission, called a "coronal cavity," surrounded by a brighter envelope. Often a chromospheric filament resides near the base of the cavity and parallel to the cavity's central axis. Typically, both the cavity and filament move outward from the Sun at the start of an eruption of the magnetic field in which the cavity and filament reside. Studying properties the cavities and filaments just prior to and during eruption can help constrain models that attempt to explain why and how the eruptions occur. In this study, we examined six different at-limb solar eruptions using images from the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). For four of these eruptions we observed both cavities and filaments, while for the remaining two eruptions, one had only a cavity and the other only a filament visible in EIT images. All six eruptions were in comparatively-quiet solar regions, with one in the neighborhood of the polar crown. We measured the height and velocities of the cavities and filaments just prior to and during the start of their fast-eruption onsets. Our results support that the filament and cavity are integral parts of a single large-scale erupting magnetic-field system. We examined whether the eruption-onset heights were correlated with the expected magnetic field strengths of the eruption-source regions, but no clear correlation was found. We discuss possible reasons for this lack of correlation, and we also discuss future research directions. The research performed was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AGS-1460767; J

  12. X-Ray Detected Magnetic Resonance: A Unique Probe of the Precession Dynamics of Orbital Magnetization Components

    PubMed Central

    Goulon, Jośe; Rogalev, Andrei; Goujon, Gérard; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Ben Youssef, Jamal; Gros, Claude; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Guilard, Roger

    2011-01-01

    X-ray Detected Magnetic Resonance (XDMR) is a novel spectroscopy in which X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) is used to probe the resonant precession of local magnetization components in a strong microwave pump field. We review the conceptual bases of XDMR and recast them in the general framework of the linear and nonlinear theories of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Emphasis is laid on the information content of XDMR spectra which offer a unique opportunity to disentangle the precession dynamics of spin and orbital magnetization components at given absorbing sites. For the sake of illustration, we focus on selected examples in which marked differences were found between FMR and XDMR spectra simultaneously recorded on ferrimagnetically ordered iron garnets. With pumping capabilities extended up to sub-THz frequencies, high-field XDMR should allow us to probe the precession of orbital magnetization components in paramagnetic organometallic complexes with large zero-field splitting. Even more challenging, we suggest that XDMR spectra might be recorded on selected antiferromagnetic crystals for which orbital magnetism is most often ignored in the absence of any supporting experimental evidence. PMID:22272105

  13. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10(-20) A m(2), respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  14. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10−20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  15. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10-20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution.

  16. Probing transmembrane mechanical coupling and cytomechanics using magnetic twisting cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    We recently developed a magnetic twisting cytometry technique that allows us to apply controlled mechanical stresses to specific cell surface receptors using ligand-coated ferromagnetic microbeads and to simultaneously measure the mechanical response in living cells. Using this technique, we have previously shown the following: (i) beta 1 integrin receptors mediate mechanical force transfer across the cell surface and to the cytoskeleton, whereas other transmembrane receptors (e.g., scavenger receptors) do not; (ii) cytoskeletal stiffness increases in direct proportion to the level of stress applied to integrins; and (iii) the slope of this linear stiffening response differs depending on the shape of the cell. We now show that different integrins (beta 1, alpha V beta 3, alpha V, alpha 5, alpha 2) and other transmembrane receptors (scavenger receptor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) differ in their ability to mediate force transfer across the cell surface. In addition, the linear stiffening behavior previously observed in endothelial cells was found to be shared by other cell types. Finally, we demonstrate that dynamic changes in cell shape that occur during both cell spreading and retraction are accompanied by coordinate changes in cytoskeletal stiffness. Taken together, these results suggest that the magnetic twisting cytometry technique may be a powerful and versatile tool for studies analyzing the molecular basis of transmembrane mechanical coupling to the cytoskeleton as well as dynamic relations between changes in cytoskeletal structure and alterations in cell form and function.

  17. Homogeneous Protein Analysis by Magnetic Core-Shell Nanorod Probes.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Altantzis, Thomas; Bals, Sara; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-04-13

    Studying protein interactions is of vital importance both to fundamental biology research and to medical applications. Here, we report on the experimental proof of a universally applicable label-free homogeneous platform for rapid protein analysis. It is based on optically detecting changes in the rotational dynamics of magnetically agitated core-shell nanorods upon their specific interaction with proteins. By adjusting the excitation frequency, we are able to optimize the measurement signal for each analyte protein size. In addition, due to the locking of the optical signal to the magnetic excitation frequency, background signals are suppressed, thus allowing exclusive studies of processes at the nanoprobe surface only. We study target proteins (soluble domain of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 - sHER2) specifically binding to antibodies (trastuzumab) immobilized on the surface of our nanoprobes and demonstrate direct deduction of their respective sizes. Additionally, we examine the dependence of our measurement signal on the concentration of the analyte protein, and deduce a minimally detectable sHER2 concentration of 440 pM. For our homogeneous measurement platform, good dispersion stability of the applied nanoprobes under physiological conditions is of vital importance. To that end, we support our measurement data by theoretical modeling of the total particle-particle interaction energies. The successful implementation of our platform offers scope for applications in biomarker-based diagnostics as well as for answering basic biology questions. PMID:27023370

  18. HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLENOID COIL NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE PROBE FOR SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET SPECTROMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A broadband probe having a tuning range of 20 to 65 MHz has been designed and built specifically to give maximum sensitivity per unit volume of sample. This is accomplished through use of a solenoid rf coil instead of the usual Helmholtz coil found in commercial probes for superc...

  19. Magnetic Anisotropy of Maghemite Nanoparticles Probed by RF Transverse Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A. I.; Bartolomé, J.; García, L. M.; Bartolomé, F.; Arauzo, A.; Millán, A.; Palacio, F.

    We present radio frequency magnetic transverse susceptibility measurements on γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, which yield an estimation of their effective anisotropy constant, Keff as a function of nanoparticle size. The resulting values range from 4 to 8 × 104 erg/cm3, being on the order of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in bulk maghemite. Keff values increase as the particle diameter increases. Evidences of anisotropy field distribution given by the size distribution in the samples, and interparticle interactions that increase as the particle size increases, are also observed in the TS measurements. The effects of such interparticle interaction overcome those of thermal fluctuations, in contrast with the behavior of other iron oxide particles.

  20. SPIN POLARIZED PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY AS A PROBE OF MAGNETIC SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, P.D.; GUNTHERODT, G.

    2006-11-01

    Spin-polarized photoelectron spectroscopy has developed into a versatile tool for the study of surface and thin film magnetism. In this chapter, we examine the methodology of the technique and its recent application to a number of different problems. We first examine the photoemission process itself followed by a detailed review of spin-polarization measurement techniques and the related experimental requirements. We review studies of spin polarized surface states, interface states and quantum well states followed by studies of the technologically important oxide systems including half-metallic transition metal oxides, ferromagnet/oxide interfaces and the antiferromagnetic cuprates that exhibit high Tc Superconductivity. We also discuss the application of high-resolution photoemission with spin resolving capabilities to the study of spin dependent self energy effects.

  1. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Buendía, A.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.; Azpeitia, J.; Luccas, R. F.; Munuera, C.; García-Hernandez, M.; and others

    2015-01-15

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi{sub 2}Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert.

  2. Scanned probe imaging of nanoscale magnetism at cryogenic temperatures with a single-spin quantum sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Jenkins, Alec; Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Reetz, Christopher; Emmanuelidu, Eve; Ni, Ni; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) defect in diamond has emerged as a promising candidate for high resolution magnetic imaging based on its atomic size and quantum-limited sensing capabilities afforded by long spin coherence times. Although the NV center has been successfully implemented as a nanoscale scanning magnetic probe at room temperature, it has remained an outstanding challenge to extend this capability to cryogenic temperatures, where many solid-state systems exhibit non-trivial magnetic order. In this talk, we present NV magnetic imaging at T = 6 K, first benchmarking the technique with a magnetic hard disk sample, then utilizing the technique to image vortices in the iron pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 with Tc = 30 K. In addition, we discuss other candidate solid-state systems that can benefit from the high spatial resolution and field sensitivity of the scanning NV magnetometer.

  3. Magnetic field measurement of superconducting dipolemagnets with harmonic coil and Hall probe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Hirotaka; Kabe, Atsushi; Terashima, Akio

    1996-12-31

    Magnetic field measurements and field analyses of 1-m long superconducting dipole magnets fabricated at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK) have been carried out using a harmonic coil with the bucking scheme. Conditions of the data acquisition are optimized to achieve the accurate and efficient measurements. Not only in the steady state of the magnet excitation by constant currents, but also on the way the excite current increases until the magnet quenches the field measurements have been tried, and the results are discussed in this paper on the possibility of the {open_quotes}on-the-fly{close_quotes} measurement using a harmonic coil. Some results on the so-called remnant field of the magnets measured with a Hall probe are also described.

  4. Three axis vector magnet set-up for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, J A; Herrera, E; Guillamón, I; Azpeitia, J; Luccas, R F; Munuera, C; Cuenca, M; Higuera, J A; Díaz, N; Pazos, M; García-Hernandez, M; Buendía, A; Vieira, S; Suderow, H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three axis vector magnet system for cryogenic scanning probe microscopy measurements. We discuss the magnet support system and the power supply, consisting of a compact three way 100 A current source. We obtain tilted magnetic fields in all directions with maximum value of 5T along z-axis and of 1.2T for XY-plane magnetic fields. We describe a scanning tunneling microscopy-spectroscopy (STM-STS) set-up, operating in a dilution refrigerator, which includes a new high voltage ultralow noise piezodrive electronics and discuss the noise level due to vibrations. STM images and STS maps show atomic resolution and the tilted vortex lattice at 150 mK in the superconductor β-Bi2Pd. We observe a strongly elongated hexagonal lattice, which corresponds to the projection of the tilted hexagonal vortex lattice on the surface. We also discuss Magnetic Force Microscopy images in a variable temperature insert. PMID:25638089

  5. Batch-fabrication of cantilevered magnets on attonewton-sensitivity mechanical oscillators for scanned-probe nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Steven A.; Moore, Eric W.; Lee, SangGap; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Wright, Sarah J.; Harrell, Lee E.; Marohn, John A.

    2015-01-01

    We have batch-fabricated cantilevers with ~100 nm diameter nickel nanorod tips and force sensitivities of a few attonewtons at 4.2 kelvin. The magnetic nanorods were engineered to overhang the leading edge of the cantilever and, consequently, the cantilevers experience what we believe is the lowest surface noise ever achieved in a scanned probe experiment. Cantilever magnetometry indicated that the tips were well magnetized, with a ≤ 20 nm dead layer; the composition of the dead layer was studied by electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In what we believe is the first demonstration of scanned probe detection of electron-spin resonance from a batch fabricated tip, the cantilevers were used to observe electron-spin resonance from nitroxide spin labels in a film via force-gradient-induced shifts in cantilever resonance frequency. The magnetic field dependence of the magnetic resonance signal suggests a non-uniform tip magnetization at an applied field near 0.6 T. PMID:21082863

  6. DIII-D Equilibrium Reconstructions with New 3D Magnetic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Lang; Strait, E. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; Ferron, J. R.; King, J. D.; Lee, X.; Meneghini, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Huang, Y.; Qian, J. G.; Wingen, A.

    2015-11-01

    DIII-D equilibrium reconstructions with the recently installed new 3D magnetic diagnostic are presented. In addition to providing information to allow more accurate 2D reconstructions, the new 3D probes also provide useful information to guide computation of 3D perturbed equilibria. A new more comprehensive magnetic compensation has been implemented. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria making use of the new 3D probes and plasma responses from 3D MHD codes such as GATO and M3D-C1. To improve the computation efficiency, all inactive probes in one of the toroidal planes in EFIT have been replaced with new probes from other planes. Other 3D efforts include testing of 3D reconstructions using V3FIT and a new 3D variational moment equilibrium code VMOM3D. Other EFIT developments include a GPU EFIT version and new safety factor and MSE-LS constraints. The accuracy and limitation of the new probes for 3D reconstructions will be discussed. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  7. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2006-01-15

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10{sup -4} Pa Xe (3.3x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) to 1.1x10{sup -3} Pa Xe (8.4x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures.

  8. Probing DNA Helicase Kinetics with Temperature‐Controlled Magnetic Tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Gollnick, Benjamin; Carrasco, Carolina; Zuttion, Francesca; Gilhooly, Neville S.; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Motor protein functions like adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis or translocation along molecular substrates take place at nanometric scales and consequently depend on the amount of available thermal energy. The associated rates can hence be investigated by actively varying the temperature conditions. In this article, a thermally controlled magnetic tweezers (MT) system for single‐molecule experiments at up to 40 °C is presented. Its compact thermostat module yields a precision of 0.1 °C and can in principle be tailored to any other surface‐coupled microscopy technique, such as tethered particle motion (TPM), nanopore‐based sensing of biomolecules, or super‐resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument is used to examine the temperature dependence of translocation along double‐stranded (ds)DNA by individual copies of the protein complex AddAB, a helicase‐nuclease motor involved in dsDNA break repair. Despite moderately lower mean velocities measured at sub‐saturating ATP concentrations, almost identical estimates of the enzymatic reaction barrier (around 21–24 k B T) are obtained by comparing results from MT and stopped‐flow bulk assays. Single‐molecule rates approach ensemble values at optimized chemical energy conditions near the motor, which can withstand opposing loads of up to 14 piconewtons (pN). Having proven its reliability, the temperature‐controlled MT described herein will eventually represent a routinely applied method within the toolbox for nano‐biotechnology. PMID:25400244

  9. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-15

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  10. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Doran D; Alexson, Dimitri A; Garbini, Joseph L

    2013-09-01

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner. PMID:24089869

  11. A 4 K cryogenic probe for use in magnetic resonance force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Doran D.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Garbini, Joseph L.

    2013-09-01

    The detailed design of a mechanically detected nuclear magnetic resonance probe using the SPAM (Springiness Preservation by Aligning Magnetization) geometry, operating at 4 K, in vacuum, and a several-Tesla magnetic field is described. The probe head is vibration-isolated well enough from the environment by a three-spring suspension system that the cantilever achieves thermal equilibrium with the environment without the aid of eddy current damping. The probe uses an ultra-soft Si cantilever with a Ni sphere attached to its tip, and magnetic resonance is registered as a change in the resonant frequency of the driven cantilever. The RF system uses frequency sweeps for adiabatic rapid passage using a 500 μm diameter RF coil wound around a sapphire rod. The RF coil and optical fiber of the interferometer used to sense the cantilever's position are both located with respect to the cantilever using a Garbini micropositioner, and the sample stage is mounted on an Attocube nanopositioner.

  12. Design and calibration of high-frequency magnetic probes for the SUNIST spherical tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangqing; Tan, Yi; Pan, Ou; Ke, Rui; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2014-11-01

    A new high-frequency magnetic diagnostic system is designed, installed, and calibrated in the Sino-United Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST) to investigate Alfvén waves (AWs). The system consists of a fixed toroidal array and a movable radial array of high-frequency magnetic probes (HFMPs) with 21 and 60 probes, respectively. Based on the method of vacuum enameled wire wound on ceramic bobbins, the fixed toroidal array is located as near as possible to the plasma and carefully shielded to reduce the attenuation of high-frequency magnetic field. Meanwhile, by using the technology of commercial chip inductors mounted on printed circuit boards, the movable radial array is inserted into a thin quartz tube that allows positioning along radial direction. A Helmholtz coil is utilized to calibrate the effective areas as well as the frequency response of each HFMP. The calibration results are consistent with the calculated results of an equivalent probe-and-cable circuit model. High-frequency magnetic signals related to AW are detected with these HFMPs. These HFMPs are expected to play a key role in analyzing Alfvén eigenmodes excited by AW antenna in the SUNIST. PMID:25430367

  13. Design and calibration of high-frequency magnetic probes for the SUNIST spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangqing; Tan, Yi; Pan, Ou; Ke, Rui; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2014-11-01

    A new high-frequency magnetic diagnostic system is designed, installed, and calibrated in the Sino-United Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST) to investigate Alfvén waves (AWs). The system consists of a fixed toroidal array and a movable radial array of high-frequency magnetic probes (HFMPs) with 21 and 60 probes, respectively. Based on the method of vacuum enameled wire wound on ceramic bobbins, the fixed toroidal array is located as near as possible to the plasma and carefully shielded to reduce the attenuation of high-frequency magnetic field. Meanwhile, by using the technology of commercial chip inductors mounted on printed circuit boards, the movable radial array is inserted into a thin quartz tube that allows positioning along radial direction. A Helmholtz coil is utilized to calibrate the effective areas as well as the frequency response of each HFMP. The calibration results are consistent with the calculated results of an equivalent probe-and-cable circuit model. High-frequency magnetic signals related to AW are detected with these HFMPs. These HFMPs are expected to play a key role in analyzing Alfvén eigenmodes excited by AW antenna in the SUNIST.

  14. Molecular magnetic resonance probe targeting VEGF165: preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    You, Xiao-Guang; Tu, Rong; Peng, Ming-Li; Bai, Yu-Jie; Tan, Mingqian; Li, Han-Jian; Guan, Jing; Wen, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    A new method for imaging the tumor human vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF 165) is presented. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probe was prepared by crosslinking ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles to the aptamer for tumor vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF165-aptamer). The molecular probe was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo activities toward VEGF165. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO nanoparticles conjugate specifically binds to VEGF165 in vitro. A cell proliferation test showed that VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO seems to block the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by free VEGF165, suggesting that VEGF165 is an effective target of this molecular probe. In xenograft mice carrying liver cancer that expresses VEGF165, T2-weighted imaging of the tumor displayed marked negative enhancement 3 h after the intravenous administration of VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO. The enhancement disappeared 6 h after administration of the probe. These results suggest the targeted imaging effect of VEGF165-aptamer-USPIO probe in vivo for VEGF165-expressing tumors. This is the first report of a targeted MRI molecular probe based on USPIO and VEGF165-aptamer. PMID:24729581

  15. Continuous Magnetic Field Monitoring Using Rapid Re-Excitation of NMR Probe Sets.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Benjamin E; Brunner, David O; Wilm, Bertram J; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-06-01

    MRI relies on static and spatially varying dynamic magnetic fields of high accuracy. NMR field probes permit the direct observation of spatiotemporal field dynamics for diverse purposes such as data correction, field control, sequence validation, and hardware characterization. However, due to probe signal decay and dephasing existing field cameras are limited in terms of readout duration and the extent of k -space that can be covered. The present work aims to overcome these limitations by the transition to short-lived NMR probes and rapid re-excitation. The proposed approach uses probes with T 2 so short that thermal relaxation dominates signal decay even in the presence of strongest gradients. They are integrated with transmit, receive and sequencing electronics that permit high-rate re-excitation with optional probe alternation as well as complementary RF pulse recording. The system is demonstrated by monitoring of sample MRI sequences with long readouts and large gradient moments. It is compared with the conventional long-lived probe concept and characterized in terms of net sensitivity and sources of systematic error. Continuous k -space trajectory mapping is demonstrated and validated by trajectory-based image reconstruction. PMID:26742126

  16. Rotating field eddy current probe for characterization of cracking in non-magnetic tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Capobianco, T.E.

    1998-07-01

    A rotating field eddy current probe was built and tested for use in small diameter, non-magnetic tubing. The rotating field probe is a driver/pickup style with two orthogonally wound drive coils and a pancake pickup coil. The driver coils are excited by two sine waves 90{degree} out of phase with each other. The physical arrangement of the drive coils and the 90{degree} phase shift of the excitation waveforms creates a field which rotates in the test piece under the drive coils. Preliminary tests on electrical discharge machined (EDM) notches show that phased based estimates of notch depth are possible. Probes currently used for detection of cracks in tubing produce responses that have proven unreliable for estimating defect depths. This recently developed version of the rotating field eddy current probe produces a bipolar response in the presence of a crack or a notch. Typically, the phase angle of a bipolar eddy current response is easily identified and measured and is used extensively for estimating depths of volumetric defects. Data are shown relating the phase angle of the rotating field probe`s bipolar response to the depth of circumferential EDM notches.

  17. Probing Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropy of Large-Diameter Armchair Carbon Nanotubes via Magnetic Linear Dichroism Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroz, Erik; Kono, Junichiro; Searles, Thomas; Tu, Xiaomin; Zheng, Ming; Fagan, Jeffrey; McGill, Stephen; Smirnov, Dmitry

    2012-02-01

    We studied magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, via magnetic linear dichroism spectroscopy, of aqueous suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes in high magnetic fields up to 22T using a unique magnet system (Split-Florida Helix magnet). Specifically, we measured magnetic susceptibility anisotropies, δχ, of several armchair species ranging from (5,5)-(13,13) at room temperature over an excitation wavelength range of 400-900 nm. For large diameter armchairs such as (12,12) and (13,13), we have observed some of the strongest alignment in a static magnetic field due to their large diameters. Results will be discussed in comparison with detailed calculations involving the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  18. CoMP linear polarization as a probe of coronal magnetic topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah; Bak-Steslicka, Urszula; de Toma, Giuliana; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Zhang, Mei

    2016-05-01

    New data from HAO’s Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) have allowed us for the first time to obtain daily polarimetric observations of the solar atmosphere, providing unique constraints on coronal magnetic models. However, due to the relatively-small size of the telescope, polarization observations are currently limited to linear polarization measurements, which depend upon the plane-of-sky magnetic field direction but not its magnitude. Despite this limitation, and despite the fact that the linearly polarized light measured is optically thin and so integrated over the line of sight, CoMP linear polarization has proved useful as a probe of a range of magnetic topologies. In particular, we will use forward modeling in comparison to CoMP data to show how linear polarization diagnoses magnetic flux ropes, null points, pseudostreamers, non-radial expansion factor, and solar cycle evolution.

  19. A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of group IV clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Weiping

    The clathrates feature large cages of silicon, germanium, or tin, with guest atoms in the cage centers. The group IV clathrates are interesting because of their thermoelectric efficiency, and their glasslike thermal conductivity at low temperatures. Clathrates show a variety of properties, and the motion of cage center atoms is not well understood. In Sr8Ga16Ge30, we found that the slow atomic motion in the order 10-5 s is present in this system, which is much slower than what would be expected for standard atomic dynamics. NMR studies of Sr8Ga16Ge30 showed that Knight shift and T1 results are consistent with low density metallic behavior. The lineshapes exhibit changes consistent with motional narrowing at low temperatures, and this indicates unusually slow hopping rates. To further investigate this behavior, we made a series of measurements using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR sequence. Fitting the results to a hopping model yielded an activation energy of 4.6 K. We can understand all of our observations in terms of non-resonant atomic tunneling between asymmetric sites within the cages, in the presence of disorder. For Ba8Ga16Ge30, the relaxation behavior (T1) deviates from the Korringa relation, and the Knight shift and linewidth change with temperature. Those results could be explained by carrier freezout, and the development of a dilute set of magnetic moments due to these localized carriers. For Ba8Ga 16Ge30 samples made from Ga flux, we observed different T1 and Knight shift behavior as compared to n type material. This is due to the differences in carrier type among these different samples. The p type sample has a smaller Knight shift and a slower relaxation rate than n type samples made with the stoichiometric ratio, which is consistent with a change in orbital symmetry between the conduction and valence bands. WDS study for Ba8Al10Ge36 showed the existence of vacancies in the Al-deficient samples, which results in some degree of ordering of Al

  20. Sensor probes and phantoms for advanced transcranial magnetic stimulation system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Patel, Prashil; Trivedi, Sudhir; Du, Xiaoming; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become one of the most widely used noninvasive method for brain tissue stimulation and has been used as a treatment tool for various neurological and psychiatric disorders including migraine, stroke, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, tinnitus and depression. In the process of developing advanced TMS deep brain stimulation tools, we need first to develop field measurement devices like sensory probes and brain phantoms, which can be used to calibrate the TMS systems. Currently there are commercially available DC magnetic or electric filed measurement sensors, but there is no instrument to measure transient fields. In our study, we used a commercial figure-8 shaped TMS coil to generate transient magnetic field and followed induced field and current. The coil was driven by power amplified signal from a pulse generator with tunable pulse rate, amplitude, and duration. In order to obtain a 3D plot of induced vector electric field, many types of probes were designed to detect single component of electric-field vectors along x, y and z axis in the space around TMS coil. We found that resistor probes has an optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) near 3k ohm but it signal output is too weak compared with other techniques. We also found that inductor probes can have very high output for Curl E measurement, but it is not the E-field distribution we are interested in. Probes with electrical wire wrapped around iron coil can directly measure induced E-field with high sensitivity, which matched computer simulation results.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic mode identification from magnetic probe signals via a matched filter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, Dana H.; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bogatu, Ioan N.; Humphreys, David A.; Turnbull, Alan D.

    2002-04-01

    A matched filter analysis has been developed to identify the amplitude and phase of magnetohydrodynamic modes in DIII-D tokamak plasmas using magnetic probe signals (δBp). As opposed to conventional Fourier spatial analysis of toroidally spaced probes, this analysis includes data from both toroidally and poloidally spaced magnetic probe arrays. Using additional probes both improves the statistics of the analysis and more importantly incorporates poloidal information into the mode analysis. The matched filter is a numeric filter that matches signals from the magnetic probes with numerically predicted signals for the mode. The numerical predictions are developed using EFIT equilibrium reconstruction data as input to the stability code GATO and the vacuum field code VACUUM. Changes is the plasma equilibrium that occur on the same time scale as the mode are taken into account by modeling simple matched filter vectors corresponding to changes in total plasma current, plus vertical and horizontal plasma shifts. The matched filter method works well when there is good understanding of a mode and good modeling of its structure. Matched filter analysis results for a fast growing ideal kink mode, where equilibrium change effects are minimal, show the effectiveness of this method. A slow growing resistive-wall mode (RWM) is also analyzed using the matched filter method. The method gives good results for identifying the amplitude and phase of the RWM but the simple equilibrium vectors are insufficient for complete elimination of equilibrium changes on this time scale. An analysis of the computational requirements of the scheme indicates that real-time application of the matched filter for RWM identification will be possible.

  2. Intraluminal magnetisation of bowel by ferromagnetic particles for retraction and manipulation by magnetic probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; André, P; McLean, D; Brown, S I; Florence, G J; Cuschieri, A

    2014-11-01

    Feasibility studies are needed to demonstrate that safe and effective manipulation of bowel during Minimal Access Surgery (MAS) can be obtained by use of magnetic force. This paper characterises two classes of magnetic particles: stainless steel microparticles (SS-μPs) and iron oxide nanoparticles (IO-nPs) in terms of their magnetisation, chemical composition, crystallinity, morphology and size distribution. Both magnetic particles were dispersed in a high viscosity biological liquid for intraluminal injection of bowel. Ex vivo porcine bowel segments were then retracted by permanent magnetic probes of 5.0 and 10mm diameter. Strong retraction forces reaching 6N maximum were obtained by magnetic fluid based on dispersion of SS-μPs. In contrast, the IO-nP-based magnetic liquid generated less attraction force, due to both lower magnetic and solution properties of the IO-nPs. The comparison of the two particles allowed the identification of the rules to engineer the next generation of particles. The results with SS-μPs provide proof on concept that intraluminal injection of magnetic fluid can generate sufficient force for efficient bowel retraction. Thereafter we shall carry out in vivo animal studies for efficacy and safety of both types of ferrofluids. PMID:25169469

  3. Dust as In-Situ Probes for Plasma Magnetic Field Interactions in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    A series of experiments were conducted inside a GEC rf reference cell to map the forces in three dimensions above a magnet placed in a dusty plasma and employing both horizontal and vertical orientations. Micron sized dust particles were used as in-situ probes to investigate the interaction between the low-temperature plasma produced and a magnetic field close to a non-conductive surface. Dust particles were dropped into the plasma where they obtained a negative charge leading to trajectories, which were strongly influenced by both electric and ion drag forces. By recording the trajectories of the particles, which were illuminated by a vertical laser plane, the forces onto the particles were determined. A strong influence of the magnetic field onto the plasma sheath was observed. Given the electrons are strongly magnetized by the magnet while ions remain comparatively unaffected by the magnet a charge separation takes place, which leads to strong electric fields. As a result the sheath thickness varies significantly within the magnetic field, showing strong horizontal force components. Based on these observations, analogies to the interaction of the lunar plasma with known lunar magnetic anomalies will be drawn to contribute to the explanation of the formation of lunar swirls.

  4. Rotational shear near the solar surface as a probe for subphotospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2016-05-01

    Helioseismology revealed an increase in the rotation rate with depth just beneath the solar surface. The relative magnitude of the radial shear is almost constant with latitude. This rotational state can be interpreted as a consequence of two conditions characteristic of the near-surface convection: the smallness of convective turnover time in comparison with the rotation period and absence of a horizontal preferred direction of convection anisotropy. The latter condition is violated in the presence of a magnetic field. This raises the question of whether the subphotospheric fields can be probed with measurements of near-surface rotational shear. The shear is shown to be weakly sensitive to magnetic fields but can serve as a probe for sufficiently strong fields of the order of one kilogauss. It is suggested that the radial differential rotation in extended convective envelopes of red giants is of the same origin as the near-surface rotational shear of the Sun.

  5. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strongmore » as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.« less

  6. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strong as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.

  7. Langmuir probe data analysis for a magnetized inductive radio-frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, S.; Ohtsu, Y.; Fujita, H.

    2007-11-01

    The properties of an inductively coupled argon plasma in a uniform magnetic field, at pressures of the order of 0.1 Pa, in the presence of a weak current-free electric double layer, are measured with a plane Langmuir probe. The static current-voltage probe characteristics, recorded on the symmetry axis of the experimental device, both in the plasma source and in the main chamber of the setup, showed the existence of two electron populations with different temperatures. The axial profiles of plasma parameters, such as the plasma potential and the cold and hot electron temperatures, offered a new insight into such a complex system. However, both the external magnetic field and the two electron populations contribute to the difficulty of calculation of the local plasma density. A method for solving this problem, involving the definition of an effective electron temperature, is also presented.

  8. InAs Micro-Hall Probes for Local Magnetic Measurements in Superconducting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugel, E.; Shung, E.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Watkins, S. P.

    1997-03-01

    High field sensitivity, a linear field response, minimal temperature dependence, and stability upon thermal cycling are essential for local magnetization measurements at low temperature (mK-10K) and fields above 1T. This regime is not accessible by the GaAs Hall probes conventionally used in high-Tc superconductor measurements. We show that thin film (.1 μm) InAs grown epitaxially on GaAs serves as an ideal candidate for a micro-Hall probe in this low temperature, high field regime, with minimal temperature dependence at low temperatures (2-50K), sensitivity of 16Ω/T and superb thermal cycling (from mK-300K). We apply this novel technology to the measurement of local magnetization relaxation in high-Tc superconductors.

  9. Development of internal magnetic probe for current density profile measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, J. W.; Jung, B. K.; Chung, K. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    An internal magnetic probe using Hall sensors to measure a current density profile directly with perturbation of less than 10% to the plasma current is successfully operated for the first time in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). An appropriate Hall sensor is chosen to produce sufficient signals for VEST magnetic field while maintaining the small size of 10 mm in outer diameter. Temperature around the Hall sensor in a typical VEST plasma is regulated by blown air of 2 bars. First measurement of 60 kA VEST ohmic discharge shows a reasonable agreement with the total plasma current measured by Rogowski coil in VEST.

  10. Magnetic domain-wall motion twisted by nanoscale probe-induced spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Xie, L. S.; Wang, C. S.; Zhang, H. Z.; Shu, L.; Bai, J.; Chai, Y. S.; Zhao, X.; Nie, J. C.; Cao, C. B.; Gu, C. Z.; Xiong, C. M.; Sun, Y.; Shi, J.; Salahuddin, S.; Xia, K.; Nan, C. W.; Zhang, J. X.

    2014-12-01

    A method for deterministic control of magnetism using an electrical stimulus is highly desired for the new generation of magnetoelectronic devices. Much effort has been focused on magnetic domain-wall (DW) motion manipulated by a successive injection of spin-polarized current into a magnetic nanostructure. However, an integrant high-threshold current density of 1011˜1012A /m2 inhibits the integration with low-energy-cost technology. Here, we report an approach to manipulate a single magnetic domain wall with a perpendicular anisotropy in a manganite/dielectric/metal capacitor using a probe-induced spin displacement. A spin-transfer torque (STT) occurs in the strongly correlated manganite film during the spin injection into the capacitor from the nanoscale magnetized tip with an ultralow voltage of 0.1 V, where a lower bound of the estimated threshold spin-polarized current density is ˜108A /m2 at the tip/manganite interface. The dynamic of DW motions are analyzed using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert method. This probe-voltage-controlled DW motion, at an ambient condition, demonstrates a critical framework for the fundamental understanding of the manipulation of the nanomagnet systems with low-energy consumption.

  11. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotkevych, V. V.; Milošević, M. V.; Bending, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial H3e-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6×6×7 mm3 space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields ⩾10 mG/Hz1/2. The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature.

  12. A scanning Hall probe microscope for high resolution magnetic imaging down to 300 mK

    SciTech Connect

    Khotkevych, V. V.; Bending, S. J.; Milosevic, M. V.

    2008-12-15

    We present the design, construction, and performance of a low-temperature scanning Hall probe microscope with submicron lateral resolution and a large scanning range. The detachable microscope head is mounted on the cold flange of a commercial {sup 3}He-refrigerator (Oxford Instruments, Heliox VT-50) and operates between room temperature and 300 mK. It is fitted with a three-axis slip-stick nanopositioner that enables precise in situ adjustment of the probe location within a 6x6x7 mm{sup 3} space. The local magnetic induction at the sample surface is mapped with an easily changeable microfabricated Hall probe [typically GsAs/AlGaAs or AlGaAs/InGaAs/GaAs Hall sensors with integrated scanning tunnel microscopy (STM) tunneling tips] and can achieve minimum detectable fields {>=}10 mG/Hz{sup 1/2}. The Hall probe is brought into very close proximity to the sample surface by sensing and controlling tunnel currents at the integrated STM tip. The instrument is capable of simultaneous tunneling and Hall signal acquisition in surface-tracking mode. We illustrate the potential of the system with images of superconducting vortices at the surface of a Nb thin film down to 372 mK, and also of labyrinth magnetic-domain patterns of an yttrium iron garnet film captured at room temperature.

  13. Using superlattice potentials to probe long-range magnetic correlations in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Kim G. L.; Andersen, Brian M.; Bruun, Georg M.; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2015-12-01

    We previously proposed [K. G. L. Pedersen, B. M. Andersen, G. M. Bruun, O. F. Syljuåsen, and A. S. Sørensen, Phys. Rev. A 84, 041603 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.041603] a method to utilize a temporally dependent superlattice potential to mediate spin-selective transport and thereby probe long- and short-range magnetic correlations in optical lattices. Specifically, this can be used for detecting antiferromagnetic ordering in repulsive fermionic optical lattice systems, but more generally it can serve as a means of directly probing correlations among the atoms by measuring the mean value of an observable, the number of double occupied sites. Here we provide a detailed investigation of the physical processes that limit the effectiveness of this "conveyer belt method." Furthermore, we propose a simple way to improve the procedure, resulting in an essentially perfect (error-free) probing of the magnetic correlations. These results shows that suitably constructed superlattices constitute a promising way of manipulating atoms of different spin species as well as probing their interactions.

  14. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T1-T2 and diffusion-T2), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  15. Probing the magnetic topologies of magnetic clouds by means of solar energetic particles. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S.W.; Reames, D.V.

    1991-06-01

    Magnetic clouds are large (<0.25 AU) interplanetary regions with topologies consistent with those of magnetic loops. They are of interest because they may be an interplanetary signature of coronal mass ejections. Clouds have been identified in solar wind data by their magnetic properties and by the presence of bidirectional particle fluxes. Two possible closed magnetic topologies have been considered for clouds: (1) an elongated bottle with field lines rooted at both ends in the Sun and (2) a detached magnetic bubble or plasmoid consisting of closed field lines. The inferred topologies are also consistent with open field lines that converge beyond 1 AU. We have used solar energetic particles (SEPs) as probes of the cloud topologies. The rapid access of SEPs to the interiors of many clouds indicates that the cloud field lines extend back to the Sun and hence are not plasmoids. The small modulation of galactic cosmic rays associated with clouds also suggests that the magnetic fields of clouds are not closed.

  16. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  17. Probing cellular traction forces with magnetic nanowires and microfabricated force sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the use of magnetic nanowires for the study of cellular response to force is demonstrated. High-aspect ratio Ni rods with diameter 300 nm and lengths up to 20 μm were bound to or internalized by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on arrays of flexible micropost force sensors. Forces and torques were applied to the cells by driving the nanowires with AC magnetic fields in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, and the changes in cellular contractile forces were recorded with the microposts. These local stimulations yield global force reinforcement of the cells’ traction forces, but this contractile reinforcement can be effectively suppressed upon addition of a calcium channel blocker, ruthenium red, suggesting the role of calcium channels in the mechanical response. The responsiveness of the SMCs to actuation depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation. These results show that the combination of magnetic nanoparticles and micropatterned, flexible substrates can provide new approaches to the study of cellular mechanotransduction.

  18. Si nanowire probe with Nd-Fe-B magnet for attonewton-scale force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yong-Jun; Toda, Masaya; Ono, Takahito

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we have developed a 210 nm-wide and 32 µm-long silicon nanowire probe with a silicon mirror using a silicon-on-insulator wafer in order to improve sensitivity of force detection for magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). Additionally, a Nd-Fe-B magnet has been integrated at the end of the nanowire. The fabricated nanowire probe shows a resonance frequency of 11.256 kHz and a factor of 12 800 after annealing at 800 °C for 2 h in forming gas. The probe exhibits attonewton sensitivity, and the measurement of force mapping based on electron spin resonance is demonstrated for 3D imaging of radicals. The detected force and magnetic field gradient are approximately 82 aN and ~70.1 G μm-1 at room temperature. The radical density is calculated as 4.6  ×  1018 spins cm-3.

  19. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compressionmore » and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.« less

  20. PROBING THE LARGE-SCALE TOPOLOGY OF THE HELIOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD USING JOVIAN ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, M. J.; Horbury, T. S.; Arge, C. N.

    2010-05-10

    Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a point source of near-relativistic electrons within the heliosphere. In this study, three solar cycles of Jovian electron data in near-Earth space are examined. Jovian electron intensity is found to peak for an ideal Parker spiral connection, but with considerable spread about this point. Assuming the peak in Jovian electron counts indicates the best magnetic connection to Jupiter, we find a clear trend for fast and slow solar wind to be over- and under-wound with respect to the ideal Parker spiral, respectively. This is shown to be well explained in terms of solar wind stream interactions. Thus, modulation of Jovian electrons by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) may primarily be the result of changing magnetic connection, rather than CIRs acting as barriers to cross-field diffusion. By using Jovian electrons to remote sensing magnetic connectivity with Jupiter's magnetosphere, we suggest that they provide a means to validate solar wind models between 1 and 5 AU, even when suitable in situ solar wind observations are not available. Furthermore, using Jovian electron observations as probes of heliospheric magnetic topology could provide insight into heliospheric magnetic field braiding and turbulence, as well as any systematic under-winding of the heliospheric magnetic field relative to the Parker spiral from footpoint motion of the magnetic field.

  1. Preparation of magnetic resonance probes using one-pot method for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, You-Wei; Chen, Zheng-Guang; Zhao, Zhou-She; Li, Hong-Li; Wang, Ji-Chen; Zhang, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To prepare the specific magnetic resonance (MR) probes for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using one-pot method. METHODS: The carboxylated dextran-coated nanoparticles were conjugated with anti-α-fetoprotein (anti-AFP) or anti-glypican 3 (anti-GPC3) antibodies through 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS)-mediated reaction to synthesize the probes. The physical and chemical properties of the probes were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering, and the relaxivity was compared to uncombined ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIONs) using a 1.5T clinical MR scanner. The binding efficiency of the antibodies to nanoparticles was measured with an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. In addition, the probes were incubated with targetable cells in vitro. RESULTS: The superparamagnetic MR probes (anti-GPC3-USPION probe and anti-AFP-USPION probe) were synthesized using one-pot method. Their mean hydrodynamic diameter was 47 nm with a broader slight size distribution. The coupling efficiency of carboxylated dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) with anti-GPC3 or anti-AFP antibody was 15.9% and 88.8%, respectively. Each of the USPIO nanoparticles may bind 3 GPC3 antibodies or 12 AFP antibodies. The statistical analysis showed no significance (P > 0.05) in shortening the T1 and T2 values when comparing the USPIO-AFP or USPIO-GPC3 to USPIO. Analysis of TEM images revealed that anti-GPC3-USPION probes and anti-AFP-USPION probes could specifically enter into the HepG2 cell by combining with the GPC3 receptors or AFP receptors, whereas the HepG2 cell sample incubated with USPIONs showed no or few nanoparticles in the cytoplasm. CONCLUSION: The synthesized probes using one-pot method can be used for in vitro experimental study and have potential clinical application in MR imaging for detection of hepatocellular carcinomas

  2. Probing magnetic properties of ferrofluids using temperature dependent magnetic hyperthermia studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemala, Humeshkar; Thakur, Jagdish; Naik, Vaman; Naik, Ratna

    2014-03-01

    Tuning the properties of magnetic nanoparticles is essential for biomedical and technological applications. An important phenomenon displayed by these nanoparticles is the generation of heat in the presence of an external oscillating magnetic field and is known as magnetic hyperthermia (MHT). The heat dissipation by the magnetic nanoparticles occurs via Neel relaxation (the flip of the internal magnetic moment of the nanoparticles) and Brownian relaxation (the physical rotation of the nanoparticles in the suspended media). Dextran coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized using the co-precipitation method and characterized using XRD, TEM and DC magnetometry measurements. Roughly spherical in shape the particles have an average size of 13nm and a saturation magnetization of 65 emu/g. The MHT properties of these nanoparticles suspended in a weakly basic solution (ferrofluid) have been investigated as a function of the frequency and amplitude of magnetic field by incorporating a complete thermodynamical analysis of the experimental set-up. The heat generation is quantified using the specific power loss (SPL) and compared with the predictions of linear response theory. This analysis sheds light on important physical and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles.

  3. Mechanical anisotropy and adaptation of metastatic cells probed by magnetic microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Shi, Yanhui; Jhiang, Sissy M.; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2010-02-01

    Metastatic cells have the ability to break through the basal lamina, enter the blood vessels, circulate through the vasculature, exit at distant sites, and form secondary tumors. This multi-step process, therefore, clearly indicates the inherent ability of metastatic cells to sense, process, and adapt to the mechanical forces in different surrounding environments. We describe a magnetic probing device that is useful in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells along arbitrary two-dimensional directions. Magnetic force, with the advantages of biocompatibility and specificity, was produced by magnetic poles placed in an octupole configuration and applied to fibronectin-coated magnetic microbeads attached on cell membrane. Cell deformation in response to the applied force was then recorded through the displacement of the microbeads. The motion of the beads was measured by computer processing the video images acquired by a high-speed CMOS camera. Rotating force vectors with constant magnitude while pointing to directions of all 360 degrees were applied to study the mechanical anisotropy of metastatic breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. The temporal changes in magnitude and directionality of the cellular responses were then analyzed to investigate the cellular adaptation to force stimulation. This probing technology thus has the potential to provide us a better understanding of the mechano-signatures of cells.

  4. Noninvasively probing the light-emitting diode temperature by magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Run; Du, Zhongzhou; Cheng, Ting; Huang, Zhixing; Liu, Wenzhong; Luo, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    The precise measurement of temperature information is of great importance in the thermal management of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Hitherto, many methods have been proposed to measure the LED temperature, but none of them involve with magnetics. Herein, we developed a noninvasive and precise method to probe the LED temperatures based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Detailed measurement principle and experimental setup were introduced. Through this setup, the heating and cooling characteristics of LEDs were investigated with different voltage inputs. It is found that higher voltage input leads to higher LED temperature. When the input voltage is 5.2 V, the LED temperature is 326.8 K. The present noninvasive and precise method supplements the existing techniques of temperature measurement in terms of magnetics and opens up new avenues to measure the temperature information where conventional approaches may fail.

  5. Cr-polluted soil studied by high gradient magnetic separation and electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Rikers, R.A.; Voncken, J.H.L.; Dalmijn, W.L.

    1998-12-01

    An Fe-rich soil from the site of a former leather tannery, heavily polluted with Cr, was studied using a combination of wet chemical analysis, high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). It is demonstrated that such a combination is a powerful tool for the characterization of polluted soils, especially in cases where the pollution is present as discrete particles. Both EPMA and magnetic separation data indicated that the Cr pollution was present as a hydrous Cr-oxide phase. The Cr does not correlate with the Fe minerals, most likely as a result of the initial high Cr concentrations in the soil, which lead to precipitation of separate hydrous Cr-oxide minerals and Fe minerals. The Cr-containing material is present as (layered) aggregates, which are formed around larger quartz grains or around very small other particles that served as precipitation nuclei. Magnetic separation tests show that the Cr pollution can largely be removed by HGMS.

  6. Scanned probe imaging of nanoscale magnetism at cryogenic temperatures with a single-spin quantum sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Jenkins, Alec; Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Reetz, Christopher; Emmanouilidou, Eve; Ni, Ni; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C.

    2016-08-01

    High-spatial-resolution magnetic imaging has driven important developments in fields ranging from materials science to biology. However, to uncover finer details approaching the nanoscale with greater sensitivity requires the development of a radically new sensor technology. The nitrogen–vacancy (NV) defect in diamond has emerged as a promising candidate for such a sensor on the basis of its atomic size and quantum-limited sensing capabilities. It has remained an outstanding challenge to implement the NV centre as a nanoscale scanning magnetic probe at cryogenic temperatures, however, where many solid-state systems exhibit non-trivial magnetic order. Here, we present NV magnetic imaging down to 6 K with 3 μT Hz–1/2 field sensitivity, and use the technique to image vortices in the iron pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 with critical temperature Tc = 30 K. The expansion of NV-based magnetic imaging to cryogenic temperatures will enable future studies of previously inaccessible nanoscale magnetism in condensed-matter systems.

  7. Parametric Harmonic Generation as a Probe of Unconstrained Spin Magnetization Precession in the Shallow Barrier Limit.

    PubMed

    Capua, Amir; Rettner, Charles; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-01-29

    We study the parametric excitation of high orders of magnetization precession in ultrathin films having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We observe that for a given driving field amplitude the harmonic generation can be increased by lowering the barrier with the application of an in-plane magnetic field in the manner of the Smit-Beljers effect. In this effect, the magnetic stiffness is reduced not by lowering the magnitude of the magnetic field upon which the spins precess, but rather by effectively releasing the field's "anchoring" point. This results in a shallow energy barrier where the electrons' spin is locally unconstrained. While the observation is unveiled in the form of nonlinear high harmonic generation, we believe that the physics whereby the barrier is suppressed by an external magnetic field may apply to other phenomena associated with ultrathin films. In these cases, such unconstrained motion may serve as a sensitive probe of the torques associated with proximate spin currents. Moreover, our approach may be used as a model system for the study of phase transitions in the field of nonlinear dynamics. PMID:26871356

  8. Scanned probe imaging of nanoscale magnetism at cryogenic temperatures with a single-spin quantum sensor.

    PubMed

    Pelliccione, Matthew; Jenkins, Alec; Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Reetz, Christopher; Emmanouilidou, Eve; Ni, Ni; Bleszynski Jayich, Ania C

    2016-08-01

    High-spatial-resolution magnetic imaging has driven important developments in fields ranging from materials science to biology. However, to uncover finer details approaching the nanoscale with greater sensitivity requires the development of a radically new sensor technology. The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond has emerged as a promising candidate for such a sensor on the basis of its atomic size and quantum-limited sensing capabilities. It has remained an outstanding challenge to implement the NV centre as a nanoscale scanning magnetic probe at cryogenic temperatures, however, where many solid-state systems exhibit non-trivial magnetic order. Here, we present NV magnetic imaging down to 6 K with 3 μT Hz(-1/2) field sensitivity, and use the technique to image vortices in the iron pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 with critical temperature Tc = 30 K. The expansion of NV-based magnetic imaging to cryogenic temperatures will enable future studies of previously inaccessible nanoscale magnetism in condensed-matter systems. PMID:27136130

  9. Charged Aerosol Collection Inside PMSEs by a Magnetically Shielded Rocket Probe during MIDAS/SOLSTICE 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, B.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2001-12-01

    A charged aerosol detector was flown during the MIDAS/SOLSTICE rocket campaign in June 2001 over Andoya, Norway. The probe is a graphite collection surface with a permanent magnet underneath to deflect electrons and light ions. This probe was first used on a sounding rocket over White Sands, NM in 1998, where it measured a thin positively charged layer 500 m thick at an altitude of 86.5 km, followed by a broad negatively charged layer which extended a few kilometers lower [Geophys. Res. Lett. 27, 3825 (2000)]. The flights aboard the two MIDAS payloads were the second use of the probes. The first MIDAS launch was into a triple layered PMSE that extended from 82 to 90 km. On both upleg and downleg, the detector saw finely detailed positive charge structures within the PMSE. These uniquely shaped layers were completely correlated with simultaneously collected positive ion data. On downleg, the probe measured a thin burst of negatively charged particles at 83 km. The second MIDAS flight was fired into a very strong single-layered PMSE. On downleg, thin bursts of negative charge were seen from 87 km to 83 km. Also, a single thick layer of negative charge was measured at 82 km. This layer had a very sharp upper boundary and extended downward over the next km. During both flights the probe also measured a smooth, positively charged background which was well correlated with the positive ion probe. Also seen was a photoelectron signal due to solar UV. Cloud cover prevented lidar support for either launch. This work was funded by NASA.

  10. Actuator-valve interface optimization. [Explosive actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    The interface of explosive actuator driven valves can be optimized to maximize the velocity of the valve plunger by using the computer code Actuator-Valve Response. Details of the AVR model of the actuator driven valve plunger and the results of optimizing an actuator-valve interface with AVR are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Scanning Hall probe microscopy of magnetic vortices in very underdoped yttrium-barium-copper-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guikema, Janice Wynn

    Since their discovery by Bednorz and Muller in 1986, high-temperature cuprate superconductors have been the subject of intense research. Despite this effort, agreement on the mechanism of high- Tc has not been reached. Many theories make their strongest predictions for underdoped superconductors with very low superfluid density ns/m*. I implemented a scanning Hall probe microscope (SHPM) and used it to study magnetic vortices in newly available single crystals of very underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x . These studies have disproved a promising theory of spin-charge separation, measured the apparent vortex size (an upper bound on the penetration depth lambda ab), and revealed an intriguing phenomenon of "split" vortices. SHPM is a non-invasive and direct method for magnetic field imaging. It is one of the few techniques capable of submicron spatial resolution coupled with sub-phi0 (flux quantum) sensitivity, and it operates over a wide temperature range. Chapter 2 introduces the variable temperature scanning microscope and discusses the scanning Hall probe set-up and scanner characterizations. Chapter 3 details my fabrication of submicron GaAs/AlGaAs Hall probes and discusses noise studies for a range of probe sizes, which suggest that sub-100 nm probes could be made without compromising flux sensitivity. The subsequent chapters detail SHPM (and SQUID) studies of very underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x crystals with T c ≤ 15 K. Chapter 4 describes two experimental tests for visons, essential excitations of a spin-charge separation theory proposed by Senthil and Fisher. We searched for predicted hc/ e vortices and a vortex memory effect with null results, placing upper bounds on the vison energy inconsistent with the theory. Chapter 5 discusses imaging of isolated vortices as a function of Tc. Vortex images were fit with theoretical magnetic field profiles in order to extract the apparent vortex size. The data for the lowest Tc 's (5 and 6.5 K) show some inhomogeneity and suggest that

  12. Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E.; Raitses, Y.

    2010-10-15

    By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

  13. Simultaneous poloidal measurements using new magnetically driven reciprocating probes in COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejarnac, R.; Gunn, J. P.; Dimitrova, M.; Hron, M.; Panek, R.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Saragosti-Chausy, C.; Tamain, P.; the COMPASS team

    2016-03-01

    Particles and heat transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of tokamaks is not yet fully understood. COMPASS is a small-size tokamakp where the edge plasma is well diagnosed in view of studying the competition between the parallel and the cross-field transport in the SOL. In order to better characterize SOL dynamics, in particular the poloidal asymmetry of the main parameters' radial profiles, two new in-situ magnetically driven reciprocating manipulators have been recently installed in COMPASS. These manipulators, the so-called pecker probes, are two additional poloidal measurement points to the existing two (vertical and horizontal) reciprocating manipulators. The pecker probes are located at the low field side of COMPASS at ±47.5o with respect to the outer mid-plane and are equipped with identical tunnel probe heads, providing simultaneous measurements of the ion saturation current density Jsat, the electron temperature Te and the parallel Mach number M// with high temporal resolution. In this paper, a detailed description of the pecker probe system in COMPASS is described and first measurements are presented.

  14. Dual-Modal Magnetic Resonance/Fluorescent Zinc Probes for Pancreatic β-Cell Mass Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stasiuk, Graeme J; Minuzzi, Florencia; Sae-Heng, Myra; Rivas, Charlotte; Juretschke, Hans-Paul; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Allegrini, Peter R; Laurent, Didier; Duckworth, Andrew R; Beeby, Andrew; Rutter, Guy A; Long, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Despite the contribution of changes in pancreatic β-cell mass to the development of all forms of diabetes mellitus, few robust approaches currently exist to monitor these changes prospectively in vivo. Although magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) provides a potentially useful technique, targeting MRI-active probes to the β cell has proved challenging. Zinc ions are highly concentrated in the secretory granule, but they are relatively less abundant in the exocrine pancreas and in other tissues. We have therefore developed functional dual-modal probes based on transition-metal chelates capable of binding zinc. The first of these, Gd⋅1, binds ZnII directly by means of an amidoquinoline moiety (AQA), thus causing a large ratiometric Stokes shift in the fluorescence from λem=410 to 500 nm with an increase in relaxivity from r1=4.2 up to 4.9 mM−1 s−1. The probe is efficiently accumulated into secretory granules in β-cell-derived lines and isolated islets, but more poorly by non-endocrine cells, and leads to a reduction in T1 in human islets. In vivo murine studies of Gd⋅1 have shown accumulation of the probe in the pancreas with increased signal intensity over 140 minutes. PMID:25736590

  15. Rotary actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotary actuators and other mechanical devices incorporating shape memory alloys are provided herein. Shape memory alloys are a group of metals which when deformed at temperatures below their martensite temperatures, resume the shapes which they had prior to the deformation if they are heated to temperatures above their austensite temperatures. Actuators in which shape memory alloys are employed include bias spring types, in which springs deform the shape memory alloy (SMA), and differential actuators, which use two SMA members mechanically connected in series. Another type uses concentric cylindrical members. One member is in the form of a sleeve surrounding a cylinder, both being constructed of shape memory alloys. Herein two capstans are mounted on a shaft which is supported in a framework. Each capstan is capable of rotating the shaft. Shape memory wire, as two separate lengths of wire, is wrapped around each capstan to form a winding around that capstan. The winding on one capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a prestretched state. The winding on the other capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a taut, but not a prestretched, state. Heating one performs work in one direction, thus deforming the other one. When the other SMA is heated the action is reversed.

  16. Advances in Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Tsv K.; Dimitrova, M.; Ivanova, P.; Kovačič, J.; Gyergyek, T.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Pedrosa, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.; Hidalgo, C.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Langmuir probe techniques for evaluating the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function (EEDF) in magnetized plasma are reviewed. It is shown that when the magnetic field applied is very weak and the electrons reach the probe without collisions in the probe sheath the second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula can be used for EEDF evaluation. At low values of the magnetic field, an extended second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula yields reliable results, while at higher values of the magnetic field, the first-derivative probe technique is applicable for precise evaluation of the plasma potential and the EEDF. There is an interval of intermediate values of the magnetic field when both techniques—the extended second-derivative and the first-derivative one—can be used. Experimental results from probe measurements in different ranges of magnetic field are reviewed and discussed: low-pressure argon gas discharges in the presence of a magnetic field in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 T, probe measurements in circular hydrogen plasmas for high-temperature fusion (magnetic fields from 0.45 T to 1.3 T) in small ISTTOK and CASTOR tokamaks, D-shape COMPASS tokamak plasmas, as well as in the TJ-II stellarator. In the vicinity of the last closed flux surface (LCFS) in tokamaks and in the TJ-II stellarator, the EEDF obtained is found to be bi-Maxwellian, while close to the tokamak chamber wall it is Maxwellian. The mechanism of the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is discussed. Comparison of the results from probe measurements with those obtained from calculations using the ASTRA and EIRENE codes shows that the main reason for the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is the ionization of the neutral atoms.

  17. Magnetic probe (B-dot) measurements in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP): Techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Piejak, R.B.

    1998-12-31

    There has been a considerable amount of study of ICP sources in recent years because these discharges have been found to be useful in plasma processing and light source applications. In view of their practical relevance, the authors have made a fairly extensive experimental study of ICP sources using B-dot (dB/dt) probes to measure the magnitude and phase of the magnetic field (as well as Langmuir probes to measure the electron energy distribution function). The measurements span gas pressures ranging between 0.3 and 300 mTorr, discharge powers ranging between 25 and 200W and include three driving frequencies: 3.39, 6.78 and 13.56 MHz. This talk is based mainly upon these measurements.

  18. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Live Cancer Cells Using Conjugated Polymer Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Minjie; Sun, Bin; Liu, Yun; Shen, Qun-Dong; Jiang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in biological applications of nanomaterials brings about pressing needs for exploring nanomaterial-cell interactions. Cationic blue-emissive and anionic green-emissive conjugated polymers are applied as dual-color fluorescence probes to the surface of negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles through sequentially electrostatic adsorption. These conjugated polymers have large extinction coefficients and high fluorescence quantum yield (82% for PFN and 62% for ThPFS). Thereby, one can visualize trace amount (2.7 μg/mL) of fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles within cancer cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescence labeling by the conjugated polymers is also validated for quantitative determination of the internalized nanoparticles in each individual cell by flow cytometry analysis. Extensive overlap of blue and green fluorescence signals in the cytoplasm indicates that both conjugated polymer probes tightly bind to the surface of the nanoparticles during cellular internalization. The highly charged and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles non-specifically bind to the cell membranes, followed by cellular uptake through endocytosis. The nanoparticles form aggregates inside endosomes, which yields a punctuated staining pattern. Cellular internalization of the nanoparticles is dependent on the dosage and time. Uptake efficiency can be enhanced three-fold by application of an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles are low cytotoxicity and suitable for simultaneously noninvasive fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging application. PMID:26931282

  19. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Live Cancer Cells Using Conjugated Polymer Probes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Minjie; Sun, Bin; Liu, Yun; Shen, Qun-Dong; Jiang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in biological applications of nanomaterials brings about pressing needs for exploring nanomaterial-cell interactions. Cationic blue-emissive and anionic green-emissive conjugated polymers are applied as dual-color fluorescence probes to the surface of negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles through sequentially electrostatic adsorption. These conjugated polymers have large extinction coefficients and high fluorescence quantum yield (82% for PFN and 62% for ThPFS). Thereby, one can visualize trace amount (2.7 μg/mL) of fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles within cancer cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescence labeling by the conjugated polymers is also validated for quantitative determination of the internalized nanoparticles in each individual cell by flow cytometry analysis. Extensive overlap of blue and green fluorescence signals in the cytoplasm indicates that both conjugated polymer probes tightly bind to the surface of the nanoparticles during cellular internalization. The highly charged and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles non-specifically bind to the cell membranes, followed by cellular uptake through endocytosis. The nanoparticles form aggregates inside endosomes, which yields a punctuated staining pattern. Cellular internalization of the nanoparticles is dependent on the dosage and time. Uptake efficiency can be enhanced three-fold by application of an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles are low cytotoxicity and suitable for simultaneously noninvasive fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging application. PMID:26931282

  20. Dynamics of positive probes in underdense, strongly magnetized, E×B drifting plasma: Particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Cooke, David L.

    2013-09-15

    Electron trapping, electron heating, space-charge wings, wake eddies, and current collection by a positive probe in E×B drifting plasma were studied in three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations. In these simulations, electrons and ions were magnetized with respect to the probe and the plasma was underdense (ω{sub pe}<ω{sub ce}). A large drift velocity (Mach 4.5 with respect to the ion acoustic speed) between the plasma and probe was created with background electric and magnetic fields. Four distinct regions developed in the presences of the positive probe: a quasi-trapped electron region, an electron-depletion wing, an ion-rich wing, and a wake region. We report on the observations of strong electron heating mechanisms, space-charge wings, ion cyclotron charge-density eddies in the wake, electron acceleration due to a magnetic presheath, and the current-voltage relationship.

  1. Measurements of spheromak formation and field buildup at SSPX using a double magnetic probe array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ohia, O. O.; Jayakumar, R.

    2007-11-01

    A specially designed magnetic probe consisting of two linear arrays that measure Bx, By, and Bz, is being used to investigate magnetic evolution during spheromak formation, and during multiple gun current pulses on top of a baseline current at SSPX. The measurements reveal that at the start of each pulse there is a time lag in the magnetic response of the closed flux region, while the open flux (intercepting the gun electrodes) responds immediately. This is interpreted as the time to build enough helicity on the open flux, before reconnecting and adding flux to the closed surfaces. Magnetic reconstructions after pulsed buildup using CORSICA show good agreement with the data. A code that simulates the magnetic field from current-carrying flux ropes is used to reproduce the field measured during flux buildup. The code includes an optimization routine that finds the rope shape that best fits the data in order to estimate helicity in the open flux. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48.

  2. Magnetic scanning gate microscopy of a domain wall nanosensor using microparticle probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte-León, H.; Gribkov, B.; Krzysteczko, P.; Marchi, F.; Motte, J.-F.; Schumacher, H. W.; Antonov, V.; Kazakova, O.

    2016-02-01

    We apply the magnetic scanning gate microscopy (SGM) technique to study the interaction between a magnetic bead (MB) and a domain wall (DW) trapped in an L-shaped magnetic nanostructure. Magnetic SGM is performed using a custom-made probe, comprising a hard magnetic NdFeB bead of diameter 1.6 μm attached to a standard silicon tip. The MB-DW interaction is detected by measuring changes in the electrical resistance of the device as a function of the tip position. By scanning at different heights, we create a 3D map of the MB-DW interaction and extract the sensing volume for different widths of the nanostructure's arms. It is shown that for 50 nm wide devices the sensing volume is a cone of 880 nm in diameter by 1.4 μm in height, and reduces down to 800 nm in height for 100 nm devices with almost no change in its diameter.

  3. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Pulse Sequences and Probes to Study Biomacromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cosman, M; Krishnan, V V; Maxwell, R

    2001-02-26

    The determination of the three dimensional structures at high resolution of biomolecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, enables us to understand their function at the molecular level. At the present time, there are only two methods available for determining such structures, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compared to well-established X-ray diffraction techniques, NMR methodology is relatively new and has many areas in which improvement can still be attained. In this project, we focused on the development of new NMR probes and pulse sequences that were tailored to tackle specific problems that are not adequately addressed by current technology. Probes are the hardware that contain the radio frequency (RF) circuitry used to both excite and detect the NMR signals. Pulse sequences are composed of a series of RF pulses and delays, which are applied to the sample held within the magnetic field by the probe, so as to manipulate the nuclear spins. Typically, a probe is developed for a specific set of nuclei and types of experiments and the pulse sequences are then written to use the probe in an optimal manner. In addition, the inter-development of instrumentation and methods are determined by the specific biological question to be examined. Thus our efforts focused on addressing an area of importance in NMR Structural Biology namely more effective ways to use the phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nucleus. Phosphorus is a very important biological element that is strategically located in nucleic acids, where it imparts negative charge and flexibility to RNA and DNA. It is also a component of the cellular membrane and thus interacts with membrane proteins. It is used in mechanisms to signal, activate or deactivate enzymes; and participates in energy storage and release. However, the phosphorus nucleus exhibits certain properties, such as poor spectral dispersion, low sensitivity of detection, and fast relaxation, which limit its effective use

  4. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  5. Coaxial probe for nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion and relaxation correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yiqiao; Hürlimann, Martin; Mandal, Soumyajit; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-02-21

    A coaxial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is built to measure diffusion and relaxation properties of liquid samples. In particular, we demonstrate the acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) distribution functions (T{sub 1}-T{sub 2} and diffusion–T{sub 2}), essential for fluids characterization. The compact design holds promise for miniaturization, thus enabling the measurement of molecular diffusion that is inaccessible to conventional micro-NMR setups. Potential applications range from crude oil characterization to biomolecular screening and detections.

  6. Design and Testing of Three-Axis Satellite Attitude Determination and Stabilization Systems That Are Based on Magnetic Sensing and Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psiaki, Mark L.; Guelman, Moshe

    2002-11-01

    Three-axis satellite attitude determination and active stabilization systems have been designed and tested using both flight experiments and simulation studies. These are being developed for use on low-Earth-orbiting name- satellites. Such satellites can be used as elements of constellations that implement synthetic aperture radar or that serve as nudes in a communications network. The research has addressed the problems of under-sensing and under-actuation that are present in magnetic-based systems. Magnetometer outputs are insensitive to rotation about the local Earth magnetic field, and magnetic torque coils cannot produce torque slump the field direction. A new attitude representation and a special globally-convergent extended Kalman filter have been used to solve the 3-axis attitude estimation problem. The efficacy of this system has been demonstrated using data from the missions, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. Semi-active global 3-axis stabilization has been demonstrated using a simplified magnetometer output feedback control law in combination with weak passive stabilization of the axes. The passive stabilization can come from a very small momentum wheel or from a new aerodynamic system. The momentum-wheel-based concept has been successfully tested on the TechSat Gurwin II spacecraft.

  7. Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy of Magnetic Vortices inVery Underdoped yttrium-barium-copper-oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Guikema, Janice Wynn; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-12-02

    Since their discovery by Bednorz and Mueller (1986), high-temperature cuprate superconductors have been the subject of intense experimental research and theoretical work. Despite this large-scale effort, agreement on the mechanism of high-T{sub c} has not been reached. Many theories make their strongest predictions for underdoped superconductors with very low superfluid density n{sub s}/m*. For this dissertation I implemented a scanning Hall probe microscope and used it to study magnetic vortices in newly available single crystals of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (Liang et al. 1998, 2002). These studies have disproved a promising theory of spin-charge separation, measured the apparent vortex size (an upper bound on the penetration depth {lambda}{sub ab}), and revealed an intriguing phenomenon of ''split'' vortices. Scanning Hall probe microscopy is a non-invasive and direct method for magnetic field imaging. It is one of the few techniques capable of submicron spatial resolution coupled with sub-{Phi}{sub 0} (flux quantum) sensitivity, and it operates over a wide temperature range. Chapter 2 introduces the variable temperature scanning microscope and discusses the scanning Hall probe set-up and scanner characterizations. Chapter 3 details my fabrication of submicron GaAs/AlGaAs Hall probes and discusses noise studies for a range of probe sizes, which suggest that sub-100 nm probes could be made without compromising flux sensitivity. The subsequent chapters detail scanning Hall probe (and SQUID) microscopy studies of very underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} crystals with T{sub c} {le} 15 K. Chapter 4 describes two experimental tests for visons, essential excitations of a spin-charge separation theory proposed by Senthil and Fisher (2000, 2001b). We searched for predicted hc/e vortices (Wynn et al. 2001) and a vortex memory effect (Bonn et al. 2001) with null results, placing upper bounds on the vison energy inconsistent with the theory. Chapter

  8. MicroRNA Sensor Based on Magnetic Beads and Enzymatic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhou, Dejian; He, Junhui

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs are associated with multiple cellular processes and diseases. Here, we designed a highly sensitive, magnetically retrievable biosensor using magnetic beads (MBs) as a model RNA sensor. The assay utilized two biotinylated probes, which were hybridized to the complementary target miRNA in a sandwich assay format. One of the biotinylated ends of the hybridization complex was immobilized onto the surface of a NeutrAvidin (NAV) coated MB and the other biotinylated end was conjugated to HRP via NAV-biotin interaction. The results were presented by colorimetric absorbance of the resorufin product from amplex red oxidation. We show that by combining the use of MBs as well as bio-specific immobilization, the sensitivity of miRNA detection is down to 100 pM. This model HRP-MBs system can be used for simple, rapid colorimetric quantification of low level DNA/RNA or other small molecules.

  9. Interface-Induced Magnetic Coupling in Multiferroic/Ferromagnetic Bilayer: An Ultrafast Pump-Probe Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Elbert; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Tian, Y. F.; Wu, Tom; Panagopoulos, Christos; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Su, Haibin

    2014-03-01

    By use of optical pump-probe measurement, we study the relaxation dynamics of a muliferroic-ferromagnetic TbMnO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 bilayer. The relaxation dynamics of both layers are well separated in time allowing us to investigate the magnetic coupling across the bilayer. We observe that the relaxation dynamics of the individual layers in the bilayer sample are the result of the interplay between the intrinsic magnetic order and the induced interfacial effect. Our data suggest the existence of induced ferromagnetic order in the TbMnO3 layer, and antiferromagnetic order in the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 layer. Singapore NRF CRP (NRF-CRP4-2008-04) and MOE AcRF Tier 1 (RG 13/12).

  10. A new approach for highly accurate, remote temperature probing using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Liu, Wenzhong; Kong, Li; Morais, Paulo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report on a new approach for remote temperature probing that provides accuracy as good as 0.017°C (0.0055% accuracy) by measuring the magnetisation curve of magnetic nanoparticles. We included here the theoretical model construction and the inverse calculation method, and explored the impact caused by the temperature dependence of the saturation magnetisation and the applied magnetic field range. The reported results are of great significance in the establishment of safer protocols for the hyperthermia therapy and for the thermal assisted drug delivery technology. Likewise, our approach potentially impacts basic science as it provides a robust thermodynamic tool for noninvasive investigation of cell metabolism. PMID:25315470

  11. Lobe crossing events observed by the Van Allen Probes as tests of magnetic field line mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, P.; MacDonald, E.; Grande, M.; Glocer, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we examine a series of lobe crossing events witnessed by the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft between 0200 and 0515 on November 14th 2012. The events occurred on the flank between 0400 and 0635 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE. During the events Dst was less than 100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = - 15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). Other observations at geosynchronous orbit also show lobe crossings at dawn and dusk flanks. These events provide a chance to examine the magnetic field topology in detail and compare it with models. We will show that the spacecraft were in locations with access to the open field lines by comparison to the CRCM + BATS-RUS models as well as comparing spacecraft encounters with the lobe to the predicted magnetic field topology.

  12. Zeeman mapping of probability densities in square quantum wells using magnetic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prechtl, G.; Heiss, W.; Bonanni, A.; Jantsch, W.; Mackowski, S.; Janik, E.; Karczewski, G.

    2000-06-01

    We use a method to probe experimentally the probability density of carriers confined in semiconductor quantum structures. The exciton Zeeman splitting in quantum wells containing a single, ultranarrow magnetic layer is studied depending on the layer position. In particular, a system consisting of a 1/4 monolayer MnTe embedded at varying positions in nonmagnetic CdTe/CdMgTe quantum wells is investigated. The sp-d exchange interaction results in a drastic increase of the Zeeman splitting, which, because of the strongly localized nature of this interaction, sensitively depends on the position of the MnTe submonolayer in the quantum well. For various interband transitions we show that the dependence of the exciton Zeeman splitting on the position of the magnetic layer directly maps the probability density of free holesin the growth direction.

  13. Investigation of implosion dynamics and magnetic fields in 1-MA wire arrays by optical probing diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laca, P. J.; Sarkisov, G. S.

    2005-10-01

    Multiframe optical probing diagnostics were applied for the investigation of implosion dynamics and magnetic fields in z-pinch plasma of wire arrays and x-pinches at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF). Five shadow frames per shot, with a long 34-ns or short 9-ns pulse train, presents fine details of plasma evolution in the wire array. A Faraday rotation diagnostic consists of identical shadow and Faraday channels, shearing air-wedge interferometer, and schlieren channel. Evolution of the wire array z-pinch in different regimes of implosion was investigated. Fast dynamics of bubbles in plasma streams were studied in detail. A current in the plasma column of Al wire arrays and magnetic bubbles were found by the Faraday rotation diagnostic.

  14. How to probe transverse magnetic anisotropy of a single-molecule magnet by electronic transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiorny, M.; Burzuri, E.; Gaudenzi, R.; Park, K.; Leijnse, M.; Wegewijs, M.; Paaske, J.; Cornia, A.; van der Zant, H.

    We propose an approach for in-situ determination of the transverse magnetic anisotropy (TMA) of an individual molecule by electronic transport measurements, see Phys. Rev. B 91, 035442 (2015). We study a Fe4 single-molecule magnet (SMM) captured in a gateable junction, a unique tool for addressing the spin in different redox states of a molecule. We show that, due to mixing of the spin eigenstates of the SMM, the TMA significantly manifests itself in transport. We predict and experimentally observe the pronounced intensity modulation of the Coulomb peak amplitude with the magnetic field in the linear-response transport regime, from which the TMA parameter E can be estimated. Importantly, the method proposed here does not rely on the small induced tunnelling effects and, hence, works well at temperatures and electron tunnel broadenings by far exceeding the tunnel splittings and even E itself. We deduce that the TMA for a single Fe4 molecule captured in a junction is substantially larger than the bulk value. Work supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Education as `Iuventus Plus' project (IP2014 030973) in years 2015-2016.

  15. Advanced actuators for the control of large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Hockney, Richard; Johnson, Bruce; Misovec, Kathleen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop advanced six-degree-of-freedom actuators employing magnetic suspensions suitable for the control of structural vibrations in large space structures. The advanced actuators consist of a magnetically suspended mass that has three-degrees-of-freedom in both translation and rotation. The most promising of these actuators featured a rotating suspended mass providing structural control torques in a manner similar to a control moment gyro (CMG). These actuators employ large-angle-magnetic suspensions that allow gimballing of the suspended mass without mechanical gimbals. Design definitions and sizing algorithms for these CMG type as well as angular reaction mass actuators based on multi-degree-of-freedom magnetic suspensions were developed. The performance of these actuators was analytically compared with conventional reaction mass actuators for a simple space structure model.

  16. Optimized multimodal functional magnetic resonance imaging/near-infrared spectroscopy probe for ultrahigh-resolution mapping.

    PubMed

    Hocke, Lia Maria; Cayetano, Kenroy; Tong, Yunjie; Frederick, Blaise

    2015-10-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly important noninvasive method in neuroscience due to its high temporal resolution and ability to independently measure oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin. However, the relatively low spatial resolution of fNIRS makes it difficult to relate this signal to underlying anatomy. Simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can complement fNIRS with superior spatial resolution and the ability to image the entire brain, providing additional information to improve fNIRS localization. However, current simultaneous fMRI/fNIRS acquisition methods are not optimal, due to the poor physical compatibility of existing MR coils and fNIRS optodes. Here, we present a technique to manufacture a true multimodal fMRI/fNIRS probe in which both modalities can be used with maximal sensitivity. To achieve this, we designed custom MR coils with integral fNIRS optodes using three-dimensional printing. This multimodal probe can be used to optimize spatial ([Formula: see text]) and temporal resolution (2.5 Hz) of fMRI, and it provides maximal MRI sensitivity, while allowing for high flexibility in the location and density of fNIRS optodes within the area of interest. Phantom and human data are shown to confirm the improvement in sensitivity in both modalities. This probe shows promise for addressing fundamental questions of the relation of fNIRS to physiology. PMID:26668816

  17. Developing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (NMRFM) as an Electronic Probe of Nanoscale Condensed Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, Jeremy W.; Tennant, Daniel M.; Mozaffari, Shirin; Markert, John T.

    2015-03-01

    The investigation of NMR via magnetic force coupling in a large field gradient has led to vast improvements in spatial resolution over the conventional inductive method. It has been demonstrated that nanoscale force sensors could be scaled to distinguish a single nuclear spin, assuming experimental noise can be minimized and other specious force signatures stifled. Accordingly, there are many efforts aimed at repurposing NMR for 3D imaging on the atomic scale. In addition to proof-of-concept experiments aimed at separately resolving some of the eventual experimental barriers to atomic resolution, some of us have directed our attention to using NMR to probe the electronic environment in larger condensed matter systems which are not well suited for other scanning probe microscopy techniques and which are prohibitively small for inductive NMR detection. Previously, we proposed using NMRFM to probe superconducting transitions in microcrystals. In parallel, we revamped our investigation of thin films to explore two-dimensional conducting interfaces between insulating oxides. Presented here is a survey of the technical impediments as well as current strategies for unlocking this exciting potential for NMRFM, as a tool to investigate sub-surface electronic transport in microscale and nanoscale condensed matter systems.

  18. Bioengineered Probes for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The development of molecular imaging probes has changed the nature of neurobiological research. Some of the most notable successes have involved the use of biological engineering techniques for the creation of fluorescent protein derivatives for optical imaging, but recent work has also led to a number of bioengineered probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the preeminent technique for noninvasive investigation of brain structure and function. Molecular MRI agents are beginning to be applied for experiments in the nervous system, where they have the potential to bridge from molecular to systems or organismic levels of analysis. Compared with canonical synthetic small molecule agents, biomolecular or semibiosynthetic MRI contrast agents offer special advantages due to their amenability to molecular engineering approaches, their properties in some cases as catalysts, and their specificity in targeting and ligand binding. Here, we discuss an expanding list of instances where biological engineering techniques have aided in the design of MRI contrast agents and reporter systems, examining both advantages and limitations of these types of probes for studies in the central nervous system. PMID:22896803

  19. Magnetic rotational spectroscopy with nanorods to probe time-dependent rheology of microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, Alexander; Luzinov, Igor; Owens, Jeffery R; Kornev, Konstantin G

    2012-07-01

    In situ characterization of minute amounts of fluids that rapidly change their rheological properties is a challenge. In this paper, the rheological properties of fluids were evaluated by examining the behavior of magnetic nanorods in a rotating magnetic field. We proposed a theory describing the rotation of a magnetic nanorod in a fluid when its viscosity increases with time exponentially fast. To confirm the theory, we studied the time-dependent rheology of microdroplets of 2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate (HEMA)/diethylene glycol dimethacylate (DEGDMA)-based hydrogel during photopolymerization synthesis. We demonstrated that magnetic rotational spectroscopy provides rich physicochemical information about the gelation process. The method allows one to completely specify the time-dependent viscosity by directly measuring characteristic viscosity and characteristic time. Remarkably, one can analyze not only the polymer solution, but also the suspension enriched with the gel domains being formed. Since the probing nanorods are measured in nanometers, this method can be used for the in vivo mapping of the rheological properties of biofluids and polymers on a microscopic level at short time intervals when other methods fall short. PMID:22668085

  20. Magnetization measurements reveal the local shear stiffness of hydrogels probed by ferromagnetic nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, P.; Tschöpe, A.; Birringer, R.

    2014-12-01

    The local mechanical coupling of ferromagnetic nanorods in hydrogels was characterized by magnetization measurements. Nickel nanorods were synthesized by the AAO-template method and embedded in gelatine hydrogels with mechanically soft or hard matrix properties determined by the gelatine weight fraction. By applying a homogeneous magnetic field during gelation the nanorods were aligned along the field resulting in uniaxially textured ferrogels. The magnetization curves of the soft ferrogel exhibited not only important similarities but also characteristic differences as compared to the hard ferrogel. The hystereses measured in a field parallel to the texture axis were almost identical for both samples indicating effective coupling of the nanorods with the polymer network. By contrast, measurements in a magnetic field perpendicular to the texture axis revealed a much higher initial susceptibility of the soft as compared to the hard ferrogel. This difference was attributed to the additional rotation of the nanorods allowed by the reduced shear modulus in the soft ferrogel matrix. Two methods for data analysis were presented which enabled us to determine the shear modulus of the gelatine matrix which was interpreted as a local rather than macroscopic quantity in consideration of the nanoscale of the probe particles.

  1. Magnetic hydroxyapatite coatings as a new tool in medicine: A scanning probe investigation.

    PubMed

    Gambardella, A; Bianchi, M; Kaciulis, S; Mezzi, A; Brucale, M; Cavallini, M; Herrmannsdoerfer, T; Chanda, G; Uhlarz, M; Cellini, A; Pedna, M F; Sambri, V; Marcacci, M; Russo, A

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite films enriched with magnetite have been fabricated via a Pulsed Plasma Deposition (PPD) system with the final aim of representing a new platform able to disincentivate bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. The chemical composition and magnetic properties of films were respectively examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) measurements. The morphology and conductive properties of the magnetic films were investigated via a combination of scanning probe technologies including atomic force microscopy (AFM), electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Interestingly, the range of adopted techniques allowed determining the preservation of the chemical composition and magnetic properties of the deposition target material while STM analysis provided new insights on the presence of surface inhomogeneities, revealing the presence of magnetite-rich islands over length scales compatible with the applications. Finally, preliminary results of bacterial adhesion tests, indicated a higher ability of magnetic hydroxyapatite films to reduce Escherichia coli adhesion at 4h from seeding compared to control hydroxyapatite films. PMID:26952445

  2. Optical probe of spin-orbit fields in metallic magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazeri, Mohammad; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Wong, Kin L.; Lang, Murong; Fan, Yabin; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Schwartz, Robert N.; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-03-01

    We report a novel self-consistent optical approach based on magneto-optical Kerr effect to directly and quantitatively probe the spin-orbit fields of magnetic devices with 1um diffraction limited spatial resolution. The optical probe is exemplified by investigating the spin-orbit fields in a magnetic stack of Ta(5 nm)/CoFeB(1.1 nm)/MgO(2.0 nm)/TaOx with enhanced perpendicular anisotropy. Both field-like and damping-like contributions were measured independently and their coefficients are quantified at 3 . 3 ×10-6 and - 2 . 0 ×10-6 Oe / A . cm-2 respectively. A detailed comparison with standard transport technique is presented in which a very good agreement were found. Our results establish the relevance of the optical methods for studying spin-orbit torque related physics. We acknowledge the support from the National Science Foundation (DMR-1411085) and the FAME Center, one of the six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  3. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  4. Magnetism in Complex Oxides Probed by Magnetocaloric Effect and Transverse Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Nicholas S.

    Magnetic oxides exhibit rich complexity in their fundamental physical properties determined by the intricate interplay between structural, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. The common themes that are often present in these systems are the phase coexistence, strong magnetostructural coupling, and possible spin frustration induced by lattice geometry. While a complete understanding of the ground state magnetic properties and cooperative phenomena in this class of compounds is key to manipulating their functionality for applications, it remains among the most challenging problems facing condensed-matter physics today. To address these outstanding issues, it is essential to employ experimental methods that allow for detailed investigations of the temperature and magnetic field response of the different phases. In this PhD dissertation, I will demonstrate the relatively unconventional experimental methods of magnetocaloric effect (MCE) and radio-frequency transverse susceptibility (TS) as powerful probes of multiple magnetic transitions, glassy phenomena, and ground state magnetic properties in a large class of complex magnetic oxides, including La0.7Ca0.3- xSrxMnO3 (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.25), Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO3, Pr1-xSrxCoO 3 (x = 0.3, 0.35, 0.4 and 0.5), La5/8- xPrxCa3/8MnO3 (x = 0.275 and 0.375), and Ca3Co2O 6. First, the influences of strain and grain boundaries, via chemical substitution and reduced dimensionality, were studied via MCE in La0.7Ca 0.3-xSrxMnO 3. Polycrystalline, single crystalline, and thin-film La0.7Ca 0.3-xSrxMnO 3 samples show a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition at a wide variety of temperatures as well as an observed change in the fundamental nature of the transition (i.e. first-order magnetic transition to second order magnetic transition) that is dependent on the chemical concentration and dimensionality. Systematic TS and MCE experiments on Pr0.5Sr0.5MnO 3 and Pr0.5Sr0.5CoO3 have uncovered the different nature of low

  5. Experimental Investigation on Airfoil Shock Control by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Quan; Cheng, Bangqin; Li, Yinghong; Cui, Wei; Jin, Di; Li, Jun

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on airfoil (NACA64—215) shock control is performed by plasma aerodynamic actuation in a supersonic tunnel (Ma = 2). The results of schlieren and pressure measurement show that when plasma aerodynamic actuation is applied, the position moves forward and the intensity of shock at the head of the airfoil weakens. With the increase in actuating voltage, the total pressure measured at the head of the airfoil increases, which means that the shock intensity decreases and the control effect increases. The best actuation effect is caused by upwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, and then downwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, while the control effect of aerodynamic actuation without a magnetic field is the most inconspicuous. The mean intensity of the normal shock at the head of the airfoil is relatively decreased by 16.33%, and the normal shock intensity is relatively reduced by 27.5% when 1000 V actuating voltage and upwind-direction actuation are applied with a magnetic field. This paper theoretically analyzes the Joule heating effect generated by DC discharge and the Lorentz force effect caused by the magnetic field. The discharge characteristics are compared for all kinds of actuation conditions to reveal the mechanism of shock control by plasma aerodynamic actuation.

  6. Magnetic Susceptibility of Ancient and Modern Potsherds Using a Fast, Cheap and Portable Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, P. W.

    2009-05-01

    It has been estimated that there exist over 100 million ancient potsherds in various collections worldwide, many of which have never been studied and for which the provenance is ambiguous or unknown. Indeed, many collections are extremely badly catalogued or completely mixed-up. We have been using a novel portable probe to measure the magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of potsherds in the hope that this fast, cheap and portable measurement can provide data that will help to sort similar looking potsherds into sets in a manner which may help to define their provenance. The probe, which resembles a firearm, uses the Hall effect to make a non-destructive measurement on the potsherd. The probe is attached to an Dell Axim X51 PDA, which runs software that allows the measurement to be carried out and logged. Each measurement, which is made by pressing a button on the gun, takes only a few seconds. We have made measurements on three suites of ancient potsherds as well as a suite of modern potsherds that were created by using a garden centre and a hammer! In each case a set of 5 stacked measurements were taken on the inside and outside faces of the potsherd in two perpendicular directions. Potsherds which were either (i) so flat that the inside and outside could not be distinguished, (ii) so curved (radius of curvature less than 5 cm) that the probe tip could not approach the surface sufficiently closely, or (iii) smaller than the probe tip, were excluded from the suite of measurements. Each suite contained over 50 measureable potsherds. All measurements were completed within one day. In this pilot study we found that (1) each suite was represented by a normal distribution of magnetic susceptibility values, (2) the four different suites could be distinguished statistically on the basis of their magnetic susceptibility measurements, but (3) the distinction was not sufficiently powerful to separate all potsherds (i.e., there was a significant overlap of the

  7. Probing the Chemical Stability of Mixed Ferrites: Implications for Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agent Design

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz-Sikma, Elise A.; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Ma, Qing; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2011-09-16

    Nanomaterials with mixed composition, in particular magnetic spinel ferrites, are emerging as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Many factors, including size, composition, atomic structure, and surface properties, are crucial in the design of such nanoparticle-based probes because of their influence on the magnetic properties. Silica-coated iron oxide (IO-SiO{sub 2}) and cobalt ferrite (CoIO-SiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were synthesized using standard high-temperature thermal decomposition and base-catalyzed water-in-oil microemulsion techniques. Under neutral aqueous conditions, it was found that 50-75% of the cobalt content in the CoIO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles leached out of the core structure. Leaching caused a 7.2-fold increase in the longitudinal relaxivity and an increase in the saturation magnetization from {approx}48 to {approx}65 emu/g of the core. X-ray absorption fine structure studies confirmed that the atomic structure of the ferrite core was altered following leaching, while transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering confirmed that the morphology and size of the nanoparticle remained unchanged. The CoIO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles converted from a partially inverted spinel cation arrangement (unleached state) to an inverse spinel arrangement (leached state). The control IO-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles remained stable with no change in the structure and negligible changes in the magnetic behavior. This detailed analysis highlights how important understanding the properties of nanomaterials is in the development of reliable agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  8. Comparative measurements of plasma potential with ball-pen and Langmuir probe in low-temperature magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zanáška, M.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.; Adámek, J.; Peterka, M.

    2015-03-15

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) is used for direct plasma potential measurements in magnetized plasma. The probe can adjust the ratio of the electron and ion saturation currents I{sub sat}{sup −}/I{sub sat}{sup +} to be close to one and therefore its I-V characteristic becomes nearly symmetric. If this is achieved, the floating potential of the BPP is close to the plasma potential. Because of its rather simple construction, it offers an attractive probe for measurements in magnetized plasma. Comparative measurements of plasma potential by BPPs of different dimensions as well as one Langmuir probe (LP) in an argon discharge plasma of a cylindrical magnetron were performed at various experimental conditions. An additional comparison by an emissive probe was also performed. All these types of probes provide similar values of plasma potential in a wide range of plasma parameters. Our results for three different BPP dimensions indicate that the BPP can be operated in a cylindrical magnetron DC argon discharge if the value of the ratio of the magnetic field and neutral gas pressure, B/p, is greater than approximately 10 mT/Pa.

  9. A wide linear range Eddy Current Displacement Sensor equipped with dual-coil probe applied in the Magnetic Suspension Flywheel.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wen, Tong

    2012-01-01

    The Eddy Current Displacement Sensor (ECDS) is widely used in the Magnetic Suspension Flywheel (MSFW) to measure the tiny clearance between the rotor and the magnetic bearings. The linear range of the ECDS is determined by the diameter of its probe coil. Wide clearances must be measured in some new MSFWs recently designed for the different space missions, but the coil diameter is limited by some restrictions. In this paper, a multi-channel ECDS equipped with dual-coil probes is proposed to extend the linear range to satisfy the demands of such MSFWs. In order to determine the best configuration of the dual-coil probe, the quality factors of the potential types of the dual-coil probes, the induced eddy current and the magnetic intensity on the surface of the measuring object are compared with those of the conventional single-coil probe. The linear range of the ECDS equipped with the selected dual-coil probe is extended from 1.1 mm to 2.4 mm under the restrictions without adding any cost for additional compensation circuits or expensive coil materials. The effectiveness of the linear range extension ability and the dynamic response of the designed ECDS are confirmed by the testing and the applications in the MSFW. PMID:23112623

  10. Biomimetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, Vaclav; Boudova, Lea; Haluzikova, Denisa

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is to propose an alternative model of mammalian skeletal muscle function, which reflects the simplicity of nature and can be applied in engineering. Van der Waals attractive and repulsive electrostatic forces are assumed to control the design of internal structures and functions of contractile units of the muscles - sarcomere. The role of myosin heads is crucial for the higher order formation. The model of the myosin head lattice is the working model for the sarcomere contraction interpretation. The contraction is interpreted as a calcium induced phase transition of the lattice, which results in relative actin-myosin sliding and/or force generation. The model should provide the engineering science with a simple analogy to technical actuators of high performance.

  11. A peptide probe for the detection of neurokinin-1 receptor by disaggregation enhanced fluorescence and magnetic resonance signals

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingxian; Zou, Rongfeng; Wang, Qi; Xue, Yajing; Wei, Ping; Yang, Shiping; Wu, Junchen; Tian, He

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel peptide probe for the detection of neurokinin-1 receptor using disaggregation-caused signal enhancement. The probe was obtained via the aggregation of a modified substance P in a terpyridine-Fe (II) complex with Gd (III)-DOTA into well-defined nanostructures, which effectively weaken ligand fluorescence and slow the exchange rate of inner-sphere water molecules. This probe disaggregates upon binding to the neurokinin-1 receptor and activates the contrast agents to generate a fluorescent signal that positively enhances magnetic resonance imaging contrast and allows for the detection of overexpressed receptors on tumor cells and the identification of lung cancer using serum samples. PMID:25270511

  12. Applied Doppler Imaging: Can The Magnetic Activity Of IM Pegasi Affect The Gravity Probe B Mission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, S. C.; Berdyugina, S. V.

    2006-08-01

    IM Pegasi is a single-lined spectroscopic RS CVn binary, with the primary being a rapidly-rotating (vsini = 27 km/s) early-K giant. Magnetic activity of the primary is evident as dark spot features covering 15% or more of the stellar surface. Since the system is bright in both optical and radio bands, IM Pegasi was chosen as a guide star for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite mission. The mission is designed to verify two predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity, the geodetic effect and "frame-dragging", based on measurements of mean gyroscope drift with respect to the optical centroid of IM Pegasi. The requested standard error of 0.5 milliarcseconds/year implies that even small contributions to the shift of the optical centroid of IM Pegasi due to surface magnetic activity must be determined. In support of the GP-B mission we are undertaking an intensive Doppler imaging survey of the primary component of IM Pegasi to determine the effect of spot features on the optical centroid of IM Pegasi. We present an overview of our role in GP-B and report initial results from this support project, including the first magnetic maps of the IM Pegasi primary, created using Least-Squares Deconvolution and Zeeman Doppler Imaging.

  13. Applied Doppler Imaging: Can Magnetic Activity of IM Pegasi Affect the Gravity Probe B Mission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.

    2006-12-01

    IM Peg is a single-lined, spectroscopic RS CVn binary, with a rapidly rotating (v sin i=27 km/s), early K-type, giant primary. Magnetic activity of the primary is indicated by dark spots covering > 15% of the surface. The system is bright in both optical and radio, and was chosen as a guide star for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) satellite mission. The goal of GP-B is to verify two predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity (geodetic effect and ``frame dragging''), based on measurements of mean gyroscopic drift with respect to the optical centroid of IM Peg. The requested precision of 0.5×10-3 arcsec/yr implies that even small shifts of the optical centroid of IM Peg due to surface magnetic activity must be determined. In support of the GP-B mission, we are undertaking an intensive Doppler imaging survey of the primary component of IM Peg, to determine the effect of spot features on its optical centroid. We present an overview of our work for GP-B, and report initial results from this support project, including the first magnetic maps of the IM~Peg primary, created using Least-Squares Deconvolution and Zeeman Doppler Imaging.

  14. Growth rate of matter perturbations as a probe of large-scale magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2011-09-01

    The growth rate of matter perturbations is computed in a magnetized environment for the ΛCDM and wCDM paradigms. It is argued that the baryons do not necessarily follow into the dark matter potential wells after they are released from the drag of the photons. The baryonic evolution equations inherit a forcing term whose explicit form depends on the plasma description and can be deduced, for instance, in the resistive magnetohydrodynamical approximation. After deriving an analytical expression for the growth rate applicable when dark energy does not cluster, the effects of relativistic corrections and of the inhomogeneities associated with the other species of the plasma are taken into account numerically. The spectral amplitudes and slopes of the stochastic magnetic background are selected to avoid appreciable distortions in the measured temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background. The growth of structures in the current paradigms of structure formation represents a complementary probe of large-scale magnetism in the same way as the shape of the growth factor and the associated indices can be used, in the conventional lore, to discriminate between competing scenarios of dark energy or even to distinguish different models of gravity.

  15. Probing structure-property relationships in perpendicularly magnetized Fe/Cu(001) using MXLD and XPD

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, T.R.; Waddill, G.D.; Goodman, K.W.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic X-ray Linear Dichroism (MXLD) in Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Diffraction (XPD) of the Fe 3p core level have been used to probe the magnetic structure-property relationships of perpendicularly magnetized Fe/Cu(001), in an element-specific fashion. A strong MEXLD effect was observed in the high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy of the Fe 3p at {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} emission and was used to follow the loss of perpendicular ferromagnetic ordering as the temperature was raised toward room temperature. In parallel with this, {open_quotes}Forward Focussing{close_quotes} in XPD was used as a direct measure of geometric structure in the overlayer. These results and the implications of their correlation will be discussed. Additionally, an investigation of the effect of Mn doping of the Fe/Cu(001) will be described. These measurements were performed at the Spectromicroscopy Facility (Beamline 7.0.1) of the Advanced Light Source.

  16. Probing boundary magnetization through exchange bias in heterostructures with competing anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Binek, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Cr2O3 (chromia) is a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet with a bulk TN of 307 K. It has been utilized for electrically controlled exchange bias (EB) by taking advantage of voltage-controllable boundary magnetization (BM) occurring as a generic property in magnetoelectric single domain antiferromagnets.[2] In the perpendicular Cr2O3(0001)/CoPd EB system the EB-field shows an order parameter type T-dependence close to TN reflecting the T-dependence of the BM. At about 150 K a decrease of the EB-field sets in with decreasing temperature suggesting canting of the BM. To evidence this mechanism we use EB as a probe. Specifically, we investigate EB in Permalloy(5nm)/Cr2O3 (0001)(100nm) with Permalloy and chromia having competing anisotropies. We measure easy axis magnetic hysteresis loops via longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect for various temperatures after perpendicular and in-plane magnetic field-cooling. The T-dependence of the EB field supports the canting mechanism. In addition to the all thin film EB system, we explore a Permalloy(10nm)/Cr2O3(0001 single crystal) heterostructure where magnetoelectric annealing allows selecting Cr2O3 single domain states. Here the effect of T-dependent canting of the BM is compared with findings in the complementary perpendicular EB system. Financial support by NSF through MRSEC and the Nanoelectronic Research Initiative.

  17. Preparation and characterization of a magnetic and optical dual-modality molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumb, A.; Regino, C. A. S.; Perkins, M. R.; Bernardo, M.; Ogawa, M.; Fugger, L.; Choyke, P. L.; Dobson, P. J.; Brechbiel, M. W.

    2010-04-01

    Multi-modality imaging probes combine the advantages of individual imaging techniques to yield highly detailed anatomic and molecular information in living organisms. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of a dual-modality nanoprobe that couples the magnetic properties of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) with the near infrared fluorescence of Cy5.5. The fluorophore is encapsulated in a biocompatible shell of silica surrounding the iron oxide core for a final diameter of ~ 17 nm. This silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticle (SCION) has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The particle demonstrates a strong negative surface charge and maintains colloidal stability in the physiological pH range. Magnetic hysteresis analysis confirms superparamagnetic properties that could be manipulated for thermotherapy. The viability of primary human monocytes, T cells, and B cells incubated with the particle has been examined in vitro. In vivo analysis of agent leakage into subcutaneous A431 tumors in mice was also conducted. This particle has been designed for diagnostic application with magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, and has future potential to serve as a heat-sensitive targeted drug delivery platform.

  18. An Immuno-Magnetic Nanobead Probe Competitive Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella choleraesuis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daofeng; Yu, Zhibiao; Huang, Yanmei; Wang, Shuying; Wang, Jingyun; Guo, Qi; Xu, Chaolian; Xia, Shiqi; Lai, Weihua

    2016-03-01

    A competitive lateral flow assay for the rapid detection of Salmonella choleraesuis was developed. Immuno-magnetic nanobeads were produced by covalently coupling anti-Salmonella choleraesuis antibody to magnetic nanobeads. These immuno-magnetic nanobeads were used as visually detected probes in the subsequent assay. Compared with the traditional sandwich assay, which is used for detecting macro-molecules, this new method was developed based on the competitive relationship between S. choleraesuis in the inspected sample and the outer membrane protein immobilized on the T line. Thus, only one antibody was necessary in the new assay, whereas a pair of rigorously selected antibodies were required in the sandwich assay. The sensitivity of the competitive assay for S. choleraesuis was 1.2 x 10(7) cfu/mL. In addition, no cross reactions were found in the 17 common non-Salmonella bacteria strains and in the 4 Salmonella strains of other serotypes. Thus, with satisfactory sensitivity and specificity, the assay can be applied for the rapid detection of pre-enriched culture that may contain S. choleraesuis. PMID:27455631

  19. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  20. Using magnetic coupling to implement 1H, 19F, 13C experiments in routine high resolution NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Paul; Finnigan, Jim; Marsden, Brian; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2015-12-01

    We report in this paper the design of 1H, 19F, 13C circuitry using magnetic coupling which can do on demand experiments where one of the three nuclei is observed and the other two are decoupled. The implementation of this circuitry in routine NMR probes is compared with capacitive coupling methods where it was found that by using magnetic coupling the performance of the routine NMR probe was not impacted by the addition of this circuitry. It is surmised that using this type of circuitry would be highly desirable for those chemists doing routine 19F NMR.

  1. Magnetically engineered Cd-free quantum dots as dual-modality probes for fluorescence/magnetic resonance imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ke; Jing, Lihong; Liu, Chunyan; Hou, Yi; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-02-01

    Magnetically engineered Cd-free CuInS2@ZnS:Mn quantum dots (QDs) were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential dual-modality probes for fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumors in vivo. The synthesis of Mn-doped core-shell structured CuInS2@ZnS mainly comprised three steps, i.e., the preparation of fluorescent CuInS2 seeds, the particle surface coating of ZnS, and the Mn-doping of the ZnS shells. Systematic spectroscopy studies were carried out to illustrate the impacts of ZnS coating and the following Mn-doping on the optical properties of the QDs. In combination with conventional fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, and time-resolved fluorescence measurements, the structure of CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs prepared under optimized conditions presented a Zn gradient CuInS2 core and a ZnS outer shell, while Mn ions were mainly located in the ZnS shell, which well balanced the optical and magnetic properties of the resultant QDs. For the following in vivo imaging experiments, the hydrophobic CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs were transferred into water upon ligand exchange reactions by replacing the 1-dodecanethiol ligand with dihydrolipoic acid-poly(ethylene glycol) (DHLA-PEG) ligand. The MTT assays based on HeLa cells were carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the current Cd-free CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs for comparing with that of water soluble CdTe QDs. Further in vivo fluorescence and MR imaging experiments suggested that the PEGylated CuInS2@ZnS:Mn QDs could well target both subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumors in vivo. PMID:24239108

  2. Stabilization of large space structures by linear reluctance actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Saroj K.; Sendaula, Henry M.

    1991-01-01

    Application of magnetic forces are considered for stabilization of vibrations of flexible space structures. Three electromagnetic phenomena are studied, such as: (1) magnetic body force; (2) reluctance torque; and (3) magnetostriction, and their application is analyzed for stabilization of a beam. The magnetic body force actuator uses the force that exists between poles of magnets. The reluctance actuator is configured in such a way that the reluctance of the magnetic circuit will be minimum when the beam is straight. Any bending of the beam increases the reluctance and hence generates a restoring torque that reduces bending. The gain of the actuator is controlled by varying the magnetizing current. Since the energy density of a magnetic device is much higher compared to piezoelectric or thermal actuators, it is expected that the reluctance actuator will be more effective in controlling the structural vibrations.

  3. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on ancient and modern potsherds using a fast, cheap and portable probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, P. W. J.

    2009-04-01

    It has been estimated that there exist over 100 million ancient potsherds in various collections worldwide, many of which have never been studied and for which the provenance is ambiguous or unknown. Indeed, many collections are extremely badly catalogued or completely mixed-up. We have been using a novel portable probe to measure the magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity of potsherds in the hope that this fast, cheap and portable measurement can provide data that will help to sort similar looking potsherds into sets in a manner which may help to define their provenance. The probe, which resembles a firearm, uses the Hall effect to make a non-destructive measurement on the potsherd. The probe is attached to an Dell Axim X51 PDA, which runs software that allows the measurement to be carried out and logged. Each measurement, which is made by pressing a button on the gun, takes only a few seconds. We have made measurements on three suites of ancient potsherds as well as a suite of modern potsherds that were created by using a garden centre and a hammer! In each case a set of 5 stacked measurements were taken on the inside and outside faces of the potsherd in two perpendicular directions. Potsherds which were either (i) so flat that the inside and outside could not be distinguished, (ii) so curved (radius of curvature less than 5 cm) that the probe tip could not approach the surface sufficiently closely, or (iii) smaller than the probe tip, were excluded from the suite of measurements. Each suite contained over 50 measureable potsherds. All measurements were completed within one day. In this pilot study we found that (1) each suite was represented by a normal distribution of magnestic susceptibility values, (2) the four different suites could be distinguished statistically on the basis of their magnetic susceptibilty measurements, but (3) the distinction was not sufficiently powerful to separate all potsherds (i.e., there was a significant overlap of the

  4. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator that provides incremental linear movements to large object and holds its position against heavy loads. Electromechanical actuator cleaner and simpler, and needs less maintenance. Two principal innovative features that distinguish new actuator are use of shaft-angle resolver as source of position feedback to electronic control subsystem and antibacklash gearing arrangement.

  5. BLAZAR HALOS AS PROBE FOR EXTRAGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MAXIMAL ACCELERATION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Dolag, K.; Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Tomas, R.

    2009-09-20

    High-energy photons from blazars interact within tens of kpc with the extragalactic photon background, initiating electromagnetic pair cascades. The charged component of such cascades is deflected by extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs), leading to halos even around initially point-like sources. We calculate the intensity profile of the resulting secondary high-energy photons for different assumptions on the initial source spectrum and the strength of the EGMF, employing also fields found earlier in a constrained simulation of structure formation including magnetohydrodynamics processes. We find that the observation of halos around blazars like Mrk 180 probes an interesting range of EGMF strengths and acceleration models: in particular, blazar halos test if the photon energy spectrum at the source extends beyond {approx}100 TeV and how anisotropic this high-energy component is emitted.

  6. Enabling freehand lateral scanning of optical coherence tomography needle probes with a magnetic tracking system

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Boon Y.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Sampson, David D.

    2012-01-01

    We present a high-resolution three-dimensional position tracking method that allows an optical coherence tomography (OCT) needle probe to be scanned laterally by hand, providing the high degree of flexibility and freedom required in clinical usage. The method is based on a magnetic tracking system, which is augmented by cross-correlation-based resampling and a two-stage moving window average algorithm to improve upon the tracker's limited intrinsic spatial resolution, achieving 18 µm RMS position accuracy. A proof-of-principle system was developed, with successful image reconstruction demonstrated on phantoms and on ex vivo human breast tissue validated against histology. This freehand scanning method could contribute toward clinical implementation of OCT needle imaging. PMID:22808429

  7. Radio Synchrotron Fluctuation Statistics as a Probe of Magnetized Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, C. A.; Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Gaensler, B. M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate how observations of synchrotron intensity fluctuations can be used to probe the sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers of interstellar turbulence, based on mock observations performed on simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We find that the structure function slope and a diagnostic of anisotropy that we call the integrated quadrupole ratio modulus both depend on the Alfvénic Mach number. However, these statistics also depend on the orientation of the mean magnetic field in the synchrotron emitting region relative to our line of sight, and this creates a degeneracy that cannot be broken by observations of synchrotron intensity alone. We conclude that the polarization of synchrotron emission could be analyzed to break this degeneracy, and suggest that this will be possible with the Square Kilometre Array.

  8. Magnetic phases in EuMnO3 nanoceramics probed using ultraviolet excited opto-impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Srinivasan; Rangarajan, Jagannathan; Baerner, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    EuMnO nanocrystals (Φav˜5 nm) synthesized using sol-gel thermolysis exhibit significant difference in magnetic structure in comparison to their bulk-counterpart (Φav˜3 μm). Opto- and magneto-impedance techniques are successful local probes to bring out the difference between the bulk, nano-manganites with the latter manifesting in multiplicity of spin-defect ensembles attributed to pronounced difference between surface and core states. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra also confirm the variety of spin-defect ensembles arising from pronounced surface states. Upon optical perturbation, there is significant drop in resistivity (approximately four orders) at room temperature observed for the bulk EuMnO, an otherwise insulating system, which suggests an interesting scope for possible application.

  9. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2013-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the angular anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thereby inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that current Fermi data already seem to prefer nonnegligible IGMF values. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  10. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2012-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the anisotropy properties of the extragalactic gamma-ray background, through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thus inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that the two extreme cases (zero IGMF and IGMF strong enough to completely isotropize cascade photons) would be separable by ten years of Fermi observations and reasonable model parameters for the gamma-ray background. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  11. Langmuir-magnetic probe measurements of ELMs and dithering cycles in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, N.; Naulin, V.; Xu, G. S.; Rasmussen, J. J.; Wang, H. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, L.; Liang, Y.; Nielsen, A. H.; Madsen, J.; Guo, H. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-09-01

    Measurements of the dynamical behavior associated with edge localized modes (ELMs) have been carried out in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) by direct probing near the separatrix and far scrape-off layer (SOL) using electrostatic as well as magnetic probes. Type-III ELMs and dithering cycles have been investigated near the threshold power for the transition from the low confinement mode (L-mode) to the high confinement mode (H-mode). A precursor is observed prior to type-III ELM events with chirping frequency (130-70 kHz). It is located inside the separatrix and does not lead to considerable particle transport into the SOL. Distinct from type-III ELMs, no precursor modes precede the dithering cycles. It is evident from our measurements that the absence of precursor activity is a good indicator to distinguish the dithering cycles from type-III ELMs. A number of distinct current filaments are identified slightly inside the separatrix, both during type-III ELM events and dithering cycles. The characteristic current topology in these filaments is still ambiguous in our investigations. Furthermore, small ELMs are observed in type-I ELMy-like H-mode discharge regimes on EAST, in which solitary monopolar current filaments are observed to propagate in the SOL.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging compatibility testing of intracranial pressure probes. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Williams, E J; Bunch, C S; Carpenter, T A; Downey, S P; Kendall, I V; Czosnyka, M; Pickard, J D; Martin, J; Menon, D K

    1999-10-01

    There is increasing recognition that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy may provide important information in the assessment of patients with acute brain injury. However, optimum care of the acutely head injured patient requires monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP). Although many monitoring modalities have been integrated into commercially available MR-compatible systems, there have been no reports of commonly used intraparenchymal ICP sensors in an MR environment. The authors describe the use of an ICP micromanometer probe in an MR environment, with a fiberoptic connection that interfaces the probe with a commercially available MR-compatible monitoring system. Phantom studies were performed to demonstrate the safety and compatibility of the modified MR system at 0.5 tesla. The safety of the device was assessed in relation to its interaction with the static, gradient, and radiofrequency fields used in MR imaging. The MR compatibility was documented by demonstrating that its performance was unaffected by the operation of imaging sequences and by showing that there was no degradation of the diagnostic quality of imaging data obtained during ICP monitoring. PMID:10507397

  13. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  14. Magnetization reversal in individual Py and CoFeB nanotubes locally probed via anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertl, K.; Heimbach, F.; Maendl, S.; Rueffer, D.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.; Grundler, D.

    2016-03-01

    Using anisotropic magnetoresistance in a multi-probe configuration and local heating with a scanning laser, we investigate the magnetization reversal of individual permalloy (Py) and CoFeB nanotubes with spatial resolution. Nanocrystalline Py and amorphous CoFeB nanotubes are found to reverse via domain wall movement and chirality switching, respectively. Our experiments provide an understanding of the role of microstructure and magnetic anisotropy in the switching of ferromagnetic nanotubes at room temperature.

  15. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  16. Roles of Atomic Injection Rate and External Magnetic Field on Optical Properties of Elliptical Polarized Probe Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, R.; Asadpour, S. H.; Batebi, S.; Rahimpour Soleimani, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the optical properties of an open four-level tripod atomic system driven by an elliptically polarized probe field in the presence of the external magnetic field and compare its properties with the corresponding closed system. Our result reveals that absorption, dispersion and group velocity of probe field can be manipulated by adjusting the phase difference between the two circularly polarized components of a single coherent field, magnetic field and cavity parameters i.e. the atomic exit rate from cavity and atomic injection rates. We show that the system can exhibit multiple electromagnetically induced transparency windows in the presence of the external magnetic field. The numerical result shows that the probe field in the open system can be amplified by appropriate choice of cavity parameters, while in the closed system with introduce appropriate phase difference between fields the probe field can be enhanced. Also it is shown that the group velocity of light pulse can be controlled by external magnetic field, relative phase of applied fields and cavity parameters. By changing the parameters the group velocity of light pulse changes from subluminal to superluminal light propagation and vice versa.

  17. High-Resolution B Dot Probe for Measuring 3D Magnetic Fields in the MOCHI Labjet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuara Rosales, Manuel; von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The MOCHI Labjet experiment will use a triple electrode planar plasma gun to explore canonical helicity transport in laboratory astrophysical jets. Canonical helicity transport suggests that destabilizing magnetic energy can be converted into stabilizing shear flows at two-fluid spatial scales li ~c/wpi . A high-resolution . B probe array, capable of measuring magnetic field dynamics at length and time scales important to canonical helicity transport is being built. The probe array consists of three tridents, made of 5 . 13 mm OD and 4 . 32 mm ID stainless steel tubes of 102 cm length, enclosing a total of 1215 commercial inductor chips with a three axis spatial resolution of 11 mm. The average value for the effective NA of each inductor chip is 1 . 21 .10-4 m2. The probe array lays in a plane perpendicular to the jet, and is axially translatable. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  18. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  19. Non-linear magnetization dynamics probed with X-rays: 1. Broken cylindrical symmetry of uniform modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulon, J.; Brouder, Ch.; Rogalev, A.; Goujon, G.; Wilhelm, F.

    2014-10-01

    We discuss how X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and X-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) may complement each other to probe the nonlinear nature of the resonant precession of either spin or orbital magnetization components in aligned ferro-, ferri- or even antiferro-magnets. The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is solved in a rotating frame locked to the microwave pump field, while treating as time-dependent perturbations the terms which, in the formulation of the free energy density, break down the cylindrical symmetry of precession. Concretely, we analyze the time-oscillating deviations of the magnetization from the steady-state solutions of the LLG equation hereafter called SS-modes. At any perturbation order, one may derive magnetic dipole components which oscillate at harmonic frequencies of the pump frequency and could be probed with XMCD. Under bichromatic pumping, frequency mixing arises from a time-dependent Zeeman coupling between two rotating frames locked to each individual pump field. Similarly, we expect magnetic quadrupole components to oscillate at the same frequencies. For consistency, their derivation requires a perturbation calculation up to second order. The latter time-reversal even, rank-2 magnetic tensor components can be probed only with XMLD. Beyond the (reciprocal) linear dichroism classically measured in ferri- or antiferromagnetic samples, a non-reciprocal XMLD signal is to be expected when space parity is lost. Nonlinear effects strongly depend upon the relative orientations of the external bias field and of the pump field with respect to the symmetry axes of the magnetic system. This holds true for the foldover lineshape distortions, harmonic generation, frequency mixing or multiquanta excitations.

  20. Nanoscale probe of magnetism, orbital occupation, and structural distortions in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    Local probes of atomic and electronic structures with sub-nanometer spatial resolution can provide additional insights into the physics of iron-based superconductors (FBS) by resolving the influence of inhomogeneities that are typically averaged over by bulk-sensitive techniques. Here we apply aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy to a wide class of iron-based superconductors and parent compounds to decipher the interplay between crystal distortions, local magnetic moment, orbital occupancy, and charge doping in these complex materials. In addition to revealing universal trends for hole concentration and local magnetic moment across families of FBS, we directly observe the effects of magneto-elastic coupling in 122 arsenides at room temperature, well above the structural and antiferromagnetic transition. The presence of atomic displacements indicates that the C4 tetragonal symmetry is already broken at room temperature in unstrained crystals, lowering the symmetry to orthorhombic (I2mm), and that all of the crystals are twinned with domains the size of a few nanometers. By tracking these local atomic displacements as a function of doping level x, in Ba(Fe1-xCox)2 As2, we find that the domain size correlates with the magnitude of the dynamic Fe moment, and both are enhanced near optimal doping where the ordered moment is suppressed. The non-monotonic behavior of the local Fe magnetic moment is linked to the strong coupling between lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom. Research supported by the Materials Sciences and Engineering Division Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Enhanced staggered magnetization probed by NMR in Zn-doped YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Marc-Henri

    2001-03-01

    We present NMR measurements in Zn-doped YBCO. The electronic spin polarization of Cu sites is probed through 63Cu NMR spectra, and is found to grow rapidly on cooling, in agreement with previous 63Cu, 89Y and 17O NMR works [1]. This is attributed to staggered magnetic moments induced on many sites around the impurity, presumably including also the first neighbor sites. Hence, the notion of destruction of AF correlations by Zn is not valid, as also shown by the enhanced low temperature/low energy spectral weight at Q=(pi/a,pi/a), detected in inelastic neutron scattering [2] and NMR T1 measurements [3]. In Ref. [3], we have used the expression "enhancement of AF correlations", proposed in another context [4]. Strictly speaking, however, it is the staggered polarization, rather than the strength of AF correlations, which is enhanced with respect to the pure material: Zn only reveals the already-existing AF-correlated Cu2+ moments. Actually, this kind of magnetic response is expected for any kind of local disorder in CuO2 planes. The staggered magnetic moments with spatially distributed amplitude in CuO2 planes (AF-like patches) give rise to a Curie-like contribution in the bulk susceptibility. They may also have an important impact in transport or spectroscopic measurements. [1] R.E. Walstedt et al., PRB 48, 10646 (1993); A.V. Mahajan et al. PRL 72, 3100 (1994); J. Bobroff et al., Physica C 282-287, 139 (1997). [2] Y. Sidis et al., PRB 53, 6811 (1996); P. Bourges et al., Czech. J. Phys 46, 1155 (1996). [3] M.-H. Julien et al., PRL 84, 3422 (2000). [4] G.B. Martins, PRL 78, 3563 (1997).

  2. Characterization of heat-assisted magnetic probe recording on cobalt nickel/platinum multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li

    In this PhD project, a method of heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) potentially suitable for probe-based storage systems is characterized. Field emission current from a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip is used as the heating source. Pulse voltages of 2--7 V were applied to a CoNi/Pt multilayered film. Identical films fabricated on a bare silicon substrate and an oxidized silicon substrate were applied as the recording medium. Different types of Ir/Pt and W STM tips were used in the experiment. Without the external magnetic field, results show that thermally recorded magnetic marks are formed in the film on silicon substrate, with a nearly uniform mark size of 170 nm when the pulse voltage is above a threshold value. Larger marks were obtained on the film on oxidized silicon substrate. The threshold voltage depends on the material work function of tip. External fields will change the mark size: negative fields lead to smaller marks and positive fields lead to larger marks. Field addition during writing also shows that positive field lowers the threshold write voltage. A model is used to quantitatively simulate our experimental results. It contains three aspects: model of emission current, model of heat transfer in a multilayered structure, and model of magnetic domain. The simulation result agrees well with our experimental results. Based on the model, the requirements to achieve smaller marks are sharp STM tip and high coercivity granular perpendicular medium fabricated on a high thermal conductivity substrate. Some experiments were done on some high coercivity samples. We achieved the smallest marks as 50 nm. We also tried writing by very sharp STM tips with radius below 10 nm, and unfortunately no marks were written. In order to achieve small marks for the purpose of 1 Terabits/in2 recording density, i.e., mark size of 25 nm, we propose writing on a granular perpendicular medium by applying a 3.5 V voltage between a sharp W STM tip (with tip radius of

  3. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  4. Fabrication of a 3D active mixer based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS cones with magnetic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh, Elaheh

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an active 3D mixer for lab-on-chip applications is presented. The micrometer size cone shape holes are ablated on a PMMA sheet utilizing a CO2 laser. The holes are filled with Fe micro-particles and the whole structure is molded with PDMS which cause the Fe micro-particles to be trapped in a PDMS cone structure. These Fe-doped PDMS cones are placed in a PMMA micro-channel structure fabricated by CO2 laser machining. By applying an external periodic magnetic field, the cones periodically bend in the micro-channel and stir the fluid. The fabrication method and the effect of the magnetic field on the bending of the cones with different aspect ratios is also discussed utilizing computer simulation. Doping the polymers with micro- and nano-metallic particles has been carried out by different research groups before, but according to our knowledge, application of such structures for the fabrication of a 3D active mixer has not been presented before.

  5. A dual-modal magnetic nanoparticle probe for preoperative and intraoperative mapping of sentinel lymph nodes by magnetic resonance and near infrared fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhengyang; Chen, Hongwei; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Liya; Yu, Qiqi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Tiwari, Diana; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The ability to reliably detect sentinel lymph nodes for sentinel lymph node biopsy and lymphadenectomy is important in clinical management of patients with metastatic cancers. However, the traditional sentinel lymph node mapping with visible dyes is limited by the penetration depth of light and fast clearance of the dyes. On the other hand, sentinel lymph node mapping with radionucleotide technique has intrinsically low spatial resolution and does not provide anatomic details in the sentinel lymph node mapping procedure. This work reports the development of a dual modality imaging probe with magnetic resonance and near infrared imaging capabilities for sentinel lymph node mapping using magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (10 nm core size) conjugated with a near infrared molecule with emission at 830 nm. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in sentinel lymph nodes leads to strong T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast that can be potentially used for preoperative localization of sentinel lymph nodes, while conjugated near infrared molecules provide optical imaging tracking of lymph nodes with a high signal to background ratio. The new magnetic nanoparticle based dual imaging probe exhibits a significant longer lymph node retention time. Near infrared signals from nanoparticle conjugated near infrared dyes last up to 60 min in sentinel lymph node compared to that of 25 min for the free near infrared dyes in a mouse model. Furthermore, axillary lymph nodes, in addition to sentinel lymph nodes, can be also visualized with this probe, given its slow clearance and sufficient sensitivity. Therefore, this new dual modality imaging probe with the tissue penetration and sensitive detection of sentinel lymph nodes can be applied for preoperative survey of lymph nodes with magnetic resonance imaging and allows intraoperative sentinel lymph node mapping using near infrared optical devices. PMID:23812946

  6. Nitrilotriacetic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles as affinity probes for enrichment of histidine-tagged proteins and phosphorylated peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Ya-Shiuan; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chen, Cheng-Tai; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-10-01

    We herein demonstrate superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with nitrilotriacetic acid derivative (NTA) that can bind with different immobilized metal ions are capable of probing diverse target species. Immobilized Ni(II) on the surfaces of the NTA-magnetic nanoparticles have the capability of selectively trapping histidine (His)-tagged proteins such as a mutated streptopain tagged with 6x His, i.e., C192S (MW approximately 42 kDa), from cell lysates. Enrichment was achieved by vigorously mixing the sample solution and the nanoparticles by pipetting in and out of a sample vial for only 30 s. After enrichment, the probe-target species could be readily isolated by magnetic separation. We also characterized the proteins enriched on the affinity probes using on-probe tryptic digestion under microwave irradiation for only 2 min, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry analysis. Using this enrichment and tryptic digestion, the target species can be rapidly enriched and characterized, reducing the time required for carrying out the complete analysis to less than 10 min. Furthermore, when either Zr(IV) or Ga (III) ions are immobilized on the surfaces of the NTA-magnetic nanoparticles, the nanoparticles have the capability of selectively enriching phosphorylated peptides from tryptic digests of alpha-, beta-caseins, and diluted milk. The detection limit for the tryptic digests of alpha- and beta-caseins is approximately 50 fmol. PMID:17784733

  7. Application of AI techniques to a voice-actuated computer system for reconstructing and displaying magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherley, Patrick L.; Pujol, Alfonso, Jr.; Meadow, John S.

    1990-07-01

    To provide a means of rendering complex computer architectures languages and input/output modalities transparent to experienced and inexperienced users research is being conducted to develop a voice driven/voice response computer graphics imaging system. The system will be used for reconstructing and displaying computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan data. In conjunction with this study an artificial intelligence (Al) control strategy was developed to interface the voice components and support software to the computer graphics functions implemented on the Sun Microsystems 4/280 color graphics workstation. Based on generated text and converted renditions of verbal utterances by the user the Al control strategy determines the user''s intent and develops and validates a plan. The program type and parameters within the plan are used as input to the graphics system for reconstructing and displaying medical image data corresponding to that perceived intent. If the plan is not valid the control strategy queries the user for additional information. The control strategy operates in a conversation mode and vocally provides system status reports. A detailed examination of the various AT techniques is presented with major emphasis being placed on their specific roles within the total control strategy structure. 1.

  8. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  9. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  10. [Connection of magnetic antisense probe with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide detected by high resolution atomic force microscope].

    PubMed

    Tan, Shude; Ouyang, Yu; Li, Xinyou; Wen, Ming; Li, Shaolin

    2011-06-01

    The present paper is aimed to detect superparamagnetic iron oxide labeled c-erbB2 oncogene antisense oligonucleotide probe (magnetic antisense probe) connected with SK-Br-3 oncocyte mRNA nucleotide by high resolution atomic force microscope (AFM). We transfected SK-Br-3 oncocyte with magnetic antisense probe, then observed the cells by AFM with high resolution and detected protein expression and magnetic resonance imagine (MRI). The high resolution AFM clearly showed the connection of the oligonucleotide remote end of magnetic antisense probe with the mRNA nucleotide of oncocyte. The expression of e-erbB2 protein in SK-Br3 cells were highly inhibited by using magnetic antisense probe. We then obtained the lowest signal to noise ratio (SNR) of SK-Br-3 oncocyte transfected with magnetic antisense probe by MRI (P<0.05). These experiments demonstrated that the high resolution AFM could be used to show the binding of magnetic antisense probe and SK-Br-3 mRNA of tumor cell nuclear. PMID:21774198

  11. Analysis of magnetic probe signals including effect of cylindrical conducting wall for field-reversed configuration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeyama, Taeko; Hiroi, Masanori; Nemoto, Yuuichi; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2008-06-15

    A confinement field is disturbed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) motions of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in a cylindrical conductor. The effect of the conductor should be included to obtain a spatial structure of the disturbed field with a good precision. For this purpose, a toroidal current in the plasma and an eddy current on a conducting wall are replaced by magnetic dipole and image magnetic dipole moments, respectively. Typical spatial structures of the disturbed field are calculated by using the dipole moments for such MHD motions as radial shift, internal tilt, external tilt, and n=2 mode deformation. Then, analytic formulas for estimating the shift distance, tilt angle, and deformation rate of the MHD motions from magnetic probe signals are derived. It is estimated from the calculations by using the dipole moments that the analytic formulas include an approximately 40% error. Two kinds of experiment are carried out to investigate the reliability of the calculations. First, a magnetic field produced by a circular current is measured in an aluminum pipe to confirm the replacement of the eddy current with the image magnetic dipole moments. The measured fields coincide well with the calculated values including the image magnetic dipole moments. Second, magnetic probe signals measured from the FRC plasma are substituted into the analytic formulas to obtain shift distance and deformation rate. The experimental results are compared to the MHD motions measured by using a radiation from the plasma. If the error included in the analytic formulas and the difference between the magnetic and optical structures in the plasma are considered, the results of the radiation measurement support well those of the magnetic analysis.

  12. Probing astrocyte metabolism in vivo: proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the injured and aging brain.

    PubMed

    Harris, Janna L; Choi, In-Young; Brooks, William M

    2015-01-01

    Following a brain injury, the mobilization of reactive astrocytes is part of a complex neuroinflammatory response that may have both harmful and beneficial effects. There is also evidence that astrocytes progressively accumulate in the normal aging brain, increasing in both number and size. These astrocyte changes in normal brain aging may, in the event of an injury, contribute to the exacerbated injury response and poorer outcomes observed in older traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors. Here we present our view that proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), a neuroimaging approach that probes brain metabolism within a defined region of interest, is a promising technique that may provide insight into astrocyte metabolic changes in the injured and aging brain in vivo. Although (1)H-MRS does not specifically differentiate between cell types, it quantifies certain metabolites that are highly enriched in astrocytes (e.g., Myo-inositol, mlns), or that are involved in metabolic shuttling between astrocytes and neurons (e.g., glutamate and glutamine). Here we focus on metabolites detectable by (1)H-MRS that may serve as markers of astrocyte metabolic status. We review the physiological roles of these metabolites, discuss recent (1)H-MRS findings in the injured and aging brain, and describe how an astrocyte metabolite profile approach might be useful in clinical medicine and clinical trials. PMID:26578948

  13. Fisher analysis on wide-band polarimetry for probing the intergalactic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Takahashi, Keitaro; Akahori, Takuya; Kumazaki, Kohei; Ryu, Dongsu

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the capability of current radio telescopes for probing Faraday rotation measure (RM) due to the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in the large-scale structure of the universe, which is expected to be of order O (1) rad m-2. We consider polarization observations of a compact radio source such as quasars behind a diffuse source such as the Galaxy, and calculate Stokes parameters Q and U assuming a simple model of the Faraday dispersion functions with Gaussian shape. Then, we perform the Fisher analysis to estimate the expected errors in the model parameters from QU-fitting of polarization intensity, accounting for the sensitivities and frequency bands of Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder, Low Frequency Array, and the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope. Finally, we examine the conditions on the source intensities which are required to detect the IGMF. Our analysis indicates that the QU-fitting is promising for forthcoming wideband polarimetry to explore RM due to the IGMF in filaments of galaxies.

  14. Fast Radio Bursts as Probes of Magnetic Fields in the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu; Gaensler, B. M.

    2016-06-01

    We examine the proposal that the dispersion measures (DMs) and Faraday rotation measures (RMs) of extragalactic linearly polarized fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to probe the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies. The DM through the cosmic web is dominated by contributions from the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) in filaments and from the gas in voids. On the other hand, RM is induced mostly by the hot medium in galaxy clusters, and only a fraction of it is produced in the WHIM. We show that if one excludes FRBs whose sightlines pass through galaxy clusters, the line of sight (LOS) strength of the IGMF in filaments, {B}| | , is approximately C(< 1+z> /{f}{DM})({RM}/{DM}), where C is a known constant. Here, the redshift of the FRB is not required to be known; f DM is the fraction of total DM due to the WHIM, while < 1+z> is the redshift of interevening gas weighted by the WHIM gas density, both of which can be evaluated for a given cosmology model solely from the DM of an FRB. Using data on structure formation simulations and a model IGMF, we show that C(< 1+z> /{f}{DM})({RM}/{DM}) closely reproduces the density-weighted LOS strength of the IGMF in filaments of the large-scale structure.

  15. Probing articular cartilage damage and disease by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Deva D.; Neu, Corey P.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease that reflects a complex interplay of biochemical, biomechanical, metabolic and genetic factors, which are often triggered by injury, and mediated by inflammation, catabolic cytokines and enzymes. An unmet clinical need is the lack of reliable methods that are able to probe the pathogenesis of early OA when disease-rectifying therapies may be most effective. Non-invasive quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) techniques have shown potential for characterizing the structural, biochemical and mechanical changes that occur with cartilage degeneration. In this paper, we review the background in articular cartilage and OA as it pertains to conventional MRI and qMRI techniques. We then discuss how conventional MRI and qMRI techniques are used in clinical and research environments to evaluate biochemical and mechanical changes associated with degeneration. Some qMRI techniques allow for the use of relaxometry values as indirect biomarkers for cartilage components. Direct characterization of mechanical behaviour of cartilage is possible via other specialized qMRI techniques. The combination of these qMRI techniques has the potential to fully characterize the biochemical and biomechanical states that represent the initial changes associated with cartilage degeneration. Additionally, knowledge of in vivo cartilage biochemistry and mechanical behaviour in healthy subjects and across a spectrum of osteoarthritic patients could lead to improvements in the detection, management and treatment of OA. PMID:23135247

  16. Probing Corticospinal Recruitment Patterns and Functional Synergies with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, James; Kübler, Angelika; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: On the one hand, stimulating the motor cortex at different spots may activate the same muscle and result in a muscle-specific cortical map. Maps of different muscles, which are functionally coupled, may present with a large overlap but may also show a relevant variability. On the other hand, stimulation of the motor cortex at one spot with different stimulation intensities results in a characteristic input–output (IO) curve for one specific muscle but may simultaneously also activate different, functionally coupled muscles. A comparison of the cortical map overlap of synergistic muscles and their IO curves has not yet been carried out. Objective: The aim of this study was to probe functional synergies of forearm muscles with transcranial magnetic stimulation by harnessing the convergence and divergence of the corticospinal output. Methods: We acquired bihemispheric cortical maps and IO curves of the extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, and extensor digitorum communis muscles by subjecting 11 healthy subjects to both monophasic and biphasic pulse waveforms. Results: The degree of synergy between pairs of forearm muscles was captured by the overlap of the cortical motor maps and the respective IO curves which were influenced by the pulse waveform. Monophasic and biphasic stimulation were particularly suitable for disentangling synergistic muscles in the right and left hemisphere, respectively. Conclusion: Combining IO curves and different pulse waveforms may provide complementary information on neural circuit dynamics and corticospinal recruitment patterns of synergistic muscles and their neuroplastic modulation. PMID:27458344

  17. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  18. Subminiature hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.

    1978-01-01

    Subminiature, single-vane rotary actuator for wind-tunnel test-model control-surface actuation systems presents severe torque and system band-pass requirements with stringent space and weight limitations. Actuator has very low leakage of fluid from one side to other, permitting use in precision position servo-systems.

  19. Dual drive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of electromechanical actuators is described. These dual drive actuators were developed for the NASA-JPL Galileo Spacecraft. The dual drive actuators are fully redundant and therefore have high inherent reliability. They can be used for a variety of tasks, and they can be fabricated quickly and economically.

  20. Development of a magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe with a cryogenic detection system for sensitivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Takashi; Hioka, Katsuya; Fujioka, Koji; Takegoshi, K.

    2008-04-01

    A novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe for high-resolution solid-state NMR has been developed. In this probe, temperature of the detection coil is kept at cryogenic temperature (˜12K) for sensitivity enhancement, which is achieved not only by suppression of thermal noise but also by increment of a Q factor of the coil. A marked feature of this probe is that a sample rotating at magic angle is thermally isolated from the cryogenic system in order to realize high-resolution solid-state NMR measurement at various sample temperatures. We call this system as cryocoil magic-angle spinning (cryocoil MAS). H1 MAS NMR with the coil temperature of ˜20K was successfully observed for solid adamantane rotating at room temperature, and signal-to-noise increment due to this cryocoil approach was confirmed.

  1. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Kitaoka, H.

    2014-07-15

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30 eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  2. High-pressure magnetic state of MnP probed by means of muon-spin rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, R.; Amato, A.; Bonfà, P.; Guguchia, Z.; Luetkens, H.; Morenzoni, E.; De Renzi, R.; Zhigadlo, N. D.

    2016-05-01

    We report a detailed muon-spin rotation study of the pressure evolution of the magnetic order in the manganese-based pnictide MnP, which has been recently found to undergo a superconducting transition under pressure once the magnetic ground state is suppressed. Using the muon as a volume sensitive local magnetic probe, we identify a ferromagnetic state as well as two incommensurate helical states (with propagation vectors Q aligned along the crystallographic c and b directions, respectively) which transform into each other through first-order phase transitions as a function of pressure and temperature. Our data suggest that the magnetic state from which superconductivity develops at higher pressures is an incommensurate helical phase.

  3. Thermonuclear supernovae: probing magnetic fields by positrons and late-time IR line profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P. E-mail: rpenney@g.clemson.edu

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of γ and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 μm, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M {sub Ch}) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 10{sup 9} G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a γ-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 μm can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M {sub Ch} mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central {sup 56}Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M {sub Ch}. Good time coverage is required to

  4. Thermonuclear Supernovae: Probing Magnetic Fields by Positrons and Late-time IR Line Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P.

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of γ and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 μm, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M Ch) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 109 G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a γ-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 μm can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M Ch mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central 56Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M Ch. Good time coverage is required to separate the effects of optical

  5. Ground state and low-energy magnetic dynamics in the frustrated magnet CoAl2O4 as revealed by local spin probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovleva, M.; Vavilova, E.; Grafe, H.-J.; Zimmermann, S.; Alfonsov, A.; Luetkens, H.; Klauss, H.-H.; Maljuk, A.; Wurmehl, S.; Büchner, B.; Kataev, V.

    2015-04-01

    We report a combined experimental study of magnetic properties of a single crystal of the frustrated diamond lattice antiferromagnet CoAl2O4 with Co2+ electron spin resonance, 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance, and muon spin rotation/relaxation techniques. With our local probes, we show that the frustration of spin interactions and the Co/Al site disorder strongly affect the spin dynamics. The experimental results evidence inhomogeneous and slow magnetic fluctuations and the occurrence of short-range electron spin correlations far above a characteristic temperature T*=8 K at which the spin system turns into in a quasistatic state. Our data indicate that this spin order is likely short range and unconventional with spin fluctuations persistent even at T ≪T* . The results of three spectroscopy techniques highlight a nontrivial role of structural disorder for the magnetism of a frustrated diamond spin lattice at the proximity to the critical point.

  6. Probing Kinetic Mechanisms of Protein Function and Folding with Time-Resolved Natural and Magnetic Chiroptical Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Kliger, David S.; Chen, Eefei; Goldbeck, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent and ongoing developments in time-resolved spectroscopy have made it possible to monitor circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism, optical rotatory dispersion, and magnetic optical rotatory dispersion with nanosecond time resolution. These techniques have been applied to determine structural changes associated with the function of several proteins as well as to determine the nature of early events in protein folding. These studies have required new approaches in triggering protein reactions as well as the development of time-resolved techniques for polarization spectroscopies with sufficient time resolution and sensitivity to probe protein structural changes. PMID:22312279

  7. Omnidirectional Actuator Handle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed actuator handle comprises two normally concentric rings, cables, and pulleys arranged such that relative displacement of rings from concentricity results in pulling of cable and consequent actuation of associated mechanism. Unlike conventional actuator handles like levers on farm implements, actuated from one or two directions only, proposed handle reached from almost any direction and actuated by pulling or pushing inner ring in any direction with respect to outer ring. Flanges installed on inner ring to cover gap between inner ring and housing to prevent clothing from being caught.

  8. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  9. Magnetic field effects on spectrally resolved lifetime of on-line oxygen monitoring using magneto-optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermut, O.; Gallant, P.; Le Bouch, N.; Leclair, S.; Noiseux, I.; Vernon, M.; Morin, J.-F.; Diamond, K.; Patterson, M. S.; Samkoe, K.; Pogue, B.

    2009-02-01

    Multimodal agents that serve as both probes for contrast and light-activated effectors of cellular processes in diseased tissue were developed. These agents were introduced into multicellular tumor spheroids (3D tissue models) and in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of a chicken embryo. The luminescence decay was examined using a novel technique involving a spectrally-resolved fluorescence lifetime apparatus integrated with a weak electromagnet. A spectrallyresolved lifetime setup was used to identify magneto-optic species sensitive to magnetic field effects and distinguish from background emissions. We demonstrate that the applied magnetic fields can alter reaction rates and product distribution of some dyes detected by time- and spectrally-resolved luminescence changes. We will discuss the use of exogenous magneto-optical probes taken up in tumors to both induce phototoxicity, a process that is governed by complex and dynamically evolving mechanisms involving reactive oxygen species, and monitor treatment progress. The magnetic field enhancement, measured over a range of weak fields (0-300 mT) is correlated to oxygenation and may be used to monitor dynamic changes occurring due to oxygen consumption over the course of photodynamic therapy. Such online measurements provide the possibility to derive real-time information about response to treatment via monitoring magnetic field enhancement/suppression of the time-resolved, spectrally-resolved luminescence of the probe at the site of the treatment directly. Magnetic perturbation of lifetime can serve as a status reporter, providing optical feedback of oxygen-mediated treatments in situ and allowing for real-time adjustment of a phototherapy treatment plan.

  10. Very high energy emission as a probe of relativistic magnetic reconnection in pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochol, Iwona; Pétri, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    The population of gamma-ray pulsars, including Crab observed in the TeV range, and Vela detected above 50 GeV, challenges existing models of pulsed high-energy emission. Such models should be universally applicable, yet they should account for spectral differences among the pulsars. We show that the gamma-ray emission of Crab and Vela can be explained by synchrotron radiation from the current sheet of a striped wind, expanding with a modest Lorentz factor Γ ≲ 100 in the Crab case, and Γ ≲ 50 in the Vela case. In the Crab spectrum, a new synchrotron self-Compton component is expected to be detected by the upcoming experiment CTA. We suggest that the gamma-ray spectrum directly probes the physics of relativistic magnetic reconnection in the striped wind. In the most energetic pulsars, like Crab, with dot{E}_{38}^{3/2}/P_{-2}≳ 0.002 (where dot{E} is the spin-down power, P is the pulsar period, and X = Xi × 10i in CGS units), reconnection proceeds in the radiative cooling regime and results in a soft power-law distribution of cooling particles; in less powerful pulsars, like Vela, particle energization is limited by the current sheet size, and a hard particle spectrum reflects the acceleration mechanism. A strict lower limit on the number density of radiating particles corresponds to emission close to the light cylinder, and, in units of the GJ density, it is ≳ 0.5 in the Crab wind, and κ ≳ 0.05 in the Vela wind.

  11. Quantum phase transitions and local magnetism in Mott insulators: A local probe investigation using muons, neutrons, and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.

    Mott insulators are materials in which strong correlations among the electrons induce an unconventional insulating state. Rich interplay between the structural, magnetic, and electronic degrees of freedom resulting from the electron correlation can lead to unusual complexity of Mott materials on the atomic scale, such as microscopically heterogeneous phases or local structural correlations that deviate significantly from the average structure. Such behavior must be studied by suitable experimental techniques, i.e. "local probes", that are sensitive to this local behavior rather than just the bulk, average properties. In this thesis, I will present results from our studies of multiple families of Mott insulators using two such local probes: muon spin relaxation (muSR), a probe of local magnetism; and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of x-ray and neutron total scattering, a probe of local atomic structure. In addition, I will present the development of magnetic pair distribution function analysis, a novel method for studying local magnetic correlations that is highly complementary to the muSR and atomic PDF techniques. We used muSR to study the phase transition from Mott insulator to metal in two archetypal Mott insulating systems: RENiO3 (RE = rare earth element) and V2O3. In both of these systems, the Mott insulating state can be suppressed by tuning a nonthermal parameter, resulting in a "quantum" phase transition at zero temperature from the Mott insulating state to a metallic state. In RENiO3, this occurs through variation of the rare-earth element in the chemical composition; in V 2O3, through the application of hydrostatic pressure. Our results show that the metallic and Mott insulating states unexpectedly coexist in phase-separated regions across a large portion of parameter space near the Mott quantum phase transition and that the magnitude of the ordered antiferromagnetic moment remains constant across the phase diagram until it is abruptly

  12. Position Sensor Integral with a Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E.; Alhorn, Dean C.

    2004-01-01

    A noncontact position sensor has been designed for use with a specific two-dimensional linear electromagnetic actuator. To minimize the bulk and weight added by the sensor, the sensor has been made an integral part of the actuator: that is to say, parts of the actuator structure and circuitry are used for sensing as well as for varying position. The actuator (see Figure 1) includes a C-shaped permanent magnet and an armature that is approximately centered in the magnet gap. The intended function of the actuator is to cause the permanent magnet to translate to, and/or remain at, commanded x and y coordinates, relative to the armature. In addition, some incidental relative motion along the z axis is tolerated but not controlled. The sensor is required to measure the x and y displacements from a nominal central position and to be relatively insensitive to z displacement. The armature contains two sets of electromagnet windings oriented perpendicularly to each other and electrically excited in such a manner as to generate forces in the x,y plane to produce the required motion. Small sensor excitation coils are mounted on the pole tips of the permanent magnet. These coils are excited with a sine wave at a frequency of 20 kHz. This excitation is transformer-coupled to the armature windings. The geometric arrangement of the excitation coils and armature windings is such that the amplitudes of the 20-kHz voltages induced in the armature windings vary nearly linearly with x and y displacements and do not vary significantly with small z displacements. Because the frequency of 20 kHz is much greater than the maximum frequency characteristic of the actuation signals applied to the armature windings, there is no appreciable interference between actuator and sensor functions of the armature windings.

  13. Electron and ion currents to a planar probe oriented at an arbitrary angle to the magnetic field in a cesium Q machine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinlay, Michael J.; Harding, Sean M.; Merlino, Robert L.

    2014-10-01

    Current collection to a planar Langmuir probe in a magnetized Q machine plasma was investigated. The Q machine was operated in the single-ended mode with cesium ions having densities in the range of 1014 to 1015 m-3, electron and ion temperatures, Te ~Ti ~ 0 . 2 eV, and magnetic fields from 0.06 T to 0.48 T. The probe was a disk of 9.5 mm diameter, and the side facing away from the plasma source was insulated. The effect of varying the angle between the magnetic field and the probe's surface normal vector on the ion and electron saturation currents and the floating potential was the focus of this study. The effect of varying the probe normal-magnetic field angle on the excitation and quenching of current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves was also observed. Supported by DOE and NSF.

  14. Actuators Based on Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongrui; Li, Chensha; Huang, Xuezhen

    2013-01-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) exhibit a number of remarkable physical effects, including the unique, high-stroke reversible mechanical actuation when triggered by external stimuli. This article reviews some recent exciting developments in the field of LCEs materials with an emphasis on their utilization in actuator applications. Such applications include artificial muscles, industrial manufacturing, health and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). With suitable synthetic and preparation pathways and well-controlled actuation stimuli, such as heat, light, electric and magnetic field, excellent physical properties of LCE materials can be realized. By comparing the actuating properties of different systems, general relationships between the structure and the property of LCEs are discussed. How these materials can be turned into usable devices using interdisciplinary techniques is also described. PMID:23648966

  15. Electropneumatic actuator, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, D. P.

    1989-10-01

    The program demonstrated the feasibility of an electropneumatic actuator which can be used in manufacturing applications. The electropneumatic actuator, an alternative to the electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators used in industry, consists of an electrochemical compressor, a power supply, and an actuator. The electrochemical compressor working fluid is hydrogen and a solvent such as water or ammonia. The compressor has no moving parts and runs on low voltage DC. The actuator is a conventional, commercially available unit. Researchers designed, constructed, and tested the electrochemical compressor in conjunction with the actuator, power supply, and computerized control. The one inch actuator can lift a fifty pound weight a distance of ten inches in about 1.5 minutes. The electrochemically powered system is capable of driving its loaded actuator to a prescribed location at a controlled rate. A defined set of design changes will combine the compressor and actuator in the same housing, and will develop two orders of magnitude increased actuator speed at the same or higher force levels.

  16. Superconducting magnetic control system for manipulation of particulate matter and magnetic probes in medical and industrial applications

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung Sheng; Hull, John R.; Askew, Thomas R.

    2006-07-11

    A system and method of controlling movement of magnetic material with at least first and second high temperature superconductors at spaced locations. A plurality of solenoids are associated with the superconductors to induce a persistent currents in preselected high temperature superconductors establishing a plurality of magnetic fields in response to pulsed currents introduced to one or more of the solenoids. Control mechanism in communication with said solenoids and/or said high temperature superconductors are used to demagnetize selected ones of the high temperature superconductors to reduce the magnetic fields substantially to zero. Magnetic material is moved between magnetic fields by establishing the presence thereof and thereafter reducing magnetic fields substantially to zero and establishing magnetic fields in other superconductors arranged in a predetermined configuration.

  17. Design and control of dual servo actuator for near field optical recording system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaehwa; Choi, Young-Man; Lee, Jun-Hee; Yoon, Hyoung-Kil; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2005-12-01

    Near field recording (NFR) has been introduced as a new optical data storage method to realize higher data density beyond the diffraction limit. As the data density increases, the track pitch is remarkably reduced to about 400nm. Thus, more precise actuator is required and we propose a dual servo actuator to improve the accuracy of actuator. The proposed dual servo actuator consists of a coarse actuator and a fine actuator, multisegmented magnet array (MSMA) voice coil motor (VCM) and PMN-PT actuator. In design of VCM actuator, a novel magnetic circuit of VCM with MSMA is proposed. It can generate higher air gap flux density than the magnetic circuit of VCM with the conventional magnet array. In design of fine actuator, the fine actuator including PMN-PT single crystal instead of the conventional PZT is proposed. The displacement gain of PMN-PT fine actuator is 26 nm/V and that of PZT fine actuator is 17 nm/V. The displacement gain is increased by 53 %. To evaluate tracking performance of the manufactured dual servo actuator and to assign the proper role to each actuator, the PQ method is selected. From experiment results, the total bandwidth of the dual servo actuator is increased to 2.5kHz and the resolution is 25 nm. Comparing with the resolution of one servo actuator, 70 nm, we can find that the accuracy of actuator is remarkably improved. And the proposed dual servo actuator shows satisfactory performances to be applied to NFR and it can be applied to other future disk drives.

  18. Dual-Mode Encoded Magnetic Composite Microsphere Based on Fluorescence Reporters and Raman Probes as Covert Tag for Anticounterfeiting Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruimin; Zhang, Yuting; Tan, Jing; Wan, Jiaxun; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun

    2016-04-13

    Utilizing fluorescence reporters and SERS probes as the security labels, a series of dual-mode encoded magnetic composite microspheres with micrometer size was designed and prepared for anticounterfeiting applications. At first, the micro-meter-sized melamine formaldehyde microspheres with different fluorescence molecules (FMF) were prepared by precipitation polymerization, and then the magnetite composite microspheres (FMF/MNPs) were fabricated by direct immobilization of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) onto the surface of FMF microspheres. After deposition of Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) onto FMF/MNPs microspheres, the SERS probes were absorbed onto the surface of Ag-NPs, and then a protection layer of silica was coated on the composite microspheres by Stöber method. The combination of different fluorescence reporters and SERS probes greatly increased the encoding complexity and volume for high-level anticounterfeiting. The structure of the dual-encoded FMF/MNPs/Ag-NPs/SiO2 composite microspheres was characterized by FESEM, TEM, FLS(fluorescence spectrometer), XRD, VSM, UV-vis and EDS. The embedded magnetic nanoparticles enable the composite microspheres to be quickly isolated from the marked latex paint by magnet at the concentration of as low as 1 ppm, and the covert tag information can be read out even from one composite microsphere. In addition, the covert security information in the marked coating film can be also read out in situ and the existence of the composite microspheres does not influence the visible appearance of the coating film. All the above outstanding properties will make these dual-mode encoded composite microspheres as advanced security tags for next-generation anticounterfeiting applications. PMID:27010437

  19. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  20. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  1. Spectropolarimetry of Giant stars: Probing the influence of magnetic field on evolved stars Spectropolarimetry of Giant stars: Probing the influence of magnetic field on evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, Jefferson; Castro, Matthieu; Petit, Pascal; do Nascimento, José-Dias, Jr.

    2015-08-01

    It is know that lithium is element easily destroyed in stellar interior, the existence of lithium rich stars means a great challenge in stellar evolution. In this context our observations ravels the serendipitous discovery of an unusually high lithium abundance star. This is a K0III HD 150050, which has strong deepening on lithium line (6707.8 Å) this means lithium abundance of 2.81 0.2 dex, therefore this star belong a rare group called super Li-Rich stars. A possible source of the non-standard episodes required to produce Li-rich stars were identified in magneto-thermohaline mixing accounted by models of extra-mixing induced by magnetic buoyancy. However to better understand this is necessary more observational data. In last three decades several studies has showed that late type red giant stars presents a remarkable modifications in these outer atmosphere layers when they become late type star in HR diagram. These changes are founded through X-ray, Ultraviolet, and Chromospheric activity analyses, and then we can establish the called “Dividing lines”. We made spectropalarimetric observations with ESPaDOnS@CFHT to achieve two main objectives: analyze the influence of magnetic field in the Li-rich giant stars, and understand how works the magnetic field in late type giants and supergiants across the “dividing line”.

  2. Design of an innovative magnetostrictive patch actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquemani, S.; Giberti, H.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetostrictive actuators can be profitably used to reduce vibration in structures. However, this technology has been exploited only to develop inertial actuators, while patches actuators have not been ever used in practice. Patches actuators consist on a layer of magnetostrictive material, which has to be stuck to the surface of the vibrating structure, and on a coil surrounding the layer itself. However, the presence of the winding severely limits the use of such devices. As a matter of fact, the scientific literature reports only theoretical uses of such actuators, but, in practice it does not seem they were ever used. This paper presents an innovative solution to improve the structure of the actuator patches, allowing their use in several practical applications. The principle of operation of these devices is rather simple. The actuator patch is able to generate a local deformation of the surface of the vibrating structure so as to introduce an equivalent damping that dissipates the kinetic energy associated to the vibration. This deformation is related to the behavior of the magnetostrictive material immersed in a variable magnetic field generated by the a variable current flowing in the winding. Contrary to what suggested in the theoretical literature, the designed device has the advantage of generating the variable magnetic field no longer in close proximity of the material, but in a different area, thus allowing a better coupling. The magnetic field is then conveyed through a suitable ferromagnetic structure to the magnetostrictive material. The device has been designed and simulated through FEA. Results confirm that the new configuration can easily overcome all the limits of traditional devices.

  3. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  4. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  5. Probing quantum confinement at the atomic scale with optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, James G.

    2001-09-01

    Near-band-gap circularly polarized excitation in III-V semiconductors provides spin-polarized electrons that transfer spin order to lattice nuclei via fluctuations in the contact hyperfine interaction. This process of optical nuclear polarization and the complementary technique of optical detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide extreme sensitivity enhancement and spatial selectivity in structured samples, enabling collection of NMR spectra from samples such as single quantum wells or dots containing as few as ˜105 nuclei. Combining these advances with novel techniques for high spectral resolution, we have probed quantum-confined electronic states near the interface of a single epitaxially grown Al1-x As/GaAs (x = 0.36) heterojunction. Using a novel strategy that we refer to as POWER (p&barbelow;erturbations o&barbelow;bserved w&barbelow;ith e&barbelow;nhanced ṟesolution) NMR, multiple-pulse time suspension is synchronized with bandgap optical irradiation to reveal spectra of effective spin Hamiltonians that are differences between those of the occupied and unoccupied photoexcited electronic state. The underlying NMR linewidth is reduced by three orders of magnitude in these experiments, enabling resolution of an asymmetric line shape due to light-induced hyperfine interactions. The results are successfully fit with the coherent nuclear spin evolution and relaxation theoretically expected for sites distributed over the volume of an electronic excitation weakly localized at a point defect. This analysis establishes a one-to-one relationship, which can be used to follow nuclear spin diffusion, between optical Knight shift and the radial position of lattice nuclei. We have also introduced POWER NMR techniques to characterize the change in electric field associated with cycling from light-on to light-off states via a linear quadrupole Stark effect (LQSE) of the nuclear spins. Simulations of these NMR spectra in terms of the radial electric fields of

  6. Widely tunable two-colour seeded free-electron laser source for resonant-pump resonant-probe magnetic scattering

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Eugenio; Spezzani, Carlo; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Vidal, Franck; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Diviacco, Bruno; Gauthier, David; Penco, Giuseppe; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; Roussel, Eleonore; Trovò, Marco; Moussy, Jean-Baptiste; Pincelli, Tommaso; Lounis, Lounès; Manfredda, Michele; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Capotondi, Flavio; Svetina, Cristian; Mahne, Nicola; Zangrando, Marco; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Demidovich, Alexander; Giannessi, Luca; De Ninno, Giovanni; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Allaria, Enrico; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The advent of free-electron laser (FEL) sources delivering two synchronized pulses of different wavelengths (or colours) has made available a whole range of novel pump–probe experiments. This communication describes a major step forward using a new configuration of the FERMI FEL-seeded source to deliver two pulses with different wavelengths, each tunable independently over a broad spectral range with adjustable time delay. The FEL scheme makes use of two seed laser beams of different wavelengths and of a split radiator section to generate two extreme ultraviolet pulses from distinct portions of the same electron bunch. The tunability range of this new two-colour source meets the requirements of double-resonant FEL pump/FEL probe time-resolved studies. We demonstrate its performance in a proof-of-principle magnetic scattering experiment in Fe–Ni compounds, by tuning the FEL wavelengths to the Fe and Ni 3p resonances. PMID:26757813

  7. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Water-soluble Progesterone-Conjugated Probes for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Hormone Related Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sukerkar, Preeti A.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Townsend, Taryn R.; Ahmed, Roshan A.; Burdette, Joanna E.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) is strongly associated with disease prognosis and therapeutic efficacy in hormone related diseases such as endometriosis and breast, ovarian, and uterine cancers. Receptor status is currently determined by immunohistochemistry assays. However, noninvasive PR imaging agents could improve disease detection and help elucidate pathological molecular pathways, leading to new therapies and animal disease models. A series of water-soluble PR-targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) probes were synthesized using Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. These agents demonstrated activation of PR in vitro and preferential accumulation in PR(+) compared to PR(−) human breast cancer cells with low toxicity. In xenograft tumor models, the agents demonstrated enhanced signal intensity in PR(+) tumors compared to PR(−) tumors. The results suggest that these agents may be promising MRI probes for PR(+) diseases. PMID:21972997

  8. Widely tunable two-colour seeded free-electron laser source for resonant-pump resonant-probe magnetic scattering.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Eugenio; Spezzani, Carlo; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Vidal, Franck; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Diviacco, Bruno; Gauthier, David; Penco, Giuseppe; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; Roussel, Eleonore; Trovò, Marco; Moussy, Jean-Baptiste; Pincelli, Tommaso; Lounis, Lounès; Manfredda, Michele; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Capotondi, Flavio; Svetina, Cristian; Mahne, Nicola; Zangrando, Marco; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Demidovich, Alexander; Giannessi, Luca; De Ninno, Giovanni; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Allaria, Enrico; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The advent of free-electron laser (FEL) sources delivering two synchronized pulses of different wavelengths (or colours) has made available a whole range of novel pump-probe experiments. This communication describes a major step forward using a new configuration of the FERMI FEL-seeded source to deliver two pulses with different wavelengths, each tunable independently over a broad spectral range with adjustable time delay. The FEL scheme makes use of two seed laser beams of different wavelengths and of a split radiator section to generate two extreme ultraviolet pulses from distinct portions of the same electron bunch. The tunability range of this new two-colour source meets the requirements of double-resonant FEL pump/FEL probe time-resolved studies. We demonstrate its performance in a proof-of-principle magnetic scattering experiment in Fe-Ni compounds, by tuning the FEL wavelengths to the Fe and Ni 3p resonances. PMID:26757813

  9. Widely tunable two-colour seeded free-electron laser source for resonant-pump resonant-probe magnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Eugenio; Spezzani, Carlo; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Vidal, Franck; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Diviacco, Bruno; Gauthier, David; Penco, Giuseppe; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; Roussel, Eleonore; Trovò, Marco; Moussy, Jean-Baptiste; Pincelli, Tommaso; Lounis, Lounès; Manfredda, Michele; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Capotondi, Flavio; Svetina, Cristian; Mahne, Nicola; Zangrando, Marco; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Demidovich, Alexander; Giannessi, Luca; de Ninno, Giovanni; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Allaria, Enrico; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The advent of free-electron laser (FEL) sources delivering two synchronized pulses of different wavelengths (or colours) has made available a whole range of novel pump-probe experiments. This communication describes a major step forward using a new configuration of the FERMI FEL-seeded source to deliver two pulses with different wavelengths, each tunable independently over a broad spectral range with adjustable time delay. The FEL scheme makes use of two seed laser beams of different wavelengths and of a split radiator section to generate two extreme ultraviolet pulses from distinct portions of the same electron bunch. The tunability range of this new two-colour source meets the requirements of double-resonant FEL pump/FEL probe time-resolved studies. We demonstrate its performance in a proof-of-principle magnetic scattering experiment in Fe-Ni compounds, by tuning the FEL wavelengths to the Fe and Ni 3p resonances.

  10. Apparatus for direct addition of reagents into a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sample in the NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Charles L.; Rivero, Ignacio A.

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a widely used tool in chemistry and biochemistry. It is occasionally necessary to add small aliquots of solvents or reagents repeatedly into the NMR tube. Ordinarily this is accomplished only by ejecting the sample and carrying out the addition outside the probe. It would be preferable to add the aliquot directly into the sample. We have designed and implemented a delivery system to accomplish this. This apparatus is particularly applicable to a recent NMR titration method for measuring relative pK's and to experiments where temperature must also be varied. This apparatus provides a safe, simple, and inexpensive method for repeated aliquot addition directly into the sample in the NMR probe.

  11. Probing the role of the magnetic field in the formation of structure in molecular clouds with Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Soler, Juan

    2015-08-01

    The Planck observations of intensity and polarization of thermal emission from Galactic dust over the whole sky, and down to scales that probe the interiors of nearby molecular clouds, constitute an unprecedented data set for the study of the morphology of the magnetic field.Within ten nearby (d < 450 pc) Gould Belt molecular clouds we evaluate statistically the relative orientation between the magnetic field projected on the plane of sky, inferred from the polarized thermal emission of Galactic dust observed by Planck at 353 GHz, and the gas column density structures, quantified by the gradient of the column density, NH. The relative orientation is evaluated pixel by pixel and analyzed in bins of column density using the novel statistical tool called "Histogram of Relative Orientations".Within most clouds we find that the relative orientation changes progressively with increasing NH, from preferentially parallel or having no preferred orientation to preferentially perpendicular.In simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in molecular clouds this trend in relative orientation is a signature of Alfvénic or sub-Alfvénic turbulence, implying that the magnetic field is significant for the gas dynamics at the scales probed by Planck.We compare the deduced plane-of-the-sky magnetic field strength with estimates we obtain from the Davis-Chandrasekhar-Fermi method and with the line-of-sight magnetic field strengths derived from Zeeman splitting observations towards some of the studied regions.Finally, we discuss the implications of the Planck observations for the general picture of molecular cloud formation and evolution.This work is presented on behalf of the Planck Collaboration.

  12. Preliminary experiments about the measure of the magnetic properties of a material by means of TDR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, the possibility of measuring possible magnetic properties of materials by means of a TDR probe is studied. A transmission line model is adopted and data in time and frequency domain are exploited together. Simulation results are shown, at the moment based on a bifilar line model. Magnetic properties of materials can be of interest for several applications. In particular, the presence of magnetic features in the soil or in any substance, might be associated to some contaminant (presumably containing some metallic element as iron, nickel or chromium [1]). This kind of pollution might occur close to some farms, especially regarding the dying of dresses, the production of some medicines, the tanning of leather issues. Moreover, modern agriculture puts in the soil several fertilizing substances, and there is a debate about the quantity of heavy metals spread in the terrain by these activities [2]. Still, some depuration-mud can be affected by an excessive presence of metallic elements, because of the presence of batteries, skins, varnishes, cosmetics, and so on [2]. Moreover, it is thought that the soil on the planet Mars might show magnetic properties [3]. Finally, in GPR prospecting, possible magnetic characteristics of the soil or of the targets might be of interest too [4], but they cannot be retrieved by means of only GPR data [5]. In the present paper, the results of a preliminary study are exposed with regard to the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of a material by mean of a TDR probe [6-7]. In particular a TDR probe is essentially a transmission line (a bifilar model will be exploited in this work) open at the end, form which most of the impinging energy (ideally the whole of thi energy in a lossless medium) is back reflected. In particular, this allows a customary measure of the propagation velocity in the medium if an impulsive signal is generated. In fact, the return time along a path of known length is measured. The

  13. Magnetic Structure of Fe-doped CoFe(2)O(4) Probed by X-ray Magnetic Spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    J Moyer; C Vaz; D Arena; D Kumah; E Negusse; V Henrich

    2011-12-31

    The magnetic properties of iron-doped cobalt ferrite (Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2+x}O{sub 4}) (001) thin films grown epitaxially on MgO (001) substrates are investigated by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and soft x-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroisms. All Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2+x}O{sub 4} (0.01 {le} x {le} 0.63) samples have out-of-plane magnetic easy axes and large coercive fields, unlike Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, due to a large Co{sup 2+} orbital moment. The magnetic moments for those samples are significantly reduced from their bulk values; however, as x increases, the magnetic moments tend nearer to their bulk values and increase more rapidly as x approaches 1. This reduction in magnetic moment is attributed to spin canting among the Co{sup 2+} cations, owing to a small in-plane tensile strain in the film and to an increased antiferromagnetic alignment among all the cations caused by a partially inverse spinel cubic structure and the likely presence of antiphase boundaries. Our results show that small changes in stoichiometry can lead to significant changes in the magnetic moment of Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2+x}O{sub 4}, especially at large values of x.

  14. Magnetic structure of Fe-doped CoFe2O4 probed by x-ray magnetic spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, J. A.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Arena, D. A.; Kumah, D.; Negusse, E.; Henrich, V. E.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetic properties of iron-doped cobalt ferrite (Co1-xFe2+xO4) (001) thin films grown epitaxially on MgO (001) substrates are investigated by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and soft x-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroisms. All Co1-xFe2+xO4 (0.01 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.63) samples have out-of-plane magnetic easy axes and large coercive fields, unlike Fe3O4, due to a large Co2+ orbital moment. The magnetic moments for those samples are significantly reduced from their bulk values; however, as x increases, the magnetic moments tend nearer to their bulk values and increase more rapidly as x approaches 1. This reduction in magnetic moment is attributed to spin canting among the Co2+ cations, owing to a small in-plane tensile strain in the film and to an increased antiferromagnetic alignment among all the cations caused by a partially inverse spinel cubic structure and the likely presence of antiphase boundaries. Our results show that small changes in stoichiometry can lead to significant changes in the magnetic moment of Co1-xFe2+xO4, especially at large values of x.

  15. Three-axis lever actuator with flexure hinges for an optical disk system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chang-Soo; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2002-10-01

    A three-axis lever actuator with a flexure hinge has been designed and fabricated. This actuator is driven by electromagnetic force based on a coil-magnet system and can be used as a high precision actuator and, especially as a pickup head actuator in optical disks. High precision and low sensitivity to external vibration are the major advantages of this lever actuator. An analysis model was found and compared to the finite element method. Dynamic characteristics of the three-axis lever actuator were measured. The results are in very close agreement to those predicted by the model and finite element analysis.

  16. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L.

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  17. Control surface actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Gerhard E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A device which actuates aircraft control surfaces is disclosed. The actuator is disposed entirely within the control surface structure. This allows the gap between the wing structural box and the control surface to be reduced. Reducing the size of the gap is especially desirable for wings with high aspect ratio, wherein the volume of the structural box is at a premium.

  18. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  19. Probing the magnetic field structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan; Johnson, Michael; Doeleman, Sheperd; Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Accreting black holes (BHs) are at the core of relativistic astrophysics as messengers of the strong-field regime of General Relativity and prime targets of several observational campaigns, including imaging the black hole shadow in SagA* and M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope. I will present results from general-relativistic, polarized radiatiative transfer models for the inner accretion flow in Sgr A*. The models use time dependent, global GRMHD simulations of hot accretion flows including standard-and-normal-evolution (SANE) and magnetically arrested disks (MAD). I present comparisons of these synthetic data sets to the most recent observations with the Event Horizon Telescope and show how the data distinguishes the models and probes the magnetic field structure.

  20. Recent Results From The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    2014-05-01

    The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics which are well-measured by the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft launched in 2012. An overview of recent results from the mission focusing on waves and wave-particle interactions measured by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is presented. We show examples of automated density determination and plasmapause identification as derived from the upper hybrid resonance; low frequency ULF pulsations; EMIC waves with electrostatic harmonics and their occurrence statistics; and whistler mode waves including upper and lower band chorus as well as plasmaspheric hiss and its relation to energetic particles.

  1. A magnetorheological actuation system: test and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Shaju; Chaudhuri, Anirban; Wereley, Norman M.

    2008-04-01

    Self-contained actuation systems, based on frequency rectification of the high frequency motion of an active material, can produce high force and stroke output. Magnetorheological (MR) fluids are active fluids whose rheological properties can be altered by the application of a magnetic field. By using MR fluids as the energy transmission medium in such hybrid devices, a valving system with no moving parts can be implemented and used to control the motion of an output cylinder shaft. The MR fluid based valves are configured in the form of an H-bridge to produce bi-directional motion in an output cylinder by alternately applying magnetic fields in the two opposite arms of the bridge. The rheological properties of the MR fluid are modeled using both Bingham plastic and bi-viscous models. In this study, the primary actuation is performed using a compact terfenol-D rod driven pump and frequency rectification of the rod motion is done using passive reed valves. The pump and reed valve configuration along with MR fluidic valves form a compact hydraulic actuation system. Actuator design, analysis and experimental results are presented in this paper. A time domain model of the actuator is developed and validated using experimental data.

  2. Probing of field-induced structures and tunable rheological properties of surfactant capped magnetically polarizable nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Felicia, Leona J; Philip, John

    2013-01-01

    Oil-based nanofluid containing surfactant-capped magnetite nanoparticles are synthesized by a simple coprecipitation approach, and their magnetorheological properties are studied for different magnetic field strengths and volume fractions. We observe a distinct "plateau-like region" in the shear thinning viscosity curve, under an external magnetic field, possibly due to a peculiar alignment of the chains with respect to the field direction where the structure is stable against fragmentation. The observed plateau regime is reminiscent to that of kinetically arrested gel networks. Interestingly, such a plateau regime has been observed only above certain critical magnetic field when the dipolar interaction strength is much greater than the thermal energy where the aggregation becomes a nonequilibrium transport-limited process. The good collapse of specific viscosity data against Mason number for different magnetic field strengths onto a single curve suggests the dominance of hydrodynamic and magnetic forces on thermal force above a certain magnetic field strength. The observed increase in both static and dynamic yield stresses under the magnetic field confirms the formation of columnar structures that hinder the flow behavior. The hysteresis observed in the magnetic sweep experiments shows the inability of the chains to relax within the measurement time. The dynamic measurements confirm that the field-induced structures impart elastic behavior to the dispersion, which is found to increase with magnetic field and saturates at higher field strengths. PMID:23210900

  3. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques to probe muscle structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, Vadim

    Structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of skeletal muscle allow the elucidation of muscle physiology under normal and pathological conditions. Continuing on the efforts of the Muscle Imaging and Modeling laboratory, the focus of the thesis is to (i) extend and refine two challenging imaging modalities: structural imaging using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and functional imaging based on Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast Imaging (VE-PC) and (ii) apply these methods to explore age related structure and functional differences of the gastrocnemius muscle. Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows the study of tissue microstructure as well as muscle fiber architecture. The images, based on an ultrafast single shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) sequence, suffer from geometric distortions and low signal to noise ratio. A processing pipeline was developed to correct for distortions and to improve image Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). DTI acquired on a senior and young cohort of subjects were processed through the pipeline and differences in DTI derived indices and fiber architecture between the two cohorts were explored. The DTI indices indicated that at the microstructural level, fiber atrophy was accompanied with a reduction in fiber volume fraction. At the fiber architecture level, fiber length and pennation angles decreased with age that potentially contribute to the loss of muscle force with age. Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast imaging provides tissue (e.g. muscle) velocity at each voxel which allows the study of strain and Strain Rate (SR) under dynamic conditions. The focus of the thesis was to extract 2D strain rate tensor maps from the velocity images and apply the method to study age related differences. The tensor mapping can potentially provide unique information on the extracellular matrix and lateral transmission the role of these two elements has recently emerged as important determinants of force loss with age. In the cross sectional study on

  4. Swinging reciprocating Mach probes for the high field side scrape-off layer in DIII-D.

    PubMed

    Tsui, C K; Taussig, D A; Watkins, M G; Boivin, R L; Stangeby, P C

    2012-10-01

    A new pair of in situ reciprocating Mach probes termed swing probes has been deployed on the DIII-D centerpost for the 2012 experimental campaign. When not deployed, the entire assembly is housed in a <5 cm space underneath the centerpost tiles. This design is unique in that the probe swings vertically through the edge plasma, taking measurements along a 180° arc with a 20 cm radius. The motion is powered by actuator coils that interact with the tokamak's magnetic field. Two electrodes maintain a Mach-pair orientation throughout the swing and provide measurements of saturation current, electron temperature, and parallel flow speeds up to the separatrix. PMID:23126897

  5. Swinging reciprocating Mach probes for the high field side scrape-off layer in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, C. K.; Stangeby, P. C.; Taussig, D. A.; Watkins, M. G.; Boivin, R. L.

    2012-10-15

    A new pair of in situ reciprocating Mach probes termed swing probes has been deployed on the DIII-D centerpost for the 2012 experimental campaign. When not deployed, the entire assembly is housed in a <5 cm space underneath the centerpost tiles. This design is unique in that the probe swings vertically through the edge plasma, taking measurements along a 180 Degree-Sign arc with a 20 cm radius. The motion is powered by actuator coils that interact with the tokamak's magnetic field. Two electrodes maintain a Mach-pair orientation throughout the swing and provide measurements of saturation current, electron temperature, and parallel flow speeds up to the separatrix.

  6. Probing magnetic bottom and crustal temperature variations along the Red Sea margin of Egypt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravat, D.; Salem, A.; Abdelaziz, A.M.S.; Elawadi, E.; Morgan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Over 50 magnetic bottom depths derived from spectra of magnetic anomalies in Eastern Egypt along the Red Sea margin show variable magnetic bottoms ranging from 10 to 34. km. The deep magnetic bottoms correspond more closely to the Moho depth in the region, and not the depth of 580??C, which lies significantly deeper on the steady state geotherms. These results support the idea of Wasilewski and coworkers that the Moho is a magnetic boundary in continental regions. Reduced-to-pole magnetic highs correspond to areas of Younger Granites that were emplaced toward the end of the Precambrian. Other crystalline Precambrian units formed earlier during the closure of ocean basins are not strongly magnetic. In the north, magnetic bottoms are shallow (10-15. km) in regions with a high proportion of these Younger Granites. In the south, the shoaling of the magnetic bottom associated with the Younger Granites appears to be restricted to the Aswan and Ras Banas regions. Complexity in the variation of magnetic bottom depths may arise due to a combination of factors: i) regions of Younger (Precambrian) Granites with high magnetite content in the upper crust, leaving behind low Curie temperature titanomagnetite components in the middle and lower crust, ii) rise in the depth of 580??C isotherm where the crust may have been heated due to initiation of intense magmatism at the time of the Red Sea rifting (~. 20. Ma), and iii) the contrast of the above two factors with respect to the neighboring regions where the Moho and/or Curie temperature truncates lithospheric ferromagnetism. Estimates of fractal and centroid magnetic bottoms in the oceanic regions of the Red Sea are significantly below the Moho in places suggesting that oceanic uppermost mantle may be serpentinized to the depth of 15-30 km in those regions. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Reaction-based turn-on fluorescent probes with magnetic responses for Fe(2+) detection in live cells.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Siddhartha; Aydin, Ziya; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Maolin

    2015-05-21

    Iron is the most abundant nutritionally essential transition metal found in the human body. It plays important roles in various biological processes such as oxygen delivery, electron transport, enzymatic reactions and DNA synthesis and repair. However, iron can also catalyze the production of free radicals, which are linked to quite a few diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Both iron deficiency and iron overload are related to various health problems. Thus, precisely monitoring iron ions (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+)) in biological systems is important in understanding the detailed biological functions of iron and its trafficking pathways. However, effective tools for monitoring labile Fe(2+) in biological systems have not yet been established. Reported herein are turn on, reaction-based coumarin and rhodamine-linked nitroxide probes (Cou-T and Rh-T) for selective detection of Fe(2+) in solution and in living cells. Rh-T displayed a unique change in the EPR signal as well as enhancement of the fluorescence signal resulting from a specific redox reaction between the probe and Fe(2+). The turn-on fluorescence response towards Fe(2+) allows the subcellular imaging of endogenous Fe(2+) as well as imaging under conditions of external iron supplementation or depletion, with a labile Fe(2+) pool located in the mitochondria of human fibroblast primary cells. The detection and mechanism were verified by the magnetic properties of the probe via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in solution and in cells. PMID:25875289

  8. Parameterized least-squares attitude history estimation and magnetic field observations of the auroral spatial structures probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau, Ryan J.

    Terrestrial auroras are visible-light events caused by charged particles trapped by the Earth's magnetic field precipitating into the atmosphere along magnetic field lines near the poles. Auroral events are very dynamic, changing rapidly in time and across large spatial scales. Better knowledge of the flow of energy during an aurora will improve understanding of the heating processes in the atmosphere during geomagnetic and solar storms. The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe is a sounding rocket campaign to observe the middle-atmosphere plasma and electromagnetic environment during an auroral event with multipoint simultaneous measurements for fine temporal and spatial resolution. The auroral event in question occurred on January 28, 2015, with liftoff of the rocket at 10:41:01 UTC. The goal of this thesis is to produce clear observations of the magnetic field that may be used to model the current systems of the auroral event. To achieve this, the attitude of ASSP's 7 independent payloads must be estimated, and a new attitude determination method is attempted. The new solution uses nonlinear least-squares parameter estimation with a rigid-body dynamics simulation to determine attitude with an estimated accuracy of a few degrees. Observed magnetic field perturbations found using the new attitude solution are presented, where structures of the perturbations are consistent with previous observations and electromagnetic theory.

  9. A Dual-Colour Architecture for Pump-Probe Spectroscopy of Ultrafast Magnetization Dynamics in the Sub-10-femtosecond Range.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, C S; Silva, A S; Navas, D; Miranda, M; Silva, F; Crespo, H; Schmool, D S

    2016-01-01

    Current time-resolution-limited dynamic measurements clearly show the need for improved techniques to access processes on the sub-10-femtosecond timescale. To access this regime, we have designed and constructed a state-of-the-art time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect apparatus, based on a new dual-color scheme, for the measurement of ultrafast demagnetization and precessional dynamics in magnetic materials. This system can operate well below the current temporal ranges reported in the literature, which typically lie in the region of around 50 fs and above. We have used a dual-colour scheme, based on ultra broadband hollow-core fibre and chirped mirror pulse compression techniques, to obtain unprecedented sub-8-fs pump and probe pulse durations at the sample plane. To demonstrate the capabilities of this system for ultrafast demagnetization and precessional dynamics studies, we have performed measurements in a ferrimagnetic GdFeCo thin film. Our study has shown that the magnetization shows a sudden drop within the first picosecond after the pump pulse, a fast recovery (remagnetization) within a few picoseconds, followed by a clear oscillation or precession during a slower magnetization recovery. Moreover, we have experimentally confirmed for the first time that a sub-10-fs pulse is able to efficiently excite a magnetic system such as GdFeCo. PMID:26976721

  10. A Dual-Colour Architecture for Pump-Probe Spectroscopy of Ultrafast Magnetization Dynamics in the Sub-10-femtosecond Range

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, C. S.; Silva, A. S.; Navas, D.; Miranda, M.; Silva, F.; Crespo, H.; Schmool, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Current time-resolution-limited dynamic measurements clearly show the need for improved techniques to access processes on the sub-10-femtosecond timescale. To access this regime, we have designed and constructed a state-of-the-art time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect apparatus, based on a new dual-color scheme, for the measurement of ultrafast demagnetization and precessional dynamics in magnetic materials. This system can operate well below the current temporal ranges reported in the literature, which typically lie in the region of around 50 fs and above. We have used a dual-colour scheme, based on ultra broadband hollow-core fibre and chirped mirror pulse compression techniques, to obtain unprecedented sub-8-fs pump and probe pulse durations at the sample plane. To demonstrate the capabilities of this system for ultrafast demagnetization and precessional dynamics studies, we have performed measurements in a ferrimagnetic GdFeCo thin film. Our study has shown that the magnetization shows a sudden drop within the first picosecond after the pump pulse, a fast recovery (remagnetization) within a few picoseconds, followed by a clear oscillation or precession during a slower magnetization recovery. Moreover, we have experimentally confirmed for the first time that a sub-10-fs pulse is able to efficiently excite a magnetic system such as GdFeCo. PMID:26976721

  11. A Dual-Colour Architecture for Pump-Probe Spectroscopy of Ultrafast Magnetization Dynamics in the Sub-10-femtosecond Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, C. S.; Silva, A. S.; Navas, D.; Miranda, M.; Silva, F.; Crespo, H.; Schmool, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Current time-resolution-limited dynamic measurements clearly show the need for improved techniques to access processes on the sub-10-femtosecond timescale. To access this regime, we have designed and constructed a state-of-the-art time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect apparatus, based on a new dual-color scheme, for the measurement of ultrafast demagnetization and precessional dynamics in magnetic materials. This system can operate well below the current temporal ranges reported in the literature, which typically lie in the region of around 50 fs and above. We have used a dual-colour scheme, based on ultra broadband hollow-core fibre and chirped mirror pulse compression techniques, to obtain unprecedented sub-8-fs pump and probe pulse durations at the sample plane. To demonstrate the capabilities of this system for ultrafast demagnetization and precessional dynamics studies, we have performed measurements in a ferrimagnetic GdFeCo thin film. Our study has shown that the magnetization shows a sudden drop within the first picosecond after the pump pulse, a fast recovery (remagnetization) within a few picoseconds, followed by a clear oscillation or precession during a slower magnetization recovery. Moreover, we have experimentally confirmed for the first time that a sub-10-fs pulse is able to efficiently excite a magnetic system such as GdFeCo.

  12. Self-assembly of SiO2/Gd-DTPA-polyethylenimine nanocomposites as magnetic resonance imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kui; Tian, Jing; Liu, Gang; Sun, Jiayu; Xia, Chunchao; Tang, Hehan; Lin, Ling; Miao, Tianxin; Zhao, Xuna; Gao, Fabao; Gong, Qiyong; Song, Bin; Shuai, Xintao; Ai, Hua; Gu, Zhongwei

    2010-01-01

    Controlled self-assembly of organic/inorganic magnetic hybrid materials have important applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, a widely used polycation polyethylenimine was conjugated with gadopentetic acid (Gd-DTPA) as a gadolinium bearing polyelectrolyte (Gd-DTPA-PEI). Next, multilayers of Gd-DTPA-PEI were coated on silica nanoparticles through layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly with polyanions as monitored by dynamic light scattering, zeta-potential, and scanning electron microscopy. The thickness of the multilayer film was estimated from quartz crystal microbalance based on counting frequency change of each adsorbed layer. The magnetic relaxation of SiO2/(Gd-DTPA-PEl/polyanion), core-shell nanocomposite was tested at 1.5 T magnetic field in a clinical MRI scanner, and a 3-fold increase in T1 relaxivity to 15.1 Gd mM(-1)s(-1) was noticed comparing to Gd-DTPA small molecules. Dextran sulfate was coated as the outermost layer on the nanocomposite for better biocompatibility as verified by in vitro cytotoxicity studies. This formulation provides good signal intensity enhancement of mouse liver in vivo with only 1/25 dose of clinical standard at 30 and 60 minutes after intravenous injection. This sensitive imaging probe with unique core-shell structures may find broad applications in cellular and molecular imaging. PMID:20352889

  13. The magnetic particle in a box: Analytic and micromagnetic analysis of probe-localized spin wave modes

    SciTech Connect

    Adur, Rohan Du, Chunhui; Manuilov, Sergei A.; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Fengyuan; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-07

    The dipole field from a probe magnet can be used to localize a discrete spectrum of standing spin wave modes in a continuous ferromagnetic thin film without lithographic modification to the film. Obtaining the resonance field for a localized mode is not trivial due to the effect of the confined and inhomogeneous magnetization precession. We compare the results of micromagnetic and analytic methods to find the resonance field of localized modes in a ferromagnetic thin film, and investigate the accuracy of these methods by comparing with a numerical minimization technique that assumes Bessel function modes with pinned boundary conditions. We find that the micromagnetic technique, while computationally more intensive, reveals that the true magnetization profiles of localized modes are similar to Bessel functions with gradually decaying dynamic magnetization at the mode edges. We also find that an analytic solution, which is simple to implement and computationally much faster than other methods, accurately describes the resonance field of localized modes when exchange fields are negligible, and demonstrating the accessibility of localized mode analysis.

  14. Long-ranged magnetic proximity effects in noble metal-doped cobalt probed with spin-dependent tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabureac, M. S.; MacLaren, D. A.; Courtois, H.; Marrows, C. H.

    2014-04-01

    We inserted non-magnetic layers of Au and Cu into sputtered AlO_{x}-based magnetic tunnel junctions and Meservey-Tedrow junctions in order to study their effect on tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) and spin polarization (TSP). When either Au or Cu are inserted into a Co/AlO_{x} interface, we find that TMR and TSP remain finite and measurable for thicknesses up to several nanometres. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that the Cu and Au interface layers are fully continuous when their thickness exceeds ~3nm, implying that spin-polarized carriers penetrate the interface noble metal to distances exceeding this value. A power law model based on exchange scattering is found to fit the data better than a phenomenological exponential decay. The discrepancy between these length scales and the much shorter ones reported from x-ray magnetic circular dichroism studies of magnetic proximitization is ascribed to the fact that our tunnelling transport measurements selectively probe s-like electrons close to the Fermi level. When a 0.1 nm thick Cu or Au layer is inserted within the Co, we find that the suppression of TMR and TSP is restored on a length scale of lesssim1nm, indicating that this is a sufficient quantity of Co to form a fully spin-polarized band structure at the interface with the tunnel barrier.

  15. A broadband ferromagnetic resonance dipper probe for magnetic damping measurements from 4.2 K to 300 K.

    PubMed

    He, Shikun; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    A dipper probe for broadband Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) operating from 4.2 K to room temperature is described. The apparatus is based on a 2-port transmitted microwave signal measurement with a grounded coplanar waveguide. The waveguide generates a microwave field and records the sample response. A 3-stage dipper design is adopted for fast and stable temperature control. The temperature variation due to FMR is in the milli-Kelvin range at liquid helium temperature. We also designed a novel FMR probe head with a spring-loaded sample holder. Improved signal-to-noise ratio and stability compared to a common FMR head are achieved. Using a superconducting vector magnet we demonstrate Gilbert damping measurements on two thin film samples using a vector network analyzer with frequency up to 26 GHz: (1) A Permalloy film of 5 nm thickness and (2) a CoFeB film of 1.5 nm thickness. Experiments were performed with the applied magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the film plane. PMID:27131657

  16. Comparison Of Electromagnetic, Electrostatic And Permanent Magnet Quadrupole Lens Probe-Forming Systems For High Energy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dymnikov, Alexander D.; Glass, Gary A.

    2011-06-01

    The focusing system is an essential part of any ion microbeam system and focusing of MeV ion beams is generally accomplished using quadrupole lenses. There are two types of quadrupole lenses requiring the application of either voltage or current to provide the excitation, but there is also the possibility of utilizing lenses constructed from permanent magnets. All of these lens types have different advantages and disadvantages. Most microprobes employ electromagnetic quadrupoles for focusing, however electrostatic lenses have several advantages with respect to electromagnetic lenses, including significantly smaller size, no hysteresis effects, no heating, the utilization of highly stable voltage supplies, focusing which is independent of ion mass, and construction from industrial grade materials. The main advantage of the permanent magnetic lens is that it does not require the application of external power which can significantly reduce the overall lifetime cost. In this presentation, the short probe-forming systems comprised from all these types of quadrupole lenses are compared and the smallest beam spot size and appropriate optimal parameters of these probe-forming systems are determined.

  17. A broadband ferromagnetic resonance dipper probe for magnetic damping measurements from 4.2 K to 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shikun; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    A dipper probe for broadband Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) operating from 4.2 K to room temperature is described. The apparatus is based on a 2-port transmitted microwave signal measurement with a grounded coplanar waveguide. The waveguide generates a microwave field and records the sample response. A 3-stage dipper design is adopted for fast and stable temperature control. The temperature variation due to FMR is in the milli-Kelvin range at liquid helium temperature. We also designed a novel FMR probe head with a spring-loaded sample holder. Improved signal-to-noise ratio and stability compared to a common FMR head are achieved. Using a superconducting vector magnet we demonstrate Gilbert damping measurements on two thin film samples using a vector network analyzer with frequency up to 26 GHz: (1) A Permalloy film of 5 nm thickness and (2) a CoFeB film of 1.5 nm thickness. Experiments were performed with the applied magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the film plane.

  18. Interfacial Magnetism in Complex Oxide Heterostructures Probed by Neutrons and X-rays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Yaohua; Ke, Xianglin

    2015-09-02

    Magnetic complex-oxide heterostructures are of keen interest because a wealth of phenomena at the interface of dissimilar materials can give rise to fundamentally new physics and potentially valuable functionalities. Altered magnetization, novel magnetic coupling and emergent interfacial magnetism at the epitaxial layered-oxide interfaces have all been intensively investigated, which shapes our understanding on how to utilize those materials, particularly for spintronics. Neutron and x-ray based techniques have played a decisive role in characterizing interfacial magnetic structures and clarifying the underlying physics in this rapidly developing field. Here we review some recent experimental results, with an emphasis on those studied viamore » polarized neutron reflectometery and polarized x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We conclude with some perspectives.« less

  19. Interfacial Magnetism in Complex Oxide Heterostructures Probed by Neutrons and X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yaohua; Ke, Xianglin

    2015-09-02

    Magnetic complex-oxide heterostructures are of keen interest because a wealth of phenomena at the interface of dissimilar materials can give rise to fundamentally new physics and potentially valuable functionalities. Altered magnetization, novel magnetic coupling and emergent interfacial magnetism at the epitaxial layered-oxide interfaces have all been intensively investigated, which shapes our understanding on how to utilize those materials, particularly for spintronics. Neutron and x-ray based techniques have played a decisive role in characterizing interfacial magnetic structures and clarifying the underlying physics in this rapidly developing field. Here we review some recent experimental results, with an emphasis on those studied via polarized neutron reflectometery and polarized x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We conclude with some perspectives.

  20. Probing the magnetic moment of FePt micromagnets prepared by focused ion beam milling

    SciTech Connect

    Overweg, H. C.; Haan, A. M. J. den; Eerkens, H. J.; Bossoni, L.; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Alkemade, P. F. A.; La Rooij, A. L.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.

    2015-08-17

    We investigate the degradation of the magnetic moment of a 300 nm thick FePt film induced by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling. A 1 μm × 8 μm rod is milled out of a film by a FIB process and is attached to a cantilever by electron beam induced deposition. Its magnetic moment is determined by frequency-shift cantilever magnetometry. We find that the magnetic moment of the rod is μ = 1.1 ± 0.1 × 10{sup −12} Am{sup 2}, which implies that 70% of the magnetic moment is preserved during the FIB milling process. This result has important implications for atom trapping and magnetic resonance force microscopy, which are addressed in this paper.

  1. Probing the magnetic moment of FePt micromagnets prepared by focused ion beam milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overweg, H. C.; den Haan, A. M. J.; Eerkens, H. J.; Alkemade, P. F. A.; La Rooij, A. L.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.; Bossoni, L.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the degradation of the magnetic moment of a 300 nm thick FePt film induced by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling. A 1 μm × 8 μm rod is milled out of a film by a FIB process and is attached to a cantilever by electron beam induced deposition. Its magnetic moment is determined by frequency-shift cantilever magnetometry. We find that the magnetic moment of the rod is μ = 1.1 ± 0.1 × 10-12 Am2, which implies that 70% of the magnetic moment is preserved during the FIB milling process. This result has important implications for atom trapping and magnetic resonance force microscopy, which are addressed in this paper.

  2. Implementation and analysis of an innovative digital charge amplifier for hysteresis reduction in piezoelectric stack actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Bazghaleh, Mohsen Grainger, Steven; Cazzolato, Ben; Lu, Tien-Fu; Oskouei, Reza

    2014-04-15

    Smart actuators are the key components in a variety of nanopositioning applications, such as scanning probe microscopes and atomic force microscopes. Piezoelectric actuators are the most common smart actuators due to their high resolution, low power consumption, and wide operating frequency but they suffer hysteresis which affects linearity. In this paper, an innovative digital charge amplifier is presented to reduce hysteresis in piezoelectric stack actuators. Compared to traditional analog charge drives, experimental results show that the piezoelectric stack actuator driven by the digital charge amplifier has less hysteresis. It is also shown that the voltage drop of the digital charge amplifier is significantly less than the voltage drop of conventional analog charge amplifiers.

  3. Magnetic pulsations as a probe of the interplanetary magnetic field - A test of the Borok B index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Fleming, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    A magnetic pulsation index based on the periods of Pc 2-4 pulsations as recorded in earth current measurements at the Borok Geophysical Observatory has been claimed to be a measure of the interplanetary field. Tests of this index for the period 1972 to June 1974 show only a 27% success rate. However, a simple recalibration of the index improves the success rate to 51%. The success of the index indicates that the source of many terrestrial magnetic pulsations is external to the magnetosphere.

  4. Electro-Mechanical Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The electro-mechanical actuator, a new electronics technology, is an electronic system that provides the force needed to move valves that control the flow of propellant to the engine. It is proving to be advantageous for the main propulsion system plarned for a second generation reusable launch vehicle. Hydraulic actuators have been used successfully in rocket propulsion systems. However, they can leak when high pressure is exerted on such a fluid-filled hydraulic system. Also, hydraulic systems require significant maintenance and support equipment. The electro-mechanical actuator is proving to be low maintenance and the system weighs less than a hydraulic system. The electronic controller is a separate unit powering the actuator. Each actuator has its own control box. If a problem is detected, it can be replaced by simply removing one defective unit. The hydraulic systems must sustain significant hydraulic pressures in a rocket engine regardless of demand. The electro-mechanical actuator utilizes power only when needed. A goal of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program is to substantially improve safety and reliability while reducing the high cost of space travel. The electro-mechanical actuator was developed by the Propulsion Projects Office of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  6. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  7. Probing of the pairing state of HTSCs utilizing a-b plane magnetization anisotropy (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buan, J.; Israeloff, N. E.; Huang, C. C.; Goldman, A. M.; Liu, J. Z.; Shelton, R. N.

    1994-05-01

    We have performed measurements of the a-b plane longitudinal and transverse magnetization anisotropy on an untwinned, high quality single crystal of LuBa2Cu3O7-x in magnetic fields below Hc1 as a function of temperature, from 2 K to the transition temperature and the angle between the field and a fixed direction in the a-b plane. When the superconducting order parameter has nodes on the Fermi surface, such as the case of the spin-singlet dx2-y2 order parameter, nonlinear effects associated with low-energy quasiparticles should become important.1 It was pointed out by Yip and Sauls that these effects will be most important at low temperatures. They should be observable in a measurement of the anisotropy of the magnetization or the magnetic torque. The magnetization is predicted to develop an anisotropic component transverse to the applied field. Anisotropic transverse magnetization with dx2-y2 symmetry is not seen in the temperature regime 5 to 25 K. Our results set stringent limits on the anisotropy of the transverse magnetization in this range. Within the resolution of our experiment no evidence for d-wave pairing is observed.

  8. Cavity optoelectromechanical system combining strong electrical actuation with ultrasensitive transduction

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, Terry G.; Lee, Kwan H.; Harris, Glen I.; Knittel, Joachim; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2010-08-15

    A cavity optoelectromechanical system is reported which combines the ultrasensitive transduction of cavity optomechanical systems with the electrical actuation of nanoelectromechanical systems. Ultrasensitive mechanical transduction is achieved via optomechanical coupling. Electrical gradient forces as large as 0.40 {mu}N are realized, facilitating strong actuation with ultralow dissipation. A scanning probe microscope is implemented, capable of characterizing the mechanical modes. The integration of electrical actuation into optomechanical devices is an enabling step toward the regime of quantum nonlinear dynamics and provides capabilities for quantum control of mechanical motion.

  9. A thermopneumatically actuated bistable microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bocong; Wang, Boxiong; Schomburg, Werner Karl

    2010-09-01

    A bistable polymer microvalve with a thermopneumatic actuator has been developed. The microvalve was fabricated by micro milling of a polymer combined with sputtering and photolithography. The valve comprises two 2/2-way valves which are alternately switched such that they can be connected to serve as a 3/2-way valve. Two permanent magnets work with a movable soft magnet to keep the valve in its current state, resulting in bistable switching with a minimum energy of 320 mJ. An air flow rate of 1.36 L min-1 is achieved at 20 °C with a pressure difference of 200 kPa. No leakage is observed up to a differential pressure of 350 kPa. Flowing and switching performances were also tested at different temperatures. Sealing the flow channels from the actuator chamber makes the valve less sensitive to the temperature and other properties of the fluid to be switched. An initial gap between the valve seat and the silicone sealing membrane at least reduces the sticking problem. Switching time is found to be significantly influenced by the thickness of the heating membrane. With an 8 µm thick heating membrane, a response time of 10 ms can be achieved.

  10. Probing depth dependent structure and magnetic properties of thin films using polarized neutron reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal

    2015-06-24

    Novel properties of materials produced using nanoscale manufacturing processes often arise from interactions across interfaces between dissimilar materials. In order to understand the physical and magnetic properties of such nanostructures, a thorough and detailed structural and magnetic characterization with interface specificity is required. X-ray reflectivity and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR) are two nondestructive techniques that provide quantitative measures of the chemical and magnetic depth profiles of the films with less than nanometer resolution averaged over the lateral dimensions of the entire sample (typically 100 mm{sup 2}). PNR specifically gives simultaneous structure and magnetic information of the interfaces. Unquestionably, neutron reflectivity has played a decisive role in the development and study of new emergent phenomena at interfaces.

  11. Single ion as a shot-noise-limited magnetic-field-gradient probe

    SciTech Connect

    Walther, A.; Poschinger, U.; Ziesel, F.; Hettrich, M.; Wiens, A.; Welzel, J.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.

    2011-06-15

    It is expected that ion-trap quantum computing can be made scalable through protocols that make use of transport of ion qubits between subregions within the ion trap. In this scenario, any magnetic field inhomogeneity the ion experiences during the transport may lead to dephasing and loss of fidelity. Here we demonstrate how to measure, and compensate for, magnetic field gradients inside a segmented ion trap, by transporting a single ion over variable distances. We attain a relative magnetic field sensitivity of {Delta}B/B{sub 0{approx}}5x10{sup -7} over a test distance of 140 {mu}m, which can be extended to the mm range, still with sub-{mu}m resolution. A fast experimental sequence is presented, facilitating its use as a magnetic-field-gradient calibration routine, and it is demonstrated that the main limitation is the quantum shot noise.

  12. Note: Fiber optic transport probe for Hall measurements under light and magnetic field at low temperatures: Case study of a two dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, P. P. S.; Gupta, Anurag; Kumar, Pramod; Dogra, Anjana; Budhani, R. C.

    2015-05-15

    A fiber optic based probe is designed and developed for electrical transport measurements in presence of quasi-monochromatic (360–800 nm) light, varying temperature (T = 1.8–300 K), and magnetic field (B = 0–7 T). The probe is tested for the resistivity and Hall measurements performed on a LaAlO{sub 3}–SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface system with a conducting two dimensional electron gas.

  13. Probing a chemical compass: novel variants of low-frequency reaction yield detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Storey, Jonathan G; Liddell, Paul A; Gust, Devens; Hore, P J; Wedge, C J; Timmel, Christiane R

    2015-02-01

    We present a study of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad previously shown to function as a chemical compass: the photogenerated carotenoid-fullerene radical pair recombines at a rate sensitive to the orientation of an applied magnetic field. To characterize the system we develop a time-resolved Low-Frequency Reaction Yield Detected Magnetic Resonance (tr-LF-RYDMR) technique; the effect of varying the relative orientation of applied static and 36 MHz oscillating magnetic fields is shown to be strongly dependent on the strength of the oscillating magnetic field. RYDMR is a diagnostic test for involvement of the radical pair mechanism in the magnetic field sensitivity of reaction rates or yields, and has previously been applied in animal behavioural experiments to verify the involvement of radical-pair-based intermediates in the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds. The spectroscopic selection rules governing RYDMR are well understood at microwave frequencies for which the so-called 'high-field approximation' is valid, but at lower frequencies different models are required. For example, the breakdown of the rotating frame approximation has recently been investigated, but less attention has so far been given to orientation effects. Here we gain physical insights into the interplay of the different magnetic interactions affecting low-frequency RYDMR experiments performed in the challenging regime in which static and oscillating applied magnetic fields as well as internal electron-nuclear hyperfine interactions are of comparable magnitude. Our observations aid the interpretation of existing RYDMR-based animal behavioural studies and will inform future applications of the technique to verify and characterize further the biological receptors involved in avian magnetoreception. PMID:25537133

  14. A new probe of the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2015-08-01

    Establishing the properties of magnetic fields on scales larger than galaxy clusters is critical for resolving the unknown origin and evolution of galactic and cluster magnetism. More generally, observations of magnetic fields on cosmic scales are needed for assessing the impacts of magnetism on cosmology, particle physics, and structure formation over the full history of the Universe. However, firm observational evidence for magnetic fields in large scale structure remains elusive. In an effort to address this problem, we have developed a novel statistical method to infer the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments using observation of the two-point correlation of Faraday rotation measures from a dense grid of extragalactic radio sources. Here we describe our approach, which embeds and extends the pioneering work of Kolatt (1998) within the context of Information Field Theory (a statistical theory for Bayesian inference on spatially distributed signals; Enfllin et al., 2009). We describe prospects for observation, for example with forthcoming data from the ultra-deep JVLA CHILES Con Pol survey and future surveys with the SKA.

  15. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray probes of large scale structure and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2004-08-01

    We study signatures of a structured universe in the multi-pole moments, auto-correlation function, and cluster statistics of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above 1019 eV. We compare scenarios where the sources are distributed homogeneously or according to the baryon density distribution obtained from a cosmological large scale structure simulation. The influence of extragalactic magnetic fields is studied by comparing the case of negligible fields with fields expected to be produced along large scale shocks with a maximal strength consistent with observations. We confirm that strongly magnetized observers would predict considerable anisotropy on large scales, which is already in conflict with current data. In the best fit scenario only the sources are strongly magnetized, although deflection can still be considerable, of order 20° up to 1020 eV, and a pronounced GZK cutoff is predicted. We then discuss signatures for future large scale full-sky detectors such as the Pierre Auger and EUSO projects. Auto-correlations are sensitive to the source density only if magnetic fields do not significantly affect propagation. In contrast, for a weakly magnetized observer, degree scale auto-correlations below a certain level indicate magnetized discrete sources. It may be difficult even for next generation experiments to distinguish between structured and unstructured source distributions.

  16. O+ ion conic and plasma sheet dynamics observed by Van Allen Probe satellites during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, W. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Yang, J.; Foster, J.; Wygant, J.; Reeves, G.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-05-01

    The Van Allen Probe satellites were near apogee in the late evening local time sector during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm's main phase. About an hour after crossing the ring current's "nose structure" into the plasma sheet, the satellites encountered a quasiperiodic sequence of 0.08-3 keV O+ ions. Pitch angle distributions of this population consistently peaked nearly antiparallel to the local magnetic field. We interpret this population as O+ conics originating in the northern ionosphere. Sequences began as fairly steady state conic fluxes with energies in the ~ 80 to 100 eV range. Over about a half hour buildup phase, O+ energies peaked near 1 keV. During subsequent release phases lasting ~ 20 min, O+ energies returned to low-energy starting points. We argue these observations reflect repeated formations and dissolutions of downward, magnetically aligned electric fields (ɛ||) layers trapping O+ conics between mirror points within heating layers below and electrostatic barriers above. Nearly identical variations were observed at the locations of both satellites during 9 of these 13 conic cycles. Phase differences between cycles were observed at both spacecraft during the remaining events. Most "buildup" to "release" phase transitions coincided with AL index minima. However, in situ magnetometer measurements indicate only weak dipolarizations of tail-like magnetic fields. The lack of field-aligned reflected O+ and tail-like magnetic fields suggest that both ionospheres may be active. However, Southern Hemisphere origin conics cannot be observed since they would be isotropized and accelerated during neutral sheet crossings.

  17. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of 13C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the 13C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of 13C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different 13C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized 13C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the 13C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex.

  18. Effect of ionic interaction between a hyperpolarized magnetic resonance chemical probe and a gadolinium contrast agent for the hyperpolarized lifetime after dissolution.

    PubMed

    Takakusagi, Yoichi; Inoue, Kaori; Naganuma, Tatsuya; Hyodo, Fuminori; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    In hyperpolarization of (13)C-enriched magnetic resonance chemical probes in the solid-state, a trace amount of gadolinium (Gd) contrast agent can be used to maximize polarization of the (13)C nuclear spins. Here, we report systematic measurement of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and enhancement level of (13)C-enriched chemical probes in the presence of various Gd contrast agents in the liquid-state after dissolution. Using two different (13)C probes having opposite electric charges at neutral pH, we clearly show the T1 of hyperpolarized (13)C was barely affected by the use of a Gd complex that displays repulsive interaction with the (13)C probe in solution, whilst T1 was drastically shortened when there was ionic attraction between probe and complex. PMID:27490303

  19. Rotary Series Elastic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  20. Rotary series elastic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.