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Sample records for magnetically channeled line-driven

  1. New Instabilities in Line Driven Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1985-01-01

    The physical mechanisms which potentially lead to instabilities in line driven winds, the drift instability and the line shape instability, are discussed. A general three dimensional treatment of the stability problem of line driven winds which leads to the general dispersion equation is proposed. From this dispersion equation automatically a third physical mechanism driving instability in stellar winds is deduced; the thermal drift instability which is related to changes in absorption of radiation caused by temperature perturbations. This mechanism results in growing inwardly propagating sound waves.

  2. Muon cooling in a quadrupole magnet channel

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Poklonskiy, A.; /Michigan State U.

    2007-10-01

    As discussed before,[1] a cooling channel using quadrupole magnets in a FODO transport channel can be used for initial cooling of muons. In the present note we discuss this possibility of a FODO focusing channel for cooling, and we present ICOOL simulations of muon cooling within a FODO channel. We explore a 1.5m cell-length cooling channel that could be used for the initial transverse cooling stage of a muon collider or neutrino factory.

  3. Acceleration efficiency in line-driven flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the physics of flow driving by line scattering of a continuum radiation source to determine the degree to which such line scattering can heat as well as accelerate the flow. Within the framework of the Sobolev theory for line transfer, we argue that the finite thermal width of the line scattering profile can lead to a significant 'Doppler heating' via photon frequency redistribution within a Sobolev resonance layer. Quantitative computation of this heating shows, however, that it is largely canceled by a corresponding cooling by the diffuse radiation. The resulting reduction in net Doppler heating or cooling means that the overall effect is only of limited importance in the energy balance of line-driven stellar winds. Through simple scaling relations, we compare the effect to other competing heating or cooling terms, including the ion-drag frictional heating recently discussed by Springmann and Pauldrach. We also provide a physical explanation of the unexpected cooling effect, and comment that its near cancellation of the anticipated heating provides another example of the tendency for ideal Sobolev theory to apply to a higher order than expected.

  4. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Flanagan, Gene

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic channel flows with weak transverse magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Rothmayer, A P

    2014-07-28

    Magnetohydrodynamic flow of an incompressible fluid through a plane channel with slowly varying walls and a magnetic field applied transverse to the channel is investigated in the high Reynolds number limit. It is found that the magnetic field can first influence the hydrodynamic flow when the Hartmann number reaches a sufficiently large value. The magnetic field is found to suppress the steady and unsteady viscous flow near the channel walls unless the wall shapes become large. PMID:24936018

  6. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  7. Separating Magnetically Labeled and Unlabeled Biological Cells within Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byvank, Tom; Vieira, Greg; Miller, Brandon; Yu, Bo; Chalmers, Jeffrey; Lee, L. James; Sooryakumar, R.

    2011-03-01

    The transport of microscopic objects that rely on magnetic forces have numerous advantages including flexibility of controlling many design parameters and the long range magnetic interactions generally do not adversely affect biological or chemical interactions. We present results on the use of magnetic micro-arrays imprinted within polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels that benefit from these features and the ability to rapidly reprogram the magnetic energy landscape for cell manipulation and sorting applications. A central enabling feature is the very large, tunable, magnetic field gradients (> 10 4) that can be designed within the microfluidic architecture. Through use of antibody-conjugated magnetic microspheres to label biological cells, results on the transport and sorting of heterogeneous cell populations are presented. The effects of micro-array and fluid channel design parameters, competition between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic drag forces, and cell-labeling efficiency on cell separation are discussed.

  8. Line-Driven Winds in Strong Gravitational Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton

    A general physical mechanism which could contribute to the formation of fast line-driven outflows at the vicinity of strong gravitational field sources is proposed. The problem of the acceleration of a wind due to absorption of the radiation flux in lines is considered at the vicinity of a supermassive BH. We argue that the gradient of the gravitational potential plays the same role as the velocity gradient plays in Sobolev approximation. Both Doppler effect and gravitational redshifting are taken into account in Sobolev approximation. It is shown that the radiation force becomes a function of the local velocity gradient and the gradient of the gravitational potential. The derived equation of motion has a critical point that is different from that of Castor Abbott Klein (CAK). A solution that is continuous through the singular point is obtained numerically. A comparison with CAK theory is presented. It is shown that the developed theory predicts terminal velocities which are greater than those obtained from the CAK theory. Applications to the problem of the formation of fast outflows from AGN are discussed.

  9. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    SciTech Connect

    I.Yu. Kostyukov; G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.M. Rax

    2001-12-12

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made.

  10. Simulations of Filament Channel Formation in a Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, Kalman; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    A major unanswered problem in solar physics has been explaining the presence of sheared filament channels above photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs) and the simultaneous lack of structure in the ‘loop’ portion of the coronal magnetic field. The shear inherent in filament channels represents not only a form of magnetic energy, but also magnetic helicity. As a result, models of filament channel formation need to explain not only why helicity is observed above PILs, but also why it is apparently not observed anywhere else in the corona. Previous results (Knizhnik, Antiochos & DeVore, 2015) have suggested that any helicity injected into the coronal field inverse-cascades in scale, a process known as magnetic helicity condensation (Antiochos, 2013). In this work, we present high resolution numerical simulations of photospheric helicity injection into a coronal magnetic field that contains both a PIL and a coronal hole (CH). We show conclusively that the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity terminates at the PIL, resulting in the formation of highly sheared filament channels and a smooth, untwisted corona. We demonstrate that even though magnetic helicity is injected throughout the flux system, it accumulates only at the PIL, where it manifests itself in the form of highly sheared filament channels, while any helicity obtained by the CH is ejected out of the system. We show that the formation of filament channels is both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with observations and discuss the implications of our simulations for observations.This work was supported by the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, LWS TR&T and H-SR Programs.

  11. Line-driven disk winds in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proga, D.; Stone, J. M.; Kallman, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    We present the results of axisymmetric time-dependent hydrodynamic calculations of line-driven winds from accretion disks in active galactic nuclei (AGN). We assume the disk is flat, Keplerian, geometrically thin, and optically thick, radiating according to the α-disk prescription. The central engine of the AGN is a source of both ionizing X-rays and wind-driving ultraviolet (UV) photons. To calculate the radiation force, we take into account radiation from the disk and the central engine. The gas temperature and ionization state in the wind are calculated self-consistently from the photoionization and heating rate of the central engine. We find that a disk accreting onto a 10 8 M ⊙ yr -1 black hole at the rate of 1.8 M ⊙ yr -1 can launch a wind at ˜ 10 16 cm from the central engine. The X-rays from the central object are significantly attenuated by the disk atmosphere so they cannot prevent the local disk radiation from pushing matter away from the disk. However in the supersonic portion of the flow high above the disk, the X-rays can overionize the gas and decrease the wind terminal velocity. For a reasonable X-ray opacity, e.g., κ X = 40 g -1 cm 2, the disk wind can be accelerated by the central UV radiation to velocities of up to 15000 km s -1 at a distance of ˜ 10 17 cm from the central engine. The covering factor of the disk wind is ˜ 0.2. The wind is unsteady and consists of an opaque, slow vertical flow near the disk that is bounded on the polar side by a high-velocity, stream. A typical column density through the fast stream is a few 10 23 cm -2 so the stream is optically thin to the UV radiation. This low column density is precisely why gas can be accelerated to high velocities. The fast stream contributes nearly 100% to the total wind mass loss rate of 0.5 M ⊙ yr -1.

  12. Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

    2011-03-01

    Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

  13. Wind channeling, magnetospheres, and spindown of magnetic massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, S. P.; ud-Doula, A.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Petit, V.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Cohen, D. H.

    2014-08-01

    A subpopulation (~10%) of hot, luminous, massive stars have been revealed through spectropolarimetry to harbor strong (hundreds to tens of thousand Gauss), steady, large-scale (often significantly dipolar) magnetic fields. This review focuses on the role of such fields in channeling and trapping the radiatively driven wind of massive stars, including both in the strongly perturbed outflow from open field regions, and the wind-fed ``magnetospheres'' that develop from closed magnetic loops. For B-type stars with weak winds and moderately fast rotation, one finds ``centrifugal magnetospheres'', in which rotational support allows magnetically trapped wind to accumulate to a large density, with quite distinctive observational signatures, e.g. in Balmer line emission. In contrast, more luminous O-type stars have generally been spun down by magnetic braking from angular momentum loss in their much stronger winds. The lack of centrifugal support means their closed loops form a ``dynamical magnetosphere'', with trapped material falling back to the star on a dynamical timescale; nonetheless, the much stronger wind feeding leads to a circumstellar density that is still high enough to give substantial Balmer emission. Overall, this review describes MHD simulations and semi-analytic dynamical methods for modeling the magnetospheres, the magnetically channeled wind outflows, and the associated spin-down of these magnetic massive stars.

  14. The Physical Connection and Magnetic Coupling of the MICE CoolingChannel Magnets and the Magnet Forces for Various MICE OperatingModes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Baynham, D.E.; Fabricatore, Pasquale; Farinon, Stefania; Green, Michael A.; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Lau, Wing W.; Maldavi, S.M.; Virostek, Steve P.; Witte, Holger

    2006-08-20

    A key issue in the construction of the MICE cooling channel is the magnetic forces between various elements in the cooling channel and the detector magnets. This report describes how the MICE cooling channel magnets are hooked to together so that the longitudinal magnetic forces within the cooling channel can be effectively connected to the base of the experiment. This report presents a magnetic force and stress analysis for the MICE cooling channel magnets, even when longitudinal magnetic forces as large as 700 kN (70 tons) are applied to the vacuum vessel of various magnets within the MICE channel. This report also shows that the detector magnets can be effectively separated from the central MICE cooling channel magnets without damage to either type of magnet component.

  15. Magnetic field generation during intense laser channelling in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, A. G.; Sarri, G.; Vranic, M.; Amano, Y.; Doria, D.; Guillaume, E.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hicks, G.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P. A.; Kar, S.; Silva, L. O.; Tanaka, K. A.; Vieira, J.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Channel formation during the propagation of a high-energy (120 J) and long duration (30 ps) laser pulse through an underdense deuterium plasma has been spatially and temporally resolved via means of a proton imaging technique, with intrinsic resolutions of a few μm and a few ps, respectively. Conclusive proof is provided that strong azimuthally symmetric magnetic fields with a strength of around 0.5 MG are created inside the channel, consistent with the generation of a collimated beam of relativistic electrons. The inferred electron beam characteristics may have implications for the cone-free fast-ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion.

  16. Quench Protection for the MICE Cooling Channel Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xing Long; Xu, Feng Yu; Wang, Li; Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Liu, X.K.; Jia, Lin Xiang; Amm, Kathleen

    2008-08-02

    This paper describes the passive quench protection system selected for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) cooling channel coupling magnet. The MICE coupling magnet will employ two methods of quench protection simultaneously. The most important method of quench protection in the coupling magnet is the subdivision of the coil. Cold diodes and resistors are put across the subdivisions to reduce both the voltage to ground and the hot-spot temperature. The second method of quench protection is quench-back from the mandrel, which speeds up the spread of the normal region within the coils. Combining quench back with coil subdivision will reduce the hot spot temperature further. This paper explores the effect on the quench process of the number of coil sub-divisions, the quench propagation velocity within the magnet, and the shunt resistance.

  17. Evolution of chirped laser pulses in a magnetized plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Hemlata,; Mishra, Rohit Kumar

    2014-12-15

    The propagation of intense, short, sinusoidal laser pulses in a magnetized plasma channel has been studied. The wave equation governing the evolution of the radiation field is set up and a variational technique is used to obtain the equations describing the evolution of the laser spot size, pulse length and chirp parameter. Numerical methods are used to analyze the simultaneous evolution of these parameters. The effect of the external magnetic field on initially chirped as well as unchirped laser pulses on the spot size, pulse length and chirping has been analyzed.

  18. Magnetic tornadoes as energy channels into the solar corona.

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer-Böhm, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Steiner, Oskar; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe; de la Cruz Rodriguez, Jaime; Fedun, Viktor; Erdélyi, Robert

    2012-06-28

    Heating the outer layers of the magnetically quiet solar atmosphere to more than one million kelvin and accelerating the solar wind requires an energy flux of approximately 100 to 300 watts per square metre, but how this energy is transferred and dissipated there is a puzzle and several alternative solutions have been proposed. Braiding and twisting of magnetic field structures, which is caused by the convective flows at the solar surface, was suggested as an efficient mechanism for atmospheric heating. Convectively driven vortex flows that harbour magnetic fields are observed to be abundant in the photosphere (the visible surface of the Sun). Recently, corresponding swirling motions have been discovered in the chromosphere, the atmospheric layer sandwiched between the photosphere and the corona. Here we report the imprints of these chromospheric swirls in the transition region and low corona, and identify them as observational signatures of rapidly rotating magnetic structures. These ubiquitous structures, which resemble super-tornadoes under solar conditions, reach from the convection zone into the upper solar atmosphere and provide an alternative mechanism for channelling energy from the lower into the upper solar atmosphere. PMID:22739314

  19. Salmonella detection in a microfluidic channel using orbiting magnetic beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Matt; Mills, Zachary; Owen, Drew; Hanasoge, Srinivas; Hesketh, Peter; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We use three-dimensional simulations to model the detection of salmonella in a complex fluid sample in a microfluidic channel. Salmonella is captured using magnetic microbeads orbiting around soft ferromagnetic discs at the microchannel bottom subjected to a rotating external magnetic field. Numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of salmonella and microbeads throughout the detection process. We examine the effect of the channel geometry on the salmonella capture, and the forces applied to the salmonella as it is dragged through the fluid after capture. Our findings guide the design of a lab-on-a-chip device to be used for detection of salmonella in food samples in a way that ensures that salmonella captured by orbiting microbeads are preserved until they can be extracted from the system for testing, and are not washed away by the fluid flow or damaged due to the experience of excessive stresses. Such a device is needed to detect bacteria at the food source and prevention of consumption of contaminated food, and also can be used for the detection of a variety of biomaterials of interest from complex fluid samples. Support from USDA and NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. a Numerical Study on the Magnetic Fluid Flow in a Channel Surrounding a Permanent Magnet Under Temperature Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. L.; Yao, K. L.; Liu, Z. L.

    It was investigated that the magnetic fluid which can be the carrier of magnetic particles or magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCP) flows surrounding a permanent magnet in a channel under the influence of high gradient magnetic field and the temperature difference between upper and lower boundaries of the channel. It is considered that the magnetization of the fluid varies linearly with temperature and magnetic field intensity. The numerical solution of above model is described by a coupled and nonlinear system of PDEs. Results indicate that the presence of magnetic and temperature fields appreciably influence the flow field; vortexes arise almost around the magnetic source and also appear near the upper left and lower right boundaries. The temperature, local skin friction coefficient and rate of heat transfer are all affected by the magnitude and position of the magnetic source, they fluctuate evidently near the high gradient magnetic field area.

  1. Experimental investigation of magnetically actuated separation using tangential microfluidic channels and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Munir, Ahsan; Zhu, Zanzan; Wang, Jianlong; Zhou, Hong Susan

    2014-06-01

    A novel continuous switching/separation scheme of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in a sub-microlitre fluid volume surrounded by neodymium permanent magnet is studied in this work using tangential microfluidic channels. Polydimethylsiloxane tangential microchannels are fabricated using a novel micromoulding technique that can be done without a clean room and at much lower cost and time. Negligible switching of MNPs is seen in the absence of magnetic field, whereas 90% of switching is observed in the presence of magnetic field. The flow rate of MNPs solution had dramatic impact on separation performance. An optimum value of the flow rate is found that resulted in providing effective MNP separation at much faster rate. Separation performance is also investigated for a mixture containing non-magnetic polystyrene particles and MNPs. It is found that MNPs preferentially moved from lower microchannel to upper microchannel resulting in efficient separation. The proof-of-concept experiments performed in this work demonstrates that microfluidic bioseparation can be efficiently achieved using functionalised MNPs, together with tangential microchannels, appropriate magnetic field strength and optimum flow rates. This work verifies that a simple low-cost magnetic switching scheme can be potentially of great utility for the separation and detection of biomolecules in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:25014081

  2. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations of line-driven disk winds for ultra-fast outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Mariko; Ohsuga, Ken; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Wada, Keiichi; Yoshida, Tessei

    2016-02-01

    Using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the origin of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) that are often observed in luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We found that the radiation force due to the spectral lines generates strong winds (line-driven disk winds) that are launched from the inner region of accretion disks (˜30 Schwarzschild radii). A wide range of black hole masses (MBH) and Eddington ratios (ε) was investigated to study the conditions causing the line-driven winds. For MBH = 106-109 M⊙ and ε = 0.1-0.7, funnel-shaped disk winds appear, in which dense matter is accelerated outward with an opening angle of 70°-80° and with 10% of the speed of light. If we observe the wind along its direction, the velocity, the column density, and the ionization state are consistent with those of the observed UFOs. As long as obscuration by the torus does not affect the observation of X-ray bands, the UFOs could be statistically observed in about 13%-28% of the luminous AGNs, which is not inconsistent with the observed ratio (˜40%). We also found that the results are insensitive to the X-ray luminosity and the density of the disk surface. Thus, we can conclude that UFOs could exist in any luminous AGNs, such as narrow-line Seyfert 1s and quasars with ε > 0.1, with which fast line-driven winds are associated.

  3. Optical control of Magnetic Feshbach Resonances using Closed Channel EIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, Arunkumar; Arunkumar, Nithya; Joseph, James; Thomas, John

    2016-05-01

    Optical techniques can provide rapid temporal control and high-resolution spatial control of interactions in cold gases enabling the study of non-equilibrium strongly interacting Fermi gases. We use electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the closed channel to control magnetic Feshbach resonances in an optically-trapped mixture of the two lowest hyperfine states of a 6 Li Fermi gas. In our experiments, the narrow Feshbach resonance is tuned by up to 3 G. For the broad resonance, the spontaneous lifetime is increased to 0.4 s at the dark state resonance, compared to 0.5 ms for single field tuning. We present a new model of light-induced loss spectra, employing continuum-dressed basis states, that agrees in shape and magnitude with loss measurements for both broad and narrow resonances. Using this model, we predict the trade-off between tunability and loss for the broad resonance in 6 Li, showing that our two-field method substantially reduces the two-body loss rate compared to single field methods for same tuning range. This research is supported by AFOSR, NSF, ARO, and DOE.

  4. Theory for nanoparticle retention time in the helical channel of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-05-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a separation and characterization technique for magnetic nanoparticles such as those used for cell labeling and for targeted drug therapy. A helical separation channel is used to efficiently exploit the quadrupole magnetic field. The fluid and sample components therefore have angular and longitudinal components to their motion in the thin annular space occupied by the helical channel. The retention ratio is defined as the ratio of the times for non-retained and a retained material to pass through the channel. Equations are derived for the respective angular and longitudinal components to retention ratio.

  5. Ion Runaway Instability in Low-Density, Line-driven Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Puls, Joachim

    2002-04-01

    We examine the linear instability of low-density, line-driven stellar winds to runaway of the heavy minor ions when the drift speed of these ions relative to the bulk, passive plasma of hydrogen and helium approaches or exceeds the plasma thermal speed. We first focus on the surprising results of recent steady state, two-component models, which indicate that the limited Coulomb coupling associated with suprathermal ion drift leads not to an ion runaway, but instead to a relatively sharp shift of both the ion and passive fluids to a much lower outward acceleration. Drawing on analogies with subsonic outflow in the solar wind, we provide a physical discussion of how this lower acceleration is the natural consequence of the weaker frictional coupling, allowing the ion line driving to maintain its steady state balance against collisional drag with a comparatively shallow ion velocity gradient. However, we then carry out a time-dependent, linearized stability analysis of these two-component steady solutions and thereby find that, as the ion drift increases from sub- to suprathermal speeds, a wave mode characterized by separation between the ion versus passive plasma goes from being strongly damped to being strongly amplified. Unlike the usual line-driven flow instability of high-density, strongly coupled flows, this ion separation instability occurs even in the long-wavelength Sobolev limit, although with only a modest spatial growth rate. At shorter wavelengths, the onset of instability occurs for ion drift speeds that are still somewhat below the plasma thermal speed and, moreover, generally has a very large spatial growth. For all wavelengths, however, the temporal growth rate exceeds the already rapid growth of line-driven instability by a typical factor of ~100, corresponding to the mass-density ratio between the bulk plasma and the driven minor ions. We further show that this ion separation mode has an inward propagation speed that is strongly enhanced (at its

  6. Modulation of channel activity and gadolinium block of MscL by static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Evgeny; Martinac, Boris

    2007-02-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has for long been known to influence the behaviour and orientation of a variety of living organisms. Experimental studies of the magnetic sense have, however, been impaired by the lack of a plausible cellular and/or molecular mechanism providing meaningful explanation for detection of magnetic fields by these organisms. Recently, mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels have been implied to play a role in magnetoreception. In this study we have investigated the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) of moderate intensity on the activity and gadolinium block of MscL, the bacterial MS channel of large conductance, which has served as a model channel to study the basic physical principles of mechanosensory transduction in living cells. In addition to showing that direct application of the magnetic field decreased the activity of the MscL channel, our study demonstrates for the first time that SMFs can reverse the effect of gadolinium, a well-known blocker of MS channels. The results of our study are consistent with a notion that (1) the effects of SMFs on the MscL channels may result from changes in physical properties of the lipid bilayer due to diamagnetic anisotropy of phospholipid molecules and consequently (2) cooperative superdiamagnetism of phospholipid molecules under influence of SMFs could cause displacement of Gd(3+) ions from the membrane bilayer and thus remove the MscL channel block. PMID:17089151

  7. Lambertson magnet design for the Tevatron extraction channel

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.P.; Harrison, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    The beam splitting requirements of the Tevatron extraction system necessitated the design of two different high field (11 kG and 15 kG) magnetic septa. The authors present details of the magnet design with emphasis on the construction techniques used to achieve good vacuum behaviour and septum straightness while maintaining magnetic field quality.

  8. USING CORONAL CELLS TO INFER THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE AND CHIRALITY OF FILAMENT CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Martin, S. F.; Panasenco, O.

    2013-08-01

    Coronal cells are visible at temperatures of {approx}1.2 MK in Fe XII coronal images obtained from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft. We show that near a filament channel, the plumelike tails of these cells bend horizontally in opposite directions on the two sides of the channel like fibrils in the chromosphere. Because the cells are rooted in magnetic flux concentrations of majority polarity, these observations can be used with photospheric magnetograms to infer the direction of the horizontal field in filament channels and the chirality of the associated magnetic field. This method is similar to the procedure for inferring the direction of the magnetic field and the chirality of the fibril pattern in filament channels from H{alpha} observations. However, the coronal cell observations are easier to use and provide clear inferences of the horizontal field direction for heights up to {approx}50 Mm into the corona.

  9. Dynamic Behavior of Nano-Size Dust Particles in a Magnetic Field Channel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Park, Haewoo; Jo, Youngmin

    2016-05-01

    Removal of very small dust from indoor public spaces, such as metro subway stations, is a challenge. A large proportion of subway dust, particularly that of submicron sizes, contains iron compounds. This study sought to understand the dynamic behavior of such fine iron dust in a magnetic field. The computer aided fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation revealed that the design and configuration of a rectangular flow channel with magnets determine the dynamic motion of particles. An attractive magnetic emitter arrangement produced higher magnetic flux density than a repulsive arrangement. Additional ferromagnetic wire mesh inserted into the duct channel could provide a more systematic magnetic field and collect more dust. The field gradient for 0.3 mm thick wire was more than twice that of 0.5 mm wire. The provision of a magnetic field could contribute a 20% increase in 100 nm particle collection and an increase of 5% in 10 nm. PMID:27483753

  10. Stability of layered channel flow of magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yecko, Philip

    2009-03-01

    The stability of a sheared interface separating a viscous magnetic fluid (ferrofluid) and an ordinary viscous fluid is examined for arbitrary wavelength disturbances using three dimensional linear perturbation theory. The unperturbed state corresponds to a two-layer Poiseuille profile in which a uniform magnetic field of arbitrary orientation is imposed. Coupling between the field and fluid occurs via the magnetic Maxwell stress tensor, formulated here for nonlinear magnetic material, expanding the scope of previous studies of linear media. Neutral curves and stability characteristics at low Reynolds number are presented and analyzed, and are found to depend sensitively on the linear and nonlinear magnetic properties of the material. The stability properties of the flow are shaped by a small set of the least stable modes of the spectrum, a result that evades single mode or potential flow analyses. The gravest modes can be of different character, resembling either interfacial or shear modes, modified by magnetic effects. The commonly cited ferrofluid interface properties of "stabilization by a tangential field" and "destabilization by a normal field" are shown to be invalid here, although the origins of these features can be identified within this problem.

  11. MHD flows in the channels of plasma accelerators with a longitudinal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Zhdanova, N. S.

    2008-12-15

    Plasma flows caused by the interaction of the discharge current with the azimuthal magnetic self-field in coaxial channels (nozzles) of plasma accelerators are strongly affected by the longitudinal field produced by external conductors. A two-dimensional MHD model of flows in channels in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field is proposed. Depending on the ratio between the characteristic values of the longitudinal and azimuthal field components, one of three types of flow is established in the channel: super-Alfven, sub-Alfven, or combined. The properties of different types of flows are analyzed. The acceleration process in sub-Alfven flows differs qualitatively from that in regimes without a longitudinal field in transitions between the kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy components.

  12. MHD flows in the channels of plasma accelerators with a longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Zhdanova, N. S.

    2008-12-01

    Plasma flows caused by the interaction of the discharge current with the azimuthal magnetic self-field in coaxial channels (nozzles) of plasma accelerators are strongly affected by the longitudinal field produced by external conductors. A two-dimensional MHD model of flows in channels in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field is proposed. Depending on the ratio between the characteristic values of the longitudinal and azimuthal field components, one of three types of flow is established in the channel: super-Alfvén, sub-Alfvén, or combined. The properties of different types of flows are analyzed. The acceleration process in sub-Alfvén flows differs qualitatively from that in regimes without a longitudinal field in transitions between the kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy components.

  13. Integrated acoustic and magnetic separation in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Thévoz, Patrick; Bruus, Henrik; Soh, H. Tom

    2009-12-01

    With a growing number of cell-based biotechnological applications, there is a need for particle separation systems capable of multiparameter separations at high purity and throughput, beyond what is presently offered by traditional methods including fluorescence activated cell sorting and column-based magnetic separation. Toward this aim, we report on the integration of microfluidic acoustic and magnetic separation in a monolithic device for multiparameter particle separation. Using our device, we demonstrate high-purity separation of a multicomponent particle mixture at a throughput of up to 108 particles/hr.

  14. Magnetic field shimming of a permanent magnet using a combination of pieces of permanent magnets and a single-channel shim coil for skeletal age assessment of children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Y.; Kono, S.; Ishizawa, K.; Inamura, S.; Uchiumi, T.; Tamada, D.; Kose, K.

    2013-05-01

    We adopted a combination of pieces of permanent magnets and a single-channel (SC) shim coil to shim the magnetic field in a magnetic resonance imaging system dedicated for skeletal age assessment of children. The target magnet was a 0.3-T open and compact permanent magnet tailored to the hand imaging of young children. The homogeneity of the magnetic field was first improved by shimming using pieces of permanent magnets. The residual local inhomogeneity was then compensated for by shimming using the SC shim coil. The effectiveness of the shimming was measured by imaging the left hands of human subjects and evaluating the image quality. The magnetic resonance images for the child subject clearly visualized anatomical structures of all bones necessary for skeletal age assessment, demonstrating the usefulness of combined shimming.

  15. Polarized neutron channeling as a tool for the investigations of weakly magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, S. V.; Khaydukov, Yu. N.; Keller, T.; Ott, F.; Radu, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present and apply a new method to measure directly weak magnetization in thin films. The polarization of a neutron beam channeling through a thin film structure is measured after exiting the structure edge as a microbeam. We have applied the method to a three-layer thin film structure acting as a planar waveguide for polarized neutrons. The middle guiding layer is a rare earth based ferrimagnetic material TbCo5 with a low magnetization of about 20 mT. We demonstrate that the channeling method is more sensitive than the specular neutron reflection method.

  16. Laser beat wave resonant terahertz generation in a magnetized plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhasin, Lalita; Tripathi, V. K.; Kumar, Pawan

    2016-02-01

    Resonant excitation of terahertz (THz) radiation by nonlinear mixing of two lasers in a ripple-free self created plasma channel is investigated. The channel has a transverse static magnetic field and supports a THz X-mode with phase velocity close to the speed of light in vacuum when the frequency of the mode is close to plasma frequency on the channel axis and its value decreases with the intensity of lasers. The THz is resonantly driven by the laser beat wave ponderomotive force. The THz amplitude scales almost three half power of the intensity of lasers as the width of the THz eigen mode shrinks with laser intensity.

  17. Impact of radial magnetic field on peristalsis in curved channel with convective boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaadi, Fuad; Mousa, Ghassan

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses the peristaltic flow in curved channel with combined heat/mass transfer and convective effects. The channel walls are flexible. An imposed magnetic field is applied in radial direction to increase the wave amplitude (used in ECG for synchronization purposes). The pseudoplastic fluid comprising shear-thinning/shear thickening effects has been used in mathematical modeling. Small Reynolds number assumption is employed to neglect inertial effects. Half channel-width to wavelength ratio is small enough for the pressure to be considered uniform over the cross-section. The graphical results obtained are compared with planar channel. Results show the non-symmetric behavior of sundry parameters in contrary to the planar case. Additionally more clear results are seen when the curved channel is approached.

  18. Magnetic Shielding of the Acceleration Channel Walls in a Long-Life Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; de Grys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In a Qualification Life Test (QLT) of the BPT-4000 Hall thruster that recently accumulated greater than 10,000 h it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approximately 5,600 h. Numerical simulations of this thruster using a 2-D axisymmetric, magnetic field-aligned-mesh (MFAM) plasma solver reveal that the process that led to this significant reduction of the erosion was multifaceted. It is found that when the channel receded from its early-in-life geometry to its steady-state configuration several changes in the near-wall plasma and sheath were induced by the magnetic field that, collectively, constituted an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Because all such changes in the behavior of the ionized gas near the eroding surfaces were caused by the topology of the magnetic field there, we term this process "magnetic shielding."

  19. Suppression of weak localization due to magnetic flux in few-channel ballistic microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhar, Z.; Weidenmueller, H.A.; Zuk, J.A. ); Lewenkopf, C.H. )

    1994-10-10

    Using a random-matrix model for the Hamiltonian of a ballistic microstructure, which is chaotic in the classical limit, maximizing the coupling to the external leads, and employing Landauer's formula and Efetov's supersymmetry technique, we derive an expression for the magnetic-flux dependence of weak localization. This expression describes the crossover from orthogonal to unitary symmetry, depends only on the number of channels and on the magnetic flux through the structure, and is expected to apply universally.

  20. Hydrodynamic Models of Line-Driven Accretion Disk Winds III: Local Ionization Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereyra, Nicolas Antonio; Kallman, Timothy R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic models of line-driven accretion disk winds in cataclysmic variable systems and calculate wind mass-loss rates and terminal velocities. The models are 2.5-dimensional, include an energy balance condition with radiative heating and cooling processes, and includes local ionization equilibrium introducing time dependence and spatial dependence on the line radiation force parameters. The radiation field is assumed to originate in an optically thick accretion disk. Wind ion populations are calculated under the assumption that local ionization equilibrium is determined by photoionization and radiative recombination, similar to a photoionized nebula. We find a steady wind flowing from the accretion disk. Radiative heating tends to maintain the temperature in the higher density wind regions near the disk surface, rather than cooling adiabatically. For a disk luminosity L (sub disk) = solar luminosity, white dwarf mass M(sub wd) = 0.6 solar mass, and white dwarf radii R(sub wd) = 0.01 solar radius, we obtain a wind mass-loss rate of M(sub wind) = 4 x 10(exp -12) solar mass yr(exp -1) and a terminal velocity of approximately 3000 km per second. These results confirm the general velocity and density structures found in our earlier constant ionization equilibrium adiabatic CV wind models. Further we establish here 2.5D numerical models that can be extended to QSO/AGN winds where the local ionization equilibrium will play a crucial role in the overall dynamics.

  1. An approximate analytic solution for the radiation from a line-driven fluid-loaded plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diperna, Daniel T.; Feit, David

    2001-12-01

    In the analysis of a fluid loaded line-driven plate, the fields in the structure and the fluid are often expressed in terms of a Fourier transform. Once the boundary conditions are matched, the structural displacement can be expressed as an inverse transform, which can be evaluated using contour integration. The result is then a sum of propagating or decaying waves, each arising from poles in the complex plane, plus a branch cut integral. The branch cut is due to a square root in the transform of the acoustic impedance. The complex layer analysis (CLA) used here eliminates the branch cut singularity by approximating the square root with a rational function, causing the characteristic equation to become a polynomial in the transform variable. An approximate analytic solution to the characteristic equation is then found using a perturbation method. The result is four poles corresponding to the roots of the in vacuo plate, modified by the presence of the fluid, plus an infinity of poles located along the branch cut of the acoustic impedance. The solution is then found analytically using contour integration, with the integrand containing only simple poles.

  2. Quench Protection for the MICE Cooling Channel CouplingMagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wang, L.; Guo, X.L.

    2007-11-20

    The MICE coupling coil is fabricated from Nb-Ti, which hashigh quench propagation velocities within the coil in all directionscompared to coils fabricated with other superconductors such as niobiumtin. The time for the MICE coupling coil to become fully normal throughnormal region propagation in the coil is shorter than the time needed fora safe quench (as defined by a hot-spot temperature that is less than 300K). A MICE coupling coil quench was simulated using a code written at theInstitute of Cryogenics and Superconductive Technology (ICST) at theHarbin Institute of Technology (HIT). This code simulates quench backfrom the mandrel as well as normal region propagation within the coil.The simulations included sub-division of the coil. Each sub-division hasa back to back diodes and resistor across the coil. Current flows in theresistor when there is enough voltage across the coil to cause current toflow through the diodes in the forward direction. The effects of thenumber of coil sub-divisions and the value of the resistor across thesub-division on the quench were calculated with and without quench back.Sub-division of the coupling coil reduces the peak voltage to ground, thelayer-to-layer voltage and the magnet hot-spot temperature. Quench backreduces the magnet hot-spot temperature, but the peak voltage to groundand layer-to-layer voltage are increased, because the magnet quenchesfaster. The resistance across the coil sub-division affects both thehot-spot temperature and the peak voltage to ground.

  3. Low magnetic field dynamic nuclear polarization using a single-coil two-channel probe

    SciTech Connect

    TonThat, D.M.; Augustine, M.P.; Pines, A.; Clarke, J. |

    1997-03-01

    We describe the design and construction of a single-coil, two-channel probe for the detection of low-field magnetic resonance using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). The high-frequency channel of the probe, which is used to saturate the electron spins, is tuned to the electron Larmor frequency, 75 MHz at 2.7 mT, and matched to 50 {Omega}. Low-field, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is detected through the second, low-frequency channel at frequencies {lt}1 MHz. The performance of the probe was tested by measuring the DNP of protons in a manganese (II) chloride solution at 2.7 mT. At the proton NMR frequency of 120 kHz, the signal amplitude was enhanced over the value without DNP by a factor of about 200. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. The effect of external magnetic field on plasma acceleration in electromagnetic railgun channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobashev, S. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Kurakin, R. O.; Ponyaev, S. A.; Reznikov, B. I.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the effect of an external magnetic field on the dynamics of a free plasma piston (PP) accelerated without solid striker armature in an electromagnetic railgun channel filled with various gases (argon or helium). It is established that, as the applied magnetic field grows, the velocity of a shock wave generated by PP in the channel increases. The experimental results are compared to a theoretical model that takes into account the gas pressure force behind the shock wave and the drag force that arises when erosion mass entering the channel is partly entrained by the accelerated plasma. The results of model calculations are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The discrepancy somewhat increases with the applied field, but the maximum deviation still does not exceed 20%.

  5. Study of magnetic particles pulse-injected into an annular SPLITT-like channel inside a quadrupole magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, M; Moore, L R; McCloskey, K E; Margel, S; Zuberi, M; Chalmers, J J; Zborowski, M

    2000-12-01

    Advantages of the continuous magnetic flow sorting for biomedical applications over current, batch-wise magnetic separations include high throughput and a potential for scale-up operations. A continuous magnetic sorting process has been developed based on the quadrupole magnetic field centered on an annular flow channel. The performance of the sorter has been described using the conceptual framework of split-flow thin (SPLITT) fractionation, a derivative of field-flow fractionation (FFF). To eliminate the variability inherent in working with a heterogenous cell population, we developed a set of monodisperse magnetic microspheres of a characteristic magnetization, and a magnetophoretic mobility, similar to those of the cells labeled with a magnetic colloid. The theory of the magnetic sorting process has been tested by injecting a suspension of the magnetic beads into the carrier fluid flowing through the sorter and by comparing the theoretical and experimental recovery versus total flow-rate profiles. The position of the recovery maxima along the total flow-rate axis was a function of the average bead magnetophoretic mobility and the magnetic field intensity. The theory has correctly predicted the position of the peak maxima on the total flow-rate axis and the dependence on the bead mobility and the field intensity, but has not correctly predicted the peak heights. The differences between the calculated and the measured peak heights were a function of the total flow-rate through the system, indicating a fluid-mechanical origin of the deviations from the theory (such as expected of the lift force effects in the system). The well-controlled elution studies using the monodisperse magnetic beads, and the SPLITT theory, provided us with a firm basis for the future sorter evaluation using cell mixtures. PMID:11153960

  6. Magnetic shielding of the channel walls in a Hall plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; Grys, Kristi de; Mathers, Alex

    2011-03-15

    In a qualification life test of a Hall thruster it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after {approx}5600 h. Numerical simulations using a two-dimensional axisymmetric plasma solver with a magnetic field-aligned mesh reveal that when the channel receded from its early-in-life to its steady-state configuration the following changes occurred near the wall: (1) reduction of the electric field parallel to the wall that prohibited ions from acquiring significant impact kinetic energy before entering the sheath, (2) reduction of the potential fall in the sheath that further diminished the total energy ions gained before striking the material, and (3) reduction of the ion number density that decreased the flux of ions to the wall. All these changes, found to have been induced by the magnetic field, constituted collectively an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Thus, we term this process in Hall thrusters 'magnetic shielding'.

  7. Effect of an alternating nonuniform magnetic field on ferrofluid flow and heat transfer in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goharkhah, Mohammad; Ashjaee, Mehdi

    2014-08-01

    Forced convective heat transfer of water based Fe3O4 nanofluid (ferrofluid) in the presence of an alternating non-uniform magnetic field is investigated numerically. The geometry is a two-dimensional channel which is subjected to a uniform heat flux at the top and bottom surfaces. Nonuniform magnetic field produced by eight line source dipoles is imposed on several parts of the channel. Also, a rectangular wave function is applied to the dipoles in order to turn them on and off alternatingly. The effects of the alternating magnetic field strength and frequency on the convective heat transfer are investigated for four different Reynolds numbers (Re=100, 600, 1200 and 2000) in the laminar flow regime. Comparing the results with zero magnetic field case, show that the heat transfer enhancement increases with the Reynolds number and reaches a maximum of 13.9% at Re=2000 and f=20 Hz. Moreover, at a constant Reynolds number, it increases with the magnetic field intensity while an optimum value exists for the frequency. Also, the optimum frequency increases with the Reynolds number. On the other hand, the heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is always accompanied by a pressure drop penalty. A maximum pressure drop increase of 6% is observed at Re=2000 and f=5 Hz which shows that the pressure drop increase is not as significant as the heat transfer enhancement.

  8. High-Resolution Observations of Flare Precursors and Their Relationship with Magnetic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haimin; Xu, Yan; Ahn, Kwangsu; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Huang, Nengyi; Gary, Dale E.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-05-01

    The study of precursors of flares is important for understanding the basic magnetic instability leading to solar flares, which can aid the forecasting of eruptions potentially related to severe space weather effects. Although literatures reported many important clues, high-resolution observations of pre-flare activities before a well-observed solar flare have been rare. Even rarely, the associated magnetic structures in fine scale (below 1") were also observed. In this study we take advantage of multiwavelength high-resolution observations completely covering the 2015 June 22 M6.6 flare, which were obtained under excellent seeing condition with the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory. The NST data includes observations of the H-alpha line in five spectral positions at a spatial resolution of 0.1" and magnetograms at a resolution of 0.25". These are complemented by IRIS UV observations with a resolution of 0.25". We find that there are two episodes of pre-flare brightenings (precursors), which are spatially associated with magnetic channels, i.e., elongated structures comprising alternating magnetic polarity inversion lines (Zirin & Wang, 1993, Nature, 363, 426). The pre-flare chromospheric and coronal features reflect an extremely sheared magnetic topology, while the initiation of main flare brightenings correspond to a much less sheared configuration. RHESSI HXR observations reveal that the precursors have both thermal and nonthermal components, and the latter is further evidenced by the microwave observations of the newly expanded Solar Radio Array at Owens Valley.We further investigate the electric current system above the magnetic channels using NLFFF extrapolations, which show strong current sheets above the channel structure. This is consistent with the MHD modeling of Kusano et al (2012, Ap.J., 760, 31), who noted the importance of localized small-scale magnetic structure in triggering the eruption of the whole active region. We

  9. A non-hydrodynamical model for acceleration of line-driven winds in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risaliti, G.; Elvis, M.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Radiation driven winds are the likely origin of AGN outflows, and are believed to be a fundamental component of the inner structure of AGNs. Several hydrodynamical models have been developed, showing that these winds can be effectively launched from AGN accretion disks. Aims: Here we want to study the acceleration phase of line-driven winds in AGNs, in order to examine the physical conditions required for the existence of such winds for a wide variety of initial conditions. Methods: We built a simple and fast non-hydrodynamic model QWIND, where we assume that a wind is launched from the accretion disk at supersonic velocities of a few 100 km s-1, and we concentrated on the subsequent supersonic phase, when the wind is accelerated to final velocities up to 104 km s-1. Results: We show that, with a set of initial parameters in agreement with observations in AGNs, this model can produce a wind with terminal velocities on the order of 104 km s-1. There are three zones in the wind, only the middle one of which can launch a wind: in the inner zone the wind is too ionized and so experiences only the Compton radiation force, which is not effective in accelerating gas. This inner “failed wind” is important for shielding the next zone by lowering the ionization parameter there. In the middle zone the lower ionization of the gas leads to a much larger radiation force and the gas achieves escape velocity This middle zone is quite thin (about 100 gravitational radii). The outer, third zone is shielded from the UV radiation by the central wind zone, so does not achieve a high enough acceleration to reach escape velocity. We also describe a simple analytic approximation of our model, in which we neglect the effects of gravity during the acceleration phase. This analytic approach agrees with the results of the numerical code, and is a powerful way to check whether a radiation driven wind can be accelerated with a given set of initial parameters. Conclusions: Our

  10. Dynamics of Line-driven Disk Winds in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proga, Daniel; Stone, James M.; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2000-11-01

    We present the results of axisymmetric time-dependent hydrodynamic calculations of line-driven winds from accretion disks in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We assume the disk is flat, Keplerian, geometrically thin, and optically thick, radiating according to the α-disk prescription. The central engine of the AGN is a source of both ionizing X-rays and wind-driving UV photons. To calculate the radiation force, we take into account radiation from the disk and the central engine. The gas temperature and ionization state in the wind are calculated self-consistently from the photoionization and heating rate of the central engine. We find that a disk accreting onto a 108 Msolar black hole at the rate of 1.8 Msolar yr-1 can launch a wind at ~1016 cm from the central engine. The X-rays from the central object are significantly attenuated by the disk atmosphere so they cannot prevent the local disk radiation from pushing matter away from the disk. However, in the supersonic portion of the flow high above the disk, the X-rays can overionize the gas and decrease the wind terminal velocity. For a reasonable X-ray opacity, e.g., κX=40 g-1 cm2, the disk wind can be accelerated by the central UV radiation to velocities of up to 15,000 km s-1 at a distance of ~1017 cm from the central engine. The covering factor of the disk wind is ~0.2. The wind is unsteady and consists of an opaque, slow vertical flow near the disk that is bounded on the polar side by a high-velocity stream. A typical column density through the fast stream is a few times 1023 cm-2 so the stream is optically thin to the UV radiation. This low column density is precisely why gas can be accelerated to high velocities. The fast stream contributes nearly 100% to the total wind mass-loss rate of 0.5 Msolar yr-1.

  11. Secondary energy growth and turbulence suppression in conducting channel flow with streamwise magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shuai; Krasnov, Dmitry; Boeck, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    The effects of a streamwise magnetic field on conducting channel flow are studied by analyzing secondary linear perturbations evolving on streamwise streaks and by direct numerical simulations of relaminarization. By means of an optimal perturbation approach, magnetic damping is found to increase the streamwise wavelength of the most amplified secondary perturbations and to reduce their amplification level. Complete suppression of secondary instability is observed at a critical magnetic interaction parameter that depends on the streak amplitude and on the Reynolds number when the transient evolution of the streaky basic flow is taken into account. Relaminarization in the direct numerical simulation occurs at lower values of the interaction parameter than the critical values from the stability computations for the streak amplitudes considered. The dependence of these threshold values of the interaction parameters on the Reynolds number is fairly similar between simulations and stability analysis. Relaminarization thresholds from the simulations are also in good agreement with experiments on pipe flow with streamwise magnetic field.

  12. Performance comparison of post-processor for PRML channel in perpendicular magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Okamoto, Y.; Osawa, H.; Muraoka, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, post-processors for the partial-response maximum-likelihood (PRML) channel combined with the Reed-Solomon (RS) encoder/decoder are studied in perpendicular magnetic recording. The bit error rate (BER) performance is obtained by read/write experiments using a spin-stand with a perpendicular medium and single-pole-type/giant magnetoresistive (SPT/GMR) head. The experimental results show that post-processors improve linear densities of about 10-20 kBPI in perpendicular magnetic recording.

  13. Four-channel magnetic resonance imaging receiver using frequency domain multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wang; Qin, Xu; Jiejing, Ren; Gengying, Li

    2007-01-01

    An alternative technique that uses frequency domain multiplexing to acquire phased array magnetic resonance images is discussed in detail. The proposed method has advantages over traditional independent receiver chains in that it utilizes an analog-to-digital converter and a single-chip multicarrier receiver with high performance to reduce the size and cost of the phased array receiver system. A practical four-channel digital receiver using frequency domain multiplexing was implemented and verified on a home-built 0.3T magnetic resonance imaging system. The experimental results confirmed that the cross talk between each channel was below -60dB, the phase fluctuations were about 1°, and there was no obvious signal-to-noise ratio degradation. It is demonstrated that the frequency domain multiplexing is a valuable and economical technique, particularly for array coil systems where the multichannel receiver is indispensable and dynamic range is not a critical problem.

  14. Remote control of ion channels and neurons through magnetic-field heating of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Heng; Delikanli, Savas; Zeng, Hao; Ferkey, Denise M.; Pralle, Arnd

    2010-08-01

    Recently, optical stimulation has begun to unravel the neuronal processing that controls certain animal behaviours. However, optical approaches are limited by the inability of visible light to penetrate deep into tissues. Here, we show an approach based on radio-frequency magnetic-field heating of nanoparticles to remotely activate temperature-sensitive cation channels in cells. Superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles were targeted to specific proteins on the plasma membrane of cells expressing TRPV1, and heated by a radio-frequency magnetic field. Using fluorophores as molecular thermometers, we show that the induced temperature increase is highly localized. Thermal activation of the channels triggers action potentials in cultured neurons without observable toxic effects. This approach can be adapted to stimulate other cell types and, moreover, may be used to remotely manipulate other cellular machinery for novel therapeutics.

  15. Hindered magnetic dipole transitions between P-wave bottomonia and coupled-channel effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng-Kun; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Yang, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    In the hindered magnetic dipole transitions of heavy quarkonia, the coupled-channel effects originating from the coupling of quarkonia to a pair of heavy and anti-heavy mesons can play a dominant role. Here, we study the hindered magnetic dipole transitions between two P-wave bottomonia, χb (nP) and hb (n‧ P), with n ≠n‧. In these processes the coupled-channel effects are expected to lead to partial widths much larger than the quark model predictions. We estimate these partial widths which, however, are very sensitive to unknown coupling constants related to the vertices χb0 (nP) B B bar . A measurement of the hindered M1 transitions can shed light on the coupled-channel dynamics in these transitions and hence on the size of the coupling constants. We also suggest to check the coupled-channel effects by comparing results from quenched and fully dynamical lattice QCD calculations.

  16. Particles Sorting in Micro Channel Using Designed Micro Electromagnets of Magnetic Field Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yung-Chiang; Wu, Chen-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, microelectromagnet, microchannel, syringe pump, and controlling devices were integrated to form a particle sorting system. A simple, two-dimensional, relatively quick fabricating and easily operating microelectromagnet was designed. Polystyrene particles and magnetic beads were pumped into the microchannel with the syringe pump, and it was observed that the magnetic beads were attracted to one of two outlets by the microelectromagnet, which features a gradually changing magnetic field. The polystyrene particles would move to another outlet because of different-width micro channel, and it completed the separation of the particles. Based on experimental results, the magnetic flux density of the microelectromagnet was 2.3 Gauss for a 12.5-μm average distance between electrodes at 1.0-μm increments, and the magnetic force was 0.22 pN for 2.8-μm magnetic beads. The separating rate was greater for larger distance increment and smaller average distance between the electrodes. The separating rate of the magnetic beads increased as the electric current increased and flow velocity decreased. When the flow velocity was 0.333 μm/s and electric current was 1 A, the separating rate was 90%. The separating rate of the polystyrene particles increased as the flow velocity increased and was 85% when the flow velocity was 0.6 μm/s. These results demonstrate that this particle sorting system has potential applications in bio-molecular studies.

  17. The use of a linear Halbach array combined with a step-SPLITT channel for continuous sorting of magnetic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Moore, Lee; Williams, P. Stephen; Zborowski, Maciej

    2011-05-01

    The Quadrupole Magnetic Sorter (QMS), employing an annular flow channel concentric with the aperture of a quadrupole magnet, is well established for cell and particle separations. Here we propose a magnetic particle separator comprising a linear array of cylindrical magnets, analogous to the array proposed by Klaus Halbach, mated to a substantially improved form of a parallel plate SPLITT channel, known as the step-SPLITT channel. While the magnetic force and throughput are generally lower than for the QMS, the new separator has advantages in ease of fabrication and the ability to vary the magnetic force to suit the separands. Preliminary experiments yield results consistent with prediction and show promise regarding future separations of cells of biomedical interest.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of a Quadrupole Magnetic Sorter Flow Channel: Effect of Splitter Position on Nonspecific Crossover

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, V. S. K.; Kennedy, David J.; Todd, Paul W.; Hanley, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    In the Quadrupole Magnetic Sorter (QMS) magnetic particles enter a vertical flow annulus and are separated from non-magnetic particles by radial deflection into an outer annulus where the purified magnetic particles are collected via a flow splitter. The purity of magnetically isolated particles in QMS is affected by the migration of nonmagnetic particles across transport lamina in the annular flow channel. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to predict the flow patterns, pressure drop and nonspecific crossover in QMS flow channel for the isolation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Simulation results were compared with the experimental results to validate the CFD model. Results of the simulations were used to show that one design gives up to 10% less nonspecific crossover than another and this model can be used to optimise the flow channel design to achieve maximum purity of magnetic particles. PMID:21984840

  19. Effect of normal and parallel magnetic fields on the stability of interfacial flows of magnetic fluids in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yecko, Philip

    2010-02-01

    The effect of an imposed magnetic field on the linear stability of immiscible two-fluid Poiseuille flow in a channel is examined for low Reynolds numbers. Surface tension acts on the interface, the fluids have different densities and viscosities, and one fluid is magnetic (ferrofluid). A Langevin function is used to model the fluid magnetization, resulting in a nonlinear permeability; the stability properties depend on this permeability relation both directly and indirectly, through the base state solution. Uniform magnetic fields applied normal or parallel to the interface both lead to an interfacial instability. Normal fields excite longer wavelength modes, generally having higher growth rates, but parallel fields can excite faster growing modes in high permeability fluids at large applied field strength. Whether or not the field stabilizes or destabilizes the flow depends on the viscosity and layer thickness ratios in a simple way, while the placement of the magnetic fluid layer does not play a major role. Growth rates predicted for realistic microchannel conditions are shown to be large enough to make ferrofluid manipulation a practical method of control.

  20. Effect of media property variations on shingled magnetic recording channel bit error rate and signal to noise ratio performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Maria Yu; Teo, Kim Keng; Chan, Kheong Sann

    2015-05-01

    Shingled Magnetic Recording (SMR) is an upcoming technology to see the hard disk drive industry over until heat assisted magnetic recording or another technology matures. In this work, we study the impact of variations in media parameters on the raw channel bit error rate (BER) through micromagnetic simulations and the grain flipping probability channel model in the SMR situation. This study aims to provide feedback to media designers on how media property variations influence the SMR channel performance. In particular, we analyse the effect of variations in the anisotropy constant (Ku), saturation magnetization (Ms), easy axis (ez), grain size (gs), and exchange coupling (Ax), on the written micromagnetic output and the ensuing hysteresis loop. We also compare these analyses with the channel performance on signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the raw channel BER.

  1. Line-driven disk winds in active galactic nuclei: The critical importance of ionization and radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbottom, Nick; Knigge, Christian; Matthews, James H.; Proga, Daniel; Long, Knox S.; Sim, Stuart A.

    2014-07-01

    Accretion disk winds are thought to produce many of the characteristic features seen in the spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). These outflows also represent a natural form of feedback between the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy. The mechanism for driving this mass loss remains unknown, although radiation pressure mediated by spectral lines is a leading candidate. Here, we calculate the ionization state of, and emergent spectra for, the hydrodynamic simulation of a line-driven disk wind previously presented by Proga and Kallman. To achieve this, we carry out a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation of the radiative transfer through, and energy exchange within, the predicted outflow. We find that the wind is much more ionized than originally estimated. This is in part because it is much more difficult to shield any wind regions effectively when the outflow itself is allowed to reprocess and redirect ionizing photons. As a result, the calculated spectrum that would be observed from this particular outflow solution would not contain the ultraviolet spectral lines that are observed in many AGN/QSOs. Furthermore, the wind is so highly ionized that line driving would not actually be efficient. This does not necessarily mean that line-driven winds are not viable. However, our work does illustrate that in order to arrive at a self-consistent model of line-driven disk winds in AGN/QSO, it will be critical to include a more detailed treatment of radiative transfer and ionization in the next generation of hydrodynamic simulations.

  2. Magnetic Shielding of the Channel Walls in a Hall Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; deGrys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2011-01-01

    In a qualification life test of a Hall thruster it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approx 5,600 h. Numerical simulations using a two-dimensional axisymmetric plasma solver with a magnetic field-aligned mesh reveal that when the channel receded from its early-in-life to its steady-state configuration the following changes occurred near the wall: (1) reduction of the electric field parallel to the wall that prohibited ions from acquiring significant impact kinetic energy before entering the sheath, (2) reduction of the potential fall in the sheath that further diminished the total energy ions gained before striking the material, and (3) reduction of the ion number density that decreased the flux of ions to the wall. All these changes, found to have been induced by the magnetic field, constituted collectively an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Thus, we term this process in Hall thrusters "magnetic shielding."

  3. Analytic theory for betatron radiation from relativistic electrons in ion plasma channels with magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H. C.; Jiang, T. F.

    2010-11-15

    We analytically solve the relativistic equation of motion for an electron in ion plasma channels and calculate the corresponding trajectory as well as the synchrotron radiation. The relativistic effect on a trajectory is strong, i.e., many high-order harmonic terms in the trajectory, when the ratio of the initial transverse velocity (v{sub x0}) to the longitudinal velocity (v{sub z0}) of the electron injected to ion plasma channels is high. Interestingly, these high-order harmonic terms result in a quite broad and intense radiation spectrum, especially at an oblique angle, in contrast to an earlier understanding. As the initial velocity ratio (v{sub x0}:v{sub z0}) decreases, the relativistic effect becomes weak; only the first and second harmonic terms remain in the transverse and longitudinal trajectories, respectively, which coincides with the result of Esarey et al. [Phys. Rev. E 65, 056505 (2002)]. Our formalism also allows the description of electron's trajectory in the presence of an applied magnetic field. Critical magnetic fields for cyclotron motions are figured out and compared with semiclassical results. The cyclotron motion leads to more high-order harmonic terms than the trajectory without magnetic fields and causes an immensely broad spectrum with vastly large radiation amplitude for high initial velocity ratios (v{sub x0}:v{sub z0}). The radiation from hard x-ray to gamma-ray regions can be generated with a broad radiation angle, thus available for applications.

  4. Pulsed magnetic stimulation modifies amplitude of action potentials in vitro via ionic channels-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zaghloul; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the influence of pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs) on amplitude of evoked, compound action potential (CAP) recorded from the segments of sciatic nerve in vitro. PMFs were applied for 30 min at frequency of 0.16 Hz and intensity of 15 mT. In confirmation of our previous reports, PMF exposure enhanced amplitude of CAPs. The effect persisted beyond PMF activation period. As expected, CAP amplitude was attenuated by antagonists of sodium channel, lidocaine, and tetrodotoxin. Depression of the potential by sodium channels antagonists was reversed by subsequent exposure to PMFs. The effect of elevated potassium concentration and veratridine on the action potential was modified by exposure to PMFs as well. Neither inhibitors of protein kinase C and protein kinase A, nor known free radicals scavengers had any effects on PMF action. Possible mechanisms of PMF action are discussed. PMID:25884360

  5. The HEAO-2 Guest Investigator Program: Non-linear growth of instabilities in line-driven stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    The linear instability of line-driven stellar winds to take proper account of the dynamical effect of scattered radiation were analyzed. It is found that: (1) the drag effect of the mean scattered radiation does greatly reduce the contribution of scattering lines to the instability at the very base of the wind, but the instability growth rate associated with such lines rapidly increases as the flow moves outward from the base, reaching more than 50% of the growth rate for pure absorption lines within a stellar radius of the surface, and eventually reaching 80% of that rate at large radii; (2) perturbations in the scattered radiation field may be important for the propagation of wind disturbances, but they have little effect on the wind instability; and (3) the contribution of strongly shadowed lines to the wind instability is often reduced compared to that of unshadowed lines, but their overall effect is not one of damping in the outer parts of the wind. It is concluded that, even when all scattering effects are taken into account, the bulk of the flow in a line-driven stellar wind is still highly unstable.

  6. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase I: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    In a proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate the feasibility of magnetically shielded (MS) Hall thrusters, an existing laboratory thruster has been modified with the guidance of physics-based numerical simulation. When operated at a discharge power of 6-kilowatts the modified thruster has been designed to reduce the total energy and flux of ions to the channel insulators by greater than 1 and greater than 3 orders of magnitude, respectively. The erosion rates in this MS thruster configuration are predicted to be at least 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than those in the baseline (BL) configuration. At such rates no detectable erosion is expected to occur.

  8. Entropy generation during fluid flow in a channel under the effect of transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damseh, R. A.; Al-Odat, M. Q.; Al-Nimr, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    Entropy generation due to fluid flow and heat transfer inside a horizontal channel made of two parallel plates under the effect of transverse magnetic field is numerically investigated. The flow is assumed to be steady, laminar, hydro-dynamically and thermally fully developed of electrically conducting fluid. Both horizontal walls are maintained at constant temperatures higher than that of the fluid. The governing equations in Cartesian coordinate are solved by an implicit finite difference technique. After the flow field and the temperature distributions are obtained, the entropy generation profiles are computed and presented graphically. The factors, which were found to affect the problem under consideration are the magnetic parameter, Eckert number, Prandtl number, and the temperature parameter (θ∞). It was found that, entropy generation increased as all parameters involved in the present problem increased.

  9. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  10. A dual-channel flux-switching permanent magnet motor for hybrid electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Wei; Wu, Zhongze; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Baoan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Zhou, Shigui

    2012-04-01

    The flux-switching permanent magnet (FSPM) motor is a relatively novel brushless machine having both magnets and concentrated windings in the stator, which exhibits inherently sinusoidal PM flux-linkage, back-EMF waveforms, and high torque capability. However, in the application of hybrid electric vehicles, it is essential to prevent magnets and armature windings moving in radial direction due to the possible vibration during operation, and to ensure fault-tolerant capability. Hence, in this paper based on an original FSPM motor, a dual-channel FSPM (DC-FSPM) motor with modified structure to fix both armature windings and magnets and improved reliability is proposed for a practical 10 kW integral starter/generator (ISG) in hybrid electric vehicles. The influences of different solutions and the end-effect on the static characteristics, are evaluated based on the 2D and 3D finite element analysis, respectively. Finally, both the predicted and experimental results, compared with a prototype DC-FSPM motor and an interior PM motor used in Honda Civic, confirm that the more sinusoidal back-EMF waveform and lower torque ripple can be achieved in the DC-FSPM motor, whereas the torque is smaller under the same coil current.

  11. Ionization channel of continuum lowering in plasmas: effects of plasma screening, electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, N.; Oks, E.

    2013-12-01

    Calculations of continuum lowering (CL) in plasmas evolved from ion sphere models to dicentre models of the plasma state. One of such theories—a percolation theory—calculated CL defined as an absolute value of energy at which an electron becomes bound to a macroscopic portion of plasma ions (a quasi-ionization). Previously one of us derived analytically the value of CL in the ionization channel which was disregarded in the percolation theory. In the present paper we study how the value of CL in the ionization channel is affected by plasma screening, electric and magnetic fields. We show that the screening and the magnetic field decrease the value of CL, inhibiting the ionization, while the electric field increases the value of CL, promoting the ionization. These results should be important for inertial fusion, x-ray lasers, powerful Z-pinches, astrophysics and other applications of high-density plasmas. We also show that the screening stabilizes the nuclear motion of the corresponding Rydberg quasimolecules in some cases and destabilizes it in other cases.

  12. Optical, Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Potassium Metal Loaded into Channel-Type Zeolite L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan Thi, Pham; Nakano, Takehito; Sakamoto, Yasuhiro; Nozue, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Potassium metal was loaded into K-form zeolite L crystals which have one-dimensional (1D) main-channels with an inside diameter of ≈1 nm. The loading density of K atoms per unit cell, n, was changed from 0 to 9.6. Optical, electrical and magnetic properties were measured for the powders of K-loaded zeolite L crystals. A resonant optical absorption-reflection band is observed at ≈1.1 eV in all K-loaded samples. Another reflection band at ≈1.8 eV appears at n ⪆ 5. The 1.1 and 1.8 eV bands are assigned to the respective excitations from 1s to 1p and from 1p to 1d states of s-electrons confined in main-channels. A mid-infrared absorption around 0.3 eV is observed at n ⪆ 3 and increases with n. This absorption is assigned to a Drude term of s-electrons. A temperature-dependent semiconducting resistivity is observed at 3 ≤ssapprox n ≤ssapprox 9. A nearly metallic resistivity is observed at 9 ≤ssapprox n. The semiconducting and metallic resistivities are assigned to the polaron hopping between main-channels and the three-dimensional (3D) band conduction, respectively. A temperature independent spin-susceptibility is extracted from the integrated intensity of ESR signal, and increases at n ⪆ 5. This term is assigned to the Pauli paramagnetism. These properties are interpreted in terms of an insulating state of 1s and 1p states at n ≤ssapprox 5, a 1D metallic state of 1s and 1p states at 5 ≤ssapprox n ≤ssapprox 9 and a 3D metallic state of 1d state at 9 ≤ssapprox n for s-electrons in the bundle of main-channels.

  13. Reverberation Mapping of the Broad Line Region: Application to a Hydrodynamical Line-driven Disk Wind Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Tim; Kashi, Amit; Proga, Daniel; Eracleous, Michael; Barth, Aaron J.; Greene, Jenny

    2016-08-01

    The latest analysis efforts in reverberation mapping are beginning to allow reconstruction of echo images (or velocity-delay maps) that encode information about the structure and kinematics of the broad line region (BLR) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Such maps can constrain sophisticated physical models for the BLR. The physical picture of the BLR is often theorized to be a photoionized wind launched from the AGN accretion disk. Previously we showed that the line-driven disk wind solution found in an earlier simulation by Proga and Kallman is virialized over a large distance from the disk. This finding implies that, according to this model, black hole masses can be reliably estimated through reverberation mapping techniques. However, predictions of echo images expected from line-driven disk winds are not available. Here, after presenting the necessary radiative transfer methodology, we carry out the first calculations of such predictions. We find that the echo images are quite similar to other virialized BLR models such as randomly orbiting clouds and thin Keplerian disks. We conduct a parameter survey exploring how echo images, line profiles, and transfer functions depend on both the inclination angle and the line opacity. We find that the line profiles are almost always single peaked, while transfer functions tend to have tails extending to large time delays. The outflow, despite being primarily equatorially directed, causes an appreciable blueshifted excess on both the echo image and line profile when seen from lower inclinations (i≲ 45^\\circ ). This effect may be observable in low ionization lines such as {{H}}β .

  14. Effect of scattering on the transonic solution topology and intrinsic variability of line-driven stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2015-11-01

    For line-driven winds from hot, luminous OB stars, we examine the subtle but important role of diffuse, scattered radiation in determining both the topology of steady-state solutions and intrinsic variability in the transonic wind base. We use a smooth source function formalizm to obtain non-local, integral expressions for the direct and diffuse components of the line-force that account for deviations from the usual localized, Sobolev forms. As the scattering source function is reduced, we find the solution topology in the transonic region transitions from X-type, with a unique wind solution, to a nodal type, characterized by a degenerate family of solutions. Specifically, in the idealized case of an optically thin source function and a uniformly bright stellar disc, the unique X-type solution proves to be a stable attractor to which time-dependent numerical radiation-hydrodynamical simulations relax. But in models where the scattering strength is only modestly reduced, the topology instead turns nodal, with the associated solution degeneracy now manifest by intrinsic structure and variability that persist down to the photospheric wind base. This highlights the potentially crucial role of diffuse radiation for the dynamics and variability of line-driven winds, and seriously challenges the use of Sobolev theory in the transonic wind region. Since such Sobolev-based models are commonly used in broad applications like stellar evolution and feedback, this prompts development of new wind models, not only for further quantifying the intrinsic variability found here, but also for computing new theoretical predictions of global properties like velocity laws and mass-loss rates.

  15. Role of Induced Magnetic Field on Transient Natural Convection Flow in a Vertical Channel: The Riemann Sum Approximation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Sani, I.

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates the role of induced magnetic field on a transient natural convection flow of an electrically conducting, incompressible and viscous fluid in a vertical channel formed by two infinite vertical parallel plates. The transient flow formation inside the channel is due to sudden asymmetric heating of channel walls. The time dependent momentum, energy and magnetic induction equations are solved semi-analytically using the Laplace transform technique along with the Riemann-sum approximation method. The solutions obtained are validated by comparisons with the closed form solutions obtained for the steady states which have been derived separately and also by the implicit finite difference method. Graphical results for the temperature, velocity, induced magnetic field, current density, and skin-friction based on the semi-analytical solutions are presented and discussed.

  16. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN A HOT-CHANNEL-LIKE SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE AND ITS EMBEDDED PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Guo, Y.; Chen, P. F.; Sun, J. Q.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2014-07-10

    A magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a coherent and helical magnetic field structure that has recently been found likely to appear as an elongated hot channel prior to a solar eruption. In this Letter, we investigate the relationship between the hot channel and the associated prominence through analysis of a limb event on 2011 September 12. In the early rise phase, the hot channel was initially cospatial with the prominence. It then quickly expanded, resulting in a separation of the top of the hot channel from that of the prominence. Meanwhile, they both experienced an instantaneous morphology transformation from a Λ shape to a reversed-Y shape and the top of these two structures showed an exponential increase in height. These features are a good indication of the occurrence of kink instability. Moreover, the onset of kink instability is found to coincide in time with the impulsive enhancement of flare emission underneath the hot channel, suggesting that ideal kink instability likely also plays an important role in triggering fast flare reconnection besides initiating the impulsive acceleration of the hot channel and distorting its morphology. We conclude that the hot channel is most likely the MFR system and the prominence only corresponds to the cool materials that are collected in the bottom of the helical field lines of the MFR against gravity.

  17. On the Relationship Between a Hot-channel-like Solar Magnetic Flux Rope and its Embedded Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Srivastava, A. K.; Guo, Y.; Chen, P. F.; Sun, J. Q.

    2014-07-01

    A magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a coherent and helical magnetic field structure that has recently been found likely to appear as an elongated hot channel prior to a solar eruption. In this Letter, we investigate the relationship between the hot channel and the associated prominence through analysis of a limb event on 2011 September 12. In the early rise phase, the hot channel was initially cospatial with the prominence. It then quickly expanded, resulting in a separation of the top of the hot channel from that of the prominence. Meanwhile, they both experienced an instantaneous morphology transformation from a Λ shape to a reversed-Y shape and the top of these two structures showed an exponential increase in height. These features are a good indication of the occurrence of kink instability. Moreover, the onset of kink instability is found to coincide in time with the impulsive enhancement of flare emission underneath the hot channel, suggesting that ideal kink instability likely also plays an important role in triggering fast flare reconnection besides initiating the impulsive acceleration of the hot channel and distorting its morphology. We conclude that the hot channel is most likely the MFR system and the prominence only corresponds to the cool materials that are collected in the bottom of the helical field lines of the MFR against gravity.

  18. Turbulence in ferrofluids in channel flow with steady and oscillating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Kristopher R; Riley, James J; Finlayson, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    The turbulent flow of a ferrofluid in channel flow is studied using direct numerical simulation. The method of analysis is an extension of that used for Newtonian fluids, with additional features necessary to model the ferrofluid. The analysis is applied to low Reynolds number turbulence in the range of existing experimental data in a capillary. For steady and oscillating magnetic fields, comparisons are made between a Newtonian fluid and a ferrofluid by comparing the pressure drop, turbulent Reynolds number, turbulent kinetic energy (k), Reynolds stress, velocity, and spin profiles. The results are also compared with predictions of a k-ɛ model to show the accuracy of that model when applied to ferrofluids, where ɛ is the rate of viscous dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. PMID:21405774

  19. Optical Control of Magnetic Feshbach Resonances by Closed-Channel Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, A.; Arunkumar, N.; Joseph, J. A.; Thomas, J. E.

    2016-02-01

    We control magnetic Feshbach resonances in an optically trapped mixture of the two lowest hyperfine states of a 6Li Fermi gas, using two optical fields to create a dark state in the closed molecular channel. In the experiments, the narrow Feshbach resonance is tuned by up to 3 G. For the broad resonance, the spontaneous lifetime is increased to 0.4 s at the dark-state resonance, compared to 0.5 ms for single-field tuning. We present a new model of light-induced loss spectra, employing continuum-dressed basis states, which agrees in shape and magnitude with loss measurements for both broad and narrow resonances. Using this model, we predict the trade-off between tunability and loss for the broad resonance in 6Li, showing that our two-field method substantially reduces the two-body loss rate compared to single-field methods for the same tuning range.

  20. Magnetic-Field Asymmetry of Electron Wave Packet Transmission in Bent Channels Capacitively Coupled to a Metal Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalina, R.; Szafran, B.; Bednarek, S.; Peeters, F. M.

    2009-02-01

    We study the electron wave packet moving through a bent channel. We demonstrate that the packet transmission probability becomes an asymmetric function of the magnetic field when the electron packet is capacitively coupled to a metal plate. The coupling occurs through a nonlinear potential which translates a different kinetics of the transport for opposite magnetic-field orientations into a different potential felt by the scattered electron.

  1. Magnetic domain walls as reconfigurable spin-wave nano-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Kai

    Research efforts to utilize spin waves as information carriers for wave based logic in micro- and nano-structured ferromagnetic materials have increased tremendously over the recent years. However, finding efficient means of tailoring and downscaling guided spin-wave propagation in two dimensions, while maintaining energy efficiency and reconfigurability, still remains a delicate challenge. Here we target these challenges by spin-wave transport inside nanometer-scaled potential wells formed along magnetic domain walls. For this, we investigate the magnetization dynamics of a rectangular-like element in a Landau state exhibiting a so called 180° Néel wall along its center. By microwave antennae the rf-excitation is constricted to one end of the domain wall and the spin-wave intensities are recorded by means of Brillouin-Light Scattering microscopy revealing channeled transport. Additional micromagnetic simulations with pulsed as well as cw-excitation are performed to yield further insight into this class of modes. We find several spin-wave modes quantized along the width of the domain wall yet with well defined wave vectors along the wall, exhibiting positive dispersion. In a final step, we demonstrate the flexibility of these spin-wave nano-channels based on domain walls. In contrast to wave guides realised by fixed geometries, domain walls can be easily manipulated. Here we utilize small external fields to control its position with nanometer precision over a micrometer range, while still enabling transport. Domain walls thus, open the perspective for reprogrammable and yet non-volatile spin-wave waveguides of nanometer width. Financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within project SCHU2922/1-1 is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. The effect of the magnetic field on heat transfer in a slotted channel

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, I.; Kirillov, I.; Sidorenkov, S.

    1994-12-31

    The results of numerical and experimental studies of the liquid metal heat transfer in the slotted channel with transverse magnetic field are presented. Theoretical predictions were prepared by both Efremov Institute and Argonne National Laboratory. The heat transfer test was conducted at ALEX facility jointly between ANL and Efremov Institute. The test section consisted of the two slotted geometry (b/a=10) parts - with and without {open_quotes}anchor links{close_quotes}. The Hartmann numbers (M) up to 1050 and Interaction parameters (N) up to 2000, based on the half-width of the short wall (7 mm) were achieved. The heat flux to the top wall was up to 9 x 10{sup 4} W/m{sup 2}. The test results showed the improvement of heat transfer in the straight channel at low and moderate N. The Nusselt number at small N (around 120) was up to 3 times higher than in the turbulent flow at the same Peclet number. Qualitative correlations between the heat transfer results and velocity fluctuation data show that the generation of large velocity fluctuation in the side layer of the heated wall is the main reason for the heat transfer improvement, high average velocity in the side layer is of the less effect on the heat transfer. At high N the velocity fluctuations are suppressed and consequently the Nusselt number at high N is smaller than at the corresponding turbulent flow.

  3. Magnetic resonance image enhancement by reducing receptors' effective size and enabling multiple channel acquisition.

    PubMed

    Yepes-Calderon, Fernando; Velasquez, Adriana; Lepore, Natasha; Beuf, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is empowered by parallel reading, which reduces acquisition time dramatically. The time saved by parallelization can be used to increase image quality or to enable specialized scanning protocols in clinical and research environments. In small animals, the sizing constraints render the use of multi-channeled approaches even more necessary, as they help to improve the typically low spatial resolution and lesser signal-to-noise ratio; however, the use of multiple channels also generates mutual induction (MI) effects that impairs imaging creation. Here, we created coils and used the shared capacitor technique to diminish first degree MI effects and pre-amplifiers to deal with higher order MI-related image deterioration. The constructed devices are tested by imaging phantoms that contain identical solutions; thus, creating the conditions for several statistical comparisons. We confirm that the shared capacitor strategy can recover the receptor capacity in compounded coils when working at the dimensions imposed by small animal imaging. Additionally, we demonstrate that the use of pre-amplifiers does not significantly reduce the quality of the images. Moreover, in light of our results, the two MI-avoiding techniques can be used together, therefore establishing the practical feasibility of flexible array coils populated with multiple loops for small animal imaging. PMID:25570478

  4. Numerical study of a magnetically insulated front-end channel for a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.; Neuffer, D.

    2011-02-14

    A neutrino factory, which can deliver an intense flux of {approx}10{sup 21} neutrinos per year from a multi-GeV stored muon beam, is seemingly the ideal tool for studying neutrino oscillations and CP violations for leptons. The front end of this facility plays a critical role in determining the number of muons that can be accepted by the downstream accelerators. Delivering peak performance requires transporting the muon beams through long sections of a beam channel containing high-gradient rf cavities and strong focusing solenoids. Here, we propose a novel scheme to improve the performance of the cavities, thereby increasing the number of muons within the acceptance of the accelerator chain. The key element of our new scheme is to apply a tangential magnetic field to the rf surfaces, thus forcing any field-emitted electrons to return to the surface before gaining enough energy to damage the cavity. We incorporate this idea into a new lattice design for a neutrino factory, and detail its performance numerically. Although our proposed front-end channel requires more rf power than conventional pillbox designs, it provides enough beam cooling and muon production to be a feasible option for a neutrino factory.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance of 23Na ions interacting with the gramicidin channel.

    PubMed Central

    Monoi, H.

    1985-01-01

    Basic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) features of 23Na ions bound to the gramicidin channel (packaged into lecithin liposomes) were studied. The first binding constant K1 of Na+ was not significantly dependent on channel models employed. With the two-identical-site model (Model I), K1 was 13.7 (+/- 1.4) molal-1 (in the activity basis) at 25 degrees C; when the binding of a third ion was included (Model II), it was 13.0 (+/- 2.0) molal-1. The second binding constant K2 was model dependent; it was 1.6 (+/- 0.2) and 3-4 molal-1 for Models I and II, respectively. The rate constants, k-1 and k-2, of Na+ for exit from singly and doubly loaded channels, respectively, were 8 X 10(5) s-1 less than or equal to k-1 less than or equal to 3 X 10(6) s-1 and 8 X 10(5) s-1 less than or equal to k-2 less than or equal to 1.0 X 10(7) s-1 at 25 degrees C; the lower bound represents a rough approximation of k-1. The ratio k-2/k-1 was greater than one and did not greatly exceed 20. From the competition experiment, K1 of T1+ was 5.7 (+/- 0.6) X 10(2) molal-1. The longitudinal relaxation time T1 of bound 23Na in the state of single occupancy (T 1B sing) was virtually independent of models, 0.56 (+/- 0.03) and 0.55 (+/- 0.04) ms at 25 degrees C for Models I and II, respectively. For the state of double occupancy, T1 of bound 23Na (T 1B doub) was model dependent: 0.27 (+/- 0.01) and 0.4-0.6 ms for Models I and II. The correlation time tau c of bound 23Na was 2.2 (+/- 0.2) ns at 25 degrees C for single occupancy; tau c for double occupancy was not significantly different from this value. The estimated tau c was found to involve no appreciable contribution of the exchange of 23Na between the channel and the bulk solution. Thé quadrupole coupling constant chi was 1.0 (+/- 0.1) MHz for 23Na in single occupancy; chi for double occupancy was 0.9-1.4 MHz, depending on models. A lower bound of the average quadrupole coupling constant chi alpha was 0.13-0.26 MHz at 25 degrees C for 23Na in single

  6. Microstructural and magnetic properties of Nd-Fe-B alloys processed by equal-channel angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onal, E.; Lapovok, R.; Kishimoto, H.; Kato, A.; Davies, C. H. J.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-05-01

    Equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) is a well-established thermo-mechanical processing technique. This technique allows virtually unlimited strain and manipulation of texture by processing route, while the cross-section of the sample remains unchanged during processing. In order to clarify the effectiveness of ECAP on preparing anisotropic permanent magnets, the microstructure and magnetic properties of a melt-spun Nd13.5Fe73.8Co6.7B5.6Ga0.4 alloy processed at 773 K for 300 s by ECAP were investigated. Macrotexture analysis carried out for the exit channel of ECAP shows that the basal plane of the tetragonal Nd2Fe14B crystal aligns parallel to the shear band, i.e., the c-axis texture formation normal to the shear band induced by the ECAP process. Due to this texture formation, the technical magnetization behaviour becomes anisotropic, and the remanent magnetization is clearly enhanced along the direction perpendicular to the shear band. This anisotropic microstructure is realized at a relatively low processing temperature of 773 K, well below the melting point of the Nd-rich intergranular phase. As a consequence of this lower processing temperature, the nanostructure of the melt-spun alloy remains approximately 20 to 30 nm, considerably smaller than the typical grain size obtained after conventional die-upsetting. Our study demonstrates that equal-channel angular pressing has a potential for realising anisotropic nanostructured magnets.

  7. Soret and Dufour effects on peristaltic transport in curved channel with radial magnetic field and convective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Quratulain; Rafiq, M.; Alsaadi, Fuad; Ayub, M.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses the impact of convective heat and mass conditions in the peristaltic transport of fluid in a complaint wall curved channel. Formulation for flow of third grade fluid is made. Soret and Dufour effects are considered. Fluid is conducting through applied magnetic field in radial direction. Lubrication approach is employed. Solutions for stream function, temperature and concentration fields are derived. The effects of pertinent parameters in the solutions are analyzed graphically. It is found that the velocity profile is not symmetric about the central line in curved channel. The velocity and temperature are reduced by increasing magnetic field strength. The number and size of streamlines are decreased in the presence of magnetic field effect.

  8. Line-driven winds revisited in the context of Be stars: Ω-slow solutions with high k values

    SciTech Connect

    Silaj, J.; Jones, C. E.; Curé, M.

    2014-11-01

    The standard, or fast, solutions of m-CAK line-driven wind theory cannot account for slowly outflowing disks like the ones that surround Be stars. It has been previously shown that there exists another family of solutions—the Ω-slow solutions—that is characterized by much slower terminal velocities and higher mass-loss rates. We have solved the one-dimensional m-CAK hydrodynamical equation of rotating radiation-driven winds for this latter solution, starting from standard values of the line force parameters (α, k, and δ), and then systematically varying the values of α and k. Terminal velocities and mass-loss rates that are in good agreement with those found in Be stars are obtained from the solutions with lower α and higher k values. Furthermore, the equatorial densities of such solutions are comparable to those that are typically assumed in ad hoc models. For very high values of k, we find that the wind solutions exhibit a new kind of behavior.

  9. Heat transfer characteristics of Fe3O4 ferrofluid flowing in a mini channel under constant and alternating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemian, M.; Najafian Ashrafi, Z.; Goharkhah, M.; Ashjaee, M.

    2015-05-01

    Laminar forced convection heat transfer of water based Fe3O4 ferrofluid in a mini channel in the presence of constant and alternating magnetic fields is studied numerically. The hot ferrofluid flows into the 20 mm (l)×2 mm (h) mini channel with isothermal top and bottom cold surfaces and is subjected to a transverse non-uniform magnetic field produced by current carrying wires. Two-phase mixture model is implemented and the governing equations are solved using the finite volume approach. Primarily, the effects of the constant magnetic field location and intensity on the convective heat transfer are investigated. Simulation results show that the heat transfer is enhanced due to the disruption of the thermal boundary layer. However, this effect is more pronounced when the magnetic field source is placed in the fully developed region. In the next section, an alternating magnetic field with frequencies ranging from 0 to 10 Hz is imposed to the ferrofluid at different Reynolds numbers of Re=10, 25 and 50. A 16.48% heat transfer enhancement is obtained with a constant magnetic field at Re=25 and magnetic field intensity, Mn=1.07×108. This value is increased up to 27.72% by applying an alternating magnetic field with the same intensity at f=4 Hz. Results also indicate that the heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is more significant at lower Reynolds numbers. The optimum frequency for heat transfer enhancement has been obtained for all the cases which shows that it has an increasing trend with the Reynolds number.

  10. Influence of magnetic field on peristaltic flow of a Casson fluid in an asymmetric channel: Application in crude oil refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sher Akbar, Noreen

    2015-03-01

    The influence of magnetic field on peristaltic flow of a Casson fluid model is considered. The model for peristaltic literature is modelled first time. The governing coupled equations are constructed under long wavelength and low Reynold's number approximation. Exact solutions are evaluated for stream function and pressure gradient. The important findings in this study are the variation of the Hartmann number M, Casson fluid parameter ζ and amplitudes a, b, d and ϕ. The velocity field increases due to increase in Hartmann number M near the channel walls while velocity field decreases at the centre of the channel.

  11. Effect of an inclined magnetic field on peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid in an inclined channel with convective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Bibi, Shahida; Rafiq, M.; Alsaedi, A.; Abbasi, F. M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the influence of inclined magnetic field on peristaltic flow of an incompressible Williamson fluid in an inclined channel with heat and mass transfer. Convective conditions of heat and mass transfer are employed. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are taken into consideration. Mathematical modeling also includes Soret and Dufour effects. Channel walls have compliant properties. Analysis has been carried out through long wavelength and low Reynolds number approach. Resulting problems are solved for small Weissenberg number. Impacts of variables reflecting the salient features of wall properties, Biot numbers and Soret and Dufour on the velocity, temperature, concentration and heat transfer coefficient are pointed out. Trapping phenomenon is also analyzed.

  12. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, Y.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H. Tanaka, K. A.; Ivancic, S.; Theobald, W.; Lei, A. L.

    2014-11-15

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10{sup 11} V/m and B ∼ 10{sup 8} G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  13. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignitiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Y.; Ivancic, S.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H.; Lei, A. L.; Theobald, W.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ˜ 1011 V/m and B ˜ 108 G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  14. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Y; Ivancic, S; Iwawaki, T; Habara, H; Lei, A L; Theobald, W; Tanaka, K A

    2014-11-01

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10(11) V/m and B ∼ 10(8) G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma. PMID:25430358

  15. Assessing the feasibility of detecting a hemorrhagic type stroke using a 16 channel magnetic induction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekdouk, B.; Ktistis, C.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) has been proposed as a possible method for imaging stroke in the human brain. Hemorrhagic stroke is characterized by local blood accumulation in the brain and exhibits a greater change in conductivity with frequency compared to other tissues which is observed in the frequency range of interest [1-10] MHz. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of detecting hemorrhagic stroke using absolute and frequency difference imaging. For this purpose, a model of the head originally obtained from MRI and X-ray data was used, to which a large stroke (50 ml) was added. In addition, a model of a 16 channel circular array MIT system was employed. The received coil induced voltages were computed using a custom eddy current solver, based on the finite difference method. For absolute imaging, the induced voltages at the receiver coils were calculated from various coil combinations at 10 MHz frequency together with anticipated systematic errors and biases (orientation and displacement of the coils, movement of the head). The induced voltage noise due to these systematic inaccuracies was compared with the voltage change due to the stroke. In order to decrease the impact of this noise, frequency difference was also considered, whereby measurements were performed at another frequency (1MHz) and subtracted. Comparison results are presented and a realistic picture is delivered with to regard the required mechanical stability and electronics accuracy for this particular medical application

  16. Signal acquisition module design for multi-channel surface magnetic resonance sounding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tingting; Chen, Wuqiang; Du, Wenyuan; Zhao, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To obtain a precise 2D/3D image of fissure or karst water, multi-channel magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) systems using edge-to-edge or overlapping receiving coils are needed. Thus, acquiring a nano-volt signal for a small amount of the aquifer and suppressing the mutual coupling between adjacent coils are two important issues for the design of the signal acquisition module in the system. In the present study, we propose to use a passive low pass filter, consisted of a resistance (R) and capacitance (C), to inhibit the mutual coupling effects of the coils. Four low-noise operational amplifiers LT1028, OPA124, AD745, and OP27 were compared with respect to achieving the lowest system noise. As a result, 3 pieces of LT1028 were chosen and connected in parallel to serve as preamplifier, with a sensitivity of 1.4 nV/√Hz at 2 kHz. Experimental results are presented for 2D MRS groundwater investigations conducted in the suburb of Changchun, China. The inversion result is consistent with the result of drilling log, suggesting that the signal acquisition module is well developed.

  17. Signal acquisition module design for multi-channel surface magnetic resonance sounding system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Chen, Wuqiang; Du, Wenyuan; Zhao, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To obtain a precise 2D/3D image of fissure or karst water, multi-channel magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) systems using edge-to-edge or overlapping receiving coils are needed. Thus, acquiring a nano-volt signal for a small amount of the aquifer and suppressing the mutual coupling between adjacent coils are two important issues for the design of the signal acquisition module in the system. In the present study, we propose to use a passive low pass filter, consisted of a resistance (R) and capacitance (C), to inhibit the mutual coupling effects of the coils. Four low-noise operational amplifiers LT1028, OPA124, AD745, and OP27 were compared with respect to achieving the lowest system noise. As a result, 3 pieces of LT1028 were chosen and connected in parallel to serve as preamplifier, with a sensitivity of 1.4 nV/√Hz at 2 kHz. Experimental results are presented for 2D MRS groundwater investigations conducted in the suburb of Changchun, China. The inversion result is consistent with the result of drilling log, suggesting that the signal acquisition module is well developed. PMID:26628154

  18. Design and Application of Combined 8-Channel Transmit and 10-Channel Receive Arrays and Radiofrequency Shimming for 7-T Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ryan; Deniz, Cem Murat; Zhang, Bei; Chang, Gregory; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Wiggins, Graham C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to investigate the feasibility of 7-T shoulder magnetic resonance imaging by developing transmit and receive radiofrequency (RF) coil arrays and exploring RF shim methods. Materials and Methods A mechanically flexible 8-channel transmit array and an anatomically conformable 10-channel receive array were designed and implemented. The transmit performance of various RF shim methods was assessed through local flip angle measurements in the right and left shoulders of 6 subjects. The receive performance was assessed through signal-to-noise ratio measurements using the developed 7-T coil and a baseline commercial 3-T coil. Results The 7-T transmit array driven with phase-coherent RF shim weights provided adequate B1+ efficiency and uniformity for turbo spin echo shoulder imaging. B1+ twisting that is characteristic of high-field loop coils necessitates distinct RF shim weights in the right and left shoulders. The 7-T receive array provided a 2-fold signal-to-noise ratio improvement over the 3-T array in the deep articular shoulder cartilage. Conclusions Shoulder imaging at 7-T is feasible with a custom transmit/receive array either in a single-channel transmit mode with a fixed RF shim or in a parallel transmit mode with a subject-specific RF shim. PMID:24056112

  19. Performance characteristics according to the channel length and magnetic fields of cylindrical Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongsub; Seo, Mihui; Seon, Jongho; June Lee, Hae; Choe, Wonho

    2011-09-01

    Performance characteristics of low power cylindrical Hall thrusters are investigated in terms of the length of the discharge channel. Thrust, efficiency, discharge current, and propellant utilization are evaluated for different channel lengths of 19, 22, and 25 mm. It is found that the propellant utilization and ion energy distribution function are strongly associated with the channel length. Increase of thrust and efficiency are also found with increasing channel lengths. These characteristics of the thruster are interpreted with possible generation of multi-charged ions due to increased residing time within the extended space inside the channel.

  20. Persistent current and low-field magnetic susceptibility in one channel mesoscopic loops and Möbius strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Santanu K.

    2006-06-01

    I study persistent current and low-field magnetic susceptibility of one-dimensional normal metal mesoscopic rings and Möbius strips threaded by slowly varying magnetic flux phi. In strictly one-channel perfect rings, current shows saw-tooth-like variation with phi for the cases where the rings contain odd and even number of electrons Ne respectively. But in disordered rings, current shows a continuous variation with phi. In these systems current has only phi0 flux-quantum periodicity. Now in Möbius strips, the motion of the electrons in the transverse direction has an important factor on persistent current and also on low-field magnetic response. If the electrons are unable to hop in the transverse direction then an electron encircles the system twice before returning to its initial position and current obtains phi0/2 flux-quantum periodicity unlike phi0 flux-quantum periodicity in strictly one-channel rings or multi-channel cylinders. The sign of the low-field currents in one-channel mesoscopic rings can be predicted exactly, even in the presence of impurity in these systems. For perfect rings current has only diamagnetic behaviour in the limit of zero field irrespective of the total number of electrons Ne. On the other hand, in dirty rings, current shows paramagnetic and diamagnetic signs respectively for the rings with even and odd Ne. In Möbius strips for zero hopping strength of the electrons in the transverse direction we get exactly the same behaviour as in strictly one-channel rings, but for nonzero transverse hopping strength the sign of the low-field currents cannot be predicted since it strongly depends on Ne and the specific realization of disorder configuration of the systems.

  1. Validation of partial tissue segmentation of single-channel magnetic resonance images of the brain.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, T J; Frank, R J; Szumski, N R; Brown, C K; Damasio, H

    2000-12-01

    We describe and evaluate a practical, automated algorithm based on local statistical mixture modeling for segmenting single-channel, T1-weighted volumetric magnetic resonance images of the brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. We employed a stereological sampling method to assess, prospectively, the performance of the method with respect to human experts on 10 normal T1-weighted brain scans acquired with a three-dimensional gradient echo pulse sequence. The overall kappa statistic for the concordance of the algorithm with the human experts was 0.806, while that among raters, excluding the algorithm, was 0.802. The algorithm had better agreement with the modal expert decision (kappa = 0.878). The algorithm could not be distinguished from the experts by this measure. We also validated the algorithm on a simulated MR scan of a digital brain phantom with known tissue composition. Global gray matter and white matter errors were 1% and <1%, respectively, and correlation coefficients with the underlying tissue model were 0.95 for gray matter, 0.98 for white matter, and 0.95 for cerebrospinal fluid. In both approaches to validation, we evaluated both local and global performance of the algorithm. Human experts generated slightly higher global gray matter proportion estimates on the test brain scans relative to the algorithm (3.7%) and on the simulated MR scan relative to the true tissue model (4.4%). The algorithm underestimated gray in some subcortical nuclei which contain admixed gray and white matter. We demonstrate the reliability of the method on individual 1 NEX data sets of the test subjects, and its insensitivity to the precise values of initial model parameters. The output of this algorithm is suitable for quantifying cerebral cortical tissue, using a commonly performed commercial pulse sequence. PMID:11112396

  2. Line-driven ablation of circumstellar discs – I. Optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe/Be stars

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan; Owocki, Stanley; Sundqvist, J. O.

    2016-01-01

    discussion of future extensions to study line-driven ablation of denser, optically thick, accretion discs of pre-main-sequence massive stars. PMID:27346978

  3. Line-driven ablation of circumstellar discs - I. Optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan; Owocki, Stanley; Sundqvist, J. O.

    2016-05-01

    discussion of future extensions to study line-driven ablation of denser, optically thick, accretion discs of pre-main-sequence massive stars.

  4. Temperature and magnetic field effects on electron transport through DNA molecules in a two-dimensional four-channel system.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yong S; Lee, Sun H; Hedin, Eric R; Kim, Young D

    2013-06-01

    We utilize a two-dimensional four-channel DNA model, with a tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian, and investigate the temperature and the magnetic field dependence of the transport behavior of a short DNA molecule. Random variation of the hopping integrals due to the thermal structural disorder, which partially destroy phase coherence of electrons and reduce quantum interference, leads to a reduction of the localization length and causes suppressed overall transmission. We also incorporate a variation of magnetic field flux density into the hopping integrals as a phase factor and observe Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations in the transmission. It is shown that for non-zero magnetic flux, the transmission zero leaves the real-energy axis and moves up into the complex-energy plane. We also point out that the hydrogen bonds between the base pair with flux variations play a role to determine the periodicity of AB oscillations in the transmission. PMID:23862423

  5. Mixed convective thermally radiative micro nanofluid flow in a stretchable channel with porous medium and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, A.; Shahzad, S. A.; Siddiq, M. K.; Raza, J.; Meraj, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    A numerical study is carried out for two dimensional steady incompressible mixed convective flow of electrically conductive micro nanofluid in a stretchable channel. The flow is generated due to the stretching walls of the channel immersed in a porous medium. The magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the walls. The impact of radiation, viscous dissipation, thermophoretic and Brownian motion of nanoparticles appear in the energy equation. A numerical technique based on Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order (RFK45) method is used to express the solutions of velocity, microrotation, temperature and concentration fields. The dimensionless physical parameters are discussed both in tabular and graphical forms. The results are also found in a good agreement with previously published literature work.

  6. AC Losses in the MICE Channel Magnets -- Is This a Curse or aBlessing?

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wu, H.; Wang, L.; Kai, L.L.; Jia, L.X.; Yang, S.Q.

    2008-01-31

    This report discusses the AC losses in the MICE channelmagnets during magnet charging and discharging. This report talks aboutthe three types of AC losses in the MICE magnets; the hysteretic AC lossin the superconductor, the coupling AC loss in the superconductor and theeddy current AC loss in the magnet mandrel and support structure. AClosses increase the heat load at 4 K. The added heat load increases thetemperature of the second stage of the cooler. In addition, AC losscontributes to the temperature rise between the second stage cold headand the high field point of the magnet, which is usually close to themagnet hot spot. These are the curses of AC loss in the MICE magnet thatcan limit the rate at which the magnet can be charge or discharged. Ifone is willing to allow some of the helium that is around the magnet toboil away during a magnet charge or discharge, AC losses can become ablessing. The boil off helium from the AC losses can be used to cool theupper end of the HTS leads and the surrounding shield. The AC losses arepresented for all three types of MICE magnets. The AC loss temperaturedrops within the coupling magnet are presented as an example of how boththe curse and blessing of the AC losses can be combined.

  7. Edge channel transport in a HgTe waveguide modulated by two magnetic barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Feng; Jin, Xuanping; Lu, Junqiang

    we investigate the effects of a magnetic double barrier on the ballistic transport properties of edge-states in a HgTe waveguide with inverted band structures. When its energy is in the bulk gap and close to the bulk conduction band of leads, the electron incident from a quantum spin Hall (QSH) state can be almost totally reflected as the two magnetic barriers are in the antiparallel configuration. For the magnetic double barrier in the parallel configuration, the same electron can transmit nearly perfectly for a proper spin orientation. In the antiparallel configuration, the spin polarization of the output current vanishes. This distinction in the transmission indicates that the proposed edge-state device has two functions: magnetic switching and spin filtering. Our calculations also indicate that nonuniform magnetic fields can break the QSH states more effectively than uniform ones. This work was supported by the NSFC (Grant 11174252) and by the NSF EPSCOR (Grant 1010094).

  8. GPUbased, Microsecond Latency, HectoChannel MIMO Feedback Control of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Nikolaus

    Feedback control has become a crucial tool in the research on magnetic confinement of plasmas for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. This thesis presents a novel plasma feedback control system that, for the first time, employs a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for microsecond-latency, real-time control computations. This novel application area for GPU computing is opened up by a new system architecture that is optimized for low-latency computations on less than kilobyte sized data samples as they occur in typical plasma control algorithms. In contrast to traditional GPU computing approaches that target complex, high-throughput computations with massive amounts of data, the architecture presented in this thesis uses the GPU as the primary processing unit rather than as an auxiliary of the CPU, and data is transferred from A-D/D-A converters directly into GPU memory using peer-to-peer PCI Express transfers. The described design has been implemented in a new, GPU-based control system for the High-Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The system is built from commodity hardware and uses an NVIDIA GeForce GPU and D-TACQ A-D/D-A converters providing a total of 96 input and 64 output channels. The system is able to run with sampling periods down to 4 μs and latencies down to 8 μs. The GPU provides a total processing power of 1.5 x 1012 floating point operations per second. To illustrate the performance and versatility of both the general architecture and concrete implementation, a new control algorithm has been developed. The algorithm is designed for the control of multiple rotating magnetic perturbations in situations where the plasma equilibrium is not known exactly and features an adaptive system model: instead of requiring the rotation frequencies and growth rates embedded in the system model to be set a priori, the adaptive algorithm derives these parameters from the evolution of the perturbation amplitudes themselves. This results in non-linear control

  9. Performance of a Chase-type decoding algorithm for Reed-Solomon codes on perpendicular magnetic recording channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chang, W.; Cruz, J. R.

    Algebraic soft-decision Reed-Solomon (RS) decoding algorithms with improved error-correcting capability and comparable complexity to standard algebraic hard-decision algorithms could be very attractive for possible implementation in the next generation of read channels. In this work, we investigate the performance of a low-complexity Chase (LCC)-type soft-decision RS decoding algorithm, recently proposed by Bellorado and Kavčić, on perpendicular magnetic recording channels for sector-long RS codes of practical interest. Previous results for additive white Gaussian noise channels have shown that for a moderately long high-rate code, the LCC algorithm can achieve a coding gain comparable to the Koetter-Vardy algorithm with much lower complexity. We present a set of numerical results that show that this algorithm provides small coding gains, on the order of a fraction of a dB, with similar complexity to the hard-decision algorithms currently used, and that larger coding gains can be obtained if we use more test patterns, which significantly increases its computational complexity.

  10. Parallel Subspace Subcodes of Reed-Solomon Codes for Magnetic Recording Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Han

    2010-01-01

    Read channel architectures based on a single low-density parity-check (LDPC) code are being considered for the next generation of hard disk drives. However, LDPC-only solutions suffer from the error floor problem, which may compromise reliability, if not handled properly. Concatenated architectures using an LDPC code plus a Reed-Solomon (RS) code…

  11. Spin-communication channels between Ln(III) bis-phthalocyanines molecular nanomagnets and a magnetic substrate

    PubMed Central

    Candini, A.; Klar, D.; Marocchi, S.; Corradini, V.; Biagi, R.; De Renzi, V.; del Pennino, U.; Troiani, F.; Bellini, V.; Klyatskaya, S.; Ruben, M.; Kummer, K.; Brookes, N. B.; Huang, H.; Soncini, A.; Wende, H.; Affronte, M.

    2016-01-01

    Learning the art of exploiting the interplay between different units at the atomic scale is a fundamental step in the realization of functional nano-architectures and interfaces. In this context, understanding and controlling the magnetic coupling between molecular centers and their environment is still a challenging task. Here we present a combined experimental-theoretical work on the prototypical case of the bis(phthalocyaninato)-lanthanide(III) (LnPc2) molecular nanomagnets magnetically coupled to a Ni substrate. By means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism we show how the coupling strength can be tuned by changing the Ln ion. The microscopic parameters of the system are determined by ab-initio calculations and then used in a spin Hamiltonian approach to interpret the experimental data. By this combined approach we identify the features of the spin communication channel: the spin path is first realized by the mediation of the external (5d) electrons of the Ln ion, keeping the characteristic features of the inner 4 f orbitals unaffected, then through the organic ligand, acting as a bridge to the external world. PMID:26907811

  12. Spin-communication channels between Ln(III) bis-phthalocyanines molecular nanomagnets and a magnetic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candini, A.; Klar, D.; Marocchi, S.; Corradini, V.; Biagi, R.; de Renzi, V.; Del Pennino, U.; Troiani, F.; Bellini, V.; Klyatskaya, S.; Ruben, M.; Kummer, K.; Brookes, N. B.; Huang, H.; Soncini, A.; Wende, H.; Affronte, M.

    2016-02-01

    Learning the art of exploiting the interplay between different units at the atomic scale is a fundamental step in the realization of functional nano-architectures and interfaces. In this context, understanding and controlling the magnetic coupling between molecular centers and their environment is still a challenging task. Here we present a combined experimental-theoretical work on the prototypical case of the bis(phthalocyaninato)-lanthanide(III) (LnPc2) molecular nanomagnets magnetically coupled to a Ni substrate. By means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism we show how the coupling strength can be tuned by changing the Ln ion. The microscopic parameters of the system are determined by ab-initio calculations and then used in a spin Hamiltonian approach to interpret the experimental data. By this combined approach we identify the features of the spin communication channel: the spin path is first realized by the mediation of the external (5d) electrons of the Ln ion, keeping the characteristic features of the inner 4 f orbitals unaffected, then through the organic ligand, acting as a bridge to the external world.

  13. Spin-communication channels between Ln(III) bis-phthalocyanines molecular nanomagnets and a magnetic substrate.

    PubMed

    Candini, A; Klar, D; Marocchi, S; Corradini, V; Biagi, R; De Renzi, V; Del Pennino, U; Troiani, F; Bellini, V; Klyatskaya, S; Ruben, M; Kummer, K; Brookes, N B; Huang, H; Soncini, A; Wende, H; Affronte, M

    2016-01-01

    Learning the art of exploiting the interplay between different units at the atomic scale is a fundamental step in the realization of functional nano-architectures and interfaces. In this context, understanding and controlling the magnetic coupling between molecular centers and their environment is still a challenging task. Here we present a combined experimental-theoretical work on the prototypical case of the bis(phthalocyaninato)-lanthanide(III) (LnPc2) molecular nanomagnets magnetically coupled to a Ni substrate. By means of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism we show how the coupling strength can be tuned by changing the Ln ion. The microscopic parameters of the system are determined by ab-initio calculations and then used in a spin Hamiltonian approach to interpret the experimental data. By this combined approach we identify the features of the spin communication channel: the spin path is first realized by the mediation of the external (5d) electrons of the Ln ion, keeping the characteristic features of the inner 4 f orbitals unaffected, then through the organic ligand, acting as a bridge to the external world. PMID:26907811

  14. Electric field induced spin and valley polarization within a magnetically confined silicene channel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yiman; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhou, Ma; Zhou, Guanghui; Long, Meng-Qiu

    2014-12-28

    We study the electronic structure and transport properties of Dirac electrons along a channel created by an exchange field through the proximity of ferromagnets on a silicene sheet. The multiple total internal reflection induces localized states in the channel, which behaves like an electron waveguide. An effect of spin- and valley-filtering originating from the coupling between valley and spin degrees is predicted for such a structure. Interestingly, this feature can be tuned significantly by locally applying electric and exchange fields simultaneously. The parameter condition for observing fully spin- and valley-polarized current is obtained. These findings may be observable in todays' experimental technique and useful for spintronic and valleytronic applications based on silicene.

  15. Effects of Magnetic Field on the Turbulent Wake of a Cylinder in MHD Channel Flow

    SciTech Connect

    John Rhoads; Edlundd, Eric; Ji, Hantao

    2013-04-01

    Results from a free-surface MHD flow experiment are presented detailing the modi cation of vortices in the wake of a circular cylinder with its axis parallel to the applied magnetic fi eld. Experiments were performed with a Reynolds number near Re ~ 104 as the interaction parameter, N = |j x B| / |ρ (υ • ∇), was increased through unity. By concurrently sampling the downstream fluid velocity at sixteen cross-stream locations in the wake, it was possible to extract an ensemble of azimuthal velocity profi les as a function of radius for vortices shed by the cylinder at varying strengths of magnetic field. Results indicate a signi cant change in vortex radius and rotation as N is increased. The lack of deviations from the vortex velocity pro file at high magnetic fi elds suggests the absence of small-scale turbulent features. By sampling the wake at three locations downstream in subsequent experiments, the decay of the vortices was examined and the effective viscosity was found to decrease as N-049±0.4. This reduction in effective viscosity is due to the modi cation of the small-scale eddies by the magnetic fi eld. The slope of the energy spectrum was observed to change from a k-1.8 power-law at low N to a k-3.5 power-law for N > 1. Together, these results suggest the flow smoothly transitioned to a quasi-two-dimensional state in the range 0 < N < 1.

  16. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase III: Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters of the magnetic-layer type can be eliminated has been completed. The first principles of the technique, now known as "magnetic shielding," were derived based on the findings of numerical simulations in 2-D axisymmetric geometry. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster. This magnetically shielded (MS) thruster was then built and tested. Because neither theory nor experiment alone can validate fully the first principles of the technique, the objective of the 2-yr effort was twofold: (1) to demonstrate in the laboratory that the erosion rates can be reduced by >order of magnitude, and (2) to demonstrate that the near-wall plasma properties can be altered according to the theoretical predictions. This paper concludes the demonstration of magnetic shielding by reporting on a wide range of comparisons between results from numerical simulations and laboratory diagnostics. Collectively, we find that the comparisons validate the theory. Near the walls of the MS thruster, theory and experiment agree: (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered by at least 2.5-3 times compared to the unshielded (US) thruster. Also, based on carbon deposition measurements, the erosion rates at the inner and outer walls of the MS thruster are found to be lower by at least 2300 and 1875 times, respectively. Erosion was so low along these walls that the rates were below the resolution of the profilometer. Using a sputtering yield model with an energy threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a reduction of 600 at the MS inner wall. At the outer wall ion energies are computed to be below 25 V, for which case we set the erosion to zero in the simulations. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both

  17. Novel therapeutic strategies for alcohol and drug addiction: focus on GABA, ion channels and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Leggio, Lorenzo; Hopf, F Woodward; Diana, Marco; Bonci, Antonello

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction represents a major social problem where addicts and alcoholics continue to seek and take drugs despite adverse social, personal, emotional, and legal consequences. A number of pharmacological compounds have been tested in human addicts with the goal of reducing the level or frequency of intake, but these pharmacotherapies have often been of only moderate efficacy or act in a sub-population of humans. Thus, there is a tremendous need for new therapeutic interventions to treat addiction. Here, we review recent interesting studies focusing on gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, voltage-gated ion channels, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Some of these treatments show considerable promise to reduce addictive behaviors, or the early clinical studies or pre-clinical rationale suggest that a promising avenue could be developed. Thus, it is likely that within a decade or so, we could have important new and effective treatments to achieve the goal of reducing the burden of human addiction and alcoholism. PMID:22030714

  18. Novel Therapeutic Strategies for Alcohol and Drug Addiction: Focus on GABA, Ion Channels and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Addolorato, Giovanni; Leggio, Lorenzo; Hopf, F Woodward; Diana, Marco; Bonci, Antonello

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction represents a major social problem where addicts and alcoholics continue to seek and take drugs despite adverse social, personal, emotional, and legal consequences. A number of pharmacological compounds have been tested in human addicts with the goal of reducing the level or frequency of intake, but these pharmacotherapies have often been of only moderate efficacy or act in a sub-population of humans. Thus, there is a tremendous need for new therapeutic interventions to treat addiction. Here, we review recent interesting studies focusing on gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, voltage-gated ion channels, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Some of these treatments show considerable promise to reduce addictive behaviors, or the early clinical studies or pre-clinical rationale suggest that a promising avenue could be developed. Thus, it is likely that within a decade or so, we could have important new and effective treatments to achieve the goal of reducing the burden of human addiction and alcoholism. PMID:22030714

  19. Coherent magnetic vortex motion in optically formed channels for easy flow in YBa2Cu3O7- x superconducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukna, A.; Steponavičienė, L.; Plaušinaitienė, V.; Abrutis, A.; Maneikis, A.; Šliužienė, K.; Lisauskas, V.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2013-12-01

    We report our results of investigation of electric and magnetic properties of partially oxygen-depleted channels for easy vortex motion in YBa2Cu3O7- x (YBCO) superconducting, 50-μm-wide, and 100-μm-long microbridges at temperatures below the onset of the superconducting state critical temperature T {c/on}. The channels were produced by means of a laser-writing technique. The writing was performed using a 0.1-0.3 W power, continuous-wave laser radiation focused down to a ~ 5 μm spot on the surface of a superconducting film in a nitrogen gas atmosphere, and resulted in perpendicular stripes (channels) with partial ( x ~ 0.2) reduction of the oxygen content in the YBCO stripe. The oxygen-depleted channels exhibit a depressed T c and lower both the critical current density and the first critical magnetic field, as compared with the laser-untreated areas. The bias current applied to the bridge self-produced a magnetic flux that penetrated the channels in a form of Abrikosov magnetic vortices that, subsequently, moved coherently (a quasi-Josephson effect) along the channels in the narrow temperature range of 0.943 T {c/on}-0.98 T {c/on} and manifested themselves as steps on the current-voltage characteristics of our microbridges. Our results demonstrate that laser-induced formation of artificial channels of the flux flow can be used for a precise control of vortex nucleation and their coherent motion in pre-assigned regions of thin-film YBCO devices.

  20. The effects of temperature and magnetic flux on electron transport through a four-channel DNA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunhee; Hedin, Eric; Joe, Yong

    2010-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the conductivity of lambda phage DNA has been measured by Tran et al [1] experimentally, where the conductivity displayed strong (weak) temperature dependence above (below) a threshold temperature. In order to understand the temperature effects of electron transport theoretically, we study a two-dimensional and four-channel DNA model using a tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian. The thermal effects within a TB model are incorporated into the hopping integral and the relative twist angle from its equilibrium value between base-pairs. Since these thermal structural fluctuations localize the electronic wave functions in DNA, we examine a temperature-dependent localization length, a temperature-driven transmission, and current-voltage characteristics in this system. In addition, we incorporate magnetic field effects into the analysis of the transmission through DNA in order to modulate the quantum interference between the electron paths that comprise the 4-channel structure. [1] P. Tran, B. Alavi, and G. Gruner, PRL 85, 1564 (2000).

  1. Analysis of cyclic and acyclic nicotinic cholinergic agonists using radioligand binding, single channel recording, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    McGroddy, K A; Carter, A A; Tubbert, M M; Oswald, R E

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the structure and function of a series of nicotinic cholinergic agonists has been studied using radioligand binding, single channel recording, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The cyclic compound 1,1-dimethyl-4-acetylpiperazinium iodide and its trifluoromethyl analogue (F3-PIP) interact with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) from both Torpedo electroplaque and BC3H-1 cells at lower concentrations than the acyclic derivatives, N,N,N,N'-tetramethyl-N'-acetylethylenediamine iodide and its fluorinated analogue (F3-TED). The magnitude of the difference in potencies depends on the type of measurement. In binding experiments, the differences between the two classes of compounds depends mainly on the conditions of the experiment. In measurements of the initial interaction with the nAChR, the PIP compounds have an affinity approximately one order of magnitude higher than that of the TED compounds. Longer incubations indicated that the PIP compounds were able to induce a time-dependent shift in receptor affinity consistent with desensitization, whereas the TED compounds were unable to induce such a shift. The activation of single channel currents by the cyclic compounds occurs at concentrations approximately two orders of magnitude lower than for the acyclic compounds, but the TED compounds exhibit a larger degree of channel blockade than the PIP compounds. Previous work (McGroddy, K.A., and R.E. Oswald. 1992. Biophys. J. 64:314-324) has shown that the TED compounds can exist in two energetically distinct conformational states related by an isomerization of the amide bond. 19F nuclear magnetic resonance experiments suggest that the higher energy population of the TED compounds may interact preferentially with the ACh binding sites on the nAChRs and that a significant fraction of the difference between the initial affinity of the PIP and TED compounds may be accounted for by the predominance in solution of a conformational state

  2. Research of transportation efficiency of low-energy high- current electron beam in plasma channel in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagin, E. S.; Grigoriev, V. P.

    2015-11-01

    Effective high current (5-20 kA) and low energy (tens of keV) electrons beam transportation is possible only with almost complete charging neutralization. It is also necessary to use quite high current neutralization for elimination beam self-pinching effect. The research is based on the self-consistent mathematical model that takes into account beam and plasma particles dynamic, current and charge neutralization of electron beam and examines the transportation of electron beam into a chamber with low-pressure plasma in magnetic field. A numerical study was conducted using particle in cell (PIC) method. The study was performed with various system parameters: rise time and magnitude of the beam current, gas pressure and plasma density and geometry of the system. Regularities of local virtual cathode field generated by the beam in the plasma channel, as well as ranges of parameters that let transportation beam with minimal losses, depending on the external magnetic field were determined through a series of numerical studies. In addition, the assessment of the impact of the plasma ion mobility during the transition period and during steady beam was performed.

  3. Golden channel at a neutrino factory revisited: Improved sensitivities from a magnetized iron neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Gómez Cadenas, J. J.; Hernández, P.; Martín-Albo, J.; Burguet-Castell, J.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the performance and sensitivity to neutrino mixing parameters of a Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a Neutrino Factory with a neutrino beam created from the decay of 10 GeV muons. Specifically, it is concerned with the ability of such a detector to detect muons of the opposite sign to those stored (wrong-sign muons) while suppressing contamination of the signal from the interactions of other neutrino species in the beam. A new, more realistic simulation and analysis, which improves the efficiency of this detector at low energies, has been developed using the GENIE neutrino event generator and the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. Low-energy neutrino events down to 1 GeV were selected, while reducing backgrounds to the 10-4 level. Signal efficiency plateaus of ˜60% for νμ and ˜70% for ν¯μ events were achieved starting at ˜5GeV. Contamination from the νμ→ντ oscillation channel was studied for the first time and was found to be at the level between 1% and 4%. Full response matrices are supplied for all the signal and background channels from 1 GeV to 10 GeV. The sensitivity of an experiment involving a Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector detector of 100 ktons at 2000 km from the Neutrino Factory is calculated for the case of sin⁡22θ13˜10-1. For this value of θ13, the accuracy in the measurement of the CP-violating phase is estimated to be ΔδCP˜3°-5°, depending on the value of δCP, the CP coverage at 5σ is 85% and the mass hierarchy would be determined with better than 5σ level for all values of δCP.

  4. Subject-specific optimization of channel currents for multichannel transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cline, Christopher C; Johnson, Nessa N; He, Bin

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system using a multichannel coil array for high-resolution neuromodulation. We proposed a novel spatially-distributed stimulation strategy to significantly improve the focality of TMS. Computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the proposed approach and test the merits of multichannel TMS. Three different multichannel coil arrays were modeled in addition to a conventional figure-8 coil for comparison. Simulations were performed on finite element head models of six subjects constructed from anatomical MR images via an automated pipeline. Multichannel TMS arrays exhibited significantly more focal induced electric field magnitudes compared to the figure-8 coil. Additionally, electrical steering of stimulation sites without physical movement of the coil array was demonstrated. PMID:26736698

  5. Inhibition of the cancer-associated TASK 3 channels by magnetically induced thermal release of Tetrandrine from a polymeric drug carrier.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Thum, Carolin; Zhang, Qian; Tu, Wei; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J; Zhang, Yu; Schneider, Marc

    2016-09-10

    Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels have recently attracted growing interest in the field of cancer research. These channels play an important role in cancer biology specifically for cancer progression, including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis, which makes them an attractive target for novel cancer therapies. Here, we examined the effect of Tetrandrine (Tet), a natural compound known as a channel modulator, which is associated with anticancer activities, as potential drug in this regard. Xenopus oocyte with overexpression of K2P 9.1 (TASK 3) channels has been chosen as model system for this purpose. In order to release Tet and trigger the channels we developed a polymeric magnetic delivery system: Tetrandrine-Magnetite co-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid particles. The embedded iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) allow to inductively heat the particles by applying a high frequency alternating magnetic field, and thus trigger the release of the co-encapsulated Tet. As a proof of concept the nanoparticulate drug delivery system was heated by raising the suspension's temperature proving the temperature dependent release behaviour. Both heating approaches were then successfully applied for measuring the TASK 3 channels current in response to the released drug. It was found that the released Tet amount is sufficient to inhibit the TASK 3 channels in a dose dependent manner. Thus, such a stimulus responsive drug delivery system holds great promise as a novel approach for the treatment of various cancer types such as for the interaction with the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P 9.1. PMID:27374629

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic liquid-metal flows in a rectangular channel with an axial magnetic field, a moving conducting wall, and free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talmage, Gita; Walker, John S.; Brown, Samuel H.; Sondergaard, Neal A.; Burt, Patricia E.

    1989-11-01

    Fully developed, viscous liquid-metal velocity profiles and induced magnetic field contours were studied for Hartmann number of M=2 and 10 and for different load currents for a particular rectangular channel configuration (two-dimensional Couette flow). The rectangular channel was assumed to have a homogeneous external (axial) magnetic field parallel to the moving, perfectly conducting top wall and the stationary, perfectly conducting bottom wall. The two stationary side walls were also perfect conductors. The small gap between the moving wall and each side wall was an insulating, free surface. The method of weighted residuals was used to obtain truncated series solutions for the variables of interest. The heavy load currents across the channel were obtained by simulating an external potential to the conducting moving wall. The load currents in each case were opposed by the induced electric field. Since there is no pressure gradient, the flow along the channel is driven by the viscous effects of the moving wall and the Lorentz body force and is retarded by the stationary walls. The circulation is driven by the generator that is due to the axial variation of velocity in an axial magnetic field. The numerical data presented show that the radial gap and the free surface region represent electrical resistances in parallel between the perfectly conducting stationary wall and the perfectly conducting moving wall.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic liquid-metal flows in a rectangular channel with an axial magnetic field, a moving conducting wall and free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talmage, Gita; Walker, John S.; Brown, Samuel H.; Sondergaard, Neal A.; Burt, Patricia E.

    1990-11-01

    Fully developed, viscous liquid-metal velocity profiles and induced magnetic field contours were studied for Hartmann numbers of M=2 and 10 and for different load currents for a particular rectangular channel configuration (two-dimensional Couette flow). The rectangular channel was assumed to have a homogeneous external (axial) magnetic field parallel to the moving, perfectly conducting top wall and the stationary, perfectly conducting bottom wall. The two stationary side walls were also perfect conductors. The small gap between the moving wall and each side wall was an insulating, free surface. The method of weighted residuals was used to obtain truncated series solutions for the variables of interest. The heavy load currents across the channel were obtained by simulating an external potential to the conducting moving wall. The load currents in each case were opposed by the induced electric field. Since there is no pressure gradient, the flow along the channel is driven by the viscous effects of the moving wall and the Lorentz body force and is retarded by the stationary walls. In the case where no load current is applied across the channel, the current circulates in the channel. The circulation is driven by the generator that is due to the axial variation of velocity in an axial magnetic field. The numerical results presented show that the radial gap and the free surface region represent electrical resistances in parallel between the perfectly conducting stationary wall and the perfectly conducting moving wall. The numerical results also show that the resistance of the radial gap increases as M2 while that of the free surface increases by M or M1/2. Thus, as M increases, the division of current shifts to the free surface region and the current density in the radial gap decreases as M-1. The theoretical magnetohydrodynamic model presented here was developed to provide numerical parameters to help in the design of liquid-metal current collectors. Numerical results

  8. Improvement of spatial learning by facilitating large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel with transcranial magnetic stimulation in Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Furong; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Li; Sun, Peng; Luo, Xianwen; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Sugai, Tokio; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kato, Nobuo

    2015-10-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is fragmentarily reported to be beneficial to Alzheimer's patients. Its underlying mechanism was investigated. TMS was applied at 1, 10 or 15 Hz daily for 4 weeks to young Alzheimer's disease model mice (3xTg), in which intracellular soluble amyloid-β is notably accumulated. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was tested after behavior. TMS ameliorated spatial learning deficits and enhanced LTP in the same frequency-dependent manner. Activity of the large conductance calcium-activated potassium (Big-K; BK) channels was suppressed in 3xTg mice and recovered by TMS frequency-dependently. These suppression and recovery were accompanied by increase and decrease in cortical excitability, respectively. TMS frequency-dependently enhanced the expression of the activity-dependently expressed scaffold protein Homer1a, which turned out to enhance BK channel activity. Isopimaric acid, an activator of the BK channel, magnified LTP. Amyloid-β lowering was detected after TMS in 3xTg mice. In 3xTg mice with Homer1a knocked out, amyloid-β lowering was not detected, though the TMS effects on BK channel and LTP remained. We concluded that TMS facilitates BK channels both Homer1a-dependently and -independently, thereby enhancing hippocampal LTP and decreasing cortical excitability. Reduced excitability contributed to amyloid-β lowering. A cascade of these correlated processes, triggered by TMS, was likely to improve learning in 3xTg mice. PMID:26051398

  9. Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Gating in Two-Dimensional Lipid Crystalline Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminus of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) has been proposed to contain the mechanistically important gating helices that modulate channel opening and closing. In this study, we utilize magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) to determine the location and structure of the N-terminus for functional channels in lipid bilayers by measuring long-range 13C–13C distances between residues in the N-terminus and other domains of VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers. Our structural studies show that the distance between A14 Cβ in the N-terminal helix and S193 Cβ is ∼4–6 Å. Furthermore, VDAC phosphorylation by a mitochondrial kinase at residue S193 has been claimed to delay mitochondrial cell death by causing a conformational change that closes the channel, and a VDAC-Ser193Glu mutant has been reported to show properties very similar to those of phosphorylated VDAC in a cellular context. We expressed VDAC-S193E and reconstituted it into DMPC lipid bilayers. Two-dimensional 13C–13C correlation experiments showed chemical shift perturbations for residues located in the N-terminus, indicating possible structural perturbations to that region. However, electrophysiological data recorded on VDAC-S193E showed that channel characteristics were identical to those of wild type samples, indicating that phosphorylation of S193 does not directly affect channel gating. The combination of NMR and electrophysiological results allows us to discuss the validity of proposed gating models. PMID:25545271

  10. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of voltage-dependent anion channel gating in two-dimensional lipid crystalline bilayers.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Matthew T; Andreas, Loren; Teijido, Oscar; Su, Yongchao; Clark, Lindsay; Noskov, Sergei Y; Wagner, Gerhard; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-02-01

    The N-terminus of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) has been proposed to contain the mechanistically important gating helices that modulate channel opening and closing. In this study, we utilize magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) to determine the location and structure of the N-terminus for functional channels in lipid bilayers by measuring long-range (13)C-(13)C distances between residues in the N-terminus and other domains of VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers. Our structural studies show that the distance between A14 Cβ in the N-terminal helix and S193 Cβ is ∼4-6 Å. Furthermore, VDAC phosphorylation by a mitochondrial kinase at residue S193 has been claimed to delay mitochondrial cell death by causing a conformational change that closes the channel, and a VDAC-Ser193Glu mutant has been reported to show properties very similar to those of phosphorylated VDAC in a cellular context. We expressed VDAC-S193E and reconstituted it into DMPC lipid bilayers. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments showed chemical shift perturbations for residues located in the N-terminus, indicating possible structural perturbations to that region. However, electrophysiological data recorded on VDAC-S193E showed that channel characteristics were identical to those of wild type samples, indicating that phosphorylation of S193 does not directly affect channel gating. The combination of NMR and electrophysiological results allows us to discuss the validity of proposed gating models. PMID:25545271

  11. Generalization of the Bennett equilibrium condition for a relativistic electron beam propagating in the Ohmic plasma channel and ion focusing regime along an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, E. K.; Manuilov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of formulating the generalization of the Bennett equilibrium condition is considered for a relativistic electron beam propagating in the Ohmic plasma channel, as well as in the ion focusing regime in the presence of an external longitudinal uniform magnetic field. We assume that the electron component of the background plasma is not completely removed from the region occupied by the beam. This equilibrium condition is derived using the mass and momentum transport equations obtained for a paraxial monoenergetic beam from the Fokker-Planck kinetic equation.

  12. New X-ray observations of IQ Aurigae and α2 Canum Venaticorum. Probing the magnetically channeled wind shock model in A0p stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robrade, J.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2011-07-01

    Aims: We re-examine the scenario of X-ray emission from magnetically confined/channeled wind shocks (MCWS) for Ap/Bp stars, a model originally developed to explain the ROSAT detection of the A0p star IQ Aur. Methods: We present new X-ray observations of the A0p stars α2 CVn (Chandra) and IQ Aur (XMM-Newton) and discuss our findings in the context of X-ray generating mechanisms of magnetic, chemically peculiar intermediate mass stars. Results: The X-ray luminosities of IQ Aur with log LX = 29.6 erg s-1 and α2 CVn with log LX ≲ 26.0 erg s-1 differ by at least three orders of magnitude, although both are A0p stars. By studying a sample of comparison stars, we find that X-ray emission is preferably generated by more massive objects such as IQ Aur. Besides a strong, cool plasma component, significant amounts of hot (>10 MK) plasma are present during the quasi-quiescent phase of IQ Aur; moreover, diagnostics of the UV sensitive f/i line ratio in He-like O vii triplet point to X-ray emitting regions well above the stellar surface of IQ Aur. In addition we detect a large flare from IQ Aur with temperatures up to ~100 MK and a peak X-ray luminosity of log LX ≈ 31.5 erg s-1. The flare, showing a fast rise and e-folding decay time of less than half an hour, originates in a fairly compact structure and is accompanied by a significant metallicity increase. The X-ray properties of IQ Aur cannot be described by wind shocks only and require the presence of magnetic reconnection. This is most evident in the, to our knowledge, first X-ray flare reported from an A0p star. Conclusions: Our study indicates that the occurrence the of X-ray emission in A0p stars generated by magnetically channeled wind shocks depends on stellar properties such as luminosity, which promote a high mass loss rate, whereas magnetic field configuration and transient phenomena refine their appearance. While we cannot rule out unknown close companions, the X-ray emission from IQ Aur can be described

  13. Unsteady Two-Layered Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer of Conducting Fluids in a Channel Between Parallel Porous Plates Under Transverse Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, T. Linga; Nagavalli, M.

    2013-08-01

    The unsteady magnetohydrodynamic flow of two immiscible fluids in a horizontal channel bounded by two parallel porous isothermal plates in the presence of an applied magnetic and electric field is investigated. The flow is driven by a constant uniform pressure gradient in the channel bounded by two parallel insulating plates, one being stationary and the other oscillating, when both fluids are considered as electrically conducting. Also, both fluids are assumed to be incompressible with variable properties, viz. different viscosities, thermal and electrical conductivities. The transport properties of the two fluids are taken to be constant and the bounding plates are maintained at constant and equal temperatures. The governing equations are partial in nature, which are then reduced to the ordinary linear differential equations using two-term series. Closed form solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are obtained in both fluid regions of the channel. Profiles of these solutions are plotted to discuss the effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics, and their dependence on the governing parameters involved, such as the Hartmann number, porous parameter, ratios of the viscosities, heights, electrical and thermal conductivities

  14. Influence of Heat Source, Thermal Radiation and Inclined Magnetic Field on Peristaltic Flow of a Hyperbolic Tangent Nanofluid in a Tapered Asymmetric Channel.

    PubMed

    Kothandapani, Munirathinam; Prakash, Jayavel

    2014-10-31

    In the present analytic thinking, we have modeled the governing equations of a two dimensional peristaltic transport of a Hyperbolic tangent nanofluid in the presence of a heat source/sink with the combined effects of thermal radiation and inclined magnetic field in a tapered asymmetric channel. The propagation of waves on the non-uniform walls to have different amplitudes and phase but the same wave speed is produced the tapered asymmetric channel. The equations of dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle concentration are solved analytically under assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number. The governing equations of momentum of a hyperbolic tangent nanofluid for the tapered asymmetric channel have also been solved analytically using the regular perturbation method. The expression for average rise in pressure has been figured using numerical integrations. The effects of various physical parameters entering into the problem are discussed numerically and graphically. The phenomenon of trapping is also investigated. Furthermore, the received results show that the maximum pressure rise gets increased in case of non-Newtonian fluid when equated with Newtonian fluid. PMID:25373110

  15. THE POST-MERGER MAGNETIZED EVOLUTION OF WHITE DWARF BINARIES: THE DOUBLE-DEGENERATE CHANNEL OF SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THE FORMATION OF MAGNETIZED WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Suoqing; Fisher, Robert T.; Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Loren-Aguilar, Pablo; Cremer, Pascal; Behrends, Jan

    2013-08-20

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) play a crucial role as standardizable cosmological candles, though the nature of their progenitors is a subject of active investigation. Recent observational and theoretical work has pointed to merging white dwarf binaries, referred to as the double-degenerate channel, as the possible progenitor systems for some SNe Ia. Additionally, recent theoretical work suggests that mergers which fail to detonate may produce magnetized, rapidly rotating white dwarfs. In this paper, we present the first multidimensional simulations of the post-merger evolution of white dwarf binaries to include the effect of the magnetic field. In these systems, the two white dwarfs complete a final merger on a dynamical timescale, and are tidally disrupted, producing a rapidly rotating white dwarf merger surrounded by a hot corona and a thick, differentially rotating disk. The disk is strongly susceptible to the magnetorotational instability (MRI), and we demonstrate that this leads to the rapid growth of an initially dynamically weak magnetic field in the disk, the spin-down of the white dwarf merger, and to the subsequent central ignition of the white dwarf merger. Additionally, these magnetized models exhibit new features not present in prior hydrodynamic studies of white dwarf mergers, including the development of MRI turbulence in the hot disk, magnetized outflows carrying a significant fraction of the disk mass, and the magnetization of the white dwarf merger to field strengths {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G. We discuss the impact of our findings on the origins, circumstellar media, and observed properties of SNe Ia and magnetized white dwarfs.

  16. Conformation of gramicidin A channel in phospholipid vesicles: a 13C and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, S; Wallace, B A; Blout, E R; Morrow, J S; Veatch, W

    1979-01-01

    We have determined the conformation of the channel-forming polypeptide antibiotic gramicidin A in phosphatidylcholine vesicles by using 13C and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The models previously proposed for the conformation of the dimer channel differ in the surface localization of the NH2 and COOH termini. We have incorporated specific 13C and 19F nuclei at both the NH2, and COOH termini of gramicidin and have used 13C and 19F chemical shifts and spin lattice relaxation time measurements to determine the accessibility of these labels to three paramagnetic NMR probes--two in aqueous solution and one attached to the phosphatidylcholine fatty acid chain9 all of our results indicate that the COOH terminus of gramicidin in the channel is located near the surface of the membrane and the NH2 terminus is buried deep within the lipid bilayer. These findings strongly favor an NH2-terminal to NH2-terminal helical dimer as the major conformation for the gramicidin channel in phosphatidylcholine vesicles. PMID:92025

  17. Applications of the computer codes FLUX2D and PHI3D for the electromagnetic analysis of compressed magnetic field generators and power flow channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgdon, M.L.; Oona, H.; Martinez, A.R.; Salon, S.; Wendling, P.; Krahenbuhl, L.; Nicolas, A.; Nicolas, L.

    1989-01-01

    We present herein the results of three electromagnetic field problems for compressed magnetic field generators and their associated power flow channels. The first problem is the computation of the transient magnetic field in a two-dimensional model of helical generator during loading. The second problem is the three-dimensional eddy current patterns in a section of an armature beneath a bifurcation point of a helical winding. Our third problem is the calculation of the three-dimensional electrostatic fields in a region known as the post-hole convolute in which a rod connects the inner and outer walls of a system of three concentric cylinders through a hole in the middle cylinder. While analytic solutions exist for many electromagnetic field problems in cases of special and ideal geometries, the solutions of these and similar problems for the proper analysis and design of compressed magnetic field generators and their related hardware require computer simulations. In earlier studies, computer models have been proposed, several based on research oriented hydrocodes to which uncoupled or partially coupled Maxwell's equations solvers are added. Although the hydrocode models address the problem of moving, deformable conductors, they are not useful for electromagnetic analysis, nor can they be considered design tools. For our studies, we take advantage of the commercial, electromagnetic computer-aided design software packages FLUX2D nd PHI3D that were developed for motor manufacturers and utilities industries. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Capture and separation of biomolecules using magnetic beads in a simple microfluidic channel without an external flow device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Morabito, Kenneth; Erkers, Tom; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2013-11-01

    The use of microfluidic devices and magnetic beads for applications in biotechnology has been extensively explored over the past decade. Many elaborate microfluidic chips have been used in efficient systems for biological assays. However most fail to achieve the ideal point of care (POC) status, as they require larger conventional external devices in conjunction with the microchip. This paper presents a simple technique to capture and separate biomolecules using magnetic bead movement on a microchip without the use of an external flow device. This microchip consisted of two well reservoirs (W1 and W2) connected via a tapered microchannel. Beads were dragged through the microchannel between the two wells at an equivalent speed to a permanent magnet that moved alongside the microchip. More than 95% of beads were transferred from W1 to W2 within 2 min at an average velocity of 0.7 mm s(-1). Enzymatic reactions were employed to test our microchip. Specifically, three assays were performed using the streptavidin coated magnetic beads as a solid support to capture and transfer biomolecules: (1) non-specific adsorption of the substrate, 6-8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (DiFMUP), (2) capture of the enzyme, biotinylated alkaline phosphatase (AP), and (3) separation of AP from DiFMUP. Our non-specific adsorption assay indicated that the microchip was capable of transferring the beads with less than 0.002% carryover of DiFMUP. Our capture assay indicated efficient capture and transfer of AP with beads to W2 containing DiFMUP, where the transferred AP converted 100% of DiFMUP to DiFMU within 15 minutes. Our separation assay showed effective separation of AP from DiFMUP and elucidated the binding capacity of the beads for AP. The leftover unbound AP in W1 converted 100% of DiFMUP within 10 minutes and samples with less than the full bead capacity of AP (i.e. all AP was transferred) did not convert any of the DiFMUP. The immobilization of AP on the bead surface

  19. Performance evaluation of signal dependent noise predictive maximum likelihood detector for two-dimensional magnetic recording read/write channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, S.; Okamoto, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Osawa, H.; Kanai, Y.; Muraoaka, H.

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional magnetic recording is affected by the inter-track interference (ITI) from the adjacent tracks. We investigate the improvement of partial response maximum likelihood (PRML) systems with signal dependent noise predictor (SDNP) in the bit error rate performance. The systems reduce the influence of ITI by two dimensional finite impulse response filter using the waveforms reproduced by triple readers from the adjacent tracks. The results show that the SDNP provides larger improvement to PR(2,6,1)ML system compare with PR1ML system.

  20. Unsteady two-layered fluid flow of conducting fluids in a channel between parallel porous plates under transverse magnetic field in a rotating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga Raju, T.; Neela Rao, B.

    2016-05-01

    An unsteady MHD two-layered fluid flow of electrically conducting fluids in a horizontal channel bounded by two parallel porous plates under the influence of a transversely applied uniform strong magnetic field in a rotating system is analyzed. The flow is driven by a common constant pressure gradient in a channel bounded by two parallel porous plates, one being stationary and the other oscillatory. The two fluids are assumed to be incompressible, electrically conducting with different viscosities and electrical conductivities. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to the linear ordinary differential equations using two-term series. The resulting equations are solved analytically to obtain exact solutions for the velocity distributions (primary and secondary) in the two regions respectively, by assuming their solutions as a combination of both the steady state and time dependent components of the solutions. Numerical values of the velocity distributions are computed for different sets of values of the governing parameters involved in the study and their corresponding profiles are also plotted. The details of the flow characteristics and their dependence on the governing parameters involved, such as the Hartmann number, Taylor number, porous parameter, ratio of the viscosities, electrical conductivities and heights are discussed. Also an observation is made how the velocity distributions vary with the rotating hydromagnetic interaction in the case of steady and unsteady flow motions. The primary velocity distributions in the two regions are seen to decrease with an increase in the Taylor number, but an increase in the Taylor number causes a rise in secondary velocity distributions. It is found that an increase in the porous parameter decreases both the primary and secondary velocity distributions in the two regions.

  1. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots@SiO2 Nanoparticles as Electrochemiluminescence and Fluorescence Signal Indicators for Magnetically Controlled Aptasensor with Dual Detection Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengquan; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun; Hua, Mengjuan; Liu, Qian; Hao, Nan; You, Tianyan; Huang, Xingyi

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a facile method to prepare the nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) doped silica (NGQDs@SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs). The NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were further explored as a versatile signal indicator for ochratoxin A (OTA) aptasensing by combination with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) and fluorescence (FL) detection. In this strategy, the core-shell Fe3O4@Au magnetic beads (MBs) acted as a nanocarrier to immobilize the thiolated aptamer specific for OTA, and the amino modified capture DNA (cDNA) was efficiently tagged with NGQDs@SiO2 NPs. The multifunctional aptasensor was thus fabricated by assembly of the NGQDs@SiO2 NPs onto the surface of Fe3O4@Au MBs through the high specific DNA hybridization between aptamer and cDNA. Upon OTA incubation, the aptamer linked with Fe3O4@Au MBs preferred to form an aptamer-OTA complex, which resulted in the partial release of the preloaded NGQDs@SiO2 NPs. The more OTA molecules in the detection system, the more NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were released into the bulk solution and the less preloaded NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were accumulated on the magnetic electrode surface. This provided a dual channel for OTA detection by combination with the enriched solid-state ECL and homogeneous FL detection. The FL assay exhibits a wide dynamic range and is more reproducible due to the homogeneous detection while the ECL assay possesses a lower detection limit and is preferable by using a cheaper instrument. One can obtain a preliminary screen from FL assay and a more accurate result from ECL assay. Integrating the virtues of dual analytical modality, this aptasensing strategy well-balanced the rapidity, sensitivity, and dynamic range, making it promising to other targets with aptamer sequences. PMID:26524349

  2. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  3. RFI channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A class of channel models is presented which exhibit varying burst error severity much like channels encountered in practice. An information-theoretic analysis of these channel models is made, and conclusions are drawn that may aid in the design of coded communication systems for realistic noisy channels.

  4. Implementation of the superfluid helium phase transition using finite element modeling: Simulation of transient heat transfer and He-I/He-II phase front movement in cooling channels of superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielert, E. R.; Verweij, A. P.; Ten Kate, H. H. J.

    2013-01-01

    In the thermal design of high magnetic field superconducting accelerator magnets, the emphasis is on the use of superfluid helium as a coolant and stabilizing medium. The very high effective thermal conductivity of helium below the lambda transition temperature significantly helps to extract heat from the coil windings during steady state and transient heat deposition. The layout and size of the helium channels have a strong effect on the maximum amount of heat that can be extracted from the porously insulated superconducting cables. To better understand the behavior of superfluid helium penetrating the magnet structure and coil windings, simulation based on a three dimensional finite element model can give valuable insight. The 3D geometries of interest can be regarded as a complex network of coupled 1D geometries. The governing physics is thus similar for both geometries and therefore validation of several and different 1D models is performed. Numerically obtained results and published experimental data are compared. Once the viability of the applied methods is proven, they can be incorporated into the 3D geometries. Not only the transport properties in the bulk of the helium are of interest, but also the strong non-linear behavior at the interfaces between solids and superfluid helium (Kapitza conductance) is important from an engineering point of view, since relatively large temperature jumps may occur here. In this work it is shown how He-II behavior in magnet windings can be simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics. 1D models are validated by experimental results taken from literature in order to improve existing 2D and 3D models with more complete physics. The examples discussed include transient heat transfer in 1D channels, Kapitza conductance and sub-cooling of normal liquid helium to temperatures below the lambda transition in long channels (phase front movement).

  5. TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Montell, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) superfamily of cation channels is remarkable in that it displays greater diversity in activation mechanisms and selectivities than any other group of ion channels. The domain organizations of some TRP proteins are also unusual, as they consist of linked channel and enzyme domains. A unifying theme in this group is that TRP proteins play critical roles in sensory physiology, which include contributions to vision, taste, olfaction, hearing, touch, and thermo- and osmosensation. In addition, TRP channels enable individual cells to sense changes in their local environment. Many TRP channels are activated by a variety of different stimuli and function as signal integrators. The TRP superfamily is divided into seven subfamilies: the five group 1 TRPs (TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPN, and TRPA) and two group 2 subfamilies (TRPP and TRPML). TRP channels are important for human health as mutations in at least four TRP channels underlie disease. PMID:17579562

  6. Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  7. Improving the spatial accuracy in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect: benefits from parallel imaging and a 32-channel head array coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Fellner, C; Doenitz, C; Finkenzeller, T; Jung, E M; Rennert, J; Schlaier, J

    2009-01-01

    Geometric distortions and low spatial resolution are current limitations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate if application of parallel imaging or significant reduction of voxel size in combination with a new 32-channel head array coil can reduce those drawbacks at 1.5 T for a simple hand motor task. Therefore, maximum t-values (tmax) in different regions of activation, time-dependent signal-to-noise ratios (SNR(t)) as well as distortions within the precentral gyrus were evaluated. Comparing fMRI with and without parallel imaging in 17 healthy subjects revealed significantly reduced geometric distortions in anterior-posterior direction. Using parallel imaging, tmax only showed a mild reduction (7-11%) although SNR(t) was significantly diminished (25%). In 7 healthy subjects high-resolution (2 x 2 x 2 mm3) fMRI was compared with standard fMRI (3 x 3 x 3 mm3) in a 32-channel coil and with high-resolution fMRI in a 12-channel coil. The new coil yielded a clear improvement for tmax (21-32%) and SNR(t) (51%) in comparison with the 12-channel coil. Geometric distortions were smaller due to the smaller voxel size. Therefore, the reduction in tmax (8-16%) and SNR(t) (52%) in the high-resolution experiment seems to be tolerable with this coil. In conclusion, parallel imaging is an alternative to reduce geometric distortions in fMRI at 1.5 T. Using a 32-channel coil, reduction of the voxel size might be the preferable way to improve spatial accuracy. PMID:19713602

  8. Tests of the standard (30 hz) NCER FM multiplex telemetry system, augmented by two timing channels and a compensation reference signal, used to record multiplexed seismic network data on magnetic tape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1976-01-01

    The application of subtractive compensation to USGS seismic magnetic tape recording and playback systems was examined in a recent USGS Open-file report (1). It was found, for the standard (30 Hz) NCER multiplex system, that subtractive compensation utilizing a 4688 Hz reference signal multiplexed onto each data track was more effective than that utilizing a 3125 Hz reference signal recorded separately on a different track. Moreover, it was found that the portion of the spectrum between the uppermost data channel (3060 Hz + or - 125 Hz) and the compensation reference signal (4688 Hz) could be used to record an additional timing signal, with a center frequency of 3700 Hz and a broader playback bandwidth (ca 0 to 100 Hz) than that of the standard data channels. Accordingly, for the tests described in that report, the standard 8-datachannel multiplex system was augmented by one additional timing channel with a center frequency of 3700 Hz. The 3700 Hz discriminator used in those tests was not successfully set up to utilize subtractive compensation; so its output from a tape playback was quite noisy. Subsequently, further tests have been carried out on the application of subtractive compensation to a 4-channel broad-band multiplex system and to the standard multiplex system, both recorded on field tape recorders with relatively poor tape speed control (2), (3). In the course of these experiments, it was discovered that two separate timing channe1s, not just one, can be inserted between the uppermost data channel and the compensation reference signal, Furthermore, it was possible to adjust the discriminators used to playback these timing channels so that they profited significantly from subtractive compensation even though the playback bandwidth was 0 to 100 Hz (for short rise times of square wave timing signals). The advantages of recording two timing signals on each data track include: 1) one standard time signal to be used for critical timing, e.g. IRIG E, can be

  9. Channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter provides a comprehensive overview of channel catfish aquaculture. Sections include fish biology; commercial culture; culture facilities; production practices; water quality management; nutrition, feeding and feed formulation; infectious diseases; harvesting and processing; and the...

  10. Signal enhancement using a switchable magnetic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2012-05-29

    A system for analyzing a sample including providing a microchannel flow channel; associating the sample with magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads; moving the sample with said magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in the microchannel flow channel; holding the sample with the magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel; and analyzing the sample obtaining an enhanced analysis signal. An apparatus for analysis of a sample includes magnetic particles connected to the sample, a microchip, a flow channel in the microchip, a source of carrier fluid connected to the flow channel for moving the sample in the flow channel, an electromagnet trap connected to the flow line for selectively magnetically trapping the sample and the magnetic particles, and an analyzer for analyzing the sample.

  11. TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Benemei, Silvia; Patacchini, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating on the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, namely TRPV1, TRPA1, TRPV4 and TRPM8, expressed by C- and Aδ-fibres primary sensory neurons, in cough mechanism. Selective stimuli for these channels have been proven to provoke and, more rarely, to inhibit cough. More importantly, cough threshold to TRP agonists is increased by proinflammatory conditions, known to favour cough. Off-target effects of various drugs, such as tiotropium or desflurane, seem to produce their protective or detrimental actions on airway irritation and cough via TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively. Thus, TRPs appear to encode the process that initiates or potentiates cough, activated by exogenous irritants and endogenous proinflammatory mediators. More research on TRP channels may result in innovative cough medicines. PMID:25725213

  12. Hall and radial magnetic field effects on radiative peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a channel with convective heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Farooq, S.; Alsaedi, A.; Ahmad, B.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of present investigation is to study the Hall and MHD effects on peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a convectively curved configuration. Thermal radiation, Soret and Dufour effects are also accounted. The channel walls comprised the no slip and compliant properties. Constitutive equations for mass, momentum, energy and concentration are first modeled in view of considered assumptions and then simplified under long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation. Solution of the resulting system of equations is carried out via a regular perturbation technique. Physical behaviors of velocity, temperature, concentration and streamlines are discussed with the help of graphical representation.

  13. Magnetic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford-Long, A. K.

    Spin-transport effects, such as giant magnetoresistance, rely on the fact that there is a difference in scattering between the spin-up and spin-down electrons in a ferromagnetic material. The degree to which each electron channel is scattered depends on the magnetisation direction within the material, and thus on the local magnetic domain structure. It is therefore of importance when analysing spin-transport devices to understand their magnetic domain structure, both as a bulk property and locally. The aim of this chapter is to review a number of the techniques currently used to image magnetic domain structure in materials. Although a considerable amount of information about the magnetic properties and behaviour of a piece of material, for example a thin ferromagnetic film, can be obtained from bulk magnetometry measurements, it is often extremely useful to image the magnetic domain structure of the film and thus gain information about its magnetic properties at a local level. The various magnetic imaging techniques yet to be described can be extended, by the application of in-situ magnetic fields which allow not only the magnetic domains but also the magnetisation reversal process to be followed in real-time.

  14. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  15. Starburst Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the polar regions of Mars seasonally. It is warmed and sublimates (evaporates) from below, and escaping gas carves a numerous channel morphologies.

    In this example (figure 1) the channels form a 'starburst' pattern, radiating out into feathery extensions. The center of the pattern is being buried with dust and new darker dust fans ring the outer edges. This may be an example of an expanding morphology, where new channels are formed as the older ones fill and are no longer efficiently channeling the subliming gas out.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003443_0980 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 21-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -81.8 degrees latitude, 76.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 247.1 km (154.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 74 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:52 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 71 degrees, thus the sun was about 19 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 223.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  16. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to

  17. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  18. Channel Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rigon, Riccardo

    This review proceeds from Luna Leopold's and Ronald Shreve's lasting accomplishments dealing with the study of random-walk and topologically random channel networks. According to the random perspective, which has had a profound influence on the interpretation of natural landforms, nature's resiliency in producing recurrent networks and landforms was interpreted to be the consequence of chance. In fact, central to models of topologically random networks is the assumption of equal likelihood of any tree-like configuration. However, a general framework of analysis exists that argues that all possible network configurations draining a fixed area are not necessarily equally likely. Rather, a probability P(s) is assigned to a particular spanning tree configuration, say s, which can be generally assumed to obey a Boltzmann distribution: P(s) % e^-H(s)/T, where T is a parameter and H(s) is a global property of the network configuration s related to energetic characters, i.e. its Hamiltonian. One extreme case is the random topology model where all trees are equally likely, i.e. the limit case for T6 4 . The other extreme case is T 6 0, and this corresponds to network configurations that tend to minimize their total energy dissipation to improve their likelihood. Networks obtained in this manner are termed optimal channel networks (OCNs). Observational evidence suggests that the characters of real river networks are reproduced extremely well by OCNs. Scaling properties of energy and entropy of OCNs suggest that large network development is likely to effectively occur at zero temperature (i.e. minimizing its Hamiltonian). We suggest a corollary of dynamic accessibility of a network configuration and speculate towards a thermodynamics of critical self-organization. We thus conclude that both chance and necessity are equally important ingredients for the dynamic origin of channel networks---and perhaps of the geometry of nature.

  19. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen

    1992-01-01

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet.

  20. Integrated microchip incorporating atomic magnetometer and microfluidic channel for NMR and MRI

    DOEpatents

    Ledbetter, Micah P.; Savukov, Igor M.; Budker, Dmitry; Shah, Vishal K.; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Michalak, David J.; Xu, Shoujun; Pines, Alexander

    2011-08-09

    An integral microfluidic device includes an alkali vapor cell and microfluidic channel, which can be used to detect magnetism for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Small magnetic fields in the vicinity of the vapor cell can be measured by optically polarizing and probing the spin precession in the small magnetic field. This can then be used to detect the magnetic field of in encoded analyte in the adjacent microfluidic channel. The magnetism in the microfluidic channel can be modulated by applying an appropriate series of radio or audio frequency pulses upstream from the microfluidic chip (the remote detection modality) to yield a sensitive means of detecting NMR and MRI.

  1. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    regime by a buried oxide layer / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- A positron source using channeling in crystals for linear colliders / X. Artru ... [et al.] -- Parametric channeling and collapse of charged particles beams in crystals / M. Vysotskyy and V. Vysotskii.The formation and usage of coherent correlated charged particles states in the physics of channeling in crystals / S. V. Adamenko, V. I. Vysotskii and M. V. Vysotskyy -- Surface channeling of magnetic-charged particles on multilayer surface / S. V. Adamenko and V. I. Vysotskii -- Coherent creation of anti-hydrogen atoms in a crystal by relativistic antiproton / Yu. P. Kunashenko -- Thermal equilibrium of light ions in heavy crystals / E. Tsyganov -- Photon emission of electrons in a crystalline undulator / H. Backe ... [et al.] -- Channeling radiation from relativistic electrons in a crystal target as complementary x-ray and gamma ray source at synchrotron light facilities / K. B. Korotchenko, Yu. L. Pivovarov and T. A. Tukhfatullin -- Diffracted channeling radiation and other compound radiation processes / H. Nitta -- Collective scattering on the atom planes under the condition of full transition / A. R. Mkrtchyan ... [et al.] -- The proposal of the experiment on the research of the diffracted channeling radiation / D. A. Baklanov ... [et al.] -- Positron channeling at the DaOne BTF Facility: the cup experiment / L. Quintieri ... [et al.] -- Radiation spectra of 200 MeV electrons in diamond and silicon crystals at axial and planar orientations / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Channeling experiments with electrons at the Mainz Microtron Mami / W. Lauth ... [et al.] -- Dechanneling of positrons by dislocations: effects of anharmonic interactions / J. George and A. P. Pathak -- Diffracted channeling radiation from axially channeled relativistic electrons / K. B. Korotchenko ... [et al.] -- Intensive quasi-monochromatic, directed x-ray radiation of planar channeled positron bunch / L. Gevorgian

  2. Asymmetric weak-pinning superconducting channels: Vortex ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K.; Heitmann, T. W.; Song, C.; Defeo, M. P.; Plourde, B. L. T.; Hesselberth, M. B. S.; Kes, P. H.

    2007-12-01

    The controlled motion of objects through narrow channels is important in many fields. We have fabricated asymmetric weak-pinning channels in a superconducting thin-film strip for controlling the dynamics of vortices. The lack of pinning allows the vortices to move through the channels with the dominant interaction determined by the shape of the channel walls. We present measurements of vortex dynamics in the channels and compare these with similar measurements on a set of uniform-width channels. While the uniform-width channels exhibit a symmetric response for both directions through the channel, the vortex motion through the asymmetric channels is quite different, with substantial asymmetries in both the static depinning and dynamic flux flow. This vortex ratchet effect has a rich dependence on magnetic field and driving force amplitude.

  3. Advanced magnetorheological damper with a spiral channel bypass valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, G.; Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid has a yield stress that is readily controllable using an applied magnetic field. MR dampers adjust this yield stress in a magnetic valve to accommodate a wide range of shock or vibration loads. In this study, the performance of an MR damper with a spiral channel bypass valve is examined. Three bypass damper configurations, i.e., a spiral channel, a spiral channel with beads, and a straight channel with beads, are subject to sinusoidal forcing at constant amplitude, while varying frequency, and applied field (current). These configurations are characterized using tortuosity and porosity parameters. The spiral channel without beads had the largest porosity and smallest tortuosity, which produced the smallest damper force, but the widest controllable damping range. The spiral channel with beads had the smallest porosity, and a comparable tortuosity, which produced the largest damping force, but similar controllable damping range to the straight channel with beads.

  4. Equalization in redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor); Cominelli, Donald F. (Inventor); O'Neill, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A miscomparison between a channel's configuration data base and a voted system configuration data base in a redundant channel system having identically operating, frame synchronous channels triggers autoequalization of the channel's historical signal data bases in a hierarchical, chronological manner with that of a correctly operating channel. After equalization, symmetrization of the channel's configuration data base with that of the system permits upgrading of the previously degraded channel to full redundancy. An externally provided equalization command, e.g., manually actuated, can also trigger equalization.

  5. Channel nut tool

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  6. The Earliest Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; Wei, C.

    2009-12-01

    Supplying protocells with ions required assistance from channels spanning their membrane walls. The earliest channels were most likely short proteins that formed transmembrane helical bundles surrounding a water-filled pore. These simple aggregates were capable of transporting ions with efficiencies comparable to those of complex, contemporary ion channels. Channels with wide pores exhibited little ion selectivity but also imposed only modest constraints on amino acid sequences of channel-forming proteins. Channels with small pores could have been selective but also might have required a more precisely defined sequence of amino acids. In contrast to modern channels, their protocellular ancestors had only limited capabilities to regulate ion flux. It is postulated that subsequent evolution of ion channels progressed primarily to acquire precise regulation, and not high efficiency or selectivity. It is further proposed that channels and the surrounding membranes co-evolved.

  7. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  8. Gramicidin Channels: Versatile Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Olaf S.; Koeppe, Roger E., II; Roux, Benoît

    Gramicidin channels are miniproteins in which two tryptophan-rich subunits associate by means of transbilayer dimerization to form the conducting channels. That is, in contrast to other ion channels, gramicidin channels do not open and close; they appear and disappear. Each subunit in the bilayer-spanning channel is tied to the bilayer/solution interface through hydrogen bonds that involve the indole NH groups as donors andwater or the phospholipid backbone as acceptors. The channel's permeability characteristics are well-defined: gramicidin channels are selective for monovalent cations, with no measurable permeability to anions or polyvalent cations; ions and water move through a pore whose wall is formed by the peptide backbone; and the single-channel conductance and cation selectivity vary when the amino acid sequence is varied, even though the permeating ions make no contact with the amino acid side chains. Given the plethora of available experimental information—for not only the wild-type channels but also for channels formed by amino acid-substituted gramicidin analogues—gramicidin channels continue to provide important insights into the microphysics of ion permeation through bilayer-spanning channels. For similar reasons, gramicidin channels constitute a system of choice for evaluating computational strategies for obtaining mechanistic insights into ion permeation through the more complex channels formed by integral membrane proteins.

  9. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z M; Wu, R G; Wang, Z P; Ramanujan, R V

    2016-01-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells. PMID:27254771

  10. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. M.; Wu, R. G.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2016-06-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells.

  11. Magnetic Trapping of Bacteria at Low Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z. M.; Wu, R. G.; Wang, Z. P.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A suspension of non-magnetic entities in a ferrofluid is referred to as an inverse ferrofluid. Current research to trap non-magnetic entities in an inverse ferrofluid focuses on using large permanent magnets to generate high magnetic field gradients, which seriously limits Lab-on-a-Chip applications. On the other hand, in this work, trapping of non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria in a uniform external magnetic field was studied with a novel chip design. An inverse ferrofluid flows in a channel and a non-magnetic island is placed in the middle of this channel. The magnetic field was distorted by this island due to the magnetic susceptibility difference between this island and the surrounding ferrofluid, resulting in magnetic forces applied on the non-magnetic entities. Both the ferromagnetic particles and the non-magnetic entities, e.g., bacteria were attracted towards the island, and subsequently accumulate in different regions. The alignment of the ferrimagnetic particles and optical transparency of the ferrofluid was greatly enhanced by the bacteria at low applied magnetic fields. This work is applicable to lab-on-a-chip based detection and trapping of non-magnetic entities bacteria and cells. PMID:27254771

  12. Interaction of Two Filament Channels of Different Chiralities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Filippov, Boris; Schmieder, Brigitte; Magara, Tetsuya; moon, Young-Jae; Uddin, Wahab

    2016-07-01

    We present observations of the interactions between the two filament channels of different chiralities and associated dynamics that occurred during 2014 April 18–20. While two flux ropes of different helicity with parallel axial magnetic fields can only undergo a bounce interaction when they are brought together, the observations at first glance show that the heated plasma is moving from one filament channel to the other. The SDO/AIA 171 Å observations and the potential-field source-surface magnetic field extrapolation reveal the presence of a fan-spine magnetic configuration over the filament channels with a null point located above them. Three different events of filament activations, partial eruptions, and associated filament channel interactions have been observed. The activation initiated in one filament channel seems to propagate along the neighboring filament channel. We believe that the activation and partial eruption of the filaments brings the field lines of flux ropes containing them closer to the null point and triggers the magnetic reconnection between them and the fan-spine magnetic configuration. As a result, the hot plasma moves along the outer spine line toward the remote point. Utilizing the present observations, for the first time we have discussed how two different-chirality filament channels can interact and show interrelation.

  13. Fading channel simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  14. Laser pulse propagation in inhomogeneous magnetoplasma channels and wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B. S. Jain, Archana; Jaiman, N. K.; Gupta, D. N.; Jang, D. G.; Suk, H.; Kulagin, V. V.

    2014-02-15

    Wakefield excitation in a preformed inhomogeneous parabolic plasma channel by an intense relativistic (≃10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse is investigated analytically and numerically in the presence of an external longitudinal magnetic field. A three dimensional envelope equation for the evolution of the laser pulse is derived, which includes the effect of the nonparaxial and applied external magnetic field. A relation for the channel radius with the laser spot size is derived and examines numerically to see the external magnetic field effect. It is observed that the channel radius depends on the applied external magnetic field. An analytical expression for the wakefield is derived and validated with the help of a two dimensional particle in cell (2D PIC) simulation code. It is shown that the electromagnetic nature of the wakes in an inhomogeneous plasma channel makes their excitation nonlocal, which results in change of fields with time and external magnetic field due to phase mixing of the plasma oscillations with spatially varying frequencies. The magnetic field effect on perturbation of the plasma density and decreasing length is also analyzed numerically. In addition, it has been shown that the electron energy gain in the inhomogeneous parabolic magnetoplasma channel can be increased significantly compared with the homogeneous plasma channel.

  15. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  16. Quench Protection and Magnet Supply Requirements for the MICEFocusingand Coupling Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Witte, Holger

    2005-06-08

    This report discusses the quench protection and power supply requirements of the MICE superconducting magnets. A section of the report discusses the quench process and how to calculate the peak voltages and hotspot temperature that result from a magnet quench. A section of the report discusses conventional quench protection methods. Thermal quench back from the magnet mandrel is also discussed. Selected quench protection methods that result in safe quenching of the MICE focusing and coupling magnets are discussed. The coupling of the MICE magnets with the other magnets in the MICE is described. The consequences of this coupling on magnet charging and quenching are discussed. Calculations of the quenching of a magnet due quench back from circulating currents induced in the magnet mandrel due to quenching of an adjacent magnet are discussed. The conclusion of this report describes how the MICE magnet channel will react when one or magnets in that channel are quenched.

  17. DISCOVERY OF ROTATIONAL BRAKING IN THE MAGNETIC HELIUM-STRONG STAR SIGMA ORIONIS E

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, R. H. D.; Oksala, M. E.; Owocki, S. P.; Cohen, D. H.; Ud-Doula, A.

    2010-05-10

    We present new U-band photometry of the magnetic helium-strong star {sigma} Ori E, obtained over 2004-2009 using the SMARTS 0.9 m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. When combined with historical measurements, these data constrain the evolution of the star's 1.19 day rotation period over the past three decades. We are able to rule out a constant period at the p {sub null} = 0.05% level, and instead find that the data are well described (p {sub null} = 99.3%) by a period increasing linearly at a rate of 77 ms per year. This corresponds to a characteristic spin-down time of 1.34 Myr, in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on magnetohydrodynamical simulations of angular momentum loss from magnetic massive stars. We therefore conclude that the observations are consistent with {sigma} Ori E undergoing rotational braking due to its magnetized line-driven wind.

  18. Optimal channels for channelized quadratic estimators.

    PubMed

    Kupinski, Meredith K; Clarkson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present a new method for computing optimized channels for estimation tasks that is feasible for high-dimensional image data. Maximum-likelihood (ML) parameter estimates are challenging to compute from high-dimensional likelihoods. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels is a critical advantage of channelized quadratic estimators (CQEs), since estimating likelihood moments from channelized data requires smaller sample sizes and inverting a smaller covariance matrix is easier. The channelized likelihood is then used to form ML estimates of the parameter(s). In this work we choose an imaging example in which the second-order statistics of the image data depend upon the parameter of interest: the correlation length. Correlation lengths are used to approximate background textures in many imaging applications, and in these cases an estimate of the correlation length is useful for pre-whitening. In a simulation study we compare the estimation performance, as measured by the root-mean-squared error (RMSE), of correlation length estimates from CQE and power spectral density (PSD) distribution fitting. To abide by the assumptions of the PSD method we simulate an ergodic, isotropic, stationary, and zero-mean random process. These assumptions are not part of the CQE formalism. The CQE method assumes a Gaussian channelized likelihood that can be a valid for non-Gaussian image data, since the channel outputs are formed from weighted sums of the image elements. We have shown that, for three or more channels, the RMSE of CQE estimates of correlation length is lower than conventional PSD estimates. We also show that computing CQE by using a standard nonlinear optimization method produces channels that yield RMSE within 2% of the analytic optimum. CQE estimates of anisotropic correlation length estimation are reported to demonstrate this technique on a two-parameter estimation problem. PMID:27409452

  19. Channel catfish pond fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most successful aquaculture enterprise in the U.S. is channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus production. In the U.S., 257 million kg of channel catfish were sold in 2007 at a value of $455 million. Large-scale commercial channel catfish culture began in the late 1950s and expanded rapidly from 1978...

  20. Ultrasonic Concentration in a Line-Driven Cylindrical Tube

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Goddard

    2004-12-15

    The fractionation of particles from their suspending fluid or noninvasive micromanipulation of particles in suspension has many applications ranging from the recovery of valuable reagents from process flows to the fabrication of microelectromechanical devices. Techniques based on size, density, solubility, or electromagnetic properties exist for fulfilling these needs, but many particles have traits that preclude their use such as small size, neutral buoyancy, or uniform electromagnetic characteristics. While separation by those techniques may not be possible, often compressibility differences exist between the particle and fluid that would allow fractionation by acoustic forces. The potential of acoustic separation is known, but due to inherent difficulties in achieving and maintaining accurate alignment of the transduction system, it is rarely utilized. The objective of this project is to investigate the use of structural excitation as a potentially efficient concentration/fractionation method for particles in suspension. It is demonstrated that structural excitation of a cylindrically symmetric cavity, such as a tube, allows non-invasive, fast, and low power concentration of particles suspended in a fluid. The inherent symmetry of the system eliminates the need for careful alignment inherent in current acoustic concentration devices. Structural excitation distributes the acoustic field throughout the volume of the cavity, which also significantly reduces temperature gradients and acoustic streaming in the fluid; cavitation is no longer an issue. The lowest-order coupled modes of a long cylindrical glass tube and fluid-filled cavity, driven by a line contact, are tuned, via material properties and aspect ratio, to achieve a coupled dipolar vibration of the system, shown to generate efficient concentration of particles to the central axis of the tube. A two dimensional elastodynamic model of the system was developed and subsequently utilized to optimize particle concentration within the system. The effects of tubing, fluid, and particle material properties, tube geometry, fluid flow, and tube length on the structural excitation and consequently power requirements and concentration quality within the tube were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Limitations of the method are discussed, as well as ways to minimize or compensate for deleterious effects. Finally a preliminary demonstration of the efficacy of acoustic concentration is presented.

  1. Bacterial Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Compton, Emma L R; Mindell, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial ion channels were known, but only in special cases, such as outer membrane porins in Escherichia coli and bacterial toxins that form pores in their target (bacterial or mammalian) membranes. The exhaustive coverage provided by a decade of bacterial genome sequencing has revealed that ion channels are actually widespread in bacteria, with homologs of a broad range of mammalian channel proteins coded throughout the bacterial and archaeal kingdoms. This review discusses four groups of bacterial channels: porins, mechano-sensitive (MS) channels, channel-forming toxins, and bacterial homologs of mammalian channels. The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria blocks access of essential nutrients; to survive, the cell needs to provide a mechanism for nutrients to penetrate the OM. Porin channels provide this access by forming large, nonspecific aqueous pores in the OM that allow ions and vital nutrients to cross it and enter the periplasm. MS channels act as emergency release valves, allowing solutes to rapidly exit the cytoplasm and to dissipate the large osmotic disparity between the internal and external environments. MS channels are remarkable in that they do this by responding to forces exerted by the membrane itself. Some bacteria produce toxic proteins that form pores in trans, attacking and killing other organisms by virtue of their pore formation. The review focuses on those bacterial toxins that kill other bacteria, specifically the class of proteins called colicins. Colicins reveal the dangers of channel formation in the plasma membrane, since they kill their targets with exactly that approach. PMID:26443789

  2. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  3. C. elegans TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2010-01-01

    TRP (transient receptor potential) channels represent a superfamily of cation channels found in all eukaryotes. The C. elegans genome encodes seventeen TRP channels covering all of the seven TRP subfamilies. Genetic analyses in C. elegans have implicated TRP channels in a wide spectrum of behavioral and physiological processes, ranging from sensory transduction (e.g. chemosensation, touch sensation, proprioception and osmosensation) to fertilization, drug dependence, organelle biogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, and neurotransmitter/hormone release. Many C. elegans TRP channels share similar activation and regulatory mechanisms with their vertebrate counterparts. Studies in C. elegans have also revealed some previously unrecognized functions and regulatory mechanisms of TRP channels. C. elegans represents an excellent genetic model organism for the study of function and regulation of TRP channels in vivo. PMID:21290304

  4. Helical Channel Design and Technology for Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Derbenev, Y. S.; Johnson, R. P.

    2010-11-04

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  5. Helical channel design and technology for cooling of muon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K; Derbenev, Y.S.; Johnson, R.P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-08-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  6. Helical Channel Design and Technology for Cooling of Muon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, K.; Derbenev, Y. S.; Johnson, R. P.

    2010-11-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  7. Magnetoacoustic transport in narrow electron channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizin, Gregory; Gumbs, Godfrey; Pepper, M.

    2000-03-01

    We develop a theory of the effect due to a small perpendicular magnetic field on the quantized acoustoelectric current induced by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) in a narrow electron channel. The quasi one-dimensional channel is formed in a piezoelectric GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor structure by a split gate technique with the gate voltage beyond pinch-off. The current is the result of the trapping of electrons in the SAW induced moving quantum dots and the transfer of electrons residing in these dots through the channel. It has been observed recently (J. Cunningham, et al., Phys. Rev.B, 1999) that in small magnetic fields the acoustoelectric current oscillates as a function of magnetic field. Based on a simple model for the quantized acoustoelecric transport in a narrow channel (G. Gumbs et al., Phys. Rev.B, Rapid Commun., 60, N20, R13954, 1999) we develop a theory for these oscillations. The case when one electron is captured in the dot is considered, and the period, the amplitude, and the phase of the current oscillations as a function of the system's parameters are obtained and analyzed.

  8. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    regime by a buried oxide layer / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- A positron source using channeling in crystals for linear colliders / X. Artru ... [et al.] -- Parametric channeling and collapse of charged particles beams in crystals / M. Vysotskyy and V. Vysotskii.The formation and usage of coherent correlated charged particles states in the physics of channeling in crystals / S. V. Adamenko, V. I. Vysotskii and M. V. Vysotskyy -- Surface channeling of magnetic-charged particles on multilayer surface / S. V. Adamenko and V. I. Vysotskii -- Coherent creation of anti-hydrogen atoms in a crystal by relativistic antiproton / Yu. P. Kunashenko -- Thermal equilibrium of light ions in heavy crystals / E. Tsyganov -- Photon emission of electrons in a crystalline undulator / H. Backe ... [et al.] -- Channeling radiation from relativistic electrons in a crystal target as complementary x-ray and gamma ray source at synchrotron light facilities / K. B. Korotchenko, Yu. L. Pivovarov and T. A. Tukhfatullin -- Diffracted channeling radiation and other compound radiation processes / H. Nitta -- Collective scattering on the atom planes under the condition of full transition / A. R. Mkrtchyan ... [et al.] -- The proposal of the experiment on the research of the diffracted channeling radiation / D. A. Baklanov ... [et al.] -- Positron channeling at the DaOne BTF Facility: the cup experiment / L. Quintieri ... [et al.] -- Radiation spectra of 200 MeV electrons in diamond and silicon crystals at axial and planar orientations / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Channeling experiments with electrons at the Mainz Microtron Mami / W. Lauth ... [et al.] -- Dechanneling of positrons by dislocations: effects of anharmonic interactions / J. George and A. P. Pathak -- Diffracted channeling radiation from axially channeled relativistic electrons / K. B. Korotchenko ... [et al.] -- Intensive quasi-monochromatic, directed x-ray radiation of planar channeled positron bunch / L. Gevorgian

  9. Filament Channel Formation by Helicity Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, K. J.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C.

    2013-12-01

    A major unexplained feature of the solar atmosphere is the accumulation of magnetic shear, in the form of filament channels, at photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs). In addition to free energy, this shear also represents magnetic helicity, which is conserved under reconnection. Consequently, the observations raise the question: Why is helicity observed to be concentrated along PILs? Preliminary results of 3D MHD simulations using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS) are presented that support the magnetic-helicity condensation model of filament-channel formation (Antiochos 2013). In this work, we address the problem of filament-channel formation by considering supergranular twisting of a quasi-potential flux system, bounded by a PIL and containing a coronal hole (CH). The magnetic helicity injected by small-scale photospheric motions is shown to inverse-cascade up to the largest allowable scales that define the closed flux system: the PIL and the CH boundary. This, in effect, produces field lines that are both sheared and smooth and, in agreement with Antiochos (2013), are sheared in opposite senses at the PIL and the CH. We present a detailed analysis of our simulation results and discuss their implications for observations.

  10. Fading channel simulator

    DOEpatents

    Argo, Paul E.; Fitzgerald, T. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  11. Thoughts on Incorporating HPRF in a Linear Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, Juan C.; Zisman, Michael S

    2009-08-20

    We discuss a possible implementation of high-pressure gas-filled RF (HPRF) cavities in a linear cooling channel for muons and some of the technical issues that must be dealt with. The approach we describe is a hybrid approach that uses high-pressure hydrogen gas to avoid cavity breakdown, along with discrete LiH absorbers to provide the majority of the energy loss. Initial simulations show that the channel performs as well as the original vacuum RF channel while potentially avoiding the degradation in RF gradient associated with the strong magnetic field in the cooling channel.

  12. MULTI-CHANNEL PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, K.; Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-11-25

    An improved multi-channel pulse height analyzer of the type where the device translates the amplitude of each pulse into a time duration electrical quantity which is utilized to control the length of a train of pulses forwarded to a scaler is described. The final state of the scaler for any one train of pulses selects the appropriate channel in a magnetic memory in which an additional count of one is placed. The improvement consists of a storage feature for storing a signal pulse so that in many instances when two signal pulses occur in rapid succession, the second pulse is preserved and processed at a later time.

  13. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  14. Phosphoinositides regulate ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides serve as signature motifs for different cellular membranes and often are required for the function of membrane proteins. Here, we summarize clear evidence supporting the concept that many ion channels are regulated by membrane phosphoinositides. We describe tools used to test their dependence on phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and consider mechanisms and biological meanings of phosphoinositide regulation of ion channels. This lipid regulation can underlie changes of channel activity and electrical excitability in response to receptors. Since different intracellular membranes have different lipid compositions, the activity of ion channels still in transit towards their final destination membrane may be suppressed until they reach an optimal lipid environment. PMID:25241941

  15. Symmetrization for redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulplue, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A plurality of redundant channels in a system each contain a global image of all the configuration data bases in each of the channels in the system. Each global image is updated periodically from each of the other channels via cross channel data links. The global images of the local configuration data bases in each channel are separately symmetrized using a voting process to generate a system signal configuration data base which is not written into by any other routine and is available for indicating the status of the system within each channel. Equalization may be imposed on a suspect signal and a number of chances for that signal to heal itself are provided before excluding it from future votes. Reconfiguration is accomplished upon detecting a channel which is deemed invalid. A reset function is provided which permits an externally generated reset signal to permit a previously excluded channel to be reincluded within the system. The updating of global images and/or the symmetrization process may be accomplished at substantially the same time within a synchronized time frame common to all channels.

  16. Applying alpha-channeling to mirror machines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhmoginov, A. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2012-05-15

    The {alpha}-channeling effect entails the use of radio-frequency waves to expel and cool high-energetic {alpha} particles born in a fusion reactor; the device reactivity can then be increased even further by redirecting the extracted energy to fuel ions. Originally proposed for tokamaks, this technique has also been shown to benefit open-ended fusion devices. Here, the fundamental theory and practical aspects of {alpha} channeling in mirror machines are reviewed, including the influence of magnetic field inhomogeneity and the effect of a finite wave region on the {alpha}-channeling mechanism. For practical implementation of the {alpha}-channeling effect in mirror geometry, suitable contained weakly damped modes are identified. In addition, the parameter space of candidate waves for implementing the {alpha}-channeling effect can be significantly extended through the introduction of a suitable minority ion species that has the catalytic effect of moderating the transfer of power from the {alpha}-channeling wave to the fuel ions.

  17. Rapid Characterization of Magnetic Moment of Cells for Magnetic Separation

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Chinchun; Earhart, Christopher M.; Wilson, Robert J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2014-01-01

    NCI-H1650 lung cancer cell lines labeled with magnetic nanoparticles via the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antigen were previously shown to be captured at high efficiencies by a microfabricated magnetic sifter. If fine control and optimization of the magnetic separation process is to be achieved, it is vital to be able to characterize the labeled cells’ magnetic moment rapidly. We have thus adapted a rapid prototyping method to obtain the saturation magnetic moment of these cells. This method utilizes a cross-correlation algorithm to analyze the cells’ motion in a simple fluidic channel to obtain their magnetophoretic velocity, and is effective even when the magnetic moments of cells are small. This rapid characterization is proven useful in optimizing our microfabricated magnetic sifter procedures for magnetic cell capture. PMID:24771946

  18. Rapid Characterization of Magnetic Moment of Cells for Magnetic Separation.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chinchun; Earhart, Christopher M; Wilson, Robert J; Wang, Shan X

    2013-07-01

    NCI-H1650 lung cancer cell lines labeled with magnetic nanoparticles via the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antigen were previously shown to be captured at high efficiencies by a microfabricated magnetic sifter. If fine control and optimization of the magnetic separation process is to be achieved, it is vital to be able to characterize the labeled cells' magnetic moment rapidly. We have thus adapted a rapid prototyping method to obtain the saturation magnetic moment of these cells. This method utilizes a cross-correlation algorithm to analyze the cells' motion in a simple fluidic channel to obtain their magnetophoretic velocity, and is effective even when the magnetic moments of cells are small. This rapid characterization is proven useful in optimizing our microfabricated magnetic sifter procedures for magnetic cell capture. PMID:24771946

  19. A case study of a density structure over a vertical magnetic field region in the Martian ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Diéval, C.; Morgan, D. D.; Pisa, D.; Lundin, R.

    2016-05-01

    One of the discoveries made by the radar sounder on the Mars Express spacecraft is the existence of magnetically controlled structures in the ionosphere of Mars, which result in bulges in the ionospheric electron density contours. These bulges lead in turn to oblique echoes, which show up as hyperbola-shaped features in the echograms. A hyperbola-shaped feature observed over an isolated region of strong crustal magnetic field is associated with a plasma cavity in the upper ionosphere and a corresponding density enhancement in the lower levels of the ionosphere. We suggest that along open magnetic field lines, the solar wind electrons are accelerated downward and the ionospheric ions are accelerated upward in a manner similar to the field line-driven auroral acceleration at Earth. This heating due to precipitating electrons may cause an increase in the scale height and may drive a loss of ionospheric plasma at high altitudes.

  20. Particle-Based Microfluidic Device for Providing High Magnetic Field Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Adam Y. (Inventor); Wong, Tak S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic device for manipulating particles in a fluid has a device body that defines a main channel therein, in which the main channel has an inlet and an outlet. The device body further defines a particulate diverting channel therein, the particulate diverting channel being in fluid connection with the main channel between the inlet and the outlet of the main channel and having a particulate outlet. The microfluidic device also has a plurality of microparticles arranged proximate or in the main channel between the inlet of the main channel and the fluid connection of the particulate diverting channel to the main channel. The plurality of microparticles each comprises a material in a composition thereof having a magnetic susceptibility suitable to cause concentration of magnetic field lines of an applied magnetic field while in operation. A microfluidic particle-manipulation system has a microfluidic particle-manipulation device and a magnet disposed proximate the microfluidic particle-manipulation device.

  1. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  2. Toroidal constant-tension superconducting magnetic energy storage units

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1992-11-03

    A superconducting magnetic energy storage unit is provided in which the magnet is wound in a toroidal fashion such that the magnetic field produced is contained only within the bore of the magnet, and thus producing a very low external field. The superconducting magnet includes a coolant channel disposed through the wire. The bore of the magnet comprises a storage volume in which cryogenic coolant is stored, and this volume supplies the coolant to be delivered to the coolant channel in the magnet. 6 figs.

  3. RFI channels, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cutoff parameters for a class of channel models exhibiting burst noise behavior were calculated and the performance of interleaved coding strategies was evaluated. It is concluded that, provided the channel memory is large enough and is properly exploited, interleaved coding is nearly optimal.

  4. Ion channels in microbes

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on Earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Though at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future. PMID:18923187

  5. Venus - Sinuous Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This full resolution radar mosaic from Magellan at 49 degrees south latitude, 273 degrees east longitude of an area with dimensions of 130 by 190 kilometers (81 by 118 miles), shows a 200 kilometer (124 mile) segment of a sinuous channel on Venus. The channel is approximately 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) wide. These channel-like features are common on the plains of Venus. In some places they appear to have been formed by lava which may have melted or thermally eroded a path over the plains' surface. Most are 1 to 3 kilometers (0.6 to 2 miles) wide. They resemble terrestrial rivers in some respects, with meanders, cutoff oxbows, and abandoned channel segments. However, Venus channels are not as tightly sinuous as terrestrial rivers. Most are partly buried by younger lava plains, making their sources difficult to identify. A few have vast radar-dark plains units associated with them, suggesting large flow volumes. These channels appear to be older than other channel types on Venus, as they are crossed by fractures and wrinkle ridges, and are often buried by other volcanic materials. In addition, they appear to run both upslope and downslope, suggesting that the plains were warped by regional tectonism after channel formation. Resolution of the Magellan data is about 120 meters (400 feet).

  6. Magnetic field calculation and measurement of active magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoping; Zhou, Zude; Hu, Yefa

    2006-11-01

    Magnetic Bearings are typical devices in which electric energy and mechanical energy convert mutually. Magnetic Field indicates the relationship between 2 of the most important parameters in a magnetic bearing - current and force. This paper presents calculation and measurement of the magnetic field distribution of a self-designed magnetic bearing. Firstly, the static Maxwell's equations of the magnetic bearing are presented and a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is found to solve the equations and get post-process results by means of ANSYS software. Secondly, to confirm the calculation results a Lakeshore460 3-channel Gaussmeter is used to measure the magnetic flux density of the magnetic bearing in X, Y, Z directions accurately. According to the measurement data the author constructs a 3D magnetic field distribution digital model by means of MATLAB software. Thirdly, the calculation results and the measurement data are compared and analyzed; the comparing result indicates that the calculation results are consistent with the measurement data in allowable dimension variation, which means that the FEA calculation method of the magnetic bearing has high precision. Finally, it is concluded that the magnetic field calculation and measurement can accurately reflect the real magnetic distribution in the magnetic bearing and the result can guide the design and analysis of the magnetic bearing effectively.

  7. Evaluation of detection algorithms for perpendicular recording channels with intertrack interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weijun; Cruz, J. R.

    2005-02-01

    Channel detection algorithms for handling intertrack interference (ITI) in perpendicular magnetic recording channels are studied in this paper. The goal is to optimize channel detection to attain the best possible performance for a practical system. Two channel detection models, namely, the single-track model and the joint-track model are evaluated using information rate analysis as well as simulations. Numerical results show that joint-track detection may be needed when ITI is severe.

  8. Generalized channeled polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Alenin, Andrey S; Tyo, J Scott

    2014-05-01

    Channeled polarimeters measure polarization by modulating the measured intensity in order to create polarization-dependent channels that can be demodulated to reveal the desired polarization information. A number of channeled systems have been described in the past, but their proposed designs often unintentionally sacrifice optimality for ease of algebraic reconstruction. To obtain more optimal systems, a generalized treatment of channeled polarimeters is required. This paper describes methods that enable handling of multi-domain modulations and reconstruction of polarization information using linear algebra. We make practical choices regarding use of either Fourier or direct channels to make these methods more immediately useful. Employing the introduced concepts to optimize existing systems often results in superficial system changes, like changing the order, orientation, thickness, or spacing of polarization elements. For the two examples we consider, we were able to reduce noise in the reconstruction to 34.1% and 57.9% of the original design values. PMID:24979633

  9. Athermalized channeled spectropolarimeter enhancement.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Julia Craven; Way, Brandyn Michael; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Hunt, Jeffery P.

    2013-09-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders, made of biaxial crystal, results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. This report presents experimental results for an anthermalized channeled spectropolarimeter prototype produced using potassium titanyl phosphate. The results of this prototype are compared to the current thermal stabilization state of the art. Finally, the application of the technique to the thermal infrared is studied, and the athermalization concept is applied to an infrared imaging spectropolarimeter design.

  10. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  11. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  12. State Machine Operation of the MICE Cooling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The cooling channel for MICE has between 12 and 18 superconductnig solenoid coils in 3 to 7 magnets, depending on the staged development of the experiment. The magnets are coaxial and in close proximity which requires coordinated operation of the magnets when ramping, responding to quench conditions, and quench recovery. To reliably manage the operation of the magnets, MICE is implementing state machines for each magnet and an over-arching state machine for the magnets integrated in the cooling channel. The state machine transitions and operating parameters are stored/restored to/from the configuration database and coupled with MICE Run Control. Proper implementation of the state machines will not only ensure safe operation of the magnets, but will help ensure reliable data quality. A description of MICE, details of the state machines, and lessons learned from use of the state machines in recent magnet training tests will be discussed.

  13. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  14. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  15. Channel coding for satellite mobile channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K. H. H.; Hanzo, L.; Steele, R.

    1989-09-01

    The deployment of channel coding and interleaving to enhance the bit-error performance of a satellite mobile radio channel is addressed for speech and data transmissions. Different convolutional codes (CC) using Viterbi decoding with soft decision are examined with interblock interleaving. Reed-Solomon (RS) codes with Berlekamp-Massey hard decision decoding or soft decision trellis decoding combined with block interleaving are also investigated. A concatenated arrangement employing RS and CC coding as the outer and inner coders, respectively, is used for transmissions via minimum shift keying over Gaussian and Rayleigh fading channels. For an interblock interleaving period of 2880 bits, a concatenated arrangement of an RS(48,36), over the Galois field GF(256) and punctured PCC(3,1,7) yielding an overall coding rate of 1/2, provides a coding gain of 42dB for a BER of 10 to the -6th, and an uncorrectable error detection probability of 1 - 10 to the -9th.

  16. Micro-channel plates and vacuum detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gys, T.

    2015-07-01

    A micro-channel plate is an array of miniature electron multipliers that are each acting as a continuous dynode chain. The compact channel structure results in high spatial and time resolutions and robustness to magnetic fields. Micro-channel plates have been originally developed for night vision applications and integrated as an amplification element in image intensifiers. These devices show single-photon sensitivity with very low noise and have been used as such for scintillating fiber tracker readout in high-energy physics experiments. Given their very short transit time spread, micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes are also being used in time-of-flight and particle identification detectors. The present paper will cover the history of the micro-channel plate development, basic features, and some of their applications. Emphasis will be put on various new manufacturing processes that have been developed over the last few years, and that result in a significant improvement in terms of efficiency, noise, and lifetime performance.

  17. Magnetic fields in nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Lenc, Emil

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation process and dynamic evolution of galaxies. Previous studies of magnetic fields relied on narrow band polarisation observations and difficult to disentangle magnetised structures along line of sight. Thanks to the broad bandwidth and multi-channels of CABB we are now able to recover the 3D structures of magnetic fields using RM synthesis and QU-fitting. We propose to observe two nearby spirals M83 and NGC 4945 to build clear pictures of their magnetic fields.

  18. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  19. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  20. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high nθ can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  1. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  2. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  3. 28-Channel rotary transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Transformer transmits power and digital data across rotating interface. Array has many parallel data channels, each with potential l megabaud data rate. Ferrite-cored transformers are spaced along rotor; airgap between them reduces crosstalk.

  4. Channel in Kasei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 November 2004 The Kasei Valles are a suite of very large, ancient outflow channels. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the youngest channel system in the Kasei Valles. Torrents of mud, rocks, and water carved this channel as flow was constricted through a narrow portion of the valley. Layers exposed by the erosion that created the channel can be seen in its walls. This 1.4 meters (5 feet) per pixel image is located near 21.1oN, 72.6oW. The picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  5. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  6. TRP channels in disease.

    PubMed

    Jordt, S E; Ehrlich, B E

    2007-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a large family of proteins with six main subfamilies termed the TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPP (polycystin), TRPML (mucolipin), and TRPA (ankyrin) groups. The sheer number of different TRPs with distinct functions supports the statement that these channels are involved in a wide range of processes ranging from sensing of thermal and chemical signals to reloading intracellular stores after responding to an extracellular stimulus. Mutations in TRPs are linked to pathophysiology and specific diseases. An understanding of the role of TRPs in normal physiology is just beginning; the progression from mutations in TRPs to pathophysiology and disease will follow. In this review, we focus on two distinct aspects of TRP channel physiology, the role of TRP channels in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and their role in the transduction of painful stimuli in sensory neurons. PMID:18193640

  7. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  8. Chloride channels in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Dayue Darrel

    2013-01-01

    Vascular remodeling of cerebral arterioles, including proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), is the major cause of changes in the cross-sectional area and diameter of the arteries and sudden interruption of blood flow or hemorrhage in the brain, ie, stroke. Accumulating evidence strongly supports an important role for chloride (Cl−) channels in vascular remodeling and stroke. At least three Cl− channel genes are expressed in VSMCs: 1) the TMEM16A (or Ano1), which may encode the calcium-activated Cl− channels (CACCs); 2) the CLC-3 Cl− channel and Cl−/H+ antiporter, which is closely related to the volume-regulated Cl− channels (VRCCs); and 3) the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which encodes the PKA- and PKC-activated Cl− channels. Activation of the CACCs by agonist-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ causes membrane depolarization, vasoconstriction, and inhibition of VSMC proliferation. Activation of VRCCs by cell volume increase or membrane stretch promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, induces proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of VSMCs. Activation of CFTR inhibits oxidative stress and may prevent the development of hypertension. In addition, Cl− current mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has also been implicated a role in ischemic neuron death. This review focuses on the functional roles of Cl− channels in the development of stroke and provides a perspective on the future directions for research and the potential to develop Cl− channels as new targets for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:23103617

  9. RF Integration into Helical Magnet for Muon 6-Dimensional Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Lee, A.; Lopes, M.; Zlobin, A.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, S.; Neubauer, M.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    The helical cooling channel is proposed to make a quick muon beam phase space cooling in a short channel length. The challenging part of the helical cooling channel magnet design is how to integrate the RF cavity into the compact helical cooling magnet. This report shows the possibility of the integration of the system.

  10. Fracture channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Yi, W.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.; Schoenberg, M.

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A{sub 0} mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  11. Mechanosensitive channels in microbes.

    PubMed

    Kung, Ching; Martinac, Boris; Sukharev, Sergei

    2010-01-01

    All cells, including microbes, detect and respond to mechanical forces, of which osmotic pressure is most ancient and universal. Channel proteins have evolved such that they can be directly stretched open when the membrane is under turgor pressure. Osmotic downshock, as in rain, opens bacterial mechanosensitive (MS) channels to jettison osmolytes, relieving pressure and preventing cell lysis. The ion flux through individual channel proteins can be observed directly with a patch clamp. MS channels of large and small conductance (MscL and MscS, respectively) have been cloned, crystallized, and subjected to biophysical and genetic analyses in depth. They are now models to scrutinize how membrane forces direct protein conformational changes. Eukaryotic microbes have homologs from animal sensory channels of the TRP superfamily. The MS channel in yeast is also directly sensitive to membrane stretch. This review examines the key concept that proteins embedded in the lipid bilayer can respond to the changes in the mechanical environment the lipid bilayer provides. PMID:20825352

  12. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic property of a new 3D iron phosphite: |C{sub 4}N{sub 3}H{sub 14}|[Fe{sub 3}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 4}F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] with intersecting channels

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Jian; Zhang Lirong; Yu Yang; Li Guanghua; Jiang Tianchan; Huo Qisheng; Liu Yunling

    2009-07-15

    A new open-framework iron (III) phosphite |C{sub 4}N{sub 3}H{sub 14}|[Fe{sub 3}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 4}F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] has been solvothermally synthesized by using diethylenetriamine (DETA) as the structure-directing agent. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c having unit cell parameters a=12.877(3) A, b=12.170(2) A, c=12.159(2) A, beta=93.99(3){sup o}, V=1900.9(7) A{sup 3}, and Z=4 with R{sub 1}=0.0447, wR{sub 2}=0.0958. The complex structure consists of HPO{sub 3} pseudo-tetrahedra and {l_brace}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 14}F{sub 2}{r_brace} trimer building units. The assembly of these building units generates 3D inorganic framework with intersecting 6-, 8-, and 10-ring channels. The DETA cations are located in the 10-ring channels linked by hydrogen bonds. The Moessbauer spectrum shows that there exhibit two crystallographically independent iron (III) atoms. And the magnetic investigation shows the presence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Further characterization of the title compound was performed using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectra, thermal gravimetric analyses (TGA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and elemental analyses. - Graphical abstract: A new three-dimensional iron phosphite with intersecting 6-, 8-, 10-ring channels has been solvothermally synthesized by using diethylenetriamine (DETA) as the structure-directing agent.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Duodenoscope.

    PubMed

    Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Wadsworth, Christopher A; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Rea, Marc

    2013-12-01

    A side-viewing duodenoscope capable of both optical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The instrument is constructed from MR-compatible materials and combines a coherent fiber bundle for optical imaging, an irrigation channel and a side-opening biopsy channel for the passage of catheter tools with a tip saddle coil for radio-frequency signal reception. The receiver coil is magnetically coupled to an internal pickup coil to provide intrinsic safety. Impedance matching is achieved using a mechanically variable mutual inductance, and active decoupling by PIN-diode switching. (1)H MRI of phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver specimens was carried out at 1.5 T. An MRI field-of-view appropriate for use during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was obtained, with limited artefacts, and a signal-to-noise ratio advantage over a surface array coil was demonstrated. PMID:23807423

  14. Morphodynamics of Floodplain Chute Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S. R.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Floodplain chute channel formation is a key process that can enable rivers to transition from single-thread to multi-thread planform geometries. Floodplain chute channels are usually incisional channels connecting topographic lows across point bars and in the floodplain. Surprisingly, it is still not clear what conditions promote chute channel formation and what governs their morphodynamic behavior. Towards this end we have initiated an empirical and theoretical study of floodplain chute channels in Indiana, USA. Using elevation models and satellite imagery we mapped 3064 km2 of floodplain in Indiana, and find that 37.3% of mapped floodplains in Indiana have extensive chute channel networks. These chute channel networks consist of two types of channel segments: meander cutoffs of the main channel and chute channels linking the cutoffs together. To understand how these chute channels link meander cutoffs together and eventually create floodplain channel networks we use Delft3D to explore floodplain morphodynamics. Our first modeling experiment starts from a generic floodplain prepopulated with meander cutoffs to test under what conditions chute channels form.We find that chute channel formation is optimized at an intermediate flood discharge. If the flood discharge is too large the meander cutoffs erosively diffuse, whereas if the floodwave is too small the cutoffs fill with sediment. A moderately sized floodwave reworks the sediment surrounding the topographic lows, enhancing the development of floodplain chute channels. Our second modeling experiments explore how floodplain chute channels evolve on the West Fork of the White River, Indiana, USA. We find that the floodplain chute channels are capable of conveying the entire 10 yr floodwave (Q=1330m3/s) leaving the inter-channel areas dry. Moreover, the chute channels can incise into the floodplain while the margins of channels are aggrading, creating levees. Our results suggest that under the right conditions

  15. Four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Anthony P; Carter, Tony R; Borna, Amir; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Johnson, Cort N; Dagel, Amber L; Schwindt, Peter D D

    2016-07-11

    We have developed a four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) that incorporates a passive diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE allows us to achieve a long, 18-mm gradiometer baseline in a compact footprint on the head. Using gradiometry, the sensitivities of the channels are < 5 fT/Hz1/2, and the 3-dB bandwidths are approximately 90 Hz, which are both sufficient to perform MEG. Additionally, the channels are highly uniform, which offers the possibility of employing standard MEG post-processing techniques. This module will serve as a building block of an array for magnetic source localization. PMID:27410816

  16. Optical Communications Channel Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Nguyen, Huy

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified deep-space optical communications links as an integral part of a unified space communication network in order to provide data rates in excess of 100 Mb/s. The distances and limited power inherent in a deep-space optical downlink necessitate the use of photon-counting detectors and a power-efficient modulation such as pulse position modulation (PPM). For the output of each photodetector, whether from a separate telescope or a portion of the detection area, a communication receiver estimates a log-likelihood ratio for each PPM slot. To realize the full effective aperture of these receivers, their outputs must be combined prior to information decoding. A channel combiner was developed to synchronize the log-likelihood ratio (LLR) sequences of multiple receivers, and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for information decoding. The channel combiner synchronizes the LLR sequences of up to three receivers and then combines these into a single LLR sequence for output. The channel combiner has three channel inputs, each of which takes as input a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The cross-correlation between the channels LLR time series are calculated and used to synchronize the sequences prior to combining. The output of the channel combiner is a sequence of four-bit LLRs for each PPM slot in a codeword via a XAUI 10 Gb/s quad optical fiber interface. The unit is controlled through a 1 Gb/s Ethernet UDP/IP interface. A deep-space optical communication link has not yet been demonstrated. This ground-station channel combiner was developed to demonstrate this capability and is unique in its ability to process such a signal.

  17. Design and performance of the LANL 158-channel magnetoencephalography system

    SciTech Connect

    Matlachov, A. N.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Espy, M. A.; Best, E. D.; Briles, M. Carolyn; Raby, E. Y.; Flynn, E. R.

    2002-01-01

    Design and performance for a recently completed whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system using a superconducting imaging-surface (SIS) surrounding an array of SQUID magnetometers is reported. The helmet-like SIS is hemispherical in shape with a brim. The SIS images nearby sources while shields sensors from ambient magnetic noise. The shielding factor depends on magnetometer position and orientation. Typical shielding values of 200 in central sulcus area have been observed. Nine reference channels form three vector magnetometers, which are placed outside SIS. Signal channels consist of 149 SQUID magnetometers with 0.84nT/{Phi}{sub 0} field sensitivity and less then 3 fT/{radical}Hz noise. Typical SQUID - room temperature separations are about 20mm in the cooled state. Twelve 16-channel flux-lock loop units are connected to two 96-channel control units allowing up to 192 total SQUID channels. The control unit includes signal conditioning circuits as well as system test and control circuits. After conditioning all signals are fed to 192-channel, 24-bit data acquisition system capable of sampling up to 48kSa/sec/channel. The SIS-MEG system enables high-quality human functional brain data to be recorded in a one-layer magnetically shielded room.

  18. Vortex transport in a channel with periodic constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapra, A. V.; Y Vodolazov, D.; Misko, V. R.

    2013-09-01

    By numerically solving the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations in a type-II superconductor, characterized by a critical temperature Tc1, and the coherence length ξ1, with a channel formed by overlapping rhombuses (diamond-like channel) made of another type-II superconductor, characterized, in general, by different Tc2 and ξ2, we investigate the dynamics of driven vortex matter for varying parameters of the channel: the width of the neck connecting the diamond cells, the cell geometry, and the ratio between the coherence lengths in the bank and the channel. We analyzed samples with periodic boundary conditions (which we call ‘infinite’ samples) and finite-size samples (with boundaries for vortex entry/exit), and we found that by tuning the channel parameters, one can manipulate the vortex dynamics, e.g., change the transition from flux-pinned to flux-flow regime and tune the slope of the IV-curves. In addition, we analyzed the effect of interstitial vortices on these characteristics. The critical current of this device was studied as a function of the applied magnetic field, jc(H). The function jc(H) reveals a striking commensurability peak, in agreement with recent experimental observations. The obtained results suggest that the diamond channel, which combines the properties of pinning arrays and flux-guiding channels, can be a promising candidate for potential use in devices controlling magnetic flux motion.

  19. Superconducting pipes and levitating magnets.

    PubMed

    Levin, Yan; Rizzato, Felipe B

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a beautiful demonstration of the Faraday and the Lenz laws in which a small neodymium magnet falls slowly through a conducting nonferromagnetic tube, we consider the dynamics of a magnet falling coaxially through a superconducting pipe. Unlike the case of normal conducting pipes, in which the magnet quickly reaches the terminal velocity, inside a superconducting tube the magnet falls freely. On the other hand, to enter the pipe the magnet must overcome a large electromagnetic energy barrier. For sufficiently strong magnets, the barrier is so large that the magnet will not be able to penetrate it and will be levitated over the mouth of the pipe. We calculate the work that must done to force the magnet to enter a superconducting tube. The calculations show that superconducting pipes are very efficient at screening magnetic fields. For example, the magnetic field of a dipole at the center of a short pipe of radius a and length L approximately > a decays, in the axial direction, with a characteristic length xi approximately 0.26a. The efficient screening of the magnetic field might be useful for shielding highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices. Finally, the motion of the magnet through a superconducting pipe is compared and contrasted to the flow of ions through a trans-membrane channel. PMID:17280160

  20. Superconducting pipes and levitating magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yan; Rizzato, Felipe B.

    2006-12-01

    Motivated by a beautiful demonstration of the Faraday and the Lenz laws in which a small neodymium magnet falls slowly through a conducting nonferromagnetic tube, we consider the dynamics of a magnet falling coaxially through a superconducting pipe. Unlike the case of normal conducting pipes, in which the magnet quickly reaches the terminal velocity, inside a superconducting tube the magnet falls freely. On the other hand, to enter the pipe the magnet must overcome a large electromagnetic energy barrier. For sufficiently strong magnets, the barrier is so large that the magnet will not be able to penetrate it and will be levitated over the mouth of the pipe. We calculate the work that must done to force the magnet to enter a superconducting tube. The calculations show that superconducting pipes are very efficient at screening magnetic fields. For example, the magnetic field of a dipole at the center of a short pipe of radius a and length L≳a decays, in the axial direction, with a characteristic length ξ≈0.26a . The efficient screening of the magnetic field might be useful for shielding highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices. Finally, the motion of the magnet through a superconducting pipe is compared and contrasted to the flow of ions through a trans-membrane channel.

  1. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis. PMID:27478527

  2. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  3. TRP Channels and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Louis S.; Abooj, Mruvil

    2013-01-01

    Since cloning and characterizing the first nociceptive ion channel Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), other TRP channels involved in nociception have been cloned and characterized, which include TRP Vanilloid 2 (TRPV2), TRP Vanilloid 3 (TRPV3), TRP Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), TRP Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and TRP Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), more recently TRP Canonical 1, 5, 6 (TRPC1, 5, 6), TRP Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and TRP Melastatin 3 (TRPM3). These channels are predominantly expressed in C and Aδ nociceptors and transmit noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical sensitivities. TRP channels are modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators, neuropeptides and cytokines. Significant advances have been made targeting these receptors either by antagonists or agonists to treat painful conditions. In this review, we will discuss TRP channels as targets for next generation analgesics and the side effects that may ensue as a result of blocking/activating these receptors, because they are also involved in physiological functions such as release of vasoactive neuropeptides and regulation of vascular tone, maintenance of the body temperature, gastrointestinal motility, urinary bladder control etc. PMID:22910182

  4. MLKL forms cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingqing; Fang, Sui; Chen, Xueqin; Hu, Hong; Chen, Peiyuan; Wang, Huayi; Gao, Zhaobing

    2016-01-01

    The mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) protein is a key factor in tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis. Recent studies on necroptosis execution revealed a commitment role of MLKL in membrane disruption. However, our knowledge of how MLKL functions on membrane remains very limited. Here we demonstrate that MLKL forms cation channels that are permeable preferentially to Mg2+ rather than Ca2+ in the presence of Na+ and K+. Moreover, the N-terminal domain containing six helices (H1-H6) is sufficient to form channels. Using the substituted cysteine accessibility method, we further determine that helix H1, H2, H3, H5 and H6 are transmembrane segments, while H4 is located in the cytoplasm. Finally, MLKL-induced membrane depolarization and cell death exhibit a positive correlation to its channel activity. The Mg2+-preferred permeability and five transmembrane segment topology distinguish MLKL from previously identified Mg2+-permeable channels and thus establish MLKL as a novel class of cation channels. PMID:27033670

  5. Mitochondrial Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Brian

    2009-01-01

    In work spanning more than a century, mitochondria have been recognized for their multifunctional roles in metabolism, energy transduction, ion transport, inheritance, signaling, and cell death. Foremost among these tasks is the continuous production of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, which requires a large electrochemical driving force for protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This process requires a membrane with relatively low permeability to ions to minimize energy dissipation. However, a wealth of evidence now indicates that both selective and nonselective ion channels are present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, along with several known channels on the outer membrane. Some of these channels are active under physiological conditions, and others may be activated under pathophysiological conditions to act as the major determinants of cell life and death. This review summarizes research on mitochondrial ion channels and efforts to identify their molecular correlates. Except in a few cases, our understanding of the structure of mitochondrial ion channels is limited, indicating the need for focused discovery in this area. PMID:17059356

  6. Trp channels and itch.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuohao; Dong, Xinzhong

    2016-05-01

    Itch is a unique sensation associated with the scratch reflex. Although the scratch reflex plays a protective role in daily life by removing irritants, chronic itch remains a clinical challenge. Despite urgent clinical need, itch has received relatively little research attention and its mechanisms have remained poorly understood until recently. The goal of the present review is to summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms of acute as well as chronic itch and classifications of the primary itch populations in relationship to transient receptor potential (Trp) channels, which play pivotal roles in multiple somatosensations. The convergent involvement of Trp channels in diverse itch signaling pathways suggests that Trp channels may serve as promising targets for chronic itch treatments. PMID:26385480

  7. Chaos in quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosur, Pavan; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Roberts, Daniel A.; Yoshida, Beni

    2016-02-01

    We study chaos and scrambling in unitary channels by considering their entanglement properties as states. Using out-of-time-order correlation functions to diagnose chaos, we characterize the ability of a channel to process quantum information. We show that the generic decay of such correlators implies that any input subsystem must have near vanishing mutual information with almost all partitions of the output. Additionally, we propose the negativity of the tripartite information of the channel as a general diagnostic of scrambling. This measures the delocalization of information and is closely related to the decay of out-of-time-order correlators. We back up our results with numerics in two non-integrable models and analytic results in a perfect tensor network model of chaotic time evolution. These results show that the butterfly effect in quantum systems implies the information-theoretic definition of scrambling.

  8. Dequantization Via Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    For a unital completely positive map {Φ} ("quantum channel") governing the time propagation of a quantum system, the Stinespring representation gives an enlarged system evolving unitarily. We argue that the Stinespring representations of each power {Φ^m} of the single map together encode the structure of the original quantum channel and provide an interaction-dependent model for the bath. The same bath model gives a "classical limit" at infinite time {mto∞} in the form of a noncommutative "manifold" determined by the channel. In this way, a simplified analysis of the system can be performed by making the large-m approximation. These constructions are based on a noncommutative generalization of Berezin quantization. The latter is shown to involve very fundamental aspects of quantum-information theory, which are thereby put in a completely new light.

  9. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, Richard J.; Crowell, Shannon L.

    1998-01-01

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface.

  10. Channel plate for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Douthart, R.J.; Crowell, S.L.

    1998-01-13

    This invention is a channel plate that facilitates data compaction in DNA sequencing. The channel plate has a length, a width and a thickness, and further has a plurality of channels that are parallel. Each channel has a depth partially through the thickness of the channel plate. Additionally an interface edge permits electrical communication across an interface through a buffer to a deposition membrane surface. 15 figs.